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Sample records for active site mutations

  1. Biochemical analysis of active site mutations of human polymerase η.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Samuel C; Beardslee, Renee A; Toffton, Shannon M; McCulloch, Scott D

    2013-01-01

    DNA polymerase η (pol η) plays a critical role in suppressing mutations caused by the bypass of cis-syn cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) that escape repair. There is evidence this is also the case for the oxidative lesion 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-guanine (8-oxoG). Both of these lesions cause moderate to severe blockage of synthesis when encountered by replicative polymerases, while pol η displays little no to pausing during translesion synthesis. However, since lesion bypass does not remove damaged DNA from the genome and can possibly be accompanied by errors in synthesis during bypass, the process is often called 'damage tolerance' to delineate it from classical DNA repair pathways. The fidelity of lesion bypass is therefore of importance when determining how pol η suppresses mutations after DNA damage. As pol η has been implicated in numerous in vivo pathways other than lesion bypass, we wanted to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the relatively low-fidelity synthesis displayed by pol η. To that end, we have created a set of mutant pol η proteins each containing a single amino acid substitution in the active site and closely surrounding regions. We determined overall DNA synthesis ability as well as the efficiency and fidelity of bypass of thymine-thymine CPD (T-T CPD) and 8-oxoG containing DNA templates. Our results show that several amino acids are critical for normal polymerase function, with changes in overall activity and fidelity being observed. Of the mutants that retain polymerase activity, we demonstrate that amino acids Q38, Y52, and R61 play key roles in determining polymerase fidelity, with substation of alanine causing both increases and decreases in fidelity. Remarkably, the Q38A mutant displays increased fidelity during synthesis opposite 8-oxoG but decreased fidelity during synthesis opposite a T-T CPD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  3. An active site mutation increases the polymerase activity of the guinea pig-lethal Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Alexander; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Becker, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) causes severe, often fatal, disease in humans and transient illness in rodents. Sequential passaging of MARV in guinea pigs resulted in selection of a lethal virus containing 4 aa changes. A D184N mutation in VP40 (VP40D184N), which leads to a species-specific gain of viral fitness, and three mutations in the active site of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase L, which were investigated in the present study for functional significance in human and guinea pig cells. The transcription/replication activity of L mutants was strongly enhanced by a substitution at position 741 (S741C), and inhibited by other substitutions (D758A and A759D) in both species. The polymerase activity of L carrying the S741C substitution was eightfold higher in guinea pig cells than in human cells upon co-expression with VP40D184N, suggesting that the additive effect of the two mutations provides MARV a replicative advantage in the new host.

  4. Inhibition of thrombin formation by active site mutated (S360A) activated protein C.

    PubMed

    Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Bock, Paul E; Segers, Kenneth; Wildhagen, Karin C A A; Dahlbäck, Björn; Rosing, Jan

    2010-07-23

    Activated protein C (APC) down-regulates thrombin formation through proteolytic inactivation of factor Va (FVa) by cleavage at Arg(506) and Arg(306) and of factor VIIIa (FVIIIa) by cleavage at Arg(336) and Arg(562). To study substrate recognition by APC, active site-mutated APC (APC(S360A)) was used, which lacks proteolytic activity but exhibits anticoagulant activity. Experiments in model systems and in plasma show that APC(S360A), and not its zymogen protein C(S360A), expresses anticoagulant activities by competing with activated coagulation factors X and IX for binding to FVa and FVIIIa, respectively. APC(S360A) bound to FVa with a K(D) of 0.11 +/- 0.05 nm and competed with active site-labeled Oregon Green activated coagulation factor X for binding to FVa. The binding of APC(S360A) to FVa was not affected by protein S but was inhibited by prothrombin. APC(S360A) binding to FVa was critically dependent upon the presence of Arg(506) and not Arg(306) and additionally required an active site accessible to substrates. Inhibition of FVIIIa activity by APC(S360A) was >100-fold less efficient than inhibition of FVa. Our results show that despite exosite interactions near the Arg(506) cleavage site, binding of APC(S360A) to FVa is almost completely dependent on Arg(506) interacting with APC(S360A) to form a nonproductive Michaelis complex. Because docking of APC to FVa and FVIIIa constitutes the first step in the inactivation of the cofactors, we hypothesize that the observed anticoagulant activity may be important for in vivo regulation of thrombin formation.

  5. A mutational analysis of the active site of human type II inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Futer, Olga; Sintchak, Michael D; Caron, Paul R; Nimmesgern, Elmar; DeCenzo, Maureen T; Livingston, David J; Raybuck, Scott A

    2002-01-31

    The oxidation of IMP to XMP is the rate-limiting step in the de novo synthesis of guanine ribonucleotides. This NAD-dependent reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). Based upon the recent structural determination of IMPDH complexed to oxidized IMP (XMP*) and the potent uncompetitive inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA), we have selected active site residues and prepared mutants of human type II IMPDH. The catalytic parameters of these mutants were determined. Mutations G326A, D364A, and the active site nucleophile C331A all abolish enzyme activity to less than 0.1% of wild type. These residues line the IMP binding pocket and are necessary for correct positioning of the substrate, Asp364 serving to anchor the ribose ring of the nucleotide. In the MPA/NAD binding site, significant loss of activity was seen by mutation of any residue of the triad Arg322, Asn303, Asp274 which form a hydrogen bonding network lining one side of this pocket. From a model of NAD bound to the active site consistent with the mutational data, we propose that these resides are important in binding the ribose ring of the nicotinamide substrate. Additionally, mutations in the pair Thr333, Gln441, which lies close to the xanthine ring, cause a significant drop in the catalytic activity of IMPDH. It is proposed that these residues serve to deliver the catalytic water molecule required for hydrolysis of the cysteine-bound XMP* intermediate formed after oxidation by NAD.

  6. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  7. Structural Characterization of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase Variants Bearing Active Site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Radom,C.; Banerjee, A.; Verdine, G.

    2007-01-01

    The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) protein is responsible for initiating base excision DNA repair of the endogenous mutagen 8-oxoguanine. Like nearly all DNA glycosylases, hOGG1 extrudes its substrate from the DNA helix and inserts it into an extrahelical enzyme active site pocket lined with residues that participate in lesion recognition and catalysis. Structural analysis has been performed on mutant versions of hOGG1 having changes in catalytic residues but not on variants having altered 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (oxoG) contact residues. Here we report high resolution structural analysis of such recognition variants. We found that Ala substitution at residues that contact the phosphate 5 to the lesion (H270A mutation) and its Watson-Crick face (Q315A mutation) simply removed key functionality from the contact interface but otherwise had no effect on structure. Ala substitution at the only residue making an oxoG-specific contact (G42A mutation) introduced torsional stress into the DNA contact surface of hOGG1, but this was overcome by local interactions within the folded protein, indicating that this oxoG recognition motif is 'hardwired'. Introduction of a side chain intended to sterically obstruct the active site pocket (Q315F mutation) led to two different structures, one of which (Q315F{sup *149}) has the oxoG lesion in an exosite flanking the active site and the other of which (Q315F{sup *292}) has the oxoG inserted nearly completely into the lesion recognition pocket. The latter structure offers a view of the latest stage in the base extrusion pathway yet observed, and its lack of catalytic activity demonstrates that the transition state for displacement of the lesion base is geometrically demanding.

  8. Effects of mutations on active site conformation and dynamics of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase from Coxsackievirus B3.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hujun; Deng, Mingsen; Zhang, Yachao

    2017-09-12

    Recent crystal structures of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (3D(pol)) from Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) revealed that a tyrosine mutation at Phe364 (F364Y) resulted in structures with open active site whereas a hydrophobic mutation at Phe364 (F364A) led to conformations with closed active site. Besides, the crystal structures showed that the F364W mutation had no preference between the open and closed active sites, similar to wild-type. In this paper, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) study on CVB3 3D(pol) in order to address some important questions raised by experiments. First, MD simulations of F364Y and F364A were carried out to explore how these mutations at Phe364 influence active site dynamics and conformations. Second, MD simulations of wild-type and mutants were performed to discover the connection between active site dynamics and polymerase function. MD simulations reveal that the effect of mutations on active site dynamics is associated with the interaction between the structural motifs A and D in CVB3 3D(pol). Interestingly, we discover that the active site state is influenced by the formation of a hydrogen bond between backbone atoms of Ala231 (in motif A) and Ala358 (in motif D), which has never been revealed before. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Mutations along a TET2 active site scaffold stall oxidation at 5-hydroxymethylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Monica Yun; Torabifard, Hedieh; Crawford, Daniel J; DeNizio, Jamie E; Cao, Xing-Jun; Garcia, Benjamin A; Cisneros, G Andrés; Kohli, Rahul M

    2017-02-01

    Ten-eleven translocation (TET) enzymes catalyze stepwise oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (mC) to yield 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (hmC) and the rarer bases 5-formylcytosine (fC) and 5-carboxylcytosine (caC). Stepwise oxidation obscures how each individual base forms and functions in epigenetic regulation, and prompts the question of whether TET enzymes primarily serve to generate hmC or are adapted to produce fC and caC as well. By mutating a single, conserved active site residue in human TET2, Thr1372, we uncovered enzyme variants that permit oxidation to hmC but largely eliminate fC and caC. Biochemical analyses, combined with molecular dynamics simulations, elucidated an active site scaffold that is required for wild-type (WT) stepwise oxidation and that, when perturbed, explains the mutants' hmC-stalling phenotype. Our results suggest that the TET2 active site is shaped to enable higher-order oxidation and provide the first TET variants that could be used to probe the biological functions of hmC separately from fC and caC.

  10. Activation induced deaminase mutational signature overlaps with CpG methylation sites in follicular lymphoma and other cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rogozin, Igor B.; Lada, Artem G.; Goncearenco, Alexander; Green, Michael R.; De, Subhajyoti; Nudelman, German; Panchenko, Anna R.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2016-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an uncurable cancer characterized by progressive severity of relapses. We analyzed sequence context specificity of mutations in the B cells from a large cohort of FL patients. We revealed substantial excess of mutations within a novel hybrid nucleotide motif: the signature of somatic hypermutation (SHM) enzyme, Activation Induced Deaminase (AID), which overlaps the CpG methylation site. This finding implies that in FL the SHM machinery acts at genomic sites containing methylated cytosine. We identified the prevalence of this hybrid mutational signature in many other types of human cancer, suggesting that AID-mediated, CpG-methylation dependent mutagenesis is a common feature of tumorigenesis. PMID:27924834

  11. Activation induced deaminase mutational signature overlaps with CpG methylation sites in follicular lymphoma and other cancers.

    PubMed

    Rogozin, Igor B; Lada, Artem G; Goncearenco, Alexander; Green, Michael R; De, Subhajyoti; Nudelman, German; Panchenko, Anna R; Koonin, Eugene V; Pavlov, Youri I

    2016-12-07

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an uncurable cancer characterized by progressive severity of relapses. We analyzed sequence context specificity of mutations in the B cells from a large cohort of FL patients. We revealed substantial excess of mutations within a novel hybrid nucleotide motif: the signature of somatic hypermutation (SHM) enzyme, Activation Induced Deaminase (AID), which overlaps the CpG methylation site. This finding implies that in FL the SHM machinery acts at genomic sites containing methylated cytosine. We identified the prevalence of this hybrid mutational signature in many other types of human cancer, suggesting that AID-mediated, CpG-methylation dependent mutagenesis is a common feature of tumorigenesis.

  12. Multiple-site mutations of phage Bp7 endolysin improves its activities against target bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Can; Wang, Yuanchao; Sun, Huzhi; Ren, Huiying

    2015-10-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has caused serious drug resistance. Bacteria that were once easily treatable are now extremely difficult to treat. Endolysin can be used as an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteria. To analyze the antibacterial activity of the endolysin of phage Bp7 (Bp7e), a 489-bp DNA fragment of endolysin Bp7e was PCR-amplified from a phage Bp7 genome and cloned, and then a pET28a-Bp7e prokaryotic expression vector was constructed. Two amino acids were mutated (L99A, M102E) to construct pET28a-Bp7Δe, with pET28a-Bp7e as a template. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that BP7e belongs to a T4-like phage endolysin group. Bp7e and its mutant Bp7Δe were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) as soluble proteins. They were purified by affinity chromatography, and then their antibacterial activities were analyzed. The results demonstrated that the recombinant proteins Bp7e and Bp7Δe showed obvious antibacterial activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus but no activity against Staphylococcus aureus. In the presence of malic acid, Bp7e and Bp7Δe exhibited an effect on most E. coli strains which could be lysed by phage Bp7, but no effect on Salmonella paratyphi or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, Bp7Δe with double-site mutations showed stronger antibacterial activity and a broader lysis range than Bp7e.

  13. Controlling the Regioselectivity of Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenases by Mutation of Active-Site Residues.

    PubMed

    Balke, Kathleen; Bäumgen, Marcus; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2017-08-17

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO)-mediated regiodivergent conversions of asymmetric ketones can lead to the formation of "normal" or "abnormal" lactones. In a previous study, we were able to change the regioselectivity of a BVMO by mutation of the active-site residues to smaller amino acids, which thus created more space. In this study, we demonstrate that this method can also be used for other BVMO/substrate combinations. We investigated the regioselectivity of 2-oxo-Δ(3) -4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetyl-CoA monooxygenase from Pseudomonas putida (OTEMO) for cis-bicyclo[3.2.0]hept-2-en-6-one (1) and trans-dihydrocarvone (2), and we were able to switch the regioselectivity of this enzyme for one of the substrate enantiomers. The OTEMO wild-type enzyme converted (-)-1 into an equal (50:50) mixture of the normal and abnormal products. The F255A/F443V variant produced 90 % of the normal product, whereas the W501V variant formed up to 98 % of the abnormal product. OTEMO F255A exclusively produced the normal lactone from (+)-2, whereas the wild-type enzyme was selective for the production of the abnormal product. The positions of these amino acids were equivalent to those mutated in the cyclohexanone monooxygenases from Arthrobacter sp. and Acinetobacter sp. (CHMOArthro and CHMOAcineto ) to switch their regioselectivity towards (+)-2, which suggests that there are hot spots in the active site of BVMOs that can be targeted with the aim to change the regioselectivity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A Crouzon syndrome synonymous mutation activates a 5{prime} splice site within the IIIC exon of the FGFR2 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Gatto, F.D.; Breathnach, R.

    1995-06-10

    Crouzon syndrome, an autosomal dominant condition causing premature fusion of cranial structures, appears to be caused by mutations in the FGFR2 gene. Several mutations have been identified in the IIIc or bek exon that alter the amino acid sequence of the receptor in a zone known to be involved in ligand binding. In addition, a synonymous G to A transition has been described in three familial Crouzon syndrome cases (mutation at the third position of the alanine 344 codon). It has been suggested that this mutation may activate a cryptic 5{prime} or 3{prime} splice site. The significance of this latter mutation in Crouzon syndrome will be established only when it is known whether it does in fact affect splicing. If it does, prediction of the structure of the mutated receptor requires us to know whether a cryptic 5{prime} or a cryptic 3{prime} splice site has been activated. Ideally, splicing of the pre-mRNA would be studied in the cell type in which the mutated receptor is supposed to exert its effect. However, in our case this information is not available. An alternative strategy is to study splicing in cultured cells using cloned genes. The validity of this approach has been established in other disease systems, for example, thalassemias. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Mutation of active site residues in synthetic T4-lysozyme gene and their effect on lytic activity.

    PubMed

    Anand, N N; Stephen, E R; Narang, S A

    1988-06-16

    The active site amino acids (Glu11 and Asp20) in T4-lysozyme have been mutated to their isosteric residues Gln or Asn and/or acidic residues such as Glu----Asp or Asp----Glu by the oligonucleotide-replacement method. Out of eight mutants so generated the mutant T4-lysozyme obtained from pTLY.Asp11 retains maximum amount of activity (approximately 16%), pTLY.Asn20 the least (0.9%) whereas pTLY.Gln11 lost completely. A systematic study of the active and inactive mutants thus generated supports the important role of Glu11 and Asp20 in T4-lysozyme activity as predicted in earlier studies.

  16. A Mutational Analysis of the Active Site Loop Residues in cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gottfried K.; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Johnson, William H.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    cis -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 and a homologue from Corynebacterium glutamicum designated Cg10062 share 34% sequence identity (54% similarity). The former catalyzes a key step in a bacterial catabolic pathway for the nematocide 1,3-dichloropropene, whereas the latter has no known biological activity. Although Cg10062 has the six active site residues (Pro-1, His-28, Arg-70, Arg-73, Tyr-103, Glu-114) that are critical for cis-CaaD activity, it shows only a low level cis-CaaD activity and lacks the specificity of cis-CaaD: Cg10062 processes both isomers of 3-chloroacrylate with a preference for the cis-isomer. Although the basis for these differences is unknown, a comparison of the crystal structures of the enzymes covalently modified by an adduct resulting from their incubation with the same inhibitor offers a possible explanation. A 6-residue active site loop in cis-CaaD shows a strikingly different conformation from that observed in Cg10062: the loop closes down on the active site of cis-CaaD, but not on that of Cg10062. In order to examine what this loop might contribute to cis-CaaD catalysis and specificity, the residues were changed individually to those found in Cg10062. Subsequent kinetic and mechanistic analysis suggests that the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD is more Cg10062-like. The mutant enzyme shows a 4-fold increase in Km (using cis-3-bromoacrylate), but not to the degree observed for Cg10062 (687-fold). The mutation also causes a 4-fold decrease in the burst rate (compared to the wild type cis-CaaD), whereas Cg10062 shows no burst rate. More telling is the reaction of the T34A mutant of cis-CaaD with the alternate substrate, 2,3-butadienoate. In the presence of NaBH4 and the allene, cis-CaaD is completely inactivated after one turnover due to the covalent modification of Pro-1. The same experiment with Cg10062 does not result in the covalent modification of Pro-1. The different outcomes are attributed to

  17. Sulfide-Binding Hemoglobins: Effects of Mutations on Active-Site Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Alberti, S.; Bacelo, D. E.; Binning, R. C.; Echave, J.; Chergui, M.; Lopez-Garriga, J.

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics of Hemoglobin I (HbI) from the clam Lucina pectinata, from wild-type sperm whale (SW) myoglobin, and from the L29F/H64Q/V68F triple mutant of SW, both unligated and bound to hydrogen sulfide (H2S), have been studied in molecular dynamics simulations. Features that account for differences in H2S affinity among the three have been examined. Our results verify the existence of an unusual heme rocking motion in unligated HbI that can promote the entrance of large ligands such as H2S. The FQF-mutant partially reproduces the amplitude and relative orientation of the motion of HbI's heme group. Therefore, besides introducing favorable electrostatic interactions with H2S, the three mutations in the distal pocket change the dynamic properties of the heme group. The active-site residues Gln-64(E7), Phe-43(CD1), and His-93(F8) are also shown to be more flexible in unligated HbI than in FQF-mutant and SW. Further contributions to H2S affinity come from differences in hydrogen bonding between the heme propionate groups and nearby amino acid residues. PMID:16782787

  18. Molecular models and mutational analyses of plant specifier proteins suggest active site residues and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Wolfgang; Backenköhler, Anita; Schulze, Eva; Plock, Antje; Herberg, Thomas; Roese, Elin; Wittstock, Ute

    2014-01-01

    As components of the glucosinolate-myrosinase system, specifier proteins contribute to the diversity of chemical defenses that have evolved in plants of the Brassicales order as a protection against herbivores and pathogens. Glucosinolates are thioglucosides that are stored separately from their hydrolytic enzymes, myrosinases, in plant tissue. Upon tissue disruption, glucosinolates are hydrolyzed by myrosinases yielding instable aglucones that rearrange to form defensive isothiocyanates. In the presence of specifier proteins, other products, namely simple nitriles, epithionitriles and organic thiocyanates, can be formed instead of isothiocyanates depending on the glucosinolate side chain structure and the type of specifier protein. The biochemical role of specifier proteins is largely unresolved. We have used two thiocyanate-forming proteins and one epithiospecifier protein with different substrate/product specificities to develop molecular models that, in conjunction with mutational analyses, allow us to propose an active site and docking arrangements with glucosinolate aglucones that may explain some of the differences in specifier protein specificities. Furthermore, quantum-mechanical calculations support a reaction mechanism for benzylthiocyanate formation including a catalytic role of the TFP involved. These results may serve as a basis for further theoretical and experimental investigations of the mechanisms of glucosinolate breakdown that will also help to better understand the evolution of specifier proteins from ancestral proteins with functions outside glucosinolate metabolism.

  19. Mutational analysis of the active site flap (20s loop) of mandelate racemase.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Jennifer R; Bearne, Stephen L

    2008-01-15

    Mandelate racemase from Pseudomonas putida catalyzes the Mg2+-dependent 1,1-proton transfer that interconverts the enantiomers of mandelate. Residues of the 20s and 50s loops determine, in part, the topology and polarity of the active site and hence the substrate specificity. Previously, we proposed that, during racemization, the phenyl ring of mandelate moves between an S-pocket comprised of residues from the 50s loop and an R-pocket comprised of residues from the 20s loop [Siddiqi, F., Bourque, J. R., Jiang, H., Gardner, M., St. Maurice, M., Blouin, C., and Bearne, S. L. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 9013-9021]. The 20s loop constitutes a mobile beta-meander flap that covers the active site cavity shielding it from solvent and controlling entry and egress of ligands. To understand the role of the 20s loop in catalysis and substrate specificity, we constructed a series of mutants (V22A, V22I, V22F, T24S, A25V, V26A, V26L, V26F, V29A, V29L, V29F, V26A/V29L, and V22I/V29L) in which the sizes of hydrophobic side chains of the loop residues were varied. Catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) for all mutants were reduced between 6- and 40-fold with the exception of those of V22I, V26A, V29L, and V22I/V29L which had near wild-type efficiencies with mandelate. Thr 24 and Ala 25, located at the tip of the 20s loop, were particularly sensitive to minor alterations in the size of their hydrophobic side chains; however, most mutations were tolerated quite well, suggesting that flap mobility could compensate for increases in the steric bulk of hydrophobic side chains. With the exception of V29L, with mandelate as the substrate, and V22F and V26A/V29L, with 2-naphthylglycolate (2-NG) as the substrate, the values of kcat and Km were not altered in a manner consistent with steric obstruction of the R-pocket, perhaps due to flap mobility compensating for the increased size of the hydrophobic side chains. Surprisingly, V22I and V29L catalyzed the racemization of the bulkier substrate 2-NG

  20. Active RNAP pre-initiation sites are highly mutated by cytidine deaminases in yeast, with AID targeting small RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin JM; Wu, Yee Ling; Rada, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Cytidine deaminases are single stranded DNA mutators diversifying antibodies and restricting viral infection. Improper access to the genome leads to translocations and mutations in B cells and contributes to the mutation landscape in cancer, such as kataegis. It remains unclear how deaminases access double stranded genomes and whether off-target mutations favor certain loci, although transcription and opportunistic access during DNA repair are thought to play a role. In yeast, AID and the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G preferentially mutate transcriptionally active genes within narrow regions, 110 base pairs in width, fixed at RNA polymerase initiation sites. Unlike APOBEC3G, AID shows enhanced mutational preference for small RNA genes (tRNAs, snoRNAs and snRNAs) suggesting a putative role for RNA in its recruitment. We uncover the high affinity of the deaminases for the single stranded DNA exposed by initiating RNA polymerases (a DNA configuration reproduced at stalled polymerases) without a requirement for specific cofactors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03553.001 PMID:25237741

  1. Asymmetric mutations in the tetrameric R67 dihydrofolate reductase reveal high tolerance to active-site substitutions

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Maximilian C C J C; Morley, Krista L; Volpato, Jordan P; Schmitzer, Andreea R; Pelletier, Joelle N

    2015-01-01

    Type II R67 dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is a bacterial plasmid-encoded enzyme that is intrinsically resistant to the widely-administered antibiotic trimethoprim. R67 DHFR is genetically and structurally unrelated to E. coli chromosomal DHFR and has an unusual architecture, in that four identical protomers form a single symmetrical active site tunnel that allows only one substrate binding/catalytic event at any given time. As a result, substitution of an active-site residue has as many as four distinct consequences on catalysis, constituting an atypical model of enzyme evolution. Although we previously demonstrated that no single residue of the native active site is indispensable for function, library selection here revealed a strong bias toward maintenance of two native protomers per mutated tetramer. A variety of such “half-native” tetramers were shown to procure native-like catalytic activity, with similar KM values but kcat values 5- to 33-fold lower, illustrating a high tolerance for active-site substitutions. The selected variants showed a reduced thermal stability (Tm ∼12°C lower), which appears to result from looser association of the protomers, but generally showed a marked increase in resilience to heat denaturation, recovering activity to a significantly greater extent than the variant with no active-site substitutions. Our results suggest that the presence of two native protomers in the R67 DHFR tetramer is sufficient to provide native-like catalytic rate and thus ensure cellular proliferation. PMID:25401264

  2. Functional analysis of box I mutations in yeast site-specific recombinases Flp and R: pairwise complementation with recombinase variants lacking the active-site tyrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J W; Evans, B R; Yang, S H; Araki, H; Oshima, Y; Jayaram, M

    1992-01-01

    The site-specific recombinases Flp and R from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, respectively, are related proteins that belong to the yeast family of site-specific recombinases. They share approximately 30% amino acid matches and exhibit a common reaction mechanism that appears to be conserved within the larger integrase family of site-specific recombinases. Two regions of the proteins, designated box I and box II, also harbor a significantly high degree of homology at the nucleotide sequence level. We have analyzed the properties of Flp and R variants carrying point mutations within the box I segment in substrate-binding, DNA cleavage, and full-site and half-site strand transfer reactions. All mutations abolish or seriously diminish recombinase function either at the substrate-binding step or at the catalytic steps of strand cleavage or strand transfer. Of particular interest are mutations of Arg-191 of Flp and R, residues which correspond to one of the two invariant arginine residues of the integrase family. These variant proteins bind substrate with affinities comparable to those of the corresponding wild-type recombinases. Among the binding-competent variants, only Flp(R191K) is capable of efficient substrate cleavage in a full recombination target. However, this protein does not cleave a half recombination site and fails to complete strand exchange in a full site. Strikingly, the Arg-191 mutants of Flp and R can be rescued in half-site strand transfer reactions by a second point mutant of the corresponding recombinase that lacks its active-site tyrosine (Tyr-343). Similarly, Flp and R variants of Cys-189 and Flp variants at Asp-194 and Asp-199 can also be complemented by the corresponding Tyr-343-to-phenylalanine recombinase mutant. Images PMID:1508181

  3. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase deficiency. A missense mutation near the active site of an anti-inflammatory phospholipase.

    PubMed Central

    Stafforini, D M; Satoh, K; Atkinson, D L; Tjoelker, L W; Eberhardt, C; Yoshida, H; Imaizumi, T; Takamatsu, S; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Gray, P W; Prescott, S M

    1996-01-01

    Deficiency of plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase is an autosomal recessive syndrome that has been associated with severe asthma in Japanese children. Acquired deficiency has been described in several human diseases usually associated with severe inflammation. PAF acetylhydrolase catalyzes the degradation of PAF and related phospholipids, which have proinflammatory, allergic, and prothrombotic properties. Thus, a deficiency in the degradation of these lipids should increase the susceptibility to inflammatory and allergic disorders. Miwa et al. reported that PAF acetylhydrolase activity is absent in 4% of the Japanese population, which suggests that it could be a common factor in such disorders, but the molecular basis of the defect is unknown. We show that inherited deficiency of PAF acetylhydrolase is the result of a point mutation in exon 9 and that this mutation completely abolishes enzymatic activity. This mutation is the cause of the lack of enzymatic activity as expression in E. coli of a construct harboring the mutation results in an inactive protein. This mutation as a heterozygous trait is present in 27% in the Japanese population. This finding will allow rapid identification of subjects predisposed to severe asthma and other PAF-mediated disorders. PMID:8675689

  4. The Role of Distant Mutations and Allosteric Regulation on LovD Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Osuna, Sílvia; Gao, Xue; Sawaya, Michael R.; Gilson, Lynne; Collier, Steven J.; Huisman, Gjalt W.; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi; Houk, K. N.

    2014-01-01

    Natural enzymes have evolved to perform their cellular functions under complex selective pressures, which often require their catalytic activities to be regulated by other proteins. We contrasted a natural enzyme, LovD, which acts on a protein-bound (LovF) acyl substrate, with a laboratory-generated variant that was transformed by directed evolution to accept instead a small free acyl thioester, and no longer requires the acyl carrier protein. The resulting 29-mutant variant is 1000-fold more efficient in the synthesis of the drug simvastatin than the wild-type LovD. This is the first non-patent report of the enzyme currently used for the manufacture of simvastatin, as well as the intermediate evolved variants. Crystal structures and microsecond molecular dynamics simulations revealed the mechanism by which the laboratory-generated mutations free LovD from dependence on protein-protein interactions. Mutations dramatically altered conformational dynamics of the catalytic residues, obviating the need for allosteric modulation by the acyl carrier LovF. PMID:24727900

  5. Mutation at the Polymerase Active Site of Mouse DNA Polymerase δ Increases Genomic Instability and Accelerates Tumorigenesis▿

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Ranga N.; Treuting, Piper M.; Fuller, Evan D.; Goldsby, Robert E.; Norwood, Thomas H.; Gooley, Ted A.; Ladiges, Warren C.; Preston, Bradley D.; Loeb, Lawrence A.

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ) is believed to replicate a large portion of the genome and to synthesize DNA in DNA repair and genetic recombination pathways. The effects of mutation in the polymerase domain of this essential enzyme are unknown. Here, we generated mice harboring an L604G or L604K substitution in highly conserved motif A in the polymerase active site of Pol δ. Homozygous Pold1L604G/L604G and Pold1L604K/L604K mice died in utero. However, heterozygous animals were viable and displayed no overall increase in disease incidence, indicative of efficient compensation for the defective mutant polymerase. The life spans of wild-type and heterozygous Pold1+/L604G mice did not differ, while that of Pold1+/L604K mice was reduced by 18%. Cultured embryonic fibroblasts from the heterozygous strains exhibited comparable increases in both spontaneous mutation rate and chromosome aberrations. We observed no significant increase in cancer incidence; however, Pold1+/L604K mice bearing histologically diagnosed tumors died at a younger median age than wild-type mice. Our results indicate that heterozygous mutation at L604 in the polymerase active site of DNA polymerase δ reduces life span, increases genomic instability, and accelerates tumorigenesis in an allele-specific manner, novel findings that have implications for human cancer. PMID:17785453

  6. Human 15-LOX-1 active site mutations alter inhibitor binding and decrease potency.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Michelle; van Hoorebeke, Christopher; Horn, Thomas; Deschamps, Joshua; Freedman, J Cody; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Jacobson, Matthew P; Holman, Theodore

    2016-11-01

    Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LOX-1 or h12/15-LOX) reacts with polyunsaturated fatty acids and produces bioactive lipid derivatives that are implicated in many important human diseases. One such disease is stroke, which is the fifth leading cause of death and the first leading cause of disability in America. The discovery of h15-LOX-1 inhibitors could potentially lead to novel therapeutics in the treatment of stroke, however, little is known about the inhibitor/active site interaction. This study utilizes site-directed mutagenesis, guided in part by molecular modeling, to gain a better structural understanding of inhibitor interactions within the active site. We have generated eight mutants (R402L, R404L, F414I, F414W, E356Q, Q547L, L407A, I417A) of h15-LOX-1 to determine whether these active site residues interact with two h15-LOX-1 inhibitors, ML351 and an ML094 derivative, compound 18. IC50 values and steady-state inhibition kinetics were determined for the eight mutants, with four of the mutants affecting inhibitor potency relative to wild type h15-LOX-1 (F414I, F414W, E356Q and L407A). The data indicate that ML351 and compound 18, bind in a similar manner in the active site to an aromatic pocket close to F414 but have subtle differences in their specific binding modes. This information establishes the binding mode for ML094 and ML351 and will be leveraged to develop next-generation inhibitors.

  7. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by a novel splice donor site mutation and activation of a cryptic splice donor site in the androgen receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Infante, Joana B; Alvelos, Maria I; Bastos, Margarida; Carrilho, Francisco; Lemos, Manuel C

    2016-01-01

    The androgen insensitivity syndrome is an X-linked recessive genetic disorder characterized by resistance to the actions of androgens in an individual with a male karyotype. We evaluated a 34-year-old female with primary amenorrhea and a 46,XY karyotype, with normal secondary sex characteristics, absence of uterus and ovaries, intra-abdominal testis, and elevated testosterone levels. Sequence analysis of the androgen receptor (AR) gene revealed a novel splice donor site mutation in intron 4 (c.2173+2T>C). RT-PCR analysis showed that this mutation resulted in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site located in the second half of exon 4 and in the synthesis of a shorter mRNA transcript and an in-frame deletion of 41 amino acids. This novel mutation associated with a rare mechanism of abnormal splicing further expands the spectrum of mutations associated with the androgen insensitivity syndrome and may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in splicing defects.

  8. Design and characterization of a mutation outside the active site of human thymidylate synthase that affects ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Cardinale, D; Salo-Ahen, O M H; Guaitoli, G; Ferrari, S; Venturelli, A; Franchini, S; Battini, R; Ponterini, G; Wade, R C; Costi, M P

    2010-02-01

    Owing to its central role in DNA synthesis, human thymidylate synthase (hTS) is a well-established target for chemotherapeutic agents, such as fluoropyrimidines. The use of hTS inhibitors in cancer therapy is limited by their toxicity and the development of cellular drug resistance. Here, with the aim of shedding light on the structural role of the A-helix in fluoropyrimidine resistance, we have created a fluoropyrimidine-resistant mutant by making a single point mutation, Glu30Trp. We postulated that residue 30, which is located in the A-helix, close to but outside the enzyme active site, could have a long-range effect on inhibitor binding. The mutant shows 100 times lower specific activity with respect to the wild-type hTS and is resistant to the classical inhibitor, FdUMP, as shown by a 6-fold higher inhibition constant. Circular dichroism experiments show that the mutant is folded. The results of molecular modeling and simulation suggest that the Glu30Trp mutation gives rise to resistance by altering the hydrogen-bond network between residue 30 and the active site.

  9. Mutation studies in the active site of β-glycosidase from Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunghoon; Alli, Inteaz; Park, Kwanhwa; Oh, Byungchul; Lee, Byonghoon

    2013-01-01

    Sequence alignments and homology modeling of Pyrococcus furiosus thermostable glycosidase (PFTG) showed that the residue 150 is conserved as tryptophan in β-glycosidase and in other related enzymes such as β- mannosidase and β-galactosidase. To elucidate the relationship between the substrate size and geometric shape of the catalytic site of thermophilic β-glycosidase and category of PFTG, the Q77, Q150 and D206 located at the interface of the dimer were replaced with Trp and Asn. Also, to confirm the role of active sites of PFTG, the Q77R/Q150W double mutant was created through subcloning. Temperature and pH optima of both mutants and native enzyme were same at 100 °C and pH 5.0 in sodium citrate buffer, respectively. The catalytic efficiencies (k(cat)/K(m)) of the mutants on synthetic and natural substrates by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry were slightly changed, but indicated the characteristics of β-glycosidase activity. Kinetic parameters of the mutant enzymes indicated that they possess characteristics of both β- galactosidase and β-mannosidase activities. Although the mutant enzymes showed similar substrate specificities compared to the recombinant enzyme, they had more affinity (K(m)) to substrates with low turnover number (k(cat)).

  10. Mutational analysis of the active site residues of a D: -psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Kwangsoo; Rhee, Sangkee; Kim, Dooil; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2010-02-01

    D-Psicose 3-epimerase from Agrobacterium tumefacience catalyzes the conversion of D: -fructose to D-psicose. According to mutational analysis, the ring at position 112, the negative charge at position 156, and the positive charge at position 215 were essential components for enzyme activity and for binding fructose and psicose. The surface contact area and distance to the bound substrate by molecular modeling suggest that the positive charge of Arg215 was involved in stabilization of cis-endiol intermediate. The distances between the catalytic residues (Glu150 and Glu244) and Mn(2+) are critical to the catalysis, and the negative charges of the metal-binding residues are important for interaction with metal ion. The kinetic parameters of the D183E and H209A mutants for metal-binding residues with substrate and the near-UV circular dichroism spectra indicate that the metal ion bound to Asp183 and His209 is involved not only in catalysis but also in substrate binding.

  11. Structural Characterization of Mutations at the Oxygen Activation Site in Monomeric Sarcosine Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman Jorns, Marilyn; Chen, Zhi-wei; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-04-30

    Oxygen reduction and sarcosine oxidation in monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) occur at separate sites above the si- and re-faces, respectively, of the flavin ring. Mutagenesis studies implicate Lys265 as the oxygen activation site. Substitution of Lys265 with a neutral (Met, Gln, or Ala) or basic (Arg) residue results in an {approx}10{sup 4}- or 250-fold decrease, respectively, in the reaction rate. The overall structure of MSOX and residue conformation in the sarcosine binding cavity are unaffected by replacement of Lys265 with Met or Arg. The side chain of Met265 exhibits the same configuration in each molecule of Lys265Met crystals and is nearly congruent with Lys265 in wild-type MSOX. The side chain of Arg265 is, however, dramatically shifted (4-5 {angstrom}) compared with Lys265, points in the opposite direction, and exhibits significant conformational variability between molecules of the same crystal. The major species in solutions of Lys265Arg is likely to contain a 'flipped-out' Arg265 and exhibit negligible oxygen activation, similar to Lys265Met. The 400-fold higher oxygen reactivity observed with Lys265Arg is attributed to a minor (<1%) 'flipped-in' Arg265 conformer whose oxygen reactivity is similar to that of wild-type MSOX. A structural water (WAT1), found above the si-face of the flavin ring in all previously determined MSOX structures, is part of an apparent proton relay system that extends from FAD N(5) to bulk solvent. WAT1 is strikingly absent in Lys265Met and Lys265Arg, a feature that may account for the apparent kinetic stabilization of a reductive half-reaction intermediate that is detectable with the mutants but not wild-type MSOX.

  12. Mutation of a putative S-nitrosylation site of TRPV4 protein facilitates the channel activates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun Jeoung; Shin, Sung Hwa; Hyun, Sunghee; Chun, Jaesun; Kang, Sang Sun

    2011-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) cation channel, a member of the TRP vanilloid subfamily, is expressed in a broad range of tissues. Nitric oxide (NO) as a gaseous signal mediator shows a variety of important biological effects. In many instances, NO has been shown to exhibit its activities via a protein S-nitrosylation mechanism in order to regulate its protein functions. With functional assays via site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrate herein that NO induces the S-nitrosylation of TRPV4 Ca2+ channel on the Cys853 residue, and the S-nitrosylation of Cys853 reduced its channel sensitivity to 4-α phorbol 12,13-didecanoate and the interaction between TRPV4 and calmodulin. A patch clamp experiment and Ca2+ image analysis show that the S-nitrosylation of Cys853 modulates the TRPV4 channel as an inhibitor. Thus, our data suggest a novel regulatory mechanism of TRPV4 via NO-mediated S-nitrosylation on its Cys853 residue. PMID:21837266

  13. Single Active Site Mutation Causes Serious Resistance of HIV Reverse Transcriptase to Lamivudine: Insight from Multiple Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Moonsamy, Suri; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Walker, Ross C; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2016-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations, binding free energy calculations, principle component analysis (PCA), and residue interaction network analysis were employed in order to investigate the molecular mechanism of M184I single mutation which played pivotal role in making the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) totally resistant to lamivudine. Results showed that single mutations at residue 184 of RT caused (1) distortion of the orientation of lamivudine in the active site due to the steric conflict between the oxathiolane ring of lamivudine and the side chain of beta-branched amino acids Ile at position 184 which, in turn, perturbs inhibitor binding, (2) decrease in the binding affinity by (~8 kcal/mol) when compared to the wild-type, (3) variation in the overall enzyme motion as evident from the PCA for both systems, and (4) distortion of the hydrogen bonding network and atomic interactions with the inhibitor. The comprehensive analysis presented in this report can provide useful information for understanding the drug resistance mechanism against lamivudine. The results can also provide some potential clues for further design of novel inhibitors that are less susceptible to drug resistance.

  14. Systematic mutational analysis of the active-site threonine of HIV-1 proteinase: rethinking the "fireman's grip" hypothesis.

    PubMed Central

    Strisovsky, K.; Tessmer, U.; Langner, J.; Konvalinka, J.; Kräusslich, H. G.

    2000-01-01

    Aspartic proteinases share a conserved network of hydrogen bonds (termed "fireman's grip"), which involves the hydroxyl groups of two threonine residues in the active site Asp-Thr-Gly triplets (Thr26 in the case of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PR). In the case of retroviral proteinases (PRs), which are active as symmetrical homodimers, these interactions occur at the dimer interface. For a systematic analysis of the "fireman's grip," Thr26 of HIV-1 PR was changed to either Ser, Cys, or Ala. The variant enzymes were tested for cleavage of HIV-1 derived peptide and polyprotein substrates. PR(T26S) and PR(T26C) showed similar or slightly reduced activity compared to wild-type HIV-1 PR, indicating that the sulfhydryl group of cysteine can substitute for the hydroxyl of the conserved threonine in this position. PR(T26A), which lacks the "fireman's grip" interaction, was virtually inactive and was monomeric in solution at conditions where wild-type PR exhibited a monomer-dimer equilibrium. All three mutations had little effect when introduced into only one chain of a linked dimer of HIV-1 PR. In this case, even changing both Thr residues to Ala yielded residual activity suggesting that the "fireman's grip" is not essential for activity but contributes significantly to dimer formation. Taken together, these results indicate that the "fireman's grip" is crucial for stabilization of the retroviral PR dimer and for overall stability of the enzyme. PMID:11045610

  15. Effects of mutations in active site heme ligands on the spectroscopic and catalytic properties of SoxAX cytochromes.

    PubMed

    Kilmartin, James R; Bernhardt, Paul V; Dhouib, Rabeb; Hanson, Graeme R; Riley, Mark J; Kappler, Ulrike

    2016-09-01

    By attaching a sulfur substrate to a conserved cysteine of the SoxYZ carrier protein SoxAX cytochromes initiate the reaction cycle of the Sox (sulfur oxidation) multienzyme complex, which is the major pathway for microbial reoxidation of sulfur compounds in the environment. Despite their important role in this process, the reaction mechanism of the SoxAX cytochromes has not been fully elucidated. Here we report the effects of several active site mutations on the spectroscopic and enzymatic properties of the type II SoxAX protein from Starkeya novella, which in addition to two heme groups also contains a Cu redox centre. All substituted proteins contained these redox centres except for His231Ala which was unable to bind Cu(II). Substitution of the SoxA active site heme cysteine ligand with histidine resulted in increased microheterogeneity around the SoxA heme as determined by CW-EPR, while a SnSoxAX(C236A) substituted protein revealed a completely new, nitrogenous SoxA heme ligand. The same novel ligand was present in SnSoxAX(H231A) CW-EPR spectra, the first time that a ligand switch of the SoxA heme involving a nearby amino acid has been demonstrated. Kinetically, SnSoxAX(C236A) and SnSoxAX(C236H) showed reduced turnover, and in assays containing SoxYZ these mutants retained only ~25% of the wildtype activity. Together, these data indicate that the Cu redox centre can mediate a low level of activity, and that a possible ligand switch can occur during catalysis. It also appears that the SoxA heme cysteine ligand (and possibly the low redox potential) is important for an efficient reaction with SnSoxYZ/thiosulfate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutational analysis of divalent metal ion binding in the active site of class II α-mannosidase from Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Dennis K; Webb, Helen; Nielsen, Jonas Willum; Harris, Pernille; Winther, Jakob R; Willemoës, Martin

    2015-03-24

    Mutational analysis of Sulfolobus solfataricus class II α-mannosidase was focused on side chains that interact with the hydroxyls of the -1 mannosyl of the substrate (Asp-534) or form ligands to the active site divalent metal ion (His-228 and His-533) judged from crystal structures of homologous enzymes. D534A and D534N appeared to be completely inactive. When compared to the wild-type enzyme, the mutant enzymes in general showed only small changes in K(M) for the substrate, p-nitrophenyl-α-mannoside, but elevated activation constants, K(A), for the divalent metal ion (Co²⁺, Zn²⁺, Mn²⁺, or Cd²⁺). Some mutant enzyme forms displayed an altered preference for the metal ion compared to that of the wild type-enzyme. Furthermore, the H228Q, H533E, and H533Q enzymes were inhibited at increasing Zn²⁺ concentrations. The catalytic rate was reduced for all enzymes compared to that of the wild-type enzyme, although less dramatically with some activating metal ions. No major differences in the pH dependence between wild-type and mutant enzymes were found in the presence of different metal ions. The pH optimum was 5, but enzyme instability was observed at pH <4.5; therefore, only the basic limb of the bell-shaped pH profile was analyzed.

  17. Mutational analysis of active site contact residues in anti-fluorescein monoclonal antibody 4-4-20.

    PubMed

    Denzin, L K; Gulliver, G A; Voss, E W

    1993-10-01

    The contribution to high affinity Fl binding by each crystallographically defined Mab 4-4-20 (Ka = 1.7 x 10(10) M-1; Qmax = 90%) ligand contact residue (L27dHis, L32Tyr, L34Arg, L91Ser, L96Trp and H33Trp) has been determined by site-specific mutagenesis studies. All six antigen contact residues were changed to Ala in the single-chain derivative of Mab 4-4-20 and following expression in E. coli, denaturation, refolding and purification, each SCA mutant was characterized in terms of Fl binding affinity, Qmax, lambda max and idiotype. Results demonstrated that Ala substitutions at each ligand contact residue reduced the binding affinities and quenching maxima for all residues except L27d which retained wild type characteristics. The SCA TyrL32Ala, SerL91Ala and TrpH33Ala mutants exhibited binding affinities that were approximately 1000-fold lower than the wild type value and greatly reduced Qmax values. Additionally, other amino acid substitutions were performed at three of the six antigen contact residues (L91Ser, L96Trp and H33Trp) to further evaluate the role of each in Fl binding. Therefore, the following mutations were constructed and characterized: SerL91Asn, TrpL96Tyr, TrpL96Phe, TrpL96Leu, TrpH33Tyr and TrpH33Phe. Results of site-specific mutagenesis studies are discussed in terms of Mab active site structure and suggest that L32Tyr, L91Ser and H33Trp are important for high affinity Fl binding and efficient Fl quenching.

  18. Phosphorylation of the VP16 transcriptional activator protein during herpes simplex virus infection and mutational analysis of putative phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Ottosen, Søren; Herrera, Francisco J.; Doroghazi, James R.; Hull, Angela; Mittal, Sheenu; Lane, William S.; Triezenberg, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    VP16 is a virion phosphoprotein of herpes simplex virus and a transcriptional activator of the viral immediate-early (IE) genes. We identified four novel VP16 phosphorylation sites (Ser18, Ser353, Ser411, and Ser452) at late times in infection, but found no evidence of phosphorylation of Ser375, a residue reportedly phosphorylated when VP16 is expressed from a transfected plasmid. A virus carrying a S375A mutation of VP16 was viable in cell culture but with a slow growth rate. The association of the mutant VP16 protein with IE gene promoters and subsequent IE gene expression was markedly reduced during infection, consistent with prior transfection and in vitro results. Surprisingly, the association of Oct-1 with IE promoters was also diminished during infection by the mutant strain. We propose that Ser375 is important for the interaction of VP16 with Oct-1, and that the interaction is required to enable both proteins to bind to IE promoters. PMID:16297954

  19. Triazole resistance mediated by mutations of a conserved active site tyrosine in fungal lanosterol 14α-demethylase

    PubMed Central

    Sagatova, Alia A.; Keniya, Mikhail V.; Wilson, Rajni K.; Sabherwal, Manya; Tyndall, Joel D. A.; Monk, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of fungal strains showing resistance to triazole drugs can make treatment of fungal disease problematic. Triazole resistance can arise due to single mutations in the drug target lanosterol 14α-demethylase (Erg11p/CYP51). We have determined how commonly occurring single site mutations in pathogenic fungi affect triazole binding using Saccharomyces cerevisiae Erg11p (ScErg11p) as a target surrogate. The mutations Y140F/H were introduced into full-length hexahistidine-tagged ScErg11p. Phenotypes and high-resolution X-ray crystal structures were determined for the mutant enzymes complexed with short-tailed (fluconazole and voriconazole) or long-tailed (itraconazole and posaconazole) triazoles and wild type enzyme complexed with voriconazole. The mutations disrupted a water-mediated hydrogen bond network involved in binding of short-tailed triazoles, which contain a tertiary hydroxyl not present in long-tailed triazoles. This appears to be the mechanism by which resistance to these short chain azoles occurs. Understanding how these mutations affect drug affinity will aid the design of azoles that overcome resistance. PMID:27188873

  20. Identification of an active site alanine in mevalonate kinase through characterization of a novel mutation in mevalonate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hinson, D D; Chambliss, K L; Hoffmann, G F; Krisans, S; Keller, R K; Gibson, K M

    1997-10-17

    Sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified cDNAs from cultured cells of three patients with mevalonate kinase deficiency revealed a G --> A transversion at nucleotide 1000 of the coding region, converting alanine to threonine at position 334 (A334T). To characterize this defect, we expressed wild-type and mutant cDNAs in Escherichia coli as the glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins, with purification by affinity chromatography. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis for wild-type and mutant fusion proteins indicated an expected molecular mass of 42-43 kDa. Kinetic characterization of the wild-type fusion protein yielded Km values of 150 +/- 23 and 440 +/- 190 microM (mean +/- S.E.) for substrates (RS)-mevalonate and ATP, respectively. Expressed wild-type mevalonate kinase (MKase) had a maximum velocity of 13.6 +/- 1.4 units/mg of protein (n = 22, +/-S.E.), whereas the A334T mutation yielded an enzyme with average Vmax of 0.26 +/- 0.02 unit/mg of protein (n = 6, +/-S.E.), representing a decrease to 1.4% of control Vmax. Restriction digestion with HhaI, in conjunction with direct sequencing of cDNAs, revealed that two patients were homozygous and one heterozygous for the A334T allele, establishing autosomal recessive inheritance within families. Although the A334T enzyme had a normal Km for ATP of 680 +/- 226 microM (n = 3, +/-S.E.), the Michaelis constant for (RS)-mevalonate was increased >30-fold to 4623 +/- 1167 microM (n = 4, +/-S.E.) under standard assay conditions. Comparable kinetic results were obtained using extracts of lymphoblasts, which were homozygous for the A334T allele. Alanine 334 is invariant in MKase from bacteria to man and located in a glycine-rich region postulated to have homology with ATP-binding sequences. Our results indicate that the bacterial expression system for human MKase will provide a useful model system in which to analyze inherited mutations and identify the first active site residue in MKase associated with

  1. Galactosemia caused by a point mutation that activates cryptic donor splice site in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wadelius, C.; Lagerkvist, A. Uppsala Univ. ); Molin, A.K.; Larsson, A. ); Von Doebeln, U. )

    1993-08-01

    Galactosemia affects 1/84,000 in Sweden and is manifested in infancy when the child is exposed to galactose in the diet. If untreated there is a risk of severe early symptoms and, even with a lactose-free diet, late symptoms such as mental retardation and ovarial dysfunction may develop. In classical galactosemia, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT) (EC 2.7.7.12) is defective and the normal cDNA sequence of this enzyme has been characterized. Recently eight mutations leading to galactosemia were published. Heparinized venous blood was drawn from a patient with classical galactosemia. In the cDNA from the patient examined, an insertion of 54 bp was found at position 1087. Amplification of the relevant genomic region of the patient's DNA was performed. Exon-intron boundaries and intronic sequences thus determined revealed that the 54-bp insertion was located immediately downstream of exon 10. It was further found that the patient was heterozygous for a point mutation, changing a C to a T (in 5 of 9 clones) at the second base in the intron downstream of the insertion. This alteration creates a sequence which, as well as the ordinary splice site, differs in only two positions from the consensus sequence. It was found that the mutation occurred in only one of the 20 alleles from galactosemic patients and in none of the 200 alleles from normal controls. The mutation is inherited from the mother, who also was found to express the 54-bp-long insertion at the mRNA level. Sequences from the 5[prime] end of the coding region were determined after genomic amplification, revealing a sequence identical to that reported. The mutation on the paternal allele has not been identified. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Mutation of a Shc binding site tyrosine residue in ErbB3/HER3 blocks heregulin-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Vijapurkar, U; Cheng, K; Koland, J G

    1998-08-14

    The ErbB2 and ErbB3 proteins together constitute a functional coreceptor for heregulin (neuregulin). Heregulin stimulates the phosphorylation of both coreceptor constituents and initiates a variety of other signaling events, which include phosphorylation of the Shc protein. The role of Shc in heregulin-stimulated signal transduction through the ErbB2.ErbB3 coreceptor was investigated here. Heregulin was found to promote ErbB3/Shc association in NIH-3T3 cells expressing endogenous ErbB2 and recombinant ErbB3. A mutant ErbB3 protein was generated in which Tyr-1325 in a consensus Shc phosphotyrosine-binding domain recognition site was mutated to Phe (ErbB3-Y/F). This mutation abolished the association of Shc with ErbB3 and blocked the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by heregulin. Whereas heregulin induced mitogenesis in NIH-3T3 cells transfected with wild-type ErbB3 cDNA, this mitogenic response was markedly attenuated in NIH-3T3 cells transfected with the ErbB3-Y/F cDNA. These results showed a specific interaction of Shc with the ErbB3 receptor protein and demonstrated the importance of this interaction in the activation of mitogenic responses by the ErbB2. ErbB3 heregulin coreceptor complex.

  3. Oxalate decarboxylase and oxalate oxidase activities can be interchanged with a specificity switch of up to 282,000 by mutating an active site lid.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Matthew R; Just, Victoria J; Bowater, Laura; Fairhurst, Shirley A; Requena, Laura; Lawson, David M; Bornemann, Stephen

    2007-10-30

    Oxalate decarboxylases and oxalate oxidases are members of the cupin superfamily of proteins that have many common features: a manganese ion with a common ligand set, the substrate oxalate, and dioxygen (as either a unique cofactor or a substrate). We have hypothesized that these enzymes share common catalytic steps that diverge when a carboxylate radical intermediate becomes protonated. The Bacillus subtilis decarboxylase has two manganese binding sites, and we proposed that Glu162 on a flexible lid is the site 1 general acid. We now demonstrate that a decarboxylase can be converted into an oxidase by mutating amino acids of the lid that include Glu162 with specificity switches of 282,000 (SEN161-3DAS), 275,000 (SENS161-4DSSN), and 225,000 (SENS161-4DASN). The structure of the SENS161-4DSSN mutant showed that site 2 was not affected. The requirement for substitutions other than of Glu162 was, at least in part, due to the need to decrease the Km for dioxygen for the oxidase reaction. Reversion of decarboxylase activity could be achieved by reintroducing Glu162 to the SENS161-4DASN mutant to give a relative specificity switch of 25,600. This provides compelling evidence for the crucial role of Glu162 in the decarboxylase reaction consistent with it being the general acid, for the role of the lid in controlling the Km for dioxygen, and for site 1 being the sole catalytically active site. We also report the trapping of carboxylate radicals produced during turnover of the mutant with the highest oxidase activity. Such radicals were also observed with the wild-type decarboxylase.

  4. The effect of active-site isoleucine to alanine mutation on the DHFR catalyzed hydride-transfer

    PubMed Central

    Stojković, Vanja; Perissinotti, Laura L.; Lee, Jeeyeon; Benkovic, Stephen J.; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of the nature of hydride transfer in wild-type and active site mutant (I14A) of dihydrofolate reductase suggests that the size of this side chain at position 14 modulates H-tunneling. PMID:20972508

  5. Conversion of citrate synthase into citryl-CoA lyase as a result of mutation of the active-site aspartic acid residue to glutamic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Man, W J; Li, Y; O'Connor, C D; Wilton, D C

    1991-01-01

    The active-site aspartic acid residue, Asp-362, of Escherichia coli citrate synthase was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to Glu-362, Asn-362 or Gly-362. Only very low catalytic activity could be detected with the Asp----Asn and Asp----Gly mutations. The Asp----Glu mutation produced an enzyme that expressed about 0.8% of the overall catalytic rate, and the hydrolysis step in the reaction, monitored as citryl-CoA hydrolysis, was inhibited to a similar extent. However, the condensation reaction, measured in the reverse direction as citryl-CoA cleavage to oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA, was not affected by the mutation, and this citryl-CoA lyase activity was the major catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme. This high condensation activity in an enzyme in which the subsequent hydrolysis step was about 98% inhibited permitted considerable exchange of the methyl protons of acetyl-CoA during catalysis by the mutant enzyme. The Km for oxaloacetate was not significantly altered in the D362E mutant enzyme, whereas the Km for acetyl-CoA was about 5 times lower. A mechanism is proposed in which Asp-362 is involved in the hydrolysis reaction of this enzyme, and not as a base in the deprotonation of acetyl-CoA as recently suggested by others. [Karpusas, Branchaud & Remington (1990) Biochemistry 29, 2213-2219; Alter, Casazza, Zhi, Nemeth, Srere & Evans, (1990) Biochemistry 29, 7557-7563]. PMID:1684105

  6. Cytochrome P450 active site plasticity: attenuation of imidazole binding in cytochrome P450(cam) by an L244A mutation.

    PubMed

    Verras, Andreas; Alian, Akram; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2006-11-01

    We have identified a P450(cam) mutation, L244A, that mitigates the affinity for imidazole and substituted imidazoles while maintaining a high affinity for the natural substrate camphor. The P450(cam) L244A crystal structure solved in the absence of any ligand reveals that the I-helix is displaced inwards by over 1 A in response to the cavity created by the change from leucine to alanine. Furthermore, the crystal structures of imidazole-bound P450(cam) and the 1-methylimidazole-bound P450(cam) L244A mutant reveal that the ligands have distinct binding modes in the two proteins. Whereas in wild-type P450(cam) the imidazole coordinates to the iron in an orientation roughly perpendicular to the plane of the heme, in the L244A mutant the rearranged I helix, and specifically residue Val247, forces the imidazole into an orientation almost parallel to the heme that impairs its ability to coordinate to the heme iron. As a result, the imidazole is much more weakly bound to the mutant than it is to the wild-type enzyme. Despite the constriction of the active site by the mutation, previous work with the L244A mutant has shown that it oxidizes larger substrates than the wild-type enzyme. This paradoxical situation, in which a mutation that nominally increases the active site cavity appears to decrease it, suggests that the mutation actually increases the active site maleability, allowing it to better expand to oxidize larger substrates.

  7. Mutations affecting enzymatic activity in liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Vockley, J.G.; Tabor, D.E.; Goodman, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    The hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea is catalyzed by arginase in the last step of the urea cycle. We examined a group of arginase deficient patients by PCR-SSCP analysis to characterize the molecular basis of this disorder. A heterogeneous population of nonsense mutations, microdeletions, and missense mutations has been identified in our cohort. Microdeletions which introduce premature stop codons downstream of the deletion and nonsense mutations result in no arginase activity. These mutations occur randomly along the gene. The majority of missense mutations identified appear to occur in regions of high cross-species homology. To test the effect of these missense mutations on arginase activity, site-directed mutagenesis was used to re-create the patient mutations for in vivo expression studies in a prokaryotic fusion-protein expression system. Of 4 different missense mutations identified in 6 individuals, only one was located outside of a conserved region. The three substitution mutations within the conserved regions had a significant effect on enzymatic activity (0-3.1 nmole/30min, normal is 1300-1400 nmoles/30min, as determined by in vitro arginase assay), while the fourth mutation, a T to S substitution, did not. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create mutations not in residues postulated to play a significant role in the enzymatic function or active site formation in manganese-binding proteins such as arginase. We have determined that the substitution of glycine for a histidine residue, located in a very highly conserved region of exon 3, and the substitution of a histidine and an aspartic acid residue within a similarly conserved region in exon 4, totally abolishes enzymatic activity. Mutations substituting glycine for an additional histidine and aspartic acid residue in exon 4 and two aspartic acid residues in exon 7 have also been created. We are currently in the process of characterizing these mutations.

  8. Mutational and structural analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B reveal novel active site residues for family 5 glycoside hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Takuji; Schmitz, George E; Dodd, Dylan; Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity.

  9. Mutational and Structural Analyses of Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5B Reveal Novel Active Site Residues for Family 5 Glycoside Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yejun; Burnett, Alanna; Nagasawa, Naoko; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nakamura, Haruki; Morikawa, Kosuke; Cann, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    CpMan5B is a glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 enzyme exhibiting both β-1,4-mannosidic and β-1,4-glucosidic cleavage activities. To provide insight into the amino acid residues that contribute to catalysis and substrate specificity, we solved the structure of CpMan5B at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure revealed several active site residues (Y12, N92 and R196) in CpMan5B that are not present in the active sites of other structurally resolved GH5 enzymes. Residue R196 in GH5 enzymes is thought to be strictly conserved as a histidine that participates in an electron relay network with the catalytic glutamates, but we show that an arginine fulfills a functionally equivalent role and is found at this position in every enzyme in subfamily GH5_36, which includes CpMan5B. Residue N92 is required for full enzymatic activity and forms a novel bridge over the active site that is absent in other family 5 structures. Our data also reveal a role of Y12 in establishing the substrate preference for CpMan5B. Using these molecular determinants as a probe allowed us to identify Man5D from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii as a mannanase with minor endo-glucanase activity. PMID:24278284

  10. Strychnine activates neuronal α7 nicotinic receptors after mutations in the leucine ring and transmitter binding site domains

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Eleonora; Fucile, Sergio; Barabino, Benedetta; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    Recent work has shown that strychnine, the potent and selective antagonist of glycine receptors, is also an antagonist of nicotinic acetylcholine (AcCho) receptors including neuronal homomeric α7 receptors, and that mutating Leu-247 of the α7 nicotinic AcCho receptor-channel domain (L247Tα7; mut1) converts some nicotinic antagonists into agonists. Therefore, a study was made of the effects of strychnine on Xenopus oocytes expressing the chick wild-type α7 or L247Tα7 receptors. In these oocytes, strychnine itself did not elicit appreciable membrane currents but reduced the currents elicited by AcCho in a reversible and dose-dependent manner. In sharp contrast, in oocytes expressing L247Tα7 receptors with additional mutations at Cys-189 and Cys-190, in the extracellular N-terminal domain (L247T/C189–190Sα7; mut2), micromolar concentrations of strychnine elicited inward currents that were reversibly inhibited by the nicotinic receptor blocker α-bungarotoxin. Single-channel recordings showed that strychnine gated mut2-channels with two conductance levels, 56 pS and 42 pS, and with kinetic properties similar to AcCho-activated channels. We conclude that strychnine is a modulator, as well as an activator, of some homomeric nicotinic α7 receptors. After injecting oocytes with mixtures of cDNAs encoding mut1 and mut2 subunits, the expressed hybrid receptors were activated by strychnine, similar to the mut2, and had a high affinity to AcCho like the mut1. A pentameric symmetrical model yields the striking conclusion that two identical α7 subunits may be sufficient to determine the functional properties of α7 receptors. PMID:10557336

  11. Mutational and structural studies of the active-site residues in truncated Fibrobacter succinogenes1,3-1,4-beta-D-glucanase.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Li-Chu; Huang, Hsiao-Chuan; Hsiao, Ching-Hua; Chiang, Yuan-Neng; Shyur, Lie-Fen; Lin, Yu-Shiun; Lee, Shu-Hua

    2008-12-01

    1,3-1,4-beta-D-Glucanases (EC 3.2.1.73) specifically hydrolyze beta-1,4-glycosidic bonds located prior to beta-1,3-glycosidic linkages in lichenan or beta-D-glucans. It has been suggested that truncated Fibrobacter succinogenes 1,3-1,4-beta-D-glucanase (TFsbeta-glucanase) can accommodate five glucose rings in its active site upon enzyme-substrate interaction. In this study, 12 mutant enzymes were created by mutating the conserved residues Gln70, Asn72, Gln81 and Glu85 proposed to bind to substrate subsites +1 and +2 and the catalytic properties of these mutants were determined. The most significant change in catalytic activity was observed on mutation of Gln70, with a 299-fold and 498-fold lower k(cat)/K(m) for the mutants Q70A and Q70I, respectively, compared with the wild-type enzyme. Mutagenesis, kinetic and structural studies revealed that the conserved residues surrounding the active site of TFsbeta-glucanase at substrate subsites +1 and +2 play an important role in its catalytic function, with the following order of importance: Gln70 > Asn72 > Glu85 > Gln81. The crystal structure of mutant E85I was determined at 2.2 A resolution. Further analysis of the E85I mutant structure revealed that the loop located at the concave site moved approximately 2 A from its position in the native enzyme complex without changing the core structure.

  12. Computational simulations of structural role of the active-site W374C mutation of acetyl-coenzyme-A carboxylase: multi-drug resistance mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Wen-Chao; Yu, Ning-Xi; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2011-03-01

    Herbicides targeting grass plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase, EC 6.4.1.2) are selectively effective against graminicides. The intensive worldwide use of this herbicide family has selected for resistance genes in a number of grass weed species. Recently, the active-site W374C mutation was found to confer multi-drug resistance toward haloxyfop (HF), fenoxaprop (FR), Diclofop (DF), and clodinafop (CF) in A. myosuroides. In order to uncover the resistance mechanism due to W374C mutation, the binding of above-mentioned four herbicides to both wild-type and the mutant-type ACCase was investigated in the current work by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The binding free energies were calculated by molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method. The calculated binding free energy values for four herbicides were qualitatively consistent with the experimental order of IC(50) values. All the computational model and energetic results indicated that the W374C mutation has great effects on the conformational change of the binding pocket and the ligand-protein interactions. The most significant conformational change was found to be associated with the aromatic amino acid residues, such as Phe377, Tyr161' and Trp346. As a result, the π-π interaction between the ligand and the residue of Phe377 and Tyr161', which make important contributions to the binding affinity, was decreased after mutation and the binding affinity for the inhibitors to the mutant-type ACCase was less than that to the wild-type enzyme, which accounts for the molecular basis of herbicidal resistance. The structural role and mechanistic insights obtained from computational simulations will provide a new starting point for the rational design of novel inhibitors to overcome drug resistance associated with W374C mutation.

  13. [Mutation of palmitoylation site of linker for activation of T cells inhibits signal transduction mediated by glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol-anchored CD59 in T cells].

    PubMed

    Gao, Meihua; Wang, Lina; Wang, Bing; Cong, Beibei; Zhang, Shuchao

    2015-08-01

    To construct the lentivirus carrying the mutated palmitoylation site of the linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and infect Jurkat cells with it to establish stable cell line, and to investigate the effect of LAT palmitoylation mutation on T cell signaling induced by CD59. Negative control (neg-EGFP) and LAT-M-EGFP fusion protein gene vectors were respectively constructed and then packaged using lentivirus. Subsequently, Jurkat cells were infected with them to establish stable cell lines. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to observe the infection efficiency and the distribution of fusion proteins in Jurkat cells. CCK-8 assay was used to detect the change of cell proliferation activity after CD59 mAb supplementation. Flow cytometry was used to determine the apoptosis rate. Western blotting was used to examine the levels of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) and lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK). Confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that LAT molecules of LAT-M group scattered on cell membrane, and there was no obvious clustered region after cross linkage with CD59 mAb. Compared with the negative control group, the cell proliferation activity of LAT-M group significantly decreased, and the quantity of middle-late apoptotic cells significantly increased; Western blotting showed that the expression levels of PLC-γ1 and LCK in LAT-M group was roughly the same with those in negative control group, and after CD59 mAb stimulation, there was no obvious change in LAT-M group, while the levels in negative control group were reduced. LAT-M-EGFP fusion protein could not locate on lipid rafts of Jurkat cells infected with LAT palmitoylation mutation. In addition, the growth of the cells carrying the LAT-M-EGFP was inhibited. The palmitoylation mutation of LAT attenuated the signal transduction induced by glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored CD59 in T cells.

  14. FK506-binding protein mutational analysis: defining the active-site residue contributions to catalysis and the stability of ligand complexes.

    PubMed

    DeCenzo, M T; Park, S T; Jarrett, B P; Aldape, R A; Futer, O; Murcko, M A; Livingston, D J

    1996-02-01

    The 12 kDa FK506-binding protein FKBP12 is a cis-trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that binds the macrolides FK506 and rapamycin. We have examined the role of the binding pocket residues of FKBP12 in protein-ligand interactions by making conservative substitutions of 12 of these residues by site-directed mutagenesis. For each mutant FKBP12, we measured the affinity for FK506 and rapamycin and the catalytic efficiency in the cis-frans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase reaction. The mutation of Trp59 or Phe99 generates an FKBP12 with a significantly lower affinity for FK506 than wild-type protein. Tyr26 and Tyr82 mutants are enzymatically active, demonstrating that hydrogen bonding by these residues is not required for catalysis of the cis-trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase reaction, although these mutations alter the substrate specificity of the enzyme. We conclude that hydrophobic interactions in the active site dominate in the stabilization of FKBP12 binding to macrolide ligands and to the twisted-amide peptidyl-prolyl substrate intermediate.

  15. Effect of the active site D25N mutation on the structure, stability, and ligand binding of the mature HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Jane M; Liu, Fengling; Ishima, Rieko; Weber, Irene T; Louis, John M

    2008-05-09

    All aspartic proteases, including retroviral proteases, share the triplet DTG critical for the active site geometry and catalytic function. These residues interact closely in the active, dimeric structure of HIV-1 protease (PR). We have systematically assessed the effect of the D25N mutation on the structure and stability of the mature PR monomer and dimer. The D25N mutation (PR(D25N)) increases the equilibrium dimer dissociation constant by a factor >100-fold (1.3 +/- 0.09 microm) relative to PR. In the absence of inhibitor, NMR studies reveal clear structural differences between PR and PR(D25N) in the relatively mobile P1 loop (residues 79-83) and flap regions, and differential scanning calorimetric analyses show that the mutation lowers the stabilities of both the monomer and dimer folds by 5 and 7.3 degrees C, respectively. Only minimal differences are observed in high resolution crystal structures of PR(D25N) complexed to darunavir (DRV), a potent clinical inhibitor, or a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle-r-Nle-Gln-Arg-NH(2) (RPB), as compared with PR.DRV and PR.RPB complexes. Although complexation with RPB stabilizes both dimers, the effect on their T(m) is smaller for PR(D25N) (6.2 degrees C) than for PR (8.7 degrees C). The T(m) of PR(D25N).DRV increases by only 3 degrees C relative to free PR(D25N), as compared with a 22 degrees C increase for PR.DRV, and the mutation increases the ligand dissociation constant of PR(D25N).DRV by a factor of approximately 10(6) relative to PR.DRV. These results suggest that interactions mediated by the catalytic Asp residues make a major contribution to the tight binding of DRV to PR.

  16. Effect of the Active Site D25N Mutation on the Structure, Stability, and Ligand Binding of the Mature HIV-1 Protease*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sayer, Jane M.; Liu, Fengling; Ishima, Rieko; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M.

    2008-01-01

    All aspartic proteases, including retroviral proteases, share the triplet DTG critical for the active site geometry and catalytic function. These residues interact closely in the active, dimeric structure of HIV-1 protease (PR). We have systematically assessed the effect of the D25N mutation on the structure and stability of the mature PR monomer and dimer. The D25N mutation (PRD25N) increases the equilibrium dimer dissociation constant by a factor >100-fold (1.3 ± 0.09 μm) relative to PR. In the absence of inhibitor, NMR studies reveal clear structural differences between PR and PRD25N in the relatively mobile P1 loop (residues 79-83) and flap regions, and differential scanning calorimetric analyses show that the mutation lowers the stabilities of both the monomer and dimer folds by 5 and 7.3 °C, respectively. Only minimal differences are observed in high resolution crystal structures of PRD25N complexed to darunavir (DRV), a potent clinical inhibitor, or a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle-r-Nle-Gln-Arg-NH2 (RPB), as compared with PR·DRV and PR·RPB complexes. Although complexation with RPB stabilizes both dimers, the effect on their Tm is smaller for PRD25N (6.2 °C) than for PR (8.7 °C). The Tm of PRD25N·DRV increases by only 3 °C relative to free PRD25N, as compared with a 22 °C increase for PR·DRV, and the mutation increases the ligand dissociation constant of PRD25N·DRV by a factor of ∼106 relative to PR·DRV. These results suggest that interactions mediated by the catalytic Asp residues make a major contribution to the tight binding of DRV to PR. PMID:18281688

  17. Active site properties of monomeric triosephosphate isomerase (monoTIM) as deduced from mutational and structural studies.

    PubMed

    Schliebs, W; Thanki, N; Eritja, R; Wierenga, R

    1996-02-01

    MonoTIM is a stable monomeric variant of the dimeric trypanosomal enzyme triose phosphate isomerase (TIM) with less, but significant, catalytic activity. It is known that in TIM, three residues, Lys 13 (loop 1), His 95 (loop 4), and Glu 167 (loop 6) are the crucial catalytic residues. In the wild-type TIM dimer, loop 1 and loop 4 are very rigid because of tight interactions with residues of the other subunit. Previous structural studies indicate that Lys 13 and His 95 have much increased conformational flexibility in monoTIM. Using site-directed mutagenesis, it is shown here that Lys 13 and His 95 are nevertheless essential for optimal catalysis by monoTIM: monoTIM-K13A is completely inactive, although it can still bind substrate analogues, and monoTIM-H95A is 50 times less active. The best inhibitors of wild-type TIM are phosphoglycolohydroxamate (PGH) and 2-phosphoglycolate (2PG), with KI values of 8 microM and 26 microM, respectively. The affinity of the monoTIM active site for PGH has been reduced approximately 60-fold, whereas for 2PG, only a twofold weakening of affinity is observed. The mode of binding, as determined by protein crystallographic analysis of these substrate analogues, shows that, in particular, 2PG interacts with Lys 13 and His 95 in a way similar but not identical to that observed for the wild-type enzyme. This crystallographic analysis also shows that Glu 167 has the same interactions with the substrate analogues as in the wild type. The data presented suggest that, despite the absence of the second subunit, monoTIM catalyzes the interconversion of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate via the same mechanism as in the wild type.

  18. Density functional study on UV/VIS spectra of copper-protein active sites: the effect of mutations.

    PubMed

    Swart, Marcel; Johansson, Mikael P

    2012-09-01

    UV/VIS Electron excitation spectra have been computed for large, realistic model systems of the blue copper protein family. Fully quantum-chemical calculations at the density-functional theory level employing polarized triple-ζ basis sets have been performed on systems of over 120 atoms, without symmetry. Different mutants, with the ligating methionine of the wild type Cu center exchanged for histidine (M121H) and glutamine (M121Q), have been investigated in order to obtain insight about how the influence of the exact surrounding milieu of the Cu-atom affects the computed spectrum. With sufficiently large model sizes, inclusion of the environment by using continuum solvation models do not change the spectra significantly. More direct and rigorous treatments are needed to reliably assess the effect of the surrounding protein on the electronic structure of the active sites. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  19. Concerted action of target-site mutations and high EPSPS activity in glyphosate-resistant junglerice (Echinochloa colona) from California

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glyphosate is the most widely used non-selective herbicide and Echinochloa colona is an annual weed affecting field crops and orchards in California. A population carrying a glyphosate-resistance-endowing mutation in the EPSPS gene was found in the Northern Sacramento Valley. We used selfed lines ...

  20. Mechanism of the Quorum-Quenching Lactonase (AiiA) from Bacillus thuringiensis. 2. Substrate Modeling and Active Site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Momb, Jessica; Wang, Canhui; Liu, Dali; Thomas, Pei W.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Guo, Hua; Ringe, Dagmar; Fast, Walter

    2008-12-02

    The N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone hydrolases (AHL lactonases) have attracted considerable attention because of their ability to quench AHL-mediated quorum-sensing pathways in Gram-negative bacteria and because of their relation to other enzymes in the metallo-{beta}-lactamase superfamily. To elucidate the detailed catalytic mechanism of AHL lactonase, mutations are made on residues that presumably contribute to substrate binding and catalysis. Steady-state kinetic studies are carried out on both the wild-type and mutant enzymes using a spectrum of substrates. Two mutations, Y194F and D108N, present significant effects on the overall catalysis. On the basis of a high-resolution structural model of the enzyme-product complex, a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical method is used to model the substrate binding orientation and to probe the effect of the Y194F mutation. Combining all experimental and computational results, we propose a detailed mechanism for the ring-opening hydrolysis of AHL substrates as catalyzed by the AHL lactonase from Bacillus thuringiensis. Several features of the mechanism that are also found in related enzymes are discussed and may help to define an evolutionary thread that connects the hydrolytic enzymes of this mechanistically diverse superfamily.

  1. Mutational analysis of the three cysteines and active-site aspartic acid 103 of ketosteroid isomerase from Pseudomonas putida biotype B.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S W; Joo, S; Choi, G; Cho, H S; Oh, B H; Choi, K Y

    1997-01-01

    In order to clarify the roles of three cysteines in ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) from Pseudomonas putida biotype B, each of the cysteine residues has been changed to a serine residue (C69S, C81S, and C97S) by site-directed mutagenesis. All cysteine mutations caused only a slight decrease in the k(cat) value, with no significant change of Km for the substrate. Even modification of the sulfhydryl group with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) has almost no effect on enzyme activity. These results demonstrate that none of the cysteines in the KSI from P. putida is critical for catalytic activity, contrary to the previous identification of a cysteine in an active-site-directed photoinactivation study of KSI. Based on the three-dimensional structures of KSIs with and without dienolate intermediate analog equilenin, as determined by X-ray crystallography at high resolution, Asp-103 was found to be located within the range of the hydrogen bond to the equilenin. To assess the role of Asp-103 in catalysis, Asp-103 has been replaced with either asparagine (D103N) or alanine (D103A) by site-directed mutagenesis. For D103A mutant KSI there was a significant decrease in the k(cat) value: the k(cat) of the mutant was 85-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme; however, for the D103N mutant, which retained some hydrogen bonding capability, there was a minor decrease in the k(cat) value. These findings support the idea that aspartic acid 103 in the active site is an essential catalytic residue involved in catalysis by hydrogen bonding to the dienolate intermediate. PMID:9401033

  2. Mutation profiling of adenoid cystic carcinomas from multiple anatomical sites identifies mutations in the RAS pathway, but no KIT mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wetterskog, Daniel; Wilkerson, Paul M; Rodrigues, Daniel N; Lambros, Maryou B; Fritchie, Karen; Andersson, Mattias K; Natrajan, Rachael; Gauthier, Arnaud; Di Palma, Silvana; Shousha, Sami; Gatalica, Zoran; Töpfer, Chantal; Vukovic, Vesna; A’Hern, Roger; Weigelt, Britta; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Stenman, Göran; Rubin, Brian P; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    Aims The majority of adenoid cystic carcinomas (AdCCs), regardless of anatomical site, harbour the MYB–NFIB fusion gene. The aim of this study was to characterize the repertoire of somatic genetic events affecting known cancer genes in AdCCs. Methods and results DNA was extracted from 13 microdissected breast AdCCs, and subjected to a mutation survey using the Sequenom OncoCarta Panel v1.0. Genes found to be mutated in any of the breast AdCCs and genes related to the same canonical molecular pathways, as well as KIT, a proto-oncogene whose protein product is expressed in AdCCs, were sequenced in an additional 68 AdCCs from various anatomical sites by Sanger sequencing. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform and Sanger sequencing, mutations in BRAF and HRAS were identified in three and one cases, respectively (breast, and head and neck). KIT, which has previously been reported to be mutated in AdCCs, was also investigated, but no mutations were identified. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that mutations in genes pertaining to the canonical RAS pathway are found in a minority of AdCCs, and that activating KIT mutations are either absent or remarkably rare in these cancers, and unlikely to constitute a driver and therapeutic target for patients with AdCC. PMID:23398044

  3. Solvent dielectric effect and side chain mutation on the structural stability of Burkholderia cepacia lipase active site: a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics study.

    PubMed

    Tahan, A; Monajjemi, M

    2011-12-01

    Quantum mechanical and molecular dynamics methods were used to analyze the structure and stability of neutral and zwitterionic configurations of the extracted active site sequence from a Burkholderia cepacia lipase, histidyl-seryl-glutamin (His86-Ser87-Gln88) and its mutated form, histidyl-cysteyl-glutamin (His86-Cys87-Gln88) in vacuum and different solvents. The effects of solvent dielectric constant, explicit and implicit water molecules and side chain mutation on the structure and stability of this sequence in both neutral and zwitterionic forms are represented. The quantum mechanics computations represent that the relative stability of zwitterionic and neutral configurations depends on the solvent structure and its dielectric constant. Therefore, in vacuum and the considered non-polar solvents, the neutral form of the interested sequences is more stable than the zwitterionic form, while their zwitterionic form is more stable than the neutral form in the aqueous solution and the investigated polar solvents in most cases. However, on the potential energy surfaces calculated, there is a barrier to proton transfer from the positively charged ammonium group to the negatively charged carboxylat group or from the ammonium group to the adjacent carbonyl oxygen and or from side chain oxygen and sulfur to negatively charged carboxylat group. Molecular dynamics simulations (MD) were also performed by using periodic boundary conditions for the zwitterionic configuration of the hydrated molecules in a box of water molecules. The obtained results demonstrated that the presence of explicit water molecules provides the more compact structures of the studied molecules. These simulations also indicated that side chain mutation and replacement of sulfur with oxygen leads to reduction of molecular flexibility and packing.

  4. Effect of the Active Site D25N Mutation on the Structure, Stability and Ligand Binding of the Mature HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Sayer, Jane M.; Liu, Fengling; Ishima, Rieko; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M.

    2008-09-03

    All aspartic proteases, including retroviral proteases, share the triplet DTG critical for the active site geometry and catalytic function. These residues interact closely in the active, dimeric structure of HIV-1 protease (PR). We have systematically assessed the effect of the D25N mutation on the structure and stability of the mature PR monomer and dimer. The D25N mutation (PR{sub D25N}) increases the equilibrium dimer dissociation constant by a factor >100-fold (1.3 {+-} 0.09 {mu}m) relative to PR. In the absence of inhibitor, NMR studies reveal clear structural differences between PR and PR{sub D25N} in the relatively mobile P1 loop (residues 79-83) and flap regions, and differential scanning calorimetric analyses show that the mutation lowers the stabilities of both the monomer and dimer folds by 5 and 7.3 C, respectively. Only minimal differences are observed in high resolution crystal structures of PR{sub D25N} complexed to darunavir (DRV), a potent clinical inhibitor, or a non-hydrolyzable substrate analogue, Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle-r-Nle-Gln-Arg-NH{sub 2} (RPB), as compared with PR{center_dot}DRV and PR{center_dot}RPB complexes. Although complexation with RPB stabilizes both dimers, the effect on their T{sub m} is smaller for PR{sub D25N} (6.2 C) than for PR (8.7 C). The T{sub m} of PR{sub D25N}{center_dot}DRV increases by only 3 C relative to free PR{sub D25N}, as compared with a 22 C increase for PR{center_dot}DRV, and the mutation increases the ligand dissociation constant of PR{sub D25N}{center_dot}DRV by a factor of {approx}10{sup 6} relative to PR{center_dot}DRV. These results suggest that interactions mediated by the catalytic Asp residues make a major contribution to the tight binding of DRV to PR.

  5. In crystallo activity tests with latent apple tyrosinase and two mutants reveal the importance of the mutated sites for polyphenol oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Kampatsikas, Ioannis; Bijelic, Aleksandar; Pretzler, Matthias; Rompel, Annette

    2017-08-01

    Tyrosinases are type 3 copper enzymes that belong to the polyphenol oxidase (PPO) family and are able to catalyze both the ortho-hydroxylation of monophenols and their subsequent oxidation to o-quinones, which are precursors for the biosynthesis of colouring substances such as melanin. The first plant pro-tyrosinase from Malus domestica (MdPPO1) was recombinantly expressed in its latent form (56.4 kDa) and mutated at four positions around the catalytic pocket which are believed to influence the activity of the enzyme. Mutating the amino acids, which are known as activity controllers, yielded the mutants MdPPO1-Ala239Thr and MdPPO1-Leu243Arg, whereas mutation of the so-called water-keeper and gatekeeper residues resulted in the mutants MdPPO1-Glu234Ala and MdPPO1-Phe259Ala, respectively. The wild-type enzyme and two of the mutants, MdPPO1-Ala239Thr and MdPPO1-Phe259Ala, were successfully crystallized, leading to single crystals that diffracted to 1.35, 1.55 and 1.70 Å resolution, respectively. All crystals belonged to space group P212121, exhibiting similar unit-cell parameters: a = 50.70, b = 80.15, c = 115.96 Å for the wild type, a = 50.58, b = 79.90, c = 115.76 Å for MdPPO1-Ala239Thr and a = 50.53, b = 79.76, c = 116.07 Å for MdPPO1-Phe259Ala. In crystallo activity tests with the crystals of the wild type and the two mutants were performed by adding the monophenolic substrate tyramine and the diphenolic substrate dopamine to crystal-containing drops. The effects of the mutation on the activity of the enzyme were observed by colour changes of the crystals owing to the conversion of the substrates to dark chromophore products.

  6. The Startle Disease Mutation E103K Impairs Activation of Human Homomeric α1 Glycine Receptors by Disrupting an Intersubunit Salt Bridge across the Agonist Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Safar, Fatemah; Hurdiss, Elliot; Erotocritou, Marios; Greiner, Timo; Irvine, Mark W.; Fang, Guangyu; Jane, David; Yu, Rilei; Dämgen, Marc A.

    2017-01-01

    Glycine receptors (GlyR) belong to the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) superfamily and mediate fast inhibitory transmission in the vertebrate CNS. Disruption of glycinergic transmission by inherited mutations produces startle disease in man. Many startle mutations are in GlyRs and provide useful clues to the function of the channel domains. E103K is one of few startle mutations found in the extracellular agonist binding site of the channel, in loop A of the principal side of the subunit interface. Homology modeling shows that the side chain of Glu-103 is close to that of Arg-131, in loop E of the complementary side of the binding site, and may form a salt bridge at the back of the binding site, constraining its size. We investigated this hypothesis in recombinant human α1 GlyR by site-directed mutagenesis and functional measurements of agonist efficacy and potency by whole cell patch clamp and single channel recording. Despite its position near the binding site, E103K causes hyperekplexia by impairing the efficacy of glycine, its ability to gate the channel once bound, which is very high in wild type GlyR. Mutating Glu-103 and Arg-131 caused various degrees of loss-of-function in the action of glycine, whereas mutations in Arg-131 enhanced the efficacy of the slightly bigger partial agonist sarcosine (N-methylglycine). The effects of the single charge-swapping mutations of these two residues were largely rescued in the double mutant, supporting the possibility that they interact via a salt bridge that normally constrains the efficacy of larger agonist molecules. PMID:28174298

  7. The Synonymous Ala87 Mutation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha Modifies Transcriptional Activation Through Both ERE and AP1 Sites.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Flouriot, Gilles; Marín, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) exerts regulatory actions through genomic mechanisms. In the classical pathway, ligand-activated ERα binds directly to DNA through estrogen response elements (ERE) located in the promoter of target genes. ERα can also exert indirect regulation of transcription via protein-protein interaction with other transcription factors such as AP-1.S everal ERα synonymous polymorphisms have been identified and efforts to understand their implications have been made. Nevertheless effects of synonymous polymorphisms are still neglected. This chapter focuses on the experimental procedure employed in order to characterize the transcriptional activity of a synonymous polymorphism of the ERα (rs746432) called Alanine 87 (Ala87). Activity of both WT and Ala87 ERα isoforms on transcriptional pathways can be analyzed in transiently transfected cells using different reporter constructs. ERα efficiency on the classical genomic pathway can be analyzed by determining its transactivation activity on an ERE-driven thymidine kinase (TK) promoter controlling the expression of the luciferase reporter gene. Transcriptional activity through the indirect genomic pathway can be analyzed by employing an AP-1 DNA response element-driven promoter also controlling the expression of luciferase reporter gene.

  8. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  9. Functional effects of diphosphomimetic mutations at cAbl-mediated phosphorylation sites on Rad51 recombinase activity.

    PubMed

    Alligand, Brendan; Le Breton, Magali; Marquis, Damien; Vallette, François; Fleury, Fabrice

    2017-08-01

    Homologous Recombination enables faithful repair of the deleterious double strand breaks of DNA. This pathway relies on Rad51 to catalyze homologous DNA strand exchange. Rad51 is known to be phosphorylated in a sequential manner on Y315 and then on Y54, but the effect of such phosphorylation on Rad51 function remains poorly understood. We have developed a phosphomimetic model in order to study all the phosphorylation states. With the purified phosphomimetic proteins we performed in vitro assays to determine the activity of Rad51. Here we demonstrate the inhibitory effect of the double phosphomimetic mutant and suggest that it may be due to a defect in nucleofilament formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  10. Functional impact of HIV coreceptor-binding site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Biscone, Mark J.; Miamidian, John L.; Muchiri, John M.; Baik, Sarah S.W.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Reeves, Jacqueline D. . E-mail: jreeves@MonogramBio.com

    2006-07-20

    The bridging sheet region of the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 Env protein interacts with the major virus coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. We examined the impact of mutations in and adjacent to the bridging sheet region of an X4 tropic HIV-1 on membrane fusion and entry inhibitor susceptibility. When the V3-loop of this Env was changed so that CCR5 was used, the effects of these same mutations on CCR5 use were assayed as well. We found that coreceptor-binding site mutations had greater effects on CXCR4-mediated fusion and infection than when CCR5 was used as a coreceptor, perhaps related to differences in coreceptor affinity. The mutations also reduced use of the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and CCR8 to varying degrees, indicating that the bridging sheet region is important for the efficient utilization of both major and minor HIV coreceptors. As seen before with a primary R5 virus strain, bridging sheet mutations increased susceptibility to the CCR5 inhibitor TAK-779, which correlated with CCR5 binding efficiency. Bridging sheet mutations also conferred increased susceptibility to the CXCR4 ligand AMD-3100 in the context of the X4 tropic Env. However, these mutations had little effect on the rate of membrane fusion and little effect on susceptibility to enfuvirtide, a membrane fusion inhibitor whose activity is dependent in part on the rate of Env-mediated membrane fusion. Thus, mutations that reduce coreceptor binding and enhance susceptibility to coreceptor inhibitors can affect fusion and enfuvirtide susceptibility in an Env context-dependent manner.

  11. A Single Mutation in a Tunnel to the Active Site Changes the Mechanism and Kinetics of Product Release in Haloalkane Dehalogenase LinB*

    PubMed Central

    Biedermannová, Lada; Prokop, Zbyněk; Gora, Artur; Chovancová, Eva; Kovács, Mihály; Damborský, Jiří; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2012-01-01

    Many enzymes have buried active sites. The properties of the tunnels connecting the active site with bulk solvent affect ligand binding and unbinding and also the catalytic properties. Here, we investigate ligand passage in the haloalkane dehalogenase enzyme LinB and the effect of replacing leucine by a bulky tryptophan at a tunnel-lining position. Transient kinetic experiments show that the mutation significantly slows down the rate of product release. Moreover, the mechanism of bromide ion release is changed from a one-step process in the wild type enzyme to a two-step process in the mutant. The rate constant of bromide ion release corresponds to the overall steady-state turnover rate constant, suggesting that product release became the rate-limiting step of catalysis in the mutant. We explain the experimental findings by investigating the molecular details of the process computationally. Analysis of trajectories from molecular dynamics simulations with a tunnel detection software reveals differences in the tunnels available for ligand egress. Corresponding differences are seen in simulations of product egress using a specialized enhanced sampling technique. The differences in the free energy barriers for egress of a bromide ion obtained using potential of mean force calculations are in good agreement with the differences in rates obtained from the transient kinetic experiments. Interactions of the bromide ion with the introduced tryptophan are shown to affect the free energy barrier for its passage. The study demonstrates how the mechanism of an enzymatic catalytic cycle and reaction kinetics can be engineered by modification of protein tunnels. PMID:22745119

  12. Localization of the serine protease-binding sites in the collagen-like domain of mannose-binding protein: indirect effects of naturally occurring mutations on protease binding and activation.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Russell; Shaw, Jonathan M; Uitdehaag, Joost; Chen, Ce-Belle; Torgersen, Dawn; Drickamer, Kurt

    2004-04-02

    Mutations in the collagen-like domain of serum mannose-binding protein (MBP) interfere with the ability of the protein to initiate complement fixation through the MBP-associated serine proteases (MASPs). The resulting deficiency in the innate immune response leads to susceptibility to infections. Studies have been undertaken to define the region of MBP that interacts with MASPs and to determine how the naturally occurring mutations affect this interaction. Truncated and modified MBPs and synthetic peptides that represent segments of the collagen-like domain of MBP have been used to demonstrate that MASPs bind on the C-terminal side of the hinge region formed by an interruption in the Gly-X-Y repeat pattern of the collagen-like domain. The binding sites for MASP-2 and for MASP-1 and -3 overlap but are not identical. The two most common naturally occurring mutations in MBP result in substitution of acidic amino acids for glycine residues in Gly-X-Y triplets on the N-terminal side of the hinge. Circular dichroism analysis and differential scanning calorimetry demonstrate that the triple helical structure of the collagen-like domain is largely intact in the mutant proteins, but it is more easily unfolded than in wild-type MBP. Thus, the effect of the mutations is to destabilize the collagen-like domain, indirectly disrupting the binding sites for MASPs. In addition, at least one of the mutations has a further effect on the ability of MBP to activate MASPs.

  13. Mutations in exons 10 and 11 of human glucokinase result in conformational variations in the active site of the structure contributing to poor substrate binding - explains hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Yellapu, Nandakumar; Mahto, Manoj Kumar; Valasani, Koteswara Rao; Sarma, P V G K; Matcha, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the glucokinase (GK) gene play a critical role in the establishment of type 2 diabetes. In our earlier study, R308K mutation in GK in a clinically proven type 2 diabetic patient showed, structural and functional variations that contributed immensely to the hyperglycemic condition. In the extension of this work, a cohort of 30 patients with established type 2 diabetic condition were chosen and the exons 10 and 11 of GK were PCR-amplified and sequenced. The sequence alignment showed A379S, D400Y, E300A, E395A, E395G, H380N, I348N, L301M, M298I, M381G, M402R, R308K, R394P, R397S, and S398R mutations in 12 different patients. The structural analysis of these mutated GKs, showed a variable number of β-α-β units, hairpins, β-bulges, strands, helices, helix-helix interactions, β-turns, and γ-turns along with the RMSD variations when compared to wild-type GK. Molecular modeling studies revealed that the substrate showed variable binding orientations and could not fit into the active site of these mutated structures; moreover, it was expelled out of the conformations. Therefore, these structural variations in GK due to mutations could be one of the strongest reasons for the hyperglycemic levels in these type 2 diabetic patients.

  14. Autosomal recessive hyponatremia due to isolated salt wasting in sweat associated with a mutation in the active site of Carbonic Anhydrase 12.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Emad; Leventhal, Neta; Parvari, Galit; Hanukoglu, Aaron; Hanukoglu, Israel; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Feinstein, Yael; Weinbrand, Jenny; Jacoby, Harel; Manor, Esther; Nagar, Tal; Beck, John C; Sheffield, Val C; Hershkovitz, Eli; Parvari, Ruti

    2011-04-01

    Genetic disorders of excessive salt loss from sweat glands have been observed in pseudohypoaldosteronism type I (PHA) and cystic fibrosis that result from mutations in genes encoding epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) subunits and the transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), respectively. We identified a novel autosomal recessive form of isolated salt wasting in sweat, which leads to severe infantile hyponatremic dehydration. Three affected individuals from a small Bedouin clan presented with failure to thrive, hyponatremic dehydration and hyperkalemia with isolated sweat salt wasting. Using positional cloning, we identified the association of a Glu143Lys mutation in carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12) with the disease. Carbonic anhydrase is a zinc metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide to form a bicarbonate anion and a proton. Glu143 in CA12 is essential for zinc coordination in this metalloenzyme and lowering of the protein-metal affinity reduces its catalytic activity. This is the first presentation of an isolated loss of salt from sweat gland mimicking PHA, associated with a mutation in the CA12 gene not previously implicated in human disorders. Our data demonstrate the importance of bicarbonate anion and proton production on salt concentration in sweat and its significance for sodium homeostasis.

  15. Deep Sequencing of Random Mutant Libraries Reveals the Active Site of the Narrow Specificity CphA Metallo-β-Lactamase is Fragile to Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhizeng; Mehta, Shrenik C.; Adamski, Carolyn J.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    CphA is a Zn2+-dependent metallo-β-lactamase that efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenem antibiotics. To understand the sequence requirements for CphA function, single codon random mutant libraries were constructed for residues in and near the active site and mutants were selected for E. coli growth on increasing concentrations of imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. At high concentrations of imipenem that select for phenotypically wild-type mutants, the active-site residues exhibit stringent sequence requirements in that nearly all residues in positions that contact zinc, the substrate, or the catalytic water do not tolerate amino acid substitutions. In addition, at high imipenem concentrations a number of residues that do not directly contact zinc or substrate are also essential and do not tolerate substitutions. Biochemical analysis confirmed that amino acid substitutions at essential positions decreased the stability or catalytic activity of the CphA enzyme. Therefore, the CphA active - site is fragile to substitutions, suggesting active-site residues are optimized for imipenem hydrolysis. These results also suggest that resistance to inhibitors targeted to the CphA active site would be slow to develop because of the strong sequence constraints on function. PMID:27616327

  16. The roles of active-site residues in the catalytic mechanism of trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase: a kinetic, NMR, and mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Azurmendi, Hugo F; Wang, Susan C; Massiah, Michael A; Poelarends, Gerrit J; Whitman, Christian P; Mildvan, Albert S

    2004-04-13

    trans-3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD) converts trans-3-chloroacrylic acid to malonate semialdehyde by the addition of H(2)O to the C-2, C-3 double bond, followed by the loss of HCl from the C-3 position. Sequence similarity between CaaD, an (alphabeta)(3) heterohexamer (molecular weight 47,547), and 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), an (alpha)(6) homohexamer, distinguishes CaaD from those hydrolytic dehalogenases that form alkyl-enzyme intermediates. The recently solved X-ray structure of CaaD demonstrates that betaPro-1 (i.e., Pro-1 of the beta subunit), alphaArg-8, alphaArg-11, and alphaGlu-52 are at or near the active site, and the >or=10(3.4)-fold decreases in k(cat) on mutating these residues implicate them as mechanistically important. The effect of pH on k(cat)/K(m) indicates a catalytic base with a pK(a) of 7.6 and an acid with a pK(a) of 9.2. NMR titration of (15)N-labeled wild-type CaaD yielded pK(a) values of 9.3 and 11.1 for the N-terminal prolines, while the fully active but unstable alphaP1A mutant showed a pK(a) of 9.7 (for the betaPro-1), implicating betaPro-1 as the acid catalyst, which may protonate C-2 of the substrate. These results provide the first evidence for an amino-terminal proline, conserved in all known tautomerase superfamily members, functioning as a general acid, rather than as a general base as in 4-OT. Hence, a reasonable candidate for the general base in CaaD is the active site residue alphaGlu-52. CaaD has 10 arginine residues, six in the alpha-subunit (Arg-8, Arg-11, Arg-17, Arg-25, Arg-35, and Arg-43), and four in the beta-subunit (Arg-15, Arg-21, Arg-55, and Arg-65). (1)H-(15)N-heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra of CaaD showed seven to nine Arg-NepsilonH resonances (denoted R(A) to R(I)) depending on the protein concentration and pH. One of these signals (R(D)) disappeared in the spectrum of the largely inactive alphaR11A mutant (deltaH = 7.11 ppm, deltaN = 89.5 ppm), and another one (R

  17. List 9 - Active CERCLIS Sites:

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The List 9 displays the sequence of activities undertaken at active CERCLIS sites. An active site is one at which site assessment, removal, remedial, enforcement, cost recovery, or oversight activities are being planned or conducted.

  18. MD simulations of anthrax edema factor: calmodulin complexes with mutations in the edema factor "switch a" region and docking of 3'-deoxy ATP into the adenylyl cyclase active site of wild-type and mutant edema factor variants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingyan; Roy, Stephanie A; Nelson, Donald J

    2003-10-01

    Bacillus anthracis, a spore-forming infectious bacterium, produces an exotoxin, called the edema factor (EF), that functions in part by disrupting internal signalling pathways. When complexed with human host cell calmodulin (CaM), EF becomes an active adenylyl cyclase, producing the internal signal substance cyclic-AMP in an uncontrolled fashion. Recently, the crystal structures for uncomplexed EF and EF:CaM complexes in the presence and absence of a substrate analog (3'-deoxy-ATP), were reported. EF mutational studies have implicated a number of residues important in CaM binding and/or in the generation of the adenylyl cyclase active site, formed by the movements of the EF switch A, B and C regions upon CaM binding. Here we report on the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on two EF:CaM complexes, one containing wild-type EF and the other containing EF in which a cluster of residues in the switch A region (L523, K525, Q526 and V529) have been mutated to alanine. The switch A mutations cause a large increase in the flexibility of the switch C region, the rupture of a number of EF-CaM interactions, an expansion of the carboxyl-terminal domain of CaM, and a change in the Ca(2+) ion binding abilities of the CaM that is in complex with EF. The results indicate the importance of the mutated switch A residues in maintaining a compact EF:CaM complex that appears to be a prerequisite for the generation of a fully-functional adenylyl cyclase active site. The effects of mutating key residues (K346, K353, H577, E588, D590 and N639) in the active site region of EF (to alanine) on the ability of EF to bind the 3'-deoxy-ATP substrate analog were also examined. Active-site residue substitutions at positions 583 (N583A) and 577 (H577A) were found to be particularly disruptive for the placement of the adenine ring moiety into the position found in the x-ray crystal structure of the ligand-protein complex.

  19. A single mutation in the hepta-peptide active site of Aspergillus niger PhyA phytase leads to myriad of biochemical changes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The active site motif of proteins belonging to ‘Histidine Acid Phosphatase’ (HAP) contains a hepta-peptide region, RHGXRXP. A close comparison among fungal and yeast HAPs has revealed the fourth residue of the hepta-peptide to be E instead of A, which is the case with A. niger phyA phytase. However,...

  20. Human DNA polymerase beta mutations allowing efficient abasic site bypass.

    PubMed

    Gieseking, Sonja; Bergen, Konrad; Di Pasquale, Francesca; Diederichs, Kay; Welte, Wolfram; Marx, Andreas

    2011-02-04

    The DNA of every cell in the human body gets damaged more than 50,000 times a day. The most frequent damages are abasic sites. This kind of damage blocks proceeding DNA synthesis by several DNA polymerases that are involved in DNA replication and repair. The mechanistic basis for the incapability of these DNA polymerases to bypass abasic sites is not clarified. To gain insights into the mechanistic basis, we intended to identify amino acid residues that govern for the pausing of DNA polymerase β when incorporating a nucleotide opposite to abasic sites. Human DNA polymerase β was chosen because it is a well characterized DNA polymerase and serves as model enzyme for studies of DNA polymerase mechanisms. Moreover, it acts as the main gap-filling enzyme in base excision repair, and human tumor studies suggest a link between DNA polymerase β and cancer. In this study we employed high throughput screening of a library of more than 11,000 human DNA polymerase β variants. We identified two mutants that have increased ability to incorporate a nucleotide opposite to an abasic site. We found that the substitutions E232K and T233I promote incorporation opposite the lesion. In addition to this feature, the variants have an increased activity and a lower fidelity when processing nondamaged DNA. The mutations described in this work are located in well characterized regions but have not been reported before. A crystallographic structure of one of the mutants was obtained, providing structural insights.

  1. Tryptophanase from Proteus vulgaris: the conformational rearrangement in the active site, induced by the mutation of Tyrosine 72 to phenylalanine, and its mechanistic consequences.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Vitalia V; Zakomirdina, Ludmila N; Dementieva, Irene S; Phillips, Robert S; Gollnick, Paul D; Demidkina, Tatyana V; Faleev, Nicolai G

    2006-04-01

    Tyr72 is located at the active site of tryptophanase (Trpase) from Proteus vulgaris. For the wild-type Trpase Tyr72 might be considered as the general acid catalyst at the stage of elimination of the leaving groups. The replacement of Tyr72 by Phe leads to a decrease in activity for L-tryptophan by 50,000-fold and to a considerable rearrangement of the active site of Trpase. This rearrangement leads to an increase of room around the alpha-C atom of any bound amino acid, such that covalent binding of alpha-methyl-substituted amino acids becomes possible (which cannot be realized in wild-type Trpase). The changes in reactivities of S-alkyl-L-cysteines provide evidence for an increase of congestion in the proximity of their side groups in the mutant enzyme as compared to wild-type enzyme. The observed alteration of catalytic properties in a large degree originates from a conformational change in the active site. The Y72F Trpase retains significant activity for L-serine, which allowed us to conclude that in the mutant enzyme, some functional group is present which fulfills the role of the general acid catalyst in reactions associated with elimination of small leaving groups.

  2. Mutation of serum response factor phosphorylation sites and the mechanism by which its DNA-binding activity is increased by casein kinase II.

    PubMed Central

    Manak, J R; Prywes, R

    1991-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) phosphorylates the mammalian transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) on a serine residue(s) located within a region of the protein spanning amino acids 70 to 92, thereby enhancing its DNA-binding activity in vitro. We report here that serine 83 appears to be the residue phosphorylated by CKII but that three other serines in this region can also be involved in phosphorylation and the enhancement of DNA-binding activity. A mutant that contained glutamate residues in place of these serines had only low-level binding activity; however, when the serines were replaced with glutamates and further mutations were made that increased the negative charge of the region, the resulting mutant showed a constitutively high level of binding equal to that achieved by phosphorylation of wild-type SRF. We have investigated the mechanism by which phosphorylation of SRF increases its DNA-binding activity. We have ruled out the possibilities that phosphorylation affects SRF dimerization or relieves inhibition due to masking of the DNA-binding domain by an amino-terminal region of the protein. Rather, using partial proteolysis to probe SRF's structure, we find that the conformation of SRF's DNA-binding domain is altered by phosphorylation. Images PMID:2046671

  3. Esophageal melanomas harbor frequent NRAS mutations unlike melanomas of other mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Yukihiro; Ogawa, Reiko; Kouda, Satoko; Kanai, Yae

    2009-05-01

    Mucosal melanomas have genetic alterations distinct from those in cutaneous melanomas. For example, NRAS- and BRAF-activating mutations occur frequently in cutaneous melanomas, but not in mucosal melanomas. We examined 16 esophageal melanomas for genetic alterations in NRAS, BRAF, and KIT to determine whether they exhibit genetic features common to melanomas arising from other mucosal sites. A sequencing analysis identified NRAS mutations in six cases; notably, four of these mutations were located in exon 1, an uncommon mutation site in cutaneous and other mucosal melanomas. BRAF and KIT mutations were found in one case each. Immunohistochemistry showed KIT expression in four cases, including the tumor with a KIT mutation and two other intramucosal tumors. The low frequency of BRAF mutations and the presence of a KIT mutation-positive case are findings similar to those of mucosal melanomas of other sites, but the prevalence of NRAS mutations was even higher than that of cutaneous melanomas. The present study implies that esophageal melanomas have genetic alterations unique from those observed in other mucosal melanomas.

  4. Frequent PIK3CA-activating mutations in hidradenoma papilliferums.

    PubMed

    Liau, Jau-Yu; Lan, Jui; Hong, Jin-Bon; Tsai, Jia-Huei; Kuo, Kuan-Tin; Chu, Chia-Yu; Sheen, Yi-Shuan; Huang, Wen-Chang

    2016-09-01

    Hidradenoma papilliferum (HP) is a benign epithelial tumor most commonly seen in the vulva. It is proposed to be derived from the anogenital mammary-like glands and is histologically very similar to the mammary intraductal papilloma (IP). Approximately 60% of mammary IPs have activating mutations in either PIK3CA or AKT1, with each gene accounting for 30% of cases. In this study, we screened the mutation statuses of PIK3CA, AKT1, RAS, and BRAF in 30 HPs. The results showed that activating mutations in either PIK3CA or AKT1 were identified in 20 tumors (67%); 19 tumors had PIK3CA mutations (63%; 13 in exon 20 and 6 in exon 9), and 1 had an AKT1 E17K mutation (3%). BRAF V600E mutation was found in an HP that also had a PIK3CA H1047R mutation. No RAS mutation was found. The mutation status was not correlated with the degree of epithelial cell hyperplasia. We conclude that although there might be site-related variations in the mutation frequencies of PIK3CA and AKT1 genes, HP is histologically and also genetically very similar to the mammary IP, suggesting that HP can be viewed as the extramammary counterpart of mammary IP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Androgen receptor exon 1 mutation causes androgen insensitivity by creating phosphorylation site and inhibiting melanoma antigen-A11 activation of NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction-dependent transactivation.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, William H; Blackwelder, Amanda J; Minges, John T; Hnat, Andrew T; French, Frank S; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2012-03-30

    Naturally occurring germ line mutations in the X-linked human androgen receptor (AR) gene cause incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia by disrupting AR function in males with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Almost all AR missense mutations that cause androgen insensitivity syndrome are located in the highly structured DNA and ligand binding domains. In this report we investigate the functional defect associated with an AR exon 1 missense mutation, R405S, that caused partial androgen insensitivity. The 46,XX heterozygous maternal carrier had a wild-type Arg-405 CGC allele but transmitted an AGC mutant allele coding for Ser-405. At birth, the 46,XY proband had a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and micropenis consistent with clinical stage 3 partial androgen insensitivity. Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity of AR-R405S expressed in CV1 cells was less than wild-type AR and refractory in androgen-dependent AR NH(2)- and carboxyl interaction transcription assays that depend on the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11. This mutation created a Ser-405 phosphorylation site evident by the gel migration of an AR-R405S NH(2)-terminal fragment as a double band that converted to the wild-type single band after treatment with λ-phosphatase. Detrimental effects of the R405S mutation were related to the proximity of the AR WXXLF motif (433)WHTLF(437) required for melanoma antigen-A11 and p300 to stimulate transcriptional activity associated with the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction. We conclude that the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11 on the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction amplify the androgen-dependent transcriptional response to p300 required for normal human male sex development in utero.

  6. ImiRP: a computational approach to microRNA target site mutation.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Bridget C; Werner, Torben S; Howard, Perry L; Chow, Robert L

    2016-04-27

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small ~22 nucleotide non-coding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators of messenger RNA (mRNA) through base-pairing to 6-8 nucleotide long target sites, usually located within the mRNA 3' untranslated region. A common approach to validate and probe microRNA-mRNA interactions is to mutate predicted target sites within the mRNA and determine whether it affects miRNA-mediated activity. The introduction of miRNA target site mutations, however, is potentially problematic as it may generate new, "illegitimate sites" target sites for other miRNAs, which may affect the experimental outcome. While it is possible to manually generate and check single miRNA target site mutations, this process can be time consuming, and becomes particularly onerous and error prone when multiple sites are to be mutated simultaneously. We have developed a modular Java-based system called ImiRP (Illegitimate miRNA Predictor) to solve this problem and to facilitate miRNA target site mutagenesis. The ImiRP interface allows users to input a sequence of interest, specify the locations of multiple predicted target sites to mutate, and set parameters such as species, mutation strategy, and disallowed illegitimate target site types. As mutant sequences are generated, ImiRP utilizes the miRBase high confidence miRNA dataset to identify illegitimate target sites in each mutant sequence by comparing target site predictions between input and mutant sequences. ImiRP then assembles a final mutant sequence in which all specified target sites have been mutated. ImiRP is a mutation generator program that enables selective disruption of specified miRNA target sites while ensuring predicted target sites for other miRNAs are not inadvertently created. ImiRP supports mutagenesis of single and multiple miRNA target sites within a given sequence, including sites that overlap. This software will be particularly useful for studies looking at microRNA cooperativity, where mutagenesis

  7. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    PubMed

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  8. MUTATION OF THE ACTIVE SITE CARBOXY-LYSINE (K70) OF OXA-1 β-LACTAMASE RESULTS IN A DEACYLATION-DEFICIENT ENZYME†

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Kyle D.; Bethel, Christopher R.; Distler, Anne M.; Hujer, Andrea M.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Leonard, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Class D β-lactamases hydrolyze β-lactam antibiotics by using an active site serine nucleophile to form a covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate, and subsequently employ water to deacylate the β-lactam and release product. Class D β-lactamases are carboxylated on the ε-amino group of an active site lysine, with the resulting carbamate functional group serving as a general base. We discovered that substitutions of the active site serine and lysine in OXA-1 β-lactamase, a monomeric class D enzyme, significantly disrupt catalytic turnover. Substitution of glycine for the nucleophilic serine (S67G) results in an enzyme that can still bind substrate but is unable to form a covalent acyl-enzyme intermediate. Substitution of the carboxylated lysine (K70), on the other hand, results in enzyme that can be acylated by substrate, but is impaired for deacylation. We employed the fluorescent penicillin BOCILLIN FL™ to show that three different substitutions for K70 (alanine, aspartate and glutamate) accumulate significant acyl-enzyme intermediate. Interestingly, BOCILLIN FL™ deacylation rates vary depending on the identity of the substituting residue, from t1/2 ≈ 60 min for K70A to undetectable deacylation for K70D. Tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy was used to confirm that these results are applicable to natural (i.e. non-fluorescent) substrates. Deacylation by K70A, but not K70D or K70E, can be partially restored by the addition of short-chain carboxylic acid mimetics of the lysine carbamate. In conclusion, we establish the functional role of the carboxylated lysine in OXA-1 and highlight its specific role in acylation and deacylation. PMID:19485421

  9. Mutations and Binding Sites of Human Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Schaefer, Ulf; Jankovic, Boris R.; Archer, John A. C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, “insertions” are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. PMID:22670148

  10. Active-Site Engineering of Benzaldehyde Lyase Shows That a Point Mutation Can Confer Both New Reactivity and Susceptibility to Mechanism-Based Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar; McLeish, Michael J.

    2010-02-11

    Benzaldehyde lyase (BAL) from Pseudomonas putida is a thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of (R)-benzoin. Here we report that a point mutant, BAL A28S, not only catalyzes the decarboxylation of benzoylformate but, like benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC), is also inactivated by the benzoylformate analogues methyl benzoylphosphonate (MBP) and benzoylphosphonate (BP). The latter has no effect on wild-type BAL, and the inactivation of the A28S variant is shown to result from phosphorylation of the newly introduced serine residue. This lends support to the proposal that an appropriately placed nucleophile facilitates the expulsion of carbon dioxide from the active site in many ThDP-dependent decarboxylases.

  11. Neurocognitive Profiles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Gene Mutation Site

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Magri, Francesca; Del Bo, Roberto; Guglieri, Michela; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nonprogressive cognitive impairment is recognized as a common feature in a substantial proportion of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To investigate the possible role of mutations along the dystrophin gene affecting different brain dystrophin isoforms and specific cognitive profiles, 42 school-age children affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, subdivided according to sites of mutations along the dystrophin gene, underwent a battery of tests tapping a wide range of intellectual, linguistic, and neuropsychologic functions. Full-scale intelligence quotient was approximately 1 S.D. below the population average in the whole group of dystrophic children. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the distal portion of the dystrophin gene (involving the 140-kDa brain protein isoform, called Dp140) were generally more severely affected and expressed different patterns of strengths and impairments, compared with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the proximal portion of the dystrophin gene (not involving Dp140). Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and distal mutations demonstrated specific impairments in visuospatial functions and visual memory (which seemed intact in proximally mutated patients) and greater impairment in syntactic processing. PMID:22000308

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of the T4 endonuclease V gene: Mutations which enhance enzyme specific activity at low salt concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.S.; Augustine, M.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Previous structure/function analyses of the DNA repair enzyme, T4 endonuclease V, have suggested that the extreme carboxyl portion of the enzyme is associated with pyrimidine dimer-specific binding. Within the final 11 amino acids there are 5 aromatic, 2 basic, and no acidic residues and it has been proposed that these residues stack with and electrostatically interact with the kinked DNA at the site of a pyrimidine dimer. The role of the tyrosine residue at position 129 has been investigated by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis in which the codon for Tyr-129 has been altered to reflect conservative changes of Trp and Phe and more dramatic changes of Ser, a stop codon, deletion of the codon or introduction of a frameshift. Both changes to the aromatic amino acids resulted in proteins which accumulated well in E. coli and not only significantly enhanced the UV survival of repair-deficient cells but also complemented a defective denV gene within UV-irradiated T4 phage. Partially purified preparations of the Tyr-129----Trp and Tyr-129----Phe mutants were assayed for their ability to processively incise UV-irradiated plasmid DNA (a nicking reaction carried out at low 25 mM salt concentrations). The mutant enzymes Tyr-129----Phe and Tyr-129----Trp displayed a 1000% and 500% enhanced specific nicking activity, respectively. These reactions were also shown to be completely processive. Assays performed at higher (100 mM) salt concentrations reduced the specific activities of the mutant enzymes approximately to that of wild type for the Tyr-129----Phe mutant and to 20% that of wild type for the Tyr-129----Trp mutant.

  13. Activating GNAS mutations in parosteal osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Carter, Jodi M; Inwards, Carrie Y; Jin, Long; Evers, Barbara; Wenger, Doris E; Oliveira, Andre M; Fritchie, Karen J

    2014-03-01

    Parosteal osteosarcoma is a surface-based osteosarcoma that often exhibits deceptively bland cytologic features, hindering diagnosis in small biopsies or when correlative radiologic imaging is not readily available. A number of benign and malignant fibro-osseous lesions, including fibrous dysplasia (FD) and low-grade central osteosarcoma, fall within the morphologic differential diagnosis of parosteal osteosarcoma. Somatic mutations in GNAS, encoding the α-subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein complex (Gsα), occur in FD and McCune-Albright syndrome but have not been reported in parosteal osteosarcoma. We evaluated GNAS mutational status in parosteal osteosarcoma and several of its histologic mimics to determine its utility in differentiating these entities. Eleven of 14 (79%) FD cases had GNAS mutations within codon 201 (5 R201C and 6 R201H mutations). GNAS mutations were not detected in any cases of adamantinoma or osteofibrous dysplasia. Direct sequencing of 9 parosteal osteosarcomas, including 3 of low grade and 6 with dedifferentiation, revealed activating GNAS mutations in 5 cases (55%), distributed as 4 R201C-mutated tumors and 1 tumor with an R201H mutation. GNAS codon 227 mutations were not detected in any of the cases. There was no association between GNAS mutational status and patient demographics, histologic dedifferentiation, or clinical outcome. To our knowledge, we report the first series of parosteal osteosarcomas harboring activating GNAS mutations. Our data suggest that GNAS mutational status may have limited utility as an ancillary technique in differentiating benign and malignant fibro-osseous lesions of the bone.

  14. Active Site Mutations as a Suitable Tool Contributing to Explain a Mechanism of Aristolochic Acid I Nitroreduction by Cytochromes P450 1A1, 1A2 and 1B1

    PubMed Central

    Milichovský, Jan; Bárta, František; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Frei, Eva; Stiborová, Marie; Martínek, Václav

    2016-01-01

    Aristolochic acid I (AAI) is a plant drug found in Aristolochia species that causes aristolochic acid nephropathy, Balkan endemic nephropathy and their associated urothelial malignancies. AAI is activated via nitroreduction producing genotoxic N-hydroxyaristolactam, which forms DNA adducts. The major enzymes responsible for the reductive bioactivation of AAI are NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase and cytochromes P450 (CYP) 1A1 and 1A2. Using site-directed mutagenesis we investigated the possible mechanisms of CYP1A1/1A2/1B1-catalyzed AAI nitroreduction. Molecular modelling predicted that the hydroxyl groups of serine122/threonine124 (Ser122/Thr124) amino acids in the CYP1A1/1A2-AAI binary complexes located near to the nitro group of AAI, are mechanistically important as they provide the proton required for the stepwise reduction reaction. In contrast, the closely related CYP1B1 with no hydroxyl group containing residues in its active site is ineffective in catalyzing AAI nitroreduction. In order to construct an experimental model, mutant forms of CYP1A1 and 1A2 were prepared, where Ser122 and Thr124 were replaced by Ala (CYP1A1-S122A) and Val (CYP1A2-T124V), respectively. Similarly, a CYP1B1 mutant was prepared in which Ala133 was replaced by Ser (CYP1B1-A133S). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed using a quickchange approach. Wild and mutated forms of these enzymes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and isolated enzymes characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy to verify correct protein folding. Their catalytic activity was confirmed with CYP1A1, 1A2 and 1B1 marker substrates. Using 32P-postlabelling we determined the efficiency of wild-type and mutant forms of CYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 reconstituted with NADPH:CYP oxidoreductase to bioactivate AAI to reactive intermediates forming covalent DNA adducts. The S122A and T124V mutations in CYP1A1 and 1A2, respectively, abolished the efficiency of CYP1A1 and 1A2 enzymes to generate AAI-DNA adducts. In contrast

  15. Active Site Mutations as a Suitable Tool Contributing to Explain a Mechanism of Aristolochic Acid I Nitroreduction by Cytochromes P450 1A1, 1A2 and 1B1.

    PubMed

    Milichovský, Jan; Bárta, František; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Arlt, Volker M; Frei, Eva; Stiborová, Marie; Martínek, Václav

    2016-02-05

    Aristolochic acid I (AAI) is a plant drug found in Aristolochia species that causes aristolochic acid nephropathy, Balkan endemic nephropathy and their associated urothelial malignancies. AAI is activated via nitroreduction producing genotoxic N-hydroxyaristolactam, which forms DNA adducts. The major enzymes responsible for the reductive bioactivation of AAI are quinone oxidoreductase and cytochromes P450 (CYP) 1A1 and 1A2. Using site-directed mutagenesis we investigated the possible mechanisms of CYP1A1/1A2/1B1-catalyzed AAI nitroreduction. Molecular modelling predicted that the hydroxyl groups of serine122/threonine124 (Ser122/Thr124) amino acids in the CYP1A1/1A2-AAI binary complexes located near to the nitro group of AAI, are mechanistically important as they provide the proton required for the stepwise reduction reaction. In contrast, the closely related CYP1B1 with no hydroxyl group containing residues in its active site is ineffective in catalyzing AAI nitroreduction. In order to construct an experimental model, mutant forms of CYP1A1 and 1A2 were prepared, where Ser122 and Thr124 were replaced by Ala (CYP1A1-S122A) and Val (CYP1A2-T124V), respectively. Similarly, a CYP1B1 mutant was prepared in which Ala133 was replaced by Ser (CYP1B1-A133S). Site-directed mutagenesis was performed using a quickchange approach. Wild and mutated forms of these enzymes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and isolated enzymes characterized using UV-vis spectroscopy to verify correct protein folding. Their catalytic activity was confirmed with CYP1A1, 1A2 and 1B1 marker substrates. Using (32)P-postlabelling we determined the efficiency of wild-type and mutant forms of CYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 reconstituted with NADPH:CYP oxidoreductase to bioactivate AAI to reactive intermediates forming covalent DNA adducts. The S122A and T124V mutations in CYP1A1 and 1A2, respectively, abolished the efficiency of CYP1A1 and 1A2 enzymes to generate AAI-DNA adducts. In contrast, the

  16. Effect of Single-Site Mutations on HP Lattice Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Wuest, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P

    2014-01-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground-states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  17. Unusual splice site mutations disrupt FANCA exon 8 definition.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Chiara; Pianigiani, Giulia; De Rocco, Daniela; Bianco, Anna Monica Rosaria; Cappelli, Enrico; Savoia, Anna; Pagani, Franco

    2014-07-01

    The pathological role of mutations that affect not conserved splicing regulatory sequences can be difficult to determine. In a patient with Fanconi anemia, we identified two unpredictable splicing mutations that act on either sides of FANCA exon 8. In patients-derived cells and in minigene splicing assay, we showed that both an apparently benign intronic c.710-5T>C transition and the nonsense c.790C>T substitution induce almost complete exon 8 skipping. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that the c.710-5T>C transition affects a polypyrimidine tract where most of the thymidines cannot be compensated by cytidines. The c.790C>T mutation located in position -3 relative to the donor site induce exon 8 skipping in an NMD-independent manner and complementation experiments with modified U1 snRNAs showed that U1 snRNP is only partially involved in the splicing defect. Our results highlight the importance of performing splicing functional assay for correct identification of disease-causing mechanism of genomic variants and provide mechanistic insights on how these two FANCA mutations affect exon 8 definition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Splice Site, Frameshift and Chimeric GFAP Mutations in Alexander Disease

    PubMed Central

    Flint, Daniel; Li, Rong; Webster, Lital S.; Naidu, Sakkubai; Kolodny, Edwin; Percy, Alan; van der Knaap, Marjo; Powers, James M.; Mantovani, John F.; Ekstein, Josef; Goldman, James E.; Messing, Albee; Brenner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Alexander disease (AxD) is a usually fatal astrogliopathy primarily caused by mutations in the gene encoding GFAP, an intermediate filament protein expressed in astrocytes. We describe three patients with unique characteristics, and whose mutations have implications for AxD diagnosis and studies of intermediate filaments. Patient 1 is the first reported case with a non-coding mutation. The patient has a splice site change producing an in-frame deletion of exon 4 in about 10% of the transcripts. Patient 2 has an insertion and deletion at the extreme end of the coding region, resulting in a short frameshift. In addition, the mutation was found in buccal DNA but not in blood DNA, making this patient the first reported chimera. Patient 3 has a single base deletion near the C-terminal end of the protein, producing a short frameshift. These findings recommend inclusion of intronic splice site regions in genetic testing for AxD, indicate that alteration of only a small fraction of GFAP can produce disease, and provide caution against tagging intermediate filaments at their C-terminal end for cell biological investigations. PMID:22488673

  19. E2F1 somatic mutation within miRNA target site impairs gene regulation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Ramos, Camila M; Barros, Bruna P; Koyama, Fernanda C; Carpinetti, Paola A; Pezuk, Julia; Doimo, Nayara T S; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Perez, Rodrigo O; Parmigiani, Raphael B

    2017-01-01

    Genetic studies have largely concentrated on the impact of somatic mutations found in coding regions, and have neglected mutations outside of these. However, 3' untranslated regions (3' UTR) mutations can also disrupt or create miRNA target sites, and trigger oncogene activation or tumor suppressor inactivation. We used next-generation sequencing to widely screen for genetic alterations within predicted miRNA target sites of oncogenes associated with colorectal cancer, and evaluated the functional impact of a new somatic mutation. Target sequencing of 47 genes was performed for 29 primary colorectal tumor samples. For 71 independent samples, Sanger methodology was used to screen for E2F1 mutations in miRNA predicted target sites, and the functional impact of these mutations was evaluated by luciferase reporter assays. We identified germline and somatic alterations in E2F1. Of the 100 samples evaluated, 3 had germline alterations at the MIR205-5p target site, while one had a somatic mutation at MIR136-5p target site. E2F1 gene expression was similar between normal and tumor tissues bearing the germline alteration; however, expression was increased 4-fold in tumor tissue that harbored a somatic mutation compared to that in normal tissue. Luciferase reporter assays revealed both germline and somatic alterations increased E2F1 activity relative to wild-type E2F1. We demonstrated that somatic mutation within E2F1:MIR136-5p target site impairs miRNA-mediated regulation and leads to increased gene activity. We conclude that somatic mutations that disrupt miRNA target sites have the potential to impact gene regulation, highlighting an important mechanism of oncogene activation.

  20. A highly conserved interaction involving the middle residue of the SXN active-site motif is crucial for function of class B penicillin-binding proteins: mutational and computational analysis of PBP 2 from N. gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Tomberg, Joshua; Temple, Brenda; Fedarovich, Alena; Davies, Christopher; Nicholas, Robert A

    2012-04-03

    Insertion of an aspartate residue at position 345a in penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2), which lowers the rate of penicillin acylation by ~6-fold, is commonly observed in penicillin-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Here, we show that insertions of other amino acids also lower the penicillin acylation rate of PBP 2, but none supported growth of N. gonorrhoeae, indicating loss of essential transpeptidase activity. The Asp345a mutation likely acts by altering the interaction between its adjacent residue, Asp346, in the β2a-β2d hairpin loop and Ser363, the middle residue of the SXN active site motif. Because the adjacent aspartate creates ambiguity in the position of the insertion, we also examined if insertions at position 346a could confer decreased susceptibility to penicillin. However, only aspartate insertions were identified, indicating that only an Asp-Asp couple can confer resistance and retain transpeptidase function. The importance of the Asp346-Ser363 interaction was assessed by mutation of each residue to Ala. Although both mutants lowered the acylation rate of penicillin G by 5-fold, neither could support growth of N. gonorrhoeae, again indicating loss of transpeptidase function. Interaction between a residue in the equivalent of the β2a-β2d hairpin loop and the middle residue of the SXN motif is observed in crystal structures of other Class B PBPs, and its importance is also supported by multisequence alignments. Overall, these results suggest that this conserved interaction can be manipulated (e.g., by insertion) to lower the acylation rate by β-lactam antibiotics and increase resistance, but only if essential transpeptidase activity is preserved.

  1. TERT promoter mutations in melanoma render TERT expression dependent on MAPK pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Vallarelli, Andrelou F; Rachakonda, P Sivaramakrishna; André, Jocelyne; Heidenreich, Barbara; Riffaud, Laurence; Bensussan, Armand; Kumar, Rajiv; Dumaz, Nicolas

    2016-08-16

    The mechanism of telomerase re-activation in cancer had remained elusive until the discovery of frequent mutations in the promoter of the TERT gene that encodes the catalytic reverse transcriptase subunit of telomerase. We investigated the regulation of TERT expression in melanoma cell lines and our results show that promoter mutations render TERT expression dependent on MAPK activation due to oncogenic BRAF or NRAS mutations. Mutations in the TERT promoter create binding sites for ETS transcription factors. ETS1, expressed in melanoma cell lines, undergoes activating phosphorylation by ERK at Thr38 residue as a consequence of constitutively activated MAPK pathway. We demonstrate that ETS1 binds on the mutated TERT promoter leading to the re-expression of the gene. The inhibition of ETS1 resulted in reduced TERT expression. We provide evidence that the TERT promoter mutations provide a direct link between TERT expression and MAPK pathway activation due to BRAF or NRAS mutations via the transcription factor ETS1.

  2. Single site mutations in the hetero-oligomeric Mrp antiporter from alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4 that affect Na+/H+ antiport activity, sodium exclusion, individual Mrp protein levels, or Mrp complex formation.

    PubMed

    Morino, Masato; Natsui, Shinsuke; Ono, Tomohiro; Swartz, Talia H; Krulwich, Terry A; Ito, Masahiro

    2010-10-01

    Mrp systems are widely distributed and structurally complex cation/proton antiporters. Antiport activity requires hetero-oligomeric complexes of all six or seven hydrophobic Mrp proteins (MrpA-MrpG). Here, a panel of site-directed mutants in conserved or proposed motif residues was made in the Mrp Na(+)(Li(+))/H(+) antiporter from an alkaliphilic Bacillus. The mutant operons were expressed in antiporter-deficient Escherichia coli KNabc and assessed for antiport properties, support of sodium resistance, membrane levels of each Mrp protein, and presence of monomeric and dimeric Mrp complexes. Antiport did not depend on a VFF motif or a conserved tyrosine pair, but a role for a conserved histidine in a potential quinone binding site of MrpA was supported. The importance of several acidic residues for antiport was confirmed, and the importance of additional residues was demonstrated (e.g. three lysine residues conserved across MrpA, MrpD, and membrane-bound respiratory Complex I subunits (NuoL/M/N)). The results extended indications that MrpE is required for normal membrane levels of other Mrp proteins and for complex formation. Moreover, mutations in several other Mrp proteins lead to greatly reduced membrane levels of MrpE. Thus, changes in either of the two Mrp modules, MrpA-MrpD and MrpE-MrpG, influence the other. Two mutants, MrpB-P37G and MrpC-Q70A, showed a normal phenotype but lacked the MrpA-MrpG monomeric complex while retaining the dimeric hetero-oligomeric complex. Finally, MrpG-P81A and MrpG-P81G mutants exhibited no antiport activity but supported sodium resistance and a low [Na(+)](in). Such mutants could be used to screen hypothesized but uncharacterized sodium efflux functions of Mrp apart from Na(+) (Li(+))/H(+) antiport.

  3. Mutation of a Conserved Active Site Residue Converts Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase l Into a DNA Topoisomerase l-Dependent Poison

    SciTech Connect

    He,X.; van Waardenburg, R.; Babaoglu, K.; Price, A.; Nitiss, K.; Nitiss, J.; Bjornsti, M.; White, S.

    2007-01-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (Tdp1) catalyzes the resolution of 3' and 5' phospho-DNA adducts. A defective mutant, associated with the recessive neurodegenerative disease SCAN1, accumulates Tdp1-DNA complexes in vitro. To assess the conservation of enzyme architecture, a 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of yeast Tdp1 was determined that is very similar to human Tdp1. Poorly conserved regions of primary structure are peripheral to an essentially identical catalytic core. Enzyme mechanism was also conserved, because the yeast SCAN1 mutant (H{sub 432}R) enhanced cell sensitivity to the DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) poison camptothecin. A more severe Top1-dependent lethality of Tdp1H{sub 432}N was drug-independent, coinciding with increased covalent Top1-DNA and Tdp1-DNA complex formation in vivo. However, both H432 mutants were recessive to wild-type Tdp1. Thus, yeast H{sub 432} acts in the general acid/base catalytic mechanism of Tdp1 to resolve 3' phosphotyrosyl and 3' phosphoamide linkages. However, the distinct pattern of mutant Tdp1 activity evident in yeast cells, suggests a more severe defect in Tdp1H{sub 432}N-catalyzed resolution of 3' phospho-adducts.

  4. Mutation in a putative glycosylation site (N489T) of biotinidase in the only known Japanese child with biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pomponio, R J; Yamaguchi, A; Arashima, S; Hymes, J; Wolf, B

    1998-06-01

    The only known Japanese child with biotinidase deficiency was identified by newborn screening in Japan. He has 10.8% of mean normal serum biotinyl-hydrolase activity and trace biotinyl-transferase activity. The mutation results in 16% of normal cross-reacting material in serum with antibody to purified normal biotinidase. He is homozygous for a unique mutation, A1466 > C (Asn489Thr) in exon 4 of the biotinidase gene. The mutation appears to abolish a putative glycosylation site in a region in which other missense mutations have been identified, indicating that this region of the enzyme must be important for enzyme activity. This mutation may affect secretion or stability of the enzyme in serum. Interestingly, this child is now 8 years old, has not been on biotin supplementation for 3 years, and has remained asymptomatic. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  5. Human cutaneous melanoma; a review of NRAS and BRAF mutation frequencies in relation to histogenetic subclass and body site.

    PubMed

    Platz, Anton; Egyhazi, Suzanne; Ringborg, Ulrik; Hansson, Johan

    2008-04-01

    A majority of cutaneous melanomas show activating mutations in the NRAS or BRAF proto-oncogenes, components of the Ras-Raf-Mek-Erk signal transduction pathway. Consistent data demonstrate the early appearance, in a mutually exclusive manner, of these mutations. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the literature on NRAS and BRAF activating mutations in melanoma tumors with respect to available data on histogenetic classification as well as body site and presumed UV-exposure. Common alterations of the signal transducing network seem to represent molecular hallmarks of cutaneous melanomas and therefore should continue to strongly stimulate design and testing of targeted molecular interventions.

  6. Mutational Biases Drive Elevated Rates of Substitution at Regulatory Sites across Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Colin A.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of gene regulation is known to play major roles in carcinogenesis and tumour progression. Here, we comprehensively characterize the mutational profiles of diverse transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) across 1,574 completely sequenced cancer genomes encompassing 11 tumour types. We assess the relative rates and impact of the mutational burden at the binding sites of 81 transcription factors (TFs), by comparing the abundance and patterns of single base substitutions within putatively functional binding sites to control sites with matched sequence composition. There is a strong (1.43-fold) and significant excess of mutations at functional binding sites across TFs, and the mutations that accumulate in cancers are typically more disruptive than variants tolerated in extant human populations at the same sites. CTCF binding sites suffer an exceptionally high mutational load in cancer (3.31-fold excess) relative to control sites, and we demonstrate for the first time that this effect is seen in essentially all cancer types with sufficient data. The sub-set of CTCF sites involved in higher order chromatin structures has the highest mutational burden, suggesting a widespread breakdown of chromatin organization. However, we find no evidence for selection driving these distinctive patterns of mutation. The mutational load at CTCF-binding sites is substantially determined by replication timing and the mutational signature of the tumor in question, suggesting that selectively neutral processes underlie the unusual mutation patterns. Pervasive hyper-mutation within transcription factor binding sites rewires the regulatory landscape of the cancer genome, but it is dominated by mutational processes rather than selection. PMID:27490693

  7. Identification of a polymorphic site as a mutational site in exon VI of the mouse p53 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Paunesku, T.; Gemmell, M.A.; Crkvenjakov, R.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1993-07-01

    Sequencing by hybridization techniques are being used to analyze the incidence of specific p53 mutations associated with radiation-induced and spontaneous lymphosarcomas in mice. One sequence difference noted as being a mouse strain-specific polymorphism has been identified through these experiments as being a mutational, rather than a polymorphic, site.

  8. Effect of mutations in putative hormone binding sites on V2 vasopressin receptor function.

    PubMed

    Sebti, Y; Rabbani, M; Sadeghi, H Mir Mohammad; Sardari, S; Ghahremani, M H; Innamorati, G

    2015-01-01

    The vasopressin V2 receptor belongs to the large family of the G-protein coupled receptors and is responsible for the antidiuretic effect of the neurohypophyseal hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP). Based on bioinformatic studies it seems that Ala300 and Asp297 of the V2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) are involved in receptor binding. Ala300Glu mutation resulted in lower energy while Asp297Tyr mutation resulted in higher energy in AVP-V2R docked complex rather than the wild type. Therefore we hypothesized that the Ala300Glu mutation results in stronger and Asp297Tyr mutation leads to weaker ligand-receptor binding. Site directed mutagenesis of Asp297Tyr and Ala300Glu was performed using nested polymerase chain reaction. After restriction enzyme digestion, the inserts were ligated into the pcDNA3 vector and Escherichia coli XL1-Blue competent cells were transformed using commercial kit and electroporation methods. The obtained colonies were analyzed for the presence and orientation of the inserts using proper restriction enzymes. After transient transfection of COS-7 cells using ESCORT™ IV transfection reagent, the adenylyl cyclase activity assay was performed for functional studies. The cell surface expression of V2R was analyzed by indirect ELISA method. Based on the obtained results, the Ala300Glu mutation of V2R led to reduced levels of cAMP production without a marked effect on the receptor expression and the receptor binding. Effect of Asp297Tyr mutation on cell surface expression of V2R was the same as the wild type receptor. Pretreatment with 1 nM vasopressin showed an increased level of Asp297Tyr mutant receptor internalization as compared to the wild type receptor, while the effect of 100 nM vasopressin was similar in the mutant and wild type receptors. These data suggest that alterations in Asp297 but not Ala300 would affect the hormone receptor binding.

  9. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Genetic diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolaemia: the importance of functional analysis of potential splice-site mutations.

    PubMed

    Bourbon, M; Duarte, M A; Alves, A C; Medeiros, A M; Marques, L; Soutar, A K

    2009-05-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) results from defective low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) activity, mainly due to LDLR gene defects. Of the many different LDLR mutations found in patients with FH, about 6% of single base substitutions are located near or within introns, and are predicted to result in exon skipping, retention of an intron, or activation of cryptic sites during mRNA splicing. This paper reports on the Portuguese FH Study, which found 10 such mutations, 6 of them novel. For the mutations that have not been described before or those whose effect on function have not been analysed, their effect on splicing was investigated, using reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of LDLR mRNA from freshly isolated blood mononuclear cells. Two of these variants (c.313+6 T-->C, c.2389G-->T (p.V776L)) caused exon skipping, and one caused retention of an intron (c.1359-5C-->G), whereas two others (c.2140+5 G-->A and c.1061-8T-->C) had no apparent effect. Any effect of c.1185G-->C (p.V374V) on splicing could not be determined because it was on an allele with a promoter mutation (-42C-->G) that was probably not transcribed. Variants in four patients lost to follow-up could not be tested experimentally, but they almost certainly affect splicing because they disrupt the invariant AG or GT in acceptor (c.818-2A-->G) or donor (c.1060+1G-->A, c.1845+1delG and c.2547+1G-->A) spice sites. These findings emphasise that care must be taken before reporting the presence or absence of a splice-site mutation in the LDLR gene for diagnostic purposes. The study also shows that relatively simple, quick and inexpensive RNA assays can evaluate putative splicing mutations that are not always predictable by available software, thereby reducing genetic misdiagnosis of patients with FH.

  11. Mutations in the phosphorylation sites of simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen alter its origin DNA-binding specificity for sites I or II and affect SV40 DNA replication activity.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, J; Fanning, E

    1988-01-01

    A series of mutants of simian virus 40 was constructed by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis to study the role of phosphorylation in the functions of large T antigen. Each of the previously mapped phosphorylated serine and threonine residues in large T antigen was replaced by an alanine or cysteine residue or, in one case, by glutamic acid. Mutant DNAs were assayed for plaque-forming activity, viral DNA replication, expression of T antigen, and morphological transformation of rat cells. Viable mutants were isolated, suggesting that modification of some residues is not essential for the biological functions of T antigen. Two of these mutants replicated more efficiently than did the wild type. Seven mutants were partially or completely deficient in viral DNA replication but retained cell transformation activity comparable with that of the wild-type protein. Biochemical analysis of the mutant T antigens demonstrated novel origin DNA-binding properties of several mutant proteins. The results are consistent with the idea that differential phosphorylation defines several functional subclasses of T-antigen molecules. Images PMID:3357207

  12. Intra- and Interdomain Effects Due to Mutation of Calcium-binding Sites in Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liang-Wen; Kleerekoper, Quinn K.; Wang, Xu; Putkey, John A.

    2010-01-01

    The IQ-motif protein PEP-19, binds to the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM) with significantly different kon and koff rates in the presence and absence of Ca2+, which could play a role in defining the levels of free CaM during Ca2+ transients. The initial goal of the current study was to determine whether Ca2+ binding to sites III or IV in the C-domain of CaM was responsible for affecting the kinetics of binding PEP-19. EF-hand Ca2+-binding sites were selectively inactivated by the common strategy of changing Asp to Ala at the X-coordination position. Although Ca2+ binding to both sites III and IV appeared necessary for native-like interactions with PEP-19, the data also indicated that the mutations caused undesirable structural alterations as evidenced by significant changes in amide chemical shifts for apoCaM. Mutations in the C-domain also affected chemical shifts in the unmodified N-domain, and altered the Ca2+ binding properties of the N-domain. Conversion of Asp93 to Ala caused the greatest structural perturbations, possibly due to the loss of stabilizing hydrogen bonds between the side chain of Asp93 and backbone amides in apo loop III. Thus, although these mutations inhibit binding of Ca2+, the mutated CaM may not be able to support potentially important native-like activity of the apoprotein. This should be taken into account when designing CaM mutants for expression in cell culture. PMID:20048169

  13. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  14. Detection of mutations in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Alsina, Janivette; Gorsk, David H; Germino, F Joseph; Shih, Weichung; Lu, Shou-En; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Jin-Ming; Hait, William N; Goydos, James S

    2003-12-15

    Recent studies suggest that activating point mutations in B-RAF may commonly occur in melanoma. We devised a method to detect point mutations in heterogeneous tissues containing both wild-type and mutant B-RAF and N-RAS genes by using site-directed mutagenesis to introduce new restrictions sites in the cDNA sequence when the specific point mutations are present. We used this technique to determine the incidence of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) mutations in human melanoma. We screened 85 melanoma samples for the most common B-RAF and N-RAS mutations found in melanoma using a site-directed mutagenesis-based detection technique. Western blotting was used to evaluate downstream up-regulation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in these tissues. Thirty-three samples (7 of 25 primaries, 15 of 25 regional metastases, 5 of 25 nodal metastases, and 6 of 10 distant metastases) harbored the V599E B-RAF mutation (39%), 12 contained a Q61R N-RAS mutation and 5 a Q61K N-RAS mutation. Western blotting with antiphosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 antibodies demonstrated up-regulation of the MAPK pathway in samples containing activating B-RAF or N-RAS mutations compared with wild-type samples. This method of detection was sensitive and specific with no false positives. Activating mutations of the MAPK pathway were present in approximately 60% of samples tested and caused activation of this cellular pathway that appears to be important in the pathogenesis of melanoma.

  15. Bioinformatics study of cancer-related mutations within p53 phosphorylation site motifs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaona; Huang, Qiang; Yu, Long; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2014-07-29

    p53 protein has about thirty phosphorylation sites located at the N- and C-termini and in the core domain. The phosphorylation sites are relatively less mutated than other residues in p53. To understand why and how p53 phosphorylation sites are rarely mutated in human cancer, using a bioinformatics approaches, we examined the phosphorylation site and its nearby flanking residues, focusing on the consensus phosphorylation motif pattern, amino-acid correlations within the phosphorylation motifs, the propensity of structural disorder of the phosphorylation motifs, and cancer mutations observed within the phosphorylation motifs. Many p53 phosphorylation sites are targets for several kinases. The phosphorylation sites match 17 consensus sequence motifs out of the 29 classified. In addition to proline, which is common in kinase specificity-determining sites, we found high propensity of acidic residues to be adjacent to phosphorylation sites. Analysis of human cancer mutations in the phosphorylation motifs revealed that motifs with adjacent acidic residues generally have fewer mutations, in contrast to phosphorylation sites near proline residues. p53 phosphorylation motifs are mostly disordered. However, human cancer mutations within phosphorylation motifs tend to decrease the disorder propensity. Our results suggest that combination of acidic residues Asp and Glu with phosphorylation sites provide charge redundancy which may safe guard against loss-of-function mutations, and that the natively disordered nature of p53 phosphorylation motifs may help reduce mutational damage. Our results further suggest that engineering acidic amino acids adjacent to potential phosphorylation sites could be a p53 gene therapy strategy.

  16. Suppressor Mutations within the Core Binding Factor (CBF/AML1) Binding Site of a T-Cell Lymphomagenic Retrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Martiney, Marita J.; Levy, Laura S.; Lenz, Jack

    1999-01-01

    The transcriptional enhancer of the lymphomagenic mouse retrovirus SL3 contains a binding site for the transcription factor core binding factor (CBF; also called AML1, PEBP2, and SEF1). The SL3 CBF binding site is called the core. It differs from the core of the weakly lymphomagenic mouse retrovirus Akv by one nucleotide (the sequences are TGTGGTTAA and TGTGGTCAA, respectively). A mutant virus called SAA that was identical to SL3 except that its core was mutated to the Akv sequence was only moderately attenuated for lymphomagenicity. In most SAA-infected mice, tumor proviruses contained either reversions of the original mutation or one of two novel core sequences. In 20% of the SAA-infected mice, tumor proviruses retained the original SAA/Akv core mutation but acquired one of two additional mutations (underlined), TGCGGTCAA or TGTGGTCTA, that generated core elements called So and T*, respectively. We tested whether the novel base changes in the So and T* cores were suppressor mutations. SL3 mutants that contained So or T* cores in place of the wild-type sequence were generated. These viruses induced T-cell lymphomas in mice more quickly than SAA. Therefore, the mutations in the So and T* cores are indeed second-site suppressor mutations. The suppressor mutations increased CBF binding in vitro and transcriptional activity of the viral long terminal repeats (LTRs) in T lymphocytes to levels comparable to those of SL3. Thus, CBF binding was increased by any of three different nucleotide changes within the sequence of the SAA core. Increased CBF binding resulted in increased LTR transcriptional activity in T cells and in increased viral lymphomagenicity. PMID:9971797

  17. Analyses of disease-related GNPTAB mutations define a novel GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase interaction domain and an alternative site-1 protease cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Velho, Renata Voltolini; De Pace, Raffaella; Klünder, Sarah; Sperb-Ludwig, Fernanda; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Schwartz, Ida V. D.; Braulke, Thomas; Pohl, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (MLII) and III alpha/beta are autosomal-recessive diseases of childhood caused by mutations in GNPTAB encoding the α/β-subunit precursor protein of the GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase complex. This enzyme modifies lysosomal hydrolases with mannose 6-phosphate targeting signals. Upon arrival in the Golgi apparatus, the newly synthesized α/β-subunit precursor is catalytically activated by site-1 protease (S1P). Here we performed comprehensive expression studies of GNPTAB mutations, including two novel mutations T644M and T1223del, identified in Brazilian MLII/MLIII alpha/beta patients. We show that the frameshift E757KfsX1 and the non-sense R587X mutations result in the retention of enzymatically inactive truncated precursor proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) due to loss of cytosolic ER exit motifs consistent with a severe clinical phenotype in homozygosity. The luminal missense mutations, C505Y, G575R and T644M, partially impaired ER exit and proteolytic activation in accordance with less severe MLIII alpha/beta disease symptoms. Analogous to the previously characterized S399F mutant, we found that the missense mutation I403T led to retention in the ER and loss of catalytic activity. Substitution of further conserved residues in stealth domain 2 (I346 and W357) revealed similar biochemical properties and allowed us to define a putative binding site for accessory proteins required for ER exit of α/β-subunit precursors. Interestingly, the analysis of the Y937_M972del mutant revealed partial Golgi localization and formation of abnormal inactive β-subunits generated by S1P which correlate with a clinical MLII phenotype. Expression analyses of mutations identified in patients underline genotype–phenotype correlations in MLII/MLIII alpha/beta and provide novel insights into structural requirements of proper GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase activity. PMID:25788519

  18. Mutation of Glycosylation Sites in BST-2 Leads to Its Accumulation at Intracellular CD63-Positive Vesicles without Affecting Its Antiviral Activity against Multivesicular Body-Targeted HIV-1 and Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhu; Lv, Mingyu; Shi, Ying; Yu, Jinghua; Niu, Junqi; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Wenyan

    2016-02-29

    BST-2/tetherin blocks the release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1 with a "physical tethering" model. The detailed contribution of N-linked glycosylation to this model is controversial. Here, we confirmed that mutation of glycosylation sites exerted an effect of post-translational mis-trafficking, leading to an accumulation of BST-2 at intracellular CD63-positive vesicles. BST-2 with this phenotype potently inhibited the release of multivesicular body-targeted HIV-1 and hepatitis B virus, without affecting the co-localization of BST-2 with EEA1 and LAMP1. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation of human BST-2 is dispensable for intracellular virion retention and imply that this recently discovered intracellular tethering function may be evolutionarily distinguished from the canonical antiviral function of BST-2 by tethering nascent virions at the cell surface.

  19. Deep mutational scanning identifies sites in influenza nucleoprotein that affect viral inhibition by MxA

    PubMed Central

    Ashenberg, Orr; Padmakumar, Jai

    2017-01-01

    The innate-immune restriction factor MxA inhibits influenza replication by targeting the viral nucleoprotein (NP). Human influenza virus is more resistant than avian influenza virus to inhibition by human MxA, and prior work has compared human and avian viral strains to identify amino-acid differences in NP that affect sensitivity to MxA. However, this strategy is limited to identifying sites in NP where mutations that affect MxA sensitivity have fixed during the small number of documented zoonotic transmissions of influenza to humans. Here we use an unbiased deep mutational scanning approach to quantify how all single amino-acid mutations to NP affect MxA sensitivity in the context of replication-competent virus. We both identify new sites in NP where mutations affect MxA resistance and re-identify mutations known to have increased MxA resistance during historical adaptations of influenza to humans. Most of the sites where mutations have the greatest effect are almost completely conserved across all influenza A viruses, and the amino acids at these sites confer relatively high resistance to MxA. These sites cluster in regions of NP that appear to be important for its recognition by MxA. Overall, our work systematically identifies the sites in influenza nucleoprotein where mutations affect sensitivity to MxA. We also demonstrate a powerful new strategy for identifying regions of viral proteins that affect inhibition by host factors. PMID:28346537

  20. Application of natural and amplification created restriction sites for the diagnosis of PKU mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Eiken, H G; Odland, E; Boman, H; Skjelkvåle, L; Engebretsen, L F; Apold, J

    1991-01-01

    PCR amplification, either conventional, or as site directed mutagenesis using primers with mismatched 3'-ends, followed by restriction endonuclease digestion, provides rapid, non-isotope assays of known mutations in the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene. Such assays were shown to have the potential to detect all of the 18 presently reported phenylketonuria mutations. The practical applicability of this approach was demonstrated for eight mutations in Norwegian phenylketonuria patients, among them the most common ones. Images PMID:1851292

  1. An Insertion Mutation That Distorts Antibody Binding Site Architecture Enhances Function of a Human Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Jens C.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Smith, Patricia B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Crowe, Jr., James E.

    2011-09-02

    The structural and functional significance of somatic insertions and deletions in antibody chains is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a naturally occurring three-amino-acid insertion within the influenza virus-specific human monoclonal antibody 2D1 heavy-chain variable region reconfigures the antibody-combining site and contributes to its high potency against the 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses. The insertion arose through a series of events, including a somatic point mutation in a predicted hot-spot motif, introduction of a new hot-spot motif, a molecular duplication due to polymerase slippage, a deletion due to misalignment, and additional somatic point mutations. Atomic resolution structures of the wild-type antibody and a variant in which the insertion was removed revealed that the three-amino-acid insertion near the base of heavy-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) H2 resulted in a bulge in that loop. This enlarged CDR H2 loop impinges on adjacent regions, causing distortion of the CDR H1 architecture and its displacement away from the antigen-combining site. Removal of the insertion restores the canonical structure of CDR H1 and CDR H2, but binding, neutralization activity, and in vivo activity were reduced markedly because of steric conflict of CDR H1 with the hemagglutinin antigen.

  2. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency.

  3. Quantitation of normal CFTR mRNA in CF patients with splice-site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Z.; Olsen, J.C.; Silverman, L.M.

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified two mutations in introns of the CFTR gene associated with partially active splice sites and unusual clinical phenotypes. One mutation in intron 19 (3849+10 kb C to T) is common in CF patients with normal sweat chloride values; an 84 bp sequence from intron 19, which contains a stop codon, is inserted between exon 19 and exon 20 in most nasal CFTR transcripts. The other mutation in intron 14B (2789+5 G to A) is associated with elevated sweat chloride levels, but mild pulmonary disease; exon 14B (38 bp) is spliced out of most nasal CFTR transcipts. The remaining CFTR cDNA sequences, other than the 84 bp insertion of exon 14B deletion, are identical to the published sequence. To correlate genotype and phenotype, we used quantitative RT-PCR to determine the levels of normally-spliced CFTR mRNA in nasal epithelia from these patients. CFTR cDNA was amplified (25 cycles) by using primers specific for normally-spliced species, {gamma}-actin cDNA was amplified as a standard.

  4. Identification of a splice-site mutation in the human growth hormone-variant gene.

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, J N; Liebhaber, S A; MacGillivray, M H; Cooke, N E

    1991-01-01

    The human growth-hormone-variant (hGH-V) gene normally expresses two alternatively spliced forms of mRNA--hGH-V and hGH-V2--in the placenta. hGH-V2 mRNA differs from hGH-V rDNA by the retention of intron 4 and represents approximately 15% of transcripts at term. In a survey of hGH-V gene expression in 20 placentas of gestational age 8-40 wk, we detected a single placenta that contained, in addition to the two normal hGH-V mRNA species, a set of two slightly larger hGH-V mRNAs. Sequence analysis of the elongated hGH-V mRNA demonstrated retention of the first 12 bases of intron 2, resulting from both a base substitution at the intron 2 splice-donor dinucleotide (GT----AT) and activation of a cryptic splice-donor site 12 bases downstream. Survey of a total of 60 additional chromosomes failed to reveal additional incidence of this mutation. The mutation, which we have designated hGH-Vintron 2, pos 1 (G----A), represents both an initial example of a nondeletional mutation within the hGH-V gene and corresponding structural alteration in the encoded hGH-V hormone. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2035535

  5. Mutational specificity and genetic control of replicative bypass of an abasic site in yeast.

    PubMed

    Pagès, Vincent; Johnson, Robert E; Prakash, Louise; Prakash, Satya

    2008-01-29

    Abasic (AP) sites represent one of the most frequently formed lesions in DNA, and they present a strong block to continued synthesis by the replicative DNA polymerases (Pols). Here we determine the mutational specificity and the genetic control of translesion synthesis (TLS) opposite an AP site in yeast by using a double-stranded plasmid system that we have devised in which bidirectional replication proceeds from a replication origin. We find that the rate, the genetic control, and the types and frequencies of nucleotides inserted opposite the AP site are very similar for both the leading and the lagging DNA strands, and that an A is predominantly inserted opposite the AP site, whereas C insertion by Rev1 constitutes a much less frequent event. In striking contrast, in studies that have been reported previously for AP bypass with gapped-duplex and single-stranded plasmids, it has been shown that a C is the predominant nucleotide inserted opposite the AP site. We discuss the implications of our observations for the mechanisms of TLS on the leading versus the lagging DNA strand and suggest that lesion bypass during replication involves the coordination of activities of the replicative Pol with that of the lesion-bypass Pol.

  6. Classification of Cancer Primary Sites Using Machine Learning and Somatic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Sun, Jingchun; Huang, Liang-Chin; Xu, Hua; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    An accurate classification of human cancer, including its primary site, is important for better understanding of cancer and effective therapeutic strategies development. The available big data of somatic mutations provides us a great opportunity to investigate cancer classification using machine learning. Here, we explored the patterns of 1,760,846 somatic mutations identified from 230,255 cancer patients along with gene function information using support vector machine. Specifically, we performed a multiclass classification experiment over the 17 tumor sites using the gene symbol, somatic mutation, chromosome, and gene functional pathway as predictors for 6,751 subjects. The performance of the baseline using only gene features is 0.57 in accuracy. It was improved to 0.62 when adding the information of mutation and chromosome. Among the predictable primary tumor sites, the prediction of five primary sites (large intestine, liver, skin, pancreas, and lung) could achieve the performance with more than 0.70 in F-measure. The model of the large intestine ranked the first with 0.87 in F-measure. The results demonstrate that the somatic mutation information is useful for prediction of primary tumor sites with machine learning modeling. To our knowledge, this study is the first investigation of the primary sites classification using machine learning and somatic mutation data.

  7. Tuning calcium biosensors with a single-site mutation: structural dynamics insights from femtosecond Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Sean R; Tang, Longteng; Wang, Yanli; Zhu, Liangdong; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong

    2017-03-08

    Fluorescent protein biosensors are popular reporters for biological processes and life sciences, but their fundamental working mechanisms remain unclear. To characterize the functional fluorescence events on their native timescales, we implemented wavelength-tunable femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) to shed light on a blue-green emission-ratiometric fluorescent protein based Ca(2+) biosensor with a single Pro377Arg mutation. The transient Raman modes of the embedded chromophore from ca. 1000-1650 cm(-1) exhibit characteristic intensity and frequency dynamics which infer the underlying atomic motions and photochemical reaction stages. Our experimental study reveals the hidden structural inhomogeneity of the protein local environment upon Ca(2+) binding with the mutated arginine residue trapping multiple chromophore subpopulations, which manifest distinct time constants of ∼16 and 90 ps for excited state proton transfer (ESPT) following 400 nm photoexcitation. The altered ESPT reaction pathways and emission properties of the Ca(2+) biosensor represent the foundational step of rationally designing advanced fluorescent protein biosensors to tune their functionalities by site-specifically altering the local environment (e.g., the active site) of the embedded chromophore.

  8. Mutational analysis of the major soybean UreF paralogue involved in urease activation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In soybean, mutation at Eu2 or Eu3 eliminates the urease activities of both the embryo-specific and the tissue-ubiquitous (assimilatory) isozymes, encoded by Eu1 and Eu4, respectively. Eu3 encodes UreG, a GTP’ase necessary for proper emplacement of Ni and carbon dioxide in the urease active site. ...

  9. Second-Site Suppression of RNase E Essentiality by Mutation of the deaD RNA Helicase in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Masaru; Kers, Johan A.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells normally require RNase E activity to propagate and form colonies. Using random Tn10 insertion mutagenesis, we screened for second-site suppressor mutations that restore colony-forming ability (CFA) to E. coli cells lacking RNase E function and found mutations in three separate chromosomal loci that had this phenotype. Restoration of CFA by mutations in two of the genes identified was observed only in nutrient-poor medium, whereas the effects of mutation of the ATP-dependent RNA helicase DeaD were medium independent. Suppression of the rne mutant phenotype by inactivation of deaD was partial, as rne deaD doubly mutant bacteria had a greatly prolonged generation time and grew as filamentous chains in liquid medium. Moreover, we found that CFA restoration by deaD inactivation requires normal expression of the endogenous rng gene in doubly mutant rne deaD cells. Second-site suppression by deaD mutation was attributable specifically to ablation of the helicase activity of DeaD and was reversed by adventitious expression of RhlE or RNase R, both of which can unwind double-stranded RNA. Our results suggest a previously unsuspected role for RNA secondary structure as a determinant of RNase E essentiality. PMID:22328678

  10. Engineering a horseradish peroxidase C stable to radical attacks by mutating multiple radical coupling sites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Jin; Joo, Jeong Chan; Song, Bong Keun; Yoo, Young Je; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2015-04-01

    Peroxidases have great potential as industrial biocatalysts. In particular, the oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds catalyzed by peroxidases has been extensively examined because of the advantage of this method over other conventional chemical methods. However, the industrial application of peroxidases is often limited because of their rapid inactivation by phenoxyl radicals during oxidative polymerization. In this work, we report a novel protein engineering approach to improve the radical stability of horseradish peroxidase isozyme C (HRPC). Phenylalanine residues that are vulnerable to modification by the phenoxyl radicals were identified using mass spectrometry analysis. UV-Vis and CD spectra showed that radical coupling did not change the secondary structure or the active site of HRPC. Four phenylalanine (Phe) residues (F68, F142, F143, and F179) were each mutated to alanine residues to generate single mutants to examine the role of these sites in radical coupling. Despite marginal improvement of radical stability, each single mutant still exhibited rapid radical inactivation. To further reduce inactivation by radical coupling, the four substitution mutations were combined in F68A/F142A/F143A/F179A. This mutant demonstrated dramatic enhancement of radical stability by retaining 41% of its initial activity compared to the wild-type, which was completely inactivated. Structure and sequence alignment revealed that radical-vulnerable Phe residues of HPRC are conserved in homologous peroxidases, which showed the same rapid inactivation tendency as HRPC. Based on our site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical characterization, we have shown that engineering radical-vulnerable residues to eliminate multiple radical coupling can be a good strategy to improve the stability of peroxidases against radical attack. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Heterogeneity of TERT promoter mutations status in squamous cell carcinomas of different anatomical sites.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Katherine A; Kurtis, Boaz; Babayeva, Sabina; Zhuge, Jian; Tantchou, Irlna; Cai, Dongming; Lafaro, Rocco J; Fallon, John T; Zhong, Minghao

    2015-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) can arise from different anatomical sites including the skin, head and neck, lung, esophagus, genital area, and so on. Despite the same histopathologic features and immunohistochemistry profile, the SCCs of different body sites can show tremendous differences in their presenting symptoms, risk factor associations, natural history, prognosis, and response to treatment. This may reflect the fact that SCCs are heterogenous and likely have unique molecular characteristics at different anatomical sites. Recurrent somatic mutations in the TERT promoter region were first reported in human melanomas. Subsequently, other tumors including cutaneous SCC were found to demonstrate high frequencies of the same mutations. However, the incidences of TERT promoter mutation in noncutaneous SCCs have not been systemically studied. We investigated the TERT promoter mutation status among SCCs from different sites. We collected 84 cases of SCC from the skin (27), head and neck (12), lung (25), and cervix (10), as well as 10 cases of urothelial carcinoma with squamous differentiation (UC-SqD). We found that the frequencies of TERT promoter mutation among SCC of different sits are quite heterogenous: ~70% in skin SCC and UC-SqD, 16.67% in head and neck SCC, and 0% in lung and cervix SCC. These results may support the hypothesis of different carcinogenesis mechanisms of SCC in different sites. It also indicates that TERT promoter mutation could be a biomarker for distinguishing skin SCC or UC-SqD vs pulmonary SCC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  13. Investigations and activities at superfund sites.

    PubMed

    Gochfeld, M; Burger, J

    1990-01-01

    Only a small proportion of the hazardous waste sites in the United States have been placed on the National Priority List (NPL), and these have become known as Superfund Sites. Many more sites exist on active industrial or military facilities, and a large number of sites remain to be discovered. It is useful to illustrate several hazardous waste sites to provide a clearer impression of the nature of the hazards, the kind of work done, and the proximity of residences to sites.

  14. 1H NMR study of the influence of mutation on the interaction of the C-terminus with the active site in heme oxygenase from Neisseria meningitidis: implications for product release.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dungeng; Ma, Li-Hua; Ogura, Hiroshi; Yang, En-Che; Zhang, Xuhong; Yoshida, Tadashi; La Mar, Gerd N

    2010-07-20

    The HO from the pathogenic bacterium Neisseria meningitidis, NmHO, possesses C-terminal His207, Arg208, and His209 residues that are undetected in crystal structures. NMR found the C-terminus ordered and interacting with the active site and shown to undergo a spontaneous cleavage of the C-terminal Arg208-His209 bond that affects the product off rate. A preliminary model for the interaction based on the wild-type (WT) NmHO complexes has been presented [Liu, Y., Ma, L.-H., Satterlee, J. D., Zhang, X., Yoshida, T., and La Mar, G. N. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 3875-3886]. Two-dimensional (1)H NMR data of resting-state, azide-inhibited substrate complexes of the three C-terminal truncation mutants (Des-His209-, Des-Arg208His209-, and Des-His207Arg208His209-NmHO) confirm the previous proposed roles for His207 and Arg208 and reveal important additional salt bridges involving the His209 carboxylate and the side chains of both Lys126 and Arg208. Deletion of His209 leads to a qualitatively retained C-terminal geometry, but with increased separation between the C-terminus and active site. Moreover, replacing vinyls with methyls on the substrate leads to a decrease in the separation between the C-terminus and the active site. The expanded model for the C-terminus reveals a less stable His207-Arg208 cis peptide bond, providing a rationalization for its spontaneous cleavage. The rate of this spontaneous cleavage is shown to correlate with the proximity of the C-terminus to the active site, suggesting that the closer interaction leads to increased strain on the already weak His207-Arg208 peptide bond. The relevance of the C-terminus structure for in vitro studies, and the physiological function of product release, is discussed.

  15. Triallelic Population Genomics for Inferring Correlated Fitness Effects of Same Site Nonsynonymous Mutations.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Aaron P; Coffman, Alec J; Hsieh, PingHsun; Struck, Travis J; Gutenkunst, Ryan N

    2016-05-01

    The distribution of mutational effects on fitness is central to evolutionary genetics. Typical univariate distributions, however, cannot model the effects of multiple mutations at the same site, so we introduce a model in which mutations at the same site have correlated fitness effects. To infer the strength of that correlation, we developed a diffusion approximation to the triallelic frequency spectrum, which we applied to data from Drosophila melanogaster We found a moderate positive correlation between the fitness effects of nonsynonymous mutations at the same codon, suggesting that both mutation identity and location are important for determining fitness effects in proteins. We validated our approach by comparing it to biochemical mutational scanning experiments, finding strong quantitative agreement, even between different organisms. We also found that the correlation of mutational fitness effects was not affected by protein solvent exposure or structural disorder. Together, our results suggest that the correlation of fitness effects at the same site is a previously overlooked yet fundamental property of protein evolution.

  16. Space environment induced mutations prefer to occur at polymorphic sites of rice genomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Liu, M.; Cheng, Z.; Sun, Y.

    To explore the genomic characteristics of rice mutants induced by space environment, space-induced mutants 971-5, 972-4, and R955, which acquired new traits after space flight such as increased yield, reduced resistance to rice blast, and semi-dwarfism compared with their on-ground controls, 971ck, 972ck, and Bing95-503, respectively, together with other 8 japonica and 3 indica rice varieties, 17 in total, were analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method. We chose 16 AFLP primer-pairs which generated a total of 1251 sites, of which 745 (59.6%) were polymorphic over all the genotypes. With the 16 pairs of primer combinations, 54 space-induced mutation sites were observed in 971-5, 86 in 972-4, and 5 in R955 compared to their controls, and the mutation rates were 4.3%, 6.9% and 0.4%, respectively. Interestingly, 75.9%, 84.9% and 100% of the mutation sites identified in 971-5, 972-4, and R955 occurred in polymorphic sites. This result suggests that the space environment preferentially induced mutations at polymorphic sites in rice genomes and might share a common mechanism with other types of mutagens. It also implies that polymorphic sites in genomes are potential "hotspots" for mutations induced by the space environment.

  17. Activating FGFR2-RAS-BRAF mutations in ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Brown, Noah A; Rolland, Delphine; McHugh, Jonathan B; Weigelin, Helmut C; Zhao, Lili; Lim, Megan S; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Betz, Bryan L

    2014-11-01

    Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic neoplasm whose overall mutational landscape has not been well characterized. We sought to characterize pathogenic mutations in ameloblastoma and their clinical and functional significance with an emphasis on the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. A total of 84 ameloblastomas and 40 non-ameloblastoma odontogenic tumors were evaluated with a combination of BRAF V600E allele-specific PCR, VE1 immunohistochemistry, the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel, and Sanger sequencing. Efficacy of a BRAF inhibitor was evaluated in an ameloblastoma-derived cell line. Somatic, activating, and mutually exclusive RAS-BRAF and FGFR2 mutations were identified in 88% of cases. Somatic mutations in SMO, CTNNB1, PIK3CA, and SMARCB1 were also identified. BRAF V600E was the most common mutation, found in 62% of ameloblastomas and in ameloblastic fibromas/fibrodentinomas but not in other odontogenic tumors. This mutation was associated with a younger age of onset, whereas BRAF wild-type cases arose more frequently in the maxilla and showed earlier recurrences. One hundred percent concordance was observed between VE1 immunohistochemistry and molecular detection of BRAF V600E mutations. Ameloblastoma cells demonstrated constitutive MAPK pathway activation in vitro. Proliferation and MAPK activation were potently inhibited by the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib. Our findings suggest that activating FGFR2-RAS-BRAF mutations play a critical role in the pathogenesis of most cases of ameloblastoma. Somatic mutations in SMO, CTNNB1, PIK3CA, and SMARCB1 may function as secondary mutations. BRAF V600E mutations have both diagnostic and prognostic implications. In vitro response of ameloblastoma to a BRAF inhibitor suggests a potential role for targeted therapy. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. TERT promoter mutations in melanoma render TERT expression dependent on MAPK pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Vallarelli, Andrelou F.; Rachakonda, P. Sivaramakrishna; André, Jocelyne; Heidenreich, Barbara; Riffaud, Laurence; Bensussan, Armand; Kumar, Rajiv; Dumaz, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of telomerase re-activation in cancer had remained elusive until the discovery of frequent mutations in the promoter of the TERT gene that encodes the catalytic reverse transcriptase subunit of telomerase. We investigated the regulation of TERT expression in melanoma cell lines and our results show that promoter mutations render TERT expression dependent on MAPK activation due to oncogenic BRAF or NRAS mutations. Mutations in the TERT promoter create binding sites for ETS transcription factors. ETS1, expressed in melanoma cell lines, undergoes activating phosphorylation by ERK at Thr38 residue as a consequence of constitutively activated MAPK pathway. We demonstrate that ETS1 binds on the mutated TERT promoter leading to the re-expression of the gene. The inhibition of ETS1 resulted in reduced TERT expression. We provide evidence that the TERT promoter mutations provide a direct link between TERT expression and MAPK pathway activation due to BRAF or NRAS mutations via the transcription factor ETS1. PMID:27449293

  19. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  20. Site-Directed Chemical Mutations on Abzymes: Large Rate Accelerations in the Catalysis by Exchanging the Functionalized Small Nonprotein Components.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Shirahashi, Masato; Hayakawa, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Asako; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Fujii, Ikuo

    2016-10-21

    Taking advantage of antibody molecules to generate tailor-made binding sites, we propose a new class of protein modifications, termed as "site-directed chemical mutation." In this modification, chemically synthesized catalytic components with a variety of steric and electronic properties can be noncovalently and nongenetically incorporated into specific sites in antibody molecules to induce enzymatic activity. Two catalytic antibodies, 25E2 and 27C1, possess antigen-combining sites which bind catalytic components and act as apoproteins in catalytic reactions. By simply exchanging these components, antibodies 25E2 and 27C1 can catalyze a wide range of chemical transformations including acyl-transfer, β-elimination, aldol, and decarboxylation reactions. Although both antibodies were generated with the same hapten, phosphonate diester 1, they showed different catalytic activity. When phenylacetic acid 4 was used as the catalytic component, 25E2 efficiently catalyzed the elimination reaction of β-haloketone 2, whereas 27C1 showed no catalytic activity. In this work, we focused on the β-elimination reaction and examined the site-directed chemical mutation of 27C1 to induce activity and elucidate the catalytic mechanism. Molecular models showed that the cationic guanidyl group of Arg(H52) in 27C1 makes a hydrogen bond with the P═O oxygen in the hapten. This suggested that during β-elimination, Arg(H52) of 27C1 would form a salt bridge with the carboxylate of 4, thus destroying reactivity. Therefore, we utilized site-directed chemical mutation to change the charge properties of the catalytic components. When amine components 7-10 were used, 27C1 efficiently catalyzed the β-elimination reaction. It is noteworthy that chemical mutation with secondary amine 8 provided extremely high activity, with a rate acceleration [(kcat/Km 2)/kuncat] of 1 000 000. This catalytic activity likely arises from the proximity effect, plus general-base catalysis associated the

  1. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  2. Predicting changes in protein thermostability brought about by single- or multi-site mutations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An important aspect of protein design is the ability to predict changes in protein thermostability arising from single- or multi-site mutations. Protein thermostability is reflected in the change in free energy (ΔΔG) of thermal denaturation. Results We have developed predictive software, Prethermut, based on machine learning methods, to predict the effect of single- or multi-site mutations on protein thermostability. The input vector of Prethermut is based on known structural changes and empirical measurements of changes in potential energy due to protein mutations. Using a 10-fold cross validation test on the M-dataset, consisting of 3366 mutants proteins from ProTherm, the classification accuracy of random forests and the regression accuracy of random forest regression were slightly better than support vector machines and support vector regression, whereas the overall accuracy of classification and the Pearson correlation coefficient of regression were 79.2% and 0.72, respectively. Prethermut performs better on proteins containing multi-site mutations than those with single mutations. Conclusions The performance of Prethermut indicates that it is a useful tool for predicting changes in protein thermostability brought about by single- or multi-site mutations and will be valuable in the rational design of proteins. PMID:20598148

  3. Gain-Of-Function Mutational Activation of Human TRNA Synthetase Procytokine

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, X.L.; Kapoor, M.; Otero, F.J.; Slike, B.M.; Tsuruta, H.; Frausto, R.; Bates, A.; Ewalt, K.L.; Cheresh, D.A.; Schimmel, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-30

    Disease-causing mutations occur in genes for aminoacyl tRNA synthetases. That some mutations are dominant suggests a gain of function. Native tRNA synthetases, such as tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS) and tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, catalyze aminoacylation and are also procytokines that are activated by natural fragmentation. In principle, however, gain-of-function phenotypes could arise from mutational activation of synthetase procytokines. From crystal structure analysis, we hypothesized that a steric block of a critical Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif in full-length TyrRS suppresses the cytokine activity of a natural fragment. To test this hypothesis, we attempted to uncover ELR in the procytokine by mutating a conserved tyrosine (Y341) that tethers ELR. Site-specific proteolytic cleavage and small-angle X-ray scattering established subtle opening of the structure by the mutation. Strikingly, four different assays demonstrated mutational activation of cytokine functions. The results prove the possibilities for constitutive gain-of-function mutations in tRNA synthetases.

  4. A Novel Intronic Splice Site Tafazzin Gene Mutation Detected Prenatally in a Family with Barth Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bakšienė, M; Benušienė, E; Morkūnienė, A; Ambrozaitytė, L; Utkus, A; Kučinskas, V

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a rare X-linked disease characterized by dilated cardiomyopathy, proximal skeletal myopathy and cyclic neutropenia. It is caused by various mutations in the tafazzin (TAZ) gene located on Xq28 that results in remodeling of cardiolipin and abnormalities in mitochondria stability and energy production. Here we report on a novel c.285-1G>C splice site mutation in intron 3 of the TAZ gene that was detected prenatally. PMID:28289596

  5. Somatic mosaicism for a newly identified splice-site mutation in a patient with adenosine deaminase-deficient immunodeficiency and spontaneous clinical recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, R.; Yang, D.R.; Israni, A.; Huie, M.L. ); Ownby, D.R. )

    1994-07-01

    Absent or severely reduced adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity produces inherited immunodeficiency of varying severity, with defects of both cellular and humoral immunity. The authors report somatic mosaicism as the basis for a delayed presentation and unusual course of a currently healthy young adult receiving no therapy. He was diagnosed at age 2[1/2] years because of life-threatening pneumonia, recurrent infections, failure of normal growth, and lymphopenia, but he retained significant cellular immune function. A fibroblast cell line and a B cell line, established at diagnosis, lacked ADA activity and were heteroallelic for a splice-donor-site mutation in IVS 1 (+1GT[yields]CT) and a missense mutation (Arg101Gln). All clones (17/17) isolated from the B cell mRNA carried the missense mutation, indicating that the allele with the splice-site mutation produced unstable mRNA. In striking contrast, a B cell line established at age 16 years expressed 50% of normal ADA; 50% had the missense mutation. Genomic DNA contained the missense mutation but not the splice-site mutation. All three cell lines were identical for multiple polymorphic markers and the presence of a Y chromosome. In vivo somatic mosaicism was demonstrated in genomic DNA from peripheral blood cells obtained at 16 years of age, in that less than half the DNA carried the splice-site mutation (P<.0.02, vs. original B cell line). Consistent with mosaicism, erythrocyte content of the toxic metabolite deoxyATP was only minimally elevated. Somatic mosaicism could have arisen either by somatic mutation or by reversion at the site of mutation. Selection in vivo for ADA normal hematopoietic cells may have played a role in the return to normal health, in the absence of therapy. 57 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Sec3 Mutations Are Synthetically Lethal with Profilin Mutations and Cause Defects in Diploid-Specific Bud-Site Selection

    PubMed Central

    Haarer, B. K.; Corbett, A.; Kweon, Y.; Petzold, A. S.; Silver, P.; Brown, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    Replacement of the wild-type yeast profilin gene (PFY1) with a mutated form (pfy1-111) that has codon 72 changed to encode glutamate rather than arginine results in defects similar to, but less severe than, those that result from complete deletion of the profilin gene. We have used a colony color-sectoring assay to identify mutations that cause pfy1-111, but not wild-type, cells to be inviable. These profilin synthetic lethal (psl) mutations result in various degrees of abnormal growth, morphology, and temperature sensitivity in PFY1 cells. We have examined psl1 strains in the most detail. Interestingly, these strains display a diploid-specific defect in bud-site selection; haploid strains bud normally, while homozygous diploid strains show a dramatic increase in random budding. We discovered that PSL1 is the late secretory gene, SEC3, and have found that mutations in several other late secretory genes are also synthetically lethal with pfy1-111. Our results are likely to reflect an interdependence between the actin cytoskeleton and secretory processes in directing cell polarity and growth. Moreover, they indicate that the secretory pathway is especially crucial for maintaining budding polarity in diploids. PMID:8889515

  7. A detailed mutational analysis of the VSG gene expression site promoter.

    PubMed

    Pham, V P; Qi, C C; Gottesdiener, K M

    1996-01-01

    The African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that causes the disease African sleeping sickness. The parasite avoids the host's immune response by the process of antigenic variation, or by sequentially expressing antigenically different cell-surface coat proteins. These proteins, called variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs), are expressed from a specific locus, the VSG gene expression site (ES). In an attempt to understand expression of VSG genes, we expanded on earlier investigations of the promoter that controls the large VSG gene expression site transcription unit. We studied VSG ES promoter function both in transient transfection assays, and after stable integration at a chromosomal locus. Analysis of closely spaced deletion mutants showed that the minimum VSG ES promoter fragment that gives full activity is extremely small, and mapped precisely to a fragment that contains no more than -67 bp 5' to the putative transcription initiation site. The promoter lacked an upstream control element, or UCE, an element found at the PARP promoter, and at most eukaryotic Pol I promoters. Furthermore, linker scanning mutagenesis demonstrated that the VSG ES promoter contains at least two essential regulatory elements, including sequences within the region -67/-60 and the region -35/-20, both numbered relative to the initiation site. An altered promoter with mutated nucleotides surrounding the transcription initiation site still directed wild-type levels of expression. In this study, the results were similar for both insect and bloodstream form trypanosomes, suggesting that the same basic machinery for expression from the VSG ES promoter is found in both stages of the parasite.

  8. Motility defects in Campylobacter jejuni defined gene deletion mutants caused by second-site mutations

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Stefan P. W.; Gupta, Srishti; Baig, Abiyad; L'Heureux, Joanna; Pont, Elsa; Wolanska, Dominika P.; Maskell, Duncan J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation due to mutation and phase variation has a considerable impact on the commensal and pathogenic behaviours of Campylobacter jejuni. In this study, we provide an example of how second-site mutations can interfere with gene function analysis in C. jejuni. Deletion of the flagellin B gene (flaB) in C. jejuni M1 resulted in mutant clones with inconsistent motility phenotypes. From the flaB mutant clones picked for further analysis, two were motile, one showed intermediate motility and two displayed severely attenuated motility. To determine the molecular basis of this differential motility, a genome resequencing approach was used. Second-site mutations were identified in the severely attenuated and intermediate motility flaB mutant clones: a TA-dinucleotide deletion in fliW and an A deletion in flgD, respectively. Restoration of WT fliW, using a newly developed genetic complementation system, confirmed that the second-site fliW mutation caused the motility defect as opposed to the primary deletion of flaB. This study highlights the importance of (i) screening multiple defined gene deletion mutant clones, (ii) genetic complementation of the gene deletion and ideally (iii) screening for second-site mutations that might interfere with the pathways/mechanisms under study. PMID:26385289

  9. Palmitoylation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes: reduction in their ability to activate G proteins by mutation of a putative palmitoylation site, cysteine 457, in the carboxyl-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M K; Haga, T

    1997-04-15

    A putative palmitoylation site, Cys457, of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor) was eliminated by conversion to alanine or stop codon by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant m2 receptor C457A was not metabolically labeled with [3H] palmitic acid when expressed in Sf9 cells, whereas the wild-type m2 receptor was labeled under the same conditions. These results confirm that the Cys457 is the palmitoylation site. The rate of palmitoylation was markedly accelerated by addition of agonist, indicating that the palmitoylation reaction is affected by conformational changes of the receptor induced by agonist binding. The m2 receptor mutants without palmitoylation were purified and reconstituted with G proteins into phospholipid vesicles. Both mutants were good substrates of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and the phosphorylation was stimulated by agonist and G protein beta gamma subunits, as was the case for wild-type receptors. The mutant receptors interacted with and activate Gi2 and G(o). However, the rate of [35S] GTP gamma S binding to Gi2 was half as much for the mutants as that for the wild type, and the proportion of guanine nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding sites was significantly less for mutants (42-42%) compared to wild type (62%). These results indicate that the palmitoylation of m2 receptors is not an absolute requirement for their interaction with G proteins but enhances the ability of the receptors to interact with G proteins.

  10. Novel compound heterozygous mutations for lipoprotein lipase deficiency. A G-to-T transversion at the first position of exon 5 causing G154V missense mutation and a 5' splice site mutation of intron 8.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Takagi, A; Nakata, Y; Sera, Y; Hyoudou, S; Hamamoto, K; Nishi, Y; Yamamoto, A

    2001-07-01

    We systematically investigated the molecular defects causing a primary LPL deficiency in a Japanese male infant (patient DI) with fasting hyperchylomicronemia (type I hyperlipoproteinemia) and in his parents. Patient DI had neither LPL activity nor immunoreactive LPL mass in the pre- and post-heparin plasma. The patient was a compound heterozygote for novel mutations consisting of a G-to-T transversion at the first nucleotide of exon 5 [+1 position of 3' acceptor splice site (3'-ass) of intron 4] and a T-to-C transition in the invariant GT at position +2 of the 5' donor splice site (5'-dss) of intron 8 (Int8/5'-dss/t(+2)c). The G-to-T transversion, although affecting the 11 nucleotide of the 3'-consensus acceptor splice site, resulted in a substitution of Gly(154) to Val (G154V; GG(716)C(-->)GTC). The mutant G154V LPL expressed in COS-1 cells was catalytically inactive and hardly released from the cells by heparin. The Int8/5'-dss/t(+2)c mutation inactivated the authentic 5' splice site of intron 8 and led to the utilization of a cryptic 5'-dss in exon 8 as an alternative splice site 133 basepairs upstream from the authentic splice site, thereby causing joining of a part of exon 8 to exon 9 with skipping of a 134-bp fragment of exon 8 and intron 8. These additional mutations in the consensus sequences of the 3' and 5' splice sites might be useful for better understanding the factors that are involved in splice site selection in vivo.

  11. The Efficiency of Dentin Sialoprotein-Phosphophoryn Processing Is Affected by Mutations Both Flanking and Distant from the Cleavage Site*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Robert T.; Lim, Glendale L.; Dong, Zhihong; Lee, Arthur M.; Yee, Colin T.; Fuller, Robert S.; Ritchie, Helena H.

    2013-01-01

    Normal dentin mineralization requires two highly acidic proteins, dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and phosphophoryn (PP). DSP and PP are synthesized as part of a single secreted precursor, DSP-PP, which is conserved in marsupial and placental mammals. Using a baculovirus expression system, we previously found that DSP-PP is accurately cleaved into DSP and PP after secretion into medium by an endogenous, secreted, zinc-dependent Sf9 cell activity. Here we report that mutation of conserved residues near and distant from the G447↓D448 cleavage site in DSP-PP240 had dramatic effects on cleavage efficiency by the endogenous Sf9 cell processing enzyme. We found that: 1) mutation of residues flanking the cleavage site from P4 to P4′ blocked, impaired, or enhanced DSP-PP240 cleavage; 2) certain conserved amino acids distant from the cleavage site were important for precursor cleavage; 3) modification of the C terminus by appending a C-terminal tag altered the pattern of processing; and 4) mutations in DSP-PP240 had similar effects on cleavage by recombinant human BMP1, a candidate physiological processing enzyme, as was seen with the endogenous Sf9 cell activity. An analysis of a partial TLR1 cDNA from Sf9 cells indicates that residues that line the substrate-binding cleft of Sf9 TLR1 and human BMP1 are nearly perfectly conserved, offering an explanation of why Sf9 cells so accurately process mammalian DSP-PP. The fact that several mutations in DSP-PP240 significantly modified the amount of PP240 product generated from DSP-PP240 precursor protein cleavage suggests that such mutation may affect the mineralization process. PMID:23297400

  12. Splice-site mutations: a novel genetic mechanism of Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Gantla, S; Bakker, C T; Deocharan, B; Thummala, N R; Zweiner, J; Sinaasappel, M; Roy Chowdhury, J; Bosma, P J; Roy Chowdhury, N

    1998-01-01

    Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1 (CN-1) is a recessively inherited, potentially lethal disorder characterized by severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia resulting from deficiency of the hepatic enzyme bilirubin-UDP-glucuronosyltransferase. In all CN-1 patients studied, structural mutations in one of the five exons of the gene (UGT1A1) encoding the uridinediphosphoglucuronate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoform bilirubin-UGT1 were implicated in the absence or inactivation of the enzyme. We report two patients in whom CN-1 is caused, instead, by mutations in the noncoding intronic region of the UGT1A1 gene. One patient (A) was homozygous for a G-->C mutation at the splice-donor site in the intron, between exon 1 and exon 2. The other patient (B) was heterozygous for an A-->G shift at the splice-acceptor site in intron 3, and in the second allele a premature translation-termination codon in exon 1 was identified. Bilirubin-UGT1 mRNA is difficult to obtain, since it is expressed in the liver only. To determine the effects of these splice-junction mutations, we amplified genomic DNA of the relevant splice junctions. The amplicons were expressed in COS-7 cells, and the expressed mRNAs were analyzed. In both cases, splice-site mutations led to the use of cryptic splice sites, with consequent deletions in the processed mRNA. This is the first report of intronic mutations causing CN-1 and of the determination of the consequences of these mutations on mRNA structure, by ex vivo expression. PMID:9497253

  13. Activating mutations in CTNNB1 in aldosterone producing adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Åkerström, Tobias; Maharjan, Rajani; Sven Willenberg, Holger; Cupisti, Kenko; Ip, Julian; Moser, Ana; Stålberg, Peter; Robinson, Bruce; Alexander Iwen, K.; Dralle, Henning; Walz, Martin K.; Lehnert, Hendrik; Sidhu, Stan; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso; Hellman, Per; Björklund, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of secondary hypertension with a prevalence of 5–10% in unreferred hypertensive patients. Aldosterone producing adenomas (APAs) constitute a large proportion of PA cases and represent a surgically correctable form of the disease. The WNT signaling pathway is activated in APAs. In other tumors, a frequent cause of aberrant WNT signaling is mutation in the CTNNB1 gene coding for β-catenin. Our objective was to screen for CTNNB1 mutations in a well-characterized cohort of 198 APAs. Somatic CTNNB1 mutations were detected in 5.1% of the tumors, occurring mutually exclusive from mutations in KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 and CACNA1D. All of the observed mutations altered serine/threonine residues in the GSK3β binding domain in exon 3. The mutations were associated with stabilized β-catenin and increased AXIN2 expression, suggesting activation of WNT signaling. By CYP11B2 mRNA expression, CYP11B2 protein expression, and direct measurement of aldosterone in tumor tissue, we confirmed the ability for aldosterone production. This report provides compelling evidence that aberrant WNT signaling caused by mutations in CTNNB1 occur in APAs. This also suggests that other mechanisms that constitutively activate the WNT pathway may be important in APA formation. PMID:26815163

  14. Rice tungro spherical virus polyprotein processing: identification of a virus-encoded protease and mutational analysis of putative cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Thole, V; Hull, R

    1998-07-20

    Rice tungro spherical virus encodes a large polyprotein containing motifs with sequence similarity to viral serine-like proteases and RNA polymerases. Polyclonal antisera raised against domains of the putative protease and polymerase in fusion with glutathione S-transferase detected a protein of about 35 kDa and, in very low amounts, a protein of about 70 kDa, respectively, in extracts from infected plants. In in vitro transcription/translation systems and in Escherichia coli we demonstrated a proteolytic activity in the C-terminal region of the polyprotein. This protease rapidly cleaved its polyprotein precursors in vitro. Mutating a potential cleavage site located N-terminal to the protease domain, Gln2526-Asp2527, diminished processing. The transversion mutation at the putative C-terminal cleavage site of the protease, at Gln2852-Ala2853, led to a delayed and partial processing.

  15. mutLBSgeneDB: mutated ligand binding site gene DataBase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pora; Zhao, Junfei; Lu, Pinyi; Zhao, Zhongming

    2017-01-01

    Mutations at the ligand binding sites (LBSs) can influence protein structure stability, binding affinity with small molecules, and drug resistance in cancer patients. Our recent analysis revealed that ligand binding residues had a significantly higher mutation rate than other parts of the protein. Here, we built mutLBSgeneDB (mutated Ligand Binding Site gene DataBase) available at http://zhaobioinfo.org/mutLBSgeneDB. We collected and curated over 2300 genes (mutLBSgenes) having ∼12 000 somatic mutations at ∼10 000 LBSs across 16 cancer types and selected 744 drug targetable genes (targetable_mutLBSgenes) by incorporating kinases, transcription factors, pharmacological genes, and cancer driver genes. We analyzed LBS mutation information, differential gene expression network, drug response correlation with gene expression, and protein stability changes for all mutLBSgenes using integrated genetic, genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, network and functional information. We calculated and compared the binding affinities of 20 carefully selected genes with their drugs in wild type and mutant forms. mutLBSgeneDB provides a user-friendly web interface for searching and browsing through seven categories of annotations: Gene summary, Mutated information, Protein structure related information, Differential gene expression and gene-gene network, Phenotype information, Pharmacological information, and Conservation information. mutLBSgeneDB provides a useful resource for functional genomics, protein structure, drug and disease research communities. PMID:27907895

  16. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1990-10-01

    DOE Order 5820.2A requires that low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites active on or after September 1988 and all transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites be monitored periodically to assure that radioactive contamination does not escape from the waste sites and pose a threat to the public or to the environment. This plan describes such a monitoring program for the active LLW disposal sites in SWSA 6 and the TRU waste storage sites in SWSA 5 North. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Mutational analysis of amino acid residues involved in catalytic activity of a family 18 chitinase from tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Keisuke; Yamagami, Takeshi; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kuhara, Satoru; Aso, Yoichi; Ishiguro, Masatsune

    2003-02-01

    We expressed chitinase-1 (TBC-1) from tulip bulbs (Tulipa bakeri) in E. coli cells and used site-directed mutagenesis to identify amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity. Mutations at Glu-125 and Trp-251 completely abolished enzyme activity, and activity decreased with mutations at Asp-123 and Trp-172 when glycolchitin was the substrate. Activity changed with the mutations of Trp-251 to one of several amino acids with side-chains of little hydrophobicity, suggesting that hydrophobic interaction of Trp-251 is important for the activity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis with hevamine as the model compound showed that the distance between Asp-123 and Glu-125 was extended by mutation of Trp-251. Kinetic studies of Trp-251-mutated chitinases confirmed these various phenomena. The results suggested that Glu-125 and Trp-251 are essential for enzyme activity and that Trp-251 had a direct role in ligand binding.

  18. Sites of preferential induction of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the nontranscribed strand of lacI correspond with sites of UV-induced mutation in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, D.R.; Awadallah, S.S.; Glickman, B.W. )

    1991-06-25

    An approach utilizing fluorescence-activated DNA sequencing technology was used to study the position and frequency of UV-induced lesions in the lacI gene of Escherichia coli. The spectrum of sites of UV damage in the NC+ region of the gene was compared with a published spectrum of UV-induced mutation in lacI . On average, the frequency of UV-induced lesions in the nontranscribed strand was higher than that in the transcribed strand in the region analyzed. A large fraction of mutations occurs at sites of UV-induced lesions in the nontranscribed strand, but not in the transcribed strand. This bias is reduced in an excision repair deficient (UvrB-) strain. In addition, mutations occur overwhelmingly at sites where a dipyrimidine sequence is present in the nontranscribed strand. This bias is also markedly reduced in the UvrB- strain. In light of recent work Mellon and Hanawalt describing the preferential removal of cyclobutane dimers from the transcribed strand of the expressed lacZ gene in E. coli, our data suggest that preferential strand repair may have a significant effect on mutagenesis.

  19. A new mutation site in the AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wufei; Hu, Zhen; Liao, Xiangyu; Chen, Xing; Huang, Wenrong; Zhong, Yu; Zeng, Zhaoyang

    2017-05-24

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1, OMIM 2403000) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that is caused by autoimmune regulator (AIRE). The main symptoms of APS-1 are chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, autoimmune adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison's disease) and hypoparathyroidism. We collected APS-1 cases and analysed them. The AIRE genes of the patient and his family members were sequenced to identify whether the APS-1 patient had an AIRE mutation. We discovered a mutation site (c.206A>C) that had never before been reported in the AIRE gene located in exon 2 of the AIRE gene. This homogyzous mutation caused a substitution of the 69th amino acid of the AIRE protein from glutamine to proline (p.Q69P). A yeast two-hybrid assay, which was used to analyse the homodimerization properties of the mutant AIRE protein, showed that the mutant AIRE protein could not interact with the normal AIRE protein. Flow cytometry and RT-qPCR analyses indicated that the new mutation site could decrease the expression levels of the AIRE, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1) proteins to affect central immune tolerance. In conclusion, our research has shown that the new mutation site (c.206A>C) may influence the homodimerization and expression levels and other aspects of the AIRE protein. It may also impact the expression levels of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), leading to a series of autoimmune diseases.

  20. Introduction of Site-Specific Mutations Into the Genome of Influenza Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enami, Masayoshi; Luytjes, Willem; Krystal, Mark; Palese, Peter

    1990-05-01

    We succeeded in rescuing infectious influenza virus by transfecting cells with RNAs derived from specific recombinant DNAs. RNA corresponding to the neuraminidase (NA) gene of influenza A/WSN/33 (WSN) virus was transcribed in vitro from plasmid DNA and, following the addition of purified influenza virus RNA polymerase complex, was transfected into MDBK cells. Superinfection with helper virus lacking the WSN NA gene resulted in the release of virus containing the WSN NA gene. We then introduced five point mutations into the WSN NA gene by cassette mutagenesis of the plasmid DNA. Sequence analysis of the rescued virus revealed that the genome contained all five mutations present in the mutated plasmid. The ability to create viruses with site-specific mutations will allow the engineering of influenza viruses with defined biological properties.

  1. KRAS-mutation incidence and prognostic value are metastatic site-specific in lung adenocarcinoma: poor prognosis in patients with KRAS mutation and bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lohinai, Zoltan; Klikovits, Thomas; Moldvay, Judit; Ostoros, Gyula; Raso, Erzsebet; Timar, Jozsef; Fabian, Katalin; Kovalszky, Ilona; Kenessey, István; Aigner, Clemens; Renyi-Vamos, Ferenc; Klepetko, Walter; Dome, Balazs; Hegedus, Balazs

    2017-01-01

    Current guidelines lack comprehensive information on the metastatic site-specific role of KRAS mutation in lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). We investigated the effect of KRAS mutation on overall survival (OS) in this setting. In our retrospective study, 500 consecutive Caucasian metastatic LADC patients with known KRAS mutational status were analyzed after excluding 32 patients with EGFR mutations. KRAS mutation incidence was 28.6%. The most frequent metastatic sites were lung (45.6%), bone (26.2%), adrenal gland (17.4%), brain (16.8%), pleura (15.6%) and liver (11%). Patients with intrapulmonary metastasis had significantly increased KRAS mutation frequency compared to those with extrapulmonary metastases (35% vs 26.5%, p = 0.0125). In contrast, pleural dissemination and liver involvement were associated with significantly decreased KRAS mutation incidence (vs all other metastatic sites; 17% (p < 0.001) and 16% (p = 0.02) vs 33%, respectively). Strikingly, we found a significant prognostic effect of KRAS status only in the bone metastatic subcohort (KRAS-wild-type vs KRAS-mutant; median OS 9.7 v 3.7 months; HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.31 to 0.79; p  = 0.003). Our study suggests that KRAS mutation frequency in LADC patients shows a metastatic site dependent variation and, moreover, that the presence of KRAS mutation is associated with significantly worse outcome in bone metastatic cases. PMID:28051122

  2. Enhancing human spermine synthase activity by engineered mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Zheng, Yueli; Petukh, Margo; Pegg, Anthony; Ikeguchi, Yoshihiko; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Spermine synthase (SMS) is an enzyme which function is to convert spermidine into spermine. It was shown that gene defects resulting in amino acid changes of the wild type SMS cause Snyder-Robinson syndrome, which is a mild-to-moderate mental disability associated with osteoporosis, facial asymmetry, thin habitus, hypotonia, and a nonspecific movement disorder. These disease-causing missense mutations were demonstrated, both in silico and in vitro, to affect the wild type function of SMS by either destabilizing the SMS dimer/monomer or directly affecting the hydrogen bond network of the active site of SMS. In contrast to these studies, here we report an artificial engineering of a more efficient SMS variant by transferring sequence information from another organism. It is confirmed experimentally that the variant, bearing four amino acid substitutions, is catalytically more active than the wild type. The increased functionality is attributed to enhanced monomer stability, lowering the pKa of proton donor catalytic residue, optimized spatial distribution of the electrostatic potential around the SMS with respect to substrates, and increase of the frequency of mechanical vibration of the clefts presumed to be the gates toward the active sites. The study demonstrates that wild type SMS is not particularly evolutionarily optimized with respect to the reaction spermidine → spermine. Having in mind that currently there are no variations (non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism, nsSNP) detected in healthy individuals, it can be speculated that the human SMS function is precisely tuned toward its wild type and any deviation is unwanted and disease-causing.

  3. Coumarin Derivatives as Substrate Probes of Mammalian Cytochromes P450 2B4 and 2B6: Assessing the Importance of 7-Alkoxy Chain Length, Halogen Substitution, and Non-Active Site Mutations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingbao; Shah, Manish B; Zhang, Qinghai; Stout, C David; Halpert, James R; Wilderman, P Ross

    2016-04-05

    Using a combined structural and biochemical approach, the functional importance of a recently described peripheral pocket bounded by the E-, F-, G-, and I-helices in CYP2B4 and 2B6 was probed. Three series of 4-substituted-7-alkoxycoumarin derivatives with -H, -CH3, or -CF3 at the 4 position of the coumarin core were used initially to monitor functional differences between CYP2B4 and 2B6. 7-Ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-EFC) displayed the highest catalytic efficiency among these substrates. Mutants were made to alter side-chain polarity (V/E194Q) or bulk (F/Y244W) to alter access to the peripheral pocket. Modest increases in catalytic efficiency of 7-EFC O-deethylation by the mutants were magnified considerably by chlorination or bromination of the substrate ethoxy chain. A structure of CYP2B6 Y244W in complex with (+)-α-pinene was solved at 2.2 Å and showed no CYMAL-5 in the peripheral pocket. A ligand free structure of CYP2B4 F244W was solved at 3.0 Å with CYMAL-5 in the peripheral pocket. In both instances, comparison of the respective wild-type and mutant CYP2B enzymes revealed that CYMAL-5 occupancy of the peripheral pocket had little effect on the topology of active site residue side-chains, despite the fact that the peripheral pocket and active site are located on opposite sides of the I-helix. Analysis of available CYP2B structures suggest that the effect of the amino acid substitutions within the peripheral pocket derive from altered interactions between the F and G helices.

  4. TERT promoter mutations and monoallelic activation of TERT in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, F W; Bielski, C M; Rinne, M L; Hahn, W C; Sellers, W R; Stegmeier, F; Garraway, L A; Kryukov, G V

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that promoter mutations in telomerase (TERT), the most common noncoding mutations in cancer, give rise to monoallelic expression of TERT. Through deep RNA sequencing, we find that TERT activation in human cancer cell lines can occur in either mono- or biallelic manner. Without exception, hotspot TERT promoter mutations lead to the re-expression of only one allele, accounting for approximately half of the observed cases of monoallelic TERT expression. Furthermore, we show that monoallelic TERT expression is highly prevalent in certain tumor types and widespread across a broad spectrum of cancers. Taken together, these observations provide insights into the mechanisms of TERT activation and the ramifications of noncoding mutations in cancer. PMID:26657580

  5. Identification of a novel splice-site mutation in MIP in a Chinese congenital cataract family

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jin; Jin, Chongfei; Wang, Wei; Tang, Xiajing; Shentu, Xingchao; Wu, Renyi; Wang, Yao; Xia, Kun

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To map the locus and identify the gene causing autosomal dominant congenital cataract (ADCC) with “snail-like” phenotype in a large Chinese family. Methods Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were conducted on family members and documented by slit lamp photography. Linkage analysis was performed with an initial 41 microsatellite markers, then 3 additional markers flanking the major intrinsic protein (MIP) gene. Mutations were screened by DNA sequencing and verified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Results Significant two-point LOD scores were obtained at 5 markers flanking MIP with the highest 3.08 (θ=0.00) at marker D12S1632. Mutation screening of MIP identified a heterozygous G>A transition at the acceptor splice site of intron 3 (IVS3 −1 G>A), abolishing a BstSF I restriction site in one allele of all the affected individuals. Conclusions We identified a novel splice-site mutation (IVS3 −1 G>A in MIP) in a Chinese ADCC family. To our knowledge, this is the first report on an acceptor splice-site mutation in human genes associated with ADCC. PMID:19137077

  6. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  7. Preferential sites in keratin 10 that are mutated in epidermolytic hyperkeratosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chipev, C.C.; Yang, J.M.; Steinert, P.M.; Marekov, L.; Compton, J.G.; Bale, S.J. ); DiGiovanna, J.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Epidermolytic hyperkeratosis (EH) is a rare autosomal dominant skin disease. Recent studies in the authors' laboratory established genetic linkage to the type II keratin gene locus on chromosome 12q in one family with EH and identified a single amino acid mutation in keratin 1 that is responsible for the disease. Other point mutations in the keratin 1 or keratin 10 genes have now been reported in other patients with EH. The authors have examined a series of probands with EH in order to develop a catalog of mutations in keratin 10. Using direct sequencing of PCR-amplified genomic DNA, they have identified mutations in six families, in which five mutations occur in the beginning of the 1A rod domain of keratin 10-namely, two Arg10 to His, one Arg10 to Cys, and Asn8 to His, and a Tyr14 to Asp. This region contains highly conserved residues among all keratins. An additional mutation (Leu103 to Gln) was found in the conserved region late in the 2B rod domain in keratin 10. The authors developed several allele-specific assays to assess the frequency of these mutations in the general population. No evidence was found for the presence of such changes in unaffected individuals. In vitro functional assays performed with peptides corresponding to the 1A mutations in these families show severely diminished capacity to disaggregate preformed keratin intermediate filaments, in comparison with a wild-type control peptide. Results from this work support the hypothesis that the beginning of the 1A rod domain segment in keratin 10 contains preferential sites for disease-causing mutation in EH. This should be of considerable use when developing prenatal diagnostic tests and biologically based therapies for this disease. 29 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Somatic mutations activating STAT3 in human inflammatory hepatocellular adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Pilati, Camilla; Amessou, Mohamed; Bihl, Michel P.; Balabaud, Charles; Van Nhieu, Jeanne Tran; Paradis, Valérie; Nault, Jean Charles; Izard, Tina; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Couchy, Gabrielle; Poussin, Karine

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory hepatocellular adenomas (IHCAs) are benign liver tumors. 60% of these tumors have IL-6 signal transducer (IL6ST; gp130) mutations that activate interleukin 6 (IL-6) signaling. Here, we report that 12% of IHCA subsets lacking IL6ST mutations harbor somatic signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mutations (6/49). Most of these mutations are amino acid substitutions in the SH2 domain that directs STAT3 dimerization. In contrast to wild-type STAT3, IHCA STAT3 mutants constitutively activated the IL-6 signaling pathway independent of ligand in hepatocellular cells. Indeed, the IHCA STAT3 Y640 mutant homodimerized independent of IL-6 and was hypersensitive to IL-6 stimulation. This was associated with phosphorylation of tyrosine 705, a residue required for IL-6–induced STAT3 activation. Silencing or inhibiting the tyrosine kinases JAK1 or Src, which phosphorylate STAT3, impaired constitutive activity of IHCA STAT3 mutants in hepatocellular cells. Thus, we identified for the first time somatic STAT3 mutations in human tumors, revealing a new mechanism of recurrent STAT3 activation and underscoring the role of the IL-6–STAT3 pathway in benign hepatocellular tumorigenesis. PMID:21690253

  9. De novo SCN2A splice site mutation in a boy with Autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background SCN2A is a gene that codes for the alpha subunit of voltage-gated, type II sodium channels, and is highly expressed in the brain. Sodium channel disruptions, such as mutations in SCN2A, may play an important role in psychiatric disorders. Recently, de novo SCN2A mutations in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been identified. The current study characterizes a de novo splice site mutation in SCN2A that alters mRNA and protein products. Case presentation We describe results from clinical and genetic characterizations of a seven-year-old boy with ASD. Psychiatric interview and gold standard autism diagnostic instruments (ADOS and ADI-R) were used to confirm ASD diagnosis, in addition to performing standardized cognitive and adaptive functioning assessments (Leiter-R and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale), and sensory reactivity assessments (Sensory Profile and Sensory Processing Scales). Genetic testing by whole exome sequencing revealed four de novo events, including a splice site mutation c.476 + 1G > A in SCN2A, a missense mutation (c.2263G > A) causing a p.V755I change in the TLE1 gene, and two synonymous mutations (c.2943A > G in the BUB1 gene, and c.1254 T > A in C10orf68 gene). The de novo SCN2A splice site mutation produced a stop codon 10 amino acids downstream, possibly resulting in a truncated protein and/or a nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The participant met new DSM-5 criteria for ASD, presenting with social and communication impairment, repetitive behaviors, and sensory reactivity issues. The participant’s adaptive and cognitive skills fell in the low range of functioning. Conclusion This report indicates that a splice site mutation in SCN2A might be contributing to the risk of ASD. Describing the specific phenotype associated with SCN2A mutations might help to reduce heterogeneity seen in ASD. PMID:24650168

  10. Mechanistic studies on beta-ketoacyl thiolase from Zoogloea ramigera: identification of the active-site nucleophile as Cys89, its mutation to Ser89, and kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of wild-type and mutant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, S; Mayerl, F; Peoples, O P; Masamune, S; Sinskey, A J; Walsh, C T

    1989-07-11

    Thiolase proceeds via covalent catalysis involving an acetyl-S-enzyme. The active-site thiol nucleophile is identified as Cys89 by acetylation with [14C]acetyl-CoA, rapid denaturation, tryptic digestion, and sequencing of the labeled peptide. The native acetyl enzyme is labile to hydrolytic decomposition with t 1/2 of 2 min at pH 7, 25 degrees C. Cys89 has been converted to the alternate nucleophile Ser89 by mutagenesis and the C89S enzyme overproduced, purified, and assessed for activity. The Ser89 enzyme retains 1% of the Vmax of the Cys89 enzyme in the direction of acetoacetyl-CoA thiolytic cleavage and 0.05% of the Vmax in the condensation of two acetyl-CoA molecules. A covalent acetyl-O-enzyme intermediate is detected on incubation with [14C]acetyl-CoA and isolation of the labeled Ser89-containing tryptic peptide. Comparisons of the Cys89 and Ser89 enzymes have been made for kinetic and thermodynamic stability of the acetyl enzyme intermediates both by isolation and by analysis of [32P]CoASH/acetyl-CoA partial reactions and for rate-limiting steps in catalysis with trideuterioacetyl-CoA.

  11. Myopathy phenotype of transgenic mice expressing active site-mutated inactive p94 skeletal muscle-specific calpain, the gene product responsible for limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, K; Taya, C; Hayashi, Y; Nakagawa, M; Ono, Y; Fukuda, R; Karasuyama, H; Toyama-Sorimachi, N; Katsui, Y; Hata, S; Ishiura, S; Nonaka, I; Seyama, Y; Arahata, K; Yonekawa, H; Sorimachi, H; Suzuki, K

    2000-05-22

    A defect of the gene for p94 (calpain 3), a skeletal muscle-specific calpain, is responsible for limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A), or 'calpainopathy', which is an autosomal recessive and progressive neuromuscular disorder. To study the relationships between the physiological functions of p94 and the etiology of LGMD2A, we created transgenic mice that express an inactive mutant of p94, in which the active site Cys129 is replaced by Ser (p94:C129S). Three lines of transgenic mice expressing p94:C129S mRNA at various levels showed significantly decreased grip strength. Sections of soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles of the aged transgenic mice showed increased numbers of lobulated and split fibers, respectively, which are often observed in limb girdle muscular dystrophy muscles. Centrally placed nuclei were also frequently found in the EDL muscle of the transgenic mice, whereas wild-type mice of the same age had almost none. There was more p94 protein produced in aged transgenic mice muscles and it showed significantly less autolytic degradation activity than that of wild-type mice. Although no necrotic-regenerative fibers were observed, the age and p94:C129S expression dependence of the phenotypes strongly suggest that accumulation of p94:C129S protein causes these myopathy phenotypes. The p94:C129S transgenic mice could provide us with crucial information on the molecular mech-anism of LGMD2A.

  12. Rec-Mediated Recombinational Hot Spot Activity in Bacteriophage Lambda II. a Mutation Which Causes Hot Spot Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Stephen T.; Stahl, Mary M.; McMilin, Kenneth D.; Stahl, Franklin W.

    1974-01-01

    Crosses have been performed which identify phage mutants (chi) which cause recombinational hot spot activity in λ. The hot spot activity is found in crosses of red- gam- chi- strains in rec+ hosts; in the crosses reported here, both the chi- mutations and the hot spot are located near the right end of the chromosome. The hot spot occurs in standard crosses as well as under conditions which block DNA synthesis, and is dependent on a functional host recB gene.—The chi mutation is shown to be dominant, but the tests do not show whether chi is a gene or a site. PMID:4415485

  13. A Novel ECM1 Splice Site Mutation in Lipoid Proteinosis: Case Report plus Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Linda K.; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Möllenhoff, Katrin; Dekomien, Gabriele; Epplen, Jörg T.; Hoffjan, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Lipoid proteinosis (LP) is an autosomal recessive genodermatosis known to be caused by mutations in ECM1. Nonsense and missense mutations are the most common variations in LP. Up to date, only 6 splice site mutations have been observed. We report on a 26-year-old female LP patient from a Turkish consanguineous family carrying a novel homozygous splice site mutation in intron 8 of the ECM1 gene and summarize the current knowledge on ECM1 mutations and possible genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:27194970

  14. Identification of thromboxane A2 synthase active site residues by molecular modeling-guided site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L H; Matijevic-Aleksic, N; Hsu, P Y; Ruan, K H; Wu, K K; Kulmacz, R J

    1996-08-16

    Human thromboxane A2 synthase (TXAS) exhibits spectral characteristics of cytochrome P450 but lacks monooxygenase activity. Its distinctive amino acid sequence makes TXAS the sole member of family 5 in the P450 superfamily. To better understand the structure-function relationship of this unusual P450, we have recently constructed a three-dimensional model for TXAS using P450BM-3 as the template (Ruan, K.-H., Milfeld, K., Kulmacz, R. J., and Wu, K. K. (1994) Protein Eng. 7, 1345-1551) and have identified a potential active site region. The catalytic roles of several putative active site residues were evaluated using selectively mutated recombinant TXAS expressed in COS-1 cells. Mutation of Ala-408 to Glu or Arg-413 to Gly led to a complete loss of enzyme activity despite expression of mutant protein levels equivalent to that of the wild-type TXAS. Mutation of Ala-408 to Gly or Leu retained the enzyme activity at levels of 30 or 40%, respectively. This suggests that Ala-408 provides a hydrophobic environment for substrate binding. Mutation of Arg-413 to Lys or Gln completely abolished the enzyme activity, indicating that this residue is essential to catalytic activity and supports its identification as an active site residue. Mutation of Arg-410 to Gly or Glu-433 to Ala resulted in >50% reduction in the enzyme activity without appreciably altering mutant protein expression, consistent with a more subtle effect of these residues on TXAS catalytic efficiency. Mutation of residues predicted to be involved in binding the heme prosthetic group, including the heme thiolate ligand Cys-480, Arg-478, Phe-127, and Asn-110, each markedly reduced the expressed protein level and abolished enzyme activity. This suggests that proper heme binding is important to synthesis or stability of recombinant TXAS. Mutation of Ile-346, which corresponds to P450cam-Thr-252, an essential amino acid involved in dioxygen bond scission, to Thr increased the enzymatic activity by 40%, suggesting

  15. Revealing the function of a novel splice-site mutation of CHD7 in CHARGE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeonghyeon; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Sagong, Borum; Koparir, Asuman; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Choi, Jae Young; Seven, Mehmet; Yuksel, Adnan; Kim, Un-Kyung; Ozen, Mustafa

    2016-02-01

    Most cases of CHARGE syndrome are sporadic and autosomal dominant. CHD7 is a major causative gene of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we screened CHD7 in two Turkish patients demonstrating symptoms of CHARGE syndrome such as coloboma, heart defect, choanal atresia, retarded growth, genital abnomalities and ear anomalies. Two mutations of CHD7 were identified including a novel splice-site mutation (c.2443-2A>G) and a previously known frameshift mutation (c.2504_2508delATCTT). We performed exon trapping analysis to determine the effect of the c.2443-2A>G mutation at the transcriptional level, and found that it caused a complete skip of exon 7 and splicing at a cryptic splice acceptor site. Our current study is the second study demonstrating an exon 7 deficit in CHD7. Results of previous studies suggest that the c.2443-2A>G mutation affects the formation of nasal tissues and the neural retina during early development, resulting in choanal atresia and coloboma, respectively. The findings of the present study will improve our understanding of the genetic causes of CHARGE syndrome.

  16. A splice site mutation in hERG leads to cryptic splicing in human long QT syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Qiuming; Zhang, Li; Moss, Arthur J.; Vincent, G. Michael; Ackerman, Michael J.; Robinson, Jeffrey C.; Jones, Melanie A.; Tester, David J.; Zhou, Zhengfeng

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) cause type 2 long QT syndrome. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the hERG splice site mutation 2398+1G>C and the genotype-phenotype relationship of mutation carriers in three unrelated kindreds with long QT syndrome. The effect of 2398+1G>C on mRNA splicing was studied by analysis of RNA isolated from lymphocytes of index patients and using minigenes expressed in HEK293 cells and neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the 2398+1G>C mutation disrupted the normal splicing and activated a cryptic splice donor site in intron 9, leading to the inclusion of 54 nt of the intron 9 sequence in hERG mRNA. The cryptic splicing resulted in an in-frame insertion of 18 amino acids in the middle of the cyclic nucleotide binding domain. In patch clamp experiments the splice mutant did not generate hERG current. Western blot and immunostaining studies showed that the mutant expressed an immature form of hERG protein that failed to reach the plasma membrane. Coexpression of the mutant and wild-type channels led to a dominant negative suppression of wild-type channel function by intracellular retention of heteromeric channels. Our results demonstrate that 2398+1G>C activates a cryptic site and generates a full-length hERG protein with an insertion of 18 amino acids, which leads to a trafficking defect of the mutant channel. PMID:18272172

  17. Mutational Analysis of the Putative High-Affinity Propofol Binding Site in Human β3 Homomeric GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Megan M.; Cao, Lily Q.; Chen, Ziwei; Franks, Nicholas P.; Evers, Alex S.

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a sedative and anesthetic agent that can both activate GABAA receptors and potentiate receptor activation elicited by submaximal concentrations of the transmitter. A recent modeling study of the β3 homomeric GABAA receptor postulated a high-affinity propofol binding site in a hydrophobic pocket in the middle of a triangular cleft lined by the M1 and M2 membrane-spanning domains of one subunit and the M2 domain of the neighboring subunit. The goal of the present study was to gain functional evidence for the involvement of this pocket in the actions of propofol. Human β3 and α1β3 receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the effects of substitutions of selected residues were probed on channel activation by propofol and pentobarbital. The data demonstrate the vital role of the β3(Y143), β3(F221), β3(Q224), and β3(T266) residues in the actions of propofol but not pentobarbital in β3 receptors. The effects of β3(Y143W) and β3(Q224W) on activation by propofol are likely steric because propofol analogs with less bulky ortho substituents activated both wild-type and mutant receptors. The T266W mutation removed activation by propofol in β3 homomeric receptors; however, this mutation alone or in combination with a homologous mutation (I271W) in the α1 subunit had almost no effect on activation properties in α1β3 heteromeric receptors. We hypothesize that heteromeric α1β3 receptors can be activated by propofol interactions with β3–β3, α1–β3, and β3–α1 interfaces, but the exact locations of the binding site and/or nature of interactions vary in different classes of interfaces. PMID:26206487

  18. Mutational Analysis of the Putative High-Affinity Propofol Binding Site in Human β3 Homomeric GABAA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Megan M; Cao, Lily Q; Chen, Ziwei; Franks, Nicholas P; Evers, Alex S; Akk, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    Propofol is a sedative and anesthetic agent that can both activate GABA(A) receptors and potentiate receptor activation elicited by submaximal concentrations of the transmitter. A recent modeling study of the β3 homomeric GABA(A) receptor postulated a high-affinity propofol binding site in a hydrophobic pocket in the middle of a triangular cleft lined by the M1 and M2 membrane-spanning domains of one subunit and the M2 domain of the neighboring subunit. The goal of the present study was to gain functional evidence for the involvement of this pocket in the actions of propofol. Human β3 and α1β3 receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the effects of substitutions of selected residues were probed on channel activation by propofol and pentobarbital. The data demonstrate the vital role of the β3(Y143), β3(F221), β3(Q224), and β3(T266) residues in the actions of propofol but not pentobarbital in β3 receptors. The effects of β3(Y143W) and β3(Q224W) on activation by propofol are likely steric because propofol analogs with less bulky ortho substituents activated both wild-type and mutant receptors. The T266W mutation removed activation by propofol in β3 homomeric receptors; however, this mutation alone or in combination with a homologous mutation (I271W) in the α1 subunit had almost no effect on activation properties in α1β3 heteromeric receptors. We hypothesize that heteromeric α1β3 receptors can be activated by propofol interactions with β3-β3, α1-β3, and β3-α1 interfaces, but the exact locations of the binding site and/or nature of interactions vary in different classes of interfaces.

  19. DNA fingerprinting reveals elevated mutation rates in herring gulls inhabiting a genotoxically contaminated site

    SciTech Connect

    Yauk, C.L.; Quinn, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    The authors used multi-locus DNA fingerprinting to examine families of herring gulls (Larus argentatus) from a genotoxically contaminated site (Hamilton Harbour) and from a pristine location (Kent Island, Bay of Fundy) to show significant differences in mutation rates between the locations. Overall the authors identified 17 mutant bands from 15 individuals of the 35 examined from Hamilton Harbour, and 7 mutant fragments from 7 individuals, of the 43 examined from Kent Island; a mutation frequency of 0.429 per nestling for Hamilton Harbour and 0.163 for Kent Island. The total number of individuals with mutant bands was significantly higher at Hamilton Harbour than at Kent Island (X{sup 2}=6.734; df = 1; P < 0.01). Ongoing analysis of other less contaminated sites also reveals lower mutation rates than those seen in Hamilton Harbour. With multi-locus DNA fingerprinting many regions of the genome can be surveyed simultaneously. The tandemly repeated arrays of nucleotides examined with DNA fingerprinting are known to have elevated rates of mutation. Furthermore, the mutations seen with DNA fingerprinting are predominantly heritable. Other biomarkers currently used in situ are not able to monitor direct and heritable DNA mutation, or measure biological endpoints that frequently result in spontaneous abortion creating difficulty in observing significantly elevated levels in viable offspring. The authors suggest that multilocus DNA fingerprinting can be used as a biomarker to identify potentially heritable risks before the onset of other types of ecological damage. This approach provides a direct measure of mutation in situ and in vivo in a vertebrate species under ambient conditions.

  20. A mutational analysis of the acetylcholine receptor channel transmitter binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Akk, G; Zhou, M; Auerbach, A

    1999-01-01

    Mutagenesis and single-channel kinetic analysis were used to investigate the roles of four acetylcholine receptor channel (AChR) residues that are candidates for interacting directly with the agonist. The EC50 of the ACh dose-response curve was increased following alpha-subunit mutations Y93F and Y198F and epsilon-subunit mutations D175N and E184Q. Single-channel kinetic modeling indicates that the increase was caused mainly by a reduced gating equilibrium constant (Theta) in alphaY198F and epsilonD175N, by an increase in the equilibrium dissociation constant for ACh (KD) and a reduction in Theta in alphaY93F, and only by a reduction in KD in epsilonE184Q. This mutation altered the affinity of only one of the two binding sites and was the only mutation that reduced competition by extracellular K+. Additional mutations of epsilonE184 showed that K+ competition was unaltered in epsilonE184D and was virtually eliminated in epsilonE184K, but that neither of these mutations altered the intrinsic affinity for ACh. Thus there is an apparent electrostatic interaction between the epsilonE184 side chain and K+ ( approximately 1.7kBT), but not ACh+. The results are discussed in terms of multisite and induced-fit models of ligand binding to the AChR. PMID:9876135

  1. Tumour mutation status and sites of metastasis in patients with cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Adler, Nikki R; Wolfe, Rory; Kelly, John W; Haydon, Andrew; McArthur, Grant A; McLean, Catriona A; Mar, Victoria J

    2017-09-26

    Cutaneous melanoma can metastasise haematogenously and/or lymphogenously to form satellite/in-transit, lymph node or distant metastasis. This study aimed to determine if BRAF and NRAS mutant and wild-type tumours differ in their site of first tumour metastasis and anatomical metastatic pathway. Prospective cohort of patients with a histologically confirmed primary cutaneous melanoma at three tertiary referral centres in Melbourne, Australia from 2010 to 2015. Multinomial regression determined clinical, histological and mutational factors associated with the site of first metastasis and metastatic pathway. Of 1048 patients, 306 (29%) developed metastasis over a median 4.7 year follow-up period. 73 (24%), 192 (63%) and 41 (13%) developed distant, regional lymph node and satellite/in-transit metastasis as the first site of metastasis, respectively. BRAF mutation was associated with lymph node metastasis (adjusted RRR 2.46 95% CI 1.07-5.69, P=0.04) and sentinel lymph node positivity (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.14-2.10, P=0.005). BRAF mutation and NRAS mutation were associated with increased odds of developing liver metastasis (aOR 3.09, 95% CI 1.49-6.42, P=0.003; aOR 3.17, 95% CI 1.32-7.58, P=0.01) and central nervous system (CNS) metastasis (aOR 4.65, 95% CI 2.23-9.69, P<0.001; aOR 4.03, 95% CI 1.72-9.44, P=0.001). NRAS mutation was associated with lung metastasis (aOR 2.44, 95% CI 1.21-4.93, P=0.01). BRAF mutation was found to be associated with lymph node metastasis as first metastasis and sentinel lymph node positivity. BRAF and NRAS mutations were associated with CNS and liver metastasis and NRAS mutation with lung metastasis. If these findings are validated in additional prospective studies, a role for heightened visceral organ surveillance may be warranted in patients with tumours harbouring these somatic mutations.

  2. Mutants of Tn3 resolvase which do not require accessory binding sites for recombination activity.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, P H; Blake, D G; Grindley, N D; Boocock, M R; Stark, W M

    1999-01-01

    Tn3 resolvase promotes site-specific recombination between two res sites, each of which has three resolvase dimer-binding sites. Catalysis of DNA-strand cleavage and rejoining occurs at binding site I, but binding sites II and III are required for recombination. We used an in vivo screen to detect resolvase mutants that were active on res sites with binding sites II and III deleted (that is, only site I remaining). Mutations of amino acids Asp102 (D102) or Met103 (M103) were sufficient to permit catalysis of recombination between site I and a full res, but not between two copies of site I. A double mutant resolvase, with a D102Y mutation and an additional activating mutation at Glu124 (E124Q), recombined substrates containing only two copies of site I, in vivo and in vitro. In these novel site Ixsite I reactions, product topology is no longer restricted to the normal simple catenane, indicating synapsis by random collision. Furthermore, the mutants have lost the normal specificity for directly repeated sites and supercoiled substrates; that is, they promote recombination between pairs of res sites in linear molecules, or in inverted repeat in a supercoiled molecule, or in separate molecules. PMID:10064606

  3. Mutations Outside the Anisomycin-Binding Site Can Make Ribosomes Drug-Resistant

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha,G.; Gurel, G.; Schroeder, S.; Moore, P.; Steitz, T.

    2008-01-01

    Eleven mutations that make Haloarcula marismortui resistant to anisomycin, an antibiotic that competes with the amino acid side chains of aminoacyl tRNAs for binding to the A-site cleft of the large ribosomal unit, have been identified in 23S rRNA. The correlation observed between the sensitivity of H. marismortui to anisomycin and the affinity of its large ribosomal subunits for the drug indicates that its response to anisomycin is determined primarily by the binding of the drug to its large ribosomal subunit. The structures of large ribosomal subunits containing resistance mutations show that these mutations can be divided into two classes: (1) those that interfere with specific drug-ribosome interactions and (2) those that stabilize the apo conformation of the A-site cleft of the ribosome relative to its drug-bound conformation. The conformational effects of some mutations of the second kind propagate through the ribosome for considerable distances and are reversed when A-site substrates bind to the ribosome.

  4. Aberrant 3′ splice sites in human disease genes: mutation pattern, nucleotide structure and comparison of computational tools that predict their utilization

    PubMed Central

    Vořechovský, Igor

    2006-01-01

    The frequency distribution of mutation-induced aberrant 3′ splice sites (3′ss) in exons and introns is more complex than for 5′ splice sites, largely owing to sequence constraints upstream of intron/exon boundaries. As a result, prediction of their localization remains a challenging task. Here, nucleotide sequences of previously reported 218 aberrant 3′ss activated by disease-causing mutations in 131 human genes were compared with their authentic counterparts using currently available splice site prediction tools. Each tested algorithm distinguished authentic 3′ss from cryptic sites more effectively than from de novo sites. The best discrimination between aberrant and authentic 3′ss was achieved by the maximum entropy model. Almost one half of aberrant 3′ss was activated by AG-creating mutations and ∼95% of the newly created AGs were selected in vivo. The overall nucleotide structure upstream of aberrant 3′ss was characterized by higher purine content than for authentic sites, particularly in position −3, that may be compensated by more stringent requirements for positive and negative nucleotide signatures centred around position −11. A newly developed online database of aberrant 3′ss will facilitate identification of splicing mutations in a gene or phenotype of interest and future optimization of splice site prediction tools. PMID:16963498

  5. In silico analysis of the thermodynamic stability changes of psychrophilic and mesophilic alpha-amylases upon exhaustive single-site mutations.

    PubMed

    Gilis, Dimitri

    2006-01-01

    Identifying sequence modifications that distinguish psychrophilic from mesophilic proteins is important for designing enzymes with different thermodynamic stabilities and to understand the underlying mechanisms. The PoPMuSiC algorithm is used to introduce, in silico, all the single-site mutations in four mesophilic and one psychrophilic chloride-dependent alpha-amylases and to evaluate the changes in thermodynamic stability. The analysis of the distribution of the sequence positions that could be stabilized upon mutation shows a clear difference between the three domains of psychrophilic and mesophilic alpha-amylases. Most of the mutations stabilizing the psychrophilic enzyme are found in domains B and C, contrary to the mesophilic proteins where they are preferentially situated in the catalytic domain A. Moreover, the calculations show that the environment of some residues responsible for the activity of the psychrophilic protein has evolved to reinforce favorable interactions with these residues. In the second part, these results are exploited to propose rationally designed mutations that are predicted to confer to the psychrophilic enzyme mesophilic-like thermodynamic properties. Interestingly, most of the mutations found in domain C strengthen the interactions with domain A, in agreement with suggestions made on the basis of structural analyses. Although this study focuses on single-site mutations, the thermodynamic effects of the recommended mutations should be additive if the mutated residues are not close in space.

  6. Missense mutations near the N-glycosylation site of the A2 domain lead to various intracellular trafficking defects in coagulation factor VIII

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Zheng, Chunlei; Zhu, Min; Zhu, Xiaofan; Yang, Renchi; Misra, Saurav; Zhang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Missense mutation is the most common mutation type in hemophilia. However, the majority of missense mutations remain uncharacterized. Here we characterize how hemophilia mutations near the unused N-glycosylation site of the A2 domain (N582) of FVIII affect protein conformation and intracellular trafficking. N582 is located in the middle of a short 310-helical turn (D580-S584), in which most amino acids have multiple hemophilia mutations. All 14 missense mutations found in this 310-helix reduced secretion levels of the A2 domain and full-length FVIII. Secreted mutants have decreased activities relative to WT FVIII. Selected mutations also lead to partial glycosylation of N582, suggesting that rapid folding of local conformation prevents glycosylation of this site in wild-type FVIII. Protease sensitivity, stability and degradation of the A2 domain vary among mutants, and between non-glycosylated and glycosylated species of the same mutant. Most of the mutants interact with the ER chaperone BiP, while only mutants with aberrant glycosylation interact with calreticulin. Our results show that the short 310-helix from D580 to S584 is critical for proper biogenesis of the A2 domain and FVIII, and reveal a range of molecular mechanisms by which FVIII missense mutations lead to moderate to severe hemophilia A. PMID:28327546

  7. Glucocerebrosidase activity in Parkinson's disease with and without GBA mutations.

    PubMed

    Alcalay, Roy N; Levy, Oren A; Waters, Cheryl C; Fahn, Stanley; Ford, Blair; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Mazzoni, Pietro; Pauciulo, Michael W; Nichols, William C; Gan-Or, Ziv; Rouleau, Guy A; Chung, Wendy K; Wolf, Pavlina; Oliva, Petra; Keutzer, Joan; Marder, Karen; Zhang, Xiaokui

    2015-09-01

    Glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations have been associated with Parkinson's disease in numerous studies. However, it is unknown whether the increased risk of Parkinson's disease in GBA carriers is due to a loss of glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity. We measured glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity in dried blood spots in patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 517) and controls (n = 252) with and without GBA mutations. Participants were recruited from Columbia University, New York, and fully sequenced for GBA mutations and genotyped for the LRRK2 G2019S mutation, the most common autosomal dominant mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity in dried blood spots was measured by a mass spectrometry-based assay and compared among participants categorized by GBA mutation status and Parkinson's disease diagnosis. Parkinson's disease patients were more likely than controls to carry the LRRK2 G2019S mutation (n = 39, 7.5% versus n = 2, 0.8%, P < 0.001) and GBA mutations or variants (seven homozygotes and compound heterozygotes and 81 heterozygotes, 17.0% versus 17 heterozygotes, 6.7%, P < 0.001). GBA homozygotes/compound heterozygotes had lower enzymatic activity than GBA heterozygotes (0.85 µmol/l/h versus 7.88 µmol/l/h, P < 0.001), and GBA heterozygotes had lower enzymatic activity than GBA and LRRK2 non-carriers (7.88 µmol/l/h versus 11.93 µmol/l/h, P < 0.001). Glucocerebrosidase activity was reduced in heterozygotes compared to non-carriers when each mutation was compared independently (N370S, P < 0.001; L444P, P < 0.001; 84GG, P = 0.003; R496H, P = 0.018) and also reduced in GBA variants associated with Parkinson's risk but not with Gaucher disease (E326K, P = 0.009; T369M, P < 0.001). When all patients with Parkinson's disease were considered, they had lower mean glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity than controls (11.14 µmol/l/h versus 11.85 µmol/l/h, P = 0.011). Difference compared to controls persisted in patients with

  8. Whole Exome Sequencing Reveals Novel PHEX Splice Site Mutations in Patients with Hypophosphatemic Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Gillies, Christopher; Sampson, Matthew G.; Kher, Vijay; Sethi, Sidharth K.; Otto, Edgar A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) is a heterogeneous genetic phosphate wasting disorder. The disease is most commonly caused by mutations in the PHEX gene located on the X-chromosome or by mutations in CLCN5, DMP1, ENPP1, FGF23, and SLC34A3. The aims of this study were to perform molecular diagnostics for four patients with HR of Indian origin (two independent families) and to describe their clinical features. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) for the affected mother of two boys who also displayed the typical features of HR, including bone malformations and phosphate wasting. B-lymphoblast cell lines were established by EBV transformation and subsequent RT-PCR to investigate an uncommon splice site variant found by WES. An in silico analysis was done to obtain accurate nucleotide frequency occurrences of consensus splice positions other than the canonical sites of all human exons. Additionally, we applied direct Sanger sequencing for all exons and exon/intron boundaries of the PHEX gene for an affected girl from an independent second Indian family. Results WES revealed a novel PHEX splice acceptor mutation in intron 9 (c.1080-3C>A) in a family with 3 affected individuals with HR. The effect on splicing of this mutation was further investigated by RT-PCR using RNA obtained from a patient’s EBV-transformed lymphoblast cell line. RT-PCR revealed an aberrant splice transcript skipping exons 10-14 which was not observed in control samples, confirming the diagnosis of X-linked dominant hypophosphatemia (XLH). The in silico analysis of all human splice sites adjacent to all 327,293 exons across 81,814 transcripts among 20,345 human genes revealed that cytosine is, with 64.3%, the most frequent nucleobase at the minus 3 splice acceptor position, followed by thymidine with 28.7%, adenine with 6.3%, and guanine with 0.8%. We generated frequency tables and pictograms for the extended donor and acceptor splice consensus regions by analyzing all human

  9. Activating Somatic FGFR2 Mutations in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reintjes, Nadine; Li, Yun; Becker, Alexandra; Rohmann, Edyta; Schmutzler, Rita; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    It is known that FGFR2 gene variations confer a risk for breast cancer. FGFR2 and FGF10, the main ligand of FGFR2, are both overexpressed in 5–10% of breast tumors. In our study, we sequenced the most important coding regions of FGFR2 in somatic tumor tissue of 140 sporadic breast cancer patients and performed MLPA analysis to detect copy number variations in FGFR2 and FGF10. We identified one somatic heterozygous missense mutation, p.K660N (c.1980G>C), within the tyrosine kinase domain of FGFR2 in tumor tissue of a sporadic breast cancer patient, which is likely mediated by the FGFR2-IIIb isoform. The presence of wild type and mutated alleles in equal quantities suggests that the mutation has driven clonal amplification of mutant cells. We have analyzed the tyrosine kinase activity of p.K660N and another recently described somatic breast cancer mutation in FGFR2, p.R203C, after expression in HEK293 cells and demonstrated that the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity of both mutant proteins is strongly increased resulting in elevated phosphorylation and activity of downstream effectors. To our knowledge, this is the first report of functional analysis of somatic breast cancer mutations in FGFR2 providing evidence for the activating nature of FGFR2-mediated signalling in the pathogenesis of breast cancer. PMID:23527311

  10. Acute intermittent porphyria: characterization of two novel mutations in the porphobilinogen deaminase gene, one amino acid deletion (453-455delAGC) and one splicing aceptor site mutation (IVS8-1G>T).

    PubMed

    De Siervi, A; Mendez, M; Parera, V E; Varela, L; Batlle, A M; Rossetti, M V

    1999-10-01

    A partial deficiency of Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) is responsible for acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). AIP is inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion, and the prevalence in the Argentinean population is about 1:125,000. Here, two new mutations and three previously reported were found in the PBG-D gene in 12 Argentinean AIP patients corresponding to 5 different families. To screen for AIP mutations in symptomatic patients, genomic DNA isolated was amplified in 2 Multiplex PCR reactions, then all coding exons and flanking intronic regions were sequenced. The new mutations are 453-455delAGC in exon 9 which results in the loss of an alanine residue at position 152, and one new point mutation in the splicing aceptor site in the last position of intron 8 (IVS8-1G>T) which leds to a 15 bp deletion because a cryptic site (first AG upstream) is used. Both mutations produce amino acid deletion without frameshift effect. To further characterize the 453-455delAGC mutation, the pKK-PBGD construct for the mutant allele was expressed in E. coli, the enzymatic activity of the recombinant protein was 1.3% of the mean level expressed by the normal allele. Finally, three missense mutations, previously reported, were identified in three unrelated families. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  12. Partial deficiency of emerin caused by a splice site mutation in EMD.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Junhui; Ando, Masahiro; Higuchi, Itsuro; Sakiyama, Yusuke; Matsuura, Eiji; Michizono, Kumiko; Watanabe, Osamu; Nagano, Shinjiro; Inamori, Yukie; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Higuchi, Yujiro; Yoshimura, Akiko; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) is caused by mutations in the EMD gene on the X chromosome, which codes for emerin, an inner nuclear membrane protein. Monoclonal antibodies against the N-terminus of emerin protein are used to screen for emerin deficiency in clinical practice. However, these tests may not accurately reflect the disease in some cases. We herein describe the identification of a splice site mutation in the EMD gene in a Japanese patient who suffered from complete atrioventricular conduction block, mild muscle weakness and joint contracture, and a persistently elevated serum creatine kinase level. We used multiple antibodies to confirm the presence of a novel truncating mutation in emerin without the transmembrane region and C-terminus in the skeletal muscle.

  13. Novel splice site mutation in CNNM4 gene in a family with Jalili syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cherkaoui Jaouad, Imane; Lyahyai, Jaber; Guaoua, Soukaina; El Alloussi, Mustapha; Zrhidri, Abdelali; Doubaj, Yassamine; Boulanouar, Abdelkrim; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2017-05-01

    Jalili syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by the association of amelogenesis imperfecta and cone-rod retinal dystrophy. This syndrome is caused by mutations in the CNNM4 gene. Different types of CNNM4 mutations have been reported; missense, nonsense, large deletions, single base insertion, and duplication. We used Sanger sequencing to analyze a large consanguineous family with three siblings affected with Jalili syndrome, suspected clinically after dental and ophthalmological examination. These patients are carrying a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site acceptor of intron 3 (c.1682-1G > C) in the CNNM4 gene. We compare the findings of the present family to those from literature, in order to further delineate Jalili syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of single-site mutations on hydrophobic-polar lattice proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Wüst, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P

    2014-09-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground-state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities, may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  15. Effect of single-site mutations on hydrophobic-polar lattice proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Wüst, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P.

    2014-09-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground-state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities, may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  16. Activating and inactivating mutations in the human GNAS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Aldred, M A; Trembath, R C

    2000-09-01

    GNAS1 on chromosome 20 is a complex locus, encoding multiple proteins, of which G(s)alpha, the alpha-subunit of the heterotrimeric stimulatory G protein G(s), is of particular interest clinically. Amino acid substitutions at two specific codons lead to constitutive activation of G(s)alpha. Such gain-of-function mutations are found in a variety of sporadic endocrine tumors and in McCune-Albright syndrome, a sporadic condition characterized by multiple endocrine abnormalities. Heterozygous loss of G(s)alpha function results in the dominantly inherited condition, Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO). Here we present a review of published GNAS1 mutations and report 19 additional mutations, of which 15 are novel. A diverse range of inactivating mutations has been detected, scattered throughout the gene but showing some evidence of clustering. Only one, a recurring 4 bp deletion in exon 7, could be considered common among AHO patients. The parental origin of the mutation apparently determines whether or not the patient shows end-organ resistance to hormones such as parathyroid hormone. G(s)alpha is biallelically expressed in all tissues studied to date and thus there is no direct evidence that this transcript is imprinted. However, the recent identification of other imprinted transcripts encoded by GNAS1 and overlapping G(s)alpha, together with at least one imprinted antisense transcript, raises intriguing questions about how the primary effect of mutations in GNAS1 might be modulated. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Relating aromatic hydrocarbon-induced DNA adducts and c-H-ras mutations in mouse skin papillomas: the role of apurinic sites.

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, D; Pelling, J C; Cavalieri, E L; Rogan, E G

    1995-01-01

    Mouse skin tumors contain activated c-H-ras oncogenes, often caused by point mutations at codons 12 and 13 in exon 1 and codons 59 and 61 in exon 2. Mutagenesis by the noncoding apurinic sites can produce G-->T and A-->T transversions by DNA misreplication with more frequent insertion of deoxyadenosine opposite the apurinic site. Papillomas were induced in mouse skin by several aromatic hydrocarbons, and mutations in the c-H-ras gene were determined to elucidate the relationship among DNA adducts, apurinic sites, and ras oncogene mutations. Dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P), DB[a,l]P-11,12-dihydrodiol, anti-DB[a,l]P-11,12-diol-13,14-epoxide, DB[a,l]P-8,9-dihydrodiol, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-DMBA consistently induced a CAA-->CTA mutation in codon 61 of the c-H-ras oncogene. Benzo[a]pyrene induced a GGC-->GTC mutation in codon 13 in 54% of tumors and a CAA-->CTA mutation in codon 61 in 15%. The pattern of mutations induced by each hydrocarbon correlated with its profile of DNA adducts. For example, both DB[a,l]P and DMBA primarily form DNA adducts at the N-3 and/or N-7 of deoxyadenosine that are lost from the DNA by depurination, generating apurinic sites. Thus, these results support the hypothesis that misreplication of unrepaired apurinic sites generated by loss of hydrocarbon-DNA adducts is responsible for transforming mutations leading to papillomas in mouse skin. PMID:7479797

  18. A founder splice site mutation underlies glycogen storage disease type 3 in consanguineous Saudi families.

    PubMed

    Basit, Sulman; Malibari, Omhani; Al Balwi, Alia Mahmood; Abdusamad, Firoz; Abu Ismail, Feras

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 3 (GSD III) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by genetic mutations in the gene AGL. AGL encodes amylo-a-1, 6-glucosidase, 4-a-glucanotransferase, a glycogen debranching enzyme. GSD III is characterized by fasting hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, growth retardation, progressive myopathy, and cardiomyopathy due to storage of abnormally structured glycogen in both skeletal and cardiac muscles and/or liver. The aim of this study is to detect mutations underlying GSD III in Saudi patients. A cross-sectional clinical genetic study of 5 Saudi consanguineous families examined at the metabolic clinic of the Madinah Maternity and Children Hospital. We present a biochemical and molecular analysis of 5 consanguineous Saudi families with GSD III. DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood of 31 individuals, including 12 patients, and the AGL gene was sequenced bidirectionally. DNA sequences were compared with the AGL reference sequence from the ensemble genome browser. Genotyping and sequence analysis identified a homozygous intronic splice acceptor site mutation (IVS32-12A > G) in 4 families perfectly segregating with the phenotype. Complementary (c)DNA sequence analysis of the AGL gene revealed an 11-bp sequence insertion between exon 32 and exon 33 due to the creation of a new 3' splice site. The predicted mutant enzyme was truncated by 112 carboxyl-terminal amino acids as a result of premature termination. Haplotype analysis revealed that the mutation arises as a result of founder effect, not an independent event. This is the first report of a genetic mutation in the AGL gene from Saudi Arabia. Screening for this mutation can improve genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of GSD III in Saudi Arabia.

  19. A de novo splice site mutation in CASK causes FG syndrome-4 and congenital nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Dunn, P; Prigatano, G P; Szelinger, S; Roth, J; Siniard, A L; Claasen, A M; Richholt, R F; De Both, M; Corneveaux, J J; Moskowitz, A M; Balak, C; Piras, I S; Russell, M; Courtright, A L; Belnap, N; Rangasamy, S; Ramsey, K; Opitz, J M; Craig, D W; Narayanan, V; Huentelman, M J; Schrauwen, I

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in CASK cause X-linked intellectual disability, microcephaly with pontine and cerebellar hypoplasia, optic atrophy, nystagmus, feeding difficulties, GI hypomotility, and seizures. Here we present a patient with a de novo carboxyl-terminus splice site mutation in CASK (c.2521-2A>G) and clinical features of the rare FG syndrome-4 (FGS4). We provide further characterization of genotype-phenotype correlations in CASK mutations and the presentation of nystagmus and the FGS4 phenotype. There is considerable variability in clinical phenotype among patients with a CASK mutation, even among variants predicted to have similar functionality. Our patient presented with developmental delay, nystagmus, and severe gastrointestinal and gastroesophageal complications. From a cognitive and neuropsychological perspective, language skills and IQ are within normal range, although visual-motor, motor development, behavior, and working memory were impaired. The c.2521-2A>G splice mutation leads to skipping of exon 26 and a 9 base-pair deletion associated with a cryptic splice site, leading to a 28-AA and a 3-AA in-frame deletion, respectively (p.Ala841_Lys843del and p.Ala841_Glu868del). The predominant mutant transcripts contain an aberrant guanylate kinase domain and thus are predicted to degrade CASK's ability to interact with important neuronal and ocular development proteins, including FRMD7. Upregulation of CASK as well as dysregulation among a number of interactors is also evident by RNA-seq. This is the second CASK mutation known to us as cause of FGS4. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  1. Mutational analysis of the transferrin receptor reveals overlapping HFE and transferrin binding sites.

    PubMed

    West, A P; Giannetti, A M; Herr, A B; Bennett, M J; Nangiana, J S; Pierce, J R; Weiner, L P; Snow, P M; Bjorkman, P J

    2001-10-19

    The transferrin receptor (TfR) binds two proteins critical for iron metabolism: transferrin (Tf) and HFE, the protein mutated in hereditary hemochromatosis. Previous results demonstrated that Tf and HFE compete for binding to TfR, suggesting that Tf and HFE bind to the same or an overlapping site on TfR. TfR is a homodimer that binds one Tf per polypeptide chain (2:2, TfR/Tf stoichiometry), whereas both 2:1 and 2:2 TfR/HFE stoichiometries have been observed. In order to more fully characterize the interaction between HFE and TfR, we determined the binding stoichiometry using equilibrium gel-filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation. Both techniques indicate that a 2:2 TfR/HFE complex can form at submicromolar concentrations in solution, consistent with the hypothesis that HFE competes for Tf binding to TfR by blocking the Tf binding site rather than by exerting an allosteric effect. To determine whether the Tf and HFE binding sites on TfR overlap, residues at the HFE binding site on TfR were identified from the 2.8 A resolution HFE-TfR co-crystal structure, then mutated and tested for their effects on HFE and Tf binding. The binding affinities of soluble TfR mutants for HFE and Tf were determined using a surface plasmon resonance assay. Substitutions of five TfR residues at the HFE binding site (L619A, R629A, Y643A, G647A and F650Q) resulted in significant reductions in Tf binding affinity. The findings that both HFE and Tf form 2:2 complexes with TfR and that mutations at the HFE binding site affect Tf binding support a model in which HFE and Tf compete for overlapping binding sites on TfR. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  2. Distributions of selectively constrained sites and deleterious mutation rates in the hominid and murid genomes.

    PubMed

    Eory, Lél; Halligan, Daniel L; Keightley, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Protein-coding sequences make up only about 1% of the mammalian genome. Much of the remaining 99% has been long assumed to be junk DNA, with little or no functional significance. Here, we show that in hominids, a group with historically low effective population sizes, all classes of noncoding DNA evolve more slowly than ancestral transposable elements and so appear to be subject to significant evolutionary constraints. Under the nearly neutral theory, we expected to see lower levels of selective constraints on most sequence types in hominids than murids, a group that is thought to have a higher effective population size. We found that this is the case for many sequence types examined, the most extreme example being 5'UTRs, for which constraint in hominids is only about one-third that of murids. Surprisingly, however, we observed higher constraints for some sequence types in hominids, notably 4-fold sites, where constraint is more than twice as high as in murids. This implies that more than about one-fifth of mutations at 4-fold sites are effectively selected against in hominids. The higher constraint at 4-fold sites in hominids suggests a more complex protein-coding gene structure than murids and indicates that methods for detecting selection on protein-coding sequences (e.g., using the d(N)/d(S) ratio), with 4-fold sites as a neutral standard, may lead to biased estimates, particularly in hominids. Our constraint estimates imply that 5.4% of nucleotide sites in the human genome are subject to effective negative selection and that there are three times as many constrained sites within noncoding sequences as within protein-coding sequences. Including coding and noncoding sites, we estimate that the genomic deleterious mutation rate U = 4.2. The mutational load predicted under a multiplicative model is therefore about 99% in hominids.

  3. Frequent activation of the β-catenin gene in sporadic colorectal carcinomas: A mutational & expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Mumtaz; Kochhar, Rakesh; Singh, Rajinder; Bhatia, Alka; Vaiphei, Kim; Mahmood, Akhtar; Mahmood, Safrun

    2016-11-01

    β-catenin (CTNNB1), an oncogene/onco-protein and an adhesion molecule is a key effector in colorectal cancer (CRC). Its activation, and subsequent up-regulation of Wnt-signaling, is an important event in the development of certain human cancers including CRC. Mutations in the β-catenin gene in the region of serine-threonine glycogen kinase (GSK)-3β phosphorylation target sites have been identified in colorectal cancer in humans. In the current study, we investigated 60 sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas along with adjoining and normal mucosa cases in humans for β-catenin mutations. Thirteen of sixty colorectal tumors from humans had point mutations with a frequency of 21.66% at codons 24, 26, 27, 32, 34, 35, 41, 42,43, 46, 49, 54, 55, or 67 sites which are mutated in colorectal cancer and some of these sites in other cancers. Thus, there appears to be a key involvement of β-catenin activation in human colorectal carcinogenesis. mRNA expression analysis using q-Real Time PCR showed 21.5-fold up-regulation of β-catenin mRNA in tumor tissue compared to normal and adjoining mucosa. Protein expression analysis using immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and Western blot confirmed aberrant accumulation of β-catenin protein along the nucleus and cytoplasm following mutation. The observed mutations and up-regulation of mRNA in tumors, and the increased expression of β-catenin protein in CRC suggest that these alterations are early and prognostic events in sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis in humans. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of human septin 1 with site-directed mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hao; Yu, Wen-bo; Li, Shu-xing; Ding, Xiang-ming; Yu, Long; Bi, Ru-Chang

    2006-02-01

    The homogeneity of septin 1 has been improved by site-directed mutation of serine residues and only a small alteration in the secondary structure is observed to arise from the mutations. Crystals of the septin 1 mutant were grown and diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Septin 1 is a member of an evolutionarily conserved family of GTP-binding and filament-forming proteins named septins, which function in diverse processes including cytokinasis, vesicle trafficking, apoptosis, remodelling of the cytoskeleton, infection, neurodegeneration and neoplasia. Human septin 1 has been expressed and purified, but suffers from severe aggregation. Studies have shown that septin 1 with site-directed mutations of five serine residues (Ser19, Ser206, Ser307, Ser312 and Ser315) has a much lower degree of aggregation and better structural homogeneity and that the mutations cause only slight perturbations in the secondary structure of septin 1. This septin 1 mutant was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. The space group is P422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 106.028, c = 137.852 Å.

  5. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  6. The active site of melanopsin: the biological clock photoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Sekharan, Sivakumar; Wei, Jennifer N; Batista, Victor S

    2012-12-05

    The nonvisual ocular photoreceptor melanopsin, found in the neurons of vertebrate inner retina, absorbs blue light and triggers the "biological clock" of mammals by activating the suprachiasmatic nuclei (a small region of the brain that regulates the circadian rhythms of neuronal and hormonal activities over 24 h cycles). The structure of melanopsin, however, has yet to be established. Here, we propose for the first time a structural model of the active site of mouse melanopsin. The homology model is based on the crystal structure of squid rhodopsin (λ(max) = 490 nm) and shows a maximal absorbance (λ(max) = 447 nm) consistent with the observed absorption of the photoreceptor. The 43 nm spectral shift is due to an increased bond-length alternation of the protonated Schiff base of 11-cis-retinal chromophore, induced by N87Q mutation and water-mediated H-bonding interactions with the Schiff base linkage. These findings, analogous to spectral changes observed in the G89Q bovine rhodopsin mutant, suggest that single site mutations can convert photopigments into visual light sensors or nonvisual sensory photoreceptors.

  7. Functional effects of mutations in the tropomyosin-binding sites of tropomodulin1 and tropomodulin3

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Raymond A.; Yamashiro, Sawako; Gokhin, David S.; Fowler, Velia M.

    2015-01-01

    Tropomodulins (Tmods) interact with tropomyosins (TMs) via two TM-binding sites and cap the pointed ends of TM-coated actin filaments. To study the functional interplay between TM binding and TM-actin filament capping by Tmods, we introduced disabling mutations into the first, second, or both TM-binding sites of full-length Tmod1 (Tmod1-L27G, Tmod1-I131D, and Tmod1-L27G/I131D, respectively) and full-length Tmod3 (Tmod3-L29G, Tmod3-L134D, and Tmod3-L29G/L134D, respectively). Tmod1 and Tmod3 showed somewhat different TM-binding site utilization, but nearly all TM binding was abolished in Tmod1-L27G/I131D and Tmod3-L29G/L134D. Disruption of Tmod-TM binding had a modest effect on Tmod1's ability and no effect on Tmod3's ability to stabilize TM-actin pointed ends against latrunculin A-induced depolymerization. However, disruption of Tmod-TM binding did significantly impair the ability of Tmod3 to reduce elongation rates at pointed ends with α/βTM, albeit less so with TM5NM1, and not at all with TM5b. For Tmod1, disruption of Tmod-TM binding only slightly impaired its ability to reduce elongation rates with α/βTM and TM5NM1, but not at all with TM5b. Thus, Tmod-TM binding has a greater influence on Tmods’ ability to inhibit subunit association as compared to dissociation from TM-actin pointed ends, particularly for α/βTM, with Tmod3's activity being more dependent on TM binding than Tmod1's activity. Nevertheless, disruption of Tmod1-TM binding precluded Tmod1 targeting to thin filament pointed ends in cardiac myocytes, suggesting that the functional effects of Tmod-TM binding on TM-coated actin filament capping can be significantly modulated by the in vivo conformation of the pointed end or other factors in the intracellular environment. PMID:24922351

  8. A Novel Splice-Site Mutation in the GJB2 Gene Causing Mild Postlingual Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, Marta; del Castillo, Francisco J.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Francisco J.; Garrido, Gema; Villamar, Manuela; Calderón, Manuela; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A.; Moreno, Felipe; del Castillo, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The DFNB1 subtype of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, caused by mutations affecting the GJB2 (connection-26) gene, is highly prevalent in most populations worldwide. DFNB1 hearing impairment is mostly severe or profound and usually appears before the acquisition of speech (prelingual onset), though a small number of hypomorphic missense mutations result in mild or moderate deafness of postlingual onset. We identified a novel GJB2 splice-site mutation, c. -22-2A>C, in three siblings with mild postlingual hearing impairment that were compound heterozygous for c. -22-2A>C and c.35delG. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments performed on total RNA extracted from saliva samples from one of these siblings confirmed that c. -22-2A>C abolished the acceptor splice site of the single GJB2 intron, resulting in the absence of normally processed transcripts from this allele. However, we did isolate transcripts from the c. -22-2A>C allele that keep an intact GJB2 coding region and that were generated by use of an alternative acceptor splice site previously unknown. The residual expression of wild-type connection-26 encoded by these transcripts probably underlies the mild severity and late onset of the hearing impairment of these subjects. PMID:24039984

  9. Antisense suppression of donor splice site mutations in the dystrophin gene transcript

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Sue; Meloni, Penny L; Johnsen, Russell D; Wong, Brenda L; Muntoni, Francesco; Wilton, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    We describe two donor splice site mutations, affecting dystrophin exons 16 and 45 that led to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), through catastrophic inactivation of the mRNA. These gene lesions unexpectedly resulted in the retention of the downstream introns, thereby increasing the length of the dystrophin mRNA by 20.2 and 36 kb, respectively. Splice-switching antisense oligomers targeted to exon 16 excised this in-frame exon and the following intron from the patient dystrophin transcript very efficiently in vitro, thereby restoring the reading frame and allowing synthesis of near-normal levels of a putatively functional dystrophin isoform. In contrast, targeting splice-switching oligomers to exon 45 in patient cells promoted only modest levels of an out-of-frame dystrophin transcript after transfection at high oligomer concentrations, whereas dual targeting of exons 44 and 45 or 45 and 46 resulted in more efficient exon skipping, with concomitant removal of intron 45. The splice site mutations reported here appear highly amenable to antisense oligomer intervention. We suggest that other splice site mutations may need to be evaluated for oligomer interventions on a case-by-case basis. PMID:24498612

  10. Active Site and Remote Contributions to Catalysis in Methylthioadenosine Nucleosidases

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Keisha; Cameron, Scott A.; Almo, Steven C.; Burgos, Emmanuel S.; Gulab, Shivali A.; Schramm, Vern L.

    2015-03-25

    5'-Methylthioadenosine/S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine nucleosidases (MTANs) catalyze the hydrolysis of 5'-methylthioadenosine to adenine and 5-methylthioribose. The amino acid sequences of the MTANs from Vibrio cholerae (VcMTAN) and Escherichia coli (EcMTAN) are 60% identical and 75% similar. Protein structure folds and kinetic properties are similar. However, binding of transition-state analogues is dominated by favorable entropy in VcMTAN and by enthalpy in EcMTAN. Catalytic sites of VcMTAN and EcMTAN in contact with reactants differ by two residues; Ala113 and Val153 in VcMTAN are Pro113 and Ile152, respectively, in EcMTAN. Here, we mutated the VcMTAN catalytic site residues to match those of EcMTAN in anticipation of altering its properties toward EcMTAN. Inhibition of VcMTAN by transition-state analogues required filling both active sites of the homodimer. However, in the Val153Ile mutant or double mutants, transition-state analogue binding at one site caused complete inhibition. Therefore, a single amino acid, Val153, alters the catalytic site cooperativity in VcMTAN. The transition-state analogue affinity and thermodynamics in mutant VcMTAN became even more unlike those of EcMTAN, the opposite of expectations from catalytic site similarity; thus, catalytic site contacts in VcMTAN are unable to recapitulate the properties of EcMTAN. X-ray crystal structures of EcMTAN, VcMTAN, and a multiple-site mutant of VcMTAN most closely resembling EcMTAN in catalytic site contacts show no major protein conformational differences. In conclusion, the overall protein architectures of these closely related proteins are implicated in contributing to the catalytic site differences.

  11. Active Site and Remote Contributions to Catalysis in Methylthioadenosine Nucleosidases

    DOE PAGES

    Thomas, Keisha; Cameron, Scott A.; Almo, Steven C.; ...

    2015-03-25

    5'-Methylthioadenosine/S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine nucleosidases (MTANs) catalyze the hydrolysis of 5'-methylthioadenosine to adenine and 5-methylthioribose. The amino acid sequences of the MTANs from Vibrio cholerae (VcMTAN) and Escherichia coli (EcMTAN) are 60% identical and 75% similar. Protein structure folds and kinetic properties are similar. However, binding of transition-state analogues is dominated by favorable entropy in VcMTAN and by enthalpy in EcMTAN. Catalytic sites of VcMTAN and EcMTAN in contact with reactants differ by two residues; Ala113 and Val153 in VcMTAN are Pro113 and Ile152, respectively, in EcMTAN. Here, we mutated the VcMTAN catalytic site residues to match those of EcMTAN in anticipation ofmore » altering its properties toward EcMTAN. Inhibition of VcMTAN by transition-state analogues required filling both active sites of the homodimer. However, in the Val153Ile mutant or double mutants, transition-state analogue binding at one site caused complete inhibition. Therefore, a single amino acid, Val153, alters the catalytic site cooperativity in VcMTAN. The transition-state analogue affinity and thermodynamics in mutant VcMTAN became even more unlike those of EcMTAN, the opposite of expectations from catalytic site similarity; thus, catalytic site contacts in VcMTAN are unable to recapitulate the properties of EcMTAN. X-ray crystal structures of EcMTAN, VcMTAN, and a multiple-site mutant of VcMTAN most closely resembling EcMTAN in catalytic site contacts show no major protein conformational differences. In conclusion, the overall protein architectures of these closely related proteins are implicated in contributing to the catalytic site differences.« less

  12. Active site and remote contributions to catalysis in methylthioadenosine nucleosidases.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Keisha; Cameron, Scott A; Almo, Steven C; Burgos, Emmanuel S; Gulab, Shivali A; Schramm, Vern L

    2015-04-21

    5'-Methylthioadenosine/S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine nucleosidases (MTANs) catalyze the hydrolysis of 5'-methylthioadenosine to adenine and 5-methylthioribose. The amino acid sequences of the MTANs from Vibrio cholerae (VcMTAN) and Escherichia coli (EcMTAN) are 60% identical and 75% similar. Protein structure folds and kinetic properties are similar. However, binding of transition-state analogues is dominated by favorable entropy in VcMTAN and by enthalpy in EcMTAN. Catalytic sites of VcMTAN and EcMTAN in contact with reactants differ by two residues; Ala113 and Val153 in VcMTAN are Pro113 and Ile152, respectively, in EcMTAN. We mutated the VcMTAN catalytic site residues to match those of EcMTAN in anticipation of altering its properties toward EcMTAN. Inhibition of VcMTAN by transition-state analogues required filling both active sites of the homodimer. However, in the Val153Ile mutant or double mutants, transition-state analogue binding at one site caused complete inhibition. Therefore, a single amino acid, Val153, alters the catalytic site cooperativity in VcMTAN. The transition-state analogue affinity and thermodynamics in mutant VcMTAN became even more unlike those of EcMTAN, the opposite of expectations from catalytic site similarity; thus, catalytic site contacts in VcMTAN are unable to recapitulate the properties of EcMTAN. X-ray crystal structures of EcMTAN, VcMTAN, and a multiple-site mutant of VcMTAN most closely resembling EcMTAN in catalytic site contacts show no major protein conformational differences. The overall protein architectures of these closely related proteins are implicated in contributing to the catalytic site differences.

  13. Nonselective Conduction in a Mutated NaK Channel with Three Cation-Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Furini, Simone; Domene, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The NaK channel is a cation-selective protein with similar permeability for K+ and Na+ ions. Crystallographic structures are available for the wild-type and mutated NaK channels with different numbers of cation-binding sites. We have performed a comparison between the potentials of mean force governing the translocation of K+ ions and mixtures of one Na+ and three K+ ions in a mutated NaK channel with only three cation-binding sites (NaK-CNG). Since NaK-CNG is not selective for K+ over Na+, analysis of its multi-ion potential energy surfaces can provide clues about how selectivity originates. Comparison of the potentials of mean force of NaK-CNG and K+-selective channels yields observations that strongly suggest that the number of contiguous ion binding sites in a single-file mechanism is the key determinant of the channel’s selectivity properties, as already proposed by experimental studies. We conclude that the presence of four binding sites in K+-selective channels is essential for highly selective and efficient permeation of K+ ions, and that a key difference between K+-selective and nonselective channels is the absence/presence of a binding site for Na+ ions at the boundary between S2 and S3 in the context of multi-ion permeation events. PMID:23200044

  14. Nonselective conduction in a mutated NaK channel with three cation-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Furini, Simone; Domene, Carmen

    2012-11-21

    The NaK channel is a cation-selective protein with similar permeability for K(+) and Na(+) ions. Crystallographic structures are available for the wild-type and mutated NaK channels with different numbers of cation-binding sites. We have performed a comparison between the potentials of mean force governing the translocation of K(+) ions and mixtures of one Na(+) and three K(+) ions in a mutated NaK channel with only three cation-binding sites (NaK-CNG). Since NaK-CNG is not selective for K(+) over Na(+), analysis of its multi-ion potential energy surfaces can provide clues about how selectivity originates. Comparison of the potentials of mean force of NaK-CNG and K(+)-selective channels yields observations that strongly suggest that the number of contiguous ion binding sites in a single-file mechanism is the key determinant of the channel's selectivity properties, as already proposed by experimental studies. We conclude that the presence of four binding sites in K(+)-selective channels is essential for highly selective and efficient permeation of K(+) ions, and that a key difference between K(+)-selective and nonselective channels is the absence/presence of a binding site for Na(+) ions at the boundary between S2 and S3 in the context of multi-ion permeation events. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Activating GNAS1 gene mutations in patients with premature thelarche.

    PubMed

    Román, Rossana; Johnson, Mara Cecilia; Codner, Ethel; Boric, Mara Angélica; áVila, Alejandra; Cassorla, Fernando

    2004-08-01

    To identify GNAS1 gene mutations in girls with exaggerated and/or chronic fluctuating thelarche for at least 1-year duration with no other signs of precocious puberty, skeletal dysplasia, or typical skin lesions of McCune-Albright syndrome. We studied the GNAS1 gene mutation by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and enzymatic digestion in leukocyte DNA in 23 girls previously described. Fluctuating thelarche was present in 14 girls and exaggerated thelarche was observed in 9. Molecular study revealed that 6 girls had a substitution of arginine by histidine in codon 201 (R201H [+]). Three R201H (+) girls reached their menarche at a mean chronologic age of 10.8 years and 9 of the R201H (-) girls at a mean age of 11 years. Activating mutations of GNAS1 gene may be observed in some girls with chronic fluctuating and/or exaggerated thelarche, without other classic signs of McCune-Albright syndrome.

  16. Novel splice site mutation in the growth hormone receptor gene in Turkish patients with Laron-type dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Arman, Ahmet; Ozon, Alev; Isguven, Pinar S; Coker, Ajda; Peker, Ismail; Yordam, Nursen

    2008-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is involved in growth, and fat and carbohydrate metabolism. Interaction of GH with the GH receptor (GHR) is necessary for systemic and local production of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) which mediates GH actions. Mutations in the GHR cause severe postnatal growth failure; the disorder is an autosomal recessive genetic disease resulting in GH insensitivity, called Laron syndrome. It is characterized by dwarfism with elevated serum GH and low levels of IGF-I. We analyzed the GHR gene for mutations and polymorphisms in eight patients with Laron-type dwarfism from six families. We found three missense mutations (S40L, V125A, I526L), one nonsense mutation (W157X), and one splice site mutation in the extracellular domain of GHR. Furthermore, G168G and exon 3 deletion polymorphisms were detected in patients with Laron syndrome. The splice site mutation, which is a novel mutation, was located at the donor splice site of exon 2/ intron 2 within GHR. Although this mutation changed the highly conserved donor splice site consensus sequence GT to GGT by insertion of a G residue, the intron splicing between exon 2 and exon 3 was detected in the patient. These results imply that the splicing occurs arthe GT site in intron 2, leaving the extra inserted G residue at the end of exon 2, thus changing the open reading frame of GHR resulting in a premature termination codon in exon 3.

  17. The Thrombopoietin Receptor: Structural Basis of Traffic and Activation by Ligand, Mutations, Agonists, and Mutated Calreticulin

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Leila N.; Defour, Jean-Philippe; Pecquet, Christian; Constantinescu, Stefan N.

    2017-01-01

    A well-functioning hematopoietic system requires a certain robustness and flexibility to maintain appropriate quantities of functional mature blood cells, such as red blood cells and platelets. This review focuses on the cytokine receptor that plays a significant role in thrombopoiesis: the receptor for thrombopoietin (TPO-R; also known as MPL). Here, we survey the work to date to understand how this receptor functions at a molecular level throughout its lifecycle, from traffic to the cell surface, dimerization and binding cognate cytokine via its extracellular domain, through to its subsequent activation of associated Janus kinases and initiation of downstream signaling pathways, as well as the regulation of these processes. Atomic level resolution structures of TPO-R have remained elusive. The identification of disease-causing mutations in the receptor has, however, offered some insight into structure and function relationships, as has artificial means of receptor activation, through TPO mimetics, transmembrane-targeting receptor agonists, and engineering in dimerization domains. More recently, a novel activation mechanism was identified whereby mutated forms of calreticulin form complexes with TPO-R via its extracellular N-glycosylated domain. Such complexes traffic pathologically in the cell and persistently activate JAK2, downstream signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs), and other pathways. This pathologic TPO-R activation is associated with a large fraction of human myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:28408900

  18. Contributions of Unique Active Site Residues of Eukaryotic UDP-Galactopyranose Mutases to Substrate Recognition and Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) catalyzes the interconversion between UDP-galactopyranose and UDP-galactofuranose. Absent in humans, galactofuranose is found in bacterial and fungal cell walls and is a cell surface virulence factor in protozoan parasites. For these reasons, UGMs are targets for drug discovery. Here, we report a mutagenesis and structural study of the UGMs from Aspergillus fumigatus and Trypanosoma cruzi focused on active site residues that are conserved in eukaryotic UGMs but are absent or different in bacterial UGMs. Kinetic analysis of the variants F66A, Y104A, Q107A, N207A, and Y317A (A. fumigatus numbering) show decreases in kcat/KM values of 200–1000-fold for the mutase reaction. In contrast, none of the mutations significantly affect the kinetics of enzyme activation by NADPH. These results indicate that the targeted residues are important for promoting the transition state conformation for UDP-galactofuranose formation. Crystal structures of the A. fumigatus mutant enzymes were determined in the presence and absence of UDP to understand the structural consequences of the mutations. The structures suggest important roles for Asn207 in stabilizing the closed active site, and Tyr317 in positioning of the uridine ring. Phe66 and the corresponding residue in Mycobacterium tuberculosis UGM (His68) play a role as the backstop, stabilizing the galactopyranose group for nucleophilic attack. Together, these results provide insight into the essentiality of the targeted residues for realizing maximal catalytic activity and a proposal for how conformational changes that close the active site are temporally related and coupled together. PMID:25412209

  19. Contributions of unique active site residues of eukaryotic UDP-galactopyranose mutases to substrate recognition and active site dynamics.

    PubMed

    Da Fonseca, Isabel; Qureshi, Insaf A; Mehra-Chaudhary, Ritcha; Kizjakina, Karina; Tanner, John J; Sobrado, Pablo

    2014-12-16

    UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM) catalyzes the interconversion between UDP-galactopyranose and UDP-galactofuranose. Absent in humans, galactofuranose is found in bacterial and fungal cell walls and is a cell surface virulence factor in protozoan parasites. For these reasons, UGMs are targets for drug discovery. Here, we report a mutagenesis and structural study of the UGMs from Aspergillus fumigatus and Trypanosoma cruzi focused on active site residues that are conserved in eukaryotic UGMs but are absent or different in bacterial UGMs. Kinetic analysis of the variants F66A, Y104A, Q107A, N207A, and Y317A (A. fumigatus numbering) show decreases in k(cat)/K(M) values of 200-1000-fold for the mutase reaction. In contrast, none of the mutations significantly affect the kinetics of enzyme activation by NADPH. These results indicate that the targeted residues are important for promoting the transition state conformation for UDP-galactofuranose formation. Crystal structures of the A. fumigatus mutant enzymes were determined in the presence and absence of UDP to understand the structural consequences of the mutations. The structures suggest important roles for Asn207 in stabilizing the closed active site, and Tyr317 in positioning of the uridine ring. Phe66 and the corresponding residue in Mycobacterium tuberculosis UGM (His68) play a role as the backstop, stabilizing the galactopyranose group for nucleophilic attack. Together, these results provide insight into the essentiality of the targeted residues for realizing maximal catalytic activity and a proposal for how conformational changes that close the active site are temporally related and coupled together.

  20. An abnormal mRNA produced by a novel PMP22 splice site mutation associated with HNPP.

    PubMed

    Bellone, E; Balestra, P; Ribizzi, G; Schenone, A; Zocchi, G; Di Maria, E; Ajmar, F; Mandich, P

    2006-04-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is an autosomal dominant, demyelinating neuropathy. Point mutations in the PMP22 gene are a rare cause of HNPP. A novel PMP22 splice site mutation (c.179+1 G-->C) is reported in an HNPP family. By reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction experiments, this mutation was shown to cause the synthesis of an abnormal mRNA in which a premature stop codon probably produces a truncated non-functional protein.

  1. Recurrent activating ACVR1 mutations in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kathryn R; Mackay, Alan; Truffaux, Nathalène; Butterfield, Yaron S; Morozova, Olena; Philippe, Cathy; Castel, David; Grasso, Catherine S; Vinci, Maria; Carvalho, Diana; Carcaboso, Angel M; de Torres, Carmen; Cruz, Ofelia; Mora, Jaume; Entz-Werle, Natacha; Ingram, Wendy J; Monje, Michelle; Hargrave, Darren; Bullock, Alex N; Puget, Stéphanie; Yip, Stephen; Jones, Chris; Grill, Jacques

    2014-05-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are highly infiltrative malignant glial neoplasms of the ventral pons that, due to their location within the brain, are unsuitable for surgical resection and consequently have a universally dismal clinical outcome. The median survival time is 9-12 months, with neither chemotherapeutic nor targeted agents showing substantial survival benefit in clinical trials in children with these tumors. We report the identification of recurrent activating mutations in the ACVR1 gene, which encodes a type I activin receptor serine/threonine kinase, in 21% of DIPG samples. Strikingly, these somatic mutations (encoding p.Arg206His, p.Arg258Gly, p.Gly328Glu, p.Gly328Val, p.Gly328Trp and p.Gly356Asp substitutions) have not been reported previously in cancer but are identical to mutations found in the germ line of individuals with the congenital childhood developmental disorder fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) and have been shown to constitutively activate the BMP-TGF-β signaling pathway. These mutations represent new targets for therapeutic intervention in this otherwise incurable disease.

  2. Four novel mutations in mucopolysaccharidosis type VII including a unique base substitution in exon 10 of the beta-glucuronidase gene that creates a novel 5'-splice site.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Tomatsu, S; Sly, W S; Islam, R; Wenger, D A; Fukuda, S; Sukegawa, K; Orii, T

    1995-04-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII), or Sly syndrome, is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency in the enzyme beta-glucuronidase. Various clinical phenotypes of this autosomal recessively inherited disease have been described. Recent isolation and characterization of human beta-glucuronidase cDNA and the genomic sequences facilitate analysis of molecular defects underlying the different phenotypes, and eight mutations in the beta-glucuronidase gene have been described. This report summarizes studies characterizing four new mutations in two Caucasian patients with a severe form of MPS VII. Three are point mutations, resulting in two missense and one nonsense change, and one is a 38 bp deletion. The first patient was a compound heterozygote having P148S and Y495C alleles. The second patient was a compound heterozygote of W507X and a 38 bp deletion at position 1642-1679 in exon 10(1642 delta 38nt). The 38 bp deletion was caused by a single base change mutation in exon 10 that generates a new, premature 5' splice site. Expression of mutant cDNAs encoding each of the four mutations showed that all four resulted in a severe reduction of beta-glucuronidase activity, indicating that these mutations are responsible for the reduced enzyme activity in patient cells. These four previously undescribed mutations provide further evidence for the broad molecular heterogeneity in Sly syndrome.

  3. Combining Natural Sequence Variation with High Throughput Mutational Data to Reveal Protein Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, Daniel; Young, David L.; Miller, Christina R.; Fields, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Many protein interactions are conserved among organisms despite changes in the amino acid sequences that comprise their contact sites, a property that has been used to infer the location of these sites from protein homology. In an inter-species complementation experiment, a sequence present in a homologue is substituted into a protein and tested for its ability to support function. Therefore, substitutions that inhibit function can identify interaction sites that changed over evolution. However, most of the sequence differences within a protein family remain unexplored because of the small-scale nature of these complementation approaches. Here we use existing high throughput mutational data on the in vivo function of the RRM2 domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae poly(A)-binding protein, Pab1, to analyze its sites of interaction. Of 197 single amino acid differences in 52 Pab1 homologues, 17 reduce the function of Pab1 when substituted into the yeast protein. The majority of these deleterious mutations interfere with the binding of the RRM2 domain to eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, isoforms of a translation initiation factor. A large-scale mutational analysis of the RRM2 domain in a two-hybrid assay for eIF4G1 binding supports these findings and identifies peripheral residues that make a smaller contribution to eIF4G1 binding. Three single amino acid substitutions in yeast Pab1 corresponding to residues from the human orthologue are deleterious and eliminate binding to the yeast eIF4G isoforms. We create a triple mutant that carries these substitutions and other humanizing substitutions that collectively support a switch in binding specificity of RRM2 from the yeast eIF4G1 to its human orthologue. Finally, we map other deleterious substitutions in Pab1 to inter-domain (RRM2–RRM1) or protein-RNA (RRM2–poly(A)) interaction sites. Thus, the combined approach of large-scale mutational data and evolutionary conservation can be used to characterize interaction sites at single

  4. Mutation-selection models of coding sequence evolution with site-heterogeneous amino acid fitness profiles

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigue, Nicolas; Philippe, Hervé; Lartillot, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Modeling the interplay between mutation and selection at the molecular level is key to evolutionary studies. To this end, codon-based evolutionary models have been proposed as pertinent means of studying long-range evolutionary patterns and are widely used. However, these approaches have not yet consolidated results from amino acid level phylogenetic studies showing that selection acting on proteins displays strong site-specific effects, which translate into heterogeneous amino acid propensities across the columns of alignments; related codon-level studies have instead focused on either modeling a single selective context for all codon columns, or a separate selective context for each codon column, with the former strategy deemed too simplistic and the latter deemed overparameterized. Here, we integrate recent developments in nonparametric statistical approaches to propose a probabilistic model that accounts for the heterogeneity of amino acid fitness profiles across the coding positions of a gene. We apply the model to a dozen real protein-coding gene alignments and find it to produce biologically plausible inferences, for instance, as pertaining to site-specific amino acid constraints, as well as distributions of scaled selection coefficients. In their account of mutational features as well as the heterogeneous regimes of selection at the amino acid level, the modeling approaches studied here can form a backdrop for several extensions, accounting for other selective features, for variable population size, or for subtleties of mutational features, all with parameterizations couched within population-genetic theory. PMID:20176949

  5. Target-site EPSPS Pro-106 mutations: sufficient to endow glyphosate resistance in polyploid Echinochloa colona?

    PubMed

    Han, Heping; Yu, Qin; Widderick, Michael J; Powles, Stephen B

    2016-02-01

    This study confirms and characterises glyphosate resistance in two polyploid Echinochloa colona populations from north-eastern Australia. Glyphosate dose response revealed that the two resistant populations were marginally (up to twofold) resistant to glyphosate. Resistant plants did not differ in non-target-site foliar uptake and translocation of (14) C-glyphosate, but contained the known target-site 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) mutation Pro-106-Thr and/or Pro-106-Leu. Although plants carrying either a single or two EPSPS mutations were glyphosate resistant relative to the susceptible population, they were still controlled at the field rate of glyphosate (450 g a.e. ha(-1) ) when treated under warm conditions (25/20 °C). However, when treated in hot conditions (35/30 °C), most mutant resistant plants (68%) can survive the field rate, and an increase (2.5-fold) in glyphosate LD50 was found for both the R and S populations. This study shows that one or two EPSPS Pro-106 mutations are insufficient to confer field-rate glyphosate resistance in polyploidy E. colona at mild temperatures. However, control of these mutant plants at the glyphosate field rate is poor at high temperatures, probably owing to reduced glyphosate efficacy. Therefore, glyphosate should be applied during relatively mild (warm) temperature periods in the summer growing season to improve E. colona control. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  7. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  8. Effect of lysine to alanine mutations on the phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition of glutaminase.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Charles J; Acheff, Eric; Kennedy, Ryan; Taylor, Lynn; Curthoys, Norman P

    2015-09-01

    The GLS1 gene encodes a mitochondrial glutaminase that is highly expressed in brain, kidney, small intestine and many transformed cells. Recent studies have identified multiple lysine residues in glutaminase that are sites of N-acetylation. Interestingly, these sites are located within either a loop segment that regulates access of glutamine to the active site or the dimer:dimer interface that participates in the phosphate-dependent oligomerization and activation of the enzyme. These two segments also contain the binding sites for bis-2[5-phenylacetamido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl]ethylsulfide (BPTES), a highly specific and potent uncompetitive inhibitor of this glutaminase. BPTES is also the lead compound for development of novel cancer chemotherapeutic agents. To provide a preliminary assessment of the potential effects of N-acetylation, the corresponding lysine to alanine mutations were constructed in the hGACΔ1 plasmid. The wild type and mutated proteins were purified by Ni(+)-affinity chromatography and their phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition profiles were analyzed. Two of the alanine substitutions in the loop segment (K311A and K328A) and the one in the dimer:dimer interface (K396A) form enzymes that require greater concentrations of phosphate to produce half-maximal activation and exhibit greater sensitivity to BPTES inhibition. By contrast, the K320A mutation results in a glutaminase that exhibits near maximal activity in the absence of phosphate and is not inhibited by BPTES. Thus, lysine N-acetylation may contribute to the acute regulation of glutaminase activity in various tissues and alter the efficacy of BPTES-type inhibitors.

  9. Oncogenically active MYD88 mutations in human lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Vu N.; Young, Ryan M.; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Xiao, Wenming; Lim, Kian-Huat; Kohlhammer, Holger; Xu, Weihong; Yang, Yandan; Zhao, Hong; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Romesser, Paul; Wright, George; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Fisher, Richard I.; Braziel, Rita M.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Cook, J. R.; Weisenburger, Denny D.; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains the least curable form of this malignancy despite recent advances in therapy1. Constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-κB and JAK kinase signalling promotes malignant cell survival in these lymphomas, but the genetic basis for this signalling is incompletely understood. Here we describe the dependence of ABC DLBCLs on MYD88, an adaptor protein that mediates toll and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor signalling2,3, and the discovery of highly recurrent oncogenic mutations affecting MYD88 in ABC DLBCL tumours. RNA interference screening revealed that MYD88 and the associated kinases IRAK1 and IRAK4 are essential for ABC DLBCL survival. High-throughput RNA resequencing uncovered MYD88 mutations in ABC DLBCL lines. Notably, 29% of ABC DLBCL tumours harboured the same amino acid substitution, L265P, in the MYD88 Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain at an evolutionarily invariant residue in its hydrophobic core. This mutation was rare or absent in other DLBCL subtypes and Burkitt’s lymphoma, but was observed in 9% of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. At a lower frequency, additional mutations were observed in the MYD88 TIR domain, occurring in both the ABC and germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL subtypes. Survival of ABC DLBCL cells bearing the L265P mutation was sustained by the mutant but not the wild-type MYD88 isoform, demonstrating that L265P is a gain-of-function driver mutation. The L265P mutant promoted cell survival by spontaneously assembling a protein complex containing IRAK1 and IRAK4, leading to IRAK4 kinase activity, IRAK1 phosphorylation, NF-κB signalling, JAK kinase activation of STAT3, and secretion of IL-6, IL-10 and interferon-β. Hence, theMYD88 signalling pathway is integral to the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL, supporting the development of inhibitors of IRAK4 kinase and other components of this pathway for the treatment of tumours bearing oncogenic MYD88 mutations

  10. A case of mild CHARGE syndrome associated with a splice site mutation in CHD7.

    PubMed

    Wells, Constance; Loundon, Natalie; Garabedian, Noël; Wiener-Vacher, Sylvette; Cordier-Bouvier, Marie-Dominique; Goudeffroye, Géraldine; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Marlin, Sandrine

    2016-04-01

    CHARGE syndrome (MIM#214800) (Coloboma, Heart defect, Atresia of choanae, Retarded growth and development, Genital hypoplasia, Ear abnormalities/deafness) is caused by heterozygous mutation of CHD7 transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. In this report, we describe a patient with bilateral hearing impairment, unusually-shaped ears, no intellectual disability and a patent ductus arteriosus. Further investigation showed abnormal semicircular canals and the presence of olfactory bulbs. He does not fulfill the Blake or the Verloes criteria for CHARGE. A de novo mutation at the donor splice site of intron 33 was identified (c.7164 + 1G > A). It is of importance to diagnose mildly affected patients for appropriate genetic counselling and to better understand the mild end of the phenotypic spectrum of CHARGE syndrome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of the pathological Q212P mutation on human prion protein non-octarepeat copper-binding site.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Paola; Della Longa, Stefano; Arcovito, Alessandro; Mancini, Giordano; Zitolo, Andrea; Chillemi, Giovanni; Giachin, Gabriele; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2012-08-07

    Prion diseases are a class of fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by brain spongiosis, synaptic degeneration, microglia and astrocytes activation, neuronal loss and altered redox control. These maladies can be sporadic, iatrogenic and genetic. The etiological agent is the prion, a misfolded form of the cellular prion protein, PrP(C). PrP(C) interacts with metal ions, in particular copper and zinc, through the octarepeat and non-octarepeat binding sites. The physiological implication of this interaction is still unclear, as is the role of metals in the conversion. Since prion diseases present metal dyshomeostasis and increased oxidative stress, we described the copper-binding site located in the human C-terminal domain of PrP-HuPrP(90-231), both in the wild-type protein and in the protein carrying the pathological mutation Q212P. We used the synchrotron-based X-ray absorption fine structure technique to study the Cu(II) and Cu(I) coordination geometries in the mutant, and we compared them with those obtained using the wild-type protein. By analyzing the extended X-ray absorption fine structure and the X-ray absorption near-edge structure, we highlighted changes in copper coordination induced by the point mutation Q212P in both oxidation states. While in the wild-type protein the copper-binding site has the same structure for both Cu(II) and Cu(I), in the mutant the coordination site changes drastically from the oxidized to the reduced form of the copper ion. Copper-binding sites in the mutant resemble those obtained using peptides, confirming the loss of short- and long-range interactions. These changes probably cause alterations in copper homeostasis and, consequently, in redox control.

  12. The degree of intratumor mutational heterogeneity varies by primary tumor sub-site

    PubMed Central

    Eterovic, Agda Karina; Wick, Jo; Chen, Ken; Zhao, Hao; Tazi, Loubna; Manna, Pradip; Kerley, Spencer; Joshi, Radhika; Wang, Lin; Chiosea, Simion I.; Garnett, James David; Tsue, Terance Ted; Chien, Jeremy; Mills, Gordon B.; Grandis, Jennifer Rubin; Thomas, Sufi Mary

    2016-01-01

    In an era where mutational profiles inform treatment options, it is critical to know the extent to which tumor biopsies represent the molecular profile of the primary and metastatic tumor. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) arise primarily in the mucosal lining of oral cavity and oropharynx. Despite aggressive therapy the 5-year survival rate is at 50%. The primary objective of this study is to characterize the degree of intratumor mutational heterogeneity in HNSCC. We used multi-region sequencing of paired primary and metastatic tumor DNA of 24 spatially distinct samples from seven patients with HNSCC of larynx, floor of the mouth (FOM) or oral tongue. Full length, in-depth sequencing of 202 genes implicated in cancer was carried out. Larynx and FOM tumors had more than 69.2% unique SNVs between the paired primary and metastatic lesions. In contrast, the oral tongue HNSCC had only 33.3% unique SNVs across multiple sites. In addition, HNSCC of the oral tongue had fewer mutations than larynx and FOM tumors. These findings were validated on the Affymetrix whole genome 6.0 array platform and were consistent with data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). This is the first report demonstrating differences in mutational heterogeneity varying by subsite in HNSCC. The heterogeneity within laryngeal tumor specimens may lead to an underestimation of the genetic abnormalities within tumors and may foster resistance to standard treatment protocols. These findings are relevant to investigators and clinicians developing personalized cancer treatments based on identification of specific mutations in tumor biopsies. PMID:27034009

  13. Omenn syndrome associated with a functional reversion due to a somatic second-site mutation in CARD11 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Pannicke, Ulrich; Lorenz, Myriam R.; Fisch, Paul; Jeelall, Yogesh; Rohr, Jan; Speckmann, Carsten; Vraetz, Thomas; Farmand, Susan; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Krüger, Marcus; Strahm, Brigitte; Henneke, Philipp; Enders, Anselm; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher; Schwarz, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is a severe immunodeficiency associated with erythroderma, lymphoproliferation, elevated IgE, and hyperactive oligoclonal T cells. A restricted T-cell repertoire caused by defective thymic T-cell development and selection, lymphopenia with homeostatic proliferation, and lack of regulatory T cells are considered key factors in OS pathogenesis. We report 2 siblings presenting with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Pneumocystis jirovecii infections and recurrent sepsis; one developed all clinical features of OS. Both carried homozygous germline mutations in CARD11 (p.Cys150*), impairing NF-κB signaling and IL-2 production. A somatic second-site mutation reverting the stop codon to a missense mutation (p.Cys150Leu) was detected in tissue-infiltrating T cells of the OS patient. Expression of p.Cys150Leu in CARD11-deficient T cells largely reconstituted NF-κB signaling. The reversion likely occurred in a prethymic T-cell precursor, leading to a chimeric T-cell repertoire. We speculate that in our patient the functional advantage of the revertant T cells in the context of persistent CMV infection, combined with lack of regulatory T cells, may have been sufficient to favor OS. This first observation of OS in a patient with a T-cell activation defect suggests that severely defective T-cell development or homeostatic proliferation in a lymphopenic environment are not required for this severe immunopathology. PMID:26289640

  14. Loss-of-function mutation in the X-linked TBX22 promoter disrupts an ETS-1 binding site and leads to cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiazhou; Cheng, Yibin; Yuan, Jia; Huang, Chunhua; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2015-02-01

    The cleft palate only (CPO) is a common congenital defect with complex etiology in humans. The molecular etiology of the CPO remains unknown. Here, we report a loss-of-function mutation in X-linked TBX22 gene (T-box 22) in a six-generation family of the CPO with obvious phenotypes of both cleft palate and hyper-nasal speech. We identify a functional -73G>A mutation in the promoter of TBX22, which is located at the core-binding site of transcription factor ETS-1 (v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the sequence around the -73G>A mutation site is specific in primates. The mutation was detected in all five affected male members cosegregating with the affected phenotype and heterozygote occurred only in some unaffected females of the family, suggesting an X-linked transmission of the mutation in the family. The -73G>A variant is a novel single nucleotide mutation. Cell co-transfections indicated that ETS-1 could activate the TBX22 promoter. Moreover, EMSA and ChIP assays demonstrated that the allele A disrupts the binding site of ETS-1, thus markedly decreases the activity of the TBX22 promoter, which is likely to lead to the birth defect of the CPO without ankyloglossia. These results suggest that a loss-of-function mutation in the X-linked TBX22 promoter may cause the cleft palate through disruption of TBX22-ETS-1 pathway.

  15. Site-specific photocoupling of pBpa mutated scFv antibodies for use in affinity proteomics.

    PubMed

    Brofelth, Mattias; Städe, Lars Wagner; Ekstrand, Anna Isinger; Edfeldt, Linn Petersson; Kovačič, Rebeka; Nielsen, Thorbjørn Terndrup; Larsen, Kim Lambertsen; Duroux, Laurent; Wingren, Christer

    2017-08-01

    Recombinant antibody libraries can provide a source of renewable and high-performing binders tailored for use in affinity proteomics. In this context, the process of generating site-specific 1:1 tagging/functionalization and/or orientated surface immobilization of antibodies has, however, proved to be challenging. Hence, novel ways of generating such engineered antibodies for use in affinity proteomics could have a major impact on array performance. In this study, we have further tailored the design of human recombinant scFv antibodies for site-specific photocoupling through the use of an unnatural amino acid (UAA) and the Dock'n'Flash technology. In more detail, we have generated the 2nd generation of scFvs carrying the photoreactive UAA p-benzoyl-l-phenylalanine (pBpa). Based on key properties, such as expression levels, activity, and affinity, a preferred choice of site for pBpa, located in the beginning of the C-terminal affinity-tag, was for the first time pin-pointed. Further, the results showed that pBpa mutated antibody could be site-specifically photocoupled to free and surface immobilized β-cyclodextrin (an affinity ligand to pBpa). This paves the way for use of scFv antibodies, engineered for site-specific photochemical-based tagging, functionalization, and orientated surface immobilization, in affinity proteomics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. NMR and Mutational Identification of the Collagen-Binding Site of the Chaperone Hsp47

    PubMed Central

    Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Yoshikawa, Sumi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Nishi, Yohei; Kurimoto, Eiji; Ishida, Yoshihito; Homma, Takayuki; Hoseki, Jun; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Koide, Takaki; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kato, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock protein 47 (Hsp47) acts as a client-specific chaperone for collagen and plays a vital role in collagen maturation and the consequent embryonic development. In addition, this protein can be a potential target for the treatment of fibrosis. Despite its physiological and pathological importance, little is currently known about the collagen-binding mode of Hsp47 from a structural aspect. Here, we describe an NMR study that was conducted to identify the collagen-binding site of Hsp47. We used chicken Hsp47, which has higher solubility than its human counterpart, and applied a selective 15N-labeling method targeting its tryptophan and histidine residues. Spectral assignments were made based on site-directed mutagenesis of the individual residues. By inspecting the spectral changes that were observed upon interaction with a trimeric collagen peptide and the mutational data, we successfully mapped the collagen-binding site in the B/C β-barrel domain and a nearby loop in a 3D-homology model based upon a serpin fold. This conclusion was confirmed by mutational analysis. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the design of compounds that target the interaction between Hsp47 and procollagen as therapeutics for fibrotic diseases. PMID:23049894

  17. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  18. A novel donor splice-site mutation of major intrinsic protein gene associated with congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Lu; Liu, Wenqiang; Feng, Wenguo; Wang, Xing; Dang, Hui; Gao, Luna; Yao, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To identify the disease-causing gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital cataract. Methods Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on all members of a Chinese family with congenital cataract. Nine genes associated with congenital cataract were screened using direct DNA sequencing. Mutations were confirmed using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The mutated major intrinsic protein (MIP) minigene, which carries the disease-causing splice-site mutation, and the wild-type (WT) MIP minigene were constructed using the pcDNA3.1 expression vector. Wild-type and mutant MIP minigene constructs were transiently transfected into HeLa cells. After 48 h of incubation at 37 °C, total RNA isolation and reverse transcription (RT)–PCR analysis were performed, and PCR products were separated and confirmed with sequencing. Results Direct DNA sequence analysis identified a novel splice-site mutation in intron 3 (c.606+1 G>A) of the MIP gene. To investigate the manner in which the splice donor mutation could affect mRNA splicing, WT and mutant MIP minigenes were inserted in the pcDNA3.1 (+) vector. Constructs were transfected into HeLa cells. RT–PCR analysis showed that the donor splice site mutation led to deletion of exon 3 in the mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. Conclusions The present study identified a novel donor splice-site mutation (c.606+1G>A) in the MIP gene in a Chinese family with congenital cataract. In vitro RT–PCR analysis showed that this splice-site mutation resulted in the deletion of exon 3 from mRNA encoded by the MIP gene. This is the first report to show that donor splice-site mutation in MIP gene can cause autosomal dominant congenital cataract. PMID:24319327

  19. Insights into the pathogenic character of a common NUBPL branch-site mutation associated with mitochondrial disease and complex I deficiency using a yeast model

    PubMed Central

    Wydro, Mateusz M.; Balk, Janneke

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Complex I deficiencies are the most common causes of mitochondrial disorders. They can result from mutations not only in the structural subunits but also in a growing number of known assembly factors. A branch-site mutation in the human gene encoding assembly factor NUBPL has recently been associated with mitochondrial encephalopathy and complex I deficiency in seven independent cases. Moreover, the mutation is present in 1.2% of European haplotypes. To investigate its pathogenicity, we have reconstructed the altered C-terminus that results from the branch-site mutation and frameshift in the homologous Ind1 protein in the respiratory yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. We demonstrate that the altered sequence did not affect IND1 mRNA stability, yet it led to a decrease in Ind1 protein level. The instability of mutant Ind1 resulted in a strong decrease in complex I activity and caused slow growth, resembling the phenotype of the deletion strain of IND1. The presented data confirms the deleterious impact of the altered C-terminus resulting from the branch-site mutation. Furthermore, our approach demonstrates the great potential of Y. lipolytica as a model to investigate complex I deficiencies, especially in cases with genetic complexity. PMID:23828044

  20. Mutations in the regulatory subunit of yeast acetohydroxyacid synthase affect its activation by MgATP

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Ting; Duggleby, Ronald G.

    2006-01-01

    Isoleucine, leucine and valine are synthesized via a common pathway in which the first reaction is catalysed by AHAS (acetohydroxyacid synthase; EC 2.2.1.6). This heterotetrameric enzyme is composed of a larger subunit that contains the catalytic machinery and a smaller subunit that plays a regulatory role. The RSU (regulatory subunit) enhances the activity of the CSU (catalytic subunit) and mediates end-product inhibition by one or more of the branched-chain amino acids, usually valine. Fungal AHAS differs from that in other organisms in that the inhibition by valine is reversed by MgATP. The fungal AHAS RSU also differs from that in other organisms in that it contains a sequence insert. We suggest that this insert may form the MgATP-binding site and we have tested this hypothesis by mutating ten highly conserved amino acid residues of the yeast AHAS RSU. The modified subunits were tested for their ability to activate the yeast AHAS CSU, to confer sensitivity to valine inhibition and to mediate reversal of the inhibition by MgATP. All but one of the mutations resulted in substantial changes in the properties of the RSU. Unexpectedly, four of them gave a protein that required MgATP in order for strong stimulation of the CSU and valine inhibition to be observed. A model to explain this result is proposed. Five of the mutations abolished MgATP activation and are suggested to constitute the binding site for this modulator. PMID:16390333

  1. Mutations in the regulatory subunit of yeast acetohydroxyacid synthase affect its activation by MgATP.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Ting; Duggleby, Ronald G

    2006-04-15

    Isoleucine, leucine and valine are synthesized via a common pathway in which the first reaction is catalysed by AHAS (acetohydroxyacid synthase; EC 2.2.1.6). This heterotetrameric enzyme is composed of a larger subunit that contains the catalytic machinery and a smaller subunit that plays a regulatory role. The RSU (regulatory subunit) enhances the activity of the CSU (catalytic subunit) and mediates end-product inhibition by one or more of the branched-chain amino acids, usually valine. Fungal AHAS differs from that in other organisms in that the inhibition by valine is reversed by MgATP. The fungal AHAS RSU also differs from that in other organisms in that it contains a sequence insert. We suggest that this insert may form the MgATP-binding site and we have tested this hypothesis by mutating ten highly conserved amino acid residues of the yeast AHAS RSU. The modified subunits were tested for their ability to activate the yeast AHAS CSU, to confer sensitivity to valine inhibition and to mediate reversal of the inhibition by MgATP. All but one of the mutations resulted in substantial changes in the properties of the RSU. Unexpectedly, four of them gave a protein that required MgATP in order for strong stimulation of the CSU and valine inhibition to be observed. A model to explain this result is proposed. Five of the mutations abolished MgATP activation and are suggested to constitute the binding site for this modulator.

  2. Mosaic Activating Mutations in FGFR1 Cause Encephalocraniocutaneous Lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, James T.; Tan, Tiong Yang; Alcantara, Diana; Tétrault, Martine; Timms, Andrew E.; Jensen, Dana; Collins, Sarah; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.M.; Lindhurst, Marjorie J.; Christensen, Katherine M.; Braddock, Stephen R.; Brandling-Bennett, Heather; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Chung, Brian; Lehman, Anna; Su, John; Ng, SuYuen; Amor, David J.; Majewski, Jacek; Biesecker, Les G.; Boycott, Kym M.; Dobyns, William B.; O’Driscoll, Mark; Moog, Ute; McDonell, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a sporadic condition characterized by ocular, cutaneous, and central nervous system anomalies. Key clinical features include a well-demarcated hairless fatty nevus on the scalp, benign ocular tumors, and central nervous system lipomas. Seizures, spasticity, and intellectual disability can be present, although affected individuals without seizures and with normal intellect have also been reported. Given the patchy and asymmetric nature of the malformations, ECCL has been hypothesized to be due to a post-zygotic, mosaic mutation. Despite phenotypic overlap with several other disorders associated with mutations in the RAS-MAPK and PI3K-AKT pathways, the molecular etiology of ECCL remains unknown. Using exome sequencing of DNA from multiple affected tissues from five unrelated individuals with ECCL, we identified two mosaic mutations, c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) and c.1966A>G (p.Lys656Glu) within the tyrosine kinase domain of FGFR1, in two affected individuals each. These two residues are the most commonly mutated residues in FGFR1 in human cancers and are associated primarily with CNS tumors. Targeted resequencing of FGFR1 in multiple tissues from an independent cohort of individuals with ECCL identified one additional individual with a c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) mutation in FGFR1. Functional studies of ECCL fibroblast cell lines show increased levels of phosphorylated FGFRs and phosphorylated FRS2, a direct substrate of FGFR1, as well as constitutive activation of RAS-MAPK signaling. In addition to identifying the molecular etiology of ECCL, our results support the emerging overlap between mosaic developmental disorders and tumorigenesis. PMID:26942290

  3. Mosaic Activating Mutations in FGFR1 Cause Encephalocraniocutaneous Lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James T; Tan, Tiong Yang; Alcantara, Diana; Tétrault, Martine; Timms, Andrew E; Jensen, Dana; Collins, Sarah; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J M; Lindhurst, Marjorie J; Christensen, Katherine M; Braddock, Stephen R; Brandling-Bennett, Heather; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Chung, Brian; Lehman, Anna; Su, John; Ng, SuYuen; Amor, David J; Majewski, Jacek; Biesecker, Les G; Boycott, Kym M; Dobyns, William B; O'Driscoll, Mark; Moog, Ute; McDonell, Laura M

    2016-03-03

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a sporadic condition characterized by ocular, cutaneous, and central nervous system anomalies. Key clinical features include a well-demarcated hairless fatty nevus on the scalp, benign ocular tumors, and central nervous system lipomas. Seizures, spasticity, and intellectual disability can be present, although affected individuals without seizures and with normal intellect have also been reported. Given the patchy and asymmetric nature of the malformations, ECCL has been hypothesized to be due to a post-zygotic, mosaic mutation. Despite phenotypic overlap with several other disorders associated with mutations in the RAS-MAPK and PI3K-AKT pathways, the molecular etiology of ECCL remains unknown. Using exome sequencing of DNA from multiple affected tissues from five unrelated individuals with ECCL, we identified two mosaic mutations, c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) and c.1966A>G (p.Lys656Glu) within the tyrosine kinase domain of FGFR1, in two affected individuals each. These two residues are the most commonly mutated residues in FGFR1 in human cancers and are associated primarily with CNS tumors. Targeted resequencing of FGFR1 in multiple tissues from an independent cohort of individuals with ECCL identified one additional individual with a c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) mutation in FGFR1. Functional studies of ECCL fibroblast cell lines show increased levels of phosphorylated FGFRs and phosphorylated FRS2, a direct substrate of FGFR1, as well as constitutive activation of RAS-MAPK signaling. In addition to identifying the molecular etiology of ECCL, our results support the emerging overlap between mosaic developmental disorders and tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Computationally optimized deimmunization libraries yield highly mutated enzymes with low immunogenicity and enhanced activity.

    PubMed

    Salvat, Regina S; Verma, Deeptak; Parker, Andrew S; Kirsch, Jack R; Brooks, Seth A; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E

    2017-06-27

    Therapeutic proteins of wide-ranging function hold great promise for treating disease, but immune surveillance of these macromolecules can drive an antidrug immune response that compromises efficacy and even undermines safety. To eliminate widespread T-cell epitopes in any biotherapeutic and thereby mitigate this key source of detrimental immune recognition, we developed a Pareto optimal deimmunization library design algorithm that optimizes protein libraries to account for the simultaneous effects of combinations of mutations on both molecular function and epitope content. Active variants identified by high-throughput screening are thus inherently likely to be deimmunized. Functional screening of an optimized 10-site library (1,536 variants) of P99 β-lactamase (P99βL), a component of ADEPT cancer therapies, revealed that the population possessed high overall fitness, and comprehensive analysis of peptide-MHC II immunoreactivity showed the population possessed lower average immunogenic potential than the wild-type enzyme. Although similar functional screening of an optimized 30-site library (2.15 × 10(9) variants) revealed reduced population-wide fitness, numerous individual variants were found to have activity and stability better than the wild type despite bearing 13 or more deimmunizing mutations per enzyme. The immunogenic potential of one highly active and stable 14-mutation variant was assessed further using ex vivo cellular immunoassays, and the variant was found to silence T-cell activation in seven of the eight blood donors who responded strongly to wild-type P99βL. In summary, our multiobjective library-design process readily identified large and mutually compatible sets of epitope-deleting mutations and produced highly active but aggressively deimmunized constructs in only one round of library screening.

  5. Mutational Analysis of the TnrA-Binding Sites in the Bacillus subtilis nrgAB and gabP Promoter Regions

    PubMed Central

    Wray, Lewis V.; Zalieckas, Jill M.; Ferson, Amy E.; Fisher, Susan H.

    1998-01-01

    Transcription of the Bacillus subtilis nrgAB promoter is activated during nitrogen-limited growth by the TnrA protein. A common inverted repeat, TGTNAN7TNACA (TnrA site), is centered 49 to 51 bp upstream of the transcriptional start sites for the TnrA-regulated nrgAB, gabP P2, and nas promoters. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis of the nrgAB promoter region showed that conserved nucleotides within the TnrA site, the A+T-rich region between the two TnrA half-sites, and an upstream A tract are all required for high-level activation of nrgAB expression. Mutations that alter the relative distance between the two half-sites of the nrgAB TnrA site abolish nitrogen regulation of nrgAB expression. Spacer mutations that change the relative distance between the TnrA site and −35 region of the nrgAB promoter reveal that activation of nrgAB expression occurs only when the TnrA site is located 49 to 51 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site. Mutational analysis of the conserved nucleotides in the gabP P2 TnrA site showed that this sequence is also required for nitrogen-regulated gabP P2 expression. The TnrA protein, expressed in an overproducing Escherichia coli strain, had a 625-fold-higher affinity for the wild-type nrgAB promoter DNA than for a mutated nrgAB promoter DNA fragment that is unable to activate nrgAB expression in vivo. These results indicate that the proposed TnrA site functions as the binding site for the TnrA protein. TnrA was found to activate nrgAB expression during late exponential growth in nutrient sporulation medium containing glucose, suggesting that cells become nitrogen limited during growth in this medium. PMID:9603886

  6. Allelic mutations in noncoding genomic sequences construct novel transcription factor binding sites that promote gene overexpression.

    PubMed

    Tian, Erming; Børset, Magne; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Brede, Gaute; Våtsveen, Thea K; Hov, Håkon; Waage, Anders; Barlogie, Bart; Shaughnessy, John D; Epstein, Joshua; Sundan, Anders

    2015-11-01

    The growth and survival factor hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is expressed at high levels in multiple myeloma (MM) cells. We report here that elevated HGF transcription in MM was traced to DNA mutations in the promoter alleles of HGF. Sequence analysis revealed a previously undiscovered single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and crucial single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the promoters of myeloma cells that produce large amounts of HGF. The allele-specific mutations functionally reassembled wild-type sequences into the motifs that affiliate with endogenous transcription factors NFKB (nuclear factor kappa-B), MZF1 (myeloid zinc finger 1), and NRF-2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2). In vitro, a mutant allele that gained novel NFKB-binding sites directly responded to transcriptional signaling induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) to promote high levels of luciferase reporter. Given the recent discovery by genome-wide sequencing (GWS) of numerous non-coding mutations in myeloma genomes, our data provide evidence that heterogeneous SNVs in the gene regulatory regions may frequently transform wild-type alleles into novel transcription factor binding properties to aberrantly interact with dysregulated transcriptional signals in MM and other cancer cells.

  7. Biochemical characterization of the chondroitinase ABC I active site

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    cABC I (chondroitinase ABC I) from Proteus vulgaris is a GalAG (galactosaminoglycan) depolymerizing lyase that cleaves its substrates at the glycosidic bond via β-elimination. cABC I cleaves a particularly broad range of GalAG substrates, including CS (chondroitin sulphate), DS (dermatan sulphate) and hyaluronic acid. We recently cloned and recombinantly expressed cABC I in Escherichia coli, and completed a preliminary biochemical characterization of the enzyme. In the present study, we have coupled site-directed mutagenesis of the recombinant cABC I with a structural model of the enzyme–substrate complex in order to investigate in detail the roles of active site amino acids in the catalytic action of the enzyme. The putative catalytic residues His-501, Tyr-508, Arg-560 and Glu-653 were probed systematically via mutagenesis. Assessment of these mutants in kinetic and end-point assays provided direct evidence on the catalytic roles of these active-site residues. The crystal structure of the native enzyme provided a framework for molecular docking of representative CS and DS substrates. This enabled us to construct recombinant enzyme–substrate structural complexes. These studies together provided structural insights into the effects of the mutations on the catalytic mechanism of cABC I and the differences in its processing of CS and DS substrates. All His-501 mutants were essentially inactive and thereby implicating this amino acid to play the critical role of proton abstraction during catalysis. The kinetic data for Glu-653 mutants indicated that it is involved in a hydrogen bonding network in the active site. The proximity of Tyr-508 to the glycosidic oxygen of the substrate at the site of cleavage suggested its potential role in protonating the leaving group. Arg-560 was proximal to the uronic acid C-5 proton, suggesting its possible role in the stabilization of the carbanion intermediate formed during catalysis. PMID:16108757

  8. Biochemical characterization of the chondroitinase ABC I active site.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Vikas; Raman, Rahul; Capila, Ishan; Bosques, Carlos J; Pojasek, Kevin; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2005-09-01

    cABC I (chondroitinase ABC I) from Proteus vulgaris is a GalAG (galactosaminoglycan) depolymerizing lyase that cleaves its substrates at the glycosidic bond via beta-elimination. cABC I cleaves a particularly broad range of GalAG substrates, including CS (chondroitin sulphate), DS (dermatan sulphate) and hyaluronic acid. We recently cloned and recombinantly expressed cABC I in Escherichia coli, and completed a preliminary biochemical characterization of the enzyme. In the present study, we have coupled site-directed mutagenesis of the recombinant cABC I with a structural model of the enzyme-substrate complex in order to investigate in detail the roles of active site amino acids in the catalytic action of the enzyme. The putative catalytic residues His-501, Tyr-508, Arg-560 and Glu-653 were probed systematically via mutagenesis. Assessment of these mutants in kinetic and end-point assays provided direct evidence on the catalytic roles of these active-site residues. The crystal structure of the native enzyme provided a framework for molecular docking of representative CS and DS substrates. This enabled us to construct recombinant enzyme-substrate structural complexes. These studies together provided structural insights into the effects of the mutations on the catalytic mechanism of cABC I and the differences in its processing of CS and DS substrates. All His-501 mutants were essentially inactive and thereby implicating this amino acid to play the critical role of proton abstraction during catalysis. The kinetic data for Glu-653 mutants indicated that it is involved in a hydrogen bonding network in the active site. The proximity of Tyr-508 to the glycosidic oxygen of the substrate at the site of cleavage suggested its potential role in protonating the leaving group. Arg-560 was proximal to the uronic acid C-5 proton, suggesting its possible role in the stabilization of the carbanion intermediate formed during catalysis.

  9. KRAS and BRAF mutational status in primary colorectal tumors and related metastatic sites: biological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Antoine; Hostein, Isabelle; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Fabas, Thibault; Benchimol, Daniel; Evrard, Serge; Gugenheim, Jean; Becouarn, Yves; Brunet, René; Fonck, Marianne; François, Eric; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Pedeutour, Florence

    2010-05-01

    KRAS and BRAF mutations in primary colorectal tumors (PT) are predictive of nonresponse to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). The question of primary resistance to anti-EGFR treatment as a result of the presence of KRAS or BRAF mutations only in metastases has been raised but not resolved. We analyzed the mutational status of KRAS and BRAF in 64 new patients with mCRC and performed a systematic review of published data from 285 patients. A total of 285 and 95 matched PT/metastases were available for the analysis of the KRAS and the BRAF status, respectively. An identical mutational pattern of KRAS in PT and the matching metastases were reported in all the cases but 14 (5%). In six cases (2%), KRAS was mutated in the PT and wild type in the metastatic site, whereas in eight cases (3%), KRAS was wild type in the PT and mutated in the metastatic site. An identical mutational pattern of BRAF in PT and the matching metastases was reported in all but two cases (3%). In one case (1.5%), BRAF was mutated in the PT and wild type in the metastatic site, whereas in one case (1.5%), BRAF was wild type in the PT and mutated in the metastatic site. The acquisition by metastases of a KRAS or a BRAF mutation that was not present in the PT is a rare event, occurring in 5% of cases of mCRC. This is not a frequent mechanism of primary resistance to anti-EGFR treatments in mCRC.

  10. Three faces of recombination activating gene 1 (RAG1) mutations.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, Himmet Haluk; Van Der Burg, Mirjam

    2015-12-01

    Severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) is a group of genetic disorder associated with development of T- and/or B-lymphocytes. Recombination-activating genes (RAG1/2) play a critical role on VDJ recombination process that leads to the production of a broad T-cell receptor (TCR) and B-cell receptor (BCR) repertoire in the development of T and B cells. RAG1/2 genes mutations result in various forms of primary immunodeficiency, ranging from classic SCID to Omenn syndrome (OS) to atypical SCID with such as granuloma formation and autoimmunity. Herein, we reported 4 patients with RAG1 deficiency: classic SCID was seen in two patients who presented with recurrent pneumonia and chronic diarrhoea, and failure to thrive. OS was observed in one patient who presented with chronic diarrhoea, skin rash, recurrent lower respiratory infections, and atypical SCID was seen in one patient who presented with Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and had novel RAG1 mutation.

  11. Effects of amino-terminal extensions and specific mutations on the activity of restrictocin.

    PubMed

    Yang, R; Kenealy, W R

    1992-08-25

    The cytotoxic activities of restrictocin with aminoterminal extensions and specific mutations were investigated using in vivo and in vitro systems. Genes were constructed from the cDNA clone of restrictocin which encode: the native form of restrictocin (including the leader sequence); Met-prorestrictocin, in which a codon for methionine was placed before a putative pro region; Met-mature restrictocin, with a methionine codon prior to the mature form of restrictocin; and three mutated forms of Met-mature restrictocin, E95G, E115G/H136L, and H136L. These constructions were placed under the control of the GAL1 promoter and were transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Transformants were killed, and a new RNA band formed when any of these genes except those containing the H136L mutation were expressed. Restrictocin protein was detected by immunoblot only in cells expressing the native form of restrictocin and the forms containing the H136L mutation. Native restrictocin, Met-prorestrictocin, and Met-mature restrictocin mRNA were translated in an in vitro system resulting in proteins of the expected molecular weight and inactivation of the translation system. Restrictocin was not inactivated by the presence of the leader sequence and the putative prosequence. Amino acid His136 is putatively in the active site of restrictocin by analogy to ribonuclease U2 and the elimination of toxic effects in the S. cerevisiae expression and in vitro translation systems.

  12. Infantile adrenocortical tumor with an activating GNAS1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Alpa; Debelenko, Larisa; Misra, Vinod K

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) are rare and are frequently associated with tumor predisposition syndromes. Somatic GNAS1 mutations are associated with adrenocortical hyperplasia, but have not typically been reported in ACTs. We report on genetic and histopathological findings in a 3-month-old infant presenting with a unilateral cortisol-producing ACT with malignant features. We performed a detailed clinical evaluation of the patient along with molecular genetic testing of genes associated with ACTs in both tumor tissue and peripheral lymphocytes. We also performed a histopathological analysis of the tumor tissue. The patient was found to have a p.R201C-activating mutation in exon 8 of the GNAS1 gene in adrenocortical tumor tissue but not peripheral lymphocytes. This mutation is the characteristic genetic change in McCune-Albright syndrome. In contrast to previously reported GNAS1-positive tumors characterized by bimodal diffuse and nodular adrenocortical hypertrophy, our patient had a single adrenocortical mass that showed features of malignancy, including areas of necrosis, microcystic degeneration, and venous and capsular microinvasion-changes that have been seen previously in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. However, our patient did not have clinical features of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Further analysis revealed abnormal allele-specific hypomethylation of the KCNQ1OT1 gene in the tumor sample but not peripheral lymphocytes. This is a novel case of an activating GNAS1 mutation associated with an epigenetic alteration that may be related to adrenocortical tumorigenesis. Our findings may have implications in the molecular pathogenesis of pediatric ACTs.

  13. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  14. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  15. LYN-activating mutations mediate antiestrogen resistance in estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Luis J.; Fox, Emily M.; Balko, Justin M.; Garrett, Joan T.; Kuba, María Gabriela; Estrada, Mónica Valeria; González-Angulo, Ana María; Mills, Gordon B.; Red-Brewer, Monica; Mayer, Ingrid A.; Abramson, Vandana; Rizzo, Monica; Kelley, Mark C.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) breast cancers adapt to hormone deprivation and become resistant to antiestrogen therapy. Here, we performed deep sequencing on ER+ tumors that remained highly proliferative after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and identified a D189Y mutation in the inhibitory SH2 domain of the SRC family kinase (SFK) LYN. Evaluation of 463 breast tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed four LYN mutations, two of which affected the SH2 domain. In addition, LYN was upregulated in multiple ER+ breast cancer lines resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). An RNAi-based kinome screen revealed that LYN is required for growth of ER+ LTED breast cancer cells. Kinase assays and immunoblot analyses of SRC substrates in transfected cells indicated that LYND189Y has higher catalytic activity than WT protein. Further, LYND189Y exhibited reduced phosphorylation at the inhibitory Y507 site compared with LYNWT. Other SH2 domain LYN mutants, E159K and K209N, also exhibited higher catalytic activity and reduced inhibitory site phosphorylation. LYND189Y overexpression abrogated growth inhibition by fulvestrant and/or the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in 3 ER+ breast cancer cell lines. The SFK inhibitor dasatinib enhanced the antitumor effect of BKM120 and fulvestrant against estrogen-deprived ER+ xenografts but not LYND189Y-expressing xenografts. These results suggest that LYN mutations mediate escape from antiestrogens in a subset of ER+ breast cancers. PMID:25401474

  16. Mutations in a conserved region of RNA polymerase II influence the accuracy of mRNA start site selection.

    PubMed Central

    Hekmatpanah, D S; Young, R A

    1991-01-01

    A sensitive phenotypic assay has been used to identify mutations affecting transcription initiation in the genes encoding the two large subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II (RPB1 and RPB2). The rpb1 and rpb2 mutations alter the ratio of transcripts initiated at two adjacent start sites of a delta-insertion promoter. Of a large number of rpb1 and rpb2 mutations screened, only a few affect transcription initiation patterns at delta-insertion promoters, and these mutations are in close proximity to each other within both RPB1 and RPB2. The two rpb1 mutations alter amino acid residues within homology block G, a region conserved in the large subunits of all RNA polymerases. The three strong rpb2 mutations alter adjacent amino acids. At a wild-type promoter, the rpb1 mutations affect the accuracy of mRNA start site selection by producing a small but detectable increase in the 5'-end heterogeneity of transcripts. These RNA polymerase II mutations implicate specific portions of the enzyme in aspects of transcription initiation. Images PMID:1922077

  17. Induction of a DNA Nickase in the Presence of Its Target Site Stimulates Adaptive Mutation in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Cesar; Tompkin, Joshua; Hazel, Jill; Foster, Patricia L.

    2002-01-01

    Adaptive mutation to Lac+ in Escherichia coli strain FC40 depends on recombination functions and is enhanced by the expression of conjugal functions. To test the hypothesis that the conjugal function that is important for adaptive mutation is the production of a single-strand nick at the conjugal origin, we supplied an exogenous nicking enzyme, the gene II protein (gIIp) of bacteriophage f1, and placed its target sequence near the lac allele. When both gIIp and its target site were present, adaptive mutation was stimulated three- to fourfold. Like normal adaptive mutations, gIIp-induced mutations were recA+ and ruvC+ dependent and were mainly single-base deletions in runs of iterated bases. In addition, gIIp with its target site could substitute for conjugal functions in adaptive mutation. These results support the hypothesis that nicking at the conjugal origin initiates the recombination that produces adaptive mutations in this strain of E. coli, and they suggest that nicking may be the only conjugal function required for adaptive mutation. PMID:12270817

  18. Exon 10 skipping in ACAT1 caused by a novel c.949G>A mutation located at an exonic splice enhancer site.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroki; Sasai, Hideo; Nakama, Mina; Aoyama, Yuka; Abdelkreem, Elsayed; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Beta-ketothiolase deficiency, also known as mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (T2) deficiency, is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the acetyl‑CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) gene. A German T2‑deficient patient that developed a severe ketoacidotic episode at the age of 11 months, was revealed to be a compound heterozygote of a previously reported null mutation, c.472A>G (p.N158D) and a novel mutation, c.949G>A (p.D317N), in ACAT1. The c.949G>A mutation was suspected to cause aberrant splicing as it is located within an exonic splicing enhancer sequence (c. 947CTGACGC) that is a potential binding site for serine/arginine‑rich splicing factor 1. A mutation in this sequence, c.951C>T, results in exon 10 skipping. A minigene construct was synthesized that included exon 9‑truncated intron 9‑exon 10‑truncated intron 10‑exon 11, and the splicing of this minigene revealed that the c.949G>A mutant construct caused exon 10 skipping in a proportion of the transcripts. Furthermore, additional substitution of G for C at the first nucleotide of exon 10 (c.941G>C) abolished the effect of the c.949G>A mutation. Transient expression analysis of the c.949G>A mutant cDNA revealed no residual T2 activity in the mutated D317N enzyme. Therefore, c.949G>A (D317N) is a pathogenic missense mutation, and diminishes the effect of an exonic splicing enhancer and causes exon 10 skipping. The present study demonstrates that a missense mutation, or even a synonymous substitution, may disrupt enzyme function by interference with splicing.

  19. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  20. Novel aberrant splicings caused by a splice site mutation (IVS1a+5g>a) in F7 gene.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiulan; Wu, Wenman; Fu, Qihua; Wang, Xuefeng; Hu, Yiqun; Wang, Hongli; Wang, Zhenyi

    2005-06-01

    Low FVII coagulant activity (FVII:C 8.2%) and antigen level (FVII:Ag 34.1%) in a 46-year-old Chinese male led to a diagnosis of coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified in his F 7 gene:a G to A transition in the 5' donor splice site of intron 1a (IVS1a+5g>a) and a T to G transition at the nucleotide position 10961 in exon 8, resulting in a His to Gln substitution at amino acid residue 348. An analysis of ectopic transcripts of F7 in the leukocytes of the patient reveals that the mutation (IVS1a+5g>a) is associated with two novel aberrant patterns of splicing. The predominant alternative transcript removes exon 2, but retains intron 3, which shifts the reading frame and predicts a premature translation termination at the nucleotide positions 2-4 in intron 3. The minor alternative transcript skips both exon 2 and exon 3 (FVII Delta 2, 3), leading to an in-frame deletion of the propeptide and gamma-carboxylated glutamic acid (Gla) domains of mature FVII protein. In vitro expression studies of the alternative transcript FVII Delta 2,3 by transient transfection of HEK 293 cells with PcDNA 3.1(-) expression vector showed that although the mutant protein could be secreted, no pro-coagulation activity was detected. The coexistence of the two abnormal transcripts and a heterozygous mutation His348Gln, explained the patient's phenotype.

  1. Oculocutaneous Albinism Type 1: Link between Mutations, Tyrosinase Conformational Stability, and Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Dolinska, Monika B.; Kus, Nicole; Farney, Katie; Wingfield, Paul T.; Brooks, Brian P.; Sergeev, Yuri V.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Oculocutaneous albinism Type 1 (OCA1) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the tyrosinase gene. Two subtypes of OCA1 have been described: severe OCA1A with complete absence of tyrosinase activity and less severe OCA1B with residual tyrosinase activity. Here, we characterize the recombinant human tyrosinase intra-melanosomal domain and mutant variants, which mimic genetic changes in both subtypes of OCA1 patients. Proteins were prepared using site-directed mutagenesis, expressed in insect larvae, purified by chromatography, and characterized by enzymatic activities- tryptophan fluorescence, and Gibbs free energy changes. The OCA1A mutants show very low protein expression, protein yield, and are enzymatically inactive. Mutants mimicking OCA1B were biochemically similar to the wild type, but exhibited lower specific activities and protein stabilities. The results are consistent with clinical data, which indicates that OCA1A mutations inactivate tyrosinase and result in severe phenotype, while OCA1B mutations partially inactive tyrosinase and results in OCA1B albinism. PMID:27775880

  2. Dynamics and Mechanism of Efficient DNA Repair Reviewed by Active-Site Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2010-06-01

    Photolyases repair the UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in damage DNA via a photoreaction which includes a series of light-driven electron transfers between the two-electron-reduced flavin cofactor FADH^- and the dimer. We report here our systematic studies of the repair dynamics in E. coli photolyase with mutation of several active-site residues. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the significant change in the forward electron transfer from the excited FADH^- to the dimer and the back electron transfer from the repaired thymines by mutation of E274A, R226A, R342A, N378S and N378C. We also found that the mutation of E274A accelerates the bond-breaking of the thymine dimer. The dynamics changes are consistent with the quantum yield study of these mutants. These results suggest that the active-site residues play a significant role, structurally and chemically, in the DNA repair photocycle.

  3. Mutations within potential glycosylation sites in the capsid protein of hepatitis E virus prevent the formation of infectious virus particles.

    PubMed

    Graff, Judith; Zhou, Yi-Hua; Torian, Udana; Nguyen, Hanh; St Claire, Marisa; Yu, Claro; Purcell, Robert H; Emerson, Suzanne U

    2008-02-01

    Hepatitis E virus is a nonenveloped RNA virus. However, the single capsid protein resembles a typical glycoprotein in that it contains a signal sequence and potential glycosylation sites that are utilized when recombinant capsid protein is overexpressed in cell culture. In order to determine whether these unexpected observations were biologically relevant or were artifacts of overexpression, we analyzed capsid protein produced during a normal viral replication cycle. In vitro transcripts from an infectious cDNA clone mutated to eliminate potential glycosylation sites were transfected into cultured Huh-7 cells and into the livers of rhesus macaques. The mutations did not detectably affect genome replication or capsid protein synthesis in cell culture. However, none of the mutants infected rhesus macaques. Velocity sedimentation analyses of transfected cell lysates revealed that mutation of the first two glycosylation sites prevented virion assembly, whereas mutation of the third site permitted particle formation and RNA encapsidation, but the particles were not infectious. However, conservative mutations that did not destroy glycosylation motifs also prevented infection. Overall, the data suggested that the mutations were lethal because they perturbed protein structure rather than because they eliminated glycosylation.

  4. Disease Mutations in Rab7 Result in Unregulated Nucleotide Exchange and Inappropriate Activation

    SciTech Connect

    B McCray; E Skordalakes; J Taylor

    2011-12-31

    Rab GTPases are molecular switches that orchestrate vesicular trafficking, maturation and fusion by cycling between an active, GTP-bound form, and an inactive, GDP-bound form. The activity cycle is coupled to GTP hydrolysis and is tightly controlled by regulatory proteins. Missense mutations of the GTPase Rab7 cause a dominantly inherited axonal degeneration known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B through an unknown mechanism. We present the 2.8 A crystal structure of GTP-bound L129F mutant Rab7 which reveals normal conformations of the effector binding regions and catalytic site, but an alteration to the nucleotide binding pocket that is predicted to alter GTP binding. Through extensive biochemical analysis, we demonstrate that disease-associated mutations in Rab7 do not lead to an intrinsic GTPase defect, but permit unregulated nucleotide exchange leading to both excessive activation and hydrolysis-independent inactivation. Consistent with augmented activity, mutant Rab7 shows significantly enhanced interaction with a subset of effector proteins. In addition, dynamic imaging demonstrates that mutant Rab7 is abnormally retained on target membranes. However, we show that the increased activation of mutant Rab7 is counterbalanced by unregulated, GTP hydrolysis-independent membrane cycling. Notably, disease mutations are able to rescue the membrane cycling of a GTPase-deficient mutant. Thus, we demonstrate that disease mutations uncouple Rab7 from the spatial and temporal control normally imposed by regulatory proteins and cause disease not by a gain of novel toxic function, but by misregulation of native Rab7 activity.

  5. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 mutation with invasive eosinophilic disease

    PubMed Central

    Swender, David; Chernin, Leah; Hafez-Khayyata, Said; Ochs, Hans; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Hostoffer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES), or Jobs disease, is a rare immunologic disorder characterized by the triad of staphylococcal abscesses, pneumonia with pneumatocele formation, and elevated IgE. It has been shown to have multiple modes of inheritance, autosomal dominant being more common than autosomal recessive, with sporadic cases as well. A mutation in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) gene has been linked to the development of the sporadic and dominant forms of HIES. Peripheral eosinophilia, typically greater than two standard deviations from the normal population, is often seen in association with HIES. Despite these elevated levels of blood eosinophils, there have been no reported cases of invasive eosinophilic disease, such as eosonophilic esophagitic. Here we report the first description, to our knowledge, of a patient with HIES with a STAT3 mutation involving exon 12, Thr389Ile, and invasive eosinophilic disease of the esophagus. STAT3 modulates the expression of several genes that control central cell processes such as growth and death in response to external soluble stimuli. A mutation in the STAT3 molecule may affect the eosinophil's response to IL-5 and thus reduce the chemotaxic ability of those cells to migrate into tissues. This may then explain the paucity of eosinophilic infiltrative disease in patients with STAT3 mutations. The level of eosinophilic involvement may be related to the site or type of mutation within the STAT3 molecule. As more data are collected, we may be able to assess whether certain mutations dictate different clinical outcomes, which could prove helpful in directing therapy. PMID:23342295

  6. A gripping tale of ribosomal frameshifting: extragenic suppressors of frameshift mutations spotlight P-site realignment.

    PubMed

    Atkins, John F; Björk, Glenn R

    2009-03-01

    Mutants of translation components which compensate for both -1 and +1 frameshift mutations showed the first evidence for framing malleability. Those compensatory mutants isolated in bacteria and yeast with altered tRNA or protein factors are reviewed here and are considered to primarily cause altered P-site realignment and not altered translocation. Though the first sequenced tRNA mutant which suppressed a +1 frameshift mutation had an extra base in its anticodon loop and led to a textbook "yardstick" model in which the number of anticodon bases determines codon size, this model has long been discounted, although not by all. Accordingly, the reviewed data suggest that reading frame maintenance and translocation are two distinct features of the ribosome. None of the -1 tRNA suppressors have anticodon loops with fewer than the standard seven nucleotides. Many of the tRNA mutants potentially affect tRNA bending and/or stability and can be used for functional assays, and one has the conserved C74 of the 3' CCA substituted. The effect of tRNA modification deficiencies on framing has been particularly informative. The properties of some mutants suggest the use of alternative tRNA anticodon loop stack conformations by individual tRNAs in one translation cycle. The mutant proteins range from defective release factors with delayed decoding of A-site stop codons facilitating P-site frameshifting to altered EF-Tu/EF1alpha to mutant ribosomal large- and small-subunit proteins L9 and S9. Their study is revealing how mRNA slippage is restrained except where it is programmed to occur and be utilized.

  7. Structural characterization of single nucleotide variants at ligand binding sites and enzyme active sites of human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazunori D.; Nishi, Hafumi; Nakata, Junichi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Functional sites on proteins play an important role in various molecular interactions and reactions between proteins and other molecules. Thus, mutations in functional sites can severely affect the overall phenotype. Progress of genome sequencing projects has yielded a wealth of information on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), especially those with less than 1% minor allele frequency (rare variants). To understand the functional influence of genetic variants at a protein level, we investigated the relationship between SNVs and protein functional sites in terms of minor allele frequency and the structural position of variants. As a result, we observed that SNVs were less abundant at ligand binding sites, which is consistent with a previous study on SNVs and protein interaction sites. Additionally, we found that non-rare variants tended to be located slightly apart from enzyme active sites. Examination of non-rare variants revealed that most of the mutations resulted in moderate changes of the physico-chemical properties of amino acids, suggesting the existence of functional constraints. In conclusion, this study shows that the mapping of genetic variants on protein structures could be a powerful approach to evaluate the functional impact of rare genetic variations. PMID:27924270

  8. Investigating the Role of Loop C Hydrophilic Residue ‘T244’ in the Binding Site of ρ1 GABAC Receptors via Site Mutation and Partial Agonism

    PubMed Central

    Naffaa, Moawiah M.; Absalom, Nathan; Solomon, V. Raja; Chebib, Mary; Hibbs, David E.; Hanrahan, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    The loop C hydrophilic residue, threonine 244 lines the orthosteric binding site of ρ1 GABAC receptors was studied by point mutation into serine, alanine and cysteine, and tested with GABA, some representative partial agonists and antagonists. Thr244 has a hydroxyl group essential for GABA activity that is constrained by the threonine methyl group, orienting it toward the binding site. Significant decreases in activation effects of the studied ligands at ρ1 T244S mutant receptors, suggests a critical role for this residue. Results of aliphatic and heteroaromatic partial agonists demonstrate different pharmacological effects at ρ1 T244S mutant receptors when co-applied with GABA EC50 responses. ρ1 T244A and ρ1 T244C mutant receptors have minimal sensitivity to GABA at high mM concentrations, whereas, the ρ1 WT partial agonists, β-alanine and MTSEA demonstrate more efficacy and potency, respectively, than GABA at these mutant receptors. This study explores the role of Thr244 in the binding of agonists as an initial step during channel gating by moving loop C towards the ligand. PMID:27244450

  9. [Effects of different mutated sites in vpr gene of HIV on apoptosis of host cells: experiment with HeLa cells].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu-huang; Zhang, Chun-ying; He, Yan; Gong, Guo-zhong; Li, Hui; Chen, Zi; Liu, Meng; Zhou, Hua-ying; Li, Ying; Liu, Chun; Li, Jing; Zhou, Guo-qiang; Yin, Wei; Yuan, Hong-li

    2009-03-10

    To investigate the effects of different mutated sites in the vpr gene of HIV on the apoptosis of host cells, and the possible mechanism thereof. Fourteen HIV-1 vpr fragments were obtained from HIV-infected persons. Eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1 (+) plasmid was extracted, the PCR purified product was double-cut by HindIII and BamH, and the cut products were ligated to vectors, thus establishing the JM109 competent cells. Sequencing was used to confirm the reconstruction of pcDNA-vpr eukaryotic expression vectors that were then transfected into HeLa cells. Blank vectors were transfected as control group. Cells were harvested after 24 hours and underwent Hoechst 33258 staining and observed under fluorescence microscope. Annexin-FITC-PI staining and flow cytometry were used to observe the percentage of apoptosis. The caspase-3 activity was detected by enzyme labeling instrument. The apoptotic rates shown by Hoechst and annexin--FITC-PI staining methods, and caspase-3 activity levels of the HeLa cells transfected with the gene fragments with mutated sites 70, 85, 86, and 94 cells were all lower than the cells transfected with the gene fragments without these mutated sites. The apoptosis causing ability levels of the No 1-7 recombinant plasmids (all of the Vpr AE subtype) were all lower than those of the No 8-14 plasmids (of Vpr B, AB, C, and C/BC subtypes). The apoptosis causing ability of the HIV with the vpr sequence with mutated sites 70, 85, 86, 94 is significantly lower than those without these sites. AE subtype induces lower apoptotic behavior in the hoist cells, and decreased activation of the caspase-3 pathway may be one of the mechanisms.

  10. A novel AVPR2 splice site mutation leads to partial X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in two brothers.

    PubMed

    Schernthaner-Reiter, Marie Helene; Adams, David; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Ramnitz, Mary Scott; Raygada, Margarita; Golas, Gretchen; Faucz, Fabio R; Nilsson, Ola; Nella, Aikaterini A; Dileepan, Kavitha; Lodish, Maya; Lee, Paul; Tifft, Cynthia; Markello, Thomas; Gahl, William; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-05-01

    X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI, OMIM#304800) is caused by mutations in the arginine vasopressin (AVP, OMIM*192340) receptor type 2 (AVPR2, OMIM*300538) gene. A 20-month-old boy and his 8-year-old brother presented with polyuria, polydipsia, and failure to thrive. Both boys demonstrated partial DDAVP (1-desamino-8-D AVP or desmopressin) responses; thus, NDI diagnosis was delayed. While routine sequencing of AVPR2 showed a potential splice site variant, it was not until exome sequencing confirmed the AVPR2 splice site variant and did not reveal any more likely candidates that the patients' diagnosis was made and proper treatment was instituted. Both patients were hemizygous for two AVPR2 variants predicted in silico to affect AVPR2 messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing. A minigene assay revealed that the novel AVPR2 c.276A>G mutation creates a novel splice acceptor site leading to 5' truncation of AVPR2 exon 2 in HEK293 human kidney cells. Both patients have been treated with high-dose DDAVP with a remarkable improvement of their symptoms and accelerated linear growth and weight gain. We present here a unique case of partial X-linked NDI due to an AVPR2 splice site mutation; patients with diabetes insipidus of unknown etiology may harbor splice site mutations that are initially underestimated in their pathogenicity on sequence analysis. • X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by AVPR2 mutations, and disease severity can vary depending on the functional effect of the mutation. What is New: • We demonstrate here that a splice site mutation in AVPR2 leads to partial X-linked NDI in two brothers. • Treatment with high-dose DDAVP led to improvement of polyuria and polydipsia, weight gain, and growth.

  11. Activating cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 (CYSLTR2) mutations in blue nevi.

    PubMed

    Möller, Inga; Murali, Rajmohan; Müller, Hansgeorg; Wiesner, Thomas; Jackett, Louise A; Scholz, Simone L; Cosgarea, Ioana; van de Nes, Johannes Ap; Sucker, Antje; Hillen, Uwe; Schilling, Bastian; Paschen, Annette; Kutzner, Heinz; Rütten, Arno; Böckers, Martin; Scolyer, Richard A; Schadendorf, Dirk; Griewank, Klaus G

    2017-03-01

    Blue nevi are common melanocytic tumors arising in the dermal layer of the skin. Similar to uveal melanomas, blue nevi frequently harbor GNAQ and GNA11 mutations. Recently, recurrent CYSLTR2 and PLCB4 mutations were identified in uveal melanomas not harboring GNAQ or GNA11 mutations. All four genes (GNAQ, GNA11, CYSLTR2, and PLCB4) code for proteins involved in the same signaling pathway, which is activated by mutations in these genes. Given the related functional consequences of these mutations and the known genetic similarities between uveal melanoma and blue nevi, we analyzed a cohort of blue nevi to investigate whether CYSLTR2 and PLCB4 mutations occur in tumors lacking GNAQ or GNA11 mutations (as in uveal melanoma). A targeted next-generation sequencing assay covering known activating mutations in GNAQ, GNA11, CYSLTR2, PLCB4, KIT, NRAS, and BRAF was applied to 103 blue nevi. As previously reported, most blue nevi were found to harbor activating mutations in GNAQ (59%, n=61), followed by less frequent mutations in GNA11 (16%, n=17). Additionally, one BRAF (1%) and three NRAS (3%) mutations were detected. In three tumors (3%) harboring none of the aforementioned gene alterations, CYSLTR2 mutations were identified. All three CYSLTR2 mutations were the same c.386T>A, L129Q mutation previously identified in uveal melanoma that has been shown to lead to increased receptor activation and signaling. In summary, our study identifies CYSLTR2 L129Q alterations as a previously unrecognized activating mutation in blue nevi, occuring in a mutually exclusive fashion with known GNAQ and GNA11 mutations. Similar to GNAQ and GNA11 mutations, CYSLTR2 mutations, when present, are likely defining pathogenetic events in blue nevi.

  12. Mutations in the p53 and Ki-ras genes, microsatellite instability and site of tumor origin in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Teresa; Curia, Maria Cristina; Aceto, Gitana; Verginelli, Fabio; Cascinu, Stefano; Cama, Alessandro; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Teti, Diana; Battista, Pasquale

    2005-09-01

    Using PCR-SSCP screening and direct sequencing we analyzed a series of 28 colorectal carcinomas for mutations in p53 (exons 5-8) and Ki-ras (codons 12, 13 and 61), and for micro-satellite instability (MSI) at BAT25 and BAT26, supplementing data with the analysis of the IARC colorectal cancer p53 mutation database. Mutations were correlated with the site of tumor origin (proximal or distal to the splenic flexure). We identified 19 mutations in p53, 9 in Ki-ras, and 4 MSI-positive cases in a total of 20 tumors. Only 6/20 cases (30%) carried mutations in both p53 and Ki-ras. Mutations in p53 were detected at similar frequencies in proximal and distal tumors, while IARC data pointed to a strong association of p53 mutations with distal cancers. Ki-ras mutations were more frequent in proximal tumors, and MSI occurred at similar frequencies in proximal and distal tumors and was associated with mutations in p53 or Ki-ras. The p53 mutations detected in the series analyzed, as well as those retrieved from the IARC database, were predominantly transitions, with no preferential sequence localization or nucleotide position. Ki-ras mutations were predominantly transversions in position 2 at codon 12. MSI-H occurred at similar frequencies in proximal and distal tumors and was associated with either p53 or Ki-ras mutations. Overall these data suggest that distinct mutagenic factors target p53 and Ki-ras in colorectal epithelium irrespective of MSI-H status.

  13. Improvement of Bacillus circulans beta-amylase activity attained using the ancestral mutation method.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Kan; Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Koikeda, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2010-07-01

    Thermostabilization of enzymes is one of the greatest challenges of protein engineering. The ancestral mutation method, which introduces ancestral residues into a target enzyme, has previously been developed and used to improve the thermostabilities of thermophilic enzymes. Herein, we report a study that used the ancestral mutation method to improve the thermostability of Bacillus circulans beta-amylase, a mesophilic enzyme. A bacterial, common-ancestral beta-amylase sequence was inferred using a phylogenetic tree composed of higher plant and bacterial amylase sequences. Eighteen mutants containing ancestral residues were designed, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Several of these mutants were more thermostable than that of the wild-type amylase. Notably, one mutant had both greater activity and greater thermostability. The relationship between the extent to which the amino acid residues within 5 A of the mutation site were evolutionarily conserved and the extent to which thermostability was improved was examined. Apparently, it is necessary to conserve the residues surrounding an ancestral residue if thermostability is to be improved by the ancestral mutation method.

  14. A novel TPM2 gene splice-site mutation causes severe congenital myopathy with arthrogryposis and dysmorphic features.

    PubMed

    Mroczek, Magdalena; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H; Pronicki, Maciej; Kochański, Andrzej

    2017-05-01

    To date, only two splice-site mutations within the TPM2 gene have been shown to be causative for congenital myopathies. While the majority of TPM2 gene mutations are causative for nemaline myopathy, cap disease or distal arthrogryposis, some mutations in this gene have been found to be associated with non-specific congenital myopathy. We report on a patient with such an unspecified congenital myopathy associated with distinctive facial dysmorphic features and distal arthrogryposis. Using the whole exome sequencing (WES) approach we were able to identify a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation within the TPM2 gene, showing the utility of WES in molecular diagnostics of congenital myopathies without recognizable morphological hallmarks.

  15. Mutations in the BRCT binding site of BRCA1 result in hyper-recombination.

    PubMed

    Dever, Seth M; Golding, Sarah E; Rosenberg, Elizabeth; Adams, Bret R; Idowu, Michael O; Quillin, John M; Valerie, Nicholas; Xu, Bo; Povirk, Lawrence F; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2011-05-01

    We introduced a K1702M mutation in the BRCA1 BRCT domain known to prevent the binding of proteins harboring pS-X-X-F motifs such as Abraxas-RAP80, BRIP1, and CtIP. Surprisingly, rather than impairing homologous recombination repair (HRR), expression of K1702M resulted in hyper-recombination coinciding with an accumulation of cells in S-G2 and no effect on nonhomologous end-joining. These cells also showed increased RAD51 and RPA nuclear staining. More pronounced effects were seen with a naturally occurring BRCT mutant (M1775R) that also produced elevated levels of ssDNA, in part co-localizing with RPA, in line with excessive DNA resection. M1775R induced unusual, thread-like promyelocytic leukemia (PML) nuclear bodies and clustered RPA foci rather than the typical juxtaposed RPA-PML foci seen with wild-type BRCA1. Interestingly, K1702M hyper-recombination diminished with a second mutation in the BRCA1 RING domain (I26A) known to reduce BRCA1 ubiquitin-ligase activity. Thesein vitro findings correlated with elevated nuclear RAD51 and RPA staining of breast cancer tissue from a patient with the M1775R mutation. Altogether, the disruption of BRCA1 (BRCT)-pS-X-X-F protein binding results in ubiquitination-dependent hyper-recombination via excessive DNA resection and the appearance of atypical PML-NBs. Thus, certain BRCA1 mutations that cause hyper-recombination instead of reduced DSB repair might lead to breast cancer.

  16. Competition of calcified calmodulin N lobe and PIP2 to an LQT mutation site in Kv7.1 channel.

    PubMed

    Tobelaim, William Sam; Dvir, Meidan; Lebel, Guy; Cui, Meng; Buki, Tal; Peretz, Asher; Marom, Milit; Haitin, Yoni; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Hirsch, Joel Alan; Attali, Bernard

    2017-01-31

    Voltage-gated potassium 7.1 (Kv7.1) channel and KCNE1 protein coassembly forms the slow potassium current IKS that repolarizes the cardiac action potential. The physiological importance of the IKS channel is underscored by the existence of mutations in human Kv7.1 and KCNE1 genes, which cause cardiac arrhythmias, such as the long-QT syndrome (LQT) and atrial fibrillation. The proximal Kv7.1 C terminus (CT) binds calmodulin (CaM) and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), but the role of CaM in channel function is still unclear, and its possible interaction with PIP2 is unknown. Our recent crystallographic study showed that CaM embraces helices A and B with the apo C lobe and calcified N lobe, respectively. Here, we reveal the competition of PIP2 and the calcified CaM N lobe to a previously unidentified site in Kv7.1 helix B, also known to harbor an LQT mutation. Protein pulldown, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and patch-clamp recordings indicate that residues K526 and K527 in Kv7.1 helix B form a critical site where CaM competes with PIP2 to stabilize the channel open state. Data indicate that both PIP2 and Ca(2+)-CaM perform the same function on IKS channel gating by producing a left shift in the voltage dependence of activation. The LQT mutant K526E revealed a severely impaired channel function with a right shift in the voltage dependence of activation, a reduced current density, and insensitivity to gating modulation by Ca(2+)-CaM. The results suggest that, after receptor-mediated PIP2 depletion and increased cytosolic Ca(2+), calcified CaM N lobe interacts with helix B in place of PIP2 to limit excessive IKS current inhibition.

  17. Novel splice-site mutation in TTLL5 causes cone dystrophy in a consanguineous family

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Miguel de Sousa; Hamel, Christian P.; Meunier, Isabelle; Varin, Juliette; Blanchard, Steven; Boyard, Fiona; Sahel, José-Alain

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To report the clinical and genetic findings of one family with autosomal recessive cone dystrophy (CD) and to identify the causative mutation. Methods An institutional study of three family members from two generations. The clinical examination included best-corrected Snellen visual acuity measurement, fundoscopy, the Farnsworth D-15 color vision test, a full-field electroretinogram (ERG) that incorporated the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision standards and methodology, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) and infrared (IR), and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Genetic findings were achieved with DNA analysis using whole exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequencing. Results The proband, a 9-year-old boy, presented with a condition that appeared to be congenital and stationary. The clinical presentation initially reflected incomplete congenital stationary night blindness (icCSNB) because of myopia, a decrease in visual acuity, abnormal oscillatory potentials, and reduced amplitudes on the 30 Hz flicker ERG but was atypical because there were no clear electronegative responses. However, no disease-causing mutations in the genes underlying icCSNB were identified. Following WES analysis of family members, a homozygous splice-site mutation in intron 3 of TTLL5 (c.182–3_182–1delinsAA) was found cosegregating within the phenotype in the family. Conclusions The distinction between icCSNB and CD phenotypes is not always straightforward in young patients. The patient was quite young, which most likely explains why the progression of the CD was not obvious. WES analysis provided prompt diagnosis for this family; thus, the use of this technique to refine the diagnosis is highlighted in this study. PMID:28356705

  18. Mutator activity of a short Okazaki fragment mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, S M; Couch, J L; Glaser, D A

    1978-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli (sof) which was previously shown to have increased recombination frequency, to produce abnormally short "Okazaki fragments," and to be deficient in deoxyuridine triphosphatase has now been found also to possess mutator activity for several genes; point mutation rates and deletion rates are affected. The mutational stimulation effects are consistent with the hypothesis that incorporation of uracil into DNA is directly or indirectly responsible for the observed mutator activity. PMID:350843

  19. Function-based mutation-resistant synthetic signaling device activated by HIV-1 proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Majerle, Andreja; Gaber, Rok; Benčina, Mojca; Jerala, Roman

    2015-06-19

    The high mutation rate of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virus is a major problem since it evades the function of antibodies and chemical inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a viral detection strategy based on synthetic biology principles to detect a specific viral function rather than a particular viral protein. The resistance caused by mutations can be circumvented since the mutations that cause the loss of function also incapacitate the virus. Many pathogens encode proteases that are essential for their replication and that have a defined substrate specificity. A genetically encoded sensor composed of a fused membrane anchor, viral protease target site, and an orthogonal transcriptional activator was engineered into a human cell line. The HIV-1 protease released the transcriptional activator from the membrane, thereby inducing transcription of the selected genes. The device was still strongly activated by clinically relevant protease mutants that are resistant to protease inhibitors. In the future, a similar principle could be applied to detect also other pathogens and functions.

  20. Improving the neutral phytase activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Wang, Zupeng; Yan, Xiuhua

    2015-03-01

    Neutral phytase is used as a feed additive for degradation of anti-nutritional phytate in aquatic feed industry. Site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 phytase was performed with an aim to increase its activity. Mutation residues were chosen based on multiple sequence alignments and structure analysis of neutral phytsaes from different microorganisms. The mutation sites on surface (D148E, S197E and N156E) and around the active site (D52E) of phytase were selected. Analysis of the phytase variants showed that the specific activities of mutants D148E and S197E remarkably increased by about 35 and 13% over a temperature range of 40-75 °C at pH 7.0, respectively. The k cat of mutants D148E and S197E were 1.50 and 1.25 times than that of the wild-type phytase, respectively. Both D148E and S197E showed much higher thermostability than that of the wild-type phytase. However, mutants N156E and D52E led to significant loss of specific activity of the enzyme. Structural analysis revealed that these mutations may affect conformation of the active site of phytase. The present mutant phytases D148E and S197E with increased activities and thermostabilities have application potential as additives in aquaculture feed.

  1. Mutation in Spike Protein Cleavage Site and Pathogenesis of Feline Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Licitra, Beth N.; Millet, Jean K.; Regan, Andrew D.; Hamilton, Brian S.; Rinaldi, Vera D.; Duhamel, Gerald E.

    2013-01-01

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) exist as 2 biotypes: feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). FECV causes subclinical infections; FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a systemic and fatal disease. It is thought that mutations in FECV enable infection of macrophages, causing FIP. However, the molecular basis for this biotype switch is unknown. We examined a furin cleavage site in the region between receptor-binding (S1) and fusion (S2) domains of the spike of serotype 1 FCoV. FECV sequences were compared with FIPV sequences. All FECVs had a conserved furin cleavage motif. For FIPV, there was a correlation with the disease and >1 substitution in the S1/S2 motif. Fluorogenic peptide assays confirmed that the substitutions modulate furin cleavage. We document a functionally relevant S1/S2 mutation that arises when FIP develops in a cat. These insights into FIP pathogenesis may be useful in development of diagnostic, prevention, and treatment measures against coronaviruses. PMID:23763835

  2. A novel splice-site mutation in the ASPM gene underlies autosomal recessive primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Jamil A; Al-Harbi, Khalid M; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Albalawi, Alia M; Mehmood, Amir; Samman, Mohammed I; Basit, Sulman

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Patients with MCPH exhibit reduced occipito-frontal head circumference and non-progressive intellectual disability. To date, 17 genes have been known as an underlying cause of MCPH in humans. ASPM (abnormal spindle-like, microcephaly associated) is the most commonly mutated MCPH gene. Identify the genetic defect underlying MCPH in a Saudi family. A cross-sectional clinical genetic study of a Saudi family. Madinah Maternity and Children Hospital and Centre for Genetics and Inherited Diseases, Taibah University. A molecular analysis was carried out on DNA samples from 10 individuals of a Saudi family segregating MCPH. DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood of 10 individuals, including 2 patients, and whole exome sequencing was performed using the Nextera Rapid Capture kit and NextSeq500 instrument. VariantStudio was used to filter and prioritize variants. Detection of mutation in the ASPM gene in a family segregating autoso- mal recessive primary microcephaly. A novel homozygous splice-site variant (c.3742-1G > C) in the ASPM gene was identified. The variant is predicted to have an effect on splicing. Human Splice Finder, an in silico tool, predicted skipping of exon 16 due to this variant. Skipping of exon 16 may change the order and number of IQ motifs in the ASPM protein leading to typical MCPH phenotype. Single family study.

  3. Identification of MGMT promoter methylation sites correlating with gene expression and IDH1 mutation in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Jian-Hui; Quan, Jia; Kang, Xing; Wang, Hui-Juan; Dai, Peng-Gao

    2016-10-01

    O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter methylation was reported to be an independent prognostic and predictive factor in glioma patients who received temozolomide treatment. However, the predictive value of MGMT methylation was recently questioned by several large clinical studies. The purpose of this study is to identify MGMT gene promoter CpG sites or region whose methylation were closely correlated with its gene expression to elucidate this contradictory clinical observations. The methylation status for all CpG dinucleotides in MGMT promoter and first exon region were determined in 42 Chinese glioma patients, which were then correlated with MGMT gene expression, IDH1 mutation, and tumor grade. In whole 87 CpG dinucleotides analyzed, three distinct CpG regions covering 28 CpG dinucleotides were significantly correlated with MGMT gene expression; 10 CpG dinucleotides were significantly correlated with glioma classification (p < 0.05). Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutation and MGMT gene hypermethylation significantly co-existed, but not for MGMT gene expression. The validation cohort of gliomas treated with standard of care and comparison of the CpGs we identified with the current CpGs used in clinical setting will be very important for gliomas individual medicine in the future.

  4. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues*

    PubMed Central

    Youngblut, Matthew D.; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C.; Carlson, Hans K.; Maglaqui, Adrian P.; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S.; Redford, Steven A.; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A.; Coates, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO32− bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  5. Glycosylation of Phenolic Compounds by the Site-Mutated β-Galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lili; Xu, Lijuan; Guo, Yuchuan; Zhang, Dayu; Qi, Tingting; Jin, Lan; Gu, Guofeng; Xu, Li; Xiao, Min

    2015-01-01

    β-Galactosidases can transfer the galactosyl from lactose or galactoside donors to various acceptors and thus are especially useful for the synthesis of important glycosides. However, these enzymes have limitations in the glycosylation of phenolic compounds that have many physiological functions. In this work, the β-galactosidase from Lactobacillus bulgaricus L3 was subjected to site-saturation mutagenesis at the W980 residue. The recombinant pET-21b plasmid carrying the enzyme gene was used as the template for mutation. The mutant plasmids were transformed into Escherichia coli cells for screening. One recombinant mutant, W980F, exhibited increased yield of glycoside when using hydroquinone as the screening acceptor. The enzyme was purified and the effects of the mutation on enzyme properties were determined in detail. It showed improved transglycosylation activity on novel phenolic acceptors besides hydroquinone. The yields of the glycosides produced from phenol, hydroquinone, and catechol were increased by 7.6% to 53.1%. Moreover, it generated 32.3% glycosides from the pyrogallol that could not be glycosylated by the wild-type enzyme. Chemical structures of these glycoside products were further determined by MS and NMR analysis. Thus, a series of novel phenolic galactosides were achieved by β-galactosidase for the first time. This was a breakthrough in the enzymatic galactosylation of the challenging phenolic compounds of great values. PMID:25803778

  6. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease. PMID:27570485

  7. Prenatal diagnosis and a donor splice site mutation in fibrillin in a family with Marfan syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, M.; Vandemark, N.; Wang, M.; Han, J.; Rao, V.H. ); Velinov, M.; Tsipouras, P. ); Wargowski, D.; Becker, J.; Robertson, W.; Droste, S. )

    1993-08-01

    The Marfan syndrome, an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder, is manifested by abnormalities in the cardiovascular, skeletal, and ocular systems. Recently, fibrillin, an elastic-associated microfibrillar glycoprotein, has been linked to the Marfan syndrome, and fibrillin mutations in affected individuals have been documented. In this study, genetic linkage analysis with fibrillin-specific markers was used to establish the prenatal diagnosis in an 11-wk-gestation fetus in a four-generation Marfan kindred. At birth, skeletal changes suggestive of the Marfan syndrome were observed. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification of the fibrillin gene mRNA detected a deletion of 123 bp in one allele in affected relatives. This deletion corresponds to an exon encoding an epidermal growth factor-like motif. Examination of genomic DNA showed a G[yields]C transversion at the +1 consensus donor splice site. 45 refs., 7 figs.

  8. JAK-2 V617F mutation increases heparanase procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Inna; Chap, Dafna; Hoffman, Ron; Axelman, Elena; Brenner, Benjamin; Nadir, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Patients with polycythaemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythaemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are at increased risk of arterial and venous thrombosis. In patients with ET a positive correlation was observed between JAK-2 V617F mutation, that facilitates erythropoietin receptor signalling, and thrombotic events, although the mechanism involved is not clear. We previously demonstrated that heparanase protein forms a complex and enhances the activity of the blood coagulation initiator tissue factor (TF) which leads to increased factor Xa production and subsequent activation of the coagulation system. The present study was aimed to evaluate heparanase procoagulant activity in myeloproliferative neoplasms. Forty bone marrow biopsies of patients with ET, PV, PMF and chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) were immunostained to heparanase, TF and TF pathway inhibitor (TFPI). Erythropoietin receptor positive cell lines U87 human glioma and MCF-7 human breast carcinoma were studied. Heparanase and TFPI staining were more prominent in ET, PV and PMF compared to CML. The strongest staining was in JAK-2 positive ET biopsies. Heparanase level and procoagulant activity were higher in U87 cells transfected to over express JAK-2 V617F mutation compared to control and the effect was reversed using JAK-2 inhibitors (Ruxolitinib, VZ3) and hydroxyurea, although the latter drug did not inhibit JAK-2 phosphorylation. Erythropoietin increased while JAK-2 inhibitors decreased the heparanase level and procoagulant activity in U87 and MCF-7 parental cells. In conclusion, JAK-2 is involved in heparanase up-regulation via the erythropoietin receptor. The present findings may potentially point to a new mechanism of thrombosis in JAK-2 positive ET patients.

  9. Mutation of large T-antigen-binding site A, but not site B or C, eliminates stalling by RNA polymerase II in the intergenic region of polyomavirus DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, J; Sunstrom, N A; Acheson, N H

    1993-01-01

    During transcription of the late strand of polyomavirus DNA, RNA polymerase II stalls and accumulates nearby the binding sites on viral DNA recognized by polyomavirus large T antigen. Stalling by RNA polymerases is eliminated when thermolabile large T antigen is inactivated by using a temperature-sensitive virus mutant (J. Bertin, N.-A. Sunstrom, P. Jain, and N. H. Acheson, Virology 189:715-724, 1992). To determine whether stalling by RNA polymerases is mediated through the interaction of large T antigen with one or more of its binding sites, viable polyomavirus mutants that contain altered large-T-antigen-binding sites were constructed. Point mutations were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis into the multiple, clustered G(A/G)GGC pentanucleotides known to be the target sequence for large T-antigen binding. Mutation of the G(A/G)GGC pentanucleotides in the first two binding sites encountered by RNA polymerases in the intergenic region (sites C and B) had no detectable effect on stalling as measured by transcriptional run-on analysis. However, mutation of the two GAGGC pentanucleotides in binding site A, which lies adjacent to the origin of viral DNA replication, eliminated stalling by RNA polymerases. We conclude that binding of large T antigen to site A blocks elongation by RNA polymerase II. Further characterization of virus containing mutated site A did not reveal any effects on early transcription levels or on virus DNA replication. However, the mutant virus gave rise to small plaques, suggesting impairment in some stage of virus growth. Stalling of RNA polymerases by large T antigen bound to the intergenic region of viral DNA may function to prevent transcription from displacing proteins whose binding is required for the normal growth of polyomavirus. Images PMID:8396655

  10. Prognostic quality of activating TERT promoter mutations in glioblastoma: interaction with the rs2853669 polymorphism and patient age at diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Spiegl-Kreinecker, Sabine; Lötsch, Daniela; Ghanim, Bahil; Pirker, Christine; Mohr, Thomas; Laaber, Magdalena; Weis, Serge; Olschowski, Alfred; Webersinke, Gerald; Pichler, Josef; Berger, Walter

    2015-09-01

    Expression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) might be altered by activating mutations of the rs2853669 polymorphism within the promoter region. Here we investigate the impact of these genomic alterations on telomerase activation and dissect their prognostic potential in glioblastoma (GBM). The respective TERT promoter region was sequenced in 126 GBM tissues and compared with clinical parameters and glioma biomarkers MGMT promoter methylation and IDH1 mutation. TERT mRNA expression, telomerase activity, and telomere lengths were determined by reverse transcriptase PCR, TRAP assay, and real-time PCR, respectively. Seventy-three percent of GBM patients harbored TERT promoter mutations associated with enhanced telomerase activity and TERT mRNA expression but reduced telomere lengths (P < .001 for all). Patients with mutated tumors exhibited significantly shorter overall survival in the entire cohort (11.5 vs 23.1 months; P < .0001) and in the primary GBM patient subgroup lacking IDH1 mutations (n = 120; P = .0084). This prognostic impact was confined to younger patients (aged <65 years), while the negative prognostic power of enhanced age at diagnosis was limited to those patients lacking TERT promoter mutations. Presence of the common single nucleotide polymorphism rs2853669, disrupting an endogenous Ets2 transcription factor-binding site, was associated with improved survival exclusively in patients with a wild-type TERT promoter. On the contrary, the shortest mean overall survival was detected in those patients harboring both an activating TERT promoter mutation and homozygous rs2853669 alleles. In summary, TERT promoter mutations are powerful prognosticators for worse course of disease in human GBM patients but their prognostic value is influenced by the rs2853669 polymorphism and age at diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  11. Prognostic quality of activating TERT promoter mutations in glioblastoma: interaction with the rs2853669 polymorphism and patient age at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Spiegl-Kreinecker, Sabine; Lötsch, Daniela; Ghanim, Bahil; Pirker, Christine; Mohr, Thomas; Laaber, Magdalena; Weis, Serge; Olschowski, Alfred; Webersinke, Gerald; Pichler, Josef; Berger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Background Expression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) might be altered by activating mutations of the rs2853669 polymorphism within the promoter region. Here we investigate the impact of these genomic alterations on telomerase activation and dissect their prognostic potential in glioblastoma (GBM). Methods The respective TERT promoter region was sequenced in 126 GBM tissues and compared with clinical parameters and glioma biomarkers MGMT promoter methylation and IDH1 mutation. TERT mRNA expression, telomerase activity, and telomere lengths were determined by reverse transcriptase PCR, TRAP assay, and real-time PCR, respectively. Results Seventy-three percent of GBM patients harbored TERT promoter mutations associated with enhanced telomerase activity and TERT mRNA expression but reduced telomere lengths (P < .001 for all). Patients with mutated tumors exhibited significantly shorter overall survival in the entire cohort (11.5 vs 23.1 months; P < .0001) and in the primary GBM patient subgroup lacking IDH1 mutations (n = 120; P = .0084). This prognostic impact was confined to younger patients (aged <65 years), while the negative prognostic power of enhanced age at diagnosis was limited to those patients lacking TERT promoter mutations. Presence of the common single nucleotide polymorphism rs2853669, disrupting an endogenous Ets2 transcription factor-binding site, was associated with improved survival exclusively in patients with a wild-type TERT promoter. On the contrary, the shortest mean overall survival was detected in those patients harboring both an activating TERT promoter mutation and homozygous rs2853669 alleles. Conclusion In summary, TERT promoter mutations are powerful prognosticators for worse course of disease in human GBM patients but their prognostic value is influenced by the rs2853669 polymorphism and age at diagnosis. PMID:25681309

  12. Mutational Studies on Resurrected Ancestral Proteins Reveal Conservation of Site-Specific Amino Acid Preferences throughout Evolutionary History

    PubMed Central

    Risso, Valeria A.; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Local protein interactions (“molecular context” effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  13. Wobble Pairs of the HDV Ribozyme Play Specific Roles in Stabilization of Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Kamali N.; Banáš, Pavel; Reblova, Kamila; Šponer, Jiři; Otyepka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only known human pathogen whose genome contains a catalytic RNA motif (ribozyme). The overall architecture of the HDV ribozyme is that of a double-nested pseudoknot, with two GU pairs flanking the active site. Although extensive studies have shown that mutation of either wobble results in decreased catalytic activity, little work has focused on linking these mutations to specific structural effects on catalytic fitness. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations based on an activated structure to probe the active site dynamics as a result of wobble pair mutations. In both wild-type and mutant ribozymes, the in-line fitness of the active site (as a measure of catalytic proficiency) strongly depends on the presence of a C75(N3H3+)N1(O5′) hydrogen bond, which positions C75 as the general acid for the reaction. Our mutational analyses show that each GU wobble supports catalytically fit conformations in distinct ways; the reverse G25U20 wobble promotes high in-line fitness, high occupancy of the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) general-acid hydrogen bond and stabilization of the G1U37 wobble, while the G1U37 wobble acts more locally by stabilizing high in-line fitness and the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) hydrogen bond. We also find that stable type I A-minor and P1.1 hydrogen bonding above and below the active site, respectively, prevent local structural disorder from spreading and disrupting global conformation. Taken together, our results define specific, often redundant architectural roles for several structural motifs of the HDV ribozyme active site, expanding the known roles of these motifs within all HDV-like ribozymes and other structured RNAs. PMID:25631765

  14. Second-Site Suppressors of Rous Sarcoma Virus CA Mutations: Evidence for Interdomain Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bowzard, J. Bradford; Wills, John W.; Craven, Rebecca C.

    2001-01-01

    The capsid (CA) protein, the major structural component of retroviruses, forms a shell that encases the ribonucleoprotein complex in the virion core. The most conserved region of CA, ∼20 amino acids of the major homology region (MHR), lies within the carboxy-terminal domain of the protein. Structural and sequence similarities among CA proteins of retroviruses and the CA-like proteins of hepatitis B virus and various retrotransposons suggest that the MHR is involved in an aspect of replication common to these reverse-transcribing elements. Conservative substitutions in this region of the Rous sarcoma virus protein were lethal due to a severe deficiency in reverse transcription, in spite of the presence of an intact genome and active reverse transcriptase in the particles. This finding suggests that the mutations interfered with normal interactions among these constituents. A total of four genetic suppressors of three lethal MHR mutations have now been identified. All four map to the sequence encoding the CA-spacer peptide (SP) region of Gag. The F167Y mutation in the MHR was fully suppressed by a single amino acid change in the alpha helix immediately downstream of the MHR, a region that forms the major dimer interface in human immunodeficiency virus CA. This finding suggests that the F167Y mutation indirectly interfered with dimerization. The F167Y defect could also be repaired by a second, independent suppressor in the C-terminal SP that was removed from CA during maturation. This single residue change, which increased the rate of SP cleavage, apparently corrected the F167Y defect by modifying the maturation pathway. More surprising was the isolation of suppressors of the R170Q and L171V MHR mutations, which mapped to the N-terminal domain of the CA protein. This finding suggests that the two domains, which in the monomeric protein are separated by a flexible linker, must communicate with each other at some unidentified point in the viral replication cycle. PMID

  15. Development and validation of a clinical trial patient stratification assay that interrogates 27 mutation sites in MAPK pathway genes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ken C N; Galuska, Stefan; Weiner, Russell; Marton, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Somatic mutations identified on genes related to the cancer-developing signaling pathways have drawn attention in the field of personalized medicine in recent years. Treatments developed to target a specific signaling pathway may not be effective when tumor activating mutations occur downstream of the target and bypass the targeted mechanism. For instance, mutations detected in KRAS/BRAF/NRAS genes can lead to EGFR-independent intracellular signaling pathway activation. Most patients with these mutations do not respond well to anti-EGFR treatment. In an effort to detect various mutations in FFPE tissue samples among multiple solid tumor types for patient stratification many mutation assays were evaluated. Since there were more than 30 specific mutations among three targeted RAS/RAF oncogenes that could activate MAPK pathway genes, a custom designed Single Nucleotide Primer Extension (SNPE) multiplexing mutation assay was developed and analytically validated as a clinical trial assay. Throughout the process of developing and validating the assay we overcame many technical challenges which include: the designing of PCR primers for FFPE tumor tissue samples versus normal blood samples, designing of probes for detecting consecutive nucleotide double mutations, the kinetics and thermodynamics aspects of probes competition among themselves and against target PCR templates, as well as validating an assay when positive control tumor tissue or cell lines with specific mutations are not available. We used Next Generation sequencing to resolve discordant calls between the SNPE mutation assay and Sanger sequencing. We also applied a triplicate rule to reduce potential false positives and false negatives, and proposed special considerations including pre-define a cut-off percentage for detecting very low mutant copies in the wild-type DNA background.

  16. Glutamic acid residues as metal ligands in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Cheryl L; Kantrowitz, Evan R

    2003-06-26

    Four independent mutations were introduced to the Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase active site, and the resulting enzymes characterized to study the effects of Glu as a metal ligand. The mutations D51E and D153E were created to study the effects of lengthening the carboxyl group by one methylene unit at the metal interaction site. The D51E enzyme had drastically reduced activity and lost one zinc per active site, demonstrating importance of the position of Asp(51). The D153E enzyme had an increased k(cat) in the presence of high concentrations of Mg(2+), along with a decreased Mg(2+) affinity as compared to the wild-type enzyme. The H331E and H412E enzymes were created to probe the requirement for a nitrogen-containing metal ligand at the Zn(1) site. The H331E enzyme had greatly decreased activity, and lost one zinc per active site. In the absence of high concentrations of Zn(2+), dephosphorylation occurs at an extremely reduced rate for the H412E enzyme, and like the H331E enzyme, metal affinity is reduced. Except at the 153 position, Glu is not an acceptable metal chelating amino acid at these positions in the E. coli alkaline phosphatase active site.

  17. Number and locations of agonist binding sites required to activate homomeric Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Diego; De Rosa, María José; Sine, Steven M; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-05-06

    Homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors contain five identical agonist binding sites, each formed at a subunit interface. To determine the number and locations of binding sites required to generate a stable active state, we constructed a receptor subunit with a mutation that disables the agonist binding site and a reporter mutation that alters unitary conductance and coexpressed mutant and nonmutant subunits. Although receptors with a range of different subunit compositions are produced, patch-clamp recordings reveal that the amplitude of each single-channel opening event reports the number and, for certain subunit combinations, the locations of subunits with intact binding sites. We find that receptors with three binding sites at nonconsecutive subunit interfaces exhibit maximal mean channel open time, receptors with binding sites at three consecutive or two nonconsecutive interfaces exhibit intermediate open time, and receptors with binding sites at two consecutive or one interface exhibit brief open time. Macroscopic recordings after rapid application of agonist reveal that channel activation slows and the extent of desensitization decreases as the number of binding sites per receptor decreases. The overall results provide a framework for defining mechanisms of activation and drug modulation for homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors.

  18. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  19. βI-tubulin mutations in the laulimalide/peloruside binding site mediate drug sensitivity by altering drug-tubulin interactions and microtubule stability.

    PubMed

    Kanakkanthara, Arun; Rowe, Matthew R; Field, Jessica J; Northcote, Peter T; Teesdale-Spittle, Paul H; Miller, John H

    2015-09-01

    Peloruside A (PLA) and laulimalide (LAU) are potent microtubule-stabilizing natural products that are effective against a broad spectrum of cancer cells. The interactions of PLA and LAU with tubulin have attracted a great deal of attention, mainly because they bind to β-tubulin at a site that is different from the classical taxoid site. Multiple βI-tubulin amino acid residues have been predicted by computer modelling studies and more recently by protein crystallography to participate in the binding of PLA and LAU to tubulin. The relevance of these residues in determining cellular sensitivity to the compounds, however, remains largely uncertain. To determine the role of four binding site residues, Q291, D295, V333, and N337 on PLA and LAU activity, we introduced single mutations to these sites by site-directed mutagenesis and transfected each mutant tubulin separately into HEK and/or HeLa cells. We found that a Q291M βI-tubulin mutation increased sensitivity of the cells to PLA, but not to LAU, paclitaxel (PTX), or vinblastine (VBL). In contrast, V333W and N337L mutations led to less stable microtubules, with the V333W causing resistance to PLA and PTX, but not LAU, and the N337L causing resistance to PLA, LAU, and PTX. Moreover, cells expressing either W333 or L337 were hypersensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing agent, VBL. The D295I mutation conferred resistance to both PLA and LAU without affecting microtubule stability or sensitivity to PTX or ixabepilone (IXB). This study identifies the first mammalian βI-tubulin mutation that specifically increases sensitivity to PLA, and reports mutations at PLA and LAU binding site residues that can either reduce microtubule stability or impair drug-tubulin binding, conferring resistance to these microtubule-stabilizing agents. This information provides insights on β-tubulin residues important for maintaining microtubule structural integrity and for sensitivity to microtubule-targeting agents, and suggests novel

  20. Pathways of H2 toward the Active Site of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H.; Baptista, António M.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2), but little is known about the diffusion of H2 toward the active site. Here we analyze pathways for H2 permeation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent. Various MD simulation replicates were done, to improve the sampling of the system states. H2 easily permeates hydrogenase in every simulation and it moves preferentially in channels. All H2 molecules that reach the active site made their approach from the side of the Ni ion. H2 is able to reach distances of <4 Å from the active site, although after 6 Å permeation is difficult. In this region we mutated Val-67 into alanine and perform new MD simulations. These simulations show an increase of H2 inside the protein and at lower distances from the active site. This valine can be a control point in the H2 access to the active center. PMID:16731562

  1. Generation of rodent malaria parasites with a high mutation rate by destructing proofreading activity of DNA polymerase δ.

    PubMed

    Honma, Hajime; Hirai, Makoto; Nakamura, Shota; Hakimi, Hassan; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Palacpac, Nirianne M Q; Hisaeda, Hajime; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Satoru; Endo, Hiroyoshi; Yasunaga, Teruo; Ohashi, Jun; Mita, Toshihiro; Horii, Toshihiro; Furusawa, Mitsuru; Tanabe, Kazuyuki

    2014-08-01

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria imposes a serious public health concern throughout the tropics. Although genetic tools are principally important to fully investigate malaria parasites, currently available forward and reverse tools are fairly limited. It is expected that parasites with a high mutation rate can readily acquire novel phenotypes/traits; however, they remain an untapped tool for malaria biology. Here, we generated a mutator malaria parasite (hereinafter called a 'malaria mutator'), using site-directed mutagenesis and gene transfection techniques. A mutator Plasmodium berghei line with a defective proofreading 3' → 5' exonuclease activity in DNA polymerase δ (referred to as PbMut) and a control P. berghei line with wild-type DNA polymerase δ (referred to as PbCtl) were maintained by weekly passage in ddY mice for 122 weeks. High-throughput genome sequencing analysis revealed that two PbMut lines had 175-178 mutations and a 86- to 90-fold higher mutation rate than that of a PbCtl line. PbMut, PbCtl, and their parent strain, PbWT, showed similar course of infection. Interestingly, PbMut lost the ability to form gametocytes during serial passages. We believe that the malaria mutator system could provide a novel and useful tool to investigate malaria biology.

  2. Demonstration of the importance and usefulness of manipulating non-active-site residues in protein design.

    PubMed

    Shimotohno, A; Oue, S; Yano, T; Kuramitsu, S; Kagamiyama, H

    2001-06-01

    Do non-active-site residues participate in protein function in a more direct way than just by holding the static framework of the protein molecule? If so, how important are they? As a model to answer these questions, ATB17, which is a mutant of aspartate aminotransferase created by directed evolution, is an ideal system because it shows a 10(6)-fold increase in the catalytic efficiency for valine but most of its 17 mutated residues are non-active-site residues. To analyze the roles of the mutations in the altered function, we divided the mutations into four groups, namely, three clusters and the remainder, based on their locations in the three-dimensional structure. Mutants with various combinations of the clusters were constructed and analyzed, and the data were interpreted in the context of the structure-function relationship of this enzyme. Each cluster shows characteristic effects: for example, one cluster appears to enhance the catalytic efficiency by fixing the conformation of the enzyme to that of the substrate-bound form. The effects of the clusters are largely additive and independent of each other. The present results illustrate how a protein function is dramatically modified by the accumulation of many seemingly inert mutations of non-active-site residues.

  3. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  4. Mouse dyskerin mutations affect accumulation of telomerase RNA and small nucleolar RNA, telomerase activity, and ribosomal RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Yuko; He, Jun; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Bessler, Monica; Mason, Philip J

    2004-07-20

    Dyskerin is a nucleolar protein present in small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particles that modify specific uridine residues of rRNA by converting them to pseudouridine. Dyskerin is also a component of the telomerase complex. Point mutations in the human gene encoding dyskerin cause the skin and bone marrow failure syndrome dyskeratosis congenita (DC). To test the extent to which disruption of pseudouridylation or telomerase activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of DC, we introduced two dyskerin mutations into murine embryonic stem cells. The A353V mutation is the most frequent mutation in patients with X-linked DC, whereas the G402E mutation was identified in a single family. The A353V, but not the G402E, mutation led to severe destabilization of telomerase RNA, a reduction in telomerase activity, and a significant continuous loss of telomere length with increasing numbers of cell divisions during in vitro culture. Both mutations caused a defect in overall pseudouridylation and a small but detectable decrease in the rate of pre-rRNA processing. In addition, both mutant embryonic stem cell lines showed a decrease in the accumulation of a subset of H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs, correlating with a significant decrease in site-specific pseudouridylation efficiency. Interestingly, the H/ACA snoRNAs decreased in the G402E mutant cell line differed from those affected in A353V mutant cells. Hence, our findings show that point mutations in dyskerin may affect both the telomerase and pseudouridylation pathways and the extent to which these functions are altered can vary for different mutations.

  5. A novel splice site mutation in a Becker muscular dystrophy patient.

    PubMed

    Bartolo, C; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Hall, C D; Mendell, J R; Prior, T W

    1996-04-01

    A Becker muscular dystrophy patient was found to have a single base substitution at the 5' end of intron 54. This single base substitution disrupts the invariant GT dinucleotide within the 5' donor splice site and was shown to cause an out of frame deletion of exon 54 during mRNA processing. This is predicted to produce a truncated dystrophin protein which is more consistent with a DMD phenotype. However, small quantities of normal mRNA are also transcribed and these are sufficient to produce a reduced amount of normal molecular weight dystrophin and give rise to a milder BMD phenotype. This indicates that a single base substitution at an invariant dinucleotide of the splice site consensus sequence may still allow read through of the message and allow the production of some normal protein. This shows that there are a greater number of possible intronic mutations that can lead to a mild phenotype and it also underlines the importance of performing cDNA analysis when screening for small gene alterations in the BMD patient population.

  6. A novel splice site mutation in a Becker muscular dystrophy patient.

    PubMed Central

    Bartolo, C; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Hall, C D; Mendell, J R; Prior, T W

    1996-01-01

    A Becker muscular dystrophy patient was found to have a single base substitution at the 5' end of intron 54. This single base substitution disrupts the invariant GT dinucleotide within the 5' donor splice site and was shown to cause an out of frame deletion of exon 54 during mRNA processing. This is predicted to produce a truncated dystrophin protein which is more consistent with a DMD phenotype. However, small quantities of normal mRNA are also transcribed and these are sufficient to produce a reduced amount of normal molecular weight dystrophin and give rise to a milder BMD phenotype. This indicates that a single base substitution at an invariant dinucleotide of the splice site consensus sequence may still allow read through of the message and allow the production of some normal protein. This shows that there are a greater number of possible intronic mutations that can lead to a mild phenotype and it also underlines the importance of performing cDNA analysis when screening for small gene alterations in the BMD patient population. Images PMID:8730289

  7. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    This Account describes the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how mutations alter the structure and organization of enzyme active sites. As proposed by Pauling about 70 years ago and elaborated by many others since then, biocatalysis is efficient when functional groups in the active site of an enzyme are in optimal positions for transition state stabilization. Changes in mechanism and covalent interactions are often critical parts of enzyme catalysis. We describe our explorations of the dynamical preorganization of active sites using MD, studying the fluctuations between active and inactive conformations normally concealed to static crystallography. MD shows how the various arrangements of active site residues influence the free energy of the transition state and relates the populations of the catalytic conformational ensemble to the enzyme activity. This Account is organized around three case studies from our laboratory. We first describe the importance of dynamics in evaluating a series of computationally designed and experimentally evolved enzymes for the Kemp elimination, a popular subject in the enzyme design field. We find that the dynamics of the active site is influenced not only by the original sequence design and subsequent mutations but also by the nature of the ligand present in the active site. In the second example, we show how microsecond MD has been used to uncover the role of remote mutations in the active site dynamics and catalysis of a transesterase, LovD. This enzyme was evolved by Tang at UCLA and Codexis, Inc., and is a useful commercial catalyst for the production of the drug simvastatin. X-ray analysis of inactive and active mutants did not reveal differences in the active sites, but relatively long time scale MD in solution showed that the active site of the wild-type enzyme preorganizes only upon binding of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) that delivers the natural acyl group to the active site. In the absence of bound ACP

  8. Effects of point mutation on enzymatic activity: correlation between protein electronic structure and motion in chorismate mutase reaction.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Toyokazu

    2010-05-26

    Assignment of particular roles to catalytic residues is an important requirement in clearly understanding enzyme functions. Therefore, predicting the catalytic activities of mutant variants is a fundamental challenge in computational biochemistry. Although site-directed mutagenesis is widely used for studying enzymatic activities and other important classes of protein function, interpreting mutation experiments is usually difficult mainly due to side effects induced by point mutations. Because steric and, in many cases, electrostatic effects may affect the local, fine geometries conserved in wild-type proteins that are usually believed to be thermodynamically stable, simply reducing a loss in catalytic activity into clear elements is difficult. To address these important but difficult issues, we performed a systematic ab initio QM/MM computational analysis combined with MD-FEP simulations and all-electron QM calculations for the entire protein matrix. We selected chorismate mutase, one of the simplest and well-known enzymes, to discuss the details of mutational effects on the enzymatic reaction process. On the basis of the reliable free energy profiles of the wild-type enzyme and several mutant variants, we analyzed the effects of point mutations relative to electronic structure and protein dynamics. In general, changes in geometrical parameters introduced by a mutation were usually limited to the local mutational site. However, this local structural modification could affect the global protein dynamics through correlated motions of particular amino acid residues even far from the mutation site. Even for mutant reactions with low catalytic activity, transition state stabilization was observed as a result of conformational modifications and reorganization around the active site. As for the electrostatic effect created by the polar protein environment, the wild-type enzyme was most effectively designed to stabilize the transition state of the reactive substrate, and

  9. A Y526Q Mutation in the Newcastle Disease Virus HN Protein Reduces Its Functional Activities and Attenuates Virus Replication and Pathogenicity▿

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Sunil K.; Yan, Yongqi; Panda, Aruna; Collins, Peter L.; Samal, Siba K.

    2009-01-01

    The hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is a multifunctional protein that plays a crucial role in virus infectivity. In this study, using the mesogenic strain Beaudette C (BC), we mutated three conserved amino acids thought to be part of the binding/catalytic active site in the HN protein. We also mutated five additional residues near the proposed active site that are nonconserved between BC and the avirulent strain LaSota. The eight recovered NDV HN mutants were assessed for effects on biological activities. While most of the mutations had surprisingly little effect, mutation at conserved residue Y526 reduced the neuraminidase, receptor binding, and fusion activities and attenuated viral virulence in eggs and young birds. PMID:19474107

  10. Altering the spectrum of immunoglobulin V gene somatic hypermutation by modifying the active site of AID

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Rada, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    High-affinity antibodies are generated by somatic hypermutation with nucleotide substitutions introduced into the IgV in a semirandom fashion, but with intrinsic mutational hotspots strategically located to optimize antibody affinity maturation. The process is dependent on activation-induced deaminase (AID), an enzyme that can deaminate deoxycytidine in DNA in vitro, where its activity is sensitive to the identity of the 5′-flanking nucleotide. As a critical test of whether such DNA deamination activity underpins antibody diversification and to gain insight into the extent to which the antibody mutation spectrum is dependent on the intrinsic substrate specificity of AID, we investigated whether it is possible to change the IgV mutation spectrum by altering AID’s active site such that it prefers a pyrimidine (rather than a purine) flanking the targeted deoxycytidine. Consistent with the DNA deamination mechanism, B cells expressing the modified AID proteins yield altered IgV mutation spectra (exhibiting a purine→pyrimidine shift in flanking nucleotide preference) and altered hotspots. However, AID-catalyzed deamination of IgV targets in vitro does not yield the same degree of hotspot dominance to that observed in vivo, indicating the importance of features beyond AID’s active site and DNA local sequence environment in determining in vivo hotspot dominance. PMID:20048284

  11. A novel splice site mutation in SMARCAL1 results in aberrant exon definition in a child with Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Clinton; Hunley, Tracy E; Guo, Yan; Cortez, David

    2015-10-01

    Schimke Immunoosseous Dysplasia (SIOD) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder of childhood characterized by spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and renal failure, T-cell immunodeficiency, and cancer in certain instances. Approximately half of patients with SIOD are reported to have biallelic mutations in SMARCAL1 (SWI/SNF-related matrix-associated actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a-like 1), which encodes a DNA translocase that localizes to sites of DNA replication and repairs damaged replication forks. We present a novel mutation (NM_014140.3:c.2070+2insT) that results in defective SMARCAL1 mRNA splicing in a child with SIOD. This mutation, within the donor site of intron 12, results in the skipping of exon 12, which encodes part of a critical hinge region connecting the two lobes of the ATPase domain. This mutation was not recognized as deleterious by diagnostic SMARCAL1 sequencing, but discovered through next generation sequencing and found to result in absent SMARCAL1 expression in patient-derived lymphoblasts. The splicing defect caused by this mutation supports the concept of exon definition. Furthermore, it illustrates the need to broaden the search for SMARCAL1 mutations in patients with SIOD lacking coding sequence variants. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Active mutants of the TCR-mediated p38α alternative activation site show changes in the phosphorylation lip and DEF site formation.

    PubMed

    Tzarum, Netanel; Diskin, Ron; Engelberg, David; Livnah, Oded

    2011-02-04

    The p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase is commonly activated by dual (Thr and Tyr) phosphorylation catalyzed by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases. However, in T-cells, upon stimulation of the T-cell receptor, p38α is activated via an alternative pathway, involving its phosphorylation by zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 on Tyr323, distal from the phosphorylation lip. Tyr323-phosphorylated p38α is autoactivated, resulting in monophosphorylation of Thr180. The conformational changes induced by pTyr323 mediating autoactivation are not known. The lack of pTyr323 p38α for structural studies promoted the search for Tyr323 mutations that may functionally emulate its effect when phosphorylated. Via a comprehensive mutagenesis of Tyr323, we identified mutations that rendered the kinase intrinsically active and others that displayed no activity. Crystallographic studies of selected active (p38α(Y323Q), p38α(Y323T), and p38α(Y323R)) and inactive (p38α(Y323F)) mutants revealed that substantial changes in interlobe orientation, extended conformation of the activation loop, and formation of substrate docking DEF site (docking site for extracellular signal-regulated kinase FXF) interaction pocket are associated with p38α activation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A distinct mutation on the alternative splice site of APC exon 9 results in attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fostira, Florentia; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis

    2010-09-01

    A subset of APC mutation carriers shows a milder familial adenomatous polyposis phenotype (attenuated FAP) developing smaller number of polyps and colorectal cancer at an older age. It seems that a different mechanism to carcinogenesis is initiated according to the initial site of the germline mutation. The APC gene of a female patient with AFAP phenotypic features was analysed. A novel mutation located on the alternatively splice site of exon 9 was identified. This is the first reported mutation in the specific site. Transcripts characterization revealed disruption of splicing occurring within exon 9, resulting in the expression of a shorter mRNA transcript, which surprisingly does not affect the ratio between the two wild type transcripts, as well as the production of wild type short isoform by the mutant allele. The short wild type isoform, produced by the mutant allele, needs to be inactivated, on top of the wild type allele, for colorectal cancer to develop. These observations enhance the 'three hit hypothesis' and indicate that a distinct mechanism for the adenoma to carcinoma sequence should be followed, for truncated mutations taking place on the borderline of the alternatively spliced exon 9 of the APC gene, as well.

  14. Mutations in KIT occur at low frequency in melanomas arising from anatomical sites associated with chronic and intermittent sun exposure.

    PubMed

    Handolias, Despina; Salemi, Renato; Murray, William; Tan, Angela; Liu, Wendy; Viros, Amaya; Dobrovic, Alexander; Kelly, John; McArthur, Grant A

    2010-04-01

    In melanoma, mutations in KIT are most frequent in acral and mucosal subtypes and rarely reported in cutaneous melanomas particularly those associated with intermittent UV exposure. Conversely melanomas arising within chronic sun damaged skin are considered to harbour KIT mutations at higher rates. To characterize the frequency of KIT mutations in a representative melanoma population, 261 patients from two Australian melanoma centres were prospectively screened for mutations in exons 11, 13 and 17 of the KIT gene. A total of 257 patients had cutaneous melanoma arising from non-acral sites and four were acral melanomas. No mucosal or ocular melanomas were analysed. KIT mutations were identified in five tumours (2% of the entire cohort) including two acral melanomas. Two of the three non-acral melanomas with KIT mutations were associated with markers of chronic sun damage as assessed by the degree of skin elastosis. In the remaining cohort, 43% had chronically sun damaged skin. This report confirms that within an Australian population, KIT mutations are infrequent in cutaneous melanomas associated with both intermittent and chronic sun exposed skin.

  15. Cavity filling mutations at the thyroxine-binding site dramatically increase transthyretin stability and prevent its aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Ricardo; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Varejāo, Nathalia; Gallego, Pablo; Esperante, Sebastian; Ferreira, Priscila; Pereira-Henriques, Alda; Palhano, Fernando L; de Carvalho, Mamede; Foguel, Debora; Reverter, David; Saraiva, Maria João; Ventura, Salvador

    2017-03-24

    More than a hundred different Transthyretin (TTR) mutations are associated with fatal systemic amyloidoses. They destabilize the protein tetrameric structure and promote the extracellular deposition of TTR as pathological amyloid fibrils. So far, only mutations R104H and T119M have been shown to stabilize significantly TTR, acting as disease suppressors. We describe a novel A108V non-pathogenic mutation found in a Portuguese subject. This variant is more stable than wild type TTR both in vitro and in human plasma, a feature that prevents its aggregation. The crystal structure of A108V reveals that this stabilization comes from novel intra and inter subunit contacts involving the thyroxine (T4) binding site. Exploiting this observation, we engineered a A108I mutation that fills the T4 binding cavity, as evidenced in the crystal structure. This synthetic protein becomes one of the most stable TTR variants described so far, with potential application in gene and protein replacement therapies.

  16. New Hyperekplexia Mutations Provide Insight into Glycine Receptor Assembly, Trafficking, and Activation Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Anna; Wood, Sian-Elin; Mullins, Jonathan G. L.; Keramidas, Angelo; Cushion, Thomas D.; Thomas, Rhys H.; Pickrell, William O.; Drew, Cheney J. G.; Masri, Amira; Jones, Elizabeth A.; Vassallo, Grace; Born, Alfred P.; Alehan, Fusun; Aharoni, Sharon; Bannasch, Gerald; Bartsch, Marius; Kara, Bulent; Krause, Amanda; Karam, Elie G.; Matta, Stephanie; Jain, Vivek; Mandel, Hanna; Freilinger, Michael; Graham, Gail E.; Hobson, Emma; Chatfield, Sue; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Rahme, Jubran E.; Afawi, Zaid; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Howell, Owain W.; Vanbellinghen, Jean-François; Rees, Mark I.; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Lynch, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperekplexia is a syndrome of readily provoked startle responses, alongside episodic and generalized hypertonia, that presents within the first month of life. Inhibitory glycine receptors are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels with a definitive and clinically well stratified linkage to hyperekplexia. Most hyperekplexia cases are caused by mutations in the α1 subunit of the human glycine receptor (hGlyR) gene (GLRA1). Here we analyzed 68 new unrelated hyperekplexia probands for GLRA1 mutations and identified 19 mutations, of which 9 were novel. Electrophysiological analysis demonstrated that the dominant mutations p.Q226E, p.V280M, and p.R414H induced spontaneous channel activity, indicating that this is a recurring mechanism in hGlyR pathophysiology. p.Q226E, at the top of TM1, most likely induced tonic activation via an enhanced electrostatic attraction to p.R271 at the top of TM2, suggesting a structural mechanism for channel activation. Receptors incorporating p.P230S (which is heterozygous with p.R65W) desensitized much faster than wild type receptors and represent a new TM1 site capable of modulating desensitization. The recessive mutations p.R72C, p.R218W, p.L291P, p.D388A, and p.E375X precluded cell surface expression unless co-expressed with α1 wild type subunits. The recessive p.E375X mutation resulted in subunit truncation upstream of the TM4 domain. Surprisingly, on the basis of three independent assays, we were able to infer that p.E375X truncated subunits are incorporated into functional hGlyRs together with unmutated α1 or α1 plus β subunits. These aberrant receptors exhibit significantly reduced glycine sensitivity. To our knowledge, this is the first suggestion that subunits lacking TM4 domains might be incorporated into functional pentameric ligand-gated ion channel receptors. PMID:24108130

  17. Novel Mutation in Cytochrome B of Plasmodium falciparum in One of Two Atovaquone-Proguanil Treatment Failures in Travelers Returning From Same Site in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Plucinski, Mateusz M.; Huber, Curtis S.; Akinyi, Sheila; Dalton, Willard; Eschete, Mary; Grady, Katharine; Silva-Flannery, Luciana; Mathison, Blaine A.; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Arguin, Paul M.; Barnwell, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Background  Atovaquone-proguanil (AP) is the most commonly used treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the United States. Apparent AP treatment failures were reported 7 months apart in 2 American travelers who stayed in the same compound for foreign workers in Rivers State, Nigeria. Methods  We analyzed pretreatment (day 0) and day of failure samples from both travelers for mutations in the P falciparum cytochrome B (pfcytb) and dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) genes associated with resistance to atovaquone and cycloguanil, the active metabolite of proguanil, respectively. We genotyped the parasites and sequenced their mitochondrial genomes. Results  On day 0, both travelers had proguanil-resistant genotypes but atovaquone-sensitive cytb sequences. Day of failure samples exhibited mutations in cytb for both travelers. One traveler had the common Y268S mutation, whereas the other traveler had a previously unreported mutation, I258M. The travelers had unrelated parasite genotypes and different mitochondrial genomes. Conclusions  Despite the infections likely having been contracted in the same site, there is no evidence that the cases were related. The mutations likely arose independently during the acute infection or treatment. Our results highlight the importance of genotyping parasites and sequencing the full cytb and dhfr genes in AP failures to rule out transmission of AP-resistant strains and identify novel mechanisms of AP resistance. PMID:25734129

  18. Mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans U2AF Large Subunit UAF-1 Alter the Choice of a 3′ Splice Site In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Long; Horvitz, H. Robert

    2009-01-01

    The removal of introns from eukaryotic RNA transcripts requires the activities of five multi-component ribonucleoprotein complexes and numerous associated proteins. The lack of mutations affecting splicing factors essential for animal survival has limited the study of the in vivo regulation of splicing. From a screen for suppressors of the Caenorhabditis elegans unc-93(e1500) rubberband Unc phenotype, we identified mutations in genes that encode the C. elegans orthologs of two splicing factors, the U2AF large subunit (UAF-1) and SF1/BBP (SFA-1). The uaf-1(n4588) mutation resulted in temperature-sensitive lethality and caused the unc-93 RNA transcript to be spliced using a cryptic 3′ splice site generated by the unc-93(e1500) missense mutation. The sfa-1(n4562) mutation did not cause the utilization of this cryptic 3′ splice site. We isolated four uaf-1(n4588) intragenic suppressors that restored the viability of uaf-1 mutants at 25°C. These suppressors differentially affected the recognition of the cryptic 3′ splice site and implicated a small region of UAF-1 between the U2AF small subunit-interaction domain and the first RNA recognition motif in affecting the choice of 3′ splice site. We constructed a reporter for unc-93 splicing and using site-directed mutagenesis found that the position of the cryptic splice site affects its recognition. We also identified nucleotides of the endogenous 3′ splice site important for recognition by wild-type UAF-1. Our genetic and molecular analyses suggested that the phenotypic suppression of the unc-93(e1500) Unc phenotype by uaf-1(n4588) and sfa-1(n4562) was likely caused by altered splicing of an unknown gene. Our observations provide in vivo evidence that UAF-1 can act in regulating 3′ splice-site choice and establish a system that can be used to investigate the in vivo regulation of RNA splicing in C. elegans. PMID:19893607

  19. Transducer-binding and transducer-mutations modulate photoactive-site-deprotonation in sensory rhodopsin I.

    PubMed

    Jung, K H; Spudich, E N; Dag, P; Spudich, J L

    1999-10-05

    Sensory rhodopsin I (SRI) is a seven-transmembrane helix retinylidene protein that mediates color-sensitive phototaxis responses through its bound transducer HtrI in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. Deprotonation of the Schiff base attachment site of the chromophore accompanies formation of the SRI signaling state, S(373). We measured the rate of laser flash-induced S(373) formation in the presence and absence of HtrI, and the effects of mutations in SRI or HtrI on the kinetics of this process. In the absence of HtrI, deprotonation occurs rapidly (halftime 10 micros) if the proton acceptor Asp76 is ionized (pK(a) = approximately 7), and only very slowly (halftime > 10 ms) when Asp76 is protonated. Transducer-binding, although it increases the pK(a) of Asp76 so that it is protonated throughout the range of pH studied, results in a first order, pH-independent rate of S(373) formation of approximately 300 micros. Therefore, the complexation of HtrI facilitates the proton-transfer reaction, increasing the rate approximately 50-fold at pH6. Arrhenius analysis shows that HtrI-binding accelerates the reaction primarily by an entropic effect, suggesting HtrI constrains the SRI molecule in the complex. Function-perturbing mutations in SRI and HtrI also alter the rate of S(373) formation and the lambda(max) of the parent state as assessed by laser flash-induced kinetic difference spectroscopy, and shifts to longer wavelength are correlated with slower deprotonation. The data indicate that HtrI affects electrostatic interactions of the protonated Schiff base and not only receives the signal from SRI but also optimizes the photochemical reaction process for SRI signaling.

  20. COL1 C-propeptide Cleavage Site Mutations Cause High Bone Mass Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Katarina; Barnes, Aileen M.; Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Whyte, Michael P.; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Makareeva, Elena; Brusel, Marina; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Kindmark, Andreas; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; McAlister, William H.; Mumm, Steven; Leikin, Sergey; Kessler, Efrat; Boskey, Adele L.; Ljunggren, Östen; Marini, Joan C.

    2011-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is most often caused by mutations in the type I procollagen genes (COL1A1/COL1A2). We identified two children with substitutions in the type I procollagen C-propeptide cleavage site, which disrupt a unique processing step in collagen maturation and define a novel phenotype within OI. The patients have mild OI caused by mutations in COL1A1 (Patient 1: p.Asp1219Asn) or COL1A2 (Patient 2: p.Ala1119Thr), respectively. Patient 1 L1-L4 DXA z-score was +3.9 and pQCT vBMD was +3.1; Patient 2 had L1-L4 DXA z-score of 0.0 and pQCT vBMD of −1.8. Patient BMD contrasts with radiographic osteopenia and histomorphometry without osteosclerosis. Mutant procollagen processing is impaired in pericellular and in vitro assays. Patient dermal collagen fibrils have irregular borders. Incorporation of pC-collagen into matrix leads to increased bone mineralization. FT-IR imaging confirms elevated mineral/matrix ratios in both patients, along with increased collagen maturation in trabecular bone, compared to normal or OI controls. Bone mineralization density distribution revealed a marked shift toward increased mineralization density for both patients. Patient 1 has areas of higher and lower bone mineralization than controls; Patient 2’s bone matrix has a mineral content exceeding even classical OI bone. These patients define a new phenotype of high BMD OI and demonstrate that procollagen C-propeptide cleavage is crucial to normal bone mineralization. PMID:21344539

  1. Naturally occurring mutation affecting the MyD88-binding site of TNFRSF13B impairs triggering of class switch recombination

    PubMed Central

    Almejun, Maria B.; Cols, Montserrat; Zelazko, Marta; Oleastro, Matias; Cerutti, Andrea; Oppezzo, Pablo; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Danielian, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the transmembrane activator and calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) were previously found to be associated with hypogammaglobulinemia in humans. It has been shown that proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL) elicits class switch recombination (CSR) by inducing recruitment of MyD88 to a TACI highly conserved cytoplasmic domain (THC). We have identified a patient with hypogammaglobulinemia carrying a missense mutation (S231R) predicted to affect the THC. Aiming to evaluate the relevance of this novel mutation of TACI in CSR induction, we tested the ability of TACI, TLR9, or/and CD40 ligands to trigger CSR in naive B cells and B-cell lines carrying S231R. IgG secretion was impaired when triggered by TACI or/and TLR9 ligands on S231R-naive B cells. Likewise, these stimuli induced less expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, I(γ)1-C(μ), and I(γ)1-C(μ), while induction by optimal CD40 stimulation was indistinguishable from controls. These cells also showed an impaired cooperation between TACI and TLR9 pathways, as well as a lack of APRIL-mediated enhancement of CD40 activation in suboptimal conditions. Finally, after APRIL ligation, S231R-mutated TACI failed to colocalize with MyD88. Collectively, these results highlight the requirement of an intact MyD88-binding site in TACI to trigger CSR. PMID:23225259

  2. Biochemical and Mutational Characterization of the Heme Chaperone CcmE Reveals a Heme Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Enggist, Elisabeth; Schneider, Michael J.; Schulz, Henk; Thöny-Meyer, Linda

    2003-01-01

    CcmE is a heme chaperone that binds heme transiently in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and delivers it to newly synthesized and exported c-type cytochromes. The chemical nature of the covalent bond between heme and H130 is not known. We have purified soluble histidine-tagged CcmE and present its spectroscopic characteristics in the visible range. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of conserved amino acids revealed that H130 is the only residue found to be strictly required for heme binding and delivery. Mutation of the hydrophobic amino acids F37, F103, L127, and Y134 to alanine affected CcmE more than mutation of charged and polar residues. Our data are in agreement with the recently solved nuclear magnetic resonance structure of apo-CcmE (PDB code 1LIZ) and suggest that heme is bound to a hydrophobic platform at the surface of the protein and then attached to H130 by a covalent bond. Replacement of H130 with cysteine led to the formation of a covalent bond between heme and C130 at a low level. However, the H130C mutant CcmE was not active in cytochrome c maturation. Isolation and characterization of the heme-binding peptides obtained after a tryptic digest of wild-type and H130C CcmE support the hypothesis that heme is bound covalently at a vinyl group. PMID:12486054

  3. Transcriptionally Silenced Transgenes in Maize Are Activated by Three Mutations Defective in Paramutation

    PubMed Central

    McGinnis, Karen M.; Springer, Catherine; Lin, Yan; Carey, Charles C.; Chandler, Vicki

    2006-01-01

    Plants with mutations in one of three maize genes, mop1, rmr1, and rmr2, are defective in paramutation, an allele-specific interaction that leads to meiotically heritable chromatin changes. Experiments reported here demonstrate that these genes are required to maintain the transcriptional silencing of two different transgenes, suggesting that paramutation and transcriptional silencing of transgenes share mechanisms. We hypothesize that the transgenes are silenced through an RNA-directed chromatin mechanism, because mop1 encodes an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In all the mutants, DNA methylation was reduced in the active transgenes relative to the silent transgenes at all of the CNG sites monitored within the transgene promoter. However, asymmetrical methylation persisted at one site within the reactivated transgene in the rmr1-1 mutant. With that one mutant, rmr1-1, the transgene was efficiently resilenced upon outcrossing to reintroduce the wild-type protein. In contrast, with the mop1-1 and rmr2-1 mutants, the transgene remained active in a subset of progeny even after the wild-type proteins were reintroduced by outcrossing. Interestingly, this immunity to silencing increased as the generations progressed, consistent with a heritable chromatin state being formed at the transgene in plants carrying the mop1-1 and rmr2-1 mutations that becomes more resistant to silencing in subsequent generations. PMID:16702420

  4. Analysis of a splice-site mutation in the sap-precursor gene of a patient with metachromatic leukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Henseler, M.; Klein, A.; Reber, M.

    1996-01-01

    Sphingolipid activator proteins (SAPs) are small, nonenzymatic glycoproteins required for the lysosomal degradation of various sphingolipids with a short oligosaccharide chain by their exohydrolases. Four of the five known activator proteins (sap-A-sap-D), also called {open_quotes}saposins,{close_quotes} are derived from a common precursor by proteolytic processing. sap-B stimulates hydrolysis of sulfatides by arylsulfatase A in vivo. Its recessively inherited deficiency results in a metabolic disorder similar to classical metachromatic leukodystrophy, which is caused by a defect of arylsulfatase A. Here we report on a patient with sap-B deficiency. Reverse-transcription-PCR studies on the patient`s mRNA revealed the occurrence of two distinct mutant species: one with an in-frame deletion of the first 21 bases of exon 6, the other with a complete in-frame deletion of this exon. The patient was homozygous for the underlying mutation, which was found to be a G-{yields}T transversion within the acceptor splice site between intron e and exon 6, abolishing normal RNA splicing. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization revealed that the parents and both grandfathers of the patient were carriers of this mutation. In order to analyze the fate of the mutant precursor proteins, both abnormal cDNAs were stably expressed in baby hamster kidney cells. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the deletion of 21 bp had no effect on the transport and the maturation of the encoded precursor. All sap forms except sap-B were detectable by immunochemical methods. The cDNA bearing a complete deletion of exon 6 encoded a shortened precursor of only 60 kD, and no mature SAPs were detectable. The carbohydrate chains of this polypeptide were of the high-mannose and hybrid type, indicating no transport of the mutant precursor beyond early Golgi apparatus. An endoplasmic-reticulum localization of this polypeptide was supported by indirect immunofluorescence analysis. 31 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Reverse mutational analysis reveals threonine-373 as a potentially sufficient phosphorylation site for inactivation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRB).

    PubMed

    Lents, Nathan H; Gorges, Laura L; Baldassare, Joseph J

    2006-08-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that constitutive cyclin E expression can alleviate the requirement for cyclin D-CDK activity in the inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (pRb). Rb(DeltaCDK), a mutant construct of pRb with 15 of the 16 CDK phosphorylation sites mutated to alanine represses activation of E2F by mitogen, despite cyclin E overexpression. However, restoration of the four cyclin E-CDK2 phosphorylation sites to Rb(DeltaCDK) renders this construct sensitive to inactivation by CDK phosphorylation. In the present study, we engage a "reverse mutational analysis" by restoring cyclin E-CDK2 phosphorylation sites to Rb(DeltaCDK) individually and in combinations in an attempt to discover phosphorylation sites on Rb that are critical for inactivation. Surprisingly, we report that, in both rodent and human cells, restoration of threonine-373 to Rb(DeltaCDK), alone or in combination with other phospho-restorations, results in a loss of the constitutively repressive effect of this construct on E2F activation. Further, induction of endogenous cyclin A protein is blocked by Rb(DeltaCDK), but not by mutants of Rb(DeltaCDK) containing a restored threonine-373. Finally, while S phase entry is blocked by expression of Rb(DeltaCDK), restoration of threonine-373 largely attenuates this effect. These findings reveal that phosphorylation of threonine-373 by CDK2-cyclin E represent a potentially crucial event in the inactivation of the pRb protein.

  6. Duchenne muscular dystrophy caused by a frame-shift mutation in the acceptor splice site of intron 26.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Mirella; Maciotta, Simona; Angeloni, Valentina; Torrente, Yvan

    2016-08-11

    The dystrophin gene is the one of the largest described in human beings and mutations associated to this gene are responsible for Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophies. Here we describe a nucleotide substitution in the acceptor splice site of intron 26 (c.3604-1G > C) carried by a 6-year-old boy who presented with a history of progressive proximal muscle weakness and elevated serum creatine kinase levels. RNA analysis showed that the first two nucleotides of the mutated intron 26 (AC) were not recognized by the splicing machinery and a new splicing site was created within exon 27, generating a premature stop codon and avoiding protein translation. The evaluation of the pathogenic effect of the mutation by mRNA analysis will be useful in the optics of an antisense oligonucleotides (AON)-based therapy.

  7. Mutational activation of the beta-catenin proto-oncogene is a common event in the development of Wilms' tumors.

    PubMed

    Koesters, R; Ridder, R; Kopp-Schneider, A; Betts, D; Adams, V; Niggli, F; Briner, J; von Knebel Doeberitz, M

    1999-08-15

    Activation of beta-catenin-mediated transcription is the nuclear end point of organ-specific Wnt signaling. In the developing kidney, Wnt-4, a secreted glycoprotein, acts as an autoinducer of the mesenchymal to epithelial transition that underlies normal nephron development. Dysregulation of this epithelial transformation process may lead to Wilms' tumors (WTs). In this study, we investigated the potential role of the beta-catenin proto-oncogene, a candidate downstream target molecule of Wnt-4 signaling, in the development of WTs. In 6 of 40 tumors (15%), mutation analysis revealed heterozygous missense mutations or small deletions that result in the loss of important regulatory phosphorylation sites within the beta-catenin protein. These findings indicate that activating beta-catenin mutations may play a significant role in the development of WTs and establish a direct link between Wilms' tumorigenesis and the Wnt signal transduction pathway governing normal kidney development.

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based mutational analysis of the bc1 complex Qo site residue 279 to study the trade-off between atovaquone resistance and function.

    PubMed

    Song, Zehua; Clain, Jérôme; Iorga, Bogdan I; Yi, Zhou; Fisher, Nicholas; Meunier, Brigitte

    2015-07-01

    The bc1 complex is central to mitochondrial bioenergetics and the target of the antimalarial drug atovaquone that binds in the quinol oxidation (Qo) site of the complex. Structural analysis has shown that the Qo site residue Y279 (Y268 in Plasmodium falciparum) is key for atovaquone binding. Consequently, atovaquone resistance can be acquired by mutation of that residue. In addition to the probability of amino acid substitution, the level of atovaquone resistance and the loss of bc1 complex activity that are associated with the novel amino acid would restrict the nature of resistance-driven mutations occurring on atovaquone exposure in native parasite populations. Using the yeast model, we characterized the effect of all the amino acid replacements resulting from a single nucleotide substitution at codon 279: Y279C, Y279D, Y279F, Y279H, Y279N, and Y279S (Y279C, D, F, H, N, and S). Two residue changes that required a double nucleotide substitution, Y279A and W, were added to the series. We found that mutations Y279A, C, and S conferred high atovaquone resistance but decreased the catalytic activity. Y279F had wild-type enzymatic activity and sensitivity to atovaquone, while the other substitutions caused a dramatic respiratory defect. The results obtained with the yeast model were examined in regard to atomic structure and compared to the reported data on the evolution of acquired atovaquone resistance in P. falciparum.

  9. The PINK1 p.I368N mutation affects protein stability and ubiquitin kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ando, Maya; Fiesel, Fabienne C; Hudec, Roman; Caulfield, Thomas R; Ogaki, Kotaro; Górka-Skoczylas, Paulina; Koziorowski, Dariusz; Friedman, Andrzej; Chen, Li; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Bu, Guojun; Ross, Owen A; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2017-04-24

    Mutations in PINK1 and PARKIN are the most common causes of recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease (EOPD). Together, the mitochondrial ubiquitin (Ub) kinase PINK1 and the cytosolic E3 Ub ligase PARKIN direct a complex regulated, sequential mitochondrial quality control. Thereby, damaged mitochondria are identified and targeted to degradation in order to prevent their accumulation and eventually cell death. Homozygous or compound heterozygous loss of either gene function disrupts this protective pathway, though at different steps and by distinct mechanisms. While structure and function of PARKIN variants have been well studied, PINK1 mutations remain poorly characterized, in particular under endogenous conditions. A better understanding of the exact molecular pathogenic mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity is crucial for rational drug design in the future. Here, we characterized the pathogenicity of the PINK1 p.I368N mutation on the clinical and genetic as well as on the structural and functional level in patients' fibroblasts and in cell-based, biochemical assays. Under endogenous conditions, PINK1 p.I368N is expressed, imported, and N-terminally processed in healthy mitochondria similar to PINK1 wild type (WT). Upon mitochondrial damage, however, full-length PINK1 p.I368N is not sufficiently stabilized on the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) resulting in loss of mitochondrial quality control. We found that binding of PINK1 p.I368N to the co-chaperone complex HSP90/CDC37 is reduced and stress-induced interaction with TOM40 of the mitochondrial protein import machinery is abolished. Analysis of a structural PINK1 p.I368N model additionally suggested impairments of Ub kinase activity as the ATP-binding pocket was found deformed and the substrate Ub was slightly misaligned within the active site of the kinase. Functional assays confirmed the lack of Ub kinase activity. Here we demonstrated that mutant PINK1 p.I368N can not be stabilized on the OMM upon

  10. Characterization of the active sites in decay-accelerating factor.

    PubMed

    Kuttner-Kondo, L A; Mitchell, L; Hourcade, D E; Medof, M E

    2001-08-15

    Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) is a complement regulator that dissociates autologous C3 convertases, which assemble on self cell surfaces. Its activity resides in the last three of its four complement control protein repeats (CCP2-4). Previous modeling on the nuclear magnetic resonance structure of CCP15-16 in the serum C3 convertase regulator factor H proposed a positively charged surface area on CCP2 extending into CCP3, and hydrophobic moieties between CCPs 2 and 3 as being primary convertase-interactive sites. To map the residues providing for the activity of DAF, we analyzed the functions of 31 primarily alanine substitution mutants based in part on this model. Replacing R69, R96, R100, and K127 in the positively charged CCP2-3 groove or hydrophobic F148 and L171 in CCP3 markedly impaired the function of DAF in both activation pathways. Significantly, mutations of K126 and F169 and of R206 and R212 in downstream CCP4 selectively reduced alternative pathway activity without affecting classical pathway activity. Rhesus macaque DAF has all the above human critical residues except for F169, which is an L, and its CCPs exhibited full activity against the human classical pathway C3 convertase. The recombinants whose function was preferentially impaired against the alternative pathway C3bBb compared with the classical pathway C4b2a were tested in classical pathway C5 convertase (C4b2a3b) assays. The effects on C4b2a and C4b2a3b were comparable, indicating that DAF functions similarly on the two enzymes. When CCP2-3 of DAF were oriented according to the crystal structure of CCP1-2 of membrane cofactor protein, the essential residues formed a contiguous region, suggesting a similar spatial relationship.

  11. Roles of s3 site residues of nattokinase on its activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuming; Feng, Chi; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-09-01

    Nattokinase (Subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with high fibrinolytic activity. To probe their roles on protease activity and substrate specificity, three residues of S3 site (Gly(100), Ser(101) and Leu(126)) were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetics parameters of 20 mutants were measured using tetrapeptides as substrates, and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. Results of mutation analysis showed that Gly(100) and Ser(101) had reverse steric and electrostatic effects. Residues with bulky or positively charged side chains at position 100 decreased the substrate binding and catalytic activity drastically, while residues with the same characters at position 101 could obviously enhance protease and fibrinolytic activity of NK. Mutation of Leu(126) might impair the structure of the active cleft and drastically decreased the activity of NK. Kinetics studies of the mutants showed that S3 residues were crucial to keep protease activity while they moderately affected substrate specificity of NK. The present study provided some original insight into the P3-S3 interaction in NK and other subtilisins, as well as showed successful protein engineering cases to improve NK as a potential therapeutic agent.

  12. Systematic mutagenesis of the active site omega loop of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, J F; Palzkill, T

    1996-01-01

    Beta-Lactamase is a bacterial protein that provides resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. TEM-1 beta-lactamase is the most prevalent plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. Normally, this enzyme has high levels of hydrolytic activity for penicillins, but mutant beta-lactamases have evolved with activity toward a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. It has been shown that active site substitutions are responsible for changes in the substrate specificity. Since mutant beta-lactamases pose a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy, the mechanisms by which mutations can alter the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase are of interest. Previously, screens of random libraries encompassing 31 of 55 active site amino acid positions enabled the identification of the residues responsible for maintaining the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. In addition to substitutions found in clinical isolates, many other specificity-altering mutations were also identified. Interestingly, many nonspecific substitutions in the N-terminal half of the active site omega loop were found to increase ceftazidime hydrolytic activity and decrease ampicillin hydrolytic activity. To complete the active sight study, eight additional random libraries were constructed and screened for specificity-altering mutations. All additional substitutions found to alter the substrate specificity were located in the C-terminal half of the active site loop. These mutants, much like the N-terminal omega loop mutants, appear to be less stable than the wild-type enzyme. Further analysis of a 165-YYG-167 triple mutant, selected for high levels of ceftazidime hydrolytic activity, provides an example of the correlation which exists between enzyme instability and increased ceftazidime hydrolytic activity in the ceftazidime-selected omega loop mutants. PMID:8606154

  13. LYN-activating mutations mediate antiestrogen resistance in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Luis J; Fox, Emily M; Balko, Justin M; Garrett, Joan T; Kuba, María Gabriela; Estrada, Mónica Valeria; González-Angulo, Ana María; Mills, Gordon B; Red-Brewer, Monica; Mayer, Ingrid A; Abramson, Vandana; Rizzo, Monica; Kelley, Mark C; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-12-01

    Estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancers adapt to hormone deprivation and become resistant to antiestrogen therapy. Here, we performed deep sequencing on ER(+) tumors that remained highly proliferative after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and identified a D189Y mutation in the inhibitory SH2 domain of the SRC family kinase (SFK) LYN. Evaluation of 463 breast tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed four LYN mutations, two of which affected the SH2 domain. In addition, LYN was upregulated in multiple ER(+) breast cancer lines resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). An RNAi-based kinome screen revealed that LYN is required for growth of ER(+) LTED breast cancer cells. Kinase assays and immunoblot analyses of SRC substrates in transfected cells indicated that LYN(D189Y) has higher catalytic activity than WT protein. Further, LYN(D189Y) exhibited reduced phosphorylation at the inhibitory Y507 site compared with LYN(WT). Other SH2 domain LYN mutants, E159K and K209N, also exhibited higher catalytic activity and reduced inhibitory site phosphorylation. LYN(D189Y) overexpression abrogated growth inhibition by fulvestrant and/or the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in 3 ER(+) breast cancer cell lines. The SFK inhibitor dasatinib enhanced the antitumor effect of BKM120 and fulvestrant against estrogen-deprived ER(+) xenografts but not LYN(D189Y)-expressing xenografts. These results suggest that LYN mutations mediate escape from antiestrogens in a subset of ER(+) breast cancers.

  14. Identification of 31 novel mutations in the F8 gene in Spanish hemophilia A patients: structural analysis of 20 missense mutations suggests new intermolecular binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Venceslá, Adoración; Corral-Rodríguez, María Ángeles; Baena, Manel; Cornet, Mónica; Domènech, Montserrat; Baiget, Montserrat; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a wide variety of mutations in the factor 8 (F8) gene, leading to absent or deficient factor VIII (FVIII). We analyzed the F8 gene of 267 unrelated Spanish patients with HA. After excluding patients with the common intron-1 and intron-22 inversions and large deletions, we detected 137 individuals with small mutations, 31 of which had not been reported previously. Eleven of these were nonsense, frameshift, and splicing mutations, whereas 20 were missense changes. We assessed the impact of the 20 substitutions based on currently available information about FV and FVIII structure and function relationship, including previously reported results of replacements at these and topologically equivalent positions. Although most changes are likely to cause gross structural perturbations and concomitant cofactor instability, p.Ala375Ser is predicted to affect cofactor activation. Finally, 3 further mutations (p.Pro64Arg, p.Gly494Val, and p.Asp2267Gly) appear to affect cofactor interactions with its carrier protein, von Willebrand factor, with the scavenger receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP), and/or with the substrate of the FVIIIapi•FIXa (Xase) complex, factor X. Characterization of these novel mutations is important for adequate genetic counseling in HA families, but also contributes to a better understanding of FVIII structure-function relationship. PMID:18184865

  15. CAPN5 mutation in hereditary uveitis: the R243L mutation increases calpain catalytic activity and triggers intraocular inflammation in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Katherine J.; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Gakhar, Lokesh; Coglan, Diana; Mahajan, MaryAnn; Wu, Shu; Yang, Jing; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Tsang, Stephen H.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2015-01-01

    A single amino acid mutation near the active site of the CAPN5 protease was linked to the inherited blinding disorder, autosomal dominant neovascular inflammatory vitreoretinopathy (ADNIV, OMIM #193235). In homology modeling with other calpains, this R243L CAPN5 mutation was situated in a mobile loop that gates substrate access to the calcium-regulated active site. In in vitro activity assays, the mutation increased calpain protease activity and made it far more active at low concentrations of calcium. To test whether the disease allele could yield an animal model of ADNIV, we created transgenic mice expressing human (h) CAPN5R243L only in the retina. The resulting hCAPN5R243L transgenic mice developed a phenotype consistent with human uveitis and ADNIV, at the clinical, histological and molecular levels. The fundus of hCAPN5R243L mice showed enhanced autofluorescence (AF) and pigment changes indicative of reactive retinal pigment epithelial cells and photoreceptor degeneration. Electroretinography showed mutant mouse eyes had a selective loss of the b-wave indicating an inner-retina signaling defect. Histological analysis of mutant mouse eyes showed protein extravasation from dilated vessels into the anterior chamber and vitreous, vitreous inflammation, vitreous and retinal fibrosis and retinal degeneration. Analysis of gene expression changes in the hCAPN5R243L mouse retina showed upregulation of several markers, including members of the Toll-like receptor pathway, chemokines and cytokines, indicative of both an innate and adaptive immune response. Since many forms of uveitis share phenotypic characteristics of ADNIV, this mouse offers a model with therapeutic testing utility for ADNIV and uveitis patients. PMID:25994508

  16. Mutations activating human c-Ha-ras1 protooncogene (HRAS1) induced by chemical carcinogens and depurination.

    PubMed Central

    Vousden, K H; Bos, J L; Marshall, C J; Phillips, D H

    1986-01-01

    In vitro modification of plasmids containing the human c-Ha-ras1 protooncogene (HRAS1) with the ultimate carcinogens N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene and r-7, t-8-dihydroxy-t-9, 10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[alpha]pyrene (anti-BPDE) generated a transforming oncogene when the modified DNA was transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The protooncogene was also activated by heating the plasmid at 70 degrees C, pH 4, to generate apurinic/apyrimidinic sites in the DNA. DNA isolated from transformed foci was analyzed by hybridization with 20-mer oligonucleotides designed to detect single point mutations within two regions of the gene commonly found to be mutated in tumor DNA. Of 23 transformants studied, 7 contained a mutation in the region of the 12th codon, whereas the remaining 16 were mutated in the 61st codon. Of the codon-61 mutants, 6 were mutated at the first base position (C X G), 5 at the second (A X T), and 5 at the third (G X C). The point mutations induced by anti-BPDE were predominantly G X C----T X A and A X T----T X A base substitutions, whereas four N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene-induced mutations were all G X C----T X A, and a single depurination-induced activation that was analyzed contained an A X T----T X A transversion. Together, these methods provide a useful means of determining point mutations produced by DNA-damaging agents in mammalian cells. Images PMID:3513171

  17. Mutation in the ap2-6 allele causes recognition of a cryptic splice site.

    PubMed

    Wakem, Michael P; Kohalmi, Susanne E

    2003-12-01

    Mutations in the homeotic gene APETALA2 of Arabidopsis thaliana cause severe developmental alterations, most prominently homeotic floral organ replacements from petals to carpels and petals to stamens in the outer two floral whorls. To date, ten different alleles have been identified conferring phenotypes of various degrees. Of these ten alleles, only three have been characterized at the sequence level. The identification of the sequence alteration in the ap2-6 allele is reported here. In ap2-6 a single G.C to A.T transition occurred at the 3' end of intron 6 (position 1342) which leads to a dinucleotide loss at the mRNA level. This change is consistent with the G.C to A.T transition destroying a conserved dinucleotide motif (AG) required for proper splice recognition and with the resulting recognition of the next available downstream AG dinucleotide which in AP2 is immediately adjacent to the authentic 3' splice site. The dinucleotide loss will cause a frameshift, the translation of three incorrect amino acids and a premature stop codon resulting in a truncation of the AP2 sequence within the AP2-R2 domain. Such a truncation is predicted to impact severely on the function of AP2 and is consistent with the observed phenotype.

  18. Structured Regions of Alpha-synuclein Fibrils Include the Early Onset Parkinson's Disease Mutation Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Comellas Canal, Gemma; Lemkau, Luisel R.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Kloepper, Kathryn D.; Ladror, Daniel T.; Ebisu, Reika; Woods, Wendy S.; Lipton, Andrew S.; George, Julia M.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-08-26

    Alpha-Synuclein (AS) fibrils constitute the major proteinaceous component of Lewy bodies (LBs), the pathological hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative diseases. Three single point mutations in the AS gene, as well as multiplication of the wild-type (WT) AS allele, have been previously identified in families with early-onset PD. Although AS fibrils have been the subject of intense study, critical details about their structure including the precise location of the B-strands and the extent of the core, the three-dimensional structure and the effects of the mutations—remain unknown. Here, we have used magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy to present a detailed characterization of the full-length WT AS fibrils. With improved sample preparations, isotopic labeling patterns and NMR experiments, we have confidently assigned more than 90% of the 13C and 15N backbone and sidechain chemical shifts of the detected residues from residue 39 to 97, and quantified the conformational dynamics throughout this region. Our results demonstrate that the core of AS fibrils extends with a repeated motif and that residues 30, 46 and 53-the early-onset PD mutant sites-are located in structured regions of AS fibrils.

  19. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. FBN1 gene mutation defines the profibrillin to fibrillin processing site and segregates with tall stature in a family

    SciTech Connect

    Grossfield, J.; Cao, S.; Milewicz, D.

    1994-09-01

    Dermal fibroblasts from a 13-year-old boy with skeletal features of the Marfan syndrome were used to study fibrillin synthesis and processing. Synthesis and secretion of profibrillin was normal but only half of the secreted profibrillin was converted to fibrillin, an extracellular proteolytic processing that removes a 20 kDa fragment from the protein. All the secreted profibrillin was processed to fibrillin in control cells. Only the processed form of fibrillin was deposited into the extracellular matrix in both the proband`s and the control cells. Electron microscopic examination of rotary shadowed microfibrils made by the proband`s fibroblasts were indistinguishable from control cells. Screening exons in the 3{prime} end of the FBN1 gene revealed a heterozygous C to T transition at nucleotide 5482 of the FBN1 cDNA changing R 1828 to W. This mutation disrupts a known consensus sequence recognized by a cellular protease and is located in the carboxy terminus at a site predicted to remove a 19 kD fragment. The proband and his 22-year-old brother, also heterozygous for the mutation, have had normal echocardiograms and ophthalmologic exams. The mutation segregated in the proband`s three generation family with autosomal dominant inheritance of height (> 90th percentile) and no known cardiovascular or ocular problems, including the 67-year-old grandmother (exams pending). The mutation was not found in 90 chromosomes from unrelated individuals. In summary, (1) the mutation identifies the cleavage site for the conversion of profibrillin to fibrillin; (2) the characterized mutation segregates in the family with tall stature without known cardiovascular or ocular problems; (3) this mutation potentially defines the phenotype associated with a {open_quotes}null{close_quotes} allele for the FBN1 gene.

  1. A novel splice site mutation of CRYBA3/A1 gene associated with congenital cataract in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng-Han; Yu, Yin-Hui; Hao, Qin-Long; Gong, Xiao-Hua; Yao, Ke

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify the disease-causing mutation responsible for the presence of congenital cataract in a Chinese family. METHODS The study recruited a four-generation Chinese pedigree affected by autosomal dominant congenital cataract (ADCC). Family history and the history of cataract extraction were recorded. Blood samples were collected from individuals for DNA extraction. Direct sequencing of congenital cataract-associated genes was performed. Single-strand conformational polymorphism and bioinformatic analysis were conducted to further study the mutation. RESULTS Direct sequencing revealed a novel splice site mutation of c.30-2 A>G in the CRYBA3/A1 gene. The mutation co-segregated within all affected individuals in the family and was not found in unaffected members or 100 unrelated normal controls. These results were further confirmed by single-strand conformational polymorphism and bioinformatic analysis using the Human Splicing Finder and MaxEnt online software and Annovar computer software. CONCLUSION c.30-2 A>G mutation of CRYBA3/A1 gene is a novel mutation and broadens the genetic spectrum of ADCC. PMID:28149769

  2. In-depth analysis of hyaline fibromatosis syndrome frameshift mutations at the same site reveal the necessity of personalized therapy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shixu E; Lemmin, Thomas; Salvi, Suzanne; Lausch, Ekkehart; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Rokicki, Dariusz; Dal Peraro, Matteo; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2013-07-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in ANTXR2, a gene involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis. Sixty percent of patients carry frameshift mutations at a mutational hotspot in exon 13. We show in patient cells that these mutations lead to low ANTXR2 mRNA and undetectable protein levels. Ectopic expression of the proteins encoded by the mutated genes reveals that a two base insertion leads to the synthesis of a protein that is rapidly targeted to the ER-associated degradation pathway due to the modified structure of the cytosolic tail, which instead of being hydrophilic and highly disordered as in wild type ANTXR2, is folded and exposes hydrophobic patches. In contrast, one base insertion leads to a truncated protein that properly localizes to the plasma membrane and retains partial function. We next show that targeting the nonsense mediated mRNA decay pathway in patient cells leads to a rescue of ANTXR2 protein in patients carrying one base insertion but not in those carrying two base insertions. This study highlights the importance of in-depth analysis of the molecular consequences of specific patient mutations, which even when they occur at the same site can have drastically different consequences. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  3. Mutational analysis of the potential phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C on the CCKA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Smeets, R L L; Fouraux, M A; Pouwels, W; van Emst-de Vries, S E; Ronken, E; De Pont, J J H H M; Willems, P H G M

    1998-01-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors contain potential phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C (PKC), the exact role of which is poorly understood. In the present study, a mutant cholecystokininA (CCKA) receptor was generated in which the four consensus sites for PKC action were changed in an alanine. Both the wild-type (CCKAWT) and mutant (CCKAMT) receptor were stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells.Binding of [3H]-cholecystokinin-(26-33)-peptide amide (CCK-8) to membranes prepared from CHO-CCKAWT cells and CHO-CCKAMT cells revealed no difference in binding affinity (Kd values of 0.72 nM and 0.86 nM CCK-8, respectively).The dose-response curves for CCK-8-induced cyclic AMP accumulation and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3) formation were shifted to the left in CHO-CCKAMT cells. This leftward shift was mimicked by the potent inhibitor of protein kinase activity, staurosporine. However, the effect of staurosporine was restricted to CHO-CCKAWT cells. This demonstrates that attenuation of CCK-8-induced activation of adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C-β involves a staurosporine-sensitive kinase, which acts directly at the potential sites of PKC action on the CCKA receptor in CCK-8-stimulated CHO-CCKAWT cells.The potent PKC activator, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), evoked a rightward shift of the dose-response curve for CCK-8-induced cyclic AMP accumulation in CHO-CCKAWT cells but not CHO-CCKAMT cells. This is in agreement with the idea that PKC acts directly at the CCKA receptor to attenuate adenylyl cyclase activation.In contrast, TPA evoked a rightward shift of the dose-response curve for CCK-8-induced Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation in both cell lines. This demonstrates that high-level PKC activation inhibits CCK-8-induced Ins(1,4,5)P3 formation also at a post-receptor site.TPA inhibition of agonist-induced Ca2+ mobilization was only partly reversed in CHO-CCKAMT cells. TPA also inhibited Ca2+ mobilization in response to the G

  4. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  5. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  6. Brown spider phospholipase-D containing a conservative mutation (D233E) in the catalytic site: identification and functional characterization.

    PubMed

    Vuitika, Larissa; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Belisário-Ferrari, Matheus Regis; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Ferrer, Valéria Pereira; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2013-11-01

    Brown spider (Loxosceles genus) bites have been reported worldwide. The venom contains a complex composition of several toxins, including phospholipases-D. Native or recombinant phospholipase-D toxins induce cutaneous and systemic loxoscelism, particularly necrotic lesions, inflammatory response, renal failure, and hematological disturbances. Herein, we describe the cloning, heterologous expression and purification of a novel phospholipase-D toxin, LiRecDT7 in reference to six other previously described in phospholipase-D toxin family. The complete cDNA sequence of this novel brown spider phospholipase-D isoform was obtained and the calculated molecular mass of the predicted mature protein is 34.4 kDa. Similarity analyses revealed that LiRecDT7 is homologous to the other dermonecrotic toxin family members particularly to LiRecDT6, sharing 71% sequence identity. LiRecDT7 possesses the conserved amino acid residues involved in catalysis except for a conservative mutation (D233E) in the catalytic site. Purified LiRecDT7 was detected as a soluble 36 kDa protein using anti-whole venom and anti-LiRecDT1 sera, indicating immunological cross-reactivity and evidencing sequence-epitopes identities similar to those of other phospholipase-D family members. Also, LiRecDT7 exhibits sphingomyelinase activity in a concentration dependent-manner and induces experimental skin lesions with swelling, erythema and dermonecrosis. In addition, LiRecDT7 induced a massive inflammatory response in rabbit skin dermis, which is a hallmark of brown spider venom phospholipase-D toxins. Moreover, LiRecDT7 induced in vitro hemolysis in human erythrocytes and increased blood vessel permeability. These features suggest that this novel member of the brown spider venom phospholipase-D family, which naturally contains a mutation (D233E) in the catalytic site, could be useful for future structural and functional studies concerning loxoscelism and lipid biochemistry. 1- Novel brown spider

  7. Mutations That Extend the Specificity of the Endonuclease Activity of λ Terminase

    PubMed Central

    Arens, Jean Sippy; Hang, Qi; Hwang, Young; Tuma, Bill; Max, Sara; Feiss, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Terminase, an enzyme encoded by the Nu1 and A genes of bacteriophage lambda, is crucial for packaging concatemeric DNA into virions. cosN, a 22-bp segment, is the site on the virus chromosome where terminase introduces staggered nicks to cut the concatemer to generate unit-length virion chromosomes. Although cosN is rotationally symmetric, mutations in cosN have asymmetric effects. The cosN G2C mutation (a G-to-C change at position 2) in the left half of cosN reduces the phage yield 10-fold, whereas the symmetric mutation cosN C11G, in the right half of cosN, does not affect the burst size. The reduction in phage yield caused by cosN G2C is correlated with a defect in cos cleavage. Three suppressors of the cosN G2C mutation, A-E515G, A-N509K, and A-R504C, have been isolated that restore the yield of λ cosN G2C to the wild-type level. The suppressors are missense mutations that alter amino acids located near an ATPase domain of gpA. λ A-E515G, A-N509K, and A-R504C phages, which are cosN+, also had wild-type burst sizes. In vitro cos cleavage experiments on cosN G2C C11G DNA showed that the rate of cleavage for A-E515G terminase is three- to fourfold higher than for wild-type terminase. The A-E515G mutation changes residue 515 of gpA from glutamic acid to glycine. Uncharged polar and hydrophobic residues at position 515 suppressed the growth defect of λ cosN G2C C11G. In contrast, basic (K, R) and acidic (E, D) residues at position 515 failed to suppress the growth defect of λ cosN G2C C11G. In a λ cosN+ background, all amino acids tested at position 515 were functional. These results suggest that A-E515G plays an indirect role in extending the specificity of the endonuclease activity of λ terminase. PMID:9864333

  8. Active Site Hydrophobicity and the Convergent Evolution of Paraoxonase Activity in Structurally Divergent Enzymes: The Case of Serum Paraoxonase 1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a native lactonase capable of promiscuously hydrolyzing a broad range of substrates, including organophosphates, esters, and carbonates. Structurally, PON1 is a six-bladed β-propeller with a flexible loop (residues 70–81) covering the active site. This loop contains a functionally critical Tyr at position 71. We have performed detailed experimental and computational analyses of the role of selected Y71 variants in the active site stability and catalytic activity in order to probe the role of Y71 in PON1’s lactonase and organophosphatase activities. We demonstrate that the impact of Y71 substitutions on PON1’s lactonase activity is minimal, whereas the kcat for the paraoxonase activity is negatively perturbed by up to 100-fold, suggesting greater mutational robustness of the native activity. Additionally, while these substitutions modulate PON1’s active site shape, volume, and loop flexibility, their largest effect is in altering the solvent accessibility of the active site by expanding the active site volume, allowing additional water molecules to enter. This effect is markedly more pronounced in the organophosphatase activity than the lactonase activity. Finally, a detailed comparison of PON1 to other organophosphatases demonstrates that either a similar “gating loop” or a highly buried solvent-excluding active site is a common feature of these enzymes. We therefore posit that modulating the active site hydrophobicity is a key element in facilitating the evolution of organophosphatase activity. This provides a concrete feature that can be utilized in the rational design of next-generation organophosphate hydrolases that are capable of selecting a specific reaction from a pool of viable substrates. PMID:28026940

  9. Altered intrinsic brain activity in patients with paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia by PRRT2 mutation: altered brain activity by PRRT2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Luo, ChunYan; Chen, Yongping; Song, Wei; Chen, Qin; Gong, QiYong; Shang, Hui-Fang

    2013-11-01

    The proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) gene has been recently identified as a causative gene of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD), with an insertion mutation c.649_650insC (p.P217fsX7) reported as the most common mutation. However, the pathogenic mechanism of the mutation of PRRT2 remains largely unknown. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging is a promising approach to assess cerebral function and reveals underlying functional changes. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 4 Chinese PKD patients with p.P217fsX7 mutation, 6 Chinese PKD patients without the mutation, and 10 healthy control subjects. Voxel-based analysis was used to characterize alterations in the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF). When compared with the healthy control subjects, both groups of PKD patients showed alterations in spontaneous brain activities within cortical-basal ganglia circuitry. Besides, the group of patients with p.P217fsX7 mutation also exhibited increased ALFF in the right postcenral gyrus and right rolandic operculum area, while the alteration of ALFF in group of patients without the mutation additionally involved the middle orbitofrontal cortex. Direct comparative analysis between these two patient groups revealed significantly increased ALFF in the right postcentral gyrus in the group with p.P217fsX7 mutation. Increased spontaneous brain activity in the cortical-basal ganglia circuitry, especially in the motor preparation areas, is a common pathophysiology in PKD. Differences in the spatial patterns of increased ALFF between patients with and those without the mutation might reflect the distinct pathological mechanism resulting from PRRT2 mutation.

  10. Exon grafting yields a "two active-site" lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Li, Bin; Fei, Yanqun; Jiang, Dazhi; Sheng, Yongjie; Sun, Yanhong; Zhang, Jin

    2007-07-13

    The design of enzymes with enhanced stability and activity has long been a goal in protein engineering. We report a strategy to engineer an additional active site for human lysozyme, grafted the entire human lysozyme exon 2, which encodes the catalytically competent domain, into the gene at a position corresponding to an exposed loop region in the translated protein. Exon 2 grafting created a novel lysozyme with twice the activity of the wild type enzyme, equal activity came from each of the two active sites. We dissected the contributions of each active site using site-directed mutagenesis of the catalytic doublets of (E35A/D53A), circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra, and molecular modeling. Temperature and pH stability of the "two active-site" enzyme were similar to those of wild-type lysozyme. Thus, we provide a novel strategy for engineering the active site of enzymes.

  11. Intramembrane Proton Binding Site Linked to Activation of Bacterial Pentameric Ion Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Long; Cheng, Xiaolin; Sine, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Prokaryotic orthologs of eukaryotic Cys-loop receptor channels recently emerged as structural and mechanistic surrogates to investigate this superfamily of intercellular signaling proteins. Here, we examine proton activation of the prokaryotic ortholog GLIC using patch clamp electrophysiology, mutagenesis, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Whole-cell current recordings from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing GLIC show half-maximal activation at pH 6, close to the pKa of histidine, implicating the three native His residues in proton sensing linked to activation. The mutation H235F abolishes proton activation, H277Y is without effect, and all nine mutations of His-127 prevent expression on the cell surface. In the GLIC crystal structure, His-235 on transmembrane (TM) α-helix 2, hydrogen bonds to the main chain carbonyl oxygen of Ile-259 on TM α-helix 3. MD simulations show that when His-235 is protonated, the hydrogen bond persists, and the channel remains in the open conformation, whereas when His-235 is deprotonated, the hydrogen bond dissociates, and the channel closes. Mutations of the proximal Tyr-263, which also links TM α-helices 2 and 3 via a hydrogen bond, alter proton sensitivity over a 1.5 pH unit range. MD simulations show that mutations of Tyr-263 alter the hydrogen bonding capacity of His-235. The overall findings show that His-235 in the TM region of GLIC is a novel proton binding site linked to channel activation. PMID:22084238

  12. Founder effect is responsible for the p.Leu131Phe heparin-binding-site antithrombin mutation common in Hungary: phenotype analysis in a large cohort.

    PubMed

    Gindele, R; Oláh, Z; Ilonczai, P; Speker, M; Udvari, Á; Selmeczi, A; Pfliegler, G; Marján, E; Kovács, B; Boda, Z; Muszbek, L; Bereczky, Z

    2016-04-01

    Antithrombin (AT) is a key regulator of the coagulation. In type II deficiency, the heparin-binding-site defect (type II HBS) is considered to be relatively low thrombosis risk. Our aims were to search for SERPINC1 mutation(s) and to describe the clinical and laboratory phenotype of a large number of AT Budapest3 (ATBp3, p.Leu131Phe) carriers and confirm the presence of a founder effect. AT-deficient patients were recruited and carriers of ATBp3, n = 102 (63 families) were selected. To investigate the founder effect, eight intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms, a 5'-length dimorphism, and five microsatellite markers were detected. Clinical and laboratory data of the patients were collected and analyzed. In AT deficiency, 16 different causative mutations were found, and the great majority of patients were of type II HBS subtype. Most of them (n = 102/118, 86.5%) carried the ATBp3 mutation. The ATBp3 mutant allele was associated with one single haplotype, while different haplotypes were detected in the case of normal allele. The anti-factor Xa-based AT activity assay that we used could detect all ATBp3 patients with high sensitivity in our cohort. ATBp3 homozygosity (n = 26) was associated with thrombosis at a young age and conferred a high thrombotic risk. Half of the heterozygotes (n = 41/76, 53.9%) also had venous and/or arterial thrombosis, and pregnancy complications were also recorded. In Hungary, the founder mutation, ATBp3, is the most common AT deficiency. Our study is the first in which the clinical characterization of ATBp3 mutation was executed in a large population. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  13. Analysis of coliphage lambda mutations that affect Q gene activity: puq, byp, and nin5.

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, N; Enquist, L

    1979-01-01

    We describe in this paper the isolation and characterization of a class of mutations, designated puq, that allow phage lambda to grow better under conditions that limit the synthesis of the phage Q gene product. These mutations were located between phage genes P and Q, a region of the lambda chromosome containing two gene N-independent mutations, nin5 and byp, that we also show to be puq mutations. Whereas the puq-3 and puq-16 mutations probably map under the nin5 deletion, the byp mutation maps between this deletion and the Q lambda-Q phi 80 crossover point. These mutations likely act by increasing the synthesis of the Q gene product. We demonstrate that the clear-plaque phenotype and reduced lysogenization frequency of byp mutants depend on increased Q gene activity. The significance of these results in understanding how transcription proceeds through the P-Q region of the lambda genome is discussed. PMID:158097

  14. Activating mutations and senescence secretome: new insights into HER2 activation, drug sensitivity and metastatic progression.

    PubMed

    Acharyya, Swarnali

    2013-04-23

    HER2 amplification and overexpression is observed in approximately 20% of breast cancers and is strongly associated with poor prognosis and therapeutic responsiveness to HER2 targeted agents. A recent study by Bose and colleagues suggests that another subset of breast cancer patients without HER2 amplification but with activating HER2 mutation might also benefit from existing HER2-targeted agents and the authors functionally characterize these somatic mutations in experimental models. In a second study on HER2-driven breast cancer, Angelini and colleagues investigate how the constitutively active, truncated carboxy-terminal fragment of HER2, p95HER2, promotes metastatic progression through non-cellautonomous secretion of factors from senescent cells. These new findings advance our understanding of HER2 biology in the context of HER2 activation as well as offer new insights into our understanding of drug sensitivity and metastatic progression.

  15. The identity of the active site of oxalate decarboxylase and the importance of the stability of active-site lid conformations1

    PubMed Central

    Just, Victoria J.; Burrell, Matthew R.; Bowater, Laura; McRobbie, Iain; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Lawson, David M.; Bornemann, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Oxalate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.2) catalyses the conversion of oxalate into carbon dioxide and formate. It requires manganese and, uniquely, dioxygen for catalysis. It forms a homohexamer and each subunit contains two similar, but distinct, manganese sites termed sites 1 and 2. There is kinetic evidence that only site 1 is catalytically active and that site 2 is purely structural. However, the kinetics of enzymes with mutations in site 2 are often ambiguous and all mutant kinetics have been interpreted without structural information. Nine new site-directed mutants have been generated and four mutant crystal structures have now been solved. Most mutants targeted (i) the flexibility (T165P), (ii) favoured conformation (S161A, S164A, D297A or H299A) or (iii) presence (Δ162–163 or Δ162–164) of a lid associated with site 1. The kinetics of these mutants were consistent with only site 1 being catalytically active. This was particularly striking with D297A and H299A because they disrupted hydrogen bonds between the lid and a neighbouring subunit only when in the open conformation and were distant from site 2. These observations also provided the first evidence that the flexibility and stability of lid conformations are important in catalysis. The deletion of the lid to mimic the plant oxalate oxidase led to a loss of decarboxylase activity, but only a slight elevation in the oxalate oxidase side reaction, implying other changes are required to afford a reaction specificity switch. The four mutant crystal structures (R92A, E162A, Δ162–163 and S161A) strongly support the hypothesis that site 2 is purely structural. PMID:17680775

  16. Small activating RNA binds to the genomic target site in a seed-region-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xing; Jiang, Qian; Chang, Nannan; Wang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Chujun; Xiong, Jingwei; Cao, Huiqing; Liang, Zicai

    2016-01-01

    RNA activation (RNAa) is the upregulation of gene expression by small activating RNAs (saRNAs). In order to investigate the mechanism by which saRNAs act in RNAa, we used the progesterone receptor (PR) gene as a model, established a panel of effective saRNAs and assessed the involvement of the sense and antisense strands of saRNA in RNAa. All active saRNAs had their antisense strand effectively incorporated into Ago2, whereas such consistency did not occur for the sense strand. Using a distal hotspot for saRNA targeting at 1.6-kb upstream from the PR transcription start site, we further established that gene activation mediated by saRNA depended on the complementarity of the 5′ region of the antisense strand, and that such activity was largely abolished by mutations in this region of the saRNA. We found markedly reduced RNAa effects when we created mutations in the genomic target site of saRNA PR-1611, thus providing evidence that RNAa depends on the integrity of the DNA target. We further demonstrated that this saRNA bound the target site on promoter DNA. These results demonstrated that saRNAs work via an on-site mechanism by binding to target genomic DNA in a seed-region-dependent manner, reminiscent of miRNA-like target recognition. PMID:26873922

  17. Small activating RNA binds to the genomic target site in a seed-region-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xing; Jiang, Qian; Chang, Nannan; Wang, Xiaoxia; Liu, Chujun; Xiong, Jingwei; Cao, Huiqing; Liang, Zicai

    2016-03-18

    RNA activation (RNAa) is the upregulation of gene expression by small activating RNAs (saRNAs). In order to investigate the mechanism by which saRNAs act in RNAa, we used the progesterone receptor (PR) gene as a model, established a panel of effective saRNAs and assessed the involvement of the sense and antisense strands of saRNA in RNAa. All active saRNAs had their antisense strand effectively incorporated into Ago2, whereas such consistency did not occur for the sense strand. Using a distal hotspot for saRNA targeting at 1.6-kb upstream from the PR transcription start site, we further established that gene activation mediated by saRNA depended on the complementarity of the 5' region of the antisense strand, and that such activity was largely abolished by mutations in this region of the saRNA. We found markedly reduced RNAa effects when we created mutations in the genomic target site of saRNA PR-1611, thus providing evidence that RNAa depends on the integrity of the DNA target. We further demonstrated that this saRNA bound the target site on promoter DNA. These results demonstrated that saRNAs work via an on-site mechanism by binding to target genomic DNA in a seed-region-dependent manner, reminiscent of miRNA-like target recognition. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. A novel biallelic splice site mutation of TECTA causes moderate to severe hearing impairment in an Algerian family.

    PubMed

    Behlouli, Asma; Bonnet, Crystel; Abdi, Samia; Hasbellaoui, Mokhtar; Boudjenah, Farid; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Ammar-Khodja, Fatima; Zenati, Akila; Petit, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Congenital deafness is certainly one of the most common monogenic diseases in humans, but it is also one of the most genetically heterogeneous, which makes molecular diagnosis challenging in most cases. Whole-exome sequencing in two out of three Algerian siblings affected by recessively-inherited, moderate to severe sensorineural deafness allowed us to identify a novel splice donor site mutation (c.5272+1G > A) in the gene encoding α-tectorin, a major component of the cochlear tectorial membrane. The mutation was present at the homozygous state in the three affected siblings, and at the heterozygous state in their unaffected, consanguineous parents. To our knowledge, this is the first reported TECTA mutation leading to the DFNB21 form of hearing impairment among Maghrebian individuals suffering from congenital hearing impairment, which further illustrates the diversity of the genes involved in congenital deafness in the Maghreb.

  19. Agonist activation of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site.

    PubMed

    Gill, Jaskiran K; Savolainen, Mari; Young, Gareth T; Zwart, Ruud; Sher, Emanuele; Millar, Neil S

    2011-04-05

    Conventional nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, such as acetylcholine, act at an extracellular "orthosteric" binding site located at the interface between two adjacent subunits. Here, we present evidence of potent activation of α7 nAChRs via an allosteric transmembrane site. Previous studies have identified a series of nAChR-positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that lack agonist activity but are able to potentiate responses to orthosteric agonists, such as acetylcholine. It has been shown, for example, that TQS acts as a conventional α7 nAChR PAM. In contrast, we have found that a compound with close chemical similarity to TQS (4BP-TQS) is a potent allosteric agonist of α7 nAChRs. Whereas the α7 nAChR antagonist metyllycaconitine acts competitively with conventional nicotinic agonists, metyllycaconitine is a noncompetitive antagonist of 4BP-TQS. Mutation of an amino acid (M253L), located in a transmembrane cavity that has been proposed as being the binding site for PAMs, completely blocks agonist activation by 4BP-TQS. In contrast, this mutation had no significant effect on agonist activation by acetylcholine. Conversely, mutation of an amino acid located within the known orthosteric binding site (W148F) has a profound effect on agonist potency of acetylcholine (resulting in a shift of ∼200-fold in the acetylcholine dose-response curve), but had little effect on the agonist dose-response curve for 4BP-TQS. Computer docking studies with an α7 homology model provides evidence that both TQS and 4BP-TQS bind within an intrasubunit transmembrane cavity. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that agonist activation of nAChRs can occur via an allosteric transmembrane site.

  20. Novel splice-site mutations and a large intragenic deletion in PLA2G6 associated with a severe and rapidly progressive form of infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, A; Romaniello, R; Grasso, R; Cavallini, A; Righini, A; Bresolin, N; Borgatti, R; Bassi, M T

    2010-11-01

    Infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy, INAD, is a severe progressive psychomotor disorder with infantile onset and characterized by the presence of axonal spheroids throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. A subset of INAD patients shows also brain iron accumulation which represents instead the distinctive feature of the idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, NBIA. These diseases share the same causative gene, PLA2G6, encoding iPLA2-VIA, a calcium-independent phospholipase. Mutations that lead to a complete absence of protein are associated with a severe INAD profile, while compound heterozygous mutations with possibly a residual protein activity are instead associated with the less severe NBIA phenotype. Here we describe two INAD patients both with an unusually rapid disease progression and a peculiar neuroradiological presentation in one of them. Compound heterozygosity for a large intragenic deletion and a nonsense mutation was found in one of them while the other is carrying two novel splice-site mutations. Breakpoint-sequence analysis suggests a non-allelic-homologous-recombination (NAHR) event, probably underlying the rearrangement. These findings, while supporting the genotype-phenotype correlation already observed in INAD patients, provide the first sequence characterization of a genomic rearrangement in PLA2G6 gene, thus orienting the search for missing mutant alleles in PLA2G6 related diseases. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. An extremely rare splice site mutation in the gene encoding complement factor I in a patient with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ipe, Tina S; Lim, Jooeun; Reyes, Meredith Anne; Ero, Mike; Leveque, Christopher; Lewis, Bradley; Kain, Jamey

    2017-04-28

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute kidney failure. The disease is difficult to diagnose due to its similarity with other hematologic disorders, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). However, genetic mutations are found in 50-70% of patients with aHUS and can be useful in its diagnosis. A 40-year-old male presented to our hospital with acute kidney injury, evidenced by high creatinine levels (8.3 mg/dL) and kidney biopsy results. The patient was preliminarily diagnosed with TTP and therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was initiated. After four treatments, TPE was discontinued due to lack of ADAMTS13 activity and inhibitor assay results that were not consistent with TTP, improved hematologic laboratory results, and aHUS genetic testing results. Next-generation sequencing showed a rare mutation at a splice site in the gene encoding complement factor I (CFI). Implication of this mutation in aHUS has not been previously described. Treatment with eculizumab reduced creatinine levels below 4.0 mg/dL, and the patient remained on maintenance dosage of eculizumab (1200 mg/14 days) to prevent aHUS recurrence. An extremely rare, heterozygous mutation in the gene encoding CFI likely affecting splicing was associated for the first time with aHUS. Sequencing was critical for rapid diagnosis and subsequent timely treatment with eculizumab, which resulted in improved renal function. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Identification of a novel splice-site mutation in the Lebercilin (LCA5) gene causing Leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramprasad, Vedam Lakshmi; Soumittra, Nagasamy; Nancarrow, Derek; Sen, Parveen; McKibbin, Martin; Williams, Grange A; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Lakshmipathy, Praveena; Inglehearn, Chris F

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is one of the most common causes of hereditary blindness in infants. To date, mutations in 13 known genes and at two other loci have been implicated in LCA causation. An examination of the known genes highlights several processes which, when defective, cause LCA, including photoreceptor development and maintenance, phototransduction, vitamin A metabolism, and protein trafficking. In addition, it has been known for some time that defects in sensory cilia can cause syndromes involving hereditary blindness. More recently evidence has come to light that non-syndromic LCA can also be a “ciliopathy.” Methods Here we present a homozygosity mapping analysis in a consanguineous sibship that led to the identification of a mutation in the recently discovered LCA5 gene. Homozygosity mapping was done using Affymetrix 10K Xba I Gene Chip and a 24.5cM region on chromosome 6 (6q12- q16.3) was identified to be significantly homozygous. The LCA5 gene on this region was sequenced and cDNA sequencing also done to characterize the mutation. Results A c.955G>A missense mutation in the last base of exon 6 causing disruption of the splice donor site was identified in both the affected sibs. Since there is a second consensus splice donor sequence 5 bp into the adjacent intron, this mutation results in a transcript with a 5 bp insertion of intronic sequence, leading to a frameshift and premature truncation. Conclusions We report a missense mutation functionally altering the splice donor site and leading to a truncated protein. This is the second report of LCA5 mutations causing LCA. It may also be significant that one affected child died at eleven months of age due to asphyxia during sleep. To date the only phenotype unambiguously associated with mutations in this gene is LCA. However the LCA5 gene is known to be expressed in nasopharynx, trachea and lungs and was originally identified in the proteome of bronchial epithelium ciliary axonemes. The

  3. Mutator Activity of Petite Strains of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Flury, Fred; von Borstel, R. C.; Williamson, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Petite strains in Saccharomyces exhibit enhanced spontaneous mutation rates of nuclear genes regardless of whether they are cytoplasmically or nuclearly inherited, or whether or not the cytoplasmic petite strains have mitochondrial DNA. In petite strains, the mutation rate for the nonsense allele lys1-1 is enhanced by a factor of 3-6 and for the missense allele his1-7 by a factor of 2 as compared with their grande counterparts. The reversion of a third allele, the putative frameshift mutation, hom3-10 , is not enhanced in a petite background. The results indicate that the spontaneous mutation rate of an organism can be altered by indirect intracellular influences. PMID:786779

  4. Mutator activity of petite strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Flury, F; von Borstel, R C; Williamson, D H

    1976-08-01

    Petite strains in Saccharomyces exhibit enhanced spontaneous mutation rates of nuclear genes regardless of whether they are cytoplasmically or nuclearly inherited, or whether or not the cytoplasmic petite strains have mitochondrial DNA. In petite strains, the mutation rate for the nonsense allele lys1-1 is enhanced by a factor of 3-6 and for the missense allele his1-7 by a factor of 2 as compared with their grande counterparts. The reversion of a third allele, the putative frameshift mutation, hom3-10, is not enhanced in a petite background. The results indicate that the spontaneous mutation rate of an organism can be altered by indirect intracellular influences.

  5. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-07-08

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins' stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity. The server integrates sequence, structural and evolutionary information obtained from 3 databases and 20 computational tools. Users are guided through the processes of selecting hot spots using four different protein engineering strategies and optimizing the resulting library's size by narrowing down a set of substitutions at individual randomized positions. The only required input is a query protein structure. The results of the calculations are mapped onto the protein's structure and visualized with a JSmol applet. HotSpot Wizard lists annotated residues suitable for mutagenesis and can automatically design appropriate codons for each implemented strategy. Overall, HotSpot Wizard provides comprehensive annotations of protein structures and assists protein engineers with the rational design of site-specific mutations and focused libraries. It is freely available at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/hotspotwizard. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins’ stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity. The server integrates sequence, structural and evolutionary information obtained from 3 databases and 20 computational tools. Users are guided through the processes of selecting hot spots using four different protein engineering strategies and optimizing the resulting library's size by narrowing down a set of substitutions at individual randomized positions. The only required input is a query protein structure. The results of the calculations are mapped onto the protein's structure and visualized with a JSmol applet. HotSpot Wizard lists annotated residues suitable for mutagenesis and can automatically design appropriate codons for each implemented strategy. Overall, HotSpot Wizard provides comprehensive annotations of protein structures and assists protein engineers with the rational design of site-specific mutations and focused libraries. It is freely available at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/hotspotwizard. PMID:27174934

  7. Divergent Activity Profiles of Type 1 Ryanodine Receptor Channels Carrying Malignant Hyperthermia and Central Core Disease Mutations in the Amino-Terminal Region.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Takashi; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Oyamada, Hideto; Suzuki, Junji; Kanemaru, Kazunori; Oguchi, Katsuji; Iino, Masamitsu; Sakurai, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1) is a Ca2+ release channel in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle and is mutated in several diseases, including malignant hyperthermia (MH) and central core disease (CCD). Most MH and CCD mutations cause accelerated Ca2+ release, resulting in abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in skeletal muscle. However, how specific mutations affect the channel to produce different phenotypes is not well understood. In this study, we have investigated 11 mutations at 7 different positions in the amino (N)-terminal region of RyR1 (9 MH and 2 MH/CCD mutations) using a heterologous expression system in HEK293 cells. In live-cell Ca2+ imaging at room temperature (~25 °C), cells expressing mutant channels exhibited alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis, i.e., an enhanced sensitivity to caffeine, a depletion of Ca2+ in the ER and an increase in resting cytoplasmic Ca2+. RyR1 channel activity was quantitatively evaluated by [3H]ryanodine binding and three parameters (sensitivity to activating Ca2+, sensitivity to inactivating Ca2+ and attainable maximum activity, i.e., gain) were obtained by fitting analysis. The mutations increased the gain and the sensitivity to activating Ca2+ in a site-specific manner. The gain was consistently higher in both MH and MH/CCD mutations. Sensitivity to activating Ca2+ was markedly enhanced in MH/CCD mutations. The channel activity estimated from the three parameters provides a reasonable explanation to the pathological phenotype assessed by Ca2+ homeostasis. These properties were also observed at higher temperatures (~37 °C). Our data suggest that divergent activity profiles may cause varied disease phenotypes by specific mutations. This approach should be useful for diagnosis and treatment of diseases with mutations in RyR1.

  8. Catalytically Active Guanylyl Cyclase B Requires Endoplasmic Reticulum-mediated Glycosylation, and Mutations That Inhibit This Process Cause Dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Deborah M; Edmund, Aaron B; Otto, Neil M; Chaffee, Thomas S; Robinson, Jerid W; Potter, Lincoln R

    2016-05-20

    C-type natriuretic peptide activation of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), also known as natriuretic peptide receptor B or NPR2, stimulates long bone growth, and missense mutations in GC-B cause dwarfism. Four such mutants (L658F, Y708C, R776W, and G959A) bound (125)I-C-type natriuretic peptide on the surface of cells but failed to synthesize cGMP in membrane GC assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy also indicated that the mutant receptors were on the cell surface. All mutant proteins were dephosphorylated and incompletely glycosylated, but dephosphorylation did not explain the inactivation because the mutations inactivated a "constitutively phosphorylated" enzyme. Tunicamycin inhibition of glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum or mutation of the Asn-24 glycosylation site decreased GC activity, but neither inhibition of glycosylation in the Golgi by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I gene inactivation nor PNGase F deglycosylation of fully processed GC-B reduced GC activity. We conclude that endoplasmic reticulum-mediated glycosylation is required for the formation of an active catalytic, but not ligand-binding domain, and that mutations that inhibit this process cause dwarfism.

  9. Catalytically Active Guanylyl Cyclase B Requires Endoplasmic Reticulum-mediated Glycosylation, and Mutations That Inhibit This Process Cause Dwarfism*

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Deborah M.; Edmund, Aaron B.; Otto, Neil M.; Chaffee, Thomas S.; Robinson, Jerid W.; Potter, Lincoln R.

    2016-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide activation of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), also known as natriuretic peptide receptor B or NPR2, stimulates long bone growth, and missense mutations in GC-B cause dwarfism. Four such mutants (L658F, Y708C, R776W, and G959A) bound 125I-C-type natriuretic peptide on the surface of cells but failed to synthesize cGMP in membrane GC assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy also indicated that the mutant receptors were on the cell surface. All mutant proteins were dephosphorylated and incompletely glycosylated, but dephosphorylation did not explain the inactivation because the mutations inactivated a “constitutively phosphorylated” enzyme. Tunicamycin inhibition of glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum or mutation of the Asn-24 glycosylation site decreased GC activity, but neither inhibition of glycosylation in the Golgi by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I gene inactivation nor PNGase F deglycosylation of fully processed GC-B reduced GC activity. We conclude that endoplasmic reticulum-mediated glycosylation is required for the formation of an active catalytic, but not ligand-binding domain, and that mutations that inhibit this process cause dwarfism. PMID:26980729

  10. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein rescues activity of 5-lipoxygenase mutations that delay nuclear membrane association and disrupt product formation.

    PubMed

    Gerstmeier, Jana; Newcomer, Marcia E; Dennhardt, Sophie; Romp, Erik; Fischer, Jana; Werz, Oliver; Garscha, Ulrike

    2016-05-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are proinflammatory lipid mediators formed from arachidonic acid in a 2-step reaction catalyzed by 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) requiring the formation of 5-HPETE [5(S)-hydroperoxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid] and its subsequent transformation to LTA4 5-LOX is thought to receive arachidonic acid from the nuclear membrane-embedded 5-LOX-activating protein (FLAP). The crystal structure of 5-LOX revealed an active site concealed by F177 and Y181 (FY cork). We examined the influence of the FY cork on 5-LOX activity and membrane binding in HEK293 cells in the absence and presence of FLAP. Uncapping the 5-LOX active site by mutation of F177 and/or Y181 to alanine (5-LOX-F177A, 5-LOX-Y181A, 5-LOX-F177/Y181A) resulted in delayed and diminished 5-LOX membrane association in A23187-stimulated cells. For 5-LOX-F177A and 5-LOX-F177/Y181A, formation of 5-LOX products was dramatically reduced relative to 5-LOX-wild type (wt). Strikingly, coexpression of FLAP in A23187-activated HEK293 cells effectively restored formation of 5-H(p)ETE (5-hydroxy- and 5-peroxy-6-trans-8,11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid) by these same 5-LOX mutants (≈60-70% 5-LOX-wt levels) but not of LTA4 hydrolysis products. Yet 5-LOX-Y181A generated 5-H(p)ETE at levels comparable to 5-LOX-wt but reduced LTA4 hydrolysis products. Coexpression of FLAP partially restored LTA4 hydrolysis product formation by 5-LOX-Y181A. Together, the data suggest that the concealed FY cork impacts membrane association and that FLAP may help shield an uncapped active site.-Gerstmeier, J., Newcomer, M. E., Dennhardt, S., Romp, E., Fischer, J., Werz, O., Garscha, U. 5-Lipoxygenase-activating protein rescues activity of 5-lipoxygenase mutations that delay nuclear membrane association and disrupt product formation. © FASEB.

  11. A G-to-T transversion at the splice acceptor site of dystrophin exon 14 shows multiple splicing outcomes that are not exemplified by transition mutations.

    PubMed

    Ota, Mitsunori; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Atsushi; Awano, Hiroyuki; Lee, Tomoko; Yagi, Mariko; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    Mutations at splicing consensus sequences have been shown to induce splicing errors such as exon skipping or cryptic splice site activation. Here, we identified eight splicing products caused by a G-to-T transversion mutation at the splice acceptor site of exon 14 of the dystrophin gene (c.1603-1G>T). Unexpectedly, the most abundant product showed skipping of the two consecutive exons 14 and 15, and exon 14 skipping was observed as the second most abundant product. To examine the cause of this splicing multiplicity, minigenes containing dystrophin exons 14 and 15 with their flanking introns were constructed and subjected to in vitro splicing. Minigenes with the wild-type sequence or a G>A transition at position c.1603-1 produced only the mature mRNA. On the other hand, the minigenes with a G>T or G>C transversion mutation produced multiple splicing products. A time-course analysis of the in vitro splicing revealed that splicing of the middle intron, intron 14, was the first step in transcript maturation for all four minigene constructs. The identity of the mutant nucleotide, but not its position, is a factor leading to multiple splicing outcomes. Our results suggest that exon skipping therapy for Duchenne's muscular dystrophy should be carefully monitored for their splicing outcomes.

  12. Interaction of aspartic acid-104 and proline-287 with the active site of m-calpain.

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, J S; Elce, J S

    1996-01-01

    In an ongoing study of the mechanisms of calpain catalysis and Ca(2+)-induced activation, the effects of Asp-104-->Ser and Pro-287-->Ser large subunit mutations on m-calpain activity, the pH-activity profile, Ca(2+)-sensitivity, and autolysis were measured. The importance of these positions was suggested by sequence comparisons between the calpain and papain families of cysteine proteinases. Asp-104 is adjacent to the active-site Cys-105, and Pro-287 is adjacent to the active-site Asn-286 and probably to the active-site His-262; both Asp-104 and Pro-287 are absolutely conserved in the known calpains, but are replaced by highly conserved serine residues in the papains. The single mutants had approx. 10-15% of wild-type activity, due mainly to a decrease in kcat, since Km was only slightly increased. The Pro-287-->Ser mutation appeared to cause a local perturbation of the catalytic Cys-105/His-262 catalytic ion pair, reducing its efficiency without major effect on the conformation and stability of the enzyme. The Asp-104-->Ser mutation caused a marked narrowing of the pH-activity curve, a 9-fold increase in Ca2+ requirement, and an acceleration of autolysis, when compared with the wild-type enzyme. The results indicated that Asp-104 alters the nature of its interaction with the catalytic ion pair during Ca(2+)-induced conformational change in calpain. This interaction may be direct or indirect, but is important in activation of the enzyme. PMID:8912692

  13. Point mutations upstream of the yeast ADH2 poly(A) site significantly reduce the efficiency of 3'-end formation.

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, L E; Seiler, S H; Whoriskey, J; Moore, C L

    1991-01-01

    The sequences directing formation of mRNA 3' ends in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are not well defined. This is in contrast to the situation in higher eukaryotes in which the sequence AAUAAA is known to be crucial to proper 3'-end formation. The AAUAAA hexanucleotide is found upstream of the poly(A) site in some but not all yeast genes. One of these is the gene coding for alcohol dehydrogenase, ADH2. Deletion or a double point mutation of the AAUAAA has only a small effect on the efficiency of the reaction, and in contrast to the mammalian system, it is most likely not operating as a major processing signal in the yeast cell. However, we isolated point mutations which reveal that a region located approximately 80 nucleotides upstream of the poly(A) site plays a critical role in either transcription termination, polyadenylation, or both. These mutations represent the first point mutations in yeasts which significantly reduce the efficiency of 3'-end formation. Images PMID:2005893

  14. Point mutations upstream of the yeast ADH2 poly(A) site significantly reduce the efficiency of 3'-end formation.

    PubMed

    Hyman, L E; Seiler, S H; Whoriskey, J; Moore, C L

    1991-04-01

    The sequences directing formation of mRNA 3' ends in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are not well defined. This is in contrast to the situation in higher eukaryotes in which the sequence AAUAAA is known to be crucial to proper 3'-end formation. The AAUAAA hexanucleotide is found upstream of the poly(A) site in some but not all yeast genes. One of these is the gene coding for alcohol dehydrogenase, ADH2. Deletion or a double point mutation of the AAUAAA has only a small effect on the efficiency of the reaction, and in contrast to the mammalian system, it is most likely not operating as a major processing signal in the yeast cell. However, we isolated point mutations which reveal that a region located approximately 80 nucleotides upstream of the poly(A) site plays a critical role in either transcription termination, polyadenylation, or both. These mutations represent the first point mutations in yeasts which significantly reduce the efficiency of 3'-end formation.

  15. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4BWT-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4BWT-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. PMID:26453300

  16. Cancer-associated mutations are preferentially distributed in protein kinase functional sites.

    PubMed

    Izarzugaza, Jose M G; Redfern, Oliver C; Orengo, Christine A; Valencia, Alfonso

    2009-12-01

    Protein kinases are a superfamily involved in many crucial cellular processes, including signal transmission and regulation of cell cycle. As a consequence of this role, kinases have been reported to be associated with many types of cancer and are considered as potential therapeutic targets. We analyzed the distribution of pathogenic somatic point mutations (drivers) in the protein kinase superfamily with respect to their location in the protein, such as in structural, evolutionary, and functionally relevant regions. We find these driver mutations are more clearly associated with key protein features than other somatic mutations (passengers) that have not been directly linked to tumor progression. This observation fits well with the expected implication of the alterations in protein kinase function in cancer pathogenicity. To explain the relevance of the detected association of cancer driver mutations at the molecular level in the human kinome, we compare these with genetically inherited mutations (SNPs). We find that the subset of nonsynonymous SNPs that are associated to disease, but sufficiently mild to the point of being widespread in the population, tend to avoid those key protein regions, where they could be more detrimental for protein function. This tendency contrasts with the one detected for cancer associated-driver-mutations, which seems to be more directly implicated in the alteration of protein function. The detailed analysis of protein kinase groups and a number of relevant examples, confirm the relation between cancer associated-driver-mutations and key regions for protein kinase structure and function.

  17. Dominance and interloci interactions in transcriptional activation cascades: models explaining compensatory mutations and inheritance patterns.

    PubMed

    Bost, Bruno; Veitia, Reiner A

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in human genes encoding transcription factors are often dominant because one active allele cannot ensure a normal phenotype (haploinsufficiency). In other instances, heterozygous mutations of two genes are required for a phenotype to appear (combined haploinsufficiency). Here, we explore with models (i) the basis of haploinsufficiency and combined haploinsufficiency owing to mutations in transcription activators, and (ii) how the effects of such mutations can be amplified or buffered by subsequent steps in a transcription cascade. We propose that the non-linear (sigmoidal) response of transcription to the concentration of activators can explain haploinsufficiency. We further show that the sigmoidal character of the output of a cascade increases with the number of steps involved, the settings of which will determine the buffering or enhancement of the effects of a decreased concentration of an upstream activator. This exploration provides insights into the bases of compensatory mutations and on interloci interactions underlying oligogenic inheritance patterns.

  18. Missense point mutations of tau to segregate with FTDP-17 exhibit site-specific effects on microtubule structure in COS cells: a novel action of R406W mutation.

    PubMed

    Sahara, N; Tomiyama, T; Mori, H

    2000-05-01

    Missense and splicing point mutations have been found in the tau gene in families with frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). Of these mutations, we examined four exonic missense point mutations (G272V, P301L, V337M and R406W) in 3-repeat or 4-repeat tau isoform on the transfection experiment. The effects of two mutations (G272V or P301L) on microtubules were subtle whereas those of two other mutations (V337M or R406W) were dramatically significant when these two mutations were constructed into 3-repeat tau but not into 4-repeat tau. The R406W mutation induced an alternation of microtubules to form dotted or fragmented forms retaining colocalization of tau with tubulin whereas the V337M mutation predominantly disrupted microtubule networks and diminished colocalization of tau and tubulin. The effect of the mutations on microtubules were thus site-dependent and isoform-dependent. Tau with R406W mutation was found to be colocalized with tubulin without filamentous structures on confocal views, suggesting that the carboxyl region of tau played a different role from tubulin-binding domain on microtubule assemble. Another abnormal property was identified in tau with R406W mutation that failed to suffer phosphorylation. Thus, diverse effects of tau mutations on microtubules may explain the various clinicopathologies of FTDP-17 and related tauopathies.

  19. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is functionally affected by mutations on actin binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Hai; Tang, Wei-Ping; Liu, Jia-Yao

    2013-03-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin, and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments. To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L. AtADF1, we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G- and F-actin binding. The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A, R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding. Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L. plants overexpressing these mutants, we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth. Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional, unless the affinity for actin monomers is also affected. The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding, depolymerization of actin polymers, and therefore in the control of actin organization. © 2012 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Computational Identification of Amino-Acid Mutations that Further Improve the Activity of a Chalcone-Flavonone Isomerase from Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hui; Wu, Jiaqi; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Jiakuan; Zhong, Yang; Huang, Qiang; Nan, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Protein design for improving enzymatic activity remains a challenge in biochemistry, especially to identify target amino-acid sites for mutagenesis and to design beneficial mutations for those sites. Here, we employ a computational approach that combines multiple sequence alignment, positive selection detection, and molecular docking to identify and design beneficial amino-acid mutations that further improve the intramolecular-cyclization activity of a chalcone-flavonone isomerase from Glycine max (GmCHI). By this approach, two GmCHI mutants with higher activities were predicted and verified. The results demonstrate that this approach could determine the beneficial amino-acid mutations for improving the enzymatic activity, and may find more applications in engineering of enzymes.

  1. Computational Identification of Amino-Acid Mutations that Further Improve the Activity of a Chalcone–Flavonone Isomerase from Glycine max

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hui; Wu, Jiaqi; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Jiakuan; Zhong, Yang; Huang, Qiang; Nan, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Protein design for improving enzymatic activity remains a challenge in biochemistry, especially to identify target amino-acid sites for mutagenesis and to design beneficial mutations for those sites. Here, we employ a computational approach that combines multiple sequence alignment, positive selection detection, and molecular docking to identify and design beneficial amino-acid mutations that further improve the intramolecular-cyclization activity of a chalcone–flavonone isomerase from Glycine max (GmCHI). By this approach, two GmCHI mutants with higher activities were predicted and verified. The results demonstrate that this approach could determine the beneficial amino-acid mutations for improving the enzymatic activity, and may find more applications in engineering of enzymes. PMID:28286513

  2. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program --now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human Exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines be opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  3. Activating HER2 mutations in HER2 gene amplification negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Ron; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Searleman, Adam C.; Shen, Wei; Shen, Dong; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Monsey, John; Goel, Nicholas; Aronson, Adam B.; Li, Shunqiang; Ma, Cynthia X.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ellis, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Data from eight breast cancer genome sequencing projects identified 25 patients with HER2 somatic mutations in cancers lacking HER2 gene amplification. To determine the phenotype of these mutations, we functionally characterized thirteen HER2 mutations using in vitro kinase assays, protein structure analysis, cell culture and xenograft experiments. Seven of these mutations are activating mutations, including G309A, D769H, D769Y, V777L, P780ins, V842I, and R896C. HER2 in-frame deletion 755-759, which is homologous to EGFR exon 19 in-frame deletions, had a neomorphic phenotype with increased phosphorylation of EGFR or HER3. L755S produced lapatinib resistance, but was not an activating mutation in our experimental systems. All of these mutations were sensitive to the irreversible kinase inhibitor, neratinib. These findings demonstrate that HER2 somatic mutation is an alternative mechanism to activate HER2 in breast cancer and they validate HER2 somatic mutations as drug targets for breast cancer treatment. PMID:23220880

  4. Novel Somatic Mutation in LEMD3 Splice Site Results in Buschke-Ollendorff Syndrome with Polyostotic Melorheostosis and Osteopoikilosis.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Cooper, Kevin D; Mitchell, Anna L; Cohn, Heather I

    2015-01-01

    Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by loss of function in LEMD3, resulting in connective tissue nevi and varying bone dysplasia. Although typically benign, we describe a novel LEMD3 splice site mutation (IVS12 + 1delG) in a 13-year-old boy with Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome presenting with severe skeletal deformities, polyostotic melorheostosis, and osteopoikilosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Novel splice site mutations and a large deletion in three patients with the cblF inborn error of vitamin B12 metabolism.

    PubMed

    Miousse, Isabelle R; Watkins, David; Rosenblatt, David S

    2011-04-01

    The cblF disorder, characterized by accumulation of internalized cobalamin in the lysosome, is caused by mutations in the LMBRD1 gene which encodes an integral lysosomal membrane protein. We describe novel mutations in LMBRD1 in three patients: two splice site mutations, c.916-1G>T and c.1339-1G>T, and a 6785 bp deletion encompassing exon 2, c.70-4298_246+2311del6785. The three patients are compound heterozygotes for one novel mutation and the common c.1056delG mutation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Suppressor Mutations for Presenilin 1 Familial Alzheimer Disease Mutants Modulate γ-Secretase Activities.

    PubMed

    Futai, Eugene; Osawa, Satoko; Cai, Tetsuo; Fujisawa, Tomoya; Ishiura, Shoichi; Tomita, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    γ-Secretase is a multisubunit membrane protein complex containing presenilin (PS1) as a catalytic subunit. Familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) mutations within PS1 were analyzed in yeast cells artificially expressing membrane-bound substrate, amyloid precursor protein, or Notch fused to Gal4 transcriptional activator. The FAD mutations, L166P and G384A (Leu-166 to Pro and Gly-384 to Ala substitution, respectively), were loss-of-function in yeast. We identified five amino acid substitutions that suppress the FAD mutations. The cleavage of amyloid precursor protein or Notch was recovered by the secondary mutations. We also found that secondary mutations alone activated the γ-secretase activity. FAD mutants with suppressor mutations, L432M or S438P within TMD9 together with a missense mutation in the second or sixth loops, regained γ-secretase activity when introduced into presenilin null mouse fibroblasts. Notably, the cells with suppressor mutants produced a decreased amount of Aβ42, which is responsible for Alzheimer disease. These results indicate that the yeast system is useful to screen for mutations and chemicals that modulate γ-secretase activity.

  7. Suppressor Mutations for Presenilin 1 Familial Alzheimer Disease Mutants Modulate γ-Secretase Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Futai, Eugene; Osawa, Satoko; Cai, Tetsuo; Fujisawa, Tomoya; Ishiura, Shoichi; Tomita, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    γ-Secretase is a multisubunit membrane protein complex containing presenilin (PS1) as a catalytic subunit. Familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) mutations within PS1 were analyzed in yeast cells artificially expressing membrane-bound substrate, amyloid precursor protein, or Notch fused to Gal4 transcriptional activator. The FAD mutations, L166P and G384A (Leu-166 to Pro and Gly-384 to Ala substitution, respectively), were loss-of-function in yeast. We identified five amino acid substitutions that suppress the FAD mutations. The cleavage of amyloid precursor protein or Notch was recovered by the secondary mutations. We also found that secondary mutations alone activated the γ-secretase activity. FAD mutants with suppressor mutations, L432M or S438P within TMD9 together with a missense mutation in the second or sixth loops, regained γ-secretase activity when introduced into presenilin null mouse fibroblasts. Notably, the cells with suppressor mutants produced a decreased amount of Aβ42, which is responsible for Alzheimer disease. These results indicate that the yeast system is useful to screen for mutations and chemicals that modulate γ-secretase activity. PMID:26559975

  8. A targeted mutation at the known collagenase cleavage site in mouse type I collagen impairs tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Degradation of type I collagen, the most abundant collagen, is initiated by collagenase cleavage at a highly conserved site between Gly775 and Ile776 of the alpha 1 (I) chain. Mutations at or around this site render type I collagen resistant to collagenase digestion in vitro. We show here that mice carrying a collagenase-resistant mutant Col1a-1 transgene die late in embryo-genesis, ascribable to overexpression of the transgene, since the same mutation introduced into the endogenous Col1a-1 gene by gene targeting permitted normal development of mutant mice to young adulthood. With increasing age, animals carrying the targeted mutation developed marked fibrosis of the dermis similar to that in human scleroderma. Postpartum involution of the uterus in the mutant mice was also impaired, with persistence of collagenous nodules in the uterine wall. Although type I collagen from the homozygous mutant mice was resistant to cleavage by human or rat fibroblast collagenases at the helical site, only the rat collagenase cleaved collagen trimers at an additional, novel site in the nonhelical N-telopeptide domain. Our results suggest that cleavage by murine collagenase at the N-telopeptide site could account for resorption of type I collagen during embryonic and early adult life. During intense collagen resorption, however, such as in the immediate postpartum uterus and in the dermis later in life, cleavage at the helical site is essential for normal collagen turnover. Thus, type I collagen is degraded by at least two differentially controlled mechanisms involving collagenases with distinct, but overlapping, substrate specificities. PMID:7790374

  9. Targetable activating mutations are very frequent in GCB and ABC diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bohers, Elodie; Mareschal, Sylvain; Bouzelfen, Abdelilah; Marchand, Vinciane; Ruminy, Philippe; Maingonnat, Catherine; Ménard, Anne-Lise; Etancelin, Pascaline; Bertrand, Philippe; Dubois, Sydney; Alcantara, Marion; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2014-02-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive and heterogeneous malignancy that can be divided in two major subgroups, germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) and activated B-cell-like (ABC). Activating mutations of genes involved in the BCR and NF-κB pathways (CD79A, CD79B, MYD88, and CARD11) or in epigenetic regulation (EZH2) have been recently reported, preferentially in one of the two DLBCL subtypes. We analyzed the mutational status of these five recurrently mutated genes in a cohort of 161 untreated de novo DLBCL. Overall, 93 mutations were detected, in 61 (38%) of the patients. The L265P MYD88 mutation was the most frequent MYD88 variant (n = 18), observed exclusively in the ABC subtype. CD79A/CD79B ITAM domains were targeted in ABC DLBCL (12/77; 16%), whereas CARD11 mutations were equally distributed in the two subtypes. The EZH2 Y641 substitution was found almost exclusively in the GCB subgroup (15/62; 24%). Twenty cases (12%) displayed two activating mutations, including the most frequent CD79/MYD88 variants combination (n = 8) which is observed exclusively in the ABC subtype. When considering only ABC DLBCL patients treated by rituximab plus chemotherapy, the presence of an activating NF-κB mutation was associated with an unfavorable outcome (3-years OS 26% for mutated cases versus 67% for the cases without mutations, P = 0.0337). Our study demonstrates that activating and targetable mutations are observed at a very high frequency in DLBCL at the time of diagnosis, indicating that sequencing of a limited number of genes could help tailor an optimal treatment strategy in DLBCL. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  11. Late-onset spastic paraplegia: Aberrant SPG11 transcripts generated by a novel splice site donor mutation.

    PubMed

    Kawarai, Toshitaka; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Mori, Atsuko; Oki, Ryosuke; Tsukamoto-Miyashiro, Ai; Matsui, Naoko; Miyazaki, Yoshimichi; Orlacchio, Antonio; Izumi, Yuishin; Nishida, Yoshihiko; Kaji, Ryuji

    2015-12-15

    We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the splice site donor (SSD) of intron 30 (c.5866+1G>A) in consanguineous Japanese SPG11 siblings showing late-onset spastic paraplegia using the whole-exome sequencing. Phenotypic variability was observed, including age-at-onset, dysarthria and pes cavus. Coding DNA sequencing revealed that the mutation affected the recognition of the constitutive SSD of intron 30, splicing upstream onto a nearby cryptic SSD in exon 30. The use of constitutive splice sites of intron 29 was confirmed by sequencing. The mutant transcripts are mostly subject to degradation by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay system. SPG11 transcripts, escaping from the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway, would generate a truncated protein (p.Tyr1900Phefs5X) containing the first 1899 amino acids and followed by 4 aberrant amino acids. This study showed a successful clinical application of whole-exome sequencing in spastic paraplegia and demonstrated a further evidence of allelic heterogeneity in SPG11. The confirmation of aberrant transcript by splice site mutation is a prerequisite for a more precise molecular diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mutation of the Sp1 binding site in the 5′ flanking region of SRY causes sex reversal in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Deng, Jichao; Chen, Mao; Yuan, Lin; Lu, Yi; Xu, Yuxin; Yao, Haobin; Li, Zhanjun; Lai, Liangxue

    2017-01-01

    Sex-determining region Y is a crucial gene that initiates male sex determination in mammals. Mutations of the Sp1-binding site in the 5′ flanking region of SRY are associated with clinical male-to-female sex reversal syndrome, although such occurrences are rare and, until now, have not been reported in animal models. In this study, we mutated Sp1-binding sites in the 5′ flanking region of the rabbit SRY gene using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. As expected, the SRY-Sp1 knockout rabbits had female external and internal genitalia and exhibited normal female copulatory behaviors, but they were infertile, and the adults displayed reduced follicles. Interestingly, we successfully obtained offspring from sex-reversed SRY-Sp1 knockout rabbits using embryo transfer. In summary, our study demonstrates that Sp1 is a major regulator in SRY gene transcription, and mutations of the Sp1 binding sites (Sp1-B and Sp1-C) in the 5′ flanking region of SRY induce sex reversal in rabbits, which can be used as targets for clinical research of male-to-female sex reversal syndrome. Additionally, we provide the first evidence that sex reversal syndrome patients have the potential to become pregnant with the use of embryo transfer. PMID:28445127

  13. G2385R and I2020T Mutations Increase LRRK2 GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jihoon; Joe, Eun-hye; Son, Ilhong; Seol, Wongi

    2016-01-01

    The LRRK2 mutation is a major causal mutation in familial Parkinson's disease. Although LRRK2 contains functional GTPase and kinase domains and their activities are altered by pathogenic mutations, most studies focused on LRRK2 kinase activity because the most prevalent mutant, G2019S, enhances kinase activity. However, the G2019S mutation is extremely rare in the Asian population. Instead, the G2385R mutation was reported as a major risk factor in the Asian population. Similar to other LRRK2 studies, G2385R studies have also focused on kinase activity. Here, we investigated GTPase activities of G2385R with other LRRK2 mutants, such as G2019S, R1441C, and I2020T, as well as wild type (WT). Our results suggest that both I2020T and G2385R contain GTPase activities stronger than that of WT. A kinase assay using the commercial recombinant proteins showed that I2020T harbored stronger activity, whereas G2385R had weaker activity than that of WT, as reported previously. This is the first report of LRRK2 I2020T and G2385R GTPase activities and shows that most of the LRRK2 mutations that are pathogenic or a risk factor altered either kinase or GTPase activity, suggesting that their physiological consequences are caused by altered enzyme activities. PMID:27314038

  14. Sudden infant death syndrome and activating GNAS1 gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Román, Rossana; López, Patricia; Johnson, María Cecilia; Boric, María Angélica; Gallo, Miriam; Ponce, Carolina; Vargas, Sergio; Codner, Ethel; Cassorla, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    GNAS1 gene mutations cause the McCune-Albright syndrome. Some patients may develop unusual, severe, nonendocrine manifestations that may lead to death. We postulate that some cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) might be caused by GNAS1 gene mutations affecting vital organs. We studied two GNAS1 gene mutations (R201H and R201C) by allele specific PCR and enzymatic digestion in pulmonary, pancreas, liver, kidney, and heart tissue from 29 infants who suffered SIDS. The infants died at age 96 +/- 78 days. At the time of death, children had a height Z score of -0,04 +/- 0,95, a weight Z score of 0,04 +/- 0,91, and a weight for length Z score of 0,1 +/- 0,83. The molecular study by both techniques did not reveal any GNAS1 mutations in the tissues examined. We conclude that GNAS1 gene mutations do not appear to be present in tissues of infants with SIDS.

  15. ALS herbicide resistance mutations in Raphanus raphanistrum: evaluation of pleiotropic effects on vegetative growth and ALS activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei; Yu, Qin; Han, Heping; Vila-Aiub, Martin; Powles, Stephen B

    2013-06-01

    Gene mutations that endow herbicide resistance may cause pleiotropic effects on plant ecology and physiology. This paper reports on the effect of a number of known and novel target-site resistance mutations of the ALS gene (Ala-122-Tyr, Pro-197-Ser, Asp-376-Glu or Trp-574-Leu) on vegetative growth traits of the weed Raphanus raphanistrum. The results from a series of experiments have indicated that none of these ALS resistance mutations imposes negative pleiotropic effects on relative growth rate (RGR), photosynthesis and resource-competitive ability in R. raphanistrum plants. The absence of pleiotropic effects on plant growth occurs in spite of increased (Ala-122-Tyr, Pro-197-Ser, Asp-376-Glu) and decreased (Trp-574-Leu) extractable ALS activity. The absence of detrimental pleiotropic effects on plant growth associated with the ALS target-site resistance mutations reported here is a contributing factor in resistance alleles being at relatively high frequencies in ALS-herbicide-unselected R. raphanistrum populations. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Importance of the Active Site "Canopy" Residues in an O2-Tolerant [NiFe]-Hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Brooke, Emily J; Evans, Rhiannon M; Islam, Shams T A; Roberts, Gerri M; Wehlin, Sara A M; Carr, Stephen B; Phillips, Simon E V; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2017-01-10

    The active site of Hyd-1, an oxygen-tolerant membrane-bound [NiFe]-hydrogenase from Escherichia coli, contains four highly conserved residues that form a "canopy" above the bimetallic center, closest to the site at which exogenous agents CO and O2 interact, substrate H2 binds, and a hydrido intermediate is stabilized. Genetic modification of the Hyd-1 canopy has allowed the first systematic and detailed kinetic and structural investigation of the influence of the immediate outer coordination shell on H2 activation. The central canopy residue, arginine 509, suspends a guanidine/guanidinium side chain at close range above the open coordination site lying between the Ni and Fe atoms (N-metal distance of 4.4 Å): its replacement with lysine lowers the H2 oxidation rate by nearly 2 orders of magnitude and markedly decreases the H2/D2 kinetic isotope effect. Importantly, this collapse in rate constant can now be ascribed to a very unfavorable activation entropy (easily overriding the more favorable activation enthalpy of the R509K variant). The second most important canopy residue for H2 oxidation is aspartate 118, which forms a salt bridge to the arginine 509 headgroup: its mutation to alanine greatly decreases the H2 oxidation efficiency, observed as a 10-fold increase in the potential-dependent Michaelis constant. Mutations of aspartate 574 (also salt-bridged to R509) to asparagine and proline 508 to alanine have much smaller effects on kinetic properties. None of the mutations significantly increase sensitivity to CO, but neutralizing the expected negative charges from D118 and D574 decreases O2 tolerance by stabilizing the oxidized resting Ni(III)-OH state ("Ni-B"). An extensive model of the catalytic importance of residues close to the active site now emerges, whereby a conserved gas channel culminates in the arginine headgroup suspended above the Ni and Fe.

  17. Computational study on the roles of amino acid residues in the active site formation mechanism of blue-light photoreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryuma; Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji; Yamato, Takahisa

    2015-07-01

    To examine the functional roles of the active site methionine (M-site) and glutamic acid (E-site) residues of blue-light photoreceptors, we performed in silico mutation at the M-site in a systematic manner and focused on the hydrogen bonding between the E-site and the substrate: the cyclobutane-pyrimidine dimer (CPD). Fragment molecular orbital calculations with electron correlations demonstrated that substitution of the M-site methionine with either alanine or glutamine always destabilizes the interaction energy between the E-site and the CPD by more than 12.0 kcal/mol, indicating that the methionine and glutamic acid residues cooperatively facilitate the enzymatic reaction in the active site.

  18. pH-sensitive CDP-diglyceride synthetase mutants of Escherichia coli: phenotypic suppression by mutations at a second site.

    PubMed Central

    Ganong, B R; Raetz, C R

    1983-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, mutations which lower the level of CDP-diglyceride synthetase are designated cds and map at min 4. The cds-8 mutation resulted in strikingly defective enzyme activity and also rendered cells pH sensitive for growth. Both the inhibition of growth and the massive accumulation of phosphatidic acid which occur in a cds-8 mutant at pH 8 were suppressed by mutations at a second locus, designated cdsS, which mapped between argG and gltB near min 68. The cdsS3 mutation by itself did not affect CDP-diglyceride synthetase activity in wild-type cells, but it caused a twofold stimulation of the residual activity present in strains harboring cds-8. Both the insensitivity to pH and the twofold stimulation of residual activity were lost by introduction of an F' strain carrying cdsS+ into a recA1 cds-8 cdsS3 host. When a culture of a cds-8 cdsS+ strain was shifted to pH 8, the residual specific activity of synthetase dropped by 75% within 100 min. In a cds-8 cdsS3 double mutant under the same conditions, the activity declined appreciably less, about to the level found in the cds-8 cdsS+ strain under permissive conditions (pH 6). Thus, it appears that mutations in the cdsS gene suppress the pH sensitivity of cds mutants by inhibiting the decay of residual CDP-diglyceride synthetase activity at the nonpermissive pH. The cdsS locus appears to be distinct from any known nonsense or missense suppressor. PMID:6296051

  19. Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood mutations have a differential effect on Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and ouabain binding.

    PubMed

    Weigand, Karl M; Messchaert, Muriël; Swarts, Herman G P; Russel, Frans G M; Koenderink, Jan B

    2014-07-01

    De novo mutations in ATP1A3, the gene encoding the α3-subunit of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, are associated with the neurodevelopmental disorder Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood (AHC). The aim of this study was to determine the functional consequences of six ATP1A3 mutations (S137Y, D220N, I274N, D801N, E815K, and G947R) associated with AHC. Wild type and mutant Na(+),K(+)-ATPases were expressed in Sf9 insect cells using the baculovirus expression system. Ouabain binding, ATPase activity, and phosphorylation were absent in mutants I274N, E815K and G947R. Mutants S137Y and D801N were able to bind ouabain, although these mutants lacked ATPase activity, phosphorylation, and the K(+)/ouabain antagonism indicative of modifications in the cation binding site. Mutant D220N showed similar ouabain binding, ATPase activity, and phosphorylation to wild type Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Functional impairment of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in mutants S137Y, I274N, D801N, E815K, and G947R might explain why patients having these mutations suffer from AHC. Moreover, mutant D801N is able to bind ouabain, whereas mutant E815K shows a complete loss of function, possibly explaining the different phenotypes for these mutations.

  20. Somatic mutations in p85α promote tumorigenesis through class IA PI3K activation

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Bijay S.; Janakiraman, Vasantharajan; Kljavin, Noelyn M.; Chaudhuri, Subhra; Stern, Howard M.; Wang, Weiru; Kan, Zhengyan; Dbouk, Hashem A.; Peters, Brock A.; Waring, Paul; Vega, Trisha Dela; Kenski, Denise M.; Bowman, Krista; Lorenzo, Maria; Li, Hong; Wu, Jiansheng; Modrusan, Zora; Stinson, Jeremy; Eby, Michael; Yue, Peng; Kaminker, Josh; de Sauvage, Frederic J.; Backer, Jonathan M.; Seshagiri, Somasekar

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Members of the mammalian phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K) family of proteins are critical regulators of various cellular process including cell survival, growth, proliferation and motility. Oncogenic activating mutations in the p110α catalytic subunit of the heterodimeric p110/p85 PI3K enzyme are frequent in human cancers. Here we show the presence of frequent mutations in p85α in colon cancer, a majority of which occurs in the inter-Src homology-2 (iSH2) domain. These mutations uncouple and retain p85α's p110-stabilizing activity, while abrogating its p110-inhibitory activity. The p85α mutants promote cell survival, Akt activation, anchorage independent cell growth, and oncogenesis in a p110-dependent manner. SIGNIFICANCE Somatic mutations in the catalytic p110α subunit of PI3K are common in cancers. In this study, we show the occurrence of frequent mutations in the regulatory p85α subunit of PI3K in human cancers. Our data demonstrate an alternate mechanism for PI3K-pathway activation and oncogenesis resulting from the impaired regulation of p110 activity by mutant p85α. Further, p85α mutations are likely to be useful as diagnostic markers for identification of p110-dependent tumors that may not carry an activating p110α mutation, but are candidates for targeted treatment with PI3K pathway inhibitors that are in development. PMID:19962665

  1. Binding Site of Macrolide Antibiotics on the Ribosome: New Resistance Mutation Identifies a Specific Interaction of Ketolides with rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Xiong, Liqun; Zhong, Ping; Mankin, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Macrolides represent a clinically important class of antibiotics that block protein synthesis by interacting with the large ribosomal subunit. The macrolide binding site is composed primarily of rRNA. However, the mode of interaction of macrolides with rRNA and the exact location of the drug binding site have yet to be described. A new class of macrolide antibiotics, known as ketolides, show improved activity against organisms that have developed resistance to previously used macrolides. The biochemical reasons for increased potency of ketolides remain unknown. Here we describe the first mutation that confers resistance to ketolide antibiotics while leaving cells sensitive to other types of macrolides. A transition of U to C at position 2609 of 23S rRNA rendered E. coli cells resistant to two different types of ketolides, telithromycin and ABT-773, but increased slightly the sensitivity to erythromycin, azithromycin, and a cladinose-containing derivative of telithromycin. Ribosomes isolated from the mutant cells had reduced affinity for ketolides, while their affinity for erythromycin was not diminished. Possible direct interaction of ketolides with position 2609 in 23S rRNA was further confirmed by RNA footprinting. The newly isolated ketolide-resistance mutation, as well as 23S rRNA positions shown previously to be involved in interaction with macrolide antibiotics, have been modeled in the crystallographic structure of the large ribosomal subunit. The location of the macrolide binding site in the nascent peptide exit tunnel at some distance from the peptidyl transferase center agrees with the proposed model of macrolide inhibitory action and explains the dominant nature of macrolide resistance mutations. Spatial separation of the rRNA residues involved in universal contacts with macrolides from those believed to participate in structure-specific interactions with ketolides provides the structural basis for the improved activity of the broader spectrum group of

  2. Clinical activity of regorafenib in PDGFRA-mutated gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Grellety, Thomas; Kind, Michèle; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Italiano, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most frequent mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract and one of the most frequent sarcoma. Mutually exclusive KIT and PDGFRA mutations are central events in GIST pathogenesis, and their understanding is crucial because specific treatment targeting oncogenic KIT and PDGFRA activation (especially imatinib) has become available. The most frequent PDGFRA mutation (D842V) is associated with primary resistance to imatinib. Data related to regorafenib efficacy in PDGFRA-mutated GIST are lacking. We report here a case report of a prolonged response with regorafenib in a patient with a PDGFRA-mutated GIST. PMID:28031906

  3. Clinical activity of regorafenib in PDGFRA-mutated gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Grellety, Thomas; Kind, Michèle; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Italiano, Antoine

    2015-11-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most frequent mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract and one of the most frequent sarcoma. Mutually exclusive KIT and PDGFRA mutations are central events in GIST pathogenesis, and their understanding is crucial because specific treatment targeting oncogenic KIT and PDGFRA activation (especially imatinib) has become available. The most frequent PDGFRA mutation (D842V) is associated with primary resistance to imatinib. Data related to regorafenib efficacy in PDGFRA-mutated GIST are lacking. We report here a case report of a prolonged response with regorafenib in a patient with a PDGFRA-mutated GIST.

  4. Do founder mutations characteristic of some cancer sites also predispose to pancreatic cancer?

    PubMed

    Lener, Marcin R; Scott, Rodney J; Kluźniak, Wojciech; Baszuk, Piotr; Cybulski, Cezary; Wiechowska-Kozłowska, Anna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Kładny, Józef; Pietrzak, Sandra; Soluch, Agnieszka; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the etiology and risk of pancreatic cancer (PaCa) is still poorly understood. This study evaluated the prevalence of 10 Polish founder mutations in four genes among PaCa patients and assessed their possible association with the risk of disease in Poland. In the study 383 PaCa patients and 4,000 control subjects were genotyped for founder mutations in: BRCA1 (5382insC, 4153delA, C61G), CHEK2 (1100delC, IVS2 + 1G > A, del5395, I157T), NBS1 (657del5) and PALB2 (509_510delGA, 172_175delTTGT). A statistically significant association between the 657del5 mutation and an increased risk of pancreatic cancer was observed for NBS1 gene. The Slavic NBS1 gene mutation (657delACAAA) was detected in 8 of 383 (2.09%) unselected cases compared with 22 of 4,000 (0.55%) controls (OR: 3.80, p = 0.002). The PALB2 509_510delGA and 172_175delTTGT mutations combined were seen in 2 (0.52%) unselected cases of PaCa and in 8 (0.20%) of 4,000 controls (OR: 2.61, p = 0.49). For BRCA1, the three mutations combined were detected in 4 of 383 (1.04%) PaCa patients and in 17 of 4,000 (0.42%) controls (OR: 2.46, p = 0.20). CHEK2 mutations were not associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.11, p = 0.72). The founder mutation in NBS1 (657del5) was associated with an increased risk of PaCa in heterozygous carriers, indicating that this mutation appears to predispose to cancer of the pancreas. By identifying pancreatic cancer risk groups, founder mutation testing in Poland should be considered for people at risk for PaCa. © 2016 UICC.

  5. The Ribotoxin Restrictocin Recognizes Its RNA Substrate by Selective Engagement of Active Site Residues

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Restrictocin and related fungal endoribonucleases from the α-sarcin family site-specifically cleave the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) on the ribosome to inhibit translation and ultimately trigger cell death. Previous studies showed that the SRL folds into a bulged-G motif and tetraloop, with restrictocin achieving a specificity of ∼1000-fold by recognizing both motifs only after the initial binding step. Here, we identify contacts within the protein−RNA interface and determine the extent to which each one contributes to enzyme specificity by examining the effect of protein mutations on the cleavage of the SRL substrate compared to a variety of other RNA substrates. As with other biomolecular interfaces, only a subset of contacts contributes to specificity. One contact of this subset is critical, with the H49A mutation resulting in quantitative loss of specificity. Maximum catalytic activity occurs when both motifs of the SRL are present, with the major contribution involving the bulged-G motif recognized by three lysine residues located adjacent to the active site: K110, K111, and K113. Our findings support a kinetic proofreading mechanism in which the active site residues H49 and, to a lesser extent, Y47 make greater catalytic contributions to SRL cleavage than to suboptimal substrates. This systematic and quantitative analysis begins to elucidate the principles governing RNA recognition by a site-specific endonuclease and may thus serve as a mechanistic model for investigating other RNA modifying enzymes. PMID:21417210

  6. Gene mutation in microRNA target sites of CFTR gene: a novel pathogenetic mechanism in cystic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Amato, Felice; Seia, Manuela; Giordano, Sonia; Elce, Ausilia; Zarrilli, Federica; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Tomaiuolo, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent lethal genetic disorder among Caucasians. It depends on alterations of a chloride channel expressed by most epithelial cells and encoded by CFTR gene. Also using scanning techniques to analyze the whole coding regions of CFTR gene, mutations are not identified in up to 10% of CF alleles, and such figure increases in CFTR-related disorders (CFTR-RD). Other gene regions may be the site of causing-disease mutations. We searched for genetic variants in the 1500 bp of CFTR 3' untranslated region, typical target of microRNA (miRNA) posttranscriptional gene regulation, in either CF patients with the F508del homozygous genotype and different clinical expression (n = 20), CF (n = 32) and CFTR-RD (n = 43) patients with one or none mutation after CFTR scanning and in controls (n = 50). We identified three SNPs, one of which, the c.*1043A>C, was located in a region predicted to bind miR-433 and miR-509-3p. Such mutation was peculiar of a CFTR-RD patient that had Congenital Bilateral Absence of Vas Deferens (CBAVD), diffuse bronchiectasis, a borderline sweat chloride test and the heterozygous severe F508del mutation on the other allele. The expression analysis demonstrated that the c.*1043A>C increases the affinity for miR-509-3p and slightly decreases that for the miR-433. Both miRNAs cause in vitro a reduced expression of CFTR protein. Thus, the c.*1043A>C may act as a mild CFTR mutation enhancing the affinity for inhibitory miRNAs as a novel pathogenetic mechanism in CF.

  7. The three Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85 isoforms have unique substrates and activities determined by non-active site regions.

    PubMed

    Backus, Keriann M; Dolan, Michael A; Barry, Conor S; Joe, Maju; McPhie, Peter; Boshoff, Helena I M; Lowary, Todd L; Davis, Benjamin G; Barry, Clifton E

    2014-09-05

    The three isoforms of antigen 85 (A, B, and C) are the most abundant secreted mycobacterial proteins and catalyze transesterification reactions that synthesize mycolated arabinogalactan, trehalose monomycolate (TMM), and trehalose dimycolate (TDM), important constituents of the outermost layer of the cellular envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These three enzymes are nearly identical at the active site and have therefore been postulated to exist to evade host immunity. Distal to the active site is a second putative carbohydrate-binding site of lower homology. Mutagenesis of the three isoforms at this second site affected both substrate selectivity and overall catalytic activity in vitro. Using synthetic and natural substrates, we show that these three enzymes exhibit unique selectivity; antigen 85A more efficiently mycolates TMM to form TDM, whereas C (and to a lesser extent B) has a higher rate of activity using free trehalose to form TMM. This difference in substrate selectivity extends to the hexasaccharide fragment of cell wall arabinan. Mutation of secondary site residues from the most active isoform (C) into those present in A or B partially interconverts this substrate selectivity. These experiments in combination with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that differences in the N-terminal helix α9, the adjacent Pro(216)-Phe(228) loop, and helix α5 are the likely cause of changes in activity and substrate selectivity. These differences explain the existence of three isoforms and will allow for future work in developing inhibitors. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Mutations in Nature Conferred a High Affinity Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate-binding Site in Vertebrate Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qiong-Yao; Larry, Trevor; Hendra, Kalen; Yamamoto, Erica; Bell, Jessica; Cui, Meng; Logothetis, Diomedes E.; Boland, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    All vertebrate inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels are activated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) (Logothetis, D. E., Petrou, V. I., Zhang, M., Mahajan, R., Meng, X. Y., Adney, S. K., Cui, M., and Baki, L. (2015) Annu. Rev. Physiol. 77, 81–104; Fürst, O., Mondou, B., and D'Avanzo, N. (2014) Front. Physiol. 4, 404–404). Structural components of a PIP2-binding site are conserved in vertebrate Kir channels but not in distantly related animals such as sponges and sea anemones. To expand our understanding of the structure-function relationships of PIP2 regulation of Kir channels, we studied AqKir, which was cloned from the marine sponge Amphimedon queenslandica, an animal that represents the phylogenetically oldest metazoans. A requirement for PIP2 in the maintenance of AqKir activity was examined in intact oocytes by activation of a co-expressed voltage-sensing phosphatase, application of wortmannin (at micromolar concentrations), and activation of a co-expressed muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. All three mechanisms to reduce the availability of PIP2 resulted in inhibition of AqKir current. However, time-dependent rundown of AqKir currents in inside-out patches could not be re-activated by direct application to the inside membrane surface of water-soluble dioctanoyl PIP2, and the current was incompletely re-activated by the more hydrophobic arachidonyl stearyl PIP2. When we introduced mutations to AqKir to restore two positive charges within the vertebrate PIP2-binding site, both forms of PIP2 strongly re-activated the mutant sponge channels in inside-out patches. Molecular dynamics simulations validate the additional hydrogen bonding potential of the sponge channel mutants. Thus, nature's mutations conferred a high affinity activation of vertebrate Kir channels by PIP2, and this is a more recent evolutionary development than the structures that explain ion channel selectivity and inward rectification. PMID:25957411

  9. Alternative Selection of β-Site APP-Cleaving Enzyme 1 (BACE1) Cleavage Sites in Amyloid β-Protein Precursor (APP) Harboring Protective and Pathogenic Mutations within the Aβ Sequence.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ayano; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2016-11-11

    β-Site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) cleaves amyloid β-protein precursor (APP) at the bond between Met(671) and Asp(672) (β-site) to generate the carboxyl-terminal fragment (CTFβ/C99). BACE1 also cleaves APP at another bond between Thr(681) and Gln(682) (β'-site), yielding CTFβ'/C89. Cleavage of CTFβ/C99 by γ-secretase generates Aβ(1-XX), whereas cleavage of CTFβ'/C89 generates Aβ(11-XX). Thus, β'-site cleavage by BACE1 is amyloidolytic rather than amyloidogenic. β' cleavage of mouse APP is more common than the corresponding cleavage of human APP. We found that the H684R substitution within human Aβ, which replaces the histidine in the human protein with the arginine found at the corresponding position in mouse, facilitated β' cleavage irrespective of the species origin of BACE1, thereby significantly increasing the level of Aβ(11-XX) and decreasing the level of Aβ(1-XX). Thus, amino acid substitutions within the Aβ sequence influenced the selectivity of alternative β- or β'-site cleavage of APP by BACE1. In familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), the APP gene harbors pathogenic variations such as the Swedish (K670N/M671L), Leuven (E682K), and A673V mutations, all of which decrease Aβ(11-40) generation, whereas the protective Icelandic mutation (A673T) increases generation of Aβ(11-40). Thus, A673T promotes β' cleavage of APP and protects subjects against AD. In addition, CTFβ/C99 was cleaved by excess BACE1 activity to generate CTFβ'/C89, followed by Aβ(11-40), even if APP harbored pathogenic mutations. The resultant Aβ(11-40) was more metabolically labile in vivo than Aβ(1-40). Our analysis suggests that some FAD mutations in APP are amyloidogenic and/or amyloidolytic via selection of alternative BACE1 cleavage sites.

  10. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  12. Novel Mutation Sites in the Development of Vancomycin- Intermediate Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yubing; Li, Xiaoli; Jiang, Libo; Han, Wentao; Xie, Xiangming; Jin, Yi; He, Xiaoqing; Wu, Rongling

    2017-01-01

    Increased use of vancomycin has led to the emergence of vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA). To investigate the mechanism of VISA development, 39 methicillin-susceptible strains and 3 MRSA strains were treated with vancomycin to induce non-susceptibility, and mutations in six genes were analyzed. All the strains were treated with vancomycin in vitro for 60 days. MICs were determined by the agar dilution and E-test methods. Vancomycin was then removed to assess the stability of VISA strains and mutations. Following 60 days of vancomycin treatment in vitro, 29/42 VISA strains were generated. The complete sequences of rpoB, vraS, graR, graS, walK, and walR were compared with those in the parental strains. Seven missense mutations including four novel mutations (L466S in rpoB, R232K in graS, I594M in walk, and A111T in walR) were detected frequently in strains with vancomycin MIC ≥ 12 μg/mL. Jonckheere-Terpstra trend test indicated these mutations might play an important role during VISA evolution. After the vancomycin treatment, strains were passaged to vancomycin-free medium for another 60 days, and the MICs of all strains decreased. Our results suggest that rpoB, graS, walk, and walR are more important than vraS and graR in VISA development. PMID:28119680

  13. Antigen-binding site anatomy and somatic mutations in antibodies that recognize different types of antigens.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Gopalan; Smart, Jason; Williams, Joseph; Almagro, Juan Carlos

    2012-03-01

    The number of antibody structures co-crystallized with their respective antigens has increased rapidly in the last few years, thus offering a formidable source of information to gain insight into the structure-function relationships of this family of proteins. We have analyzed here 140 unique middle-resolution to high-resolution (<3 Å) antibody structures, including 55 in complex with proteins, 39 with peptides, and 46 with haptens. We determined (i) length variations of the hypervariable loops, (ii) number of contacts with antigen, (iii) solvent accessible area buried upon binding, (iv) location and frequency of antigen contacting residues, (v) type of residues interacting with antigens, and (vi) putative somatic mutations. Except for somatic mutations, distinctive profiles were identified for all the variables analyzed. Compared with contacts, somatic mutations occurred with less abundance at any given position and extended beyond the regions in contact, with no clear difference among antibodies that recognize different types of antigens. This observation is consistent with the fact that although antigen recognition accomplished by shape and physicochemical complementarity is selective in nature, the somatic mutation process is stochastic and selection for mutations leading to improved affinity is not directly related to contact residues. Thus, the knowledge emerging from this study enhances our understanding of the structure-function relationship in antibodies while providing valuable guidance to design libraries for antibody discovery and optimization. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  15. A single splice site mutation in human-specific ARHGAP11B causes basal progenitor amplification

    PubMed Central

    Florio, Marta; Namba, Takashi; Pääbo, Svante; Hiller, Michael; Huttner, Wieland B.

    2016-01-01

    The gene ARHGAP11B promotes basal progenitor amplification and is implicated in neocortex expansion. It arose on the human evolutionary lineage by partial duplication of ARHGAP11A, which encodes a Rho guanosine triphosphatase–activating protein (RhoGAP). However, a lack of 55 nucleotides in ARHGAP11B mRNA leads to loss of RhoGAP activity by GAP domain truncation and addition of a human-specific carboxy-terminal amino acid sequence. We show that these 55 nucleotides are deleted by mRNA splicing due to a single C→G substitution that creates a novel splice donor site. We reconstructed an ancestral ARHGAP11B complementary DNA without this substitution. Ancestral ARHGAP11B exhibits RhoGAP activity but has no ability to increase basal progenitors during neocortex development. Hence, a single nucleotide substitution underlies the specific properties of ARHGAP11B that likely contributed to the evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex. PMID:27957544

  16. Characterisation of three novel splice site mutations in introns 11, 18 and 30 of the NF-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Purandare, S.M.; Lanyon, W.G.; Arngrimsson, R.

    1994-09-01

    Identification and characterization of germline mutations within the NF-1 gene was carried out in 25 unrelated NF-1 patients, in whom we have detected three splice site mutations which cause exon skipping. Our detection strategy incorporated both RNA and DNA as templates for PCR, chemical mismatch cleavage and direct sequencing. The first mutation was detected in the splice donor sequence of intron 11 (1721+3A{r_arrow}G), which results in the skipping of exon 11 and causes a shift in the translational reading frame and the creation of a premature stop codon at position 560. This is predicted to result in the synthesis of a shorter protein product of 559 amino acids instead of 2818, with loss of the NF-1 GAP related domain. The patient is a familial case of NF-1 with neurological complications and no evidence of malignancy. She has an affected son who has inherited the same mutation and has skeletal complications. The second mutation was detected at the splice donor site in intron 18 (3113+1G{r_arrow}A) and caused the skipping of exon 18. This did not cause a shift in the reading frame but resulted in the exclusion of 41 amino acids from the predicted protein product and was seen in a familial case of NF-1 with neurological complications. The third mutation, at the splice donor site in intron 30 (5749+2T{r_arrow}G), caused the skipping of exon 30, shifting the translational reading frame and creating a premature stop codon at position 1851. The predicted protein product is reduced from the normal 2818 to 1850 amino acids. This patient is a sporadic case of NF-1, has neurological and skeletal complications and no evidence of malignancy. Thus in our analysis of 25 patients, the strategy of using RT-PCR to amplify the NF-1 cDNA greatly facilitated the detection of these errors of splicing, each of which is predicted to cause a major distruption of the protein product neurofibromin.

  17. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  18. Cavity filling mutations at the thyroxine-binding site dramatically increase transthyretin stability and prevent its aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Ricardo; Almeida, Maria Rosário; Varejāo, Nathalia; Gallego, Pablo; Esperante, Sebastian; Ferreira, Priscila; Pereira-Henriques, Alda; Palhano, Fernando L.; de Carvalho, Mamede; Foguel, Debora; Reverter, David; Saraiva, Maria João; Ventura, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    More than a hundred different Transthyretin (TTR) mutations are associated with fatal systemic amyloidoses. They destabilize the protein tetrameric structure and promote the extracellular deposition of TTR as pathological amyloid fibrils. So far, only mutations R104H and T119M have been shown to stabilize significantly TTR, acting as disease suppressors. We describe a novel A108V non-pathogenic mutation found in a Portuguese subject. This variant is more stable than wild type TTR both in vitro and in human plasma, a feature that prevents its aggregation. The crystal structure of A108V reveals that this stabilization comes from novel intra and inter subunit contacts involving the thyroxine (T4) binding site. Exploiting this observation, we engineered a A108I mutation that fills the T4 binding cavity, as evidenced in the crystal structure. This synthetic protein becomes one of the most stable TTR variants described so far, with potential application in gene and protein replacement therapies. PMID:28338000

  19. The influence of allosteric modulators and transmembrane mutations on desensitisation and activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Chatzidaki, Anna; D'Oyley, Jarryl M; Gill-Thind, JasKiran K; Sheppard, Tom D; Millar, Neil S

    2015-10-01

    Acetylcholine activates nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by binding at an extracellular orthosteric site. Previous studies have described several positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that are selective for homomeric α7 nAChRs. These include type I PAMs, which exert little or no effect on the rate of receptor desensitisation, and type II PAMs, which cause a dramatic loss of agonist-induced desensitisation. Here we report evidence that transmembrane mutations in α7 nAChRs have diverse effects on receptor activation and desensitisation by allosteric ligands. It has been reported previously that the L247T mutation, located toward the middle of the second transmembrane domain (at the 9' position), confers reduced levels of desensitisation. In contrast, the M260L mutation, located higher up in the TM2 domain (at the 22' position), does not show any difference in desensitisation compared to wild-type receptors. We have found that in receptors containing the L247T mutation, both type I PAMs and type II PAMs are converted into non-desensitising agonists. In contrast, in receptors containing the M260L mutation, this effect is seen only with type II PAMs. These findings, indicating that the M260L mutation has a selective effect on type II PAMs, have been confirmed both with previously described PAMs and also with a series of novel α7-selective PAMs. The novel PAMs examined in this study have close chemical similarity but diverse pharmacological properties. For example, they include compounds displaying effects on receptor desensitisation that are typical of classical type I and type II PAMs but, in addition, they include compounds with intermediate properties.

  20. A cohort study of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy and high prevalence of splice site IVS11+1G>A mutation in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jiao; Qian, Ping; Li, Hui; Wu, Ye; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Zhixian

    2015-12-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the ALDH7A1 gene. We aimed to analyze the relations between the clinical diagnosis and treatment of PDE and ALDH7A1 gene mutations in Chinese PDE patients. The clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment were observed in a cohort of PDE patients with early onset of seizure. Video-electroencephalogram (VEEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. The mutation of ALDH7A1 gene was analyzed. Of eight patients, six were males and two were females. Age of seizure onset ranged from 1 to 100 days and 75% patients presented with seizures in the neonatal period. All patients showed different degrees of developmental delay. EEGs showed focal or multifocal discharges, or were normal. Molecular analysis revealed 10 ALDH7A1 mutations, including 2 splice site mutations. Five patients had mutation at IVS11+1G>A site, six patients had missense mutations, one with nonsense mutation and another patient had 9-bp genomic deletion mutation. Among them, two mutations were first time reported. Seizure onset was in neonatal or early infantile period in our PDE patients. Early recognition and diagnosis of the disease is necessary for early intervention and improve cognitive development in the later life. In this study, on the molecular level, we also identified the splice site mutation IVS11+1G>A as a high prevalence mutation site with a frequency of 31.25% (5 of 16 alleles) in Chinese PDE patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of mutated, activated BRAF in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Keith T; Puzanov, Igor; Kim, Kevin B; Ribas, Antoni; McArthur, Grant A; Sosman, Jeffrey A; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Lee, Richard J; Grippo, Joseph F; Nolop, Keith; Chapman, Paul B

    2010-08-26

    The identification of somatic mutations in the gene encoding the serine-threonine protein kinase B-RAF (BRAF) in the majority of melanomas offers an opportunity to test oncogene-targeted therapy for this disease. We conducted a multicenter, phase 1, dose-escalation trial of PLX4032 (also known as RG7204), an orally available inhibitor of mutated BRAF, followed by an extension phase involving the maximum dose that could be administered without adverse effects (the recommended phase 2 dose). Patients received PLX4032 twice daily until they had disease progression. Pharmacokinetic analysis and tumor-response assessments were conducted in all patients. In selected patients, tumor biopsy was performed before and during treatment to validate BRAF inhibition. A total of 55 patients (49 of whom had melanoma) were enrolled in the dose-escalation phase, and 32 additional patients with metastatic melanoma who had BRAF with the V600E mutation were enrolled in the extension phase. The recommended phase 2 dose was 960 mg twice daily, with increases in the dose limited by grade 2 or 3 rash, fatigue, and arthralgia. In the dose-escalation cohort, among the 16 patients with melanoma whose tumors carried the V600E BRAF mutation and who were receiving 240 mg or more of PLX4032 twice daily, 10 had a partial response and 1 had a complete response. Among the 32 patients in the extension cohort, 24 had a partial response and 2 had a complete response. The estimated median progression-free survival among all patients was more than 7 months. Treatment of metastatic melanoma with PLX4032 in patients with tumors that carry the V600E BRAF mutation resulted in complete or partial tumor regression in the majority of patients. (Funded by Plexxikon and Roche Pharmaceuticals.)

  2. Inhibition of Mutated, Activated BRAF in Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Keith T.; Puzanov, Igor; Kim, Kevin B.; Ribas, Antoni; McArthur, Grant A.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Lee, Richard J.; Grippo, Joseph F.; Nolop, Keith; Chapman, Paul B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The identification of somatic mutations in the gene encoding the serine–threonine protein kinase B-RAF (BRAF) in the majority of melanomas offers an opportunity to test oncogene-targeted therapy for this disease. Methods We conducted a multicenter, phase 1, dose-escalation trial of PLX4032 (also known as RG7204), an orally available inhibitor of mutated BRAF, followed by an extension phase involving the maximum dose that could be administered without adverse effects (the recommended phase 2 dose). Patients received PLX4032 twice daily until they had disease progression. Pharmacokinetic analysis and tumor-response assessments were conducted in all patients. In selected patients, tumor biopsy was performed before and during treatment to validate BRAF inhibition. Results A total of 55 patients (49 of whom had melanoma) were enrolled in the dose-escalation phase, and 32 additional patients with metastatic melanoma who had BRAF with the V600E mutation were enrolled in the extension phase. The recommended phase 2 dose was 960 mg twice daily, with increases in the dose limited by grade 2 or 3 rash, fatigue, and arthralgia. In the dose-escalation cohort, among the 16 patients with melanoma whose tumors carried the V600E BRAF mutation and who were receiving 240 mg or more of PLX4032 twice daily, 10 had a partial response and 1 had a complete response. Among the 32 patients in the extension cohort, 24 had a partial response and 2 had a complete response. The estimated median progression-free survival among all patients was more than 7 months. Conclusions Treatment of metastatic melanoma with PLX4032 in patients with tumors that carry the V600E BRAF mutation resulted in complete or partial tumor regression in the majority of patients. (Funded by Plexxikon and Roche Pharmaceuticals.) PMID:20818844

  3. Characterization of the Glycosylation Site of Human PSA Prompted by Missense Mutation using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Song, Ehwang; Hu, Yunli; Hussein, Ahmed; Yu, Chuan-Yih; Tang, Haixu; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-07-02

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a diagnostic biomarker for prostate cancer. It is a glycoprotein possessing a single glycosylation site at N69. During our previous study of PSA N69 glycosylation, additional glycopeptides were observed in the PSA sample that were not previously reported and did not match glycopeptides of impure glycoproteins existing in the sample. This extra glycosylation site of PSA is associated with a mutation in KLK3 genes. Among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of KLKs families, the rs61752561 in KLK3 genes is an unusual missense mutation resulting in the conversion of D102 to N in PSA amino acid sequence. Accordingly, a new N-linked glycosylation site is created with an N102MS motif. Here we report the first qualitative and quantitative glycoproteomic study of PSA N102 glycosylation site by LC-MS/MS. We successfully applied tandem MS to verify the amino acid sequence possessing N102 glycosylation site and associated glycoforms of PSA samples acquired from different suppliers. Among the three PSA samples, HexNAc2Hex5 was the predominant glycoform at N102, while HexNAc4Hex5Fuc1NeuAc1 or HexNAc4Hex5Fuc1NeuAc2 was the primary glycoforms at N69. D102 is the first amino acid of "kallikrein loop", which is close to a zinc-binding site and catalytic triad. The different glycosylation of N102 relative to N69 might be influenced by the close vicinity of N102 to these functional sites and steric hindrance.

  4. GNA11 and N-RAS mutations: alternatives for MAPK pathway activating GNAQ mutations in primary melanocytic tumours of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Gessi, M; Hammes, J; Lauriola, L; Dörner, E; Kirfel, J; Kristiansen, G; zur Muehlen, A; Denkhaus, D; Waha, A; Pietsch, T

    2013-06-01

    Primary melanocytic tumours are uncommon neoplasms of the central nervous system. Although similarities with uveal melanomas have been hypothesized, data on their molecular features are limited. In this study, we investigated the mutational status of BRAF(V600E) , KIT, GNAQ, GNA11, N-RAS and H-RAS in a series of 19 primary melanocytic tumours of the central nervous system (CNS). We identified six cases harbouring mutations in the hotspot codon 209 of the GNAQ gene and two cases with mutations in the hotspot codon 209 of the GNA11 gene. Two mutations in codon 61 of N-RAS were also found. In the single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, no shifts corresponding to BRAF(V600E) mutations or suggesting activating mutations in the KIT gene were observed. In primary melanocytic tumours of the CNS, GNA11 and N-RAS mutations represent a mechanism of MAPK pathway activation alternative to the common GNAQ mutations. On the other hand, BRAF(V600E) mutations and activating KIT mutations seem to be absent or very rare in these tumours. © 2012 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology © 2012 British Neuropathological Society.

  5. Characterization of a splice-site mutation in the tumor suppressor gene FLCN associated with renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bartram, Malte P; Mishra, Tripti; Reintjes, Nadine; Fabretti, Francesca; Gharbi, Hakam; Adam, Alexander C; Göbel, Heike; Franke, Mareike; Schermer, Bernhard; Haneder, Stefan; Benzing, Thomas; Beck, Bodo B; Müller, Roman-Ulrich

    2017-05-12

    Renal cell carcinoma is among the most prevalent malignancies. It is generally sporadic. However, genetic studies of rare familial forms have led to the identification of mutations in causative genes such as VHL and FLCN. Mutations in the FLCN gene are the cause of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, a rare tumor syndrome which is characterized by the combination of renal cell carcinoma, pneumothorax and skin tumors. Using Sanger sequencing we identify a heterozygous splice-site mutation in FLCN in lymphocyte DNA of a patient suffering from renal cell carcinoma. Furthermore, both tumor DNA and DNA from a metastasis are analyzed regarding this mutation. The pathogenic effect of the sequence alteration is confirmed by minigene assays and the biochemical consequences on the protein are examined using TALEN-mediated transgenesis in cultured cells. Here we describe an FLCN mutation in a 55-year-old patient who presented himself with progressive weight loss, bilateral kidney cysts and renal tumors. He and members of his family had a history of recurrent pneumothorax during the