Science.gov

Sample records for active site protonation

  1. Long-distance proton transfer with a break in the bacteriorhodopsin active site.

    PubMed

    Phatak, Prasad; Frähmcke, Jan S; Wanko, Marius; Hoffmann, Michael; Strodel, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C; Suhai, Sándor; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Elstner, Marcus

    2009-05-27

    Bacteriorhodopsin is a proton-pumping membrane protein found in the plasma membrane of the archaeon Halobacterium salinarium. Light-induced isomerization of the retinal chromophore from all-trans to 13-cis leads to a sequence of five conformation-coupled proton transfer steps and the net transport of one proton from the cytoplasmic to the extracellular side of the membrane. The mechanism of the long-distance proton transfer from the primary acceptor Asp85 to the extracellular proton release group during the O --> bR is poorly understood. Experiments suggest that this long-distance transfer could involve a transient state [O] in which the proton resides on the intermediate carrier Asp212. To assess whether the transient protonation of Asp212 participates in the deprotonation of Asp85, we performed hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics proton transfer calculations using different protein structures and with different retinal geometries and active site water molecules. The structural models were assessed by computing UV-vis excitation energies and C=O vibrational frequencies. The results indicate that a transient [O] conformer with protonated Asp212 could indeed be sampled during the long-distance proton transfer to the proton release group. Our calculations suggest that, in the starting proton transfer state O, the retinal is strongly twisted and at least three water molecules are present in the active site.

  2. Key Role of Active-Site Water Molecules in Bacteriorhodopsin Proton-Transfer Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, A.N.; Baudry, Jerome Y; Suhai, Sandor; Fischer, S.; Smith, Jeremy C

    2008-10-01

    The functional mechanism of the light-driven proton pump protein bacteriorhodopsin depends on the location of water molecules in the active site at various stages of the photocycle and on their roles in the proton-transfer steps. Here, free energy computations indicate that electrostatic interactions favor the presence of a cytoplasmic-side water molecule hydrogen bonding to the retinal Schiff base in the state preceding proton transfer from the retinal Schiff base to Asp85. However, the nonequilibrium nature of the pumping process means that the probability of occupancy of a water molecule in a given site depends both on the free energies of insertion of the water molecule in this and other sites during the preceding photocycle steps and on the kinetic accessibility of these sites on the time scale of the reaction steps. The presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule has a dramatic effect on the mechanism of proton transfer: the proton is channeled on the Thr89 side of the retinal, whereas the transfer on the Asp212 side is hindered. Reaction-path simulations and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of the cytoplasmic-side water molecule permits a low-energy bacteriorhodopsin conformer in which the water molecule bridges the twisted retinal Schiff base and the proton acceptor Asp85. From this low-energy conformer, proton transfer occurs via a concerted mechanism in which the water molecule participates as an intermediate proton carrier.

  3. The controlled relay of multiple protons required at the active site of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2012-07-07

    The enzyme nitrogenase, when reducing natural and unnatural substrates, requires large numbers of protons per chemical catalytic cycle. The active face of the catalytic site (the FeMo-cofactor, FeMo-co) is situated in a protein domain which is largely hydrophobic and anhydrous, and incapable of serial provision of multiple protons. Through detailed analysis of the high quality protein crystal structures available the characteristics of a chain of water molecules leading from the protein surface to a key sulfur atom (S3B) of FeMo-co are described. The first half of the water chain from the surface inwards is branched, slightly variable, and able to accommodate exogenous small molecules: this is dubbed the proton bay. The second half, from the proton bay to S3B, is comprised of a single chain of eight hydrogen bonded water molecules. This section is strictly conserved, and is intimately involved in hydrogen bonds with homocitrate, an essential component that chelates Mo. This is the proton wire, and a detailed Grotthuss mechanism for serial translocation of protons through this proton wire to S3B is proposed. This controlled serial proton relay from the protein surface to S3B is an essential component of the intramolecular hydrogenation paradigm for the complete chemical mechanisms of nitrogenase. Each proton reaching S3B, instigated by electron transfer to FeMo-co, becomes a hydrogen atom that migrates to other components of the active face of FeMo-co and to bound substrates and intermediates, allowing subsequent multiple proton transfers along the proton wire. Experiments to test the proposed mechanism of proton supply are suggested. The water chain in nitrogenase is comparable with the purported proton pumping pathway of cytochrome c oxidase.

  4. The cytochrome ba3 oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus uses a single input channel for proton delivery to the active site and for proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Yang; Hemp, James; Chen, Ying; Fee, James A; Gennis, Robert B

    2009-09-22

    The heme-copper oxygen reductases are redox-driven proton pumps that generate a proton motive force in both prokaryotes and mitochondria. These enzymes have been divided into 3 evolutionarily related groups: the A-, B- and C-families. Most experimental work on proton-pumping mechanisms has been performed with members of the A-family. These enzymes require 2 proton input pathways (D- and K-channels) to transfer protons used for oxygen reduction chemistry and for proton pumping, with the D-channel transporting all pumped protons. In this work we use site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that the ba(3) oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus, a representative of the B-family, does not contain a D-channel. Rather, it utilizes only 1 proton input channel, analogous to that of the A-family K-channel, and it delivers protons to the active site for both O2 chemistry and proton pumping. Comparison of available subunit I sequences reveals that the only structural elements conserved within the oxygen reductase families that could perform these functions are active-site components, namely the covalently linked histidine-tyrosine, the Cu(B) and its ligands, and the active-site heme and its ligands. Therefore, our data suggest that all oxygen reductases perform the same chemical reactions for oxygen reduction and comprise the essential elements of the proton-pumping mechanism (e.g., the proton-loading and kinetic-gating sites). These sites, however, cannot be located within the D-channel. These results along with structural considerations point to the A-propionate region of the active-site heme and surrounding water molecules as the proton-loading site.

  5. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    equivalents and protons are funneled into non-productive pathways. This is similar to previous work with other P450 catalyzed hydroxylation. However, catalysis of carbon–carbon bond scission by the T306A mutant was largely unimpeded by disruption of the CYP17A1 acid-alcohol pair. The unique response of CYP17A1 lyase activity to mutation of Thr306 is consistent with a reactive intermediate formed independently of proton delivery in the active site, and supports involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion rather than the traditional Compound I in catalysis.

  6. Protonation of the binuclear active site in cytochrome c oxidase decreases the reduction potential of CuB.

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Margareta R A; Siegbahn, Per E M

    2015-10-01

    One of the remaining mysteries regarding the respiratory enzyme cytochrome c oxidase is how proton pumping can occur in all reduction steps in spite of the low reduction potentials observed in equilibrium titration experiments for two of the active site cofactors, CuB(II) and Fea3(III). It has been speculated that, at least the copper cofactor can acquire two different states, one metastable activated state occurring during enzyme turnover, and one relaxed state with lower energy, reached only when the supply of electrons stops. The activated state should have a transiently increased CuB(II) reduction potential, allowing proton pumping. The relaxed state should have a lower reduction potential, as measured in the titration experiments. However, the structures of these two states are not known. Quantum mechanical calculations show that the proton coupled reduction potential for CuB is inherently high in the active site as it appears after reaction with oxygen, which explains the observed proton pumping. It is suggested here that, when the flow of electrons ceases, a relaxed resting state is formed by the uptake of one extra proton, on top of the charge compensating protons delivered in each reduction step. The extra proton in the active site decreases the proton coupled reduction potential for CuB by almost half a volt, leading to agreement with titration experiments. Furthermore, the structure for the resting state with an extra proton is found to have a hydroxo-bridge between CuB(II) and Fea3(III), yielding a magnetic coupling that can explain the experimentally observed EPR silence.

  7. The pathway for serial proton supply to the active site of nitrogenase: enhanced density functional modeling of the Grotthuss mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2015-11-07

    Nitrogenase contains a well defined and conserved chain of water molecules leading to the FeMo cofactor (FeMo-co, an [Fe7MoCS9] cluster with bidentate chelation of Mo by homocitrate) that is the active site where N2 and other substrates are sequentially hydrogenated using multiple protons and electrons. The function of this chain is proposed to be a proton wire, serially translocating protons to triply-bridging S3B of FeMo-co, where, concomitant with electron transfer to FeMo-co, an H atom is generated on S3B. Density functional simulations of this proton translocation mechanism are reported here, using a large 269-atom model that includes all residues hydrogen bonded to and surrounding the water chain, and likely to influence proton transfer: three carboxylate O atoms of obligatory homocitrate are essential. The mechanism involves the standard two components of the Grotthuss mechanism, namely H atom slides that shift H3O(+) from one water site to the next, and HOH molecular rotations that convert backward (posterior) OH bonds in the water chain to forward (anterior) OH bonds. The topography of the potential energy surface for each of these steps has been mapped. H atom slides pass through very short (ca. 2.5 Å) O-H-O hydrogen bonds, while HOH rotations involve the breaking of O-HO hydrogen bonds, and the occurrence of long (up to 3.6 Å) separations between contiguous water molecules. Both steps involve low potential energy barriers, <7 kcal mol(-1). During operation of the Grotthuss mechanism in nitrogenase there are substantial displacements of water molecules along the chain, occurring as ripples. These characteristics of the 'Grotthuss two-step', coupled with a buffering ability of two carboxylate O atoms of homocitrate, and combined with density functional characterisation of the final proton slide from the ultimate water molecule to S3B (including electron addition), have been choreographed into a complete mechanism for serial hydrogenation of FeMo-co. The

  8. Active-Site Protonation States in an Acyl-Enzyme Intermediate of a Class A β-Lactamase with a Monobactam Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Cooper, Jonathan B.; Ginell, Stephan L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The monobactam antibiotic aztreonam is used to treat cystic fibrosis patients with chronic pulmonary infections colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains expressing CTX-M extended-spectrum β-lactamases. The protonation states of active-site residues that are responsible for hydrolysis have been determined previously for the apo form of a CTX-M β-lactamase but not for a monobactam acyl-enzyme intermediate. Here we used neutron and high-resolution X-ray crystallography to probe the mechanism by which CTX-M extended-spectrum β-lactamases hydrolyze monobactam antibiotics. In these first reported structures of a class A β-lactamase in an acyl-enzyme complex with aztreonam, we directly observed most of the hydrogen atoms (as deuterium) within the active site. Although Lys 234 is fully protonated in the acyl intermediate, we found that Lys 73 is neutral. These findings are consistent with Lys 73 being able to serve as a general base during the acylation part of the catalytic mechanism, as previously proposed. PMID:27795378

  9. Relocation of active site carboxylates in major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter LmrP reveals plasticity in proton interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Asha V.; Singh, Himansha; Raturi, Sagar; Neuberger, Arthur; Tong, Zhen; Ding, Ning; Agboh, Kelvin; van Veen, Hendrik W.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of polyspecific membrane transporters is one important mechanism by which cells can obtain resistance to structurally different antibiotics and cytotoxic agents. These transporters reduce intracellular drug concentrations to subtoxic levels by mediating drug efflux across the cell envelope. The major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter LmrP from Lactococcus lactis catalyses drug efflux in a membrane potential and chemical proton gradient-dependent fashion. To enable the interaction with protons and cationic substrates, LmrP contains catalytic carboxyl residues on the surface of a large interior chamber that is formed by transmembrane helices. These residues co-localise together with polar and aromatic residues, and are predicted to be present in two clusters. To investigate the functional role of the catalytic carboxylates, we generated mutant proteins catalysing membrane potential-independent dye efflux by removing one of the carboxyl residues in Cluster 1. We then relocated this carboxyl residue to six positions on the surface of the interior chamber, and tested for restoration of wildtype energetics. The reinsertion at positions towards Cluster 2 reinstated the membrane potential dependence of dye efflux. Our data uncover a remarkable plasticity in proton interactions in LmrP, which is a consequence of the flexibility in the location of key residues that are responsible for proton/multidrug antiport. PMID:27917857

  10. Characterizing the proton loading site in cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianxun; Gunner, M R

    2014-08-26

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) uses the energy released by reduction of O2 to H2O to drive eight charges from the high pH to low pH side of the membrane, increasing the electrochemical gradient. Four electrons and protons are used for chemistry, while four more protons are pumped. Proton pumping requires that residues on a pathway change proton affinity through the reaction cycle to load and then release protons. The protonation states of all residues in CcO are determined in MultiConformational Continuum Electrostatics simulations with the protonation and redox states of heme a, a3, Cu(B), Y288, and E286 used to define the catalytic cycle. One proton is found to be loaded and released from residues identified as the proton loading site (PLS) on the P-side of the protein in each of the four CcO redox states. Thus, the same proton pumping mechanism can be used each time CcO is reduced. Calculations with structures of Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Paracoccus denitrificans, and bovine CcO derived by crystallography and molecular dynamics show the PLS functions similarly in different CcO species. The PLS is a cluster rather than a single residue, as different structures show 1-4 residues load and release protons. However, the proton affinity of the heme a3 propionic acids primarily determines the number of protons loaded into the PLS; if their proton affinity is too low, less than one proton is loaded.

  11. Probing the Protonation State and the Redox-Active Sites of Pendant Base Iron(II) and Zinc(II) Pyridinediimine Complexes.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Mayra; Sommer, Samantha K; Swanson, Seth P; Berger, Robert F; Seda, Takele; Zakharov, Lev N; Gilbertson, John D

    2015-08-03

    Utilizing the pyridinediimine ligand [(2,6-(i)PrC6H3)N═CMe)(N((i)Pr)2C2H4)N═CMe)C5H3N] (didpa), the zinc(II) and iron(II) complexes Zn(didpa)Cl2 (1), Fe(didpa)Cl2 (2), [Zn(Hdidpa)Cl2][PF6] (3), [Fe(Hdidpa)Cl2][PF6] (4), Zn(didpa)Br2 (5), and [Zn(Hdidpa)Br2][PF6] (6), Fe(didpa)(CO)2 (7), and [Fe(Hdidpa)(CO)2][PF6] (8) were synthesized and characterized. These complexes allowed for the study of the secondary coordination sphere pendant base and the redox-activity of the didpa ligand scaffold. The protonated didpa ligand is capable of forming metal halogen hydrogen bonds (MHHBs) in complexes 3, 4, and 6. The solution behavior of the MHHBs was probed via pKa measurements and (1)H NMR titrations of 3 and 6 with solvents of varying H-bond accepting strength. The H-bond strength in 3 and 6 was calculated in silico to be 5.9 and 4.9 kcal/mol, respectively. The relationship between the protonation state and the ligand-based redox activity was probed utilizing 7 and 8, where the reduction potential of the didpa scaffold was found to shift by 105 mV upon protonation of the reduced ligand in Fe(didpa)(CO)2.

  12. Di/mono-nuclear iron(I)/(II) complexes as functional models for the 2Fe2S subunit and distal Fe moiety of the active site of [FeFe] hydrogenases: protonations, molecular structures and electrochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang; Fan, Jiangli; Sun, Shiguo; Song, Fengling; Peng, Xiaojun; Duan, Qian; Jiang, Dayong; Liang, Qingcheng

    2012-10-21

    Di/mono-nuclear iron(I)/(II) complexes containing conjugated and electron-withdrawing S-to-S linkers, [{(μ-S)(2)(C(4)N(2)H(2))}Fe(2)(CO)(6)] (1), [{(μ-S)(2)(C(4)N(2)H(2))}Fe(2)(CO)(5)(PMe(3))] (1P), and [{(μ-S)(2)(C(4)N(2)H(2))}Fe(CO)(2)(PMe(3))(2)] (2) were prepared as biomimetic models for the 2Fe2S subunit and distal Fe moiety of the active site of [FeFe] hydrogenases. The N atoms in the heterocyclic pyrazines of 1 and 2 were protonated in the presence of proton acid to generate one and two hydrides, [1(NH)](+) CF(3)SO(3)(-), [2(NH)](+) CF(3)SO(3)(-), and [2(NH)(2)](2+) (CF(3)SO(3)(-))(2), respectively. The protonation processes were evidenced by in situ IR and NMR spectroscopy. The molecular structures of the protonated species [1(NH)](+) CF(3)SO(3)(-) and [2(NH)(2)](2+) (CF(3)SO(3)(-))(2) together with their originating complexes and , and the mono-PMe(3) substituted diiron complex were identified by X-ray crystallography. The IR and single-crystal analysis data all suggested that the electron-withdrawing bridge, pyrazine, led to decreased electron density at the Fe centers of the model complexes, which was consistent with the electrochemical studies. The cyclic voltammograms indicated that complex exhibited a low primary reduction potential at -1.17 V vs. Fc-Fc(+) with a 270 mV positive shift compared with that of the benzene-1,2-dithiolate (bdt) bridged analogue [(μ-bdt)Fe(2)(CO)(6)]. Under the weak acid conditions, complexes 1 and 2 could electrochemically catalyze the proton reduction. More interestingly, the mononuclear ferrous complex 2 showed two catalytic peaks during the formation of hydrogen, confirming its potential as a catalyst for hydrogen production.

  13. Protonation of kanamycin A: detailing of thermodynamics and protonation sites assignment.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Martínez, Yanet; Godoy-Alcántar, Carolina; Medrano, Felipe; Dikiy, Alexander; Yatsimirsky, Anatoly K

    2010-08-01

    Protonation of an aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A sulfate was studied by potentiometric titrations at variable ionic strength, sulfate concentration and temperature. From these results the association constants of differently protonated forms of kanamycin A with sulfate and enthalpy changes for protonation of each amino group were determined. The protonation of all amino groups of kanamycin A is exothermic, but the protonation enthalpy does not correlate with basicity as in a case of simple polyamines. The sites of stepwise protonation of kanamycin A have been assigned by analysis of (1)H-(13)C-HSQC spectra at variable pH in D(2)O. Plots of chemical shifts for each H and C atom of kanamycin A vs. pH were fitted to the theoretical equation relating them to pK(a) values of ionogenic groups and it was observed that changes in chemical shifts of all atoms in ring C were controlled by ionization of a single amino group with pK(a) 7.98, in ring B by ionization of two amino groups with pK(a) 6.61 and 8.54, but in ring A all atoms felt ionization of one group with pK(a) 9.19 and some atoms felt ionization of a second group with pK(a) 6.51, which therefore should belong to amino group at C3 in ring B positioned closer to the ring A while higher pK(a) 8.54 can be assigned to the group at C1. This resolves the previously existed uncertainty in assignment of protonation sites in rings B and C.

  14. Feasibility of proton-activated implantable markers for proton range verification using PET

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Gillin, Michael; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Titt, Uwe; Paganetti, Harald; Kerr, Matthew; Mawlawi, Osama

    2014-01-01

    Proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) currently relies on proton activation of tissue, the products of which decay with a short half-life and necessitate an on-site PET scanner. Tissue activation is, however, negligible near the distal dose fall-off region of the proton beam range due to their high interaction energy thresholds. Therefore Monte Carlo simulation is often supplemented for comparison with measurement; however, this also may be associated with systematic and statistical uncertainties. Therefore, we sought to test the feasibility of using long-lived proton-activated external materials that are inserted or infused into the target volume for more accurate proton beam range verification that could be performed at an off-site PET scanner. We irradiated samples of ≥98% 18O-enriched water, natural Cu foils, and ≥97% 68Zn-enriched foils as candidate materials, along with samples of tissue-equivalent materials including 16O water, heptane (C7H16), and polycarbonate (C16H14O3)n, at 4 depths (ranging from 100% to 3% of center of modulation (COM) dose) along the distal fall-off of a modulated 160-MeV proton beam. Samples were irradiated either directly or after being embedded in Plastic Water® or balsa wood. We then measured the activity of the samples using PET imaging for 20 or 30 min after various delay times. Measured activities of candidate materials were up to 100 times greater than those of the tissue-equivalent materials at the 4 distal dose fall-off depths. The differences between candidate materials and tissue-equivalent materials became more apparent after longer delays between irradiation and PET imaging, due to the longer half-lives of the candidate materials. Furthermore, the activation of the candidate materials closely mimicked the distal dose fall-off with offsets of 1 to 2 mm. Also, signals from the foils were clearly visible compared to the background from the activated Plastic Water® and balsa wood

  15. Feasibility of proton-activated implantable markers for proton range verification using PET.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Gillin, Michael; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Titt, Uwe; Paganetti, Harald; Kerr, Matthew; Mawlawi, Osama

    2013-11-07

    Proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) currently relies on proton activation of tissue, the products of which decay with a short half-life and necessitate an on-site PET scanner. Tissue activation is, however, negligible near the distal dose fall-off region of the proton beam range due to their high interaction energy thresholds. Therefore Monte Carlo simulation is often supplemented for comparison with measurement; however, this also may be associated with systematic and statistical uncertainties. Therefore, we sought to test the feasibility of using long-lived proton-activated external materials that are inserted or infused into the target volume for more accurate proton beam range verification that could be performed at an off-site PET scanner. We irradiated samples of ≥98% (18)O-enriched water, natural Cu foils, and >97% (68)Zn-enriched foils as candidate materials, along with samples of tissue-equivalent materials including (16)O water, heptane (C7H16), and polycarbonate (C16H14O3)n, at four depths (ranging from 100% to 3% of center of modulation (COM) dose) along the distal fall-off of a modulated 160 MeV proton beam. Samples were irradiated either directly or after being embedded in Plastic Water® or balsa wood. We then measured the activity of the samples using PET imaging for 20 or 30 min after various delay times. Measured activities of candidate materials were up to 100 times greater than those of the tissue-equivalent materials at the four distal dose fall-off depths. The differences between candidate materials and tissue-equivalent materials became more apparent after longer delays between irradiation and PET imaging, due to the longer half-lives of the candidate materials. Furthermore, the activation of the candidate materials closely mimicked the distal dose fall-off with offsets of 1 to 2 mm. Also, signals from the foils were clearly visible compared to the background from the activated Plastic Water

  16. Long-range electrostatics-induced two-proton transfer captured by neutron crystallography in an enzyme catalytic site

    DOE PAGES

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; ...

    2016-03-09

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other asparticmore » proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level.« less

  17. Long-range electrostatics-induced two-proton transfer captured by neutron crystallography in an enzyme catalytic site

    SciTech Connect

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; Shen, Chen -Hsiang; Parks, Jerry M.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Weiss, Kevin L.; Keen, David A.; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Louis, John M.; Langan, Paul; Weber, Irene T.; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2016-03-09

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other aspartic proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level.

  18. Measurement and verification of positron emitter nuclei generated at each treatment site by target nuclear fragment reactions in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji; Ogino, Takashi; Saijo, Nagahiro; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to verify the characteristics of the positron emitter nuclei generated at each treatment site by proton irradiation. Methods: Proton therapy using a beam on-line PET system mounted on a rotating gantry port (BOLPs-RGp), which the authors developed, is provided at the National Cancer Center Kashiwa, Japan. BOLPs-RGp is a monitoring system that can confirm the activity distribution of the proton irradiated volume by detection of a pair of annihilation gamma rays coincidentally from positron emitter nuclei generated by the target nuclear fragment reactions between irradiated proton nuclei and nuclei in the human body. Activity is measured from a start of proton irradiation to a period of 200 s after the end of the irradiation. The characteristics of the positron emitter nuclei generated in a patient's body were verified by the measurement of the activity distribution at each treatment site using BOLPs-RGp. Results: The decay curves for measured activity were able to be approximated using two or three half-life values regardless of the treatment site. The activity of half-life value of about 2 min was important for a confirmation of the proton irradiated volume. Conclusions: In each proton treatment site, verification of the characteristics of the generated positron emitter nuclei was performed by using BOLPs-RGp. For the monitoring of the proton irradiated volume, the detection of {sup 15}O generated in a human body was important.

  19. Activation and Proton Transport Mechanism in Influenza A M2 Channel

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chenyu; Pohorille, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories 2 μs in length have been generated for the pH-activated, tetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus in all protonation states of the pH sensor located at the His37 tetrad. All simulated structures are in very good agreement with high-resolution structures. Changes in the channel caused by progressive protonation of His37 provide insight into the mechanism of proton transport. The channel is closed at both His37 and Trp41 sites in the singly and doubly protonated states, but it opens at Trp41 upon further protonation. Anions access the charged His37 and by doing so stabilize the protonated states of the channel. The narrow opening at the His37 site, further blocked by anions, is inconsistent with the water-wire mechanism of proton transport. Instead, conformational interconversions of His37 correlated with hydrogen bonding to water molecules indicate that these residues shuttle protons in high-protonation states. Hydrogen bonds between charged and uncharged histidines are rare. The valve at Val27 remains on average quite narrow in all protonation states but fluctuates sufficiently to support water and proton transport. A proton transport mechanism in which the channel, depending on pH, opens at either the histidine or valine gate is only partially supported by the simulations. PMID:24209848

  20. X-ray-induced catalytic active-site reduction of a multicopper oxidase: structural insights into the proton-relay mechanism and O2-reduction states

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Centeno-Leija, Sara; Rojas-Trejo, Sonia Patricia; Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Stojanoff, Vivian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    During X-ray data collection from a multicopper oxidase (MCO) crystal, electrons and protons are mainly released into the system by the radiolysis of water molecules, leading to the X-ray-induced reduction of O2 to 2H2O at the trinuclear copper cluster (TNC) of the enzyme. In this work, 12 crystallographic structures of Thermus thermophilus HB27 multicopper oxidase (Tth-MCO) in holo, apo and Hg-bound forms and with different X-ray absorbed doses have been determined. In holo Tth-MCO structures with four Cu atoms, the proton-donor residue Glu451 involved in O2 reduction was found in a double conformation: Glu451a (∼7 Å from the TNC) and Glu451b (∼4.5 Å from the TNC). A positive peak of electron density above 3.5σ in an F o − F c map for Glu451a O∊2 indicates the presence of a carboxyl functional group at the side chain, while its significant absence in Glu451b strongly suggests a carboxylate functional group. In contrast, for apo Tth-MCO and in Hg-bound structures neither the positive peak nor double conformations were observed. Together, these observations provide the first structural evidence for a proton-relay mechanism in the MCO family and also support previous studies indicating that Asp106 does not provide protons for this mechanism. In addition, eight composite structures (Tth-MCO-C1–8) with different X-ray-absorbed doses allowed the observation of different O2-reduction states, and a total depletion of T2Cu at doses higher than 0.2 MGy showed the high susceptibility of this Cu atom to radiation damage, highlighting the importance of taking radiation effects into account in biochemical interpretations of an MCO structure. PMID:26627648

  1. X-ray-induced catalytic active-site reduction of a multicopper oxidase: structural insights into the proton-relay mechanism and O2-reduction states.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Centeno-Leija, Sara; Rojas-Trejo, Sonia Patricia; Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Stojanoff, Vivian; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    During X-ray data collection from a multicopper oxidase (MCO) crystal, electrons and protons are mainly released into the system by the radiolysis of water molecules, leading to the X-ray-induced reduction of O2 to 2H2O at the trinuclear copper cluster (TNC) of the enzyme. In this work, 12 crystallographic structures of Thermus thermophilus HB27 multicopper oxidase (Tth-MCO) in holo, apo and Hg-bound forms and with different X-ray absorbed doses have been determined. In holo Tth-MCO structures with four Cu atoms, the proton-donor residue Glu451 involved in O2 reduction was found in a double conformation: Glu451a (∼7 Å from the TNC) and Glu451b (∼4.5 Å from the TNC). A positive peak of electron density above 3.5σ in an Fo - Fc map for Glu451a O(ℇ2) indicates the presence of a carboxyl functional group at the side chain, while its significant absence in Glu451b strongly suggests a carboxylate functional group. In contrast, for apo Tth-MCO and in Hg-bound structures neither the positive peak nor double conformations were observed. Together, these observations provide the first structural evidence for a proton-relay mechanism in the MCO family and also support previous studies indicating that Asp106 does not provide protons for this mechanism. In addition, eight composite structures (Tth-MCO-C1-8) with different X-ray-absorbed doses allowed the observation of different O2-reduction states, and a total depletion of T2Cu at doses higher than 0.2 MGy showed the high susceptibility of this Cu atom to radiation damage, highlighting the importance of taking radiation effects into account in biochemical interpretations of an MCO structure.

  2. List 9 - Active CERCLIS Sites:

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The List 9 displays the sequence of activities undertaken at active CERCLIS sites. An active site is one at which site assessment, removal, remedial, enforcement, cost recovery, or oversight activities are being planned or conducted.

  3. Neutron and proton activation measurements from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radioactivity induced by high-energy protons and secondary neutrons (from nuclear interactions) in various samples returned from different locations in Skylab was measured directly by gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of decay gamma rays from the samples. Incident fluxes were derived from the activation measurements, using known nuclear cross-section. Neutron and proton flux values were found to range from 0.2 to 5 particles/sq cm-sec, depending on the energy range and location in Skylab. The thermal neutron flux was less than 0.07 neutrons/sq cm-sec. The results are useful for data analysis and planning of future high-energy astronomy experiments.

  4. Equilibrium constants and protonation site for N-methylbenzenesulfonamides

    PubMed Central

    Rosa da Costa, Ana M; García-Río, Luis; Pessêgo, Márcia

    2011-01-01

    Summary The protonation equilibria of four substituted N-methylbenzenesulfonamides, X-MBS: X = 4-MeO (3a), 4-Me (3b), 4-Cl (3c) and 4-NO2 (3d), in aqueous sulfuric acid were studied at 25 °C by UV–vis spectroscopy. As expected, the values for the acidity constants are highly dependent on the electron-donor character of the substituent (the pK BH+ values are −3.5 ± 0.2, −4.2 ± 0.2, −5.2 ± 0.3 and −6.0 ± 0.3 for 3a, 3b, 3c and 3d, respectively). The solvation parameter m* is always higher than 0.5 and points to a decrease in the importance of solvation on the cation stabilization as the electron-donor character of the substituent increases. Hammett plots of the equilibrium constants showed a better correlation with the σ+ substituent parameter than with σ, which indicates that the initial protonation site is the oxygen atom of the sulfonyl group. PMID:22238552

  5. Equilibrium constants and protonation site for N-methylbenzenesulfonamides.

    PubMed

    Moreira, José A; Rosa da Costa, Ana M; García-Río, Luis; Pessêgo, Márcia

    2011-01-01

    The protonation equilibria of four substituted N-methylbenzenesulfonamides, X-MBS: X = 4-MeO (3a), 4-Me (3b), 4-Cl (3c) and 4-NO(2) (3d), in aqueous sulfuric acid were studied at 25 °C by UV-vis spectroscopy. As expected, the values for the acidity constants are highly dependent on the electron-donor character of the substituent (the pK(BH+) values are -3.5 ± 0.2, -4.2 ± 0.2, -5.2 ± 0.3 and -6.0 ± 0.3 for 3a, 3b, 3c and 3d, respectively). The solvation parameter m* is always higher than 0.5 and points to a decrease in the importance of solvation on the cation stabilization as the electron-donor character of the substituent increases. Hammett plots of the equilibrium constants showed a better correlation with the σ(+) substituent parameter than with σ, which indicates that the initial protonation site is the oxygen atom of the sulfonyl group.

  6. Electron transfer activation of a second water channel for proton transport in [FeFe]-hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Sode, Olaseni; Voth, Gregory A.

    2014-12-14

    Hydrogenase enzymes are important because they can reversibly catalyze the production of molecular hydrogen. Proton transport mechanisms have been previously studied in residue pathways that lead to the active site of the enzyme via residues Cys299 and Ser319. The importance of this pathway and these residues has been previously exhibited through site-specific mutations, which were shown to interrupt the enzyme activity. It has been shown recently that a separate water channel (WC2) is coupled with electron transport to the active site of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase. The water-mediated proton transport mechanisms of the enzyme in different electronic states have been studied using the multistate empirical valence bond reactive molecular dynamics method, in order to understand any role WC2 may have in facilitating the residue pathway in bringing an additional proton to the enzyme active site. In a single electronic state A{sup 2−}, a water wire was formed through which protons can be transported with a low free energy barrier. The remaining electronic states were shown, however, to be highly unfavorable to proton transport in WC2. A double amino acid substitution is predicted to obstruct proton transport in electronic state A{sup 2-} by closing a cavity that could otherwise fill with water near the proximal Fe of the active site.

  7. External protons destabilize the activated voltage sensor in hERG channels.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu Patrick; Cheng, Yen May; Van Slyke, Aaron C; Claydon, Tom W

    2014-03-01

    Extracellular acidosis shifts hERG channel activation to more depolarized potentials and accelerates channel deactivation; however, the mechanisms underlying these effects are unclear. External divalent cations, e.g., Ca(2+) and Cd(2+), mimic these effects and coordinate within a metal ion binding pocket composed of three acidic residues in hERG: D456 and D460 in S2 and D509 in S3. A common mechanism may underlie divalent cation and proton effects on hERG gating. Using two-electrode voltage clamp, we show proton sensitivity of hERG channel activation (pKa = 5.6), but not deactivation, was greatly reduced in the presence of Cd(2+) (0.1 mM), suggesting a common binding site for the Cd(2+) and proton effect on activation and separable effects of protons on activation and deactivation. Mutational analysis confirmed that D509 plays a critical role in the pH dependence of activation, as shown previously, and that cooperative actions involving D456 and D460 are also required. Importantly, neutralization of all three acidic residues abolished the proton-induced shift of activation, suggesting that the metal ion binding pocket alone accounts for the effects of protons on hERG channel activation. Voltage-clamp fluorimetry measurements demonstrated that protons shifted the voltage dependence of S4 movement to more depolarized potentials. The data indicate a site and mechanism of action for protons on hERG activation gating; protonation of D456, D460 and D509 disrupts interactions between these residues and S4 gating charges to destabilize the activated configuration of S4.

  8. Potential regulatory phosphorylation sites in a Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump implicated during early symbiotic signaling in roots.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao T; Volkening, Jeremy D; Rose, Christopher M; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Ané, Jean-Michel; Sussman, Michael R

    2015-08-04

    In plants and fungi the plasma membrane proton pump generates a large proton-motive force that performs essential functions in many processes, including solute transport and the control of cell elongation. Previous studies in yeast and higher plants have indicated that phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory domain is involved in regulating pump activity. In this report we examine the Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump gene family, and in particular MtAHA5. Yeast complementation assays with phosphomimetic mutations at six candidate sites support a phosphoregulatory role for two residues, suggesting a molecular model to explain early Nod factor-induced changes in the plasma membrane proton-motive force of legume root cells.

  9. Atomistic Characterization of the First Step of Calcium Pump Activation Associated with Proton Countertransport.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Salinas, G Lizbeth; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel

    2015-08-25

    The calcium pump [sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA)] transports Ca(2+) from the cytosol to the SR lumen at the expense of ATP hydrolysis and proton countertransport, thus playing a central role in Ca(2+) homeostasis and muscle contractility. Proton countertransport via deprotonation of transport site residue Glu309 is a critical first step in SERCA activation because it accelerates the E2-E1 structural transition. Previous studies have suggested that flipping of Glu309 toward the cytosol constitutes the primary mechanism for Glu309 deprotonation, but no conclusive data to support this hypothesis have been published. Therefore, we performed three independent 1 μs molecular dynamics simulations of the E2 state protonated at transport site residues Glu309, Glu771, and Glu908. Structural analysis and pKa calculations showed that Glu309 deprotonation occurs by an inward-to-outward side-chain transition. We also found that Glu309 deprotonation and proton countertransport occur through transient (~113 ps) water wires connecting Glu309 with the cytosol. Although both mechanisms are operational, we found that transient water wire formation, and not Glu309 flipping, is the primary mechanism for Glu309 deprotonation and translocation of protons to the cytosol. The outward-to-inward transition of protonated Glu309 and the presence of water wires suggest that protons from the cytosol might be passively transported to the lumen via Glu309. However, structural analysis indicates that passive SR proton leakage into the lumen unlikely occurs through Glu309 in the E2 state. These findings provide a time-resolved visualization of the first step in the molecular mechanism of SERCA activation and proton transport across the SR.

  10. Evaluation of proton activity in microemulsions by a kinetic probe.

    PubMed

    Peñacoba, Indalecio A; García, Begoña; Navarro, Ana M; Hoyuelos, F Javier; Leal, José M

    2010-12-15

    The decomposition reaction of the purple dye murexide in acidic media is used as a probe indicator for protons in nonionic microemulsions. The reaction kinetics primarily rely on the proton concentration and permit assessment of the proton activity in the nonionic microemulsions of water/cyclohexane/Igepal and water/heptane/Igepal. The experiments performed in the two microemulsions covered a wide range of water-to-oil mass fraction for the two systems. The kinetic runs were monitored under pseudo-first order conditions by the stopped-flow technique. The equilibrium constants for the formation of purpuric acid and the kinetic constants for the ensuing decomposition reaction fulfill a trend consistent with the micro compartmentalized nature of the multicomponent medium, and support the use of murexide as an indicator of the proton activity in microemulsions.

  11. Proton currents constrain structural models of voltage sensor activation

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Aaron L; Mokrab, Younes; Bennett, Ashley L; Sansom, Mark SP; Ramsey, Ian Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hv1 proton channel is evidently unique among voltage sensor domain proteins in mediating an intrinsic ‘aqueous’ H+ conductance (GAQ). Mutation of a highly conserved ‘gating charge’ residue in the S4 helix (R1H) confers a resting-state H+ ‘shuttle’ conductance (GSH) in VGCs and Ci VSP, and we now report that R1H is sufficient to reconstitute GSH in Hv1 without abrogating GAQ. Second-site mutations in S3 (D185A/H) and S4 (N4R) experimentally separate GSH and GAQ gating, which report thermodynamically distinct initial and final steps, respectively, in the Hv1 activation pathway. The effects of Hv1 mutations on GSH and GAQ are used to constrain the positions of key side chains in resting- and activated-state VS model structures, providing new insights into the structural basis of VS activation and H+ transfer mechanisms in Hv1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18017.001 PMID:27572256

  12. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P.; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L.; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R. I.

    2015-01-01

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions. PMID:26330610

  13. Redox-induced activation of the proton pump in the respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Belevich, Galina; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Verkhovskaya, Marina L; Wikström, Mårten; Hummer, Gerhard; Kaila, Ville R I

    2015-09-15

    Complex I functions as a redox-linked proton pump in the respiratory chains of mitochondria and bacteria, driven by the reduction of quinone (Q) by NADH. Remarkably, the distance between the Q reduction site and the most distant proton channels extends nearly 200 Å. To elucidate the molecular origin of this long-range coupling, we apply a combination of large-scale molecular simulations and a site-directed mutagenesis experiment of a key residue. In hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, we observe that reduction of Q is coupled to its local protonation by the His-38/Asp-139 ion pair and Tyr-87 of subunit Nqo4. Atomistic classical molecular dynamics simulations further suggest that formation of quinol (QH2) triggers rapid dissociation of the anionic Asp-139 toward the membrane domain that couples to conformational changes in a network of conserved charged residues. Site-directed mutagenesis data confirm the importance of Asp-139; upon mutation to asparagine the Q reductase activity is inhibited by 75%. The current results, together with earlier biochemical data, suggest that the proton pumping in complex I is activated by a unique combination of electrostatic and conformational transitions.

  14. Copper and protons directly activate the zinc-activated channel.

    PubMed

    Trattnig, Sarah M; Gasiorek, Agnes; Deeb, Tarek Z; Ortiz, Eydith J Comenencia; Moss, Stephen J; Jensen, Anders A; Davies, Paul A

    2016-03-01

    The zinc-activated channel (ZAC) is a cationic ion channel belonging to the superfamily of Cys-loop receptors, which consists of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. ZAC is the least understood member of this family so in the present study we sought to characterize the properties of this channel further. We demonstrate that not only zinc (Zn(2+)) but also copper (Cu(2+)) and protons (H(+)) are agonists of ZAC, displaying potencies and efficacies in the rank orders of H(+)>Cu(2+)>Zn(2+) and H(+)>Zn(2+)>Cu(2+), respectively. The responses elicited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+) through ZAC are all characterized by low degrees of desensitization. In contrast, currents evoked by high concentrations of the three agonists comprise distinctly different activation and decay components, with transitions to and from an open state being significantly faster for H(+) than for the two metal ions. The permeabilities of ZAC for Na(+) and K(+) relative to Cs(+) are indistinguishable, whereas replacing all of extracellular Na(+) and K(+) with the divalent cations Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) results in complete elimination of Zn(2+)-activated currents at both negative and positive holding potentials. This indicates that ZAC is non-selectively permeable to monovalent cations, whereas Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) inhibit the channel. In conclusion, this is the first report of a Cys-loop receptor being gated by Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+). ZAC could be an important mediator of some of the wide range of physiological functions regulated by or involving Zn(2+), Cu(2+) and H(+).

  15. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Coulomb nanoradiator-mediated, site-specific thrombolytic proton treatment with a traversing pristine Bragg peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jae-Kun; Han, Sung-Mi; Min, Soon-Ki; Seo, Seung-Jun; Ihm, Kyuwook; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2016-11-01

    Traversing proton beam-irradiated, mid/high-Z nanoparticles produce site-specific enhancement of X-ray photon-electron emission via the Coulomb nanoradiator (CNR) effect, resulting in a nano- to micro-scale therapeutic effect at the nanoparticle-uptake target site. Here, we demonstrate the uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) and nanoradiator-mediated, site-specific thrombolysis without damaging the vascular endothelium in an arterial thrombosis mouse model. The enhancement of low-energy electron (LEE) emission and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from traversing proton beam-irradiated IONs was examined. Flow recovery was only observed in CNR-treated mice, and greater than 50% removal of the thrombus was achieved. A 2.5-fold greater reduction in the thrombus-enabled flow recovery was observed in the CNR group compared with that observed in the untreated ION-only and proton-only control groups (p < 0.01). Enhancement of the X-ray photon-electron emission was evident from both the pronounced Shirley background in the electron yield and the 1.2- to 2.5-fold enhanced production of ROS by the proton-irradiated IONs, which suggests chemical degradation of the thrombus without potent emboli.

  17. Coulomb nanoradiator-mediated, site-specific thrombolytic proton treatment with a traversing pristine Bragg peak

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jae-Kun; Han, Sung-Mi; Min, Soon-Ki; Seo, Seung-Jun; Ihm, Kyuwook; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Traversing proton beam-irradiated, mid/high-Z nanoparticles produce site-specific enhancement of X-ray photon-electron emission via the Coulomb nanoradiator (CNR) effect, resulting in a nano- to micro-scale therapeutic effect at the nanoparticle-uptake target site. Here, we demonstrate the uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) and nanoradiator-mediated, site-specific thrombolysis without damaging the vascular endothelium in an arterial thrombosis mouse model. The enhancement of low-energy electron (LEE) emission and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production from traversing proton beam-irradiated IONs was examined. Flow recovery was only observed in CNR-treated mice, and greater than 50% removal of the thrombus was achieved. A 2.5-fold greater reduction in the thrombus-enabled flow recovery was observed in the CNR group compared with that observed in the untreated ION-only and proton-only control groups (p < 0.01). Enhancement of the X-ray photon-electron emission was evident from both the pronounced Shirley background in the electron yield and the 1.2- to 2.5-fold enhanced production of ROS by the proton-irradiated IONs, which suggests chemical degradation of the thrombus without potent emboli. PMID:27897205

  18. Protonation Sites, Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Computational Calculations of o-Carbonyl Carbazolequinone Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cifuentes, Maximiliano; Clavijo-Allancan, Graciela; Zuñiga-Hormazabal, Pamela; Aranda, Braulio; Barriga, Andrés; Weiss-López, Boris; Araya-Maturana, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    A series of a new type of tetracyclic carbazolequinones incorporating a carbonyl group at the ortho position relative to the quinone moiety was synthesized and analyzed by tandem electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS-MS), using Collision-Induced Dissociation (CID) to dissociate the protonated species. Theoretical parameters such as molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), local Fukui functions and local Parr function for electrophilic attack as well as proton affinity (PA) and gas phase basicity (GB), were used to explain the preferred protonation sites. Transition states of some main fragmentation routes were obtained and the energies calculated at density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP level were compared with the obtained by ab initio quadratic configuration interaction with single and double excitation (QCISD). The results are in accordance with the observed distribution of ions. The nature of the substituents in the aromatic ring has a notable impact on the fragmentation routes of the molecules. PMID:27399676

  19. Integral Equation Calculation of Solvent Activation Free Energies for Electron and Proton Transfer Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-04

    6. AUTHOR(S) P.P. Schmidt Indrani Bhattacharya- Kodali and Gregory Voth 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND AODRESS(ES) 8. PERIORMING ORGANIZATION...13. ABSTRACT (Maimum 200 words) The extended reference interaction site method (RISM) integral equation theory is applied to calculate the solvent...Integral Equation Calculation of Solvent Activation Free Energies for Electron and Proton Transfer Reactions Indrani Bhattacharya- Kodali and Gregory A. Voth

  20. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bonheure, G.; Wassenhove, G. Van; Mlynar, J.; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Lutter, G.; Vermaercke, P.; Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W.

    2012-10-15

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R and D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -{approx}6 times more - compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  1. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique.

    PubMed

    Bonheure, G; Mlynar, J; Van Wassenhove, G; Hult, M; González de Orduña, R; Lutter, G; Vermaercke, P; Huber, A; Schweer, B; Esser, G; Biel, W

    2012-10-01

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R&D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -~6 times more--compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  2. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation techniquea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonheure, G.; Mlynar, J.; Wassenhove, G. Van; Hult, M.; González de Orduña, R.; Lutter, G.; Vermaercke, P.; Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W.

    2012-10-01

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R&D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -˜6 times more - compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  3. Activation of acid-sensing ion channels by localized proton transient reveals their role in proton signaling.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Zheng; Liu, Di-Shi; Liu, Lu; She, Liang; Wu, Long-Jun; Xu, Tian-Le

    2015-09-15

    Extracellular transients of pH alterations likely mediate signal transduction in the nervous system. Neuronal acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) act as sensors for extracellular protons, but the mechanism underlying ASIC activation remains largely unknown. Here, we show that, following activation of a light-activated proton pump, Archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch), proton transients induced ASIC currents in both neurons and HEK293T cells co-expressing ASIC1a channels. Using chimera proteins that bridge Arch and ASIC1a by a glycine/serine linker, we found that successful coupling occurred within 15 nm distance. Furthermore, two-cell sniffer patch recording revealed that regulated release of protons through either Arch or voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 activated neighbouring cells expressing ASIC1a channels. Finally, computational modelling predicted the peak proton concentration at the intercellular interface to be at pH 6.7, which is acidic enough to activate ASICs in vivo. Our results highlight the pathophysiological role of proton signalling in the nervous system.

  4. The Use of Chromium(III) to Supercharge Peptides by Protonation at Low Basicity Sites

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Changgeng; Commodore, Juliette J.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2014-01-01

    The addition of chromium(III) nitrate to solutions of peptides with seven or more residues greatly increases the formation of doubly protonated peptides, [M+2H]2+, by electrospray ionization. The test compound heptaalanine has only one highly basic site (the N-terminal amino group) and undergoes almost exclusive single protonation using standard solvents. When Cr(III) is added to the solution, abundant [M+2H]2+ forms, which involves protonation of the peptide backbone or the C-terminus. Salts of Al(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Fe(II), Cu(II), Zn (II), Rh(III), La(III), Ce(IV), and Eu(III) were also studied. While several metal ions slightly enhance protonation, Cr(III) has by far the greatest ability to generate [M+2H]2+. Cr(III) does not supercharge peptide methyl esters, which suggests that the mechanism involves interaction of Cr(III) with a carboxylic acid group. Other factors may include the high acidity of hexaaquochromium(III) and the resistance of Cr(III) to reduction. Nitrate salts enhance protonation more than chloride salts and a molar ratio of 10:1 Cr(III):peptide produces the most intense [M+2H]2+. Cr(III) also supercharges numerous other small peptides, including highly acidic species. For basic peptides, Cr(III) increases the charge state (2+ versus 1+) and causes the number of peptide molecules being protonated to double or triple. Chromium(III) does not supercharge the proteins cytochrome c and myoglobin. The ability of Cr(III) to enhance [M+2H]2+ intensity may prove useful in tandem mass spectrometry because of the resulting overall increase in signal-to-noise ratio, the fact that [M+2H]2+ generally dissociate more readily than [M+H]+, and the ability to produce [M+2H]2+ precursors for electron-based dissociation techniques. PMID:25395012

  5. The Use of Chromium(III) to Supercharge Peptides by Protonation at Low Basicity Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Changgeng; Commodore, Juliette J.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2015-02-01

    The addition of chromium(III) nitrate to solutions of peptides with seven or more residues greatly increases the formation of doubly protonated peptides, [M + 2H]2+, by electrospray ionization. The test compound heptaalanine has only one highly basic site (the N-terminal amino group) and undergoes almost exclusive single protonation using standard solvents. When Cr(III) is added to the solution, abundant [M + 2H]2+ forms, which involves protonation of the peptide backbone or the C-terminus. Salts of Al(III), Mn(II), Fe(III), Fe(II), Cu(II), Zn (II), Rh(III), La(III), Ce(IV), and Eu(III) were also studied. Although several metal ions slightly enhance protonation, Cr(III) has by far the greatest ability to generate [M + 2H]2+. Cr(III) does not supercharge peptide methyl esters, which suggests that the mechanism involves interaction of Cr(III) with a carboxylic acid group. Other factors may include the high acidity of hexa-aquochromium(III) and the resistance of Cr(III) to reduction. Nitrate salts enhance protonation more than chloride salts and a molar ratio of 10:1 Cr(III):peptide produces the most intense [M + 2H]2+. Cr(III) also supercharges numerous other small peptides, including highly acidic species. For basic peptides, Cr(III) increases the charge state (2+ versus 1+) and causes the number of peptide molecules being protonated to double or triple. Chromium(III) does not supercharge the proteins cytochrome c and myoglobin. The ability of Cr(III) to enhance [M + 2H]2+ intensity may prove useful in tandem mass spectrometry because of the resulting overall increase in signal-to-noise ratio, the fact that [M + 2H]2+ generally dissociate more readily than [M + H]+, and the ability to produce [M + 2H]2+ precursors for electron-based dissociation techniques.

  6. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Kerr, Matthew D; Amos, Richard A; Stingo, Francesco C; Marom, Edith M; Truong, Mylene T; Palacio, Diana M; Betancourt, Sonia L; Erasmus, Jeremy J; DeGroot, Patricia M; Carter, Brett W; Gladish, Gregory W; Sabloff, Bradley S; Benveniste, Marcelo F; Godoy, Myrna C; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2016-06-07

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials ((18)O, Cu, and (68)Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm(-3)) and beef (~1.0 g cm(-3)) were embedded with Cu or (68)Zn foils of several volumes (10-50 mm(3)). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1-5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20-40 min of scan time using various delay times (30-150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils' PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers.

  7. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Kerr, Matthew D.; Amos, Richard A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Marom, Edith M.; Truong, Mylene T.; Palacio, Diana M.; Betancourt, Sonia L.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; DeGroot, Patricia M.; Carter, Brett W.; Gladish, Gregory W.; Sabloff, Bradley S.; Benveniste, Marcelo F.; Godoy, Myrna C.; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2016-06-01

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials (18O, Cu, and 68Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm-3) and beef (~1.0 g cm-3) were embedded with Cu or 68Zn foils of several volumes (10-50 mm3). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1-5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20-40 min of scan time using various delay times (30-150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils’ PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers.

  8. Voltage-activated proton current in eosinophils from human blood.

    PubMed Central

    Gordienko, D V; Tare, M; Parveen, S; Fenech, C J; Robinson, C; Bolton, T B

    1996-01-01

    1. The resting membrane potential of freshly purified normodense human eosinophils bathed in and dialysed with quasi-physiological solutions was -63 +/- 2 mV (n = 100). 2. In voltage-clamp mode with quasi-physiological internal and external solutions, voltage steps from the holding potential of -60 mV to levels positive to +20 mV resulted in development of a quasi-instantaneous outward current and a slowly developing outward current. The instantaneous current was absent when the cells were bathed in and dialysed with K(+)-free solution. 3. The slow outward current persisted following simultaneous replacement of K+, Na+ and most of the Cl- with largely impermeant ions (tetraethylammonium, N-methyl-D-glucamine and methanesulphonate) and was augmented when the cell was dialysed with a solution of increased buffering capacity for protons. The observed reversal potential of the current closely followed the hydrogen equilibrium potential over a wide range of internal-external pH combinations, indicating that the conductance underlying the slow outward current was highly selective for H+ ions. 4. Acidification of the pipette solution (increasing [H+]i) augmented the outward H+ current and shifted its activation range negatively, whilst acidification of the external solution had the opposite effect. The voltage dependence of the current is modulated by the transmembrane pH gradient so the only outward current could be activated. However, when the outward current was activated by a voltage step, rapid acidification of external solution produced an inward H+ current which rapidly deactivated. 5. The proton current was reversibly inhibited in a voltage-dependent manner by extracellular application of Zn2+. The apparent dissociation constants were 8 nM (at +40 mV), 36 nM (at +70 mV) and 200 nM (at +100 mV). 6. The proton current was augmented by exposure to 10 microM arachidonic acid. This augmentation consisted of a shift of the voltage dependence of activation to more

  9. Characterization of the proton binding sites of extracellular polymeric substances in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Chang, Sheng; Defersha, Fantahun M

    2015-07-01

    This paper focuses on the characterization of the chemical compositions and acidic constants of the extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs) in an anaerobic membrane bioreactor treating synthetic brewery wastewater by using chemical analysis, linear programming analysis (LPA) of titration data, and FT-IR analysis. The linear programming analysis of titration data revealed that the EPSs have proton binding sites with pKa values from pKa ≤ 6, between 6 and 7, and approximately 9.8. The strong acidic sites (pKa ≤ 6) and some weak acidic sites (7.5 < pKa < 9.0) were found to be readily removed by 0.45-μm membrane filtration. In addition, the FT-IR analysis confirmed the presence of proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and lipids in the EPS samples. Based on the FT-IR analysis and the main chemical functional groups at the bacterial cell surfaces, the identified proton binding sites were related to carboxyl, phosphate, and hydroxyl/amine groups with pKa values of 4.6 ± 0.7, 6.6 ± 0.01, and 9.7 ± 0.1, respectively, with the corresponding respective intensities of 0.31 ± 0.05, 0.96 ± 0.3, and 1.53 ± 0.3 mmole/g-EPS. The pKa values and intensities of the proton binding sites are the fundamental molecular properties of EPSs that affect the EPS charge, molecular interactions, and metal complexation characteristics. Determination of such properties can advance Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO)-based concentration polarization modeling, facilitate the estimation of the osmotic pressure of the EPS concentration polarization layers, and lead to a deeper understanding of the role of metal complexation in membrane fouling.

  10. Gaugement of the inner space of the apomyoglobin's heme binding site by a single free diffusing proton. I. Proton in the cavity.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, E; Tsfadia, Y; Nachliel, E; Gutman, M

    1993-02-01

    Time resolved fluorimetry was employed to monitor the geminate recombination between proton and excited pyranine anion locked, together with less than 30 water molecules, inside the heme binding site of Apomyoglobin (sperm whale). The results were analyzed by a numerical reconstruction of the differential rate equation for time-dependent diffusion controlled reaction with radiating boundaries using N. Agmon's procedure (Huppert, Pines, and Agmon, 1990, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B., 7:1541-1550). The analysis of the curve provided the effective dielectric constant of the proton permeable space in the cavity and the diffusion coefficient of the proton. The electrostatic potential within the cavity was investigated by the equations given by Gilson et al. (1985, J. Mol. Biol., 183:503-516). According to this analysis the dielectric constant of the protein surrounding the site is epsilon prot < or = 6.5. The diffusion coefficient of the proton in the heme binding site of Apomyoglobin-pyranine complex is D = 4 x 10(-5) cm2/s. This value is approximately 50% of the diffusion coefficient of proton in water. The lower value indicates enhanced ordering of water in the cavity, a finding which is corroborated by a large negative enthropy of binding delta S0 = -46.6 cal.mole-1 deg-1. The capacity of a small cavity in a protein to retain a proton had been investigated through the mathematical reconstruction of the dynamics. It has been demonstrated that Coulombic attraction, as large as delta psi of energy coupling membrane, is insufficient to delay a free proton for a time frame comparable to the turnover time of protogenic sites.

  11. Gaugement of the inner space of the apomyoglobin's heme binding site by a single free diffusing proton. I. Proton in the cavity.

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, E; Tsfadia, Y; Nachliel, E; Gutman, M

    1993-01-01

    Time resolved fluorimetry was employed to monitor the geminate recombination between proton and excited pyranine anion locked, together with less than 30 water molecules, inside the heme binding site of Apomyoglobin (sperm whale). The results were analyzed by a numerical reconstruction of the differential rate equation for time-dependent diffusion controlled reaction with radiating boundaries using N. Agmon's procedure (Huppert, Pines, and Agmon, 1990, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B., 7:1541-1550). The analysis of the curve provided the effective dielectric constant of the proton permeable space in the cavity and the diffusion coefficient of the proton. The electrostatic potential within the cavity was investigated by the equations given by Gilson et al. (1985, J. Mol. Biol., 183:503-516). According to this analysis the dielectric constant of the protein surrounding the site is epsilon prot < or = 6.5. The diffusion coefficient of the proton in the heme binding site of Apomyoglobin-pyranine complex is D = 4 x 10(-5) cm2/s. This value is approximately 50% of the diffusion coefficient of proton in water. The lower value indicates enhanced ordering of water in the cavity, a finding which is corroborated by a large negative enthropy of binding delta S0 = -46.6 cal.mole-1 deg-1. The capacity of a small cavity in a protein to retain a proton had been investigated through the mathematical reconstruction of the dynamics. It has been demonstrated that Coulombic attraction, as large as delta psi of energy coupling membrane, is insufficient to delay a free proton for a time frame comparable to the turnover time of protogenic sites. PMID:8384501

  12. Interactions of protons with single open L-type calcium channels. Location of protonation site and dependence of proton-induced current fluctuations on concentration and species of permeant ion

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We further investigated the rapid fluctuations between two different conductance levels promoted by protons when monovalent ions carry current through single L-type Ca channels. We tested for voltage dependence of the proton-induced current fluctuations and for accessibility of the protonation site from both sides of the membrane patch. The results strongly suggest an extracellular location of the protonation site. We also studied the dependence of the kinetics of the fluctuations and of the two conductance levels on the concentration of permeant ion and on external ionic strength. We find that saturation curves of channel conductance vs. [K] are similar for the two conductance levels. This provides evidence that protonation does not appreciably change the surface potential near the entry of the permeation pathway. The proton-induced conduction change must therefore result from an indirect interaction between the protonation site and the ion-conducting pathway. Concentration of permeant ion and ionic strength also affect the kinetics of the current fluctuations, in a manner consistent with our previous hypothesis that channel occupancy destabilizes the low conductance channel conformation. We show that the absence of measurable fluctuations with Li and Ba as charge carriers can be explained by significantly higher affinities of these ions for permeation sites. Low concentrations of Li reduce the Na conductance and abbreviate the lifetimes of the low conductance level seen in the presence of Na. We use whole-cell recordings to extrapolate our findings to the physiological conditions of Ca channel permeation and conclude that in the presence of 1.8 mM Ca no proton-induced fluctuations occur between pH 7.5 and 6.5. Finally, we propose a possible physical interpretation of the formal model of the protonation cycle introduced in the companion paper. PMID:2553858

  13. Electrochemistry suggests proton access from the exit site to the binuclear center in Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase pathway variants.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Thomas; Melin, Frédéric; Richter, Oliver-M H; Ludwig, Bernd; Kannt, Aimo; Müller, Hanne; Michel, Hartmut; Hellwig, Petra

    2015-02-27

    Two different pathways through which protons access cytochrome c oxidase operate during oxygen reduction from the mitochondrial matrix, or the bacterial cytoplasm. Here, we use electrocatalytic current measurements to follow oxygen reduction coupled to proton uptake in cytochrome c oxidase isolated from Paracoccus denitrificans. Wild type enzyme and site-specific variants with defects in both proton uptake pathways (K354M, D124N and K354M/D124N) were immobilized on gold nanoparticles, and oxygen reduction was probed electrochemically in the presence of varying concentrations of Zn(2+) ions, which are known to inhibit both the entry and the exit proton pathways in the enzyme. Our data suggest that under these conditions substrate protons gain access to the oxygen reduction site via the exit pathway.

  14. Proton Transfers in a Channelrhodopsin-1 Studied by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Difference Spectroscopy and Site-directed Mutagenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Ogren, John I.; Yi, Adrian; Mamaev, Sergey; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L.; Rothschild, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Channelrhodopsin-1 from the alga Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) is a low-efficiency light-activated cation channel that exhibits properties useful for optogenetic applications such as a slow light inactivation and a red-shifted visible absorption maximum as compared with the more extensively studied channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2). Previously, both resonance Raman and low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy revealed that unlike CrChR2, CaChR1 under our conditions exhibits an almost pure all-trans retinal composition in the unphotolyzed ground state and undergoes an all-trans to 13-cis isomerization during the primary phototransition typical of other microbial rhodopsins such as bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Here, we apply static and rapid-scan FTIR difference spectroscopy along with site-directed mutagenesis to characterize the proton transfer events occurring upon the formation of the long-lived conducting P2380 state of CaChR1. Assignment of carboxylic C=O stretch bands indicates that Asp-299 (homolog to Asp-212 in BR) becomes protonated and Asp-169 (homolog to Asp-85 in BR) undergoes a net change in hydrogen bonding relative to the unphotolyzed ground state of CaChR1. These data along with earlier FTIR measurements on the CaChR1 → P1 transition are consistent with a two-step proton relay mechanism that transfers a proton from Glu-169 to Asp-299 during the primary phototransition and from the Schiff base to Glu-169 during P2380 formation. The unusual charge neutrality of both Schiff base counterions in the P2380 conducting state suggests that these residues may function as part of a cation selective filter in the open channel state of CaChR1 as well as other low-efficiency ChRs. PMID:25802337

  15. Proton transfers in a channelrhodopsin-1 studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ogren, John I; Yi, Adrian; Mamaev, Sergey; Li, Hai; Spudich, John L; Rothschild, Kenneth J

    2015-05-15

    Channelrhodopsin-1 from the alga Chlamydomonas augustae (CaChR1) is a low-efficiency light-activated cation channel that exhibits properties useful for optogenetic applications such as a slow light inactivation and a red-shifted visible absorption maximum as compared with the more extensively studied channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2). Previously, both resonance Raman and low-temperature FTIR difference spectroscopy revealed that unlike CrChR2, CaChR1 under our conditions exhibits an almost pure all-trans retinal composition in the unphotolyzed ground state and undergoes an all-trans to 13-cis isomerization during the primary phototransition typical of other microbial rhodopsins such as bacteriorhodopsin (BR). Here, we apply static and rapid-scan FTIR difference spectroscopy along with site-directed mutagenesis to characterize the proton transfer events occurring upon the formation of the long-lived conducting P2 (380) state of CaChR1. Assignment of carboxylic C=O stretch bands indicates that Asp-299 (homolog to Asp-212 in BR) becomes protonated and Asp-169 (homolog to Asp-85 in BR) undergoes a net change in hydrogen bonding relative to the unphotolyzed ground state of CaChR1. These data along with earlier FTIR measurements on the CaChR1 → P1 transition are consistent with a two-step proton relay mechanism that transfers a proton from Glu-169 to Asp-299 during the primary phototransition and from the Schiff base to Glu-169 during P2 (380) formation. The unusual charge neutrality of both Schiff base counterions in the P2 (380) conducting state suggests that these residues may function as part of a cation selective filter in the open channel state of CaChR1 as well as other low-efficiency ChRs.

  16. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  17. Proton-transfer spectroscopy of 3-hydroxyflavone in an isolated-site crystal matrix

    SciTech Connect

    McMorrow, D.; Kasha, M.

    1984-06-01

    The isolated-site low-temperature crystal matrix (dilute solutions in heptane and in octane) (Shpol'skii matrix) is shown to be operative for the spectroscopic study of 3-hydroxyflavone luminescence. The observed luminescence is demonstrated to be unique proton-transfer fluorescence from the excited tautomer. A separate study at higher concentrations of aggregated molecule luminescence and excitation spectra distinguishes these for 3-hydroxyflavone from isolated-molecule spectra. The application of the Shpol'skii matrix low-temperature spectroscopy technique is suggested for other large heteroaromatic molecules, such as biomolecules containing polar groups that impart low solubility in nonaqueous solvents. 24 references, 4 figures.

  18. Comparison of short-lived medical isotopes activation by laser thin target induced protons and conventional cyclotron proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joseph; Dudnikova, Galina; Liu, Tung-Chang; Papadopoulos, Dennis; Sagdeev, Roald; Su, J. J.; UMD MicroPET Team

    2014-10-01

    Production diagnostic or therapeutic nuclear medicines are either by nuclear reactors or by ion accelerators. In general, diagnostic nuclear radioisotopes have a very short half-life varying from tens of minutes for PET tracers and few hours for SPECT tracers. Thus supplies of PET and SPECT radiotracers are limited by regional production facilities. For example 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the most desired tracer for positron emission tomography because its 110 minutes half-life is sufficient long for transport from production facilities to nearby users. From nuclear activation to completing image taking must be done within 4 hours. Decentralized production of diagnostic radioisotopes will be idea to make high specific activity radiotracers available to researches and clinicians. 11 C, 13 N, 15 O and 18 F can be produced in the energy range from 10-20 MeV by protons. Protons of energies up to tens of MeV generated by intense laser interacting with hydrogen containing targets have been demonstrated by many groups in the past decade. We use 2D PIC code for proton acceleration, Geant4 Monte Carlo code for nuclei activation to compare the yields and specific activities of short-lived isotopes produced by cyclotron proton beams and laser driven protons.

  19. Crystal Structure of Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), a Putative Membrane-Bound Lipid Phosphatase, Reveals a Novel Binuclear Metal Binding Site and Two Proton Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran,D.; Bonnano, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerophosphatase (PGPase), an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, catalyzes formation of phosphatidylglycerol from phosphatidylglycerophosphate. Phosphatidylglycerol is a multifunctional phospholipid, found in the biological membranes of many organisms. Here, we report the crystal structure of Listeria monocytogenes PGPase at 1.8 Angstroms resolution. PGPase, an all-helical molecule, forms a homotetramer. Each protomer contains an independent active site with two metal ions, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, forming a hetero-binuclear center located in a hydrophilic cavity near the surface of the molecule. The binuclear center, conserved ligands, metal-bound water molecules, and an Asp-His dyad form the active site. The catalytic mechanism of this enzyme is likely to proceed via binuclear metal activated nucleophilic water. The binuclear metal-binding active-site environment of this structure should provide insights into substrate binding and metal-dependent catalysis. A long channel with inter-linked linear water chains, termed 'proton wires', is observed at the tetramer interface. Comparison of similar water chain structures in photosynthetic reaction centers (RCs), Cytochrome f, gramicidin, and bacteriorhodopsin, suggests that PGPase may conduct protons via proton wires.

  20. Site-specific range uncertainties caused by dose calculation algorithms for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuemann, J.; Dowdell, S.; Grassberger, C.; Min, C. H.; Paganetti, H.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of introducing site-specific range margins to replace current generic margins in proton therapy. Further, the goal was to study the potential of reducing margins with current analytical dose calculations methods. For this purpose we investigate the impact of complex patient geometries on the capability of analytical dose calculation algorithms to accurately predict the range of proton fields. Dose distributions predicted by an analytical pencil-beam algorithm were compared with those obtained using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations (TOPAS). A total of 508 passively scattered treatment fields were analyzed for seven disease sites (liver, prostate, breast, medulloblastoma-spine, medulloblastoma-whole brain, lung and head and neck). Voxel-by-voxel comparisons were performed on two-dimensional distal dose surfaces calculated by pencil-beam and MC algorithms to obtain the average range differences and root mean square deviation for each field for the distal position of the 90% dose level (R90) and the 50% dose level (R50). The average dose degradation of the distal falloff region, defined as the distance between the distal position of the 80% and 20% dose levels (R80-R20), was also analyzed. All ranges were calculated in water-equivalent distances. Considering total range uncertainties and uncertainties from dose calculation alone, we were able to deduce site-specific estimations. For liver, prostate and whole brain fields our results demonstrate that a reduction of currently used uncertainty margins is feasible even without introducing MC dose calculations. We recommend range margins of 2.8% + 1.2 mm for liver and prostate treatments and 3.1% + 1.2 mm for whole brain treatments, respectively. On the other hand, current margins seem to be insufficient for some breast, lung and head and neck patients, at least if used generically. If no case specific adjustments are applied, a generic margin of 6.3% + 1.2 mm would be

  1. Identifying involvement of Lys251/Asp252 pair in electron transfer and associated proton transfer at the quinone reduction site of Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome bc1.

    PubMed

    Kuleta, Patryk; Sarewicz, Marcin; Postila, Pekka; Róg, Tomasz; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-10-01

    Describing dynamics of proton transfers in proteins is challenging, but crucial for understanding processes which use them for biological functions. In cytochrome bc1, one of the key enzymes of respiration or photosynthesis, proton transfers engage in oxidation of quinol (QH2) and reduction of quinone (Q) taking place at two distinct catalytic sites. Here we evaluated by site-directed mutagenesis the contribution of Lys251/Asp252 pair (bacterial numbering) in electron transfers and associated with it proton uptake to the quinone reduction site (Qi site). We showed that the absence of protonable group at position 251 or 252 significantly changes the equilibrium levels of electronic reactions including the Qi-site mediated oxidation of heme bH, reverse reduction of heme bH by quinol and heme bH/Qi semiquinone equilibrium. This implicates the role of H-bonding network in binding of quinone/semiquinone and defining thermodynamic properties of Q/SQ/QH2 triad. The Lys251/Asp252 proton path is disabled only when both protonable groups are removed. With just one protonable residue from this pair, the entrance of protons to the catalytic site is sustained, albeit at lower rates, indicating that protons can travel through parallel routes, possibly involving water molecules. This shows that proton paths display engineering tolerance for change as long as all the elements available for functional cooperation secure efficient proton delivery to the catalytic site.

  2. Experimental verification of proton beam monitoring in a human body by use of activity image of positron-emitting nuclei generated by nuclear fragmentation reaction.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Teiji; Miyatake, Aya; Inoue, Kazumasa; Gomi-Miyagishi, Tomoko; Kohno, Ryosuke; Kameoka, Satoru; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Ogino, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Proton therapy is a form of radiotherapy that enables concentration of dose on a tumor by use of a scanned or modulated Bragg peak. Therefore, it is very important to evaluate the proton-irradiated volume accurately. The proton-irradiated volume can be confirmed by detection of pair-annihilation gamma rays from positron-emitting nuclei generated by the nuclear fragmentation reaction of the incident protons on target nuclei using a PET apparatus. The activity of the positron-emitting nuclei generated in a patient was measured with a PET-CT apparatus after proton beam irradiation of the patient. Activity measurement was performed in patients with tumors of the brain, head and neck, liver, lungs, and sacrum. The 3-D PET image obtained on the CT image showed the visual correspondence with the irradiation area of the proton beam. Moreover, it was confirmed that there were differences in the strength of activity from the PET-CT images obtained at each irradiation site. The values of activity obtained from both measurement and calculation based on the reaction cross section were compared, and it was confirmed that the intensity and the distribution of the activity changed with the start time of the PET imaging after proton beam irradiation. The clinical use of this information about the positron-emitting nuclei will be important for promoting proton treatment with higher accuracy in the future.

  3. Fatty Acid Flippase Activity Of UCP2 Is Essential For Its Proton Transport In Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, Marcelo J.; Chou, James J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Modulation of cellular energy expenditure is fundamental to normal and pathological cell growth and differentiation. Mitochondria stores energy as a proton gradient across their inner membrane. Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can dissipate the gradient to produce heat or regulate metabolite fluxes. UCP-mediated proton currents require fatty acids (FA) and are blocked by nucleotides, but the molecular basis of these processes is unknown. We find, by nuclear magnetic resonance and functional mutagenesis, that UCP2 can bind FA laterally thru its peripheral site, and this intramembrane molecular recognition is essential for UCP2-catalyzed FA flipping across the membrane, which in turn is essential for proton translocation. The antagonist GDP binds inside the UCP2 cavity and perturbs its conformation, which can displace FA from the peripheral site as a mean of inhibiting proton currents. Our data provide a biophysical perspective of the intricate interplay of UCPs, FA, and nucleotides in determining proton fluxes in mitochondria. PMID:25127353

  4. The active site structure and mechanism of phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.C.

    1989-01-01

    Arginine specific reagents showed irreversible inhibition of avian liver mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. Potent protection against modification was elicited by CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} in the presence of other substrates. Labeling of enzyme with (7-{sup 14}C) phenylglyoxal showed that 1 or 2 arginines are involved in CO{sub 2} binding and activation. Peptide map studies showed this active site arginine residues is located at position 289. Histidine specific reagents showed pseudo first order inhibition of avian mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity. The best protection against modification was elicited by IDP or IDP and Mn{sup +2}. One histidine residue is at or near the phosphoenolpyruvate binding site as demonstrated in the increased absorbance at 240 nm and proton relaxation rate studies. Circular dichroism studies reveal that enzyme structure was perturbed by diethylpyrocarbonate modification. Metal binding studies suggest that this enzyme has only one metal binding site. The putative binding sites from several GTP and phosphoenolpyruvate utilizing enzymes are observed in P-enolpyruvate carboxykinase from different species.

  5. Validated ligand mapping of ACE active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuster, Daniel J.; Marshall, Garland R.

    2005-08-01

    Crystal structures of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) complexed with three inhibitors (lisinopril, captopril, enalapril) provided experimental data for testing the validity of a prior active site model predicting the bound conformation of the inhibitors. The ACE active site model - predicted over 18 years ago using a series of potent ACE inhibitors of diverse chemical structure - was recreated using published data and commercial software. Comparison between the predicted structures of the three inhibitors bound to the active site of ACE and those determined experimentally yielded root mean square deviation (RMSD) values of 0.43-0.81 Å, among the distances defining the active site map. The bound conformations of the chemically relevant atoms were accurately deduced from the geometry of ligands, applying the assumption that the geometry of the active site groups responsible for binding and catalysis of amide hydrolysis was constrained. The mapping of bound inhibitors at the ACE active site was validated for known experimental compounds, so that the constrained conformational search methodology may be applied with confidence when no experimentally determined structure of the enzyme yet exists, but potent, diverse inhibitors are available.

  6. Photoresponsive hydrogel microvalve activated by bacteriorhodopsin proton pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Aribe, Khaled; Knopf, George K.

    2010-04-01

    A light driven microvalve activated by a thin organic photoelectric film that controls the expansion and shrinkage of a pH sensitive HEMA-AA hydrogel actuator is described in this paper. The self-assembled monolayer of oriented bacteriorhodopsin (bR) purple membrane patches are immobilized on a porous bio-functionalized gold (Au) surface using a biotin molecular recognition technique. When exposed to visible light, each bR molecule in the monolayer acts as a simple proton pump which transports hydrogen ions from the cytoplasmic to the extracellular side through a transmembrane ion channel that connects both sides of the membrane. The flow of ions from the photon activated bR changes the pH value of the ionic solution that surrounds the gel microactuator. The chargeable polymeric network undergoes a measureable geometric change when the pH of the ionic solution is shifted to the phase transition point pKa. The fabrication of the thin bR film and photo-responsive hybrid hydrogel are discussed. Preliminary experiments show that the 13nm self-assembled photoelectric layer can generate approximately 1.3mV/(mW.cm2) when exposed to an 18mW, 568nm light source. The photo-voltage produced by the monolayer is believed to be sufficient to change the pH of the surrounding ionic solution from its neutral state and trigger the swelling of the gel. Several design issues that need to be resolved before a fully functional light-driven microvalve can be created are identified and discussed.

  7. Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor for proton radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Seco, Joao; Depauw, Nicolas

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) in producing proton radiographic images using the proton beam at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Methods: A CMOS APS, previously tested for use in s-ray radiation therapy applications, was used for proton beam radiographic imaging at the MGH. Two different setups were used as a proof of principle that CMOS can be used as proton imaging device: (i) a pen with two metal screws to assess spatial resolution of the CMOS and (ii) a phantom with lung tissue, bone tissue, and water to assess tissue contrast of the CMOS. The sensor was then traversed by a double scattered monoenergetic proton beam at 117 MeV, and the energy deposition inside the detector was recorded to assess its energy response. Conventional x-ray images with similar setup at voltages of 70 kVp and proton images using commercial Gafchromic EBT 2 and Kodak X-Omat V films were also taken for comparison purposes. Results: Images were successfully acquired and compared to x-ray kVp and proton EBT2/X-Omat film images. The spatial resolution of the CMOS detector image is subjectively comparable to the EBT2 and Kodak X-Omat V film images obtained at the same object-detector distance. X-rays have apparent higher spatial resolution than the CMOS. However, further studies with different commercial films using proton beam irradiation demonstrate that the distance of the detector to the object is important to the amount of proton scatter contributing to the proton image. Proton images obtained with films at different distances from the source indicate that proton scatter significantly affects the CMOS image quality. Conclusion: Proton radiographic images were successfully acquired at MGH using a CMOS active pixel sensor detector. The CMOS demonstrated spatial resolution subjectively comparable to films at the same object-detector distance. Further work will be done in order to establish the spatial and energy resolution of the

  8. Acute exposure to cold rapidly increases the number of nucleotide binding sites, but not proton conductance, in BAT mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.; Swick, R.W.

    1986-03-01

    Studies on the effect of acute cold exposure of rats on brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenic activity have produced equivocal results. Therefore, the authors have reexamined the response of BAT mitochondria to abrupt changes in environmental temperature. /sup 3/H-GDP binding to BAT mitochondria increased more than 2-fold in 20 min when rats were moved from 27/sup 0/C to 4/sup 0/C. When rats housed at 4/sup 0/C for 2 h were returned to 27/sup 0/C, GDP binding decreased sharply in 20 min and returned to control levels in 2 h. On the other hand, GDP-inhibitable proton conductance, as measured by passive swelling in isotonic K-acetate of KCl buffers, was unaffected by brief cold exposure but more than doubled in rats kept at 4/sup 0/C for 10 days. The authors conclude that GDP-inhibitable swelling may be more indicative of uncoupling protein concentration whereas thermogenic activity is more appropriately indicated by GDP binding. GDP binding to BAT mitochondria from warm and acutely cold treated rats was not altered by prior swelling of the mitochondria nor by freeze-thawing the mitochondria before assay. Therefore, alterations of the number of GDP binding sites may not be a result of conformational changes of the mitochondril membrane.

  9. Studies of Neutron and Proton Nuclear Activation in Low-Earth Orbit 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The study of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit reported in NASA CR-162051 has been continued with increasing emphasis given to primary and secondary neutron activation. The previously reported activation due to protons has been modified to include: (1) flux attenuation caused by all inelastic reactions; (2) the modification of the proton flux distribution caused by sample covering material; and (3) the activation of the sample as a function of the distance into the sample from the surface of incidence. A method has been developed for including the effects on the activation of the finite width and length of the samples. The reactant product spectra produced by proton-induced reactions has been studied. Cross sections needed for neutron induced reactions leading to long-lived (half-life 1 day) radioisotopes have been identified and, in some cases, compiled.

  10. High intensity proton linac activities at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B.; Chan, K.C.; Campbell, B.

    1998-09-01

    High-current proton linear accelerators offer an attractive alternative for generating the intense neutron fluxes needed for transmutations technologies, tritium production and neutron science. To achieve the fluxes required for tritium production, a 100-mA, 1700-MeV cw proton accelerator is being designed that uses superconducting cavities for the high-energy portion of the linac, from 211 to 1,700 MeV. The development work supporting the linac design effort is focused on three areas: superconducting cavity performance for medium-beta cavities at 700 MHz, high power rf coupler development, and cryomodule design. An overview of the progress in these three areas is presented.

  11. A comparison of energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation characteristics of protonated and sodiated high mannose N-glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Aboufazeli, Forouzan; Kolli, Venkata; Dodds, Eric D

    2015-04-01

    Fragmentation of glycopeptides in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) plays a pivotal role in site-specific protein glycosylation profiling by allowing specific oligosaccharide compositions and connectivities to be associated with specific loci on the corresponding protein. Although MS/MS analysis of glycopeptides has been successfully performed using a number of distinct ion dissociation methods, relatively little is known regarding the fragmentation characteristics of glycopeptide ions with various charge carriers. In this study, energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation was examined via collision-induced dissociation for a group of related high mannose tryptic glycopeptides as their doubly protonated, doubly sodiated, and hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions. The doubly protonated glycopeptide ions with various compositions were found to undergo fragmentation over a relatively low but wide range of collision energies compared with the doubly sodiated and hybrid charged ions, and were found to yield both glycan and peptide fragmentation depending on the applied collision energy. By contrast, the various doubly sodiated glycopeptides were found to dissociate over a significantly higher but narrow range of collision energies, and exhibited only glycan cleavages. Interestingly, the hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions were consistently the most stable of the precursor ions studied, and provided fragmentation information spanning both the glycan and the peptide moieties. Taken together, these findings illustrate the influence of charge carrier over the energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation characteristics of glycopeptides, and serve to suggest potential strategies that exploit the analytically useful features uniquely afforded by specific charge carriers or combinations thereof.

  12. A Comparison of Energy-Resolved Vibrational Activation/Dissociation Characteristics of Protonated and Sodiated High Mannose N-Glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboufazeli, Forouzan; Kolli, Venkata; Dodds, Eric D.

    2015-04-01

    Fragmentation of glycopeptides in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) plays a pivotal role in site-specific protein glycosylation profiling by allowing specific oligosaccharide compositions and connectivities to be associated with specific loci on the corresponding protein. Although MS/MS analysis of glycopeptides has been successfully performed using a number of distinct ion dissociation methods, relatively little is known regarding the fragmentation characteristics of glycopeptide ions with various charge carriers. In this study, energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation was examined via collision-induced dissociation for a group of related high mannose tryptic glycopeptides as their doubly protonated, doubly sodiated, and hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions. The doubly protonated glycopeptide ions with various compositions were found to undergo fragmentation over a relatively low but wide range of collision energies compared with the doubly sodiated and hybrid charged ions, and were found to yield both glycan and peptide fragmentation depending on the applied collision energy. By contrast, the various doubly sodiated glycopeptides were found to dissociate over a significantly higher but narrow range of collision energies, and exhibited only glycan cleavages. Interestingly, the hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions were consistently the most stable of the precursor ions studied, and provided fragmentation information spanning both the glycan and the peptide moieties. Taken together, these findings illustrate the influence of charge carrier over the energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation characteristics of glycopeptides, and serve to suggest potential strategies that exploit the analytically useful features uniquely afforded by specific charge carriers or combinations thereof.

  13. Activation calculations for trapped protons below 200 MeV: Appendix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    Tables are given displaying of the results of the activation calculations of metal samples and other material aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility-1 (LDEF-1) and Spacelab-2 with the computer program, PTRAP4. The computer printouts give the reaction, the reactant product, the proton reaction cross sections as a function of the energy of the incident protons, and the activation as a function of distance into the sample from the exposed surface.

  14. Low energy proton beam induces tumor cell apoptosis through reactive oxygen species and activation of caspases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kheun Byeol; Lee, Jong-Soo; Park, Jin-Woo; Huh, Tae-Lin

    2008-01-01

    Proton beam is useful to target tumor tissue sparing normal cells by allowing precise dose only into tumor cells. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which proton beam induces tumor cell death are still undefined. We irradiated three different tumor cells (LLC, HepG2, and Molt-4) with low energy proton beam (35 MeV) with spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) in vitro, and investigated cell death by MTT or CCK-8 assay at 24 h after irradiation. LLC and HepG2 cells were sensitive to proton beam at over 10 Gy to induce apoptosis whereas Molt-4 showed rather low sensitivity. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for the death rate relative to γ-ray were ranged from 1.1 to 2.3 in LLC and HepG2 but from 0.3 to 0.7 in Molt-4 at 11 d after irradiation by colony formation assay. The typical apoptotic nuclear DNA morphological pattern was observed by staining with 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Tiny fragmented DNA was observed in HepG2 but not in Molt-4 by the treatment of proton in apoptotic DNA fragment assay. By FACS analysis after stained with FITC-Annexin-V, early as well as median apoptotic fractions were clearly increased by proton treatment. Proton beam-irradiated tumor cells induced a cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and procaspases-3 and -9. Activity of caspases was highly enhanced after proton beam irradiation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were significantly increased and N-acetyl cysteine pretreatment restored the apoptotic cell death induced by proton beam. Furthermore, p38 and JNK but not ERK were activated by proton and dominant negative mutants of p38 and JNK revived proton-induced apoptosis, suggesting that p38 and JNK pathway may be activated through ROS to activate apoptosis. In conclusion, our data clearly showed that single treatment of low energy proton beam with SOBP increased ROS and induced cell death of solid tumor cells (LLC and HepG2) in an apoptotic cell death program by the induction of caspases

  15. Infrared multiple photon dissociation spectroscopy of ciprofloxacin: Investigation of the protonation site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodo, E.; Ciavardini, A.; Giardini, A.; Paladini, A.; Piccirillo, S.; Rondino, F.; Scuderi, D.

    2012-04-01

    The vibrational spectrum of isolated protonated ciprofloxacin was recorded in the range 1100-2000 cm-1 by means of infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. The spectrum was obtained by electrospraying a methanol solution of ciprofloxacin in a Paul ion trap, coupled to the tunable IR radiation of a free electron laser. This spectroscopic study has been complemented by quantum chemical calculations at the DFT and MP2 levels of theory to identify the possible structures present under our experimental conditions. Several low-energy isomers with protonation occurring at the piperazinyl amino group and at the carbonyl group are predicted in the energy range 0-84 kJ mol-1. A good agreement between the measured IRMPD spectrum and the calculated absorption spectrum is observed for the isomer protonated at the piperazinyl amino group. This isomer is calculated at MP2 level of theory to lie about 76 kJ/mol above the most stable isomer which is protonated at the quinone carbonyl group. This discrepancy can be rationalized by assuming that the protonation at the piperazinyl amino group, typical of the zwitterionic form that is found in protic solvents, is retained in the ESI process. The vibrational bands observed in the IRMPD spectrum are assigned to normal modes of the isomer protonated at the piperazinyl amino group, with deviations of less than 20 cm-1 between measured and calculated frequencies.

  16. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-06

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions.

  17. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C.; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F.; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W.; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa. Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  18. Studies of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1982-01-01

    The expected induced radioactivity of experimental material in low Earth orbit was studied for characteristics of activating particles such as cosmic rays, high energy Earth albedo neutrons, trapped protons, and secondary protons and neutrons. The activation cross sections for the production of long lived radioisotopes and other existing nuclear data appropriate to the study of these reactions were compiled. Computer codes which are required to calculate the expected activation of orbited materials were developed. The decreased computer code used to predict the activation of trapped protons of materials placed in the expected orbits of LDEF and Spacelab II. Techniques for unfolding the fluxes of activating particles from the measured activation of orbited materials are examined.

  19. A Palladium-Binding Deltarhodopsin for Light-Activated Conversion of Protonic to Electronic Currents.

    PubMed

    Soto-Rodríguez, Jessica; Hemmatian, Zahra; Josberger, Erik E; Rolandi, Marco; Baneyx, François

    2016-08-01

    Fusion of a palladium-binding peptide to an archaeal rhodopsin promotes intimate integration of the lipid-embedded membrane protein with a palladium hydride protonic contact. Devices fabricated with the palladium-binding deltarhodopsin enable light-activated conversion of protonic currents to electronic currents with on/off responses complete in seconds and a nearly tenfold increase in electrical signal relative to those made with the wild-type protein.

  20. Integration of a 'proton antenna' facilitates transport activity of the monocarboxylate transporter MCT4.

    PubMed

    Noor, Sina Ibne; Pouyssegur, Jacques; Deitmer, Joachim W; Becker, Holger M

    2017-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) mediate the proton-coupled transport of high-energy metabolites like lactate and pyruvate and are expressed in nearly every mammalian tissue. We have shown previously that transport activity of MCT4 is enhanced by carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), which has been suggested to function as a 'proton antenna' for the transporter. In the present study, we tested whether creation of an endogenous proton antenna by introduction of a cluster of histidine residues into the C-terminal tail of MCT4 (MCT4-6xHis) could facilitate MCT4 transport activity when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results show that integration of six histidines into the C-terminal tail does indeed increase transport activity of MCT4 to the same extent as did coexpression of MCT4-WT with CAII. Transport activity of MCT4-6xHis could be further enhanced by coexpression with extracellular CAIV, but not with intracellular CAII. Injection of an antibody against the histidine cluster into MCT4-expressing oocytes decreased transport activity of MCT4-6xHis, while leaving activity of MCT4-WT unaltered. Taken together, these findings suggest that transport activity of the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 can be facilitated by integration of an endogenous proton antenna into the transporter's C-terminal tail.

  1. Corrosion Research And Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  2. Corrosion Research and Web Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidersbach, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    This report covers corrosion-related activities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center during the summer of 2000. The NASA Kennedy Space Center's corrosion web site, corrosion.ksc.nasa.gov, was updated with new information based on feedback over the past two years. The methodology for a two-year atmospheric exposure testing program to study the effectiveness of commercial chemicals sold for rinsing aircraft and other equipment was developed and some preliminary laboratory chemical analyses are presented.

  3. Anti-angiogenic activity in metastasis of human breast cancer cells irradiated by a proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu-Shik; Shin, Jin-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Soo; Shon, Yun-Hee

    2012-07-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process of metastasis in human breast cancer. We investigated the effects of proton beam irradiation on angiogenic enzyme activities and their expressions in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The regulation of angiogenic regulating factors, of transforming growth factor- β (TGF- β) and of vesicular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in breast cancer cells irradiated with a proton beam was studied. Aromatase activity and mRNA expression, which is correlated with metastasis, were significantly decreased by irradiation with a proton beam in a dose-dependent manner. TGF- β and VEGF transcriptions were also diminished by proton beam irradiation. In contrast, transcription of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), also known as biological inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), was dose-dependently enhanced. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of TIMPs caused th MMP-9 activity to be diminished and the MMP-9 and the MMP-2 expressions to be decreased. These results suggest that inhibition of angiogenesis by proton beam irradiation in breast cancer cells is closely related to inhibitions of aromatase activity and transcription and to down-regulation of TGF- β and VEGF transcription.

  4. ENERGETIC PROTONS, RADIONUCLIDES, AND MAGNETIC ACTIVITY IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Drake, J. F.

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the location of the magnetically inactive dead zone in the minimum-mass protosolar disk, under ionization scenarios including stellar X-rays, long- or short-lived radionuclide decay, and energetic protons arriving from the general interstellar medium, from a nearby supernova explosion, from the disk corona, or from the corona of the young star. The disk contains a dead zone in all scenarios except those with small dust grains removed and a fraction of the short-lived radionuclides remaining in the gas. All the cases without exception have an 'undead zone' where intermediate resistivities prevent magneto-rotational turbulence while allowing shear-generated large-scale magnetic fields. The mass column in the undead zone is typically greater than the column in the turbulent surface layers. The results support the idea that the dead and undead zones are robust consequences of cold, dusty gas with mass columns exceeding 1000 g cm{sup -2}.

  5. Mechanism of pH-dependent activation of the sodium-proton antiporter NhaA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yandong; Chen, Wei; Dotson, David L.; Beckstein, Oliver; Shen, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli NhaA is a prototype sodium-proton antiporter, which has been extensively characterized by X-ray crystallography, biochemical and biophysical experiments. However, the identities of proton carriers and details of pH-regulated mechanism remain controversial. Here we report constant pH molecular dynamics data, which reveal that NhaA activation involves a net charge switch of a pH sensor at the entrance of the cytoplasmic funnel and opening of a hydrophobic gate at the end of the funnel. The latter is triggered by charging of Asp164, the first proton carrier. The second proton carrier Lys300 forms a salt bridge with Asp163 in the inactive state, and releases a proton when a sodium ion binds Asp163. These data reconcile current models and illustrate the power of state-of-the-art molecular dynamics simulations in providing atomic details of proton-coupled transport across membrane which is challenging to elucidate by experimental techniques. PMID:27708266

  6. Mechanism of pH-dependent activation of the sodium-proton antiporter NhaA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yandong; Chen, Wei; Dotson, David L.; Beckstein, Oliver; Shen, Jana

    2016-10-01

    Escherichia coli NhaA is a prototype sodium-proton antiporter, which has been extensively characterized by X-ray crystallography, biochemical and biophysical experiments. However, the identities of proton carriers and details of pH-regulated mechanism remain controversial. Here we report constant pH molecular dynamics data, which reveal that NhaA activation involves a net charge switch of a pH sensor at the entrance of the cytoplasmic funnel and opening of a hydrophobic gate at the end of the funnel. The latter is triggered by charging of Asp164, the first proton carrier. The second proton carrier Lys300 forms a salt bridge with Asp163 in the inactive state, and releases a proton when a sodium ion binds Asp163. These data reconcile current models and illustrate the power of state-of-the-art molecular dynamics simulations in providing atomic details of proton-coupled transport across membrane which is challenging to elucidate by experimental techniques.

  7. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  8. Protonation sites and dissociation mechanisms of t-butylcarbamates in tandem mass spectrometric assays for newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Spáčil, Zdeněk; Hui, Renjie; Gelb, Michael H; Tureček, František

    2011-10-01

    Structures of tert-butylcarbamate ions in the gas-phase and methanol solution were studied for simple secondary and tertiary carbamates as well as for carbamate-containing products and internal standards for lysosomal enzyme assays used in newborn screening of a α-galactosidase A deficiency (Fabry disease), mucopolysaccharidosis I (Hurler disease), and mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter disease). The protonation of simple t-butylcarbamates can occur at the carbonyl group, which is the preferred site in the gas phase. Protonation in methanol solution is more favorable if occurring at the carbamate nitrogen atom. The protonation of more complex t-butylcarbamates occurs at amide and carbamate carbonyl groups, and the ions are stabilized by intramolecular hydrogen bonding, which is affected by solvation. Tertiary carbamates containing aminophenol amide groups were calculated to have substantially greater gas-phase basicities than secondary carbamates containing coumarin amide groups. The main diagnostically important ion dissociation by elimination of 2-methylpropene (isobutylene, i-C(4)H(8)) and carbon dioxide is shown by experiment and theory to proceed in two steps. Energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation of the Hurler's disease enzymatic product ion, which is a coumarin-diamine linker-t-butylcarbamate conjugate (3a(+)), indicated separate energy thresholds for the loss of i-C(4)H(8) and CO(2). Computational investigation of the potential energy surface along two presumed reaction pathways indicated kinetic preference for the migration of a t-butyl hydrogen atom to the carbamate carbonyl resulting in the isobutylene loss. The consequent loss of CO(2) required further proton migrations that had to overcome energy barriers.

  9. Open and closed states of Candida antarctica lipase B: protonation and the mechanism of interfacial activation1

    PubMed Central

    Stauch, Benjamin; Fisher, Stuart J.; Cianci, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Lipases (EC 3.1.1.3) are ubiquitous hydrolases for the carboxyl ester bond of water-insoluble substrates, such as triacylglycerols, phospholipids, and other insoluble substrates, acting in aqueous as well as in low-water media, thus being of considerable physiological significance with high interest also for their industrial applications. The hydrolysis reaction follows a two-step mechanism, or “interfacial activation,” with adsorption of the enzyme to a heterogeneous interface and subsequent enhancement of the lipolytic activity. Among lipases, Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB) has never shown any significant interfacial activation, and a closed conformation of CALB has never been reported, leading to the conclusion that its behavior was due to the absence of a lid regulating the access to the active site. The lid open and closed conformations and their protonation states are observed in the crystal structure of CALB at 0.91 Å resolution. Having the open and closed states at atomic resolution allows relating protonation to the conformation, indicating the role of Asp145 and Lys290 in the conformation alteration. The findings explain the lack of interfacial activation of CALB and offer new elements to elucidate this mechanism, with the consequent implications for the catalytic properties and classification of lipases. PMID:26447231

  10. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  11. Proton accumulation and ATPase activity in Golgi apparatus-enriched vesicles from rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, H.I.; van Rossum, G.D. )

    1991-03-01

    We have studied the mechanism by which liver Golgi apparatus maintains the acidity of its contents, using a subcellular fraction from rat liver highly enriched in Golgi marker enzymes. Proton accumulation (measured by quenching of acridine-orange fluorescence) and anion-dependent ATPase were characterized and compared. Maximal ATPase and proton accumulation required ATP; GTP and other nucleotides gave 10% to 30% of maximal activity. Among anions, Cl- and Br- approximately doubled the activities; others were much less effective. Half-maximal increase of ATPase and H+ uptake required 55 mmol/L and 27 mmol/L Cl-, respectively. In predominantly chloride media, SCN- and NO3- markedly inhibited H+ uptake. Nitrate competitively inhibited both the chloride-dependent ATPase (apparent Ki 6 mmol/L) and proton uptake (apparent Ki 2 mmol/L). Nitrate and SCN- also inhibited uptake of 36Cl. Replacing K+ with Na+ had no effect on the initial rate of proton uptake but somewhat reduced the steady state attained. Replacement of K+ with NH4+ and choline reduced proton uptake without affecting ATPase. The ATPase and H+ uptake were supported equally well by Mg2+ or Mn2+. The ATPase was competitively inhibited by 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyano-stilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (apparent Ki 39 mumol/L). Other agents inhibiting both H+ uptake and ATPase were N-ethylmaleimide, N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, chlorpromazine, diethylstilbestrol, Zn2+, Co2+ and Cu2+. In the Cl- medium, accumulated protons were released by ionophores at the relative rates, monensin = nigericin greater than valinomycin greater than carbonyl cyanide mchlorophenylhydrazone; the last of these also reduced ATPase activity. In the absence of Cl-, monensin and valinomycin both stimulated the ATPase. These results show a close association between ATPase activity and acidification of liver Golgi vesicles.

  12. [Structural regularities in activated cleavage sites of thrombin receptors].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlik, I V; Verevka, S V

    1999-01-01

    Comparison of thrombin receptors activation splitting sites sequences testifies to their similarity both in activation splitting sites of protein precursors and protein proteinase inhibitors reactive sites. In all these sites corresponded to effectory sites P2'-positions are placed by hydrophobic amino-acids only. The regularity defined conforms with previous thesis about the role of effectory S2'-site in regulation of the processes mediated by serine proteinases.

  13. Aminoalcohols as Probes of the Two-subsite Active Site of Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation state of catalytic base (D14, pKa 5.0) and catalytic acid (E186, pKa 7.2) which reside in subsite -1 of the two-subsite active site. Cationic aminoalcohols are shown to bind exclusively to subsite -1 of the ...

  14. On the non-thermal electron-to-proton ratio at cosmic ray acceleration sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, Lukas; Becker Tjus, Julia; Eichmann, Björn; Dettmar, Ralf-Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    The luminosity ratio of electrons to protons as it is produced in stochastic acceleration processes in cosmic ray sources is an important quantity relevant for several aspects of the modeling of the sources themselves. It is usually assumed to be around 1: 100 in the case of Galactic sources, while a value of 1: 10 is typically assumed when describing extragalactic sources. It is supported by observations that the average ratios should be close to these values. At this point, however, there is no possibility to investigate how each individual source behaves. When looking at the physics aspects, a 1: 100 ratio is well supported in theory when making the following assumptions: (1) the total number of electrons and protons that is accelerated are the same; (2) the spectral index of both populations after acceleration is αe =αp ≈ 2.2 . In this paper, we reinvestigate these assumptions. In particular, assumption (2) is not supported by observational data of the sources and PIC simulation yield different spectral indices as well. We present the detailed calculation of the electron-to-proton ratio, dropping the assumption of equal spectral indices. We distinguish between the ratio of luminosities and the ratio of the differential spectral behavior, which becomes necessary for cases where the spectral indices of the two particle populations are not the same. We discuss the possible range of values when allowing for different spectral indices concerning the spectral behavior of electrons and protons. Additionally, it is shown that the minimum energy of the accelerated population can have a large influence on the results. We find, in the case of the classical minimum energy of T0 , e =T0 , p = 10 keV, that when allowing for a difference in the spectral indices of up to 0.1 with absolute spectral indices varying between 2.0 < α < 2.3, the luminosity ratio varies between 0.008 < Kep < 0.12. The differential particle number ratio is in the range 0.008

  15. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  16. Characterization of Active Site Residues of Nitroalkane Oxidase†

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Michael P.; Fenny, Nana S.; Ali, Shah R.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The flavoenzyme nitroalkane oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitrolkanes to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones plus nitrite. The structure of the enzyme shows that Serl71 forms a hydrogen bond to the flavin N5, suggesting that it plays a role in catalysis. Cys397 and Tyr398 were previously identified by chemical modification as potential active site residues. To more directly probe the roles of these residues, the S171A, S171V, S171T, C397S, and Y398F enzymes have been characterized with nitroethane as substrate. The C397S and Y398 enzymes were less stable than the wild-type enzyme, and the C397S enzyme routinely contained a substoichiometric amount of FAD. Analysis of the steady-state kinetic parameters for the mutant enzymes, including deuterium isotope effects, establishes that all of the mutations result in decreases in the rate constants for removal of the substrate proton by ~5-fold and decreases in the rate constant for product release of ~2-fold. Only the S171V and S171T mutations alter the rate constant for flavin oxidation. These results establish that these residues are not involved in catalysis, but rather are required for maintaining the protein structure. PMID:20056514

  17. Pyrazinoic acid decreases the proton motive force, respiratory ATP synthesis activity, and cellular ATP levels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Haagsma, Anna C; Pham, Hoang; Maaskant, Janneke J; Mol, Selena; Lill, Holger; Bald, Dirk

    2011-11-01

    Pyrazinoic acid, the active form of the first-line antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide, decreased the proton motive force and respiratory ATP synthesis rates in subcellular mycobacterial membrane assays. Pyrazinoic acid also significantly lowered cellular ATP levels in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. These results indicate that the predominant mechanism of killing by this drug may operate by depletion of cellular ATP reserves.

  18. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  19. Proton storage site in bacteriorhodopsin: new insights from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations of microscopic pK(a) and infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Puja; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Phatak, Prasad; Clemens, Maike; Gaus, Michael; Elstner, Marcus; Cui, Qiang

    2011-09-28

    Identifying the group that acts as the proton storage/loading site is a challenging but important problem for understanding the mechanism of proton pumping in biomolecular proton pumps, such as bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and cytochrome c oxidase. Recent experimental studies of bR propelled the idea that the proton storage/release group (PRG) in bR is not an amino acid but a water cluster embedded in the protein. We argue that this idea is at odds with our knowledge of protein electrostatics, since invoking the water cluster as the PRG would require the protein to raise the pK(a) of a hydronium by almost 11 pK(a) units, which is difficult considering known cases of pK(a) shifts in proteins. Our recent quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations suggested an alternative "intermolecular proton bond" model in which the stored proton is shared between two conserved Glu residues (194 and 204). Here we show that this model leads to microscopic pK(a) values consistent with available experimental data and the functional requirement of a PRG. Extensive QM/MM simulations also show that, independent of a number of technical issues, such as the influence of QM region size, starting X-ray structure, and nuclear quantum effects, the "intermolecular proton bond" model is qualitatively consistent with available spectroscopic data. Potential of mean force calculations show explicitly that the stored proton strongly prefers the pair of Glu residues over the water cluster. The results and analyses help highlight the importance of considering protein electrostatics and provide arguments for why the "intermolecular proton bond" model is likely applicable to the PRG in biomolecular proton pumps in general.

  20. Protonated rhodosemiquinone at the Q(B) binding site of the M265IT mutant reaction center of photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Maróti, Ágnes; Wraight, Colin A; Maróti, Péter

    2015-03-31

    The second electron transfer from primary ubiquinone Q(A) to secondary ubiquinone Q(B) in the reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides involves a protonated Q(B)(-) intermediate state whose low pK(a) makes direct observation impossible. Here, we replaced the native ubiquinone with low-potential rhodoquinone at the Q(B) binding site of the M265IT mutant RC. Because the in situ midpoint redox potential of Q(A) of this mutant was lowered approximately the same extent (≈100 mV) as that of Q(B) upon exchange of ubiquinone with low-potential rhodoquinone, the inter-quinone (Q(A) → Q(B)) electron transfer became energetically favorable. After subsequent saturating flash excitations, a period of two damped oscillations of the protonated rhodosemiquinone was observed. The Q(B)H(•) was identified by (1) the characteristic band at 420 nm of the absorption spectrum after the second flash and (2) weaker damping of the oscillation at 420 nm (due to the neutral form) than at 460 nm (attributed to the anionic form). The appearance of the neutral semiquinone was restricted to the acidic pH range, indicating a functional pK(a) of <5.5, slightly higher than that of the native ubisemiquinone (pK(a) < 4.5) at pH 7. The analysis of the pH and temperature dependencies of the rates of the second electron transfer supports the concept of the pH-dependent pK(a) of the semiquinone at the Q(B) binding site. The local electrostatic potential is severely modified by the strongly interacting neighboring acidic cluster, and the pK(a) of the semiquinone is in the middle of the pH range of the complex titration. The kinetic and thermodynamic data are discussed according to the proton-activated electron transfer mechanism combined with the pH-dependent functional pK(a) of the semiquinone at the Q(B) site of the RC.

  1. Sulfite stimulates the ATP hydrolysis activity of but not proton translocation by the ATP synthase of Rhodobacter capsulatus and interferes with its activation by delta muH+.

    PubMed

    Cappellini, P; Turina, P; Fregni, V; Melandri, B A

    1997-09-01

    Sulfite stimulates the rate of ATP hydrolysis by the ATP synthase in chromatophores of Rhodobacter capsulatus. The stimulated activity is inhibited by oligomycin. The activation takes place also in uncoupled chromatophores. The activation consists in an increase of about 12-15-fold of the Vmax for the ATP hydrolysis reaction, while the Km for MgATP is unaffected at 0.16+/-0.03 mM. The dependence of Vmax on the sulfite concentration follows a hyperbolic pattern with half maximum effect at 12 mM. Sulfite affects the ability of the enzyme in translocating protons. Concomitant measurements of the rate of ATP hydrolysis and of ATP-induced protonic flows demonstrate that at sulfite concentrations of greater than 10 mM the hydrolytic reaction becomes progressively uncoupled from the process of proton translocation. This is accompanied by an inhibition of ATP synthesis, either driven by light or by artificially induced ionic gradients. ATP synthesis is totally inhibited at concentrations of at least 80 mM. Sulfite interferes with the mechanism of activation by delta muH+. Low concentrations of this anion (< or = 2 mM) prevent the activation by delta muH+. At higher concentrations a marked stimulation of the activity prevails, regardless of the occurrence of a delta muH+ across the membrane. Phosphate at millimolar concentrations can reverse the inhibition by sulfite. These experimental results can be simulated by a model assuming multiple and competitive equilibria for phosphate or sulfite binding with two binding sites for the two ligands (for sulfite K1S = 0.26 and K2S = 37 mM, and for phosphate K1P = 0.06 and K2P = 4.22 mM), and in which the state bound only to one sulfite molecule is totally inactive in hydrolysis. The competition between phosphate and sulfite is consistent with the molecular structures of the two ligands and of the enzyme.

  2. Intracellular Proton-mediated Activation of TRPV3 Channels Accounts for the Exfoliation Effect of α-Hydroxyl Acids on Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xu; Yang, Fan; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei

    2012-01-01

    α-Hydroxyl acids (AHAs) from natural sources act as proton donors and topical compounds that penetrate skin and are well known in the cosmetic industry for their use in chemical peels and improvement of the skin. However, little is known about how AHAs cause exfoliation to expose fresh skin cells. Here we report that the transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) channel in keratinocytes is potently activated by intracellular acidification induced by glycolic acid. Patch clamp recordings and cell death assay of both human keratinocyte HaCaT cells and TRPV3-expressing HEK-293 cells confirmed that intracellular acidification led to direct activation of TRPV3 and promoted cell death. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that an N-terminal histidine residue, His-426, known to be involved in 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate-mediated TRPV3 activation, is critical for sensing intracellular proton levels. Taken together, our findings suggest that intracellular protons can strongly activate TRPV3, and TRPV3-mediated proton sensing and cell death in keratinocytes may serve as a molecular basis for the cosmetic use of AHAs and their therapeutic potential in acidic pH-related skin disorders. PMID:22679014

  3. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-04

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases.

  4. MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hua; Rossetto, Dorine; Mellert, Hestia; Dang, Weiwei; Srinivasan, Madhusudan; Johnson, Jamel; Hodawadekar, Santosh; Ding, Emily C; Speicher, Kaye; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Perry, Rocco; Wu, Jiang; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Y George; Speicher, David W; Thibault, Pierre; Verreault, Alain; Johnson, F Bradley; Berger, Shelley L; Sternglanz, Rolf; McMahon, Steven B; Côté, Jacques; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2012-01-01

    The MYST protein lysine acetyltransferases are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes and acetylate proteins to regulate diverse biological processes including gene regulation, DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation, stem cell homeostasis and development. Here, we demonstrate that MYST protein acetyltransferase activity requires active site lysine autoacetylation. The X-ray crystal structures of yeast Esa1 (yEsa1/KAT5) bound to a bisubstrate H4K16CoA inhibitor and human MOF (hMOF/KAT8/MYST1) reveal that they are autoacetylated at a strictly conserved lysine residue in MYST proteins (yEsa1-K262 and hMOF-K274) in the enzyme active site. The structure of hMOF also shows partial occupancy of K274 in the unacetylated form, revealing that the side chain reorients to a position that engages the catalytic glutamate residue and would block cognate protein substrate binding. Consistent with the structural findings, we present mass spectrometry data and biochemical experiments to demonstrate that this lysine autoacetylation on yEsa1, hMOF and its yeast orthologue, ySas2 (KAT8) occurs in solution and is required for acetylation and protein substrate binding in vitro. We also show that this autoacetylation occurs in vivo and is required for the cellular functions of these MYST proteins. These findings provide an avenue for the autoposttranslational regulation of MYST proteins that is distinct from other acetyltransferases but draws similarities to the phosphoregulation of protein kinases. PMID:22020126

  5. Computational study of phosphatase activity in soluble epoxide hydrolase: high efficiency through a water bridge mediated proton shuttle.

    PubMed

    De Vivo, Marco; Ensing, Bernd; Klein, Michael L

    2005-08-17

    Recently, a new branch of fatty acid metabolism has been opened by the novel phosphatase activity found in the N-terminal domain of the, hence bifunctional, soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Importantly, this finding has also provided a new site for drug targeting in sEH's activity regulation. Classical MD and hybrid Car-Parrinello QM/MM calculations have been performed to investigate the reaction mechanism of the phosphoenzyme intermediate formation in the first step of the catalysis. The results support a concerted multi-event reaction mechanism: (1) a dissociative in-line nucleophilic substitution for the phosphoryl transfer reaction; (2) a double proton transfer involved in the formation of a good leaving group in the transition state. The presence of a water bridge in the substrate/enzyme complex allowed an efficient proton shuttle, showing its key role in speeding up the catalysis. The calculated free energy of the favored catalytic pathway is approximately 19 kcal/mol, in excellent agreement with experimental data.

  6. A Threonine on the Active Site Loop Controls Transition State Formation in Escherichia Coli Respiratory Complex II

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasiak, T.M.; Maklashina, E.; Cecchini, G.; Iverson, T.M.

    2009-05-26

    In Escherichia coli, the complex II superfamily members succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (SQR) and quinol:fumarate reductase (QFR) participate in aerobic and anaerobic respiration, respectively. Complex II enzymes catalyze succinate and fumarate interconversion at the interface of two domains of the soluble flavoprotein subunit, the FAD binding domain and the capping domain. An 11-amino acid loop in the capping domain (Thr-A234 to Thr-A244 in quinol:fumarate reductase) begins at the interdomain hinge and covers the active site. Amino acids of this loop interact with both the substrate and a proton shuttle, potentially coordinating substrate binding and the proton shuttle protonation state. To assess the loop's role in catalysis, two threonine residues were mutated to alanine: QFR Thr-A244 (act-T; Thr-A254 in SQR), which hydrogen-bonds to the substrate at the active site, and QFR Thr-A234 (hinge-T; Thr-A244 in SQR), which is located at the hinge and hydrogen-bonds the proton shuttle. Both mutations impair catalysis and decrease substrate binding. The crystal structure of the hinge-T mutation reveals a reorientation between the FAD-binding and capping domains that accompanies proton shuttle alteration. Taken together, hydrogen bonding from act-T to substrate may coordinate with interdomain motions to twist the double bond of fumarate and introduce the strain important for attaining the transition state.

  7. The role of proton mobility in determining the energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation channels of N-glycopeptide ions.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Venkata; Roth, Heidi A; De La Cruz, Gabriela; Fernando, Ganga S; Dodds, Eric D

    2015-10-08

    Site-specific glycoproteomic analysis largely hinges on the use of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to identify glycopeptides. Experiments of this type are usually aimed at drawing connections between individual oligosaccharide structures and their specific sites of attachment to the polypeptide chain. These determinations inherently require ion dissociation methods capable of interrogating both the monosaccharide and amino acid connectivity of the glycopeptide. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) shows potential to satisfy this requirement, as the vibrational activation/dissociation of protonated N-glycopeptides has been observed to access cleavage of either glycosidic bonds of the glycan or amide bonds of the peptide in an energy-resolved manner. Nevertheless, the relative energy requirement for these fragmentation pathways varies considerably among analytes. This research addresses the influence of proton mobility on the vibrational energy necessary to achieve either glycan or peptide cleavage in a collection of protonated N-glycopeptide ions. While greater proton mobility of the precursor ion was found to correlate with lower energy requirements for precursor ion depletion and appearance of glycosidic fragments, the vibrational energy deposition necessary for appearance of peptide backbone fragments showed no relation to the precursor ion proton mobility. These results are consistent with observations suggesting that peptide fragments arise from an intermediate fragment which is generally of lower proton mobility than the precursor ion. Such findings have potential to facilitate the rational selection of CID conditions which are best suited to provide either glycan or peptide cleavage products in MS/MS based N-glycoproteomic analysis.

  8. Kinetic and Spectroscopic Studies of Bicupin Oxalate Oxidase and Putative Active Site Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moomaw, Ellen W.; Hoffer, Eric; Moussatche, Patricia; Salerno, John C.; Grant, Morgan; Immelman, Bridget; Uberto, Richard; Ozarowski, Andrew; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ceriporiopsis subvermispora oxalate oxidase (CsOxOx) is the first bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes manganese-dependent oxidation of oxalate. In previous work, we have shown that the dominant contribution to catalysis comes from the monoprotonated form of oxalate binding to a form of the enzyme in which an active site carboxylic acid residue must be unprotonated. CsOxOx shares greatest sequence homology with bicupin microbial oxalate decarboxylases (OxDC) and the 241-244DASN region of the N-terminal Mn binding domain of CsOxOx is analogous to the lid region of OxDC that has been shown to determine reaction specificity. We have prepared a series of CsOxOx mutants to probe this region and to identify the carboxylate residue implicated in catalysis. The pH profile of the D241A CsOxOx mutant suggests that the protonation state of aspartic acid 241 is mechanistically significant and that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site. The observation that the D241S CsOxOx mutation eliminates Mn binding to both the N- and C- terminal Mn binding sites suggests that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. The introduction of a proton donor into the N-terminal Mn binding site (CsOxOx A242E mutant) does not affect reaction specificity. Mutation of conserved arginine residues further support that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site and that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. PMID:23469254

  9. Structural Basis for Substrate and Oxygen Activation in Homoprotocatechuate 2,3-Dioxygenase: Roles of Conserved Active Site Histidine-200

    PubMed Central

    Kovaleva, Elena G.; Rogers, Melanie S.; Lipscomb, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic and spectroscopic studies have shown that the conserved active site residue His200 of the extradiol ring-cleaving homoprotocatechuate 2,3-dioxygenase (FeHPCD) from Brevibacterium fuscum is critical for efficient catalysis. The roles played by this residue are probed here by analysis of the steady state kinetics, pH dependence, and X-ray crystal structures of the FeHPCD position 200 variants His200Asn, His200Gln, and His200Glu alone and in complex with three catecholic substrates (homoprotocatechuate, 4-sulfonylcatechol, and 4-nitrocatechol) possessing substituents with different inductive capacity. Structures solved at 1.35 –1.75 Å resolution show that there is essentially no change in overall active site architecture or substrate binding mode for these variants when compared to the structures of the wild type enzyme and its analogous complexes. This shows that the maximal 50-fold decrease in kcat for ring cleavage, the dramatic changes in pH dependence, and the switch from ring cleavage to ring oxidation of 4-nitrocatechol by the FeHPCD variants can be attributed specifically to the properties of the altered second sphere residue and the substrate. The results suggest that proton transfer is necessary for catalysis, and that it occurs most efficiently when the substrate provides the proton and His200 serves as a catalyst. However, in the absence of an available substrate proton, a defined proton-transfer pathway in the protein can be utilized. Changes in steric bulk and charge of the residue at position 200 appear capable of altering the rate-limiting step in catalysis, and perhaps, the nature of the reactive species. PMID:26267790

  10. Phosphorylation and protonation of neighboring MiRP2 sites: function and pathophysiology of MiRP2-Kv3.4 potassium channels in periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Geoffrey W; Butler, Margaret H; Goldstein, Steve A N

    2006-02-01

    MinK-related peptide 2 (MiRP2) and Kv3.4 subunits assemble in skeletal muscle to create subthreshold, voltage-gated potassium channels. MiRP2 acts on Kv3.4 to shift the voltage dependence of activation, speed recovery from inactivation, suppress cumulative inactivation and increase unitary conductance. We previously found an R83H missense mutation in MiRP2 that segregated with periodic paralysis in two families and diminished the effects of MiRP2 on Kv3.4. Here we show that MiRP2 has a single, functional PKC phosphorylation site at serine 82 and that normal MiRP2-Kv3.4 function requires phosphorylation of the site. The R83H variant does not prevent PKC phosphorylation of neighboring S82; rather, the change shifts the voltage dependence of activation and endows MiRP2-Kv3.4 channels with sensitivity to changes in intracellular pH across the physiological range. Thus, current passed by single R83H channels decreases as internal pH is lowered (pK(a) approximately 7.3, consistent with histidine protonation) whereas wild-type channels are largely insensitive. These findings identify a key regulatory domain in MiRP2 and suggest a mechanistic link between acidosis and episodes of periodic paralysis.

  11. Biological effects of passive versus active scanning proton beams on human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gridley, Daila S; Pecaut, Michael J; Mao, Xiao W; Wroe, Andrew J; Luo-Owen, Xian

    2015-02-01

    The goal was to characterize differences in cell response after exposure to active beam scanning (ABS) protons compared to a passive delivery system. Human lung epithelial (HLE) cells were evaluated at various locations along the proton depth dose profile. The dose delivered at the Bragg peak position was essentially identical (∼4 Gy) with the two techniques, but depth dose data showed that ABS resulted in lower doses at entry and more rapid drop-off after the peak. Average dose rates for the passive and ABS beams were 1.1 Gy/min and 5.1 Gy/min, respectively; instantaneous dose rates were 19.2 Gy/min and 2,300 Gy/min (to a 0.5 × 0.5 mm(2) voxel). Analysis of DNA synthesis was based on (3)H-TdR incorporation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was done to determine expression of genes related to p53 signaling and DNA damage; a total of 152 genes were assessed. Spectral karyotyping and analyses of the Golgi apparatus and cytokines produced by the HLE cells were also performed. At or near the Bragg peak position, ABS protons resulted in a greater decrease in DNA synthesis compared to passively delivered protons. Genes with >2-fold change (P < 0.05 vs. 0 Gy) after passive proton irradiation at one or more locations within the Bragg curve were BTG2, CDKN1A, IFNB1 and SIAH1. In contrast, many more genes had >2-fold difference with ABS protons: BRCA1, BRCA2, CDC25A, CDC25C, CCNB2, CDK1, DMC1, DNMT1, E2F1, EXO1, FEN1, GADD45A, GTSE1, IL-6, JUN, KRAS, MDM4, PRC1, PTTG1, RAD51, RPA1, TNF, WT1, XRCC2, XRCC3 and XRCC6BP1. Spectral karyotyping revealed numerous differences in chromosomal abnormalities between the two delivery systems, especially at or near the Bragg peak. Percentage of cells staining for the Golgi apparatus was low after exposure to passive and active proton beams. Studies such as this are needed to ensure patient safety and make modifications in ABS delivery, if necessary.

  12. Resonant proton scattering on 46Ar using the Active-Target Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradt, J.; Ahn, T.; Ayyad Limonge, Y.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Carpenter, L.; Kuchera, M. P.; Lynch, W.; Mittig, W.; Rost, S.; Watwood, N.; Barney, J.; Datta, U.; Estee, J.; Gillibert, A.; Manfredi, J.; Morfouace, P.; Perez Loureiro, D.; Pollacco, E.; Sammut, J.; Sweany, S.

    2016-09-01

    A well-known technique for studying the single-particle properties of neutron-rich nuclei is to use resonant proton scattering on a parent nucleus to populate the isobaric analog states of the corresponding neutron-rich nucleus. The locations and amplitudes of these resonances are directly related to the structure of the nucleus of interest by isospin symmetry. We performed an experiment of this type at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory to commission the recently completed Active-Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC). A 4.6-MeV/u radioactive beam of 46Ar was injected into the AT-TPC. The detector was filled with isobutane gas-which provided the protons for the reaction and served as the tracking medium-and placed inside a 2-T magnetic field. We will present preliminary results from this experiment and discuss the benefits of the active-target method for this type of measurement.

  13. Protons and Psalmotoxin-1 reveal nonproton ligand stimulatory sites in chicken acid-sensing ion channel: Implication for simultaneous modulation in ASICs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel N; Gonzales, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-sensitive, sodium-selective channels expressed in the nervous system that sense changes in extracellular pH. These ion channels are sensitive to an increasing number of nonproton ligands that include natural venom peptides and guanidine compounds. In the case of chicken ASIC1, the spider toxin Psalmotoxin-1 (PcTx1) activates the channel, resulting in an inward current. Furthermore, a growing class of ligands containing a guanidine group has been identified that stimulate peripheral ASICs (ASIC3), but exert subtle influence on other ASIC subtypes. The effects of the guanidine compounds on cASIC1 have not been the focus of previous study. Here, we investigated the interaction of the guanidine compound 2-guanidine-4-methylquinazoline (GMQ) on cASIC1 proton activation and PcTx1 stimulation. Exposure of expressed cASIC1 to PcTx1 resulted in biphasic currents consisting of a transient peak followed by an irreversible cASIC1 PcTx1 persistent current. This cASIC1 PcTx1 persistent current may be the result of locking the cASIC1 protein into a desensitized transition state. The guanidine compound GMQ increased the apparent affinity of protons on cASIC1 and decreased the half-maximal constant of the cASIC1 steady-state desensitization profile. Furthermore, GMQ stimulated the cASIC1 PcTx1 persistent current in a concentration-dependent manner, which resulted in a non-desensitizing inward current. Our data suggests that GMQ may have multiple sites within cASIC1 and may act as a "molecular wedge" that forces the PcTx1-desensitized ASIC into an open state. Our findings indicate that guanidine compounds, such as GMQ, may alter acid-sensing ion channel activity in combination with other stimuli, and that additional ASIC subtypes (along with ASIC3) may serve to sense and mediate signals from multiple stimuli.

  14. protonation behavior of histidine during HSF1 activation by physiological acidification.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Park, Jang-Su

    2015-06-01

    The expression of eukaryotic molecular chaperones (heat shock proteins, HSPs) is triggered in response to a wide range of environmental stresses, including: heat shock, hydrogen peroxide, heavy metal, low-pH, or virus infection. Biochemical and genetic studies have clearly shown the fundamental roles of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in stress-inducible HSP gene expression, resistance to stress-induced cell death, carcinogenesis, and other biological phenomena. Previous studies show that acidic pH changes within the physiological range directly activate the HSF1 function in vitro. However, the detailed mechanism is unclear. Though computational pKa-predications of the amino acid side-chain, acidic-pH induced protonation of a histidine residue was found to be most-likely involved in this process. The histidine 83 (His83) residue, which could be protonated by mild decrease in pH, causes mild acidic-induced HSF1 activation (including in-vitro trimerization, DNA binding, in-vivo nuclear accumulation, and HSPs expression). His83, which is located in the loop region of the HSF1 DNA binding domain, was suggested to enhance the intermolecular force with Arginine 79, which helps HSF1 form a DNA-binding competent. Therefore, low-pH-induced activation of HSF1 by the protonation of histidine can help us better to understand the HSF1 mechanism and develop more therapeutic applications (particularly in cancer therapy). J. Cell. Biochem. 116: 977-984, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Study of proton and neutron activation of metal samples in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    Progress in the following activities has been made: the analysis of the gamma ray spectra taken from samples flown in Spacelab 2; the search for and review of neutron and proton activation cross sections needed to analyze the results of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) activation measurements; the consideration given to data analysis of the LDEF and Spacelab 2 samples; the plan to measure relevant cross sections with nuclear accelerator measurements; and the preparation of an extended gamma ray calibration sources continues through planning and direct measurement of gamma ray efficiency for a Ge(Li) as a function of position along the surface of the detector housing.

  16. Facile concerted proton-electron transfers in a ruthenium terpyridine-4'-carboxylate complex with a long distance between the redox and basic sites.

    PubMed

    Manner, Virginia W; Dipasquale, Antonio G; Mayer, James M

    2008-06-11

    We have designed and prepared ruthenium complexes with terpyridine-4'-carboxylate (tpyCOO) ligands, in which there are six bonds between the redox-active Ru and the basic carboxylate. The protonated Ru(II) complex, RuII(dipic)(tpyCOOH) (Ru(II)COOH), is prepared in one-pot from [(p-cymene)RuCl2]2, tpyCOONa, and then sodium pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate [Na(dipic)]. A crystal structure of the deprotonated Ru(II) complex, Ru(II)COO-, shows a distance of 6.9 A between the metal and basic sites. The Ru(III) complex (Ru(III)COO) has been isolated by one-electron oxidation of Ru(II)COO- with triarylaminium radical cations (NAr3*+). Ru(III)COO has a bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of 81 +/- 1 kcal mol(-1), from pKa and E1/2 measurements. It oxidizes 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenol (BDFE = 77 +/- 1 kcal mol(-1)) by removal of e- and H+ (triple bond H*) to form 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl radical and Ru(II)COOH, with a second-order rate constant of (2.3 0.2) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and a kH/kD of 7.7 1.2. Thermochemical analysis suggests a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) mechanism for this reaction, despite the 6.9 A distance between the redox-active Ru and the H+-accepting oxygen. Ru(III)COO also oxidizes the hydroxylamine TEMPOH to the stable free radical TEMPO and xanthene to bixanthyl. These reactions appear to be similar to processes that have been previously termed hydrogen atom transfer.

  17. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer as a fluorescence probe for protein binding-site static polarity.

    PubMed Central

    Sytnik, A; Kasha, M

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescence probe is introduced for protein conformation and binding-site monitoring as the proton-transfer (PT) tautomer fluorescence by using 4-hydroxy-5-azaphenanthrene (HAP) as a prototype. A typical grossly-wavelength-shifted PT fluorescence for HAP is observed in the 600-nm spectral region for this UV-absorbing molecule (absorption onset, 400 nm), for which case PT occurs even in protic solvents. It is shown that PT fluorescence of HAP can serve as a protein-binding-site static-polarity calibrator, shifting from a lambda max of 612 nm in cyclohexane to 585 nm in ethanol at 298 K, contrary to the usual dispersion red shift. A small mechanical solvent-cage effect is noted in ethanol at 77 K, but solvent dielectric relaxation is not apparent from the fluorescence spectrum. Thus, HAP serves to distinguish static solvent-cage polarity from dynamical solvent dielectric relaxation and other solvent-cage effects (mechanical restriction of molecular conformation). HAP as a PT-fluorescence probe is applied to human serum albumin (HSA) and beaver apomyoglobin. PMID:8078934

  18. Fluorescent amino acid undergoing excited state intramolecular proton transfer for site-specific probing and imaging of peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Sholokh, Marianna; Zamotaiev, Oleksandr M; Das, Ranjan; Postupalenko, Viktoriia Y; Richert, Ludovic; Dujardin, Denis; Zaporozhets, Olga A; Pivovarenko, Vasyl G; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Mély, Yves

    2015-02-12

    Fluorescent amino acids bearing environment-sensitive fluorophores are highly valuable tools for site-selective probing of peptide/ligand interactions. Herein, we synthesized a fluorescent l-amino acid bearing the 4'-methoxy-3-hydroxyflavone fluorophore (M3HFaa) that shows dual emission, as a result of an excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The dual emission of M3HFaa was found to be substantially more sensitive to hydration as compared to previous analogues. By replacing the Ala30 and Trp37 residues of a HIV-1 nucleocapsid peptide, M3HFaa was observed to preserve the peptide structure and functions. Interaction of the labeled peptides with nucleic acids and lipid vesicles produced a strong switch in their dual emission, favoring the emission of the ESIPT product. This switch was associated with the appearance of long-lived fluorescence lifetimes for the ESIPT product, as a consequence of the rigid environment in the complexes that restricted the relative motions of the M3HFaa aromatic moieties. The strongest restriction and thus the longest fluorescence lifetimes were observed at position 37 in complexes with nucleic acids, where the probe likely stacks with the nucleobases. Based on the dependence of the lifetime values on the nature of the ligand and the labeled position, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging was used to identify the binding partners of the labeled peptides microinjected into living cells. Thus, M3HFaa appears as a sensitive tool for monitoring site selectively peptide interactions in solution and living cells.

  19. The selectivity of the Na+/K+-pump is controlled by binding site protonation and self-correcting occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Huan; Artigas, Pablo; Roux, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    The Na+/K+-pump maintains the physiological K+ and Na+ electrochemical gradients across the cell membrane. It operates via an 'alternating-access' mechanism, making iterative transitions between inward-facing (E1) and outward-facing (E2) conformations. Although the general features of the transport cycle are known, the detailed physicochemical factors governing the binding site selectivity remain mysterious. Free energy molecular dynamics simulations show that the ion binding sites switch their binding specificity in E1 and E2. This is accompanied by small structural arrangements and changes in protonation states of the coordinating residues. Additional computations on structural models of the intermediate states along the conformational transition pathway reveal that the free energy barrier toward the occlusion step is considerably increased when the wrong type of ion is loaded into the binding pocket, prohibiting the pump cycle from proceeding forward. This self-correcting mechanism strengthens the overall transport selectivity and protects the stoichiometry of the pump cycle. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16616.001 PMID:27490484

  20. Site-specific protonation kinetics of acidic side chains in proteins determined by pH-dependent carboxyl (13)C NMR relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, Johan; Weininger, Ulrich; Khan, M Ashhar I; Linse, Sara; Akke, Mikael

    2015-03-04

    Proton-transfer dynamics plays a critical role in many biochemical processes, such as proton pumping across membranes and enzyme catalysis. The large majority of enzymes utilize acid-base catalysis and proton-transfer mechanisms, where the rates of proton transfer can be rate limiting for the overall reaction. However, measurement of proton-exchange kinetics for individual side-chain carboxyl groups in proteins has been achieved in only a handful of cases, which typically have involved comparative analysis of mutant proteins in the context of reaction network modeling. Here we describe an approach to determine site-specific protonation and deprotonation rate constants (kon and koff, respectively) of carboxyl side chains, based on (13)C NMR relaxation measurements as a function of pH. We validated the method using an extensively studied model system, the B1 domain of protein G, for which we measured rate constants koff in the range (0.1-3) × 10(6) s(-1) and kon in the range (0.6-300) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), which correspond to acid-base equilibrium dissociation constants (Ka) in excellent agreement with previous results determined by chemical shift titrations. Our results further reveal a linear free-energy relationship between log kon and pKa, which provides information on the free-energy landscape of the protonation reaction, showing that the variability among residues in these parameters arises primarily from the extent of charge stabilization of the deprotonated state by the protein environment. We find that side-chain carboxyls with extreme values of koff or kon are involved in hydrogen bonding, thus providing a mechanistic explanation for the observed stabilization of the protonated or deprotonated state.

  1. Proton magnetic resonance studies on peptide fragments of troponin-C containing single calcium-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Leavis, P C; Evans, J S; Levine, B A

    1982-07-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been employed to study the solution conformation of three cleavage fragments of troponin-C, each containing a single Ca(II)-binding site and corresponding to different regions in the primary sequence; viz. CB8 (residues 46-77), CB9 (residues 85-134) and TH2 (residues 121-159). Although all three peptides lack a well-defined tertiary fold in the absence of metal ions, several spectral features indicate the presence of local conformational constraints in each apo-peptide. Ca(II) binding led to spectral changes consistent with increased restriction of backbone motility and the adoption of a more compact conformation. Studies using paramagnetic ions as conformational probes support current views concerning the nature of the ligands at the metal binding sites. The nature and kinetics of the structural influence of metal binding suggest that the conformational constraints existing in the CB8 apo-peptide provide an adequate Ca(II)-binding configuration. In contrast, the CB9 and TH2 peptides exhibit spectral changes consistent with an increased local structure in the region of helix E (residues 94-102) in the case of CB9 and helix H (residues 148-159) in the case of TH2. In CB9, conformation changes also appear to be transmitted to a portion of the sequence (residues 87-93) preceding helix E, a putative site of interaction between troponin-C and troponin-I. These data are discussed with reference to the contribution of long-range (interdomain) interactions within troponin-C and the modulation of troponin subunit protein-protein interactions by Ca(II) binding.

  2. Proton coupled electron transfer and redox-active tyrosine Z in the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex.

    PubMed

    Keough, James M; Jenson, David L; Zuniga, Ashley N; Barry, Bridgette A

    2011-07-27

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions play an essential role in many enzymatic processes. In PCET, redox-active tyrosines may be involved as intermediates when the oxidized phenolic side chain deprotonates. Photosystem II (PSII) is an excellent framework for studying PCET reactions, because it contains two redox-active tyrosines, YD and YZ, with different roles in catalysis. One of the redox-active tyrosines, YZ, is essential for oxygen evolution and is rapidly reduced by the manganese-catalytic site. In this report, we investigate the mechanism of YZ PCET in oxygen-evolving PSII. To isolate YZ(•) reactions, but retain the manganese-calcium cluster, low temperatures were used to block the oxidation of the metal cluster, high microwave powers were used to saturate the YD(•) EPR signal, and YZ(•) decay kinetics were measured with EPR spectroscopy. Analysis of the pH and solvent isotope dependence was performed. The rate of YZ(•) decay exhibited a significant solvent isotope effect, and the rate of recombination and the solvent isotope effect were pH independent from pH 5.0 to 7.5. These results are consistent with a rate-limiting, coupled proton electron transfer (CPET) reaction and are contrasted to results obtained for YD(•) decay kinetics at low pH. This effect may be mediated by an extensive hydrogen-bond network around YZ. These experiments imply that PCET reactions distinguish the two PSII redox-active tyrosines.

  3. Using Unnatural Amino Acids to Probe the Energetics of Oxyanion Hole Hydrogen Bonds in the Ketosteroid Isomerase Active Site

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds are ubiquitous in enzyme active sites, providing binding interactions and stabilizing charge rearrangements on substrate groups over the course of a reaction. But understanding the origin and magnitude of their catalytic contributions relative to hydrogen bonds made in aqueous solution remains difficult, in part because of complexities encountered in energetic interpretation of traditional site-directed mutagenesis experiments. It has been proposed for ketosteroid isomerase and other enzymes that active site hydrogen bonding groups provide energetic stabilization via “short, strong” or “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds that are formed due to matching of their pKa or proton affinity to that of the transition state. It has also been proposed that the ketosteroid isomerase and other enzyme active sites provide electrostatic environments that result in larger energetic responses (i.e., greater “sensitivity”) to ground-state to transition-state charge rearrangement, relative to aqueous solution, thereby providing catalysis relative to the corresponding reaction in water. To test these models, we substituted tyrosine with fluorotyrosines (F-Tyr’s) in the ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) oxyanion hole to systematically vary the proton affinity of an active site hydrogen bond donor while minimizing steric or structural effects. We found that a 40-fold increase in intrinsic F-Tyr acidity caused no significant change in activity for reactions with three different substrates. F-Tyr substitution did not change the solvent or primary kinetic isotope effect for proton abstraction, consistent with no change in mechanism arising from these substitutions. The observed shallow dependence of activity on the pKa of the substituted Tyr residues suggests that the KSI oxyanion hole does not provide catalysis by forming an energetically exceptional pKa-matched hydrogen bond. In addition, the shallow dependence provides no indication of an active site electrostatic

  4. A Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Method for the Site-Specific Measurement of Proton Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Biological and Organic Solids

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Guangjin; Gupta, Rupal; Polenova, Tatyana; Vega, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Proton chemical shifts are a rich probe of structure and hydrogen bonding environments in organic and biological molecules. Until recently, measurements of 1H chemical shift tensors have been restricted to either solid systems with sparse proton sites or were based on the indirect determination of anisotropic tensor components from cross-relaxation and liquid-crystal experiments. We have introduced an MAS approach that permits site-resolved determination of CSA tensors of protons forming chemical bonds with labeled spin-1/2 nuclei in fully protonated solids with multiple sites, including organic molecules and proteins. This approach, originally introduced for the measurements of chemical shift tensors of amide protons, is based on three RN-symmetry based experiments, from which the principal components of the 1H CS tensor can be reliably extracted by simultaneous triple fit of the data. In this article, we expand our approach to a much more challenging system involving aliphatic and aromatic protons. We start with a review of the prior work on experimental-NMR and computational-quantum-chemical approaches for the measurements of 1H chemical shift tensors and for relating these to the electronic structures. We then present our experimental results on U-13C,15N-labeled histdine demonstrating that 1H chemical shift tensors can be reliably determined for the 1H15N and 1H13C spin pairs in cationic and neutral forms of histidine. Finally, we demonstrate that the experimental 1H(C) and 1H(N) chemical shift tensors are in agreement with Density Functional Theory calculations, therefore establishing the usefulness of our method for characterization of structure and hydrogen bonding environment in organic and biological solids. PMID:25484446

  5. The active site of oxidative phosphorylation and the origin of hyperhomocysteinemia in aging and dementia.

    PubMed

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2015-01-01

    The active site of oxidative phosphorylation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in mitochondria is proposed to consist of two molecules of thioretinamide bound to cobalamin, forming thioretinaco, complexed with ozone, oxygen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. and inorganic phosphate, TR2CoO3O2NAD(+)H2PO4(-). Reduction of the pyridinium nitrogen of the nicotinamide group by an electron from electron transport complexes initiates polymerization of phosphate with adenosine diphosphate, yielding nicotinamide riboside and ATP bound to thioretinaco ozonide oxygen. A second electron reduces oxygen to hydroperoxyl radical, releasing ATP from the active site. A proton gradient is created within F1F0 ATPase complexes of mitochondria by reaction of protons with reduced nicotinamide riboside and with hydroperoxyl radical, yielding reduced nicotinamide riboside and hydroperoxide. The hyperhomocysteinemia of aging and dementia is attributed to decreased synthesis of adenosyl methionine by thioretinaco ozonide and ATP, causing decreased allosteric activation of cystathionine synthase and decreased allosteric inhibition of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and resulting in dysregulation of methionine metabolism.

  6. Comparing the quality of passively-scattered proton and photon tomotherapy plans for brain and head and neck disease sites.

    PubMed

    Kainz, Kristofer; Firat, Selim; Wilson, J Frank; Schultz, Christopher; Siker, Malika; Wang, Andrew; Olson, Dan; Li, X Allen

    2015-03-21

    We compare the quality of photon IMRT (helical tomotherapy) with classic proton plans for brain, head and neck tumors, in terms of target dose uniformity and conformity along with organ-at-risk (OAR) sparing. Plans were created for twelve target volumes among eight cases. All patients were originally planned and treated using helical tomotherapy. Proton plans were generated using a passively-scattered beam model with a maximum range of 32 g cm(-2) (225 MeV), range modulation in 0.5 g cm(-2) increments and range compensators with 4.8 mm milling tool diameters. All proton plans were limited to two to four beams. Plan quality was compared using uniformity index (UI), conformation number (CN) and a EUD-based plan quality index (fEUD). For 11 of the 12 targets, UI was improved for the proton plan; on average, UI was 1.05 for protons versus 1.08 for tomotherapy. For 7 of the 12 targets, the tomotherapy plan exhibited more favorable CN. For proximal OARs, the improved dose conformity to the target volume from tomotherapy led to a lower maximum dose. For distal OARs, the maximum dose was much lower for proton plans. For 6 of the 8 cases, near-total avoidance for distal OARs provided by protons leads to improved fEUD. However, if distal OARs are excluded in the fEUD calculation, the proton plans exhibit better fEUD in only 3 of the 8 cases. The distal OAR sparing and target dose uniformity are generally better with passive-scatter proton planning than with photon tomotherapy; proton therapy may be preferred if the clinician deems those attributes critical. However, tomotherapy may serve equally as well as protons for cases where superior target dose conformity from tomotherapy leads to plan quality nearly identical to or better than protons and for cases where distal OAR sparing is not concerning.

  7. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  8. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  9. Ligand binding and proton exchange dynamics in site-specific mutants of human myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Lambright, D.G.

    1992-01-01

    Site specific mutagenesis was used to make substitutions of four residues in the distal heme pocket of human myoglobin: Val68, His64, Lys45, and Asp60. Strongly diffracting crystals of the conservative mutation K45R in the met aquo form were grown in the trigonal space group P3[sub 2]21 and the X-ray crystal structure determined at 1.6 [angstrom] resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of sperm whale met aquo myoglobin. Several of the mutant proteins were characterized by 2-D NMR spectroscopy. The NMR data suggest the structural changes are localized to the region of the mutation. The dynamics of ligand binding to myoglobin mutants were studied by transient absorption spectroscopy following photolysis of the CO complexes. Transient absorption kinetics and spectra on the ns to ms timescale were measured in aqueous solution from 280 K to 310 K and in 75% glycerol: water from 250 K to 310 K. Two significant basis spectra were obtained from singular value decomposition of the matrix of time dependent spectra. The information was used to obtain approximations for the extent of ligand rebinding and the kinetics of conformational relaxation. Except for K45R, substitutions at Lys45 or Asp60 produce changes in the kinetics for ligand rebinding. Replacement of Lys45 with Arg increases the rate of ligand rebinding from the protein matrix by a factor of 2, but does not alter the rates for ligand escape or entry into the protein or the dynamics of the conformational relaxation. Substitutions at His64 and Val68 influence the kinetics of ligand rebinding and the dynamics of conformational relaxation. The results do not support the hypothesis that ligand migration between the heme pocket and solvent is determined solely by fluctuations of Arg45 and His64 between open and closed conformations of the heme pocket but can be rationalized if ligand diffusion through the protein matrix involves multiple competing pathways.

  10. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  11. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  12. Research activities at the Loma Linda University and Proton Treatment Facility--an overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, G. A.; Green, L. M.; Gridley, D. S.; Archambeau, J. O.; Slater, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The Loma Linda University (LLU) Radiobiology Program coordinates basic research and proton beam service activities for the university and extramural communities. The current focus of the program is on the biological and physical properties of protons and the operation of radiobiology facilities for NASA-sponsored projects. The current accelerator, supporting facilities and operations are described along with a brief review of extramural research projects supported by the program. These include space craft electronic parts and shielding testing as well as tumorigenesis and animal behavior experiments. An overview of research projects currently underway at LLU is also described. These include: 1) acute responses of the C57Bl/6 mouse immune system, 2) modulation of gene expression in the nematode C. elegans and rat thyroid cells, 3) quantitation of dose tolerance in rat CNS microvasculature, 4) behavioral screening of whole body proton and iron ion-irradiated C57Bl/6 mice, and 5) investigation of the role of cell integration into epithelial structures on responses to radiation.

  13. SU-E-J-49: Distal Edge Activity Fall Off Of Proton Therapy Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Elmekawy, A; Ewell, L; Butuceanu, C; Zhu, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify the distal edge activity fall off, created in a phantom by a proton therapy beam Method and Materials: A 30x30x10cm polymethylmethacrylate phantom was irradiated with a proton therapy beam using different ranges and beams. The irradiation volume is approximated by a right circular cylinder of diameter 7.6cm and varying lengths. After irradiation, the phantom was scanned via a Philips Gemini Big Bore™ PET-CT for isotope activation. Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system as well as ImageJ™ were used to analyze the resulting PET and CT scans. The region of activity within the phantom was longitudinally measured as a function of PET slice number. Dose estimations were made via Monte Carlo (GATE) simulation. Results: For both the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and the mono-energetic pristine Bragg peak proton beams, the proximal activation rise was steep: average slope −0.735 (average intensity/slice number) ± 0.091 (standard deviation) for the pristine beams and −1.149 ± 0.117 for the SOBP beams. In contrast, the distal fall offs were dissimilar. The distal fall off in activity for the pristine beams was fit well by a linear curve: R{sup 2} (Pierson Product) was 0.9968, 0.9955 and 0.9909 for the 13.5, 17.0 and 21.0cm range beams respectively. The good fit allows for a slope comparison between the different ranges. The slope varied as a function of range from 1.021 for the 13.5cm beam to 0.8407 (average intensity/slice number) for the 21.0cm beam. This dependence can be characterized: −0.0234(average intensity/slice number/cm range). For the SOBP beams, the slopes were significantly less and were also less linear: average slope 0.2628 ± 0.0474, average R{sup 2}=0.9236. Conclusion: The distal activation fall off edge for pristine proton beams was linear and steep. The corresponding quantities for SOBP beams were shallower and less linear. Philips has provided support for this work.

  14. Decay mechanisms of protonated 4-quinolone antibiotics after electrospray ionization and ion activation.

    PubMed

    Kovačević, Borislav; Schorr, Pascal; Qi, Yulin; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2014-11-01

    This study presents a detailed experimental investigation of charge isomers of protonated 4-quinolone antibiotics molecules formed during electrospray ionization (ESI) with proposed dissociation mechanisms after collisional activation. Piperazinyl quinolones have been previously shown to exhibit erratic behavior during tandem MS analyses of biological samples, which originated from varying ratios of two isomeric variants formed during ESI. Here, a combination of ESI-collision-induced dissociation (CID), differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS), high resolution MS, and density functional theory (DFT) was used to investigate the underlying mechanisms of isomer formation and their individual dissociation behaviors. The study focused on ciprofloxacin; major findings were confirmed using structurally related 4-quinolones. DFT calculations showed a reversal of basicity for piperazinyl quinolones between liquid and gas phase. We provide an experimental comparison and theoretical treatment of factors influencing the formation ratio of the charge isomers during ESI, including solvent pH, protic/aprotic nature of solvent, and structural effects such as pK a and proton affinity. The actual dissociation mechanisms of the isomers of the protonated molecules were studied by separating the individual isomers via DMS-MS, which allowed type-specific CID spectra to be recorded. Both primary CID reactions of the two charge isomers originated from the same carboxyl group by charge-remote (CO(2) loss) and charge-mediated (H(2)O loss) fragmentation of the piperazinyl quinolones, depending on whether the proton resides on the more basic keto or the piperazinyl group, followed by a number of secondary dissociation reactions. The proposed mechanisms were supported by calculated energies of precursors, transition states, and products for competing pathways.

  15. Controlled Orientation of Active Sites in a Nanostructured Multienzyme Complex

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sung In; Yang, Byungseop; Jung, Younghan; Cha, Jaehyun; Cho, Jinhwan; Choi, Eun-Sil; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kwon, Inchan

    2016-01-01

    Multistep cascade reactions in nature maximize reaction efficiency by co-assembling related enzymes. Such organization facilitates the processing of intermediates by downstream enzymes. Previously, the studies on multienzyme nanocomplexes assembled on DNA scaffolds demonstrated that closer interenzyme distance enhances the overall reaction efficiency. However, it remains unknown how the active site orientation controlled at nanoscale can have an effect on multienzyme reaction. Here, we show that controlled alignment of active sites promotes the multienzyme reaction efficiency. By genetic incorporation of a non-natural amino acid and two compatible bioorthogonal chemistries, we conjugated mannitol dehydrogenase to formate dehydrogenase with the defined active site arrangement with the residue-level accuracy. The study revealed that the multienzyme complex with the active sites directed towards each other exhibits four-fold higher relative efficiency enhancement in the cascade reaction and produces 60% more D-mannitol than the other complex with active sites directed away from each other. PMID:28004799

  16. Perspective: On the active site model in computational catalyst screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Karsten; Plaisance, Craig P.; Oberhofer, Harald; Andersen, Mie

    2017-01-01

    First-principles screening approaches exploiting energy trends in surface adsorption represent an unparalleled success story in recent computational catalysis research. Here we argue that our still limited understanding of the structure of active sites is one of the major bottlenecks towards an ever extended and reliable use of such computational screening for catalyst discovery. For low-index transition metal surfaces, the prevalently chosen high-symmetry (terrace and step) sites offered by the nominal bulk-truncated crystal lattice might be justified. For more complex surfaces and composite catalyst materials, computational screening studies will need to actively embrace a considerable uncertainty with respect to what truly are the active sites. By systematically exploring the space of possible active site motifs, such studies might eventually contribute towards a targeted design of optimized sites in future catalysts.

  17. Diffusional correlations among multiple active sites in a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2014-04-07

    Simulations of the enzymatic dynamics of a model enzyme containing multiple substrate binding sites indicate the existence of diffusional correlations in the chemical reactivity of the active sites. A coarse-grain, particle-based, mesoscopic description of the system, comprising the enzyme, the substrate, the product and solvent, is constructed to study these effects. The reactive and non-reactive dynamics is followed using a hybrid scheme that combines molecular dynamics for the enzyme, substrate and product molecules with multiparticle collision dynamics for the solvent. It is found that the reactivity of an individual active site in the multiple-active-site enzyme is reduced substantially, and this effect is analyzed and attributed to diffusive competition for the substrate among the different active sites in the enzyme.

  18. Optimization of a general-purpose, actively scanned proton beamline for ocular treatments: Geant4 simulations.

    PubMed

    Piersimoni, Pierluigi; Rimoldi, Adele; Riccardi, Cristina; Pirola, Michele; Molinelli, Silvia; Ciocca, Mario

    2015-03-08

    The Italian National Center for Hadrontherapy (CNAO, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica), a synchrotron-based hospital facility, started the treatment of patients within selected clinical trials in late 2011 and 2012 with actively scanned proton and carbon ion beams, respectively. The activation of a new clinical protocol for the irradiation of uveal melanoma using the existing general-purpose proton beamline is foreseen for late 2014. Beam characteristics and patient treatment setup need to be tuned to meet the specific requirements for such a type of treatment technique. The aim of this study is to optimize the CNAO transport beamline by adding passive components and minimizing air gap to achieve the optimal conditions for ocular tumor irradiation. The CNAO setup with the active and passive components along the transport beamline, as well as a human eye-modeled detector also including a realistic target volume, were simulated using the Monte Carlo Geant4 toolkit. The strong reduction of the air gap between the nozzle and patient skin, as well as the insertion of a range shifter plus a patient-specific brass collimator at a short distance from the eye, were found to be effective tools to be implemented. In perspective, this simulation toolkit could also be used as a benchmark for future developments and testing purposes on commercial treatment planning systems.

  19. Robotics at Savannah River site: activity report

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The objectives of the Robotics Technology Group at the Savannah River Laboratory are to employ modern industrial robots and to develop unique automation and robotic systems to enhance process operations at the Savannah River site (SRP and SRL). The incentives are to improve safety, reduce personnel radiation exposure, improve product quality and productivity, and to reduce operating costs. During the past year robotic systems have been installed to fill chemical dilution vials in a SRP laboratory at 772-F and remove radioactive waste materials in the SRL Californium Production Facility at 773-A. A robotic system to lubricate an extrusion press has been developed and demonstrated in the SRL robotics laboratory and is scheduled for installation at the 321-M fuel fabrication area. A mobile robot was employed by SRP for a radiation monitoring task at a waste tank top in H-Area. Several other robots are installed in the SRL robotics laboratories and application development programs are underway. The status of these applications is presented in this report.

  20. Kinetic and theoretical studies on the protonation of [Ni(2-SC6H4N){PhP(CH2CH2PPh2)2}]+: nitrogen versus sulfur as the protonation site.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Athinoula L; Koutselos, Andreas D; Wahab, Hilal S; Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W; Henderson, Richard A

    2011-02-07

    The complexes [Ni(4-Spy)(triphos)]BPh(4) and [Ni(2-Spy)(triphos)]BPh(4) {triphos = PhP(CH(2)CH(2)PPh(2))(2), 4-Spy = 4-pyridinethiolate, 2-Spy = 2-pyridinethiolate} have been prepared and characterized both spectroscopically and using X-ray crystallography. In both complexes the triphos is a tridentate ligand. However, [Ni(4-Spy)(triphos)](+) comprises a 4-coordinate, square-planar nickel with the 4-Spy ligand bound to the nickel through the sulfur while [Ni(2-Spy)(triphos)](+) contains a 5-coordinate, trigonal-bipyramidal nickel with a bidentate 2-Spy ligand bound to the nickel through both sulfur and nitrogen. The kinetics of the reactions of [Ni(4-Spy)(triphos)](+) and [Ni(2-Spy)(triphos)](+) with lutH(+) (lut = 2,6-dimethylpyridine) in MeCN have been studied using stopped-flow spectrophotometry, and the two complexes show very different reactivities. The reaction of [Ni(4-Spy)(triphos)](+) with lutH(+) is complete within the deadtime of the stopped-flow apparatus (2 ms) and corresponds to protonation of the nitrogen. However, upon mixing [Ni(2-Spy)(triphos)](+) and lutH(+) a reaction is observed (on the seconds time scale) to produce an equilibrium mixture. The mechanistic interpretation of the rate law has been aided by the application of MSINDO semiempirical and ADF calculations. The kinetics and calculations are consistent with the reaction between [Ni(2-Spy)(triphos)](+) and lutH(+) involving initial protonation of the sulfur followed by dissociation of the nitrogen and subsequent transfer of the proton from sulfur to nitrogen. The factors affecting the position of protonation and the coupling of the coordination state of the 2-pyridinethiolate ligand to the site of protonation are discussed.

  1. Active sites of thioredoxin reductases: why selenoproteins?

    PubMed

    Gromer, Stephan; Johansson, Linda; Bauer, Holger; Arscott, L David; Rauch, Susanne; Ballou, David P; Williams, Charles H; Schirmer, R Heiner; Arnér, Elias S J

    2003-10-28

    Selenium, an essential trace element for mammals, is incorporated into a selected class of selenoproteins as selenocysteine. All known isoenzymes of mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) reductases (TrxRs) employ selenium in the C-terminal redox center -Gly-Cys-Sec-Gly-COOH for reduction of Trx and other substrates, whereas the corresponding sequence in Drosophila melanogaster TrxR is -Ser-Cys-Cys-Ser-COOH. Surprisingly, the catalytic competence of these orthologous enzymes is similar, whereas direct Sec-to-Cys substitution of mammalian TrxR, or other selenoenzymes, yields almost inactive enzyme. TrxRs are therefore ideal for studying the biology of selenocysteine by comparative enzymology. Here we show that the serine residues flanking the C-terminal Cys residues of Drosophila TrxRs are responsible for activating the cysteines to match the catalytic efficiency of a selenocysteine-cysteine pair as in mammalian TrxR, obviating the need for selenium. This finding suggests that the occurrence of selenoenzymes, which implies that the organism is selenium-dependent, is not necessarily associated with improved enzyme efficiency. Our data suggest that the selective advantage of selenoenzymes is a broader range of substrates and a broader range of microenvironmental conditions in which enzyme activity is possible.

  2. Ulysses observations of electron and proton components in a magnetic cloud and related wave activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to a smooth rotation of the magnetic field vector, magnetic clouds have a low proton temperature T(sub p). Their expansion in the solar wind leads to depletion and therefore the ion component cools down. It has been shown recently that the electron component in magnetic clouds behaves differently: when the cloud expands, electron temperature Te anti correlates with density and therefore Te increases in the cloud, creating favorable conditions for the rise of ion-acoustic waves. For the magnetic cloud observed by Ulysses on June 10 - 12, 1993 at 4.64 AU at S 32.5 deg, we present observations for both electron and proton components and related plasma wave activity. Our results confirm the anti correlation between T(sub e) and electron density and also exhibit a high ratio of T(sub e)/T(sub P) in the cloud. Since Landau damping is not effective for T(sub e)/T(sub p) much greater than 1, Doppler shifted ion acoustic waves are expected in the cloud. Calculation of ion acoustic wave frequencies in the cloud and comparison with observed wave activity confirm this expectation. As in our previous work, we show that the electron component in the cloud obeys a polytropic law with gamma is less than 1 (gamma approximately equals 0.3-0.4). The dynamics of the magnetic cloud are determined to a large degree by the dominating electron pressure.

  3. Community Update on Site Activities, July 19, 2013

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In an effort to engage and inform community members interested in the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Site cleanup, EPA will be issuing periodic topic-based fact sheets that will provide background information and updates about ongoing activities.

  4. [Alteration of transport activity of proton pumps in coleoptile cells during early development stages of maize seedlings].

    PubMed

    Shishova, M F; Tankeliun, O V; Rudashevskaia, E L; Emel'ianov, V V; Shakhova, N V; Kirpichnikova, A A

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the transport activity of proton pumps (plasmalemma H+-ATPase, vacuolar H+-ATPase, and vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase) in the membrane preparations obtained from coleoptile cells ofetiolated maize seedlings (Zea mays L.) was carried out. The highest level ofvacuolar pyrophosphatase activity was observed during the early development of coleoptile cells under growth intensification through the elongation. The role of ATPase pumps of tonoplast and plasmalemma in the transport of hydrogen ions increases during further development. The plasmalemma activity in this process is higher. When the growth stops, the activity of proton pumps becomes significantly lower. Nevertheless, their substrate specificity and sensitivity to proton pump inhibitors do not change, which can be an evidence of physiological significance of pumps in the maintenance of cell homeostasis.

  5. Hydrogen production by the naked active site of the di-iron hydrogenases in water.

    PubMed

    Zipoli, Federico; Car, Roberto; Cohen, Morrel H; Selloni, Annabella

    2009-10-01

    We explored the reactivity of the active center of the [FeFe]-hydrogenases detached from the enzyme and immersed in acidified water by first-principles Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics simulations. We focused on the identification of the structures that are stable and metastable in acidified water and on their activity for hydrogen production. Our calculations revealed that the naked active center could be an efficient catalyst provided that electrons are transferred to the cluster. We found that both bridging and terminal isomers are present at equilibrium and that the bridging configuration is essential for efficient hydrogen production. The formation of the hydrogen molecule occurs via sequential protonations of the distal iron and of the N-atom of the S-CH(2)-NH-CH(2)-S chelating group. H(2) desorption does not involve a significant energy barrier, making the process very efficient at room temperature. We established that the bottleneck in the reaction is the direct proton transfer from water to the vacant site of the distal iron. Moreover, we found that even if the terminal isomer is present at the equilibrium, its strong local hydrophobicity prevents poisoning of the cluster.

  6. FCCP depolarizes plasma membrane potential by activating proton and Na+ currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu-Sang; Jo, Inho; Pak, Kim; Bae, Sung-Won; Rhim, Hyewhon; Suh, Suk-Hyo; Park, Jin; Zhu, Hong; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effects of carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), a protonophore and uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, on plasma membrane potential and ionic currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). The membrane potential and ionic currents of BAECs were recorded using the patch-clamp technique in current-clamp and voltage-clamp modes, respectively. FCCP activated ionic currents and depolarized the plasma membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Neither the removal of extracellular Ca2+ nor pretreatment with BAPTA/AM affected the FCCP-induced currents, implying that the currents are not associated with the FCCP-induced intracellular [Ca2+]i increase. FCCP-induced currents were significantly influenced by the changes in extracellular or intracellular pH; the increased proton gradient produced by lowering the extracellular pH or intracellular alkalinization augmented the changes in membrane potential and ionic currents caused by FCCP. FCCP-induced currents were significantly reduced under extracellular Na+-free conditions. The reversal potentials of FCCP-induced currents under Na+-free conditions were well fitted to the calculated equilibrium potential for protons. Interestingly, FCCP-induced Na+ transport (subtracted currents, I(control)- I(Na+-free) was closely dependent on extracellular pH, whereas FCCP-induced H+transport was not significantly affected by the absence of Na+. These results suggest that the FCCP-induced ionic currents and depolarization, which are strongly dependent on the plasmalemmal proton gradient, are likely to be mediated by both H+ and Na+ currents across the plasma membrane. The relationship between H+ and Na+ transport still needs to be determined.

  7. Distribution of the Effect of Solar Proton Flux And Geomagnetic Activity on the Stratospheric Ozone Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, P. I. Y.; Tassev, Y.; Yanev, T.; Tomova, D.

    Two-way MANOVA was used to examine the impact of two factors: 1) the proton flux intensity and 2) the geomagnetic activity on the dependant variable "ozone mixing ratio" which characterizes the stratospheric ozone profiles. The examination was carried out with fixed levels of two other factors: a) the heights at which the "ozone mixing ratio" was recorded, i,e, 35 km, 30.2 km, 24.5 km, 18.4 km, 15.6 km and b) the energetic intervals within which the proton flux was measured, i.e. =0,6-4,2 MeV; 4,2-8,7 MeV; 8,7-14,5 MeV; 15-44 MeV; 39-82 MeV; 84-200 MeV; 110-500 MeV. The analysis was performed for all combinations of levels of the factors a) and b) for which data was available. It was aimed at revealing which of the factors 1) and 2) were dominating with different combinations of the factors a) and b) with fixed levels. For this purpose a post hoc analysis was performed as well. The main results are as follows: factors 1) and 2) exert statistically significant impact on the dependant variable at all of the heights examined, but not for all of energetic intervals; increase of the ozone mixing ratio was observed as a main effect of the proton flux intensity at heights 24.5 km, 18.4 km, 15.6 km, but the analysis of the simultaneous acting of factors 1) and 2) revealed a decrease of the dependant variable at these heights; these effects possibly indicate the existence of two different mechanisms of impact on the ozone mixing ratio; the afore- discussed effects decrease with the height and therefore their graphical image was named "Christmas tree".

  8. Verbascoside isolated from Tectona grandis mediates gastric protection in rats via inhibiting proton pump activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Shukla, Nivedita; Singh, Pratibha; Sharma, Rolee; Rajendran, S M; Maurya, Rakesh; Palit, Gautam

    2010-10-01

    Evidences have suggested that Tectona grandis (TG) attenuates gastric mucosal injury; however its mechanism has not yet been established. The aim of present study was to evaluate the gastroprotective mechanism of ethanolic extract of TG (E-EtOH), butanolic fraction (Fr-Bu) and to identify its active constituents. Anti-ulcer activities were evaluated against cold restraint (CRU) and pyloric ligation (PL) induced gastric ulcer models and further confirmed through H(+) K(+)-ATPase inhibitory activity. Cytoprotective activity was evaluated in alcohol (AL) induced gastric ulcer model and further through PGE(2) level. E-EtOH and Fr-Bu attenuated ulcer formation in CRU. Moreover E-EtOH and Fr-Bu displayed potent anti-secretory activity as evident through reduced free acidity and pepsin activity in PL, confirmed further by in vitro inhibition of H(+) K(+)-ATPase activity. In addition cytoprotective potential of E-EtOH and Fr-Bu were apparent with protection in AL model, increased PGE(2) content and enhanced mucin level in PL. Phytochemical investigations of Fr-Bu yielded terpenoides and a phenolic glycoside, verbascoside. The anti-secretory mechanism of verbascoside mediated apparently through inhibition of H(+) K(+)-ATPase with corresponding decrease in plasma gastrin level, is novel to our finding. Gastroprotection elicited by TG might be through proton pump inhibition and consequent augmentation of the defensive mechanism.

  9. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 2.76 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-09-21

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region (|η jet| < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 ≤ pT jet < 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of pT jet in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta (pT) of charged particles, with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV, in the azimuthal regionmore » transverse to the highest pT jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. As a result, the measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constraints on the modelling of the UE dynamics« less

  10. Measurement of the underlying event activity using charged-particle jets in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 2.76 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-09-21

    A measurement of the underlying event (UE) activity in proton-proton collisions is performed using events with charged-particle jets produced in the central pseudorapidity region (|η jet| < 2) and with transverse momentum 1 ≤ pT jet < 100 GeV. The analysis uses a data sample collected at a centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The UE activity is measured as a function of pT jet in terms of the average multiplicity and scalar sum of transverse momenta (pT) of charged particles, with |η| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV, in the azimuthal region transverse to the highest pT jet direction. By further dividing the transverse region into two regions of smaller and larger activity, various components of the UE activity are separated. As a result, the measurements are compared to previous results at 0.9 and 7 TeV, and to predictions of several Monte Carlo event generators, providing constraints on the modelling of the UE dynamics

  11. Activation of brown adipose tissue mitochondrial GDP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Swick, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The primary function of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is heat production. This ability is attributed to the existence of a unique inner mitochondrial membrane protein termed the uncoupling protein or thermogenin. This protein is permeable to H+ and thus allows respiration (and therefore thermogenesis) to proceed at a rapid rate, independent of ADP phosphorylation. Proton conductance can be inhibited by the binding of purine nucleotides to the uncoupling protein. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-GDP to BAT mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of BAT thermogenic activity. Rats fed a diet that was low but adequate in protein exhibited a decrease in feed efficiency. In addition, BAT thermogenesis was activated as indicated by an elevation in the level of GDP binding to BAT mitochondria. This phenomena occurred in older rats and persisted over time.

  12. The Antibacterial Activity of Human Neutrophils and Eosinophils Requires Proton Channels but Not BK Channels

    PubMed Central

    Femling, Jon K.; Cherny, Vladimir V.; Morgan, Deri; Rada, Balázs; Davis, A. Paige; Czirják, Gabor; Enyedi, Peter; England, Sarah K.; Moreland, Jessica G.; Ligeti, Erzsébet; Nauseef, William M.; DeCoursey, Thomas E.

    2006-01-01

    Electrophysiological events are of central importance during the phagocyte respiratory burst, because NADPH oxidase is electrogenic and voltage sensitive. We investigated the recent suggestion that large-conductance, calcium-activated K+ (BK) channels, rather than proton channels, play an essential role in innate immunity (Ahluwalia, J., A. Tinker, L.H. Clapp, M.R. Duchen, A.Y. Abramov, S. Page, M. Nobles, and A.W. Segal. 2004. Nature. 427:853–858). In PMA-stimulated human neutrophils or eosinophils, we did not detect BK currents, and neither of the BK channel inhibitors iberiotoxin or paxilline nor DPI inhibited any component of outward current. BK inhibitors did not inhibit the killing of bacteria, nor did they affect NADPH oxidase-dependent degradation of bacterial phospholipids by extracellular gIIA-PLA2 or the production of superoxide anion (\\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{O}}_{2^{.}}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}). Moreover, an antibody against the BK channel did not detect immunoreactive protein in human neutrophils. A required role for voltage-gated proton channels is demonstrated by Zn2+ inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity assessed by H2O2 production, thus validating previous studies showing that Zn2+ inhibited \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\usepackage[Euler]{upgreek} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{O}}_{2^{.}}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} production when assessed by cytochrome c reduction. In conclusion, BK channels were not detected in human neutrophils or eosinophils, and

  13. Effects of Extrinsic and Intrinsic Proton Activity on The Mechanism of Oxygen Reduction in Ionic Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Robert August

    Mechanisms for oxygen reduction are proposed for three distinct cases covering two ionic liquids of fundamentally different archetypes and almost thirty orders of magnitude of proton activity. Proton activity is treated both extrinsically by varying the concentration and intrinsically by selecting proton donors with a wide range of aqueous pKa values. The mechanism of oxygen reduction in ionic liquids is introduced by way of the protic ionic liquid (pIL) triethylammonium triflate (TEATf) which shares some similarities with aqueous acid solutions. Oxygen reduction in TEATf begins as the one electron rate limited step to form superoxide, O2 *-, which is then rapidly protonated by the pIL cation forming the perhydroxyl radical, HO2*. The perhydroxyl radical is further reduced to peroxidate (HO2-) and hydrogen peroxide in proportions in accordance with their pKa. The reaction does not proceed beyond this point due to the adsorption of the conjugate base triethylammine interfering with the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide. This work demonstrates that this mechanism is consistent across Pt, Au, Pd, and Ag electrodes. Two related sets of experiments were performed in the inherently aprotic ionic liquid 1-butyl-2,3-dimethylimidazolium triflate (C4dMImTf). The first involved the titration of acidic species of varying aqueous pKa into the IL while monitoring the extent of oxygen reduction as a function of pKa and potential on Pt and glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. These experiments confirmed the greater propensity of Pt to reduce oxygen by its immediate and abrupt transition from one electron reduction to four electron reduction, while oxygen reduction on GC gradually approaches four electron reduction as the potentials were driven more cathodic. The potential at which oxygen reduction initiates shows general agreement with the Nernst equation and the acid's tabulated aqueous pKa value, however at the extremely acidic end, a small deviation is observed. The second set

  14. SU-E-T-557: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac Devices Irradiated During Proton Therapy Using Indium Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, S; Christodouleas, J; Delaney, K; Diffenderfer, E; Brown, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac devices Irradiated during Proton Therapy using Indium Foils Methods: The foils had dimensions of 25mm x 25mm x 1mm. After being activated, the foils were placed in a Canberra Industries well chamber utilizing a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The resulting gamma spectrum was acquired and analyzed using Genie 2000 spectroscopy software. One activation foil was placed over the upper, left chest of RANDO where a pacemaker would be. The rest of the foils were placed over the midline of the patient at different distances, providing a spatial distribution over the phantom. Using lasers and BBs to align the patient, 200 MU square fields were delivered to various treatment sites: the brain, the pancreas, and the prostate. Each field was shot at least a day apart, giving more than enough time for activity of the foil to decay (t1=2 = 54.12 min). Results: The net counts (minus background) of the three aforementioned peaks were used for our measurements. These counts were adjusted to account for detector efficiency, relative photon yields from decay, and the natural abundance of 115-In. The average neutron flux for the closed multi-leaf collimator irradiation was measured to be 1.62 x 106 - 0.18 x 106 cm2 s-1. An order of magnitude estimate of the flux for neutrons up to 1 keV from Diffenderfer et al. gives 3 x 106 cm2 s-1 which does agree on the order of magnitude. Conclusion: Lower energy neutrons have higher interaction cross-sections and are more likely to damage pacemakers. The thermal/slow neutron component may be enough to estimate the overall risk. The true test of the applicability of activation foils is whether or not measurements are capable of predicting cardiac device malfunction. For that, additional studies are needed to provide clinical evidence one way or the other.

  15. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    PubMed

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  16. Probing Oxygen Activation Sites in Two Flavoprotein Oxidases Using Chloride as an Oxygen Surrogate

    SciTech Connect

    Kommoju, Phaneeswara-Rao; Chen, Zhi-wei; Bruckner, Robert C.; Mathews, F. Scott; Jorns, Marilyn Schuman

    2011-08-16

    A single basic residue above the si-face of the flavin ring is the site of oxygen activation in glucose oxidase (GOX) (His516) and monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) (Lys265). Crystal structures of both flavoenzymes exhibit a small pocket at the oxygen activation site that might provide a preorganized binding site for superoxide anion, an obligatory intermediate in the two-electron reduction of oxygen. Chloride binds at these polar oxygen activation sites, as judged by solution and structural studies. First, chloride forms spectrally detectable complexes with GOX and MSOX. The protonated form of His516 is required for tight binding of chloride to oxidized GOX and for rapid reaction of reduced GOX with oxygen. Formation of a binary MSOX-chloride complex requires Lys265 and is not observed with Lys265Met. Binding of chloride to MSOX does not affect the binding of a sarcosine analogue (MTA, methylthioactetate) above the re-face of the flavin ring. Definitive evidence is provided by crystal structures determined for a binary MSOX-chloride complex and a ternary MSOX-chloride-MTA complex. Chloride binds in the small pocket at a position otherwise occupied by a water molecule and forms hydrogen bonds to four ligands that are arranged in approximate tetrahedral geometry: Lys265:NZ, Arg49:NH1, and two water molecules, one of which is hydrogen bonded to FAD:N5. The results show that chloride (i) acts as an oxygen surrogate, (ii) is an effective probe of polar oxygen activation sites, and (iii) provides a valuable complementary tool to the xenon gas method that is used to map nonpolar oxygen-binding cavities.

  17. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  18. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide.

  19. Combined computational and biochemical study reveals the importance of electrostatic interactions between the "pH sensor" and the cation binding site of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Olkhova, Elena; Kozachkov, Lena; Padan, Etana; Michel, Hartmut

    2009-08-15

    Sodium proton antiporters are essential enzymes that catalyze the exchange of sodium ions for protons across biological membranes. The crystal structure of NhaA has provided a basis to explore the mechanism of ion exchange and its unique regulation by pH. Here, the mechanism of the pH activation of the antiporter is investigated through functional and computational studies of several variants with mutations in the ion-binding site (D163, D164). The most significant difference found computationally between the wild type antiporter and the active site variants, D163E and D164N, are low pK(a) values of Glu78 making them insensitive to pH. Although in the variant D163N the pK(a) of Glu78 is comparable to the physiological one, this variant cannot demonstrate the long-range electrostatic effect of Glu78 on the pH-dependent structural reorganization of trans-membrane helix X and, hence, is proposed to be inactive. In marked contrast, variant D164E remains sensitive to pH and can be activated by alkaline pH shift. Remarkably, as expected computationally and discovered here biochemically, D164E is viable and active in Na(+)/H(+) exchange albeit with increased apparent K(M). Our results unravel the unique electrostatic network of NhaA that connect the coupled clusters of the "pH sensor" with the binding site, which is crucial for pH activation of NhaA.

  20. In-growth of an electrically active defect in high-purity silicon after proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Juul Pedersen, H.; Christian Petersen, M.; Privitera, V.; Gurimskaya, Y.; Mesli, A.

    2013-12-14

    Defect-related energy levels in the lower half of the band gap of silicon have been studied with transient-capacitance techniques in high-purity, carbon and oxygen lean, plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition grown, n-and p-type silicon layers after 2-MeV proton irradiations at temperatures at or just below room temperature. The in-growth of a distinct line in deep-level transient spectroscopy spectra, corresponding to a level in the band gap at E{sub V} + 0.357 eV where E{sub V} is the energy of the valence band edge, takes place for anneal temperatures at around room temperature with an activation energy of 0.95 ± 0.08 eV. The line disappears at an anneal temperature of around 450 K. The corresponding defect is demonstrated not to contain boron, carbon, oxygen, or phosphorus. Possible defect candidates are discussed.

  1. Active Damping of the E-P Instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R.J.; Assadi, S.; Byrd, J.M.; Deibele, C.E.; Henderson, S.D.; Lee, S.Y.; McCrady, R.C.; Pivi, M.F.T.; Plum, M.A.; Walbridge, S.B.; Zaugg, T.J.; /Los Alamos

    2008-03-17

    A prototype of an analog, transverse (vertical) feedback system for active damping of the two-stream (e-p) instability has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). This system was able to improve the instability threshold by approximately 30% (as measured by the change in RF buncher voltage at instability threshold). The feedback system configuration, setup procedures, and optimization of performance are described. Results of several experimental tests of system performance are presented including observations of instability threshold improvement and grow-damp experiments, which yield estimates of instability growth and damping rates. A major effort was undertaken to identify and study several factors limiting system performance. Evidence obtained from these tests suggests that performance of the prototype was limited by higher instability growth rates arising from beam leakage into the gap at lower RF buncher voltage and the onset of instability in the horizontal plane, which had no feedback.

  2. Active damping of the e-p instability at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, R. J.; Assadi, S.; Byrd, J. M.; Deibele, C. E.; Henderson, S. D.; Lee, S. Y.; McCrady, R. C.; Pivi, M. F. T.; Plum, M. A.; Walbridge, S. B.; Zaugg, T. J.

    2007-12-15

    A prototype of an analog, transverse (vertical) feedback system for active damping of the two-stream (e-p) instability has been developed and successfully tested at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). This system was able to improve the instability threshold by approximately 30% (as measured by the change in RF buncher voltage at instability threshold). The feedback system configuration, setup procedures, and optimization of performance are described. Results of several experimental tests of system performance are presented including observations of instability threshold improvement and grow-damp experiments, which yield estimates of instability growth and damping rates. A major effort was undertaken to identify and study several factors limiting system performance. Evidence obtained from these tests suggests that performance of the prototype was limited by higher instability growth rates arising from beam leakage into the gap at lower RF buncher voltage and the onset of instability in the horizontal plane, which had no feedback.

  3. Energetic proton irradiation history of the HED parent body regolith and implications for ancient solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. N.; Garrison, D. H.; Palma, R. L.; Bogard, D. D.

    1997-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the Kapoeta howardite, as well as several other meteorites, contain excess concentrations of cosmogenic neon in the darkened, solar-irradiated phase compared to the light, non-irradiated phase. The two explanations offered for the nuclear production of these Ne excesses in the parent body regolith are either from galactic particle (GCR) irradiation or from a greatly enhanced flux of energetic solar protons (SCR), as compared to the recent solar flux. Combining new isotopic data we obtained on acid-etched, separated feldspar from Kapoeta light and dark phases with literature data, we show that the cosmogenic 21Ne /22Ne ratio of light phase feldspar (0.80) is consistent with only GCR irradiation in space for ~3 Myr. However, the 21Ne/22Ne ratio (0.68) derived for irradiation of dark phase feldspar in the Kapoeta regolith indicates that cosmogenic Ne was produced in roughly equal proportions from galactic and solar protons. Considering a simple model of an immature Kapoeta parent body regolith, the duration of this early galactic exposure was only ~3-6 Myr, which would be an upper limit to the solar exposure time of individual grains. Concentrations of cosmogenic 21Ne in pyroxene separates and of cosmogenic 126Xe in both feldspar and pyroxene are consistent with this interpretation. The near-surface irradiation time of individual grains in the Kapoeta regolith probably varied considerably due to regolith mixing to an average GCR irradiation depth of ~10 cm. Because of the very different depth scales for production of solar ~Fe tracks, SCR Ne, and GCR Ne, the actual regolith exposure times for average grains probably differed correspondingly. However, both the SCR 21Ne and solar track ages appear to be longer because of enhanced production by early solar activity. The SCR/GCR production ratio of 21Ne inferred from the Kapoeta data is larger by a at least a factor of 10 and possibly as much as a factor of ~50 compared to recent solar

  4. The roles of active site residues in the catalytic mechanism of methylaspartate ammonia-lyase.

    PubMed

    Raj, Hans; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2013-01-01

    Methylaspartate ammonia-lyase (MAL; EC 4.3.1.2) catalyzes the reversible addition of ammonia to mesaconate to yield l-threo-(2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate and l-erythro-(2S,3R)-3-methylaspartate as products. In the proposed minimal mechanism for MAL of Clostridium tetanomorphum, Lys-331 acts as the (S)-specific base catalyst and abstracts the 3S-proton from l-threo-3-methylaspartate, resulting in an enolate anion intermediate. This enolic intermediate is stabilized by coordination to the essential active site Mg(2+) ion and hydrogen bonding to the Gln-329 residue. Collapse of this intermediate results in the release of ammonia and the formation of mesaconate. His-194 likely acts as the (R)-specific base catalyst and abstracts the 3R-proton from the l-erythro isomer of 3-methylaspartate, yielding the enolic intermediate. In the present study, we have investigated the importance of the residues Gln-73, Phe-170, Gln-172, Tyr-356, Thr-360, Cys-361 and Leu-384 for the catalytic activity of C. tetanomorphum MAL. These residues, which are part of the enzyme surface lining the substrate binding pocket, were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis and the mutant enzymes were characterized for their structural integrity, ability to catalyze the amination of mesaconate, and regio- and diastereoselectivity. Based on the observed properties of the mutant enzymes, combined with previous structural studies and protein engineering work, we propose a detailed catalytic mechanism for the MAL-catalyzed reaction, in which the side chains of Gln-73, Gln-172, Tyr-356, Thr-360, and Leu-384 provide favorable interactions with the substrate, which are important for substrate binding and activation. This detailed knowledge of the catalytic mechanism of MAL can serve as a guide for future protein engineering experiments.

  5. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 nitrogenase active site to increase photobiological hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Masukawa, Hajime; Inoue, Kazuhito; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Wolk, C Peter; Hausinger, Robert P

    2010-10-01

    Cyanobacteria use sunlight and water to produce hydrogen gas (H₂), which is potentially useful as a clean and renewable biofuel. Photobiological H₂ arises primarily as an inevitable by-product of N₂ fixation by nitrogenase, an oxygen-labile enzyme typically containing an iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) active site. In Anabaena sp. strain 7120, the enzyme is localized to the microaerobic environment of heterocysts, a highly differentiated subset of the filamentous cells. In an effort to increase H₂ production by this strain, six nitrogenase amino acid residues predicted to reside within 5 Å of the FeMo-co were mutated in an attempt to direct electron flow selectively toward proton reduction in the presence of N₂. Most of the 49 variants examined were deficient in N₂-fixing growth and exhibited decreases in their in vivo rates of acetylene reduction. Of greater interest, several variants examined under an N₂ atmosphere significantly increased their in vivo rates of H₂ production, approximating rates equivalent to those under an Ar atmosphere, and accumulated high levels of H₂ compared to the reference strains. These results demonstrate the feasibility of engineering cyanobacterial strains for enhanced photobiological production of H₂ in an aerobic, nitrogen-containing environment.

  6. The Active Site of Oligogalacturonate Lyase Provides Unique Insights into Cytoplasmic Oligogalacturonate β-Elimination*

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, D. Wade; Gilbert, Harry J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2010-01-01

    Oligogalacturonate lyases (OGLs; now also classified as pectate lyase family 22) are cytoplasmic enzymes found in pectinolytic members of Enterobacteriaceae, such as the enteropathogen Yersinia enterocolitica. OGLs utilize a β-elimination mechanism to preferentially catalyze the conversion of saturated and unsaturated digalacturonate into monogalacturonate and the 4,5-unsaturated monogalacturonate-like molecule, 5-keto-4-deoxyuronate. To provide mechanistic insights into the specificity of this enzyme activity, we have characterized the OGL from Y. enterocolitica, YeOGL, on oligogalacturonides and determined its three-dimensional x-ray structure to 1.65 Å. The model contains a Mn2+ atom in the active site, which is coordinated by three histidines, one glutamine, and an acetate ion. The acetate mimics the binding of the uronate group of galactourono-configured substrates. These findings, in combination with enzyme kinetics and metal supplementation assays, provide a framework for modeling the active site architecture of OGL. This enzyme appears to contain a histidine for the abstraction of the α-proton in the −1 subsite, a residue that is highly conserved throughout the OGL family and represents a unique catalytic base among pectic active lyases. In addition, we present a hypothesis for an emerging relationship observed between the cellular distribution of pectate lyase folding and the distinct metal coordination chemistries of pectate lyases. PMID:20851883

  7. Promoter-proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Pia K.; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500 base pairs of the promoter. In contrast, promoter-proximal positioning of a pA site-independent histone gene terminator supports high transcription levels. We propose that optimal communication between a pA site-dependent gene terminator and its promoter critically depends on gene length and that short RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes use specialized termination mechanisms to maintain high transcription levels. PMID:23028143

  8. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  9. Interplanetary proton flux and solar wind conditions for different solar activities interacting with spacecraft and astronauts in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat, Cyrus

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research is to determine the interplanetary proton flux and solar wind conditions by using data from several satellites such as Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) in particular GOES 9, GOES 11, GOES 12, GOES 13, and Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) to determine proton flux in different solar wind conditions. The data from above satellites were used to determine space weather conditions in which the goals are to evaluate proton fluxes for four periods of solar cycle activity: a solar cycle 23/24 minimum (2008), close to a solar cycle 22/23 minimum (1997), with intermediate activity (2011) and for about maximum activity for the cycle 23 (2003), to compare data of two period of solar cycle in 2003 and 2008 (Max vs. Min), to compare data of two period of solar cycle in 1997 and 2008 (Min vs. Min), to compare soft X-ray flux from SOHO with proton 1-10 MeV flux from GOES 9 for strong flare in 1997. To conclude the above evaluations are being used to determine the interaction between the space weather conditions and the following consequences of these conditions important for astronautics and everyday human activity: 1- Satellite and Spacecraft charging, 2-Dangerous conditions for onboard electronics and astronauts during strong solar flare events, and 3- Total Electron Content (TEC), Global Positioning System (GPS), and radio communication problems related to solar activity.

  10. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  11. Active and regulatory sites of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Pesi, Rossana; Allegrini, Simone; Careddu, Maria Giovanna; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2010-12-01

    Cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II), which acts preferentially on 6-hydroxypurine nucleotides, is essential for the survival of several cell types. cN-II catalyses both the hydrolysis of nucleotides and transfer of their phosphate moiety to a nucleoside acceptor through formation of a covalent phospho-intermediate. Both activities are regulated by a number of phosphorylated compounds, such as diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap₄A), ADP, ATP, 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (BPG) and phosphate. On the basis of a partial crystal structure of cN-II, we mutated two residues located in the active site, Y55 and T56. We ascertained that the ability to catalyse the transfer of phosphate depends on the presence of a bulky residue in the active site very close to the aspartate residue that forms the covalent phospho-intermediate. The molecular model indicates two possible sites at which adenylic compounds may interact. We mutated three residues that mediate interaction in the first activation site (R144, N154, I152) and three in the second (F127, M436 and H428), and found that Ap₄A and ADP interact with the same site, but the sites for ATP and BPG remain uncertain. The structural model indicates that cN-II is a homotetrameric protein that results from interaction through a specific interface B of two identical dimers that have arisen from interaction of two identical subunits through interface A. Point mutations in the two interfaces and gel-filtration experiments indicated that the dimer is the smallest active oligomerization state. Finally, gel-filtration and light-scattering experiments demonstrated that the native enzyme exists as a tetramer, and no further oligomerization is required for enzyme activation.

  12. Search for effect of longitudinally polarized protons on optically active amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemmon, R. M.; Conzett, H. E.; Bonner, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of irradiation by longitudinally polarized protons on the differential decomposition of amino acid is investigated in a test of the Vester Ulbricht hypothesis that L-amino acids were produced in preference to the D isomers on the primitive earth due to the effects of parity violation in beta decay. Samples of DL-leucine were irradiated with protons of both positive and negative longitudinal polarization, then analyzed by gas chromatography. Despite advantages of higher polarization, lower velocity and higher ionization density of protons with respect to electrons, proton irradation is found to lead to no detectable asymmetries in DL-leucine degradation, even at 50% gross degradation.

  13. The stereochemistry and dynamics of the introduction of hydrogen atoms onto FeMo-co, the active site of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dance, Ian

    2013-11-18

    The catalyzed hydrogenations effected at the active site FeMo-co of nitrogenase have been proposed to involve serial supply of the required multiple protons along a proton wire terminating at sulfur atom S3B of FeMo-co. In conjunction with serial electron transfer to FeMo-co, these protons become H atoms, and then are able to migrate from S3B to other Fe and S atoms of FeMo-co, and to transfer to bound substrate and intermediates. This general model, which can account for all reactions of nitrogenase, involves a preparatory stage in which each incoming H atom is required to move from the proton delivery side of S3B to the opposite migration side of S3B. This report examines the mechanism of this reconfiguration of S3B-H, finding four stable configurations in which S3B-H has pyramidal-trigonal coordination, with one elongated Fe-S3B interaction. The transition states and energies for reconfiguration are described. Pseudotetrahedral four coordination and planar-trigonal coordination for S3B-H are less stable than pyramidal-trigonal coordination. Results are presented for FeMo-co with one, two, three, and four H atoms (the E1H1, E2H2, E3H3, and E4H4 Thorneley-Lowe stages), and the general principles are defined, for application in the various chemical mechanisms of nitrogenase.

  14. Analysis of Hydrogen Tunneling in an Enzyme Active Site using von Neumann Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    2010-01-01

    We build on our earlier quantum wavepacket study of hydrogen transfer in the biological enzyme, soybean lipoxygenase-1, by using von Neumann quantum measurement theory to gain qualitative insights into the transfer event. We treat the enzyme active site as a measurement device which acts on the tunneling hydrogen nucleus via the potential it exerts at each configuration. A series of changing active site geometries during the tunneling process effects a sequential projection of the initial, reactant state onto the final, product state. We study this process using several different kinds of von Neumann measurements and show how a discrete sequence of such measurements not only progressively increases the projection of the hydrogen nuclear wavepacket onto the product side but also favors proton over deuteron transfer. Several qualitative features of the hydrogen tunneling problem found in wavepacket dynamics studies are also recovered here. These include the shift in the “transition state” towards the reactant as a result of nuclear quantization, greater participation of excited states in the case of deuterium, and presence of critical points along the reaction coordinate that facilitate hydrogen and deuterium transfer and coincide with surface crossings. To further “tailor” the dynamics, we construct a perturbation to the sequence of measurements, that is a perturbation to the dynamical sequence of active site geometry evolution, which leads us to insight on the existence of sensitive regions of the reaction profile where subtle changes to the dynamics of the active site can have an effect on the hydrogen and deuterium transfer process. PMID:22933858

  15. A Base-Independent Repair Mechanism for DNA Glycosylase—No Discrimination Within the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Iris D.; Sadeghian, Keyarash; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous occurrence of DNA damages renders its repair machinery a crucial requirement for the genomic stability and the survival of living organisms. Deficiencies in DNA repair can lead to carcinogenesis, Alzheimer, or Diabetes II, where increased amounts of oxidized DNA bases have been found in patients. Despite the highest mutation frequency among oxidized DNA bases, the base-excision repair process of oxidized and ring-opened guanine, FapydG (2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine), remained unclear since it is difficult to study experimentally. We use newly-developed linear-scaling quantum-chemical methods (QM) allowing us to include up to 700 QM-atoms and achieving size convergence. Instead of the widely assumed base-protonated pathway we find a ribose-protonated repair mechanism which explains experimental observations and shows strong evidence for a base-independent repair process. Our results also imply that discrimination must occur during recognition, prior to the binding within the active site. PMID:26013033

  16. BAX Activation is Initiated at a Novel Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Suzuki, Motoshi; Davis, Marguerite L.; Pitter, Kenneth; Bird, Gregory H.; Katz, Samuel G.; Tu, Ho-Chou; Kim, Hyungjin; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Tjandra, Nico; Walensky, Loren D.

    2008-01-01

    BAX is a pro-apoptotic protein of the BCL-2 family stationed in the cytosol until activated by a diversity of stress stimuli to induce cell death. Anti-apoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 counteract BAX-mediated cell death. Although an interaction site that confers survival functionality has been defined for anti-apoptotic proteins, an activation site has not been identified for BAX, rendering its explicit trigger mechanism unknown. We previously developed Stabilized Alpha-Helix of BCL-2 domains (SAHBs) that directly initiate BAX-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis. Here we demonstrate by NMR analysis that BIM SAHB binds BAX at an interaction site that is distinct from the canonical binding groove characterized for anti-apoptotic proteins. The specificity of the BIM SAHB-BAX interaction is highlighted by point mutagenesis that abrogates functional activity, confirming that BAX activation is initiated at this novel structural location. Thus, we have now defined a BAX interaction site for direct activation, establishing a new target for therapeutic modulation of apoptosis. PMID:18948948

  17. A proton-activated, outwardly rectifying chloride channel in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Zhiyong; Zhang Wei; Chen Liang; Wang Rong; Kan Xiaohong; Sun Guizhen; Liu Chunxi; Li Li Zhang Yun

    2008-07-04

    Extracellular acidic pH-activated chloride channel I{sub Cl,acid}, has been characterized in HEK 293 cells and mammalian cardiac myocytes. This study was designed to characterize I{sub Cl,acid} in human umbilical vein endothelial cells(HUVECs). The activation and deactivation of the current rapidly and repeatedly follows the change of the extracellular solution at pH 4.3, with the threshold pH 5.3. In addition, at very positive potentials, the current displays a time-dependent facilitation. pH-response relationship for I{sub Cl,acid} revealed that EC{sub 50} is pH 4.764 with a threshold pH value of pH 5.3 and nH of 14.545. The current can be blocked by the Cl{sup -} channel inhibitor DIDS (100 {mu}M). In summary, for the first time we report the presence of proton-activated, outwardly rectifying chloride channel in HUVECs. Because an acidic environment can develop in local myocardium under pathological conditions such as myocardial ischemia, I{sub Cl,acid} would play a role in regulation of EC function under these pathological conditions.

  18. Band 3 (AE1, SLC4A1)-mediated transport of stilbenedisulfonates. III: Role of solute and protein structure in proton-activated stilbenedisulfonate influx.

    PubMed

    Salhany, James M; Cordes, Karen S; Sloan, Renee L

    2006-01-01

    DBDS (4,4'-dibenzamido-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonate) influx into magnesium resealed ghosts (MRSG) occurs over the anion/proton co-transport pH range (pK approximately 5.0). Here, factors are studied which may influence the pH dependence of DBDS transport. Accumulation of various stilbenedisulfonate (SD) molecules was studied and found to be correlated with the hydrophobicity of the R-groups (Hansch factor), not protonation of the sulfonates. The role of proton binding to glutamate 681 was found not to be part of the rate-limiting step in DBDS uptake by MRSG. Finally, the pH dependence of changes in quaternary structure/conformational state was investigated using an assay involving photo-crosslinking of band 3 subunits in the presence of DASD (4,4'-diazido-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonate). Lowering the pH promoted intersubunit crosslinking by DASD, with a pK value of 4.75+/-1.0. This value is comparable to the pK for DBDS binding to the "second" class of sites on control band 3 (pK = 5.01+/-0.16), and to DBDS influx into control MRSG (pK values between 4.57+/-0.15 and 4.7+/-0.1). Susceptibility to photo-crosslinking was reversed by raising the pH prior to initiation of the reaction. Significantly, no photo-crosslinking was observed between pH 6.0 and 8.0, where band 3 subunits are known to exist as stable dimers and tetramers. We conclude that intersubunit photo-crosslinking does not simply involve random collision between photo-activated DASD and band 3. Rather, proton binding to band 3 either alters the conformation at the interface between subunits of pre-existing tetramers, or it promotes self-association of stable dimers to a "novel" tetrameric conformational state.

  19. Involvement of novel autophosphorylation sites in ATM activation.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Graham, Mark E; Peng, Cheng; Chen, Philip; Robinson, Phillip J; Lavin, Martin F

    2006-08-09

    ATM kinase plays a central role in signaling DNA double-strand breaks to cell cycle checkpoints and to the DNA repair machinery. Although the exact mechanism of ATM activation remains unknown, efficient activation requires the Mre11 complex, autophosphorylation on S1981 and the involvement of protein phosphatases and acetylases. We report here the identification of several additional phosphorylation sites on ATM in response to DNA damage, including autophosphorylation on pS367 and pS1893. ATM autophosphorylates all these sites in vitro in response to DNA damage. Antibodies against phosphoserine 1893 revealed rapid and persistent phosphorylation at this site after in vivo activation of ATM kinase by ionizing radiation, paralleling that observed for S1981 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation was dependent on functional ATM and on the Mre11 complex. All three autophosphorylation sites are physiologically important parts of the DNA damage response, as phosphorylation site mutants (S367A, S1893A and S1981A) were each defective in ATM signaling in vivo and each failed to correct radiosensitivity, genome instability and cell cycle checkpoint defects in ataxia-telangiectasia cells. We conclude that there are at least three functionally important radiation-induced autophosphorylation events in ATM.

  20. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  1. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  2. Spectroscopic studies of the active site of galactose oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, P.F.; Brown, R.D. III; Koenig, S.H.

    1995-07-19

    X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopy have been used to probe the copper site structure in galactose oxidase at pH 4.5 and 7.0. the results suggest that there are no major differences in the structure of the tetragonal Cu(II) site at these pH values. Analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) indicates that four N,O scatterers are present at approximately 2 {Angstrom}; these are presumably the equatorial ligands. In addition, the EXAFS data establish that oxidative activation to produce the active-site tyrosine radical does not cause major changes in the copper coordination environment. Therefore results obtained on the one-electron reduced enzyme, containing Cu(II) but not the tyrosine radical, probably also apply to the catalytically active Cu(II)/tyrosine radical state. Solvent water exchange, inhibitor binding, and substrate binding have been probed via nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) measurements. The NMRD profile of galactose oxidase is quantitatively consistent with the rapid exchange of a single, equatorial water ligand with a Cu(II)-O separation of about 2.4 {Angstrom}. Azide and cyanide displace this coordinated water. The binding of azide and the substrate dihydroxyacetone produce very similar effects on the NMRD profile of galactose oxidase, indicating that substrates also bind to the active site Cu(II) in an equatorial position.

  3. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  4. Enumerating Pathways of Proton Abstraction Based on a Spatial and Electrostatic Analysis of Residues in the Catalytic Site

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    The pathways of proton abstraction (PA), a key aspect of most catalytic reactions, is often controversial and highly debated. Ultrahigh-resolution diffraction studies, molecular dynamics, quantum mechanics and molecular mechanic simulations are often adopted to gain insights in the PA mechanisms in enzymes. These methods require expertise and effort to setup and can be computationally intensive. We present a push button methodology – Proton abstraction Simulation (PRISM) – to enumerate the possible pathways of PA in a protein with known 3D structure based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of residues in the proximity of a given nucleophilic residue. Proton movements are evaluated in the vicinity of this nucleophilic residue based on distances, potential differences, spatial channels and characteristics of the individual residues (polarity, acidic, basic, etc). Modulating these parameters eliminates their empirical nature and also might reveal pathways that originate from conformational changes. We have validated our method using serine proteases and concurred with the dichotomy in PA in Class A β-lactamases, both of which are hydrolases. The PA mechanism in a transferase has also been corroborated. The source code is made available at www.sanchak.com/prism. PMID:22745790

  5. Crystal structure, exogenous ligand binding, and redox properties of an engineered diiron active site in a bacterial hemerythrin.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yasunori; Onoda, Akira; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Takano, Yu; Hirota, Shun; Kurtz, Donald M; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Takashi

    2013-11-18

    A nonheme diiron active site in a 13 kDa hemerythrin-like domain of the bacterial chemotaxis protein DcrH-Hr contains an oxo bridge, two bridging carboxylate groups from Glu and Asp residues, and five terminally ligated His residues. We created a unique diiron coordination sphere containing five His and three Glu/Asp residues by replacing an Ile residue with Glu in DcrH-Hr. Direct coordination of the carboxylate group of E119 to Fe2 of the diiron site in the I119E variant was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. The substituted Glu is adjacent to an exogenous ligand-accessible tunnel. UV-vis absorption spectra indicate that the additional coordination of E119 inhibits the binding of the exogenous ligands azide and phenol to the diiron site. The extent of azide binding to the diiron site increases at pH ≤ 6, which is ascribed to protonation of the carboxylate ligand of E119. The diferrous state (deoxy form) of the engineered diiron site with the extra Glu residue is found to react more slowly than wild type with O2 to yield the diferric state (met form). The additional coordination of E119 to the diiron site also slows the rate of reduction from the met form. All these processes were found to be pH-dependent, which can be attributed to protonation state and coordination status of the E119 carboxylate. These results demonstrate that modifications of the endogenous coordination sphere can produce significant changes in the ligand binding and redox properties in a prototypical nonheme diiron-carboxylate protein active site.

  6. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  7. Bile acids potentiate proton-activated currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing human acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC1a).

    PubMed

    Ilyaskin, Alexandr V; Diakov, Alexei; Korbmacher, Christoph; Haerteis, Silke

    2017-02-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are nonvoltage-gated sodium channels transiently activated by extracellular protons and belong to the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/Degenerin (DEG) family of ion channels. Bile acids have been shown to activate two members of this family, the bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) and ENaC. To investigate whether bile acids also modulate ASIC function, human ASIC1a was heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Exposing oocytes to tauro-conjugated cholic (t-CA), deoxycholic (t-DCA), and chenodeoxycholic (t-CDCA) acid at pH 7.4 did not activate ASIC1a-mediated whole-cell currents. However, in ASIC1a expressing oocytes the whole-cell currents elicited by pH 5.5 were significantly increased in the presence of these bile acids. Single-channel recordings in outside-out patches confirmed that t-DCA enhanced the stimulatory effect of pH 5.5 on ASIC1a channel activity. Interestingly, t-DCA reduced single-channel current amplitude by ~15% which suggests an interaction of t-DCA with a region close to the channel pore. Molecular docking predicted binding of bile acids to the pore region near the degenerin site (G433) in the open conformation of the channel. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the amino acid residue G433 is critically involved in the potentiating effect of bile acids on ASIC1a activation by protons.

  8. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  9. Proton: The Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  10. Influence of the proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole on distribution and activity of doxorubicin in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man; Lee, Carol; Wang, Marina; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-10-01

    Cellular causes of resistance and limited drug distribution within solid tumors limit therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Acidic endosomes in cancer cells mediate autophagy, which facilitates survival of stressed cells, and may contribute to drug resistance. Basic drugs (e.g. doxorubicin) are sequestered in acidic endosomes, thereby diverting drugs from their target DNA and decreasing penetration to distal cells. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may raise endosomal pH, with potential to improve drug efficacy and distribution in solid tumors. We determined the effects of the PPI lansoprazole to modify the activity of doxorubicin. To gain insight into its mechanisms, we studied the effects of lansoprazole on endosomal pH, and on the spatial distribution of doxorubicin, and of biomarkers reflecting its activity, using in vitro and murine models. Lansoprazole showed concentration-dependent effects to raise endosomal pH and to inhibit endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin in cultured tumor cells. Lansoprazole was not toxic to cancer cells but potentiated the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and enhanced its penetration through multilayered cell cultures. In solid tumors, lansoprazole improved the distribution of doxorubicin but also increased expression of biomarkers of drug activity throughout the tumor. Combined treatment with lansoprazole and doxorubicin was more effective in delaying tumor growth as compared to either agent alone. Together, lansoprazole enhances the therapeutic effects of doxorubicin both by improving its distribution and increasing its activity in solid tumors. Use of PPIs to improve drug distribution and to inhibit autophagy represents a promising strategy to enhance the effectiveness of anticancer drugs in solid tumors.

  11. Probing the promiscuous active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase using synthetic substrates, homology modeling, and active site modification.

    PubMed

    Daniellou, Richard; Zheng, Hongyan; Langill, David M; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2007-06-26

    The active site of myo-inositol dehydrogenase (IDH, EC 1.1.1.18) from Bacillus subtilis recognizes a variety of mono- and disaccharides, as well as 1l-4-O-substituted inositol derivatives. It catalyzes the NAD+-dependent oxidation of the axial alcohol of these substrates with comparable kinetic constants. We have found that 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol does not act as a substrate for IDH, in contrast to structurally similar compounds such as those bearing substituted benzyl substituents in the same position. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol and 4-O-(2-naphthyl)methyl-myo-inositol, which is a substrate for IDH, shows a distinct difference in the preferred conformation of the aryl substituent. Conformational analysis of known substrates of IDH suggests that this conformational difference may account for the difference in reactivity of 4-O-p-toluenesulfonyl-myo-inositol in the presence of IDH. A sequence alignment of IDH with the homologous glucose-fructose oxidoreductase allowed the construction of an homology model of inositol dehydrogenase, to which NADH and 4-O-benzyl-scyllo-inosose were docked and the active site energy minimized. The active site model is consistent with all experimental results and suggests that a conserved tyrosine-glycine-tyrosine motif forms the hydrophobic pocket adjoining the site of inositol recognition. Y233F and Y235F retain activity, while Y233R and Y235R do not. A histidine-aspartate pair, H176 and D172, are proposed to act as a dyad in which H176 is the active site acid/base. The enzyme is inactivated by diethyl pyrocarbonate, and the mutants H176A and D172N show a marked loss of activity. Kinetic isotope effect experiments with D172N indicate that chemistry is rate-determining for this mutant.

  12. Nanosized IrO(x)-Ir Catalyst with Relevant Activity for Anodes of Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolysis Produced by a Cost-Effective Procedure.

    PubMed

    Lettenmeier, Philipp; Wang, Li; Golla-Schindler, Ute; Gazdzicki, Pawel; Cañas, Natalia A; Handl, Michael; Hiesgen, Renate; Hosseiny, Seyed S; Gago, Aldo S; Friedrich, Kaspar A

    2016-01-11

    We have developed a highly active nanostructured iridium catalyst for anodes of proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis. Clusters of nanosized crystallites are obtained by reducing surfactant-stabilized IrCl3 in water-free conditions. The catalyst shows a five-fold higher activity towards oxygen evolution reaction (OER) than commercial Ir-black. The improved kinetics of the catalyst are reflected in the high performance of the PEM electrolyzer (1 mg(Ir) cm(-2)), showing an unparalleled low overpotential and negligible degradation. Our results demonstrate that this enhancement cannot be only attributed to increased surface area, but rather to the ligand effect and low coordinate sites resulting in a high turnover frequency (TOF). The catalyst developed herein sets a benchmark and a strategy for the development of ultra-low loading catalyst layers for PEM electrolysis.

  13. Crystal Structures and Functional Characterization of Wild Type and Active Sites Mutants of CYP101D1

    PubMed Central

    Batabyal, Dipanwita; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Although CYP101D1 and P450cam catayze the same reaction at a similar rate and share strikingly similar active site architectures, there are significance functional differences. CYP101D1 thus provides an opportunity to probe what structural and functional features must be shared and what can differ yet maintain high catalytic efficiency. Crystal structures of the cyanide complex of wild type CYP101D1 and it active site mutants, D259N and T260A, have been solved. The conformational changes in CYP101D1 upon cyanide binding are very similar to P450cam indicating a similar mechanism for proton delivery during oxygen activation using solvent assisted proton transfer. The D259N-CN− complex shows a perturbed solvent structure compared to wild type which is similar to what was observed in the oxy-complex of the corresonding D251N mutant in P450cam. As in P450cam the T260A mutant is highly uncoupled while the D259N gives barely detectable activity. Despite these similarities, CYP101D1 is able to use the P450cam redox partners while P450cam cannot use the CYP101D1 redox partners. Thus the strict requirement of P450cam for its own redox partner is relaxed in CYP101D1. Differences in the local environment of the essential Asp (Asp259 in CYP101D1) provides a strucutral basis for understanding these functional differences. PMID:24261604

  14. The proton conducting electrolyte BaTi0.5In0.5O2.75: determination of the deuteron site and its local environment.

    PubMed

    Norberg, Stefan T; Rahman, Seikh M H; Hull, Stephen; Knee, Christopher S; Eriksson, Sten G

    2013-11-13

    Deuterated BaTi0.5In0.5O2.75 has been studied with neutron total (Bragg plus diffuse) scattering data, using both the Rietveld refinement method and the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modelling technique, to investigate the preferred proton site and its local structural environment. The Rietveld analysis shows an excellent fit between experimental data and a long-range cubic description of the BaTi0.5In0.5O2.53(OD)0.44 perovskite structure containing a statistical distribution of Ti and In ions at the centre of regular (Ti/In)O6 octahedra. However, an RMC analysis of the data reveals substantial local structural features that reflect limitations of the Rietveld method for studies of this type. The Ti-O and In-O pair distribution functions given by the RMC analysis are markedly different from each other, with average Ti-O and In-O bond distances of 2.035 Å and 2.159 Å, respectively. The InO6 octahedra are regular in shape whereas the TiO6 octahedra are distorted. The average O-D bond distance is roughly 0.96 Å, and the preferred deuteron sites have a second nearest oxygen distance of 2.13 Å, which confirms localized tilting of the deuteron and indicates a substantial degree of hydrogen bonding. The impact of octahedral distortion and hydrogen bonding on the proton conduction mechanism is discussed.

  15. 1H-NMR comparative study of the active site in shark (Galeorhinus japonicus), horse, and sperm whale deoxy myoglobins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Iwafune, K; Chûjô, R; Inoue, Y; Imai, K; Suzuki, T

    1992-09-01

    1H-NMR spectra of deoxy myoglobins (Mbs) from shark (Galeorhinus japonicus), horse, and sperm whale have been studied to gain insights into their active site structure. It has been demonstrated for the first time that nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) can be observed between heme peripheral side-chain proton resonances of these paramagnetic complexes. Val-E11 methyl and His-F8 C delta H proton resonances of these Mbs were also assigned from the characteristic shift and line width. The hyperfine shift of the former resonance was used to calculate the magnetic anisotropy of the protein. The shift analysis of the latter resonance, together with the previously assigned His-F8 N delta H proton resonance, revealed that the strain on the Fe-N epsilon bond is in the order horse Mb approximately whale Mb < shark Mb and that the hydrogen bond strength of the His-F8 N delta H proton to the main-chain carbonyl oxygen in the preceding turn of the F helix is in the order shark Mb < horse Mb < whale Mb. Weaker Feporphyrin interaction in shark Mb was manifested in a smaller shift of the heme methyl proton resonance and appears to result from distortion of the coordination geometry in this Mb. Larger strain on the Fe-N epsilon bond in shark Mb should be to some extent attributed to its lowered O2 affinity (P50 = 1.1 mmHg at 20 degrees C), compared to whale and horse Mbs.

  16. SU-E-T-230: Measurement of Proton-Activated Positron Emission with PRESAGE 3-D Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, M; Mawlawi, O; Ibbott, G; Adamovics, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measurement of positron emission following proton beam irradiation of a target has been studied as a method of in-vivo dosimetry. Relative dosimetry studies between a phantom and treatment plan are susceptible to range uncertainties from material heterogeneities and setup error. By using the radiochromic polyurethane dosimeter PRESAGE, we can correlate the proton dose distribution to the PET activity measurement within a single detector. The PRESAGE formulation used was developed for high-LET proton radiotherapy, has similar density and RLSP to tissue, and consists of a greater carbon component, which gives it a higher positron signal than many other 3D detectors. Methods: Three cylindrical PRESAGE dosimeters were irradiated semi-uniformly to 500 cGy with 180- MeV protons. The beam was directed along the dosimeter axis and delivered a 2-cm SOBP at the center of the dosimeter. The dosimeters were rushed to a nearby PET/CT where imaging began within 15 minutes, less than a single half-life of 11C. A 3-hr measurement captured the full activation decay. Afterwards, the dose profiles were measured by optical-CT. A direct comparison between the measured dose and the positron emission was performed using CERR software. Results: The correlations between dose distributions and PET activity were consistent with previous studies in that the proximal region of the SOBP displayed the highest activity. The spatial distributions between the dose and activity were similar. Along the central axis of the beam, we found a shift in the distal 80% of 1 cm. The lateral profile showed good agreement between dose and activity. PET imaging times between 30-min and 3-hrs showed <5% discrepancy. Conclusion: PRESAGE dosimeters offer a strong and unique potential to accurately correlate dosimetric and PET activation information. Implementation in an anthropomorphic phantom could be used to study representative treatment plans. NIH grant 5R01CA100835.

  17. Effect of basic site substituents on concerted proton-electron transfer in hydrogen-bonded pyridyl-phenols.

    PubMed

    Markle, Todd F; Tronic, Tristan A; DiPasquale, Antonio G; Kaminsky, Werner; Mayer, James M

    2012-12-20

    Separated concerted proton-electron transfer (sCPET) reactions of two series of phenols with pendent substituted pyridyl moieties are described. The pyridine is either attached directly to the phenol (HOAr-pyX) or connected through a methylene linker (HOArCH(2)pyX) (X = 4-NO(2), 5-CF(3), 4-CH(3), and 4-NMe(2)). Electron-donating and -withdrawing substituents have a substantial effect on the chemical environment of the transferring proton, as indicated by IR and (1)H NMR spectra, X-ray structures, and computational studies. One-electron oxidation of the phenols occurs concomitantly with proton transfer from the phenolic oxygen to the pyridyl nitrogen. The oxidation potentials vary linearly with the pK(a) of the free pyridine (pyX), with slopes slightly below the Nerstian value of 59 mV/pK(a). For the HOArCH(2)pyX series, the rate constants k(sCPET) for oxidation by NAr(3)(•+) or [Fe(diimine)(3)](3+) vary primarily with the thermodynamic driving force (ΔG°(sCPET)), whether ΔG° is changed by varying the potential of the oxidant or the substituent on the pyridine, indicating a constant intrinsic barrier λ. In contrast, the substituents in the HOAr-pyX series affect λ as well as ΔG°(sCPET), and compounds with electron-withdrawing substituents have significantly lower reactivity. The relationship between the structural and spectroscopic properties of the phenols and their CPET reactivity is discussed.

  18. Characteristics of active regions associated to large solar energetic proton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronarska, K.; Michalek, G.

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between properties of active regions (ARs) and solar energetic particles (SEP events, protons with energy ⩾10 MeV) is examined. For this purpose we study 84 SEP events recorded during the SOHO era (1996-2014). We compare properties of these SEP events with associated ARs, flares and CMEs. The ARs are characterized by McIntosh classification. Statistical analysis demonstrates that SEP events are more likely to be associated to the ARs having complex magnetic structures and the most energetic SEPs are ejected only from the associated ARs having a large and asymmetric penumbra. This tendency is used to estimate intensities of potential SEP events. For this purpose we express a probability of occurrence of an SEP event from a given AR which is correlated with fluxes of associated SEPs. We find that SEP events associated with ARs from eastern longitudes have to be more complex to produce SEP events at Earth. On the other hand, SEP particles originating from mid-longitudes (30 ° < longitude < 70 °) on the west side of solar disk are associated to the least complex ARs. These results could be useful for forecasting of space weather.

  19. On active disturbance rejection in temperature regulation of the proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dazi; Li, Chong; Gao, Zhiqiang; Jin, Qibing

    2015-06-01

    Operating a Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system to maintain the stack temperature stable is one of the key issues in PEMFC's normal electrochemical reaction process. Its temperature characteristic is easily affected by inlet gas humidity, external disturbances, and electrical load changes and so on. Because of the complexity and nonlinearity of the reaction process, it is hard to build a model totally consistent with the real characteristic of the process. If model uncertainty, external disturbances, parameters changes can be regarded as "total disturbance", which is then estimated and compensated, the accurate model is no longer required and the control design can be greatly simplified to meet the practical needs. Based on this idea, an active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) with a switching law is proposed for the problem of precise temperature regulation in PEMFC. Results of the work show that the proposed control system allows the PEMFC to operate successfully at the temperature of 343 K point in the presence of two different disturbances.

  20. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Silicate Dust Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts [1-3]. Nevertheless, among those structures K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. In this study, the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars were investigated in closer details. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. We give a potential explanation of the increased ice nucleation activity of K-feldspar. The ice nucleating sites are very much dependent on the alkali ion present by altering the water structure and the feldspar surface. The higher activity of K-feldspar can be attributed to the presence of potassium ions on the surface and surface bilayer. The alkali-ions have different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar. Chaotropic behavior of Calcium and Sodium ions are lowering the ice nucleation potential of the other feldspars, while kosmotropic Potassium has a neutral or even positive effect. Furthermore we investigated the influence of milling onto the ice nucleation of quartz particles. The ice nucleation activity can be increased by mechanical milling, by introducing more molecular, nucleation active defects to the particle surface. This effect is larger than expected by plane surface increase. [1] Atkinson et al. The Importance of Feldspar for Ice Nucleation by Mineral Dust in Mixed-Phase Clouds. Nature 2013, 498, 355-358. [2] Yakobi-Hancock et al.. Feldspar Minerals as Efficient Deposition Ice Nuclei. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2013, 13, 11175-11185. [3] Zolles et al. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015 accepted.

  1. The protonation state of catalytic residues in the resting state of KasA revisited: detailed mechanism for the activation of KasA by its own substrate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wook; Engels, Bernd

    2014-02-11

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative pathogen of tuberculosis, the second leading cause of death from an infectious disease globally. β-Ketoacyl ACP synthase I (KasA) is essential for the survival of M. tuberculosis, because it is one of the key enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of mycolic acid, the building block of the cell wall in M. tuberculosis. To distinguish among the various suggested mechanisms of KasA that are based on different protonation states of the active site, we characterize its resting state by various theoretical approaches ranging from first-principle-based quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical molecular dynamics simulations (QM/MM MD) with large QM parts to force field-based MD and free energy perturbation computations. In contrast to a previous study that used less reliable semiempirical approaches in combination with smaller QM parts, our improved computations predict that the most important active site residues, Cys171 and His311, are neutral. Because the neutral catalytic residues are too unreactive to attack the substrate, the question of how their activation is achieved arises. Combining our computed results with structural information about the malonyl binding pocket, we devised a detailed model about the activation mechanism. A conformational change of Phe404 possibly triggered by the substrate is central for the activation because it switches KasA to the sufficiently reactive zwitterionic state.

  2. Face the Edges: Catalytic Active Sites of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Edges are special sites in nanomaterials. The atoms residing on the edges have different environments compared to those in other parts of a nanomaterial and, therefore, they may have different properties. Here, recent progress in nanomaterial fields is summarized from the viewpoint of the edges. Typically, edge sites in MoS2 or metals, other than surface atoms, can perform as active centers for catalytic reactions, so the method to enhance performance lies in the optimization of the edge structures. The edges of multicomponent interfaces present even more possibilities to enhance the activities of nanomaterials. Nanoframes and ultrathin nanowires have similarities to conventional edges of nanoparticles, the application of which as catalysts can help to reduce the use of costly materials. Looking beyond this, the edge structures of graphene are also essential for their properties. In short, the edge structure can influence many properties of materials. PMID:27980960

  3. Mechanism of activation of elongation factor Tu by ribosome: catalytic histidine activates GTP by protonation.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Alexey; Field, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) is central to prokaryotic protein synthesis as it has the role of delivering amino-acylated tRNAs to the ribosome. Release of EF-Tu, after correct binding of the EF-Tu:aa-tRNA complex to the ribosome, is initiated by GTP hydrolysis. This reaction, whose mechanism is uncertain, is catalyzed by EF-Tu, but requires activation by the ribosome. There have been a number of mechanistic proposals, including those spurred by a recent X-ray crystallographic analysis of a ribosome:EF-Tu:aa-tRNA:GTP-analog complex. In this work, we have investigated these and alternative hypotheses, using high-level quantum chemical/molecular mechanical simulations for the wild-type protein and its His85Gln mutant. For both proteins, we find previously unsuggested mechanisms as being preferred, in which residue 85, either His or Gln, directly assists in the reaction. Analysis shows that the RNA has a minor catalytic effect in the wild-type reaction, but plays a significant role in the mutant by greatly stabilizing the reaction's transition state. Given the similarity between EF-Tu and other members of the translational G-protein family, it is likely that these mechanisms of ribosome-activated GTP hydrolysis are pertinent to all of these proteins.

  4. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  5. Concerted Proton-Electron Transfer in a Ruthenium Terpyridyl-Benzoate System with a Large Separation between the Redox and Basic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Manner, Virginia W.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand how the separation between the electron and proton-accepting sites affects proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactivity, we have prepared ruthenium complexes with 4′-(4-carboxyphenyl)terpyridine ligands, and studied reactivity with hydrogen atom donors (H-X). RuII(pydic)(tpy-PhCOOH) (RuIIPhCOOH), was synthesized in one pot from [(p-cymene)RuCl2]2, sodium 4′-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridine ([Na+]tpy-PhCOO−), and disodium pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate (Na2pydic). RuIIPhCOOH plus nBu4NOH in DMF yields the deprotonated Ru(II) complex, nBu4N[RuII(pydic)(tpy-PhCOO)] (RuIIPhCOO−). The Ru(III) complex (RuIIIPhCOO) has been isolated by one-electron oxidation of RuIIPhCOO− with triarylaminium radical cations (NAr3•+). The bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of the O–H bond in RuIIPhCOOH is calculated from pKa and E1/2 measurements as 87 kcal mol-1, making RuIIIPhCOO a strong hydrogen atom acceptor. There are 10 bonds and ca. 11.2 Å separating the metal from the carboxylate basic site in RuIIIPhCOO. Even with this separation, RuIIIPhCOO oxidizes the hydrogen atom donor TEMPOH (BDFE = 66.5 kcal mol-1, ΔG°rxn = -21 kcal mol-1) by removal of an electron and a proton to form RuIIPhCOOH and TEMPO radical in a concerted proton-electron transfer (CPET) process. The second order rate constant for this reaction is (1.1 ± 0.1) × 105 M-1 s-1 with kH/kD = 2.1 ± 0.2, similar to the observed kinetics in an analogous system without the phenyl spacer, RuIII(pydic)(tpy-COO) (RuIIICOO−). In contrast, hydrogen transfer from 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-methoxyphenol [tBu2(OMe)ArOH] to RuIIIPhCOO is several orders of magnitude slower than the analogous reaction with RuIIICOO. PMID:19569636

  6. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  7. Nest predation increases with parental activity: separating nest site and parental activity effects.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T E; Scott, J; Menge, C

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection. PMID:11413645

  8. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  9. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  10. [Mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis].

    PubMed

    Li, Lifeng; Ni, Ye; Sun, Zhihao

    2012-04-01

    Arginine deiminase (ADI) has been studied as a potential anti-cancer agent for inhibiting arginine-auxotrophic tumors (such as melanomas and hepatocellular carcinomas) in phase III clinical trials. In this work, we studied the molecular mechanism of arginine deiminase activity by site-directed mutagenesis. Three mutation sites, A128, H404 and 1410, were introduced into wild-type ADI gene by QuikChange site-directed mutagenesis method, and four ADI mutants M1 (A128T), M2 (H404R), M3 (I410L), and M4 (A128T, H404R) were obtained. The ADI mutants were individually expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the enzymatic properties of the purified mutant proteins were determined. The results show that both A128T and H404R had enhanced optimum pH, higher activity and stability of ADI under physiological condition (pH 7.4), as well as reduced K(m) value. This study provides an insight into the molecular mechanism of the ADI activity, and also the experimental evidence for the rational protein evolution in the future.

  11. SU-E-T-666: Radionuclides and Activity of the Patient Apertures Used in a Proton Beam of Wobbling System

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.Y.; Chen, H.H.; Tsai, H.Y.; Sheu, R.J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the radionuclides and quantify the activity of the patient apertures used in a 190-MeV proton beam of wobbling system. Methods: A proton beam of wobbling system in the first proton center in Taiwan, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, was used to bombard the patient apertures. The patient aperture was composed of 60.5 % copper, 39.4 % Zinc, 0.05 % iron, 0.05 % lead. A protable high-purity germanium (HPGe) coaxial detector was used to measure the spectra of the induced nuclides of patient apertures. The analysis of the spectra and the identification of the radionuclides were preliminarily operated by the Nuclide Navigator III Master Library. On the basis of the results by Nuclide Navigator III Master Library, we manually selected the reliable nuclides by the gamma-ray energies, branching ratio, and half life. In the spectra, we can quantify the activity of radionuclides by the Monte Carlo efficiency transfer method. Results: In this study, the radioisotopes activated in patient apertures by the 190-MeV proton beam were divided into two categories. The first category is long half-life radionuclides, such as Co-56 (half life, 77.3 days). Other radionuclides of Cu-60, Cu-61, Cu-62, Cu-66, and Zn-62 have shorter half life. The radionuclide of Cu-60 had the highest activity. From calculation with the efficiency transfer method, the deviations between the computed results and the measured efficiencies were mostly within 10%. Conclusion: To identify the radionuclides and quantify the activity helps us to estimate proper time intervals for cooling the patient apertures. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of ripple filters designed for proton and carbon ion beams in hadrontherapy with active scanning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourhaleb, F.; Attili, A.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, P.; Marchetto, F.; Donetti, M.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; Iliescu, S.; La Rosa, A.; Pardo, J.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.

    2008-02-01

    Proton and carbon ion beams have a very sharp Bragg peak. For proton beams of energies smaller than 100 MeV, fitting with a gaussian the region of the maximum of the Bragg peak, the sigma along the beam direction is smaller than 1 mm, while for carbon ion beams, the sigma derived with the same technique is smaller than 1 mm for energies up to 360 MeV. In order to use low energy proton and carbon ion beams in hadrontherapy and to achieve an acceptable homogeneity of the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) either the peak positions along the beam have to be quite close to each other or the longitudinal peak shape needs to be broaden at least few millimeters by means of a properly designed ripple filter. With a synchrotron accelerator in conjunction with active scanning techniques the use of a ripple filter is necessary to reduce the numbers of energy switches necessary to obtain a smooth SOBP, leading also to shorter overall irradiation times. We studied the impact of the design of the ripple filter on the dose uniformity in the SOBP region by means of Monte Carlo simulations, implemented using the package Geant4. We simulated the beam delivery line supporting both proton and carbon ion beams using different energies of the beams. We compared the effect of different kind of ripple filters and their advantages.

  13. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  14. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-07-11

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid-base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron-proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ λ. Multiple-Site Electron-Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron-proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron-proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e-/2H+ MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving

  15. The oxidation state of active site thiols determines activity of saccharopine dehydrogenase at low pH.

    PubMed

    Bobyk, Kostyantyn D; Kim, Sang Gon; Kumar, Vidya Prasanna; Kim, Sung-Kun; West, Ann H; Cook, Paul F

    2011-09-15

    Saccharopine dehydrogenase catalyzes the NAD-dependent conversion of saccharopine to generate L-lysine and α-ketoglutarate. A disulfide bond between cysteine 205 and cysteine 249, in the vicinity of the dinucleotide-binding site, is observed in structures of the apoenzyme, while a dithiol is observed in a structure with AMP bound, suggesting preferential binding of the dinucleotide to reduced enzyme. Mutation of C205 to S gave increased values of V/E(t) and V/KE(t) at pH 7 compared to wild type. Primary deuterium and solvent deuterium kinetic isotope effects suggest the catalytic pathway, which includes the hydride transfer and hydrolysis steps, contributes more to rate limitation in C205S, but the rates of the two steps relative to one another remain the same. There is a large increase in the rate constants V₁/E(t) and V₁/K(NAD)Et at pH values below 7 compared to WT. Data indicate the low pH increase in activity results from a decreased sensitivity of the C205S mutant enzyme to the protonation state of an enzyme group with a pK(a) of about 7, likely responsible for a pH-dependent conformational change. Reduction of WT and C205S mutant enzymes with TCEP gives equal activities at pH 6, consistent with the increased activity observed for the C205S mutant enzyme.

  16. Sodium and proton effects on inward proton transport through Na/K pumps.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Travis J; Zugarramurdi, Camila; Olivera, J Fernando; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2014-06-17

    The Na/K pump hydrolyzes ATP to export three intracellular Na (Nai) as it imports two extracellular K (Ko) across animal plasma membranes. Within the protein, two ion-binding sites (sites I and II) can reciprocally bind Na or K, but a third site (site III) exclusively binds Na in a voltage-dependent fashion. In the absence of Nao and Ko, the pump passively imports protons, generating an inward current (IH). To elucidate the mechanisms of IH, we used voltage-clamp techniques to investigate the [H]o, [Na]o, and voltage dependence of IH in Na/K pumps from ventricular myocytes and in ouabain-resistant pumps expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Lowering pHo revealed that Ho both activates IH (in a voltage-dependent manner) and inhibits it (in a voltage-independent manner) by binding to different sites. Nao effects depend on pHo; at pHo where no Ho inhibition is observed, Nao inhibits IH at all concentrations, but when applied at pHo that inhibits pump-mediated current, low [Na]o activates IH and high [Na]o inhibits it. Our results demonstrate that IH is a property inherent to Na/K pumps, not linked to the oocyte expression environment, explains differences in the characteristics of IH previously reported in the literature, and supports a model in which 1), protons leak through site III; 2), binding of two Na or two protons to sites I and II inhibits proton transport; and 3), pumps with mixed Na/proton occupancy of sites I and II remain permeable to protons.

  17. Characterization of quinol-dependent nitric oxide reductase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus: enzymatic activity and active site structure.

    PubMed

    Terasaka, Erina; Okada, Norihiro; Sato, Nozomi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Tosha, Takehiko

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) catalyzes the reduction of nitric oxide to generate nitrous oxide. We recently reported on the crystal structure of a quinol-dependent NOR (qNOR) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus [Y. Matsumoto, T. Tosha, A.V. Pisliakov, T. Hino, H. Sugimoto, S. Nagano, Y. Sugita and Y. Shiro, Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 19 (2012) 238-246], and suggested that a water channel from the cytoplasm, which is not observed in cytochrome c-dependent NOR (cNOR), functions as a pathway transferring catalytic protons. Here, we further investigated the functional and structural properties of qNOR, and compared the findings with those for cNOR. The pH optimum for the enzymatic reaction of qNOR was in the alkaline range, whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa cNOR showed a higher activity at an acidic pH. The considerably slower reduction rate, and a correlation of the pH dependence for enzymatic activity and the reduction rate suggest that the reduction process is the rate-determining step for the NO reduction by qNOR, while the reduction rate for cNOR was very fast and therefore is unlikely to be the rate-determining step. A close examination of the heme/non-heme iron binuclear center by resonance Raman spectroscopy indicated that qNOR has a more polar environment at the binuclear center compared with cNOR. It is plausible that a water channel enhances the accessibility of the active site to solvent water, creating a more polar environment in qNOR. This structural feature could control certain properties of the active site, such as redox potential, which could explain the different catalytic properties of the two NORs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference.

  18. MSK1 activity is controlled by multiple phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    McCOY, Claire E.; Campbell, David G.; Deak, Maria; Bloomberg, Graham B.; Arthur, J. Simon C.

    2004-01-01

    MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase) is a kinase activated in cells downstream of both the ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) cascades. In the present study, we show that, in addition to being phosphorylated on Thr-581 and Ser-360 by ERK1/2 or p38, MSK1 can autophosphorylate on at least six sites: Ser-212, Ser-376, Ser-381, Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758. Of these sites, the N-terminal T-loop residue Ser-212 and the ‘hydrophobic motif’ Ser-376 are phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain of MSK1, and their phosphorylation is essential for the catalytic activity of the N-terminal kinase domain of MSK1 and therefore for the phosphorylation of MSK1 substrates in vitro. Ser-381 is also phosphorylated by the C-terminal kinase domain, and mutation of Ser-381 decreases MSK1 activity, probably through the inhibition of Ser-376 phosphorylation. Ser-750, Ser-752 and Ser-758 are phosphorylated by the N-terminal kinase domain; however, their function is not known. The activation of MSK1 in cells therefore requires the activation of the ERK1/2 or p38 MAPK cascades and does not appear to require additional signalling inputs. This is in contrast with the closely related RSK (p90 ribosomal S6 kinase) proteins, whose activity requires phosphorylation by PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1) in addition to phosphorylation by ERK1/2. PMID:15568999

  19. A Ta/W mixed addenda heteropolyacid with excellent acid catalytic activity and proton-conducting property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shujun; Peng, Qingpo; Chen, Xuenian; Wang, Ruoya; Zhai, Jianxin; Hu, Weihua; Ma, Fengji; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Shuxia

    2016-11-01

    A new HPAs H20[P8W60Ta12(H2O)4(OH)8O236]·125H2O (H-1) which comprises a Ta/W mixed addenda heteropolyanion, 20 protons, and 125 crystalline water molecules has been prepared through ion-exchange method. The structure and properties of H-1 have been explored in detail. AC impedance measurements indicate that H-1 is a good solid state proton conducting material at room temperature with a conductivity value of 7.2×10-3 S cm-1 (25 °C, 30% RH). Cyclic voltammograms of H-1 indicate the electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of nitrite. Hammett acidity constant H0 of H-1 in CH3CN is -2.91, which is the strongest among the present known HPAs. Relatively, H-1 exhibits excellent catalytic activities toward acetal reaction.

  20. Synergic Effect of Active Sites in Zinc-Modified ZSM-5 Zeolites as Revealed by High-Field Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qi, Guodong; Wang, Qiang; Xu, Jun; Trébosc, Julien; Lafon, Olivier; Wang, Chao; Amoureux, Jean-Paul; Deng, Feng

    2016-12-19

    Understanding the nature of active sites in metal-supported catalysts is of great importance towards establishing their structure-property relationships. The outstanding catalytic performance of metal-supported catalysts is frequently ascribed to the synergic effect of different active sites, which is however not well spectroscopically characterized. Herein, we report the direct detection of surface Zn species and (1) H-(67) Zn internuclear interaction between Zn(2+) ions and Brønsted acid sites on Zn-modified ZSM-5 zeolites by high-field solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The observed promotion of C-H bond activation of methane is rationalized by the enhanced Brønsted acidity generated by synergic effects arising from the spatial proximity/interaction between Zn(2+) ions and Brønsted acidic protons. The concentration of synergic active sites is determined by (1) H-(67) Zn double-resonance solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

  1. Nitrate enhancement of CAM activity in two Kalanchoë species is associated with increased vacuolar proton transport capacity.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Paula Natália; Smith, James Andrew Charles; Mercier, Helenice

    2017-04-09

    Among species that perform CAM photosynthesis, members of the genus Kalanchoë have been studied frequently to investigate the effect of environmental factors on the magnitude of CAM activity. In particular, different nitrogen sources have been shown to influence the rate of nocturnal CO2 fixation and organic-acid accumulation in several species of Kalanchoë. However, there has been little investigation of the interrelationship between nitrogen source (nitrate versus ammonium), concentration, and the activity of the vacuolar proton pumps responsible for driving nocturnal organic-acid accumulation in these species. In the present study with Kalanchoë laxiflora and Kalanchoë delagoensis cultivated on different nitrogen sources, both species were found to show highest total nocturnal organic-acid accumulation and highest rates of ATP- and PPi-dependent vacuolar proton transport on 2.5 mM nitrate, whereas plants cultivated on 5.0 mM ammonium showed the lowest values. In both species malate was the principal organic-acid accumulated during the night, but the second-most accumulated organic-acid was fumarate for K. laxiflora and citrate for K. delagoensis. Higher ATP- and PPi-dependent vacuolar proton transport rates and greater nocturnal acid accumulation were observed in K. delagoensis compared with K. laxiflora. These results show that the effect of nitrogen source on CAM activity in Kalanchoë species is reflected in corresponding differences in activity of the tonoplast proton pumps responsible for driving sequestration of these acids in the vacuole of CAM-performing cells.

  2. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M.; Crooks, Richard M.; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Liu, Ping

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.

  3. In Situ Probing of the Active Site Geometry of Ultrathin Nanowires for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiqing; An, Wei; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Sasaki, Kotaro; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Su, Dong; Anderson, Rachel M; Crooks, Richard M; Adzic, Radoslav R; Liu, Ping; Wong, Stanislaus S

    2015-10-07

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (∼2 nm) core-shell Pt∼Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shown to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu∼Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Hence, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.

  4. The pH dependence of hairpin ribozyme catalysis reflects ionization of an active site adenine.

    PubMed

    Cottrell, Joseph W; Scott, Lincoln G; Fedor, Martha J

    2011-05-20

    Understanding how self-cleaving ribozymes mediate catalysis is crucial in light of compelling evidence that human and bacterial gene expression can be regulated through RNA self-cleavage. The hairpin ribozyme catalyzes reversible phosphodiester bond cleavage through a mechanism that does not require divalent metal cations. Previous structural and biochemical evidence implicated the amidine group of an active site adenosine, A38, in a pH-dependent step in catalysis. We developed a way to determine microscopic pK(a) values in active ribozymes based on the pH-dependent fluorescence of 8-azaadenosine (8azaA). We compared the microscopic pK(a) for ionization of 8azaA at position 38 with the apparent pK(a) for the self-cleavage reaction in a fully functional hairpin ribozyme with a unique 8azaA at position 38. Microscopic and apparent pK(a) values were virtually the same, evidence that A38 protonation accounts for the decrease in catalytic activity with decreasing pH. These results implicate the neutral unprotonated form of A38 in a transition state that involves formation of the 5'-oxygen-phosphorus bond.

  5. In situ probing of the active site geometry of ultrathin nanowires for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Haiqing; Wong, Stanislaus S.; An, Wei; ...

    2015-09-24

    To create truly effective electrocatalysts for the cathodic reaction governing proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), namely the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), necessitates an accurate and detailed structural understanding of these electrocatalysts, especially at the nanoscale, and to precisely correlate that structure with demonstrable performance enhancement. To address this key issue, we have combined and interwoven theoretical calculations with experimental, spectroscopic observations in order to acquire useful structural insights into the active site geometry with implications for designing optimized nanoscale electrocatalysts with rationally predicted properties. Specifically, we have probed ultrathin (~2 nm) core–shell Pt~Pd9Au nanowires, which have been previously shownmore » to be excellent candidates for ORR in terms of both activity and long-term stability, from the complementary perspectives of both DFT calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The combination and correlation of data from both experimental and theoretical studies has revealed for the first time that the catalytically active structure of our ternary nanowires can actually be ascribed to a PtAu~Pd configuration, comprising a PtAu binary shell and a pure inner Pd core. Moreover, we have plausibly attributed the resulting structure to a specific synthesis step, namely the Cu underpotential deposition (UPD) followed by galvanic replacement with Pt. Thus, the fundamental insights gained into the performance of our ultrathin nanowires from our demonstrated approach will likely guide future directed efforts aimed at broadly improving upon the durability and stability of nanoscale electrocatalysts in general.« less

  6. The role of active site tyrosine 58 in Citrobacter freundii methionine γ-lyase.

    PubMed

    Anufrieva, Natalya V; Faleev, Nicolai G; Morozova, Elena A; Bazhulina, Natalia P; Revtovich, Svetlana V; Timofeev, Vladimir P; Tkachev, Yaroslav V; Nikulin, Alexei D; Demidkina, Tatyana V

    2015-09-01

    In the spatial structure of methionine γ-lyase (MGL, EC 4.4.1.11) from Citrobacter freundii, Tyr58 is located at H-bonding distance to the oxygen atom of the phosphate "handle" of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP). It was replaced for phenylalanine by site-directed mutagenesis. The X-ray structure of the mutant enzyme was determined at 1.96Å resolution. Comparison of spatial structures and absorption spectra of wild-type and mutant holoenzymes demonstrated that the replacement did not result in essential changes of the conformation of the active site Tyr58Phe MGL. The Kd value of PLP for Tyr58Phe MGL proved to be comparable to the Kd value for the wild-type enzyme. The replacement led to a decrease of catalytic efficiencies in both γ- and β-elimination reactions of about two orders of magnitude as compared to those for the wild-type enzyme. The rates of exchange of C-α- and C-β- protons of inhibitors in D2O catalyzed by the mutant form are comparable with those for the wild-type enzyme. Spectral data on the complexes of the mutant form with the substrates and inhibitors showed that the replacement led to a change of rate the limiting step of the physiological reaction. The results allowed us to conclude that Tyr58 is involved in an optimal positioning of the active site Lys210 at some stages of γ- and β-elimination reactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cofactor-dependent proteins: evolution, chemical diversity and bio-applications.

  7. Hydrogenase activity and proton-motive force generation by Escherichia coli during glycerol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Trchounian, Karen; Blbulyan, Syuzanna; Trchounian, Armen

    2013-06-01

    Proton motive force (Δp) generation by Escherichia coli wild type cells during glycerol fermentation was first studied. Its two components, electrical-the membrane potential (∆φ) and chemical-the pH transmembrane gradient (ΔpH), were established and the effects of external pH (pHex) were determined. Intracellular pH was 7.0 and 6.0 and lower than pHex at pH 7.5 and 6.5, respectively; and it was higher than pHex at pH 5.5. At high pHex, the increase of ∆φ (-130 mV) was only partially compensated by a reversed ΔpH, resulting in a low Δp. At low pHex ∆φ and consequently Δp were decreased. The generation of Δp during glycerol fermentation was compared with glucose fermentation, and the difference in Δp might be due to distinguished mechanisms for H(+) transport through the membrane, especially to hydrogenase (Hyd) enzymes besides the F0F1-ATPase. H(+) efflux was determined to depend on pHex; overall and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD)-inhibitory H(+) efflux was maximal at pH 6.5. Moreover, ΔpH was changed at pH 6.5 and Δp was different at pH 6.5 and 5.5 with the hypF mutant lacking all Hyd enzymes. DCCD-inhibited ATPase activity of membrane vesicles was maximal at pH 7.5 and decreased with the hypF mutant. Thus, Δp generation by E. coli during glycerol fermentation is different than that during glucose fermentation. Δp is dependent on pHex, and a role of Hyd enzymes in its generation is suggested.

  8. A structural study of the proton conducting B-site ordered perovskite Ba3Ca1.18Ta1.82O8.73

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Viana, Hermenegildo A. L.; Wormald, Philip; Irvine, John T. S.

    2011-06-01

    The proton conducting material Ba3Ca1.18Ta1.82O8.73 (BCT18) was synthesized and characterized using diffraction methods and thermal analysis. It was shown that BCT18 is structurally similar to its niobium analogue (BCN18). At synthesis temperatures up to 1500 °C however, BCT18 forms a mixture of Ca- and Ta-site ordered phases, with both 1:1 type and 1:2 type ordering. The phase ratio seems to depend solely on the synthesis conditions, with 1:1 type ordering being the dominant form in most cases. Thermal treatment in vacuum, wet and dry hydrogen, and CO2 suggests that both forms contain defects (CaTa''' and {V_O^{\\bdot \\bdot }} ), allowing the material to absorb water and CO2. The uptake and the release of H2O and of CO2 are all reversible, as evidenced by x-ray diffraction studies and thermal analysis, suggesting that the molecules are present as structural defects ( {OH_O^{\\bdot }} and CO3O × ), rather than surface species or separate hydroxide or carbonate phases. Solid state 1H nuclear magnetic resonance also confirms the presence of protons, and the peak broadening suggests that they are mobile at room temperature.

  9. A structural study of the proton conducting B-site ordered perovskite Ba3Ca1.18Ta1.82O8.73.

    PubMed

    Verbraeken, Maarten C; Viana, Hermenegildo A L; Wormald, Philip; Irvine, John T S

    2011-06-15

    The proton conducting material Ba(3)Ca(1.18)Ta(1.82)O(8.73) (BCT18) was synthesized and characterized using diffraction methods and thermal analysis. It was shown that BCT18 is structurally similar to its niobium analogue (BCN18). At synthesis temperatures up to 1500 °C however, BCT18 forms a mixture of Ca- and Ta-site ordered phases, with both 1:1 type and 1:2 type ordering. The phase ratio seems to depend solely on the synthesis conditions, with 1:1 type ordering being the dominant form in most cases. Thermal treatment in vacuum, wet and dry hydrogen, and CO(2) suggests that both forms contain defects (Ca(Ta)(''') and V(O)(··)), allowing the material to absorb water and CO(2). The uptake and the release of H(2)O and of CO(2) are all reversible, as evidenced by x-ray diffraction studies and thermal analysis, suggesting that the molecules are present as structural defects (OH(O)(·) and CO(3O)(×)), rather than surface species or separate hydroxide or carbonate phases. Solid state (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance also confirms the presence of protons, and the peak broadening suggests that they are mobile at room temperature.

  10. Squeezing at entrance of proton transport pathway in proton-translocating pyrophosphatase upon substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Tzu; Liu, Tseng-Huang; Lin, Shih-Ming; Chen, Yen-Wei; Pan, Yih-Jiuan; Lee, Ching-Hung; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Tseng, Fan-Gang; Pan, Rong-Long

    2013-07-05

    Homodimeric proton-translocating pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase; EC 3.6.1.1) is indispensable for many organisms in maintaining organellar pH homeostasis. This unique proton pump couples the hydrolysis of PPi to proton translocation across the membrane. H(+)-PPase consists of 14-16 relatively hydrophobic transmembrane domains presumably for proton translocation and hydrophilic loops primarily embedding a catalytic site. Several highly conserved polar residues located at or near the entrance of the transport pathway in H(+)-PPase are essential for proton pumping activity. In this investigation single molecule FRET was employed to dissect the action at the pathway entrance in homodimeric Clostridium tetani H(+)-PPase upon ligand binding. The presence of the substrate analog, imidodiphosphate mediated two sites at the pathway entrance moving toward each other. Moreover, single molecule FRET analyses after the mutation at the first proton-carrying residue (Arg-169) demonstrated that conformational changes at the entrance are conceivably essential for the initial step of H(+)-PPase proton translocation. A working model is accordingly proposed to illustrate the squeeze at the entrance of the transport pathway in H(+)-PPase upon substrate binding.

  11. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  12. Vitamin K epoxide reductase: homology, active site and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Goodstadt, Leo; Ponting, Chris P

    2004-06-01

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) recycles reduced vitamin K, which is used subsequently as a co-factor in the gamma-carboxylation of glutamic acid residues in blood coagulation enzymes. VKORC1, a subunit of the VKOR complex, has recently been shown to possess this activity. Here, we show that VKORC1 is a member of a large family of predicted enzymes that are present in vertebrates, Drosophila, plants, bacteria and archaea. Four cysteine residues and one residue, which is either serine or threonine, are identified as likely active-site residues. In some plant and bacterial homologues the VKORC1 homologous domain is fused with domains of the thioredoxin family of oxidoreductases. These might reduce disulfide bonds of VKORC1-like enzymes as a prerequisite for their catalytic activities.

  13. Iron Acyl Thiolato Carbonyls: Structural Models for the Active Site of the [Fe]-Hydrogenase (Hmd)

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Aaron M.; Salomone-Stagni, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Phosphine-modified thioester derivatives are shown to serve as efficient precursors to phosphine-stabilized ferrous acyl thiolato carbonyls via the reaction of phosphine thioesters and sources of Fe(0). The reaction generates both Fe(SPh)(Ph2PC6H4CO)(CO)3 (1) and the diferrous diacyl Fe2(SPh)2(CO)3(Ph2PC6H4CO)2, which carbonylates to give 1. For the extremely bulky arylthioester Ph2PC6H4C(O)SC6H4-2,6-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)2, oxidative addition is arrested and the Fe(0) adduct of the phosphine is obtained. Complex 1 reacts with cyanide to give Et4N[Fe(SPh)(Ph2PC6H4CO)(CN)(CO)2] (Et4N[2]). 13C and 31P NMR spectra indicate that substitution is stereospecific and cis to P. The IR spectrum of [2]− in CH2Cl2 solution very closely matches that for HmdCN. XANES and EXAFS measurements also indicate close structural and electronic similarity of Et4N[2] to the active site of wild-type Hmd. Complex 1 also stereospecifically forms a derivative with TsCH2NC, but the adduct is more labile than Et4N[2]. Tricarbonyl 1 was found to reversibly protonate to give a thermally labile derivative, IR measurements of which indicate that the acyl and thiolate ligands are probably not protonated in Hmd. PMID:21062066

  14. Range degradation and distal edge behavior of proton radiotherapy beams using 11C activation and Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmekawy, Ahmed Farouk

    The distal edge of therapeutic proton radiation beams was investigated by different methods. Proton beams produced at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute (HUPTI) were used to irradiate a Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom for three different ranges (13.5, 17.0 and 21.0 cm) to investigate the distal slope dependence of the Bragg peak. The activation of 11 C was studied by scanning the phantom less than 10 minutes post-irradiation with a Philips Big Bore Gemini(c) PET/CT. The DICOM images were imported into the Varian Eclipse(c) Treatment Planning System (TPS) for analysis and then analyzed by ImageJ(c) . The distal slope ranged from ?0.1671 +/- 0.0036 to -0.1986 +/- 0.0052 (pixel intensity/slice number) for ranges 13.5 to 21.0 cm respectively. A realistic description of the setup was modeled using the GATE 7.0 Monte Carlo simulation tool and compared to the experiment data. The results show the distal slope ranged from -0.1158+/-0.0133 to -0.0787+/-0.002 (Gy/mm). Additionally, low activity, 11C were simulated to study the 11C reconstructed half-life dependence versus the initial activity for six ranges chosen around the previous activation study. The results of the expected/nominal half-life vs. activity ranged from -5 x 10-4 +/- 2.8104 x 10-4 to 1.6 x 10-3 +/- 9.44 x 10-4 (%diff./Bq). The comparison between two experiments with proton beams on a PMMA phantom and multi-layer ion chamber, and two GATE simulations of a proton beam incident on a water phantom and 11C PET study show that: (i) the distal fall-off variation of the steepness of the slopes are found to be similar thus validating the sensitivity of the PET technique to the range degradation and (ii) the average of the super-ratios difference between all studies observed is primarily due to the difference in the dose deposited in the media.

  15. Bicarbonate-water interactions in the rat proximal convoluted tubule. An effect of volume flux on active proton secretion

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The effect of volume absorption on bicarbonate absorption was examined in the in vivo perfused rat proximal convoluted tubule. Volume absorption was inhibited by isosmotic replacement of luminal NaCl with raffinose. In tubules perfused with 25 mM bicarbonate, as raffinose was increased from 0 to 55 to 63 mM, volume absorption decreased from 2.18 +/- 0.10 to 0.30 +/- 0.18 to -0.66 +/- 0.30 nl/mm X min, respectively, and bicarbonate absorption decreased from 131 +/- 5 to 106 +/- 8 to 91 +/- 13 pmol/mm X min, respectively. This bicarbonate-water interaction could not be attributed to dilutional changes in luminal or peritubular bulk phase bicarbonate concentrations. Inhibition of active proton secretion by acetazolamide abolished the effect of volume flow on bicarbonate absorption, which implies that the bicarbonate reflection coefficient is close to 1 and eliminates the possibility of solvent drag across the tight junction. When the luminal bicarbonate concentration was varied, the magnitude of the bicarbonate-water interaction increased with increasing luminal bicarbonate concentration. The largest interaction occurred at high luminal bicarbonate concentrations, where the rate of proton secretion has been previously shown to be independent of luminal bicarbonate concentration and pH. The results thus suggest that a peritubular and/or cellular compartment exists that limits bicarbonate diffusion, and where pH changes secondary to bicarbonate-water interactions (solute polarization) alter the rate of active proton secretion. PMID:6096481

  16. Lack of conventional oxygen-linked proton and anion binding sites does not impair allosteric regulation of oxygen binding in dwarf caiman hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Storz, Jay F.; Gorr, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to other vertebrate hemoglobins (Hbs) whose high intrinsic O2 affinities are reduced by red cell allosteric effectors (mainly protons, CO2, organic phosphates, and chloride ions), crocodilian Hbs exhibit low sensitivity to organic phosphates and high sensitivity to bicarbonate (HCO3−), which is believed to augment Hb-O2 unloading during diving and postprandial alkaline tides when blood HCO3− levels and metabolic rates increase. Examination of α- and β-globin amino acid sequences of dwarf caiman (Paleosuchus palpebrosus) revealed a unique combination of substitutions at key effector binding sites compared with other vertebrate and crocodilian Hbs: β82Lys→Gln, β143His→Val, and β146His→Tyr. These substitutions delete positive charges and, along with other distinctive changes in residue charge and polarity, may be expected to disrupt allosteric regulation of Hb-O2 affinity. Strikingly, however, P. palpebrosus Hb shows a strong Bohr effect, and marked deoxygenation-linked binding of organic phosphates (ATP and DPG) and CO2 as carbamate (contrasting with HCO3− binding in other crocodilians). Unlike other Hbs, it polymerizes to large complexes in the oxygenated state. The highly unusual properties of P. palpebrosus Hb align with a high content of His residues (potential sites for oxygenation-linked proton binding) and distinctive surface Cys residues that may form intermolecular disulfide bridges upon polymerization. On the basis of its singular properties, P. palpebrosus Hb provides a unique opportunity for studies on structure-function coupling and the evolution of compensatory mechanisms for maintaining tissue O2 delivery in Hbs that lack conventional effector-binding residues. PMID:23720132

  17. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  18. Kinetics of Hydrogen Atom Abstraction from Substrate by an Active Site Thiyl Radical in Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in all organisms. Active E. coli class Ia RNR is an α2β2 complex that undergoes reversible, long-range proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) over a pathway of redox active amino acids (β-Y122 → [β-W48] → β-Y356 → α-Y731 → α-Y730 → α-C439) that spans ∼35 Å. To unmask PCET kinetics from rate-limiting conformational changes, we prepared a photochemical RNR containing a [ReI] photooxidant site-specifically incorporated at position 355 ([Re]-β2), adjacent to PCET pathway residue Y356 in β. [Re]-β2 was further modified by replacing Y356 with 2,3,5-trifluorotyrosine to enable photochemical generation and spectroscopic observation of chemically competent tyrosyl radical(s). Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we compare the kinetics of Y· decay in the presence of substrate and wt-α2, Y731F-α2 ,or C439S-α2, as well as with 3′-[2H]-substrate and wt-α2. We find that only in the presence of wt-α2 and the unlabeled substrate do we observe an enhanced rate of radical decay indicative of forward radical propagation. This observation reveals that cleavage of the 3′-C–H bond of substrate by the transiently formed C439· thiyl radical is rate-limiting in forward PCET through α and has allowed calculation of a lower bound for the rate constant associated with this step of (1.4 ± 0.4) × 104 s–1. Prompting radical propagation with light has enabled observation of PCET events heretofore inaccessible, revealing active site chemistry at the heart of RNR catalysis. PMID:25353063

  19. Enhanced Proton Translocating Pyrophosphatase Activity Improves Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Romaine Lettuce1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Valencia, Julio; Sanchez-Lares, Jonathan; Marsh, Ellen; Dorneles, Liane T.; Santos, Mirella P.; Sanchez, Diego; Winter, Alexander; Murphy, Sean; Cox, Jennifer; Trzaska, Marcin; Metler, Jason; Kozic, Alex; Facanha, Arnoldo R.; Schachtman, Daniel; Sanchez, Charles A.; Gaxiola, Roberto A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant nitrate (NO3−) acquisition depends on the combined activities of root high- and low-affinity NO3− transporters and the proton gradient generated by the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. These processes are coordinated with photosynthesis and the carbon status of the plant. Here, we present the characterization of romaine lettuce (Lactuca sativa ‘Conquistador’) plants engineered to overexpress an intragenic gain-of-function allele of the type I proton translocating pyrophosphatase (H+-PPase) of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The proton-pumping and inorganic pyrophosphate hydrolytic activities of these plants are augmented compared with control plants. Immunohistochemical data show a conspicuous increase in H+-PPase protein abundance at the vasculature of the transgenic plants. Transgenic plants displayed an enhanced rhizosphere acidification capacity consistent with the augmented plasma membrane H+-ATPase proton transport values, and ATP hydrolytic capacities evaluated in vitro. These transgenic lines outperform control plants when challenged with NO3− limitations in laboratory, greenhouse, and field scenarios. Furthermore, we report the characterization of a lettuce LsNRT2.1 gene that is constitutive up-regulated in the transgenic plants. Of note, the expression of the LsNRT2.1 gene in control plants is regulated by NO3− and sugars. Enhanced accumulation of 15N-labeled fertilizer by transgenic lettuce compared with control plants was observed in greenhouse experiments. A negative correlation between the level of root soluble sugars and biomass is consistent with the strong root growth that characterizes these transgenic plants. PMID:23307651

  20. Mechanistic pathways of mercury removal from the organomercurial lyase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial populations present in Hg-rich environments have evolved biological mechanisms to detoxify methylmercury and other organometallic mercury compounds. The most common resistance mechanism relies on the H+-assisted cleavage of the Hg–C bond of methylmercury by the organomercurial lyase MerB. Although the initial reaction steps which lead to the loss of methane from methylmercury have already been studied experimentally and computationally, the reaction steps leading to the removal of Hg2+ from MerB and regeneration of the active site for a new round of catalysis have not yet been elucidated. In this paper, we have studied the final steps of the reaction catalyzed by MerB through quantum chemical computations at the combined MP2/CBS//B3PW91/6-31G(d) level of theory. While conceptually simple, these reaction steps occur in a complex potential energy surface where several distinct pathways are accessible and may operate concurrently. The only pathway which clearly emerges as forbidden in our analysis is the one arising from the sequential addition of two thiolates to the metal atom, due to the accumulation of negative charges in the active site. The addition of two thiols, in contrast, leads to two feasible mechanistic possibilities. The most straightforward pathway proceeds through proton transfer from the attacking thiol to Cys159 , leading to its removal from the mercury coordination sphere, followed by a slower attack of a second thiol, which removes Cys96. The other pathway involves Asp99 in an accessory role similar to the one observed earlier for the initial stages of the reaction and affords a lower activation enthalpy, around 14 kcal mol−1, determined solely by the cysteine removal step rather than by the thiol ligation step. Addition of one thiolate to the intermediates arising from either thiol attack occurs without a barrier and produces an intermediate bound to one active site cysteine and from which Hg(SCH3)2 may be removed only after

  1. Proton beam simulation with MCNPX/CINDER'90: Germanium metal activation estimates below 30MeV relevant to the bulk production of arsenic radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Fassbender, M; Taylor, W; Vieira, D; Nortier, M; Bach, H; John, K

    2012-01-01

    Germanium metal targets encapsulated in Nb shells were irradiated in a proton beam. Proton and secondary neutron beam fluences as well as radionuclide activity formation were modeled using MCNPX in combination with CINDER90. Targets were chemically processed using distillation and anion exchange. Good agreement between the measured radiochemical yields and MCNPX/CINDER90 estimates was observed. A target of pentavalent (73,74)As radioarsenic for neutron activation studies was prepared.

  2. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  3. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Altering Pollen Soluble Inorganic Pyrophosphatase Activity.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Deborah J; Haque, Tamanna; Tudor, Richard L; Barron, Yoshimi; Zampronio, Cleidiane G; Cotton, Nicholas P J; de Graaf, Barend H J; White, Scott A; Cooper, Helen J; Franklin, F Christopher H; Harper, Jeffery F; Franklin-Tong, Vernonica E

    2017-03-01

    Protein phosphorylation regulates numerous cellular processes. Identifying the substrates and protein kinases involved is vital to understand how these important posttranslational modifications modulate biological function in eukaryotic cells. Pyrophosphatases catalyze the hydrolysis of inorganic phosphate (PPi) to inorganic phosphate Pi, driving biosynthetic reactions; they are essential for low cytosolic inorganic phosphate. It was suggested recently that posttranslational regulation of Family I soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases (sPPases) may affect their activity. We previously demonstrated that two pollen-expressed sPPases, Pr-p26.1a and Pr-p26.1b, from the flowering plant Papaver rhoeas were inhibited by phosphorylation. Despite the potential significance, there is a paucity of data on sPPase phosphorylation and regulation. Here, we used liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry to map phosphorylation sites to the otherwise divergent amino-terminal extensions on these pollen sPPases. Despite the absence of reports in the literature on mapping phosphorylation sites on sPPases, a database survey of various proteomes identified a number of examples, suggesting that phosphorylation may be a more widely used mechanism to regulate these enzymes. Phosphomimetic mutants of Pr-p26.1a/b significantly and differentially reduced PPase activities by up to 2.5-fold at pH 6.8 and 52% in the presence of Ca(2+) and hydrogen peroxide over unmodified proteins. This indicates that phosphoregulation of key sites can inhibit the catalytic responsiveness of these proteins in concert with key intracellular events. As sPPases are essential for many metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells, our findings identify the phosphorylation of sPPases as a potential master regulatory mechanism that could be used to attenuate metabolism.

  4. Evidence for segmental mobility in the active site of pepsin

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, J.; Strop, P.; Senn, H.; Foundling, S.; Kostka, V.

    1986-05-01

    The low hydrolytic activity (k/sub cat/ < 0.001 s/sup -1/) of chicken pepsin (CP) towards tri- and tetrapeptides is enhanced at least 100 times by modification of its single sulfhydryl group of Cys-115, with little effect on K/sub m/-values. Modification thus simulates the effect of secondary substrate binding on pepsin catalysis. The rate of Cys-115 modification is substantially decreased in the presence of some competitive inhibitors, suggesting its active site location. Experiments with CP alkylated at Cys-115 with Acrylodan as a fluorescent probe or with N-iodoacetyl-(4-fluoro)-aniline as a /sup 19/F-nmr probe suggest conformation change around Cys-115 to occur on substrate or substrate analog binding. The difference /sup 1/H-nmr spectra (500 MHz) of unmodified free and inhibitor-complexed CP reveal chemical shifts almost exclusively in the aromatic region. The effects of Cu/sup + +/ on /sup 19/F- and /sup 1/H-nmr spectra have been studied. Examination of a computer graphics model of CP based on E. parasitica pepsin-inhibitor complex X-ray coordinates suggests that Cys-115 is located near the S/sub 3//S/sub 5/ binding site. The results are interpreted in favor of segmental mobility of this region important for pepsin substrate binding and catalysis.

  5. First Principles Computational Study of the Active Site of Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Ivaylo; Klien, Micheal

    2004-01-14

    Ab initio density functional theory (DFT) methods were used to investigate the structural features of the active site of the binuclear enzyme rat liver arginase. Special emphasis was placed on the crucial role of the second shell ligand interactions. These interactions were systematically studied by performing calculations on models of varying size. It was determined that a water molecule, and not hydroxide, is the bridging exogenous ligand. The carboxylate ligands facilitate the close approach of the Mn (II) ions by attenuating the metal-metal electrostatic repulsion. Of the two metals, MnA was shown to carry a larger positive charge. Analysis of the electronic properties of the active site revealed that orbitals involving the terminal Asp234 residue, as well as the flexible -1,1 bridging Asp232, lie at high energies, suggesting weaker coordination. This is reflected in certain structural variability present in our models and is also consistent with recent experimental findings. Finally, implications of our findings for the biological function of the enzyme are delineated.

  6. C-H Activation on Co,O Sites: Isolated Surface Sites versus Molecular Analogs.

    PubMed

    Estes, Deven P; Siddiqi, Georges; Allouche, Florian; Kovtunov, Kirill V; Safonova, Olga V; Trigub, Alexander L; Koptyug, Igor V; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-11-16

    The activation and conversion of hydrocarbons is one of the most important challenges in chemistry. Transition-metal ions (V, Cr, Fe, Co, etc.) isolated on silica surfaces are known to catalyze such processes. The mechanisms of these processes are currently unknown but are thought to involve C-H activation as the rate-determining step. Here, we synthesize well-defined Co(II) ions on a silica surface using a metal siloxide precursor followed by thermal treatment under vacuum at 500 °C. We show that these isolated Co(II) sites are catalysts for a number of hydrocarbon conversion reactions, such as the dehydrogenation of propane, the hydrogenation of propene, and the trimerization of terminal alkynes. We then investigate the mechanisms of these processes using kinetics, kinetic isotope effects, isotopic labeling experiments, parahydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) NMR, and comparison with a molecular analog. The data are consistent with all of these reactions occurring by a common mechanism, involving heterolytic C-H or H-H activation via a 1,2 addition across a Co-O bond.

  7. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  8. Enantioselective Collision-Activated Dissociation of Gas-Phase Tryptophan Induced by Chiral Recognition of Protonated uc(l)-Alanine Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Matsuyama, Hiroki; Tajiri, Michiko; Wada, Yoshinao; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2016-06-01

    Enantioselective dissociation in the gas phase is important for enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes in molecular clouds regarding the origin of homochirality in biomolecules. Enantioselective collision-activated dissociation (CAD) of tryptophan (Trp) and the chiral recognition ability of uc(l)-alanine peptides (uc(l)-Ala n ; n = 2-4) were examined using a linear ion trap mass spectrometer. CAD spectra of gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) and homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala n ) noncovalent complexes were obtained as a function of the peptide size n. The H2O-elimination product was observed in CAD spectra of both heterochiral and homochiral complexes for n = 2 and 4, and in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), indicating that the proton is attached to the uc(l)-alanine peptide, and H2O loss occurs from H+(uc(l)-Ala n ) in the noncovalent complexes. H2O loss did not occur in heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), where NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss were the primary dissociation pathways. In heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3), the protonation site is the amino group of uc(d)-Trp, and NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss occur from H+(uc(d)-Trp). uc(l)-Ala peptides recognize uc(d)-Trp through protonation of the amino group for peptide size n = 3. NH3 loss and (H2O + CO) loss from H+(uc(d)-Trp) proceeds via enantioselective CAD in gas-phase heterochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3) at room temperature, whereas uc(l)-Trp dissociation was not observed in homochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(l)-Ala3). These results suggest that enantioselective dissociation induced by chiral recognition of uc(l)-Ala peptides through protonation could play an important role in enantiomeric enrichment and chiral transmission processes of amino acids.

  9. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  10. Structural Characterization of Mutations at the Oxygen Activation Site in Monomeric Sarcosine Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman Jorns, Marilyn; Chen, Zhi-wei; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-04-30

    Oxygen reduction and sarcosine oxidation in monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) occur at separate sites above the si- and re-faces, respectively, of the flavin ring. Mutagenesis studies implicate Lys265 as the oxygen activation site. Substitution of Lys265 with a neutral (Met, Gln, or Ala) or basic (Arg) residue results in an {approx}10{sup 4}- or 250-fold decrease, respectively, in the reaction rate. The overall structure of MSOX and residue conformation in the sarcosine binding cavity are unaffected by replacement of Lys265 with Met or Arg. The side chain of Met265 exhibits the same configuration in each molecule of Lys265Met crystals and is nearly congruent with Lys265 in wild-type MSOX. The side chain of Arg265 is, however, dramatically shifted (4-5 {angstrom}) compared with Lys265, points in the opposite direction, and exhibits significant conformational variability between molecules of the same crystal. The major species in solutions of Lys265Arg is likely to contain a 'flipped-out' Arg265 and exhibit negligible oxygen activation, similar to Lys265Met. The 400-fold higher oxygen reactivity observed with Lys265Arg is attributed to a minor (<1%) 'flipped-in' Arg265 conformer whose oxygen reactivity is similar to that of wild-type MSOX. A structural water (WAT1), found above the si-face of the flavin ring in all previously determined MSOX structures, is part of an apparent proton relay system that extends from FAD N(5) to bulk solvent. WAT1 is strikingly absent in Lys265Met and Lys265Arg, a feature that may account for the apparent kinetic stabilization of a reductive half-reaction intermediate that is detectable with the mutants but not wild-type MSOX.

  11. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  12. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  13. An active site water network in the plasminogen activator pla from Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-07-14

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 A. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  14. Leu85 in the beta1-beta2 linker of ASIC1 slows activation and decreases the apparent proton affinity by stabilizing a closed conformation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianbo; Yang, Youshan; Canessa, Cecilia M

    2010-07-16

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-activated channels expressed in neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems where they modulate neuronal activity in response to external increases in proton concentration. The size of ASIC1 currents evoked by a given local acidification is determined by the number of channels in the plasma membrane and by the apparent proton affinities for activation and steady-state desensitization of the channel. Thus, the magnitude of the pH drop and the value of the baseline pH both are functionally important. Recent characterization of ASIC1s from an increasing number of species has made evident that proton affinities of these channels vary across vertebrates. We found that in species with high baseline plasma pH, e.g. frog, shark, and fish, ASIC1 has high proton affinity compared with the mammalian channel. The beta1-beta2 linker in the extracellular domain, specifically by the substitution M85L, determines the interspecies differences in proton affinities and also the time course of ASIC1 macroscopic currents. The mechanism underlying these observations is a delay in channel opening after application of protons, most likely by stabilizing a closed conformation that decreases the apparent affinity to protons and also slows the rise and decay phases of the current. Together, the results suggest evolutionary adaptation of ASIC1 to match the value of the species-specific plasma pH. At the molecular level, adaptation is achieved by substitutions of nonionizable residues rather than by modification of the channel proton sensor.

  15. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  16. A-site deficient La0.2Sr0.7TiO3-δ anode material for proton conducting ethane fuel cell to cogenerate ethylene and electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Subiao; Behnamian, Yashar; Chuang, Karl T.; Liu, Qingxia; Luo, Jing-Li

    2015-12-01

    A site deficient La0.2Sr0.7TiO3-δ (LSTA) and a highly proton conductive electrolyte BaCe0.7Zr0.1Y0.2O3-δ (BCZY) are synthesized by using solid state reaction method. The performance of the electrolyte-supported single cell, comprised of LSTA + Cr2O3 + Cu//BCZY//(La0.60Sr0.40)0.95Co0.20Fe0.80O3-δ (LSCF)+BCZY, is fabricated and investigated. LSTA shows remarkably high electrical performance, with a conductivity as high as 27.78 Scm-1 at 1150 °C in a 10% H2/N2 reducing atmosphere. As a main anode component, it shows good catalytic activity towards the oxidation of ethane, causing the power density to considerably increase from 158.4 mW cm-2 to 320.9 mW cm-2 and the ethane conversion to significantly rise from 12.6% to 30.9%, when the temperature increases from 650 °C to 750 °C. These changes agree well with the polarization resistance which dramatically decreases from 0.346 Ωcm2 to 0.112 Ωcm2. EDX measurement shows that no element diffusion exists (chemical compatibility) between anode (LSTA + Cr2O3+Cu) and electrolyte (BCZY). With these properties, the pure phase LSTA is evaluated as a high electro-catalytic activity anode material for ethane proton conducting solid oxide fuel cell (PC-SOFC).

  17. Surface Protonics Promotes Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, R.; Okada, S.; Inagaki, R.; Oshima, K.; Ogo, S.; Sekine, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production proceeds even at 473 K over 1 wt% Pd/CeO2 catalyst in an electric field, thanks to the surface protonics. Kinetic analyses demonstrated the synergetic effect between catalytic reaction and electric field, revealing strengthened water pressure dependence of the reaction rate when applying an electric field, with one-third the apparent activation energy at the lower reaction temperature range. Operando–IR measurements revealed that proton conduction via adsorbed water on the catalyst surface occurred during electric field application. Methane was activated by proton collision at the Pd–CeO2 interface, based on the inverse kinetic isotope effect. Proton conduction on the catalyst surface plays an important role in methane activation at low temperature. This report is the first describing promotion of the catalytic reaction by surface protonics.

  18. Surface Protonics Promotes Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Manabe, R.; Okada, S.; Inagaki, R.; Oshima, K.; Ogo, S.; Sekine, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production proceeds even at 473 K over 1 wt% Pd/CeO2 catalyst in an electric field, thanks to the surface protonics. Kinetic analyses demonstrated the synergetic effect between catalytic reaction and electric field, revealing strengthened water pressure dependence of the reaction rate when applying an electric field, with one-third the apparent activation energy at the lower reaction temperature range. Operando–IR measurements revealed that proton conduction via adsorbed water on the catalyst surface occurred during electric field application. Methane was activated by proton collision at the Pd–CeO2 interface, based on the inverse kinetic isotope effect. Proton conduction on the catalyst surface plays an important role in methane activation at low temperature. This report is the first describing promotion of the catalytic reaction by surface protonics. PMID:27905505

  19. [Effects of exogenous spermidine on lipid peroxidation and membrane proton pump activity of cucumber seedling leaves under high temperature stress].

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Guo, Shi-Rong; Sun, Jin; Wang, Li-Ping; Yang, Yan-Juan; Li, Bin

    2011-12-01

    Taking a relatively heat-resistant cucumber (Cucumis sativus) cultivar 'Jinchun No. 4' as test material, a sand culture experiment was conducted in growth chamber to investigate the effects of foliar spraying spermidine (Spd) on the lipid peroxidation, membrane proton pump activity, and corresponding gene expression of cucumber seedling leaves under high temperature stress. Compared with the control, foliar spraying Spd increased the plant height, stem diameter, dry and fresh mass, and leaf area significantly, and inhibited the increase of leaf relative conductivity, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, and lipoxygenase (LOX) activity effectively. Foliar spraying Spd also helped to the increase of leaf plasma membrane- and tonoplast H(+)-ATPase activity, but no significant difference was observed in the gene expression levels. These results suggested that exogenous Spd could significantly decrease the leaf lipid peroxidation and increase the proton pump activity, and thus, stabilize the leaf membrane structure and function, alleviate the damage induced by high temperature stress, and enhance the heat tolerance of cucumber seedlings.

  20. Proton and Electron Threshold Energy Measurements for Extravehicular Activity Space Suits. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. D.; Saganti, P. B.

    2003-01-01

    Construction of ISS will require more than 1000 hours of EVA. Outside of ISS during EVA, astronauts and cosmonauts are likely to be exposed to a large fluence of electrons and protons. Development of radiation protection guidelines requires the determination of the minimum energy of electrons and protons that penetrate the suits at various locations. Measurements of the water-equivalent thickness of both US. and Russian EVA suits were obtained by performing CT scans. Specific regions of interest of the suits were further evaluated using a differential range shift technique. This technique involved measuring thickness ionization curves for 6-MeV electron and 155-MeV proton beams with ionization chambers using a constant source-to-detector distance. The thicknesses were obtained by stacking polystyrene slabs immediately upstream of the detector. The thicknesses of the 50% ionizations relative to the maximum ionizations were determined. The detectors were then placed within the suit and the stack thickness adjusted until the 50% ionization was reestablished. The difference in thickness between the 50% thicknesses was then used with standard range-energy tables to determine the threshold energy for penetration. This report provides a detailed description of the experimental arrangement and results.

  1. Requirement for vacuolar proton-ATPase activity during entry of influenza virus into cells.

    PubMed Central

    Guinea, R; Carrasco, L

    1995-01-01

    The role that endosomal acidification plays during influenza virus entry into MDCK cells has been analyzed by using the macrolide antibiotics bafilomycin A1 and concanamycin A as selective inhibitors of vacuolar proton-ATPase (v-[H+]ATPase), the enzyme responsible for the acidification of endosomes. Bafilomycin A1 and concanamycin A, present at the low concentrations of 5 x 10(-7) and 5 x 10(-9) M, respectively, prevented the entry of influenza virus into cells when added during the first minutes of infection. Attachment of virion particles to the cell surface was not the target for the action of bafilomycin A1. N,N'-Dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, a nonspecific inhibitor of proton-ATPases, also blocked virus entry, whereas elaiophylin, an inhibitor of the plasma-proton ATPase, had no effect. The inhibitory actions of bafilomycin A1 and concanamycin A were tested in culture medium at different pHs. Both antibiotics powerfully prevented influenza virus infection when the virus was added under low-pH conditions. This inhibition was reduced if the virus was bound to cells at 4 degrees C prior to the addition of warm low-pH medium. Moreover, incubation of cells at acidic pH potently blocked influenza virus infection, even in the absence of antibiotics. These results indicate that a pH gradient, rather than low pH, is necessary for efficient entry of influenza virus into cells. PMID:7884876

  2. NMR Crystallography of Enzyme Active Sites: Probing Chemically-Detailed, Three-Dimensional Structure in Tryptophan Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus NMR crystallography – the synergistic combination of X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry – offers unprecedented insight into three-dimensional, chemically-detailed structure. From its initial role in refining diffraction data of organic and inorganic solids, NMR crystallography is now being developed for application to active sites in biomolecules, where it reveals chemically-rich detail concerning the interactions between enzyme site residues and the reacting substrate that is not achievable when X-ray, NMR, or computational methodologies are applied in isolation. For example, typical X-ray crystal structures (1.5 to 2.5 Å resolution) of enzyme-bound intermediates identify possible hydrogen-bonding interactions between site residues and substrate, but do not directly identify the protonation state of either. Solid-state NMR can provide chemical shifts for selected atoms of enzyme-substrate complexes, but without a larger structural framework in which to interpret them, only empirical correlations with local chemical structure are possible. Ab initio calculations and molecular mechanics can build models for enzymatic processes, but rely on chemical details that must be specified. Together, however, X-ray diffraction, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and computational chemistry can provide consistent and testable models for structure and function of enzyme active sites: X-ray crystallography provides a coarse framework upon which models of the active site can be developed using computational chemistry; these models can be distinguished by comparison of their calculated NMR chemical shifts with the results of solid-state NMR spectroscopy experiments. Conceptually, each technique is a puzzle piece offering a generous view of the big picture. Only when correctly pieced together, however, can they reveal the big picture at highest resolution. In this Account, we detail our first steps in the development of NMR

  3. Determination of the optimal position of adjacent proton-donor centers for the activation or inhibition of peptide bond formation--a computational model study.

    PubMed

    Rangelov, Miroslav A; Petrova, Galina P; Yomtova, Vihra M; Vayssilov, Georgi N

    2011-09-01

    The study reports a computational analysis of the influence of proton donor group adjacent to the reaction center during ester ammonolysis of an acylated diol as a model reaction for peptide bond formation. This analysis was performed using catalytic maps constructed after a detailed scanning of the available space around the reaction centers in different transition states, a water molecule acting as a typical proton donor. The calculations suggest that an adjacent proton donor center can reduce the activation barrier of the rate determining transition states by up to 7.2 kcal/mol, while no inhibition of the reaction can be achieved by such a group.

  4. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  5. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  6. Mutations inducing an active-site aperture in Rhizobium sp. sucrose isomerase confer hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lipski, Alexandra; Watzlawick, Hildegard; Ravaud, Stéphanie; Robert, Xavier; Rhimi, Moez; Haser, Richard; Mattes, Ralf; Aghajari, Nushin

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose isomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the production of sucrose isomers of high biotechnological and pharmaceutical interest. Owing to the complexity of the chemical synthesis of these isomers, isomaltulose and trehalulose, enzymatic conversion remains the preferred method for obtaining these products. Depending on the microbial source, the ratio of the sucrose-isomer products varies significantly. In studies aimed at understanding and explaining the underlying molecular mechanisms of these reactions, mutations obtained using a random-mutagenesis approach displayed a major hydrolytic activity. Two of these variants, R284C and F164L, of sucrose isomerase from Rhizobium sp. were therefore crystallized and their crystal structures were determined. The three-dimensional structures of these mutants allowed the identification of the molecular determinants that favour hydrolytic activity compared with transferase activity. Substantial conformational changes resulting in an active-site opening were observed, as were changes in the pattern of water molecules bordering the active-site region.

  7. Toxic effects of mercury on PSI and PSII activities, membrane potential and transthylakoid proton gradient in Microsorium pteropus.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunnuan; Zhang, Daoyong; Pan, Xiangliang; Chang, Fengqin; Wang, Shuzhi

    2013-10-05

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the top toxic metals in environment and it poses a great risk to organisms. This study aimed to elucidate the toxic effects of Hg(2+) on energy conversion of photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII), membrane potential and proton gradient of Microsorium pteropus (an aquatic plant species). Contents of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids, quantum yield and electron transfer of PSI and PSII of M. pteropus exposed to various concentrations of Hg(2+) were measured. With increasing Hg(2+) concentration, quantum yield and electron transport of PSI [Y(I) and ETR(I)] and PSII [Y(II) and ETR(II)] decreased whereas limitation of donor side of PSI [Y(ND)] increased. At ⩾165μgL(-1) Hg(2+), quantum yield of non-light-induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching in PSII [Y(NO)] significantly increased but quantum yield of light-induced non-photochemical fluorescence quenching [Y(NPQ)] decreased. Membrane potential (Δψ) and proton gradient (ΔpH) of M. pteropus were reduced significantly at 330μg L(-1) Hg(2+) compared to control. Mercury exposure affected multiple sites in PSII and PSI of M. pteropus.

  8. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for e-updates Please leave this field empty Proton Therapy SHARE Home > Treatment and Care > Treatments Listen ... a nucleus, which holds two types of particles—protons and neutrons. The nucleus is surrounded by electrons. ...

  9. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (Mw 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  10. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  11. Composite active site of chondroitin lyase ABC accepting both epimers of uronic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Shaya, D.; Hahn, Bum-Soo; Bjerkan, Tonje Marita; Kim, Wan Seok; Park, Nam Young; Sim, Joon-Soo; Kim, Yeong-Shik; Cygler, M.

    2008-03-19

    Enzymes have evolved as catalysts with high degrees of stereospecificity. When both enantiomers are biologically important, enzymes with two different folds usually catalyze reactions with the individual enantiomers. In rare cases a single enzyme can process both enantiomers efficiently, but no molecular basis for such catalysis has been established. The family of bacterial chondroitin lyases ABC comprises such enzymes. They can degrade both chondroitin sulfate (CS) and dermatan sulfate (DS) glycosaminoglycans at the nonreducing end of either glucuronic acid (CS) or its epimer iduronic acid (DS) by a {beta}-elimination mechanism, which commences with the removal of the C-5 proton from the uronic acid. Two other structural folds evolved to perform these reactions in an epimer-specific fashion: ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 5} for CS (chondroitin lyases AC) and {beta}-helix for DS (chondroitin lyases B); their catalytic mechanisms have been established at the molecular level. The structure of chondroitinase ABC from Proteus vulgaris showed surprising similarity to chondroitinase AC, including the presence of a Tyr-His-Glu-Arg catalytic tetrad, which provided a possible mechanism for CS degradation but not for DS degradation. We determined the structure of a distantly related Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron chondroitinase ABC to identify additional structurally conserved residues potentially involved in catalysis. We found a conserved cluster located {approx}12 {angstrom} from the catalytic tetrad. We demonstrate that a histidine in this cluster is essential for catalysis of DS but not CS. The enzyme utilizes a single substrate-binding site while having two partially overlapping active sites catalyzing the respective reactions. The spatial separation of the two sets of residues suggests a substrate-induced conformational change that brings all catalytically essential residues close together.

  12. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth.

  13. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site

    PubMed Central

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called ‘catalytic residues’ are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06181.001 PMID:25902402

  14. A split active site couples cap recognition by Dcp2 to activation

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N.; Jones, Brittnee N.; Hernandez, Gail A.; Gross, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Decapping by Dcp2 is an essential step in 5′-3′ mRNA decay. In yeast, decapping requires an open-to-closed transition in Dcp2, though the link between closure and catalysis remains elusive. Here we show using NMR that cap binds conserved residues on both the catalytic and regulatory domains of Dcp2. Lesions in the cap-binding site on the regulatory domain reduce the catalytic step two orders of magnitude and block formation of the closed state whereas Dcp1 enhances the catalytic step by a factor of ten and promotes closure. We conclude that closure occurs during the rate-limiting catalytic step of decapping, juxtaposing the cap-binding region of each domain to form a composite active site. This work suggests a model for regulation of decapping, where coactivators trigger decapping by stabilizing a labile composite active site. PMID:20711189

  15. Evidence that protons can be the active catalysts in Lewis acid mediated hetero-Michael addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, Tobias C; Yu, Jin-Quan; Spencer, Jonathan B

    2004-01-23

    The mechanism of Lewis acid catalysed hetero-Michael addition reactions of weakly basic nucleophiles to alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones was investigated. Protons, rather than metal ions, were identified as the active catalysts. Other mechanisms have been ruled out by analyses of side products and of stoichiometric enone-catalyst mixtures and by the use of radical inhibitors. No evidence for the involvement of pi-olefin-metal complexes or for carbonyl-metal-ion interactions was obtained. The reactions did not proceed in the presence of the non-coordinating base 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine. An excellent correlation of catalytic activities with cation hydrolysis constants was obtained. Different reactivities of mono- and dicarbonyl substrates have been rationalised. A (1)H NMR probe for the assessment of proton generation was established and Lewis acids have been classified according to their propensity to hydrolyse in organic solvents. Brønsted acid-catalysed conjugate addition reactions of nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur and carbon nucleophiles are developed and implications for asymmetric Lewis acid catalysis are discussed.

  16. Active-Site Structure of the Thermophilic Foc-Subunit Ring in Membranes Elucidated by Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Su-Jin; Todokoro, Yasuto; Yumen, Ikuko; Shen, Bo; Iwasaki, Iku; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Miyagi, Atsushi; Yoshida, Masasuke; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Akutsu, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase uses the electrochemical potential across membranes or ATP hydrolysis to rotate the Foc-subunit ring. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, we carried out a structural analysis focused on the active site of the thermophilic c-subunit (TFoc) ring in membranes with a solid-state NMR method developed for this purpose. We used stereo-array isotope labeling (SAIL) with a cell-free system to highlight the target. TFoc oligomers were purified using a virtual ring His tag. The membrane-reconstituted TFoc oligomer was confirmed to be a ring indistinguishable from that expressed in E. coli on the basis of the H+-translocation activity and high-speed atomic force microscopic images. For the analysis of the active site, 2D 13C-13C correlation spectra of TFoc rings labeled with SAIL-Glu and -Asn were recorded. Complete signal assignment could be performed with the aid of the Cαi+1-Cαi correlation spectrum of specifically 13C,15N-labeled TFoc rings. The Cδ chemical shift of Glu-56, which is essential for H+ translocation, and related crosspeaks revealed that its carboxyl group is protonated in the membrane, forming the H+-locked conformation with Asn-23. The chemical shift of Asp-61 Cγ of the E. coli c ring indicated an involvement of a water molecule in the H+ locking, in contrast to the involvement of Asn-23 in the TFoc ring, suggesting two different means of proton storage in the c rings. PMID:24461014

  17. Acid-Sensing Ion Channels Activated by Evoked Released Protons Modulate Synaptic Transmission at the Mouse Calyx of Held Synapse.

    PubMed

    González-Inchauspe, Carlota; Urbano, Francisco J; Di Guilmi, Mariano N; Uchitel, Osvaldo D

    2017-03-08

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) regulate synaptic activities and play important roles in neurodegenerative diseases. We found that these channels can be activated in neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) of the auditory system in the CNS. A drop in extracellular pH induces transient inward ASIC currents (IASICs) in postsynaptic MNTB neurons from wild-type mice. The inhibition of IASICs by psalmotoxin-1 (PcTx1) and the absence of these currents in knock-out mice for ASIC-1a subunit (ASIC1a(-/-)) suggest that homomeric ASIC-1as are mediating these currents in MNTB neurons. Furthermore, we detect ASIC1a-dependent currents during synaptic transmission, suggesting an acidification of the synaptic cleft due to the corelease of neurotransmitter and H(+) from synaptic vesicles. These currents are capable of eliciting action potentials in the absence of glutamatergic currents. A significant characteristic of these homomeric ASIC-1as is their permeability to Ca(2+) Activation of ASIC-1a in MNTB neurons by exogenous H(+) induces an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) Furthermore, the activation of postsynaptic ASIC-1as during high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the presynaptic nerve terminal leads to a PcTx1-sensitive increase in intracellular Ca(2+) in MNTB neurons, which is independent of glutamate receptors and is absent in neurons from ASIC1a(-/-) mice. During HFS, the lack of functional ASICs in synaptic transmission results in an enhanced short-term depression of glutamatergic EPSCs. These results strongly support the hypothesis of protons as neurotransmitters and demonstrate that presynaptic released protons modulate synaptic transmission by activating ASIC-1as at the calyx of Held-MNTB synapse.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The manuscript demonstrates that postsynaptic neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body at the mouse calyx of Held synapse express functional homomeric Acid-sensing ion channel-1a (ASIC-1as) that can be activated by protons

  18. Proton and gallium(III) binding properties of a biologically active salicylidene acylhydrazide.

    PubMed

    Hakobyan, Shoghik; Boily, Jean-François; Ramstedt, Madeleine

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation causes a range of problems in our society, especially in health care. Salicylidene acylhydrazides (hydrazones) are promising antivirulence drugs targeting secretion systems used during bacterial infection of host cells. When mixed with the gallium ion they become especially potent as bacterial and biofilm growth-suppressing agents, although the mechanisms through which this occurs are not fully understood. At the base of this uncertainty lies the nature of hydrazone-metal interactions. This study addresses this issue by resolving the equilibrium speciation of hydrazone-gallium aqueous solutions. The protonation constants of the target 2-oxo-2-[N-(2,4,6-trihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazino]-acetamide (ME0163) hydrazone species and of its 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzaldehyde and oxamic acid hydrazide building blocks were determined by UV-visible spectrophotometry to achieve this goal. These studies show that the hydrazone is an excessively strong complexing agent for gallium and that its antivirulence properties are predominantly ascribed to monomeric 1:1Ga-ME0163 complexes of various Ga hydrolysis and ME0163 protonation states. The chelation of Ga(III) to the hydrazone also increased the stability of the compounds against acid-induced hydrolysis, making this group of compounds very interesting for biological applications where the Fe-antagonist action of both Ga(III) and the hydrazone can be combined for enhanced biological effect.

  19. Unraveling the mechanism of proton translocation in the extracellular half-channel of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaoxia; Gunner, M R

    2016-05-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin, a light activated protein that creates a proton gradient in halobacteria, has long served as a simple model of proton pumps. Within bacteriorhodopsin, several key sites undergo protonation changes during the photocycle, moving protons from the higher pH cytoplasm to the lower pH extracellular side. The mechanism underlying the long-range proton translocation between the central (the retinal Schiff base SB216, D85, and D212) and exit clusters (E194 and E204) remains elusive. To obtain a dynamic view of the key factors controlling proton translocation, a systematic study using molecular dynamics simulation was performed for eight bacteriorhodopsin models varying in retinal isomer and protonation states of the SB216, D85, D212, and E204. The side-chain orientation of R82 is determined primarily by the protonation states of the residues in the EC. The side-chain reorientation of R82 modulates the hydrogen-bond network and consequently possible pathways of proton transfer. Quantum mechanical intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations of proton-transfer in the methyl guanidinium-hydronium-hydroxide model system show that proton transfer via a guanidinium group requires an initial geometry permitting proton donation and acceptance by the same amine. In all the bacteriorhodopsin models, R82 can form proton wires with both the CC and the EC connected by the same amine. Alternatively, rare proton wires for proton transfer from the CC to the EC without involving R82 were found in an O' state where the proton on D85 is transferred to D212.

  20. The Role of an Active Site Mg2+ in HDV Ribozyme Self-Cleavage: Insights from QM/MM Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Mlýnský, Vojtěch; Šponer, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme is a catalytic RNA motif embedded in the human pathogenic HDV RNA. It catalyzes self-cleavage of its sugar-phosphate backbone with direct participation of the active site cytosine C75. Biochemical and structural data support a general acid role of C75. Here, we used hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations to probe the reaction mechanism and changes in Gibbs energy along the ribozyme's reaction pathway with an N3-protonated C75H+ in the active site, which acts as the general acid, and a partially hydrated Mg2+ ion with one deprotonated, inner-shell coordinated water molecule that acts as the general base. We followed eight reaction paths with distinct position and coordination of the catalytically important active site Mg2+ ion. For six of them, we observed feasible activation barriers ranging from 14.2 to 21.9 kcal/mol, indicating that the specific position of the Mg2+ ion in the active site is predicted to strongly affect the kinetics of self-cleavage. The deprotonation of the U-1(2′-OH) nucleophile and the nucleophilic attack of the resulting U-1(2′-O−) on the scissile phosphodiester are found to be separate steps, as deprotonation precedes the nucleophilic attack. This sequential mechanism of the HDV ribozyme differs from the concerted nucleophilic activation and attack suggested for the hairpin ribozyme. We estimated the pKa of the U-1(2′-OH) group to range from 8.8 to 11.2, suggesting that the pKa is lowered by several units from that of a free ribose, comparable to and most likely smaller than the pKa of the solvated active site Mg2+ ion. Our results thus support the notion that the structure of the HDV ribozyme, and particularly the positioning of the active site Mg2+ ion, facilitates deprotonation and activation of the 2′-OH nucleophile. PMID:25412464

  1. The effect of pH on the exchangeability with deuterium of protons coupled to molybdenum(V) in the active and the desulpho forms of xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Malthouse, J P; Bray, R C

    1983-01-01

    The effect of pH variation on the exchangeability with deuterium of protons strongly coupled to Mo(V) in the active and desulpho forms of xanthine oxidase was studied by e.p.r. and rapid freezing, in extension of the work of Gutteridge, Tanner & Bray [Biochem. J. (1978) 175, 887-897]. Above neutrality, exchange rates increased with increasing pH. Detailed studies were made on the desulpho enzyme under a variety of conditions, and exchange rate constants at 22 degrees C ranged from 0.16s -1 at pH 6.6 to 1.6s -1 at pH 11.3. The mechanism of proton exchange in the enzyme is discussed. The interpretation by the above workers that the strongly coupled proton of the active enzyme is on sulphur and that of the desulpho enzyme is on oxygen remains valid (and is in agreement with other work), as do their proposals for the structures of the protonated and deprotonated species. However, pK values cannot be calculated from the exchange data. It is likely that the relatively low rates of exchange observed are due to the difference of structure between the protonated and the deprotonated forms. In the case of the desulpho enzyme, an exchange mechanism, which involves the proton exchanging both as such and along with oxygen in the form of a hydroxyl ion, is discussed. PMID:6312970

  2. Probing the acidity of carboxylic acids in protic ionic liquids, water, and their binary mixtures: activation energy of proton transfer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shashi Kant; Kumar, Anil

    2013-02-28

    Acidity functions were used to express the ability of a solvent/solution to donate/accept a proton to a solute. The present work accounts for the acidity determination of HCOOH, CH3COOH, and CH3CH2COOH in the alkylimidazolium-based protic ionic liquids (PILs), incorporated with carboxylate anion, water, and in a binary mixture of PIL and water using the Hammett acidity function, H0. A reversal in the acidity trend was observed, when organic acids were transferred from water to PIL. It was emphasized that an increased stabilization offered by PIL cation toward the more basic conjugate anion of organic acid was responsible for this anomalous change in acidity order in PILs, which was absent in water. The greater stabilization of a basic organic anion by PIL cation is discussed in terms of the stable hard–soft acid base (HSAB) pairing. A change in the H0 values of these acids was observed with a change in temperature, and a linear correlation between the ln H0 and 1/T was noted. This relationship points toward the activation energy of proton transfer (E(a,H+)), a barrier provided by the medium during the proton transfer from Brønsted acid to indicator. The H0 function in binary mixtures points to the involvement of pseudosolvent, the behavior of which changes with the nature and concentration of acid. The presence of the maxima/minima in the H0 function is discussed in terms of the synergetic behavior of the pseudosolvent composed of the mixtures of aqueous PILs.

  3. A plant proton-pumping inorganic pyrophosphatase functionally complements the vacuolar ATPase transport activity and confers bafilomycin resistance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Castiñeira, José R; Hernández, Agustín; Drake, Rocío; Serrano, Aurelio

    2011-07-15

    V-ATPases (vacuolar H+-ATPases) are a specific class of multi-subunit pumps that play an essential role in the generation of proton gradients across eukaryotic endomembranes. Another simpler proton pump that co-localizes with the V-ATPase occurs in plants and many protists: the single-subunit H+-PPase [H+-translocating PPase (inorganic pyrophosphatase)]. Little is known about the relative contribution of these two proteins to the acidification of intracellular compartments. In the present study, we show that the expression of a chimaeric derivative of the Arabidopsis thaliana H+-PPase AVP1, which is preferentially targeted to internal membranes of yeast, alleviates the phenotypes associated with V-ATPase deficiency. Phenotypic complementation was achieved both with a yeast strain with its V-ATPase specifically inhibited by bafilomycin A1 and with a vma1-null mutant lacking a catalytic V-ATPase subunit. Cell staining with vital fluorescent dyes showed that AVP1 recovered vacuole acidification and normalized the endocytic pathway of the vma mutant. Biochemical and immunochemical studies further demonstrated that a significant fraction of heterologous H+-PPase is located at the vacuolar membrane. These results raise the question of the occurrence of distinct proton pumps in certain single-membrane organelles, such as plant vacuoles, by proving yeast V-ATPase activity dispensability and the capability of H+-PPase to generate, by itself, physiologically suitable internal pH gradients. Also, they suggest new ways of engineering macrolide drug tolerance and outline an experimental system for testing alternative roles for fungal and animal V-ATPases, other than the mere acidification of subcellular organelles.

  4. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  5. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems.

  6. Measurement of Neutrons in Different Pb/U Setups Irradiated by Relativistic Protons and Deuterons by means of Activation Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, V.; Svoboda, O.; Vrzalová, J.; Suchopár, M.; Geier, B.; Kugler, A.; Honusek, M.; the Collaboration Energy; Radioactive Waste, Transmutation of

    2012-05-01

    The collaboration Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Waste uses different setups consisting of lead, uranium and graphite irradiated by relativistic protons and deuterons to study transmutation of radioactive materials by produced neutrons. Our group measured spatial distribution of neutrons by means of activation samples during the assembly irradiation by the JINR Nuclotron beams. We also present results of simulations using MCNPX code and their comparison with obtained experimental data. We use Au, Al, Bi, In and Ta foils as activation detectors, but unfortunately almost no experimental cross-section data for observed threshold (n,xn) reactions are available for higher neutron energies. Therefore we carried out series experiments devoted to determination of neutron cross-sections of various threshold reactions using different quasi-monoenergetic neutron sources.

  7. Activation cross-sections of proton induced reactions on vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditrói, F.; Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Hermanne, A.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental excitation functions for proton induced reactions on natural vanadium in the 37-65 MeV energy range were measured with the activation method using a stacked foil irradiation technique. By using high resolution gamma spectrometry cross-section data for the production of 51,48Cr, 48V, 48,47,46,44m,44g,43Sc and 43,42K were determined. Comparisons with the earlier published data are presented and results predicted by different theoretical codes (EMPIRE and TALYS) are included. Thick target yields were calculated from a fit to our experimental excitation curves and compared with the earlier experimental yield data. Depth distribution curves to be used for thin layer activation (TLA) are also presented.

  8. Proton therapy in the clinic.

    PubMed

    DeLaney, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The clinical advantage for proton radiotherapy over photon approaches is the marked reduction in integral dose to the patient, due to the absence of exit dose beyond the proton Bragg peak. The integral dose with protons is approximately 60% lower than that with any external beam photon technique. Pediatric patients, because of their developing normal tissues and anticipated length of remaining life, are likely to have the maximum clinical gain with the use of protons. Proton therapy may also allow treatment of some adult tumors to much more effective doses, because of normal tissue sparing distal to the tumor. Currently, the most commonly available proton treatment technology uses 3D conformal approaches based on (a) distal range modulation, (b) passive scattering of the proton beam in its x- and y-axes, and (c) lateral beam-shaping. It is anticipated that magnetic pencil beam scanning will become the dominant mode of proton delivery in the future, which will lower neutron scatter associated with passively scattered beam lines, reduce the need for expensive beam-shaping devices, and allow intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy. Proton treatment plans are more sensitive to variations in tumor size and normal tissue changes over the course of treatment than photon plans, and it is expected that adaptive radiation therapy will be increasingly important for proton therapy as well. While impressive treatment results have been reported with protons, their cost is higher than for photon IMRT. Hence, protons should ideally be employed for anatomic sites and tumors not well treated with photons. While protons appear cost-effective for pediatric tumors, their cost-effectiveness for treatment of some adult tumors, such as prostate cancer, is uncertain. Comparative studies have been proposed or are in progress to more rigorously assess their value for a variety of sites. The utility of proton therapy will be enhanced by technological developments that reduce its cost

  9. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study of the proton-irradiated KTiOPO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2013-08-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study the effects of proton irradiation on KTiOPO4 (KTP) in view of the previously studied paramagnetic impurity doping effects. High-resolution 31P NMR measurements showed significant increase in the isotropic chemical shifts of the two inequivalent phosphorus sites in the proton-irradiated KTP system, indicating decrease in the electron density around the phosphorous nuclei. The 31P NMR linewidths of the KTP system manifested anomalies associated with the superionic transition and with the polaron formation, which became much weaker after proton irradiation. Besides, the activation energy of the charge carriers increased significantly after proton irradiation.

  10. Multiple-site concerted proton-electron transfer reactions of hydrogen-bonded phenols are nonadiabatic and well described by semiclassical Marcus theory.

    PubMed

    Schrauben, Joel N; Cattaneo, Mauricio; Day, Thomas C; Tenderholt, Adam L; Mayer, James M

    2012-10-10

    Photo-oxidations of hydrogen-bonded phenols using excited-state polyarenes are described to derive fundamental understanding of multiple-site concerted proton-electron transfer reactions (MS-CPET). Experiments have examined phenol bases having -CPh(2)NH(2), -Py, and -CH(2)Py groups ortho to the phenol hydroxyl group and tert-butyl groups in the 4,6-positions for stability (HOAr-NH(2), HOAr-Py, and HOAr-CH(2)Py, respectively; Py = pyridyl; Ph = phenyl). The photo-oxidations proceed by intramolecular proton transfer from the phenol to the pendent base concerted with electron transfer to the excited polyarene. For comparison, 2,4,6-(t)Bu(3)C(6)H(2)OH, a phenol without a pendent base and tert-butyl groups in the 2,4,6-positions, has also been examined. Many of these bimolecular reactions are fast, with rate constants near the diffusion limit. Combining the photochemical k(CPET) values with those from prior thermal stopped-flow kinetic studies gives data sets for the oxidations of HOAr-NH(2) and HOAr-CH(2)Py that span over 10(7) in k(CPET) and nearly 0.9 eV in driving force (ΔG(o)'). Plots of log(k(CPET)) vs ΔG(o)', including both excited-state anthracenes and ground state aminium radical cations, define a single Marcus parabola in each case. These two data sets are thus well described by semiclassical Marcus theory, providing a strong validation of the use of this theory for MS-CPET. The parabolas give λ(CPET) ≅ 1.15-1.2 eV and H(ab) ≅ 20-30 cm(-1). These experiments represent the most direct measurements of H(ab) for MS-CPET reactions to date. Although rate constants are available only up to the diffusion limit, the parabolas clearly peak well below the adiabatic limit of ca. 6 × 10(12) s(-1). Thus, this is a very clear demonstration that the reactions are nonadiabatic. The nonadiabatic character slows the reactions by a factor of ~45. Results for the oxidation of HOAr-Py, in which the phenol and base are conjugated, and for oxidation of 2,4,6-(t)Bu(3)C(6)H(2

  11. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  12. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an active... visible emissions to the outside air from any active waste disposal site where asbestos-containing...

  13. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  14. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  15. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  16. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  17. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  18. Oxalate decarboxylase and oxalate oxidase activities can be interchanged with a specificity switch of up to 282,000 by mutating an active site lid.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Matthew R; Just, Victoria J; Bowater, Laura; Fairhurst, Shirley A; Requena, Laura; Lawson, David M; Bornemann, Stephen

    2007-10-30

    Oxalate decarboxylases and oxalate oxidases are members of the cupin superfamily of proteins that have many common features: a manganese ion with a common ligand set, the substrate oxalate, and dioxygen (as either a unique cofactor or a substrate). We have hypothesized that these enzymes share common catalytic steps that diverge when a carboxylate radical intermediate becomes protonated. The Bacillus subtilis decarboxylase has two manganese binding sites, and we proposed that Glu162 on a flexible lid is the site 1 general acid. We now demonstrate that a decarboxylase can be converted into an oxidase by mutating amino acids of the lid that include Glu162 with specificity switches of 282,000 (SEN161-3DAS), 275,000 (SENS161-4DSSN), and 225,000 (SENS161-4DASN). The structure of the SENS161-4DSSN mutant showed that site 2 was not affected. The requirement for substitutions other than of Glu162 was, at least in part, due to the need to decrease the Km for dioxygen for the oxidase reaction. Reversion of decarboxylase activity could be achieved by reintroducing Glu162 to the SENS161-4DASN mutant to give a relative specificity switch of 25,600. This provides compelling evidence for the crucial role of Glu162 in the decarboxylase reaction consistent with it being the general acid, for the role of the lid in controlling the Km for dioxygen, and for site 1 being the sole catalytically active site. We also report the trapping of carboxylate radicals produced during turnover of the mutant with the highest oxidase activity. Such radicals were also observed with the wild-type decarboxylase.

  19. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  20. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  1. Role of proton pump of mitochondria-rich cells for active transport of chloride ions in toad skin epithelium.

    PubMed

    Larsen, E H; Willumsen, N J; Christoffersen, B C

    1992-05-01

    1. Active Cl- currents were studied in short-circuited toad skin epithelium in which the passive voltage-activated Cl- current is zero. Under visual control double-barrelled microelectrodes were used for impaling principal cells from the serosal side, or for measuring the pH profile in the solution bathing the apical border. 2. The net inward (active) 36Cl- flux of 27 +/- 8 pmol s-1 cm-2 (16) (mean +/- S.E.M (number of observation)) was abolished by 2 mM-CN- (6.3 +/- 3.5 pmol s-1 cm-2 (8)). The active flux was maintained in the absence of active Na+ transport when the latter was eliminated by either 100 microM-mucosal amiloride, replacement of mucosal Na+ with K+, or by 3 mM-serosal ouabain. 3. In Ringer solution buffered by 24 mM-HCO3- -5% CO2 mucosal amiloride reversed the short circuit current (ISC). The outward ISC was maintained when gluconate replaced mucosal Cl-, and it was reversibly reduced in CO2-free 5 mM-Tris-buffered Ringer solution (pH = 7.40) or by the proton pump inhibitor oligomycin. These observations indicate that the source of the outward ISC is an apical proton pump. 4. Amiloride caused principal cells to hyperpolarize from a basolateral membrane potential, Vb, of -73 +/- 3 (22) to -93 +/- 1 mV (26), and superfusion with CO2-free Tris-buffered Ringer solution induced a further hyperpolarization (Vb = -101 +/- 1 mV (26)) which could be blocked by Ba2+. The CO2-sensitive current changes were null at Vb = EK (potassium reversal potential, -106 +/- 2 mV (55)) implying that they are carried by K+ channels in the basolateral membrane. Such a response cannot account for the inhibition of the outward ISC which by default seems to be located to mitochondria-rich (MR) cells. 5. In the absence of mucosal Cl- a pH gradient was built up above MR cells with pH = 7.02 +/- 0.04 (42) and pH increasing to 7.37 +/- 0.02 (10) above principal cells (pH = 7.40 in bulk solution buffered by 0.1 mM-Tris). This observation localizes a proton pump to the apical membrane

  2. Lidar research activities and observations at NARL site, Gadanki, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellapragada, Bhavani Kumar

    2016-05-01

    The National Atmospheric Research Laboratory (NARL), a unit of Department of Space (DOS), located at Gadanki village (13.5°N, 79.2°E, 370 m AMSL) in India, is involved in the development of lidar remote sensing technologies for atmospheric research. Several advanced lidar technologies employing micropulse, polarization, Raman and scanning have been developed at this site and demonstrated for atmospheric studies during the period between 2008 and 2015. The technology of micropulse lidar, operates at 532 nm wavelength, was successfully transferred to an industry and the commercial version has been identified for Indian Lidar network (I-LINK) programme. Under this lidar network activity, several lidar units were installed at different locations in India to study tropospheric aerosols and clouds. The polarization sensitive lidar technology was realized using a set of mini photomultiplier tube (PMT) units and has the capability to operate during day and night without a pause. The lidar technology uses a compact flashlamp pumped Qswitched laser and employs biaxial configuration between the transmitter and receiver units. The lidar technology has been utilized for understanding the polarization characteristics of boundary layer aerosols during the mixed layer development. The demonstrated Raman lidar technology, uses the third harmonic wavelength of Nd:YAG laser, provides the altitude profiles of aerosol backscattering, extinction and water vapor covering the boundary layer range and allows operation during nocturnal periods. The Raman lidar derived height profiles of aerosol backscattering and extinction coefficient, lidar ratio, and watervapor mixing ratio inform the tropical boundary layer aerosol characteristics. The scanning lidar technology uses a near infrared laser wavelength for probing the lower atmosphere and has been utilized for high resolution cloud profiling during convective periods. The lidar technology is also used for rain rate measurement during

  3. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  4. Luminal and Cytosolic pH Feedback on Proton Pump Activity and ATP Affinity of V-type ATPase from Arabidopsis*

    PubMed Central

    Rienmüller, Florian; Dreyer, Ingo; Schönknecht, Gerald; Schulz, Alexander; Schumacher, Karin; Nagy, Réka; Martinoia, Enrico; Marten, Irene; Hedrich, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    Proton pumping of the vacuolar-type H+-ATPase into the lumen of the central plant organelle generates a proton gradient of often 1–2 pH units or more. Although structural aspects of the V-type ATPase have been studied in great detail, the question of whether and how the proton pump action is controlled by the proton concentration on both sides of the membrane is not understood. Applying the patch clamp technique to isolated vacuoles from Arabidopsis mesophyll cells in the whole-vacuole mode, we studied the response of the V-ATPase to protons, voltage, and ATP. Current-voltage relationships at different luminal pH values indicated decreasing coupling ratios with acidification. A detailed study of ATP-dependent H+-pump currents at a variety of different pH conditions showed a complex regulation of V-ATPase activity by both cytosolic and vacuolar pH. At cytosolic pH 7.5, vacuolar pH changes had relative little effects. Yet, at cytosolic pH 5.5, a 100-fold increase in vacuolar proton concentration resulted in a 70-fold increase of the affinity for ATP binding on the cytosolic side. Changes in pH on either side of the membrane seem to be transferred by the V-ATPase to the other side. A mathematical model was developed that indicates a feedback of proton concentration on peak H+ current amplitude (vmax) and ATP consumption (Km) of the V-ATPase. It proposes that for efficient V-ATPase function dissociation of transported protons from the pump protein might become higher with increasing pH. This feature results in an optimization of H+ pumping by the V-ATPase according to existing H+ concentrations. PMID:22215665

  5. Active-site zinc ligands and activated H2O of zinc enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Vallee, B L; Auld, D S

    1990-01-01

    The x-ray crystallographic structures of 12 zinc enzymes have been chosen as standards of reference to identify the ligands to the catalytic and structural zinc atoms of other members of their respective enzyme families. Universally, H2O is a ligand and critical component of the catalytically active zinc sites. In addition, three protein side chains bind to the catalytic zinc atom, whereas four protein ligands bind to the structural zinc atom. The geometry and coordination number of zinc can vary greatly to accommodate particular ligands. Zinc forms complexes with nitrogen and oxygen just as readily as with sulfur, and this is reflected in catalytic zinc sites having a binding frequency of His much greater than Glu greater than Asp = Cys, three of which bind to the metal atom. The systematic spacing between the ligands is striking. For all catalytic zinc sites except the coenzyme-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, the first two ligands are separated by a "short-spacer" consisting of 1 to 3 amino acids. These ligands are separated from the third ligand by a "long spacer" of approximately 20 to approximately 120 amino acids. The spacer enables formation of a primary bidentate zinc complex, whereas the long spacer contributes flexibility to the coordination sphere, which can poise the zinc for catalysis as well as bring other catalytic and substrate binding groups into apposition with the active site. The H2O is activated by ionization, polarization, or poised for displacement. Collectively, the data imply that the preferred mechanistic pathway for activating the water--e.g., zinc hydroxide or Lewis acid catalysis--will be determined by the identity of the other three ligands and their spacing. Images PMID:2104979

  6. Mutational analysis of the active site flap (20s loop) of mandelate racemase.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Jennifer R; Bearne, Stephen L

    2008-01-15

    Mandelate racemase from Pseudomonas putida catalyzes the Mg2+-dependent 1,1-proton transfer that interconverts the enantiomers of mandelate. Residues of the 20s and 50s loops determine, in part, the topology and polarity of the active site and hence the substrate specificity. Previously, we proposed that, during racemization, the phenyl ring of mandelate moves between an S-pocket comprised of residues from the 50s loop and an R-pocket comprised of residues from the 20s loop [Siddiqi, F., Bourque, J. R., Jiang, H., Gardner, M., St. Maurice, M., Blouin, C., and Bearne, S. L. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 9013-9021]. The 20s loop constitutes a mobile beta-meander flap that covers the active site cavity shielding it from solvent and controlling entry and egress of ligands. To understand the role of the 20s loop in catalysis and substrate specificity, we constructed a series of mutants (V22A, V22I, V22F, T24S, A25V, V26A, V26L, V26F, V29A, V29L, V29F, V26A/V29L, and V22I/V29L) in which the sizes of hydrophobic side chains of the loop residues were varied. Catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) for all mutants were reduced between 6- and 40-fold with the exception of those of V22I, V26A, V29L, and V22I/V29L which had near wild-type efficiencies with mandelate. Thr 24 and Ala 25, located at the tip of the 20s loop, were particularly sensitive to minor alterations in the size of their hydrophobic side chains; however, most mutations were tolerated quite well, suggesting that flap mobility could compensate for increases in the steric bulk of hydrophobic side chains. With the exception of V29L, with mandelate as the substrate, and V22F and V26A/V29L, with 2-naphthylglycolate (2-NG) as the substrate, the values of kcat and Km were not altered in a manner consistent with steric obstruction of the R-pocket, perhaps due to flap mobility compensating for the increased size of the hydrophobic side chains. Surprisingly, V22I and V29L catalyzed the racemization of the bulkier substrate 2-NG

  7. Asymmetric protonation of EmrE

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Emma A.; Robinson, Anne E.; Liu, Yongjia

    2015-01-01

    The small multidrug resistance transporter EmrE is a homodimer that uses energy provided by the proton motive force to drive the efflux of drug substrates. The pKa values of its “active-site” residues—glutamate 14 (Glu14) from each subunit—must be poised around physiological pH values to efficiently couple proton import to drug export in vivo. To assess the protonation of EmrE, pH titrations were conducted with 1H-15N TROSY-HSQC nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Analysis of these spectra indicates that the Glu14 residues have asymmetric pKa values of 7.0 ± 0.1 and 8.2 ± 0.3 at 45°C and 6.8 ± 0.1 and 8.5 ± 0.2 at 25°C. These pKa values are substantially increased compared with typical pKa values for solvent-exposed glutamates but are within the range of published Glu14 pKa values inferred from the pH dependence of substrate binding and transport assays. The active-site mutant, E14D-EmrE, has pKa values below the physiological pH range, consistent with its impaired transport activity. The NMR spectra demonstrate that the protonation states of the active-site Glu14 residues determine both the global structure and the rate of conformational exchange between inward- and outward-facing EmrE. Thus, the pKa values of the asymmetric active-site Glu14 residues are key for proper coupling of proton import to multidrug efflux. However, the results raise new questions regarding the coupling mechanism because they show that EmrE exists in a mixture of protonation states near neutral pH and can interconvert between inward- and outward-facing forms in multiple different protonation states. PMID:26573622

  8. Active Site Loop Dynamics of a Class IIa Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pegan, Scott D.; Rukseree, Kamolchanok; Capodagli, Glenn C.; Baker, Erica A.; Krasnykh, Olga; Franzblau, Scott G.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2013-01-08

    The class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs, EC 4.1.2.13) comprises one of two families of aldolases. Instead of forming a Schiff base intermediate using an ε-amino group of a lysine side chain, class II FBAs utilize Zn(II) to stabilize a proposed hydroxyenolate intermediate (HEI) in the reversible cleavage of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, forming glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). As class II FBAs have been shown to be essential in pathogenic bacteria, focus has been placed on these enzymes as potential antibacterial targets. Although structural studies of class II FBAs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtFBA), other bacteria, and protozoa have been reported, the structure of the active site loop responsible for catalyzing the protonation–deprotonation steps of the reaction for class II FBAs has not yet been observed. We therefore utilized the potent class II FBA inhibitor phosphoglycolohydroxamate (PGH) as a mimic of the HEI- and DHAP-bound form of the enzyme and determined the X-ray structure of the MtFBA–PGH complex to 1.58 Å. Remarkably, we are able to observe well-defined electron density for the previously elusive active site loop of MtFBA trapped in a catalytically competent orientation. Utilization of this structural information and site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic studies conducted on a series of residues within the active site loop revealed that E169 facilitates a water-mediated deprotonation–protonation step of the MtFBA reaction mechanism. Furthermore, solvent isotope effects on MtFBA and catalytically relevant mutants were used to probe the effect of loop flexibility on catalytic efficiency. Additionally, we also reveal the structure of MtFBA in its holoenzyme form.

  9. Structure of a Berberine Bridge Enzyme-Like Enzyme with an Active Site Specific to the Plant Family Brassicaceae

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Bastian; Wallner, Silvia; Steiner, Barbara; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Kumar, Prashant; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Sensen, Christoph W.; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Berberine bridge enzyme-like (BBE-like) proteins form a multigene family (pfam 08031), which is present in plants, fungi and bacteria. They adopt the vanillyl alcohol-oxidase fold and predominantly show bi-covalent tethering of the FAD cofactor to a cysteine and histidine residue, respectively. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome was recently shown to contain genes coding for 28 BBE-like proteins, while featuring four distinct active site compositions. We determined the structure of a member of the AtBBE-like protein family (termed AtBBE-like 28), which has an active site composition that has not been structurally and biochemically characterized thus far. The most salient and distinguishing features of the active site found in AtBBE-like 28 are a mono-covalent linkage of a histidine to the 8α-position of the flavin-isoalloxazine ring and the lack of a second covalent linkage to the 6-position, owing to the replacement of a cysteine with a histidine. In addition, the structure reveals the interaction of a glutamic acid (Glu426) with an aspartic acid (Asp369) at the active site, which appear to share a proton. This arrangement leads to the delocalization of a negative charge at the active site that may be exploited for catalysis. The structure also indicates a shift of the position of the isoalloxazine ring in comparison to other members of the BBE-like family. The dioxygen surrogate chloride was found near the C(4a) position of the isoalloxazine ring in the oxygen pocket, pointing to a rapid reoxidation of reduced enzyme by dioxygen. A T-DNA insertional mutant line for AtBBE-like 28 results in a phenotype, that is characterized by reduced biomass and lower salt stress tolerance. Multiple sequence analysis showed that the active site composition found in AtBBE-like 28 is only present in the Brassicaceae, suggesting that it plays a specific role in the metabolism of this plant family. PMID:27276217

  10. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  11. C-terminal truncation and histidine-tagging of cytochrome c oxidase subunit II reveals the native processing site, shows involvement of the C-terminus in cytochrome c binding, and improves the assay for proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Hiser, C; Mills, D A; Schall, M; Ferguson-Miller, S

    2001-02-13

    To enable metal affinity purification of cytochrome c oxidase reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles, a histidine-tag was engineered onto the C-terminal end of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome c oxidase subunit II. Characterization of the natively processed wildtype oxidase and artificially processed forms (truncated with and without a his-tag) reveals Km values for cytochrome c that are 6-14-fold higher for the truncated and his-tagged forms than for the wildtype. This lowered ability to bind cytochrome c indicates a previously undetected role for the C-terminus in cytochrome c binding and is mimicked by reduced affinity for an FPLC anion exchange column. The elution profiles and kinetics indicate that the removal of 16 amino acids from the C-terminus, predicted from the known processing site of the Paracoccus denitrificans oxidase, does not produce the same enzyme as the native processing reaction. MALDI-TOF MS data show the true C-terminus of subunit II is at serine 290, three amino acids longer than expected. When the his-tagged form is reconstituted into lipid vesicles and further purified by metal affinity chromatography, significant improvement is observed in proton pumping analysis by the stopped-flow method. The improved kinetic results are attributed to a homogeneous, correctly oriented vesicle population with higher activity and less buffering from extraneous lipids.

  12. The yeast regulator of transcription protein Rtr1 lacks an active site and phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kehui; Manley, James L; Tong, Liang

    2012-07-10

    The activity of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is controlled in part by the phosphorylation state of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of its largest subunit. Recent reports have suggested that yeast regulator of transcription protein, Rtr1, and its human homologue RPAP2, possess Pol II CTD Ser5 phosphatase activity. Here we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces lactis Rtr1, which reveals a new type of zinc finger protein and does not have any close structural homologues. Importantly, the structure does not show evidence of an active site, and extensive experiments to demonstrate its CTD phosphatase activity have been unsuccessful, suggesting that Rtr1 has a non-catalytic role in CTD dephosphorylation.

  13. Fluorine concentrations in bone biopsy samples determined by proton-induced gamma-ray emission and cyclic neutron activation.

    PubMed

    Spyrou, N M; Altaf, W J; Gill, B S; Jeynes, C; Nicolaou, G; Pietra, R; Sabbioni, E; Surian, M

    1990-01-01

    Fluorine concentrations in bone biopsy samples taken from the iliac crest of subjects, divided into four groups depending on the length of dialysis treatment, and aluminium levels in blood and bone pathology, in terms of osteoporosis, were determined by two instrumental methods. Proton-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE), making use of the resonance reaction of 19F(p, alpha gamma)16O at 872 keV, and cyclic neutron activation analysis (CNAA), using the 19F(n, gamma)20F reaction in a reactor irradiation facility, were employed. Rutherford backscattering (RBS) was used to calculate the volume, and, hence, mass of the sample excited in PIGE by determining the major element composition of the samples in order to express results in terms of concentration. From this preliminary investigation, a relationship is suggested between fluorine concentrations in bone and aluminium levels in the system.

  14. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURE IN LOW ACTIVATION MARTENSITIC STEELS F82H AND OPTIMAX AFTER 800 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Y. DAI; ET AL

    1999-10-01

    Low-activation martensitic steels, F82H (mod.) and Optimax-A, have been irradiated with 800-MeV protons up to 5.9 dpa. The tensile properties and microstructure have been studied. The results show that radiation hardening increases continuously with irradiation dose. F82H has lesser irradiation hardening as compared to Optimax-A in the present work and DIN1.4926 from a previous study. The irradiation embrittlement effects are evident in the materials since the uniform elongation is reduced sharply to less than 2%. However, all the irradiated samples ruptured in a ductile-fracture mode. Defect clusters have been observed. The size and the density of defect clusters increase with the irradiation dose. Precipitates are amorphous after irradiation.

  15. Effects of proton radiation on evoked and spontaneous neuronal activity in the hippocampus of APP/PSEN1 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Rudobeck, Emil; Szucs, Attila; Vlkolinsky, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Ground-based studies on space radiation indicate that exposure to charged particle radiation at relatively low doses may impair neuronal functions. Decrements in excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity in the hippocampus have been previously reported in mouse brains irradiated with iron nuclei, but relatively little is known about the effects of protons on the synaptic activity in the hippocampus. Behavioral and neurophysiological decrements in irradiated subjects are also commonly observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and we hypothesized that irradiation with protons may exacerbate AD-like neurodegenerative pathology. We used transgenic (TG) mice with AD-like neurodegeneration to test whether whole-body irradiation with protons (150 MeV; 0.1, 0.5, 1 Gy) accelerates the onset of AD and/or exacerbates synaptic impairments. We measured evoked excitatory synaptic potentials, synaptic plasticity and spontaneous oscillations in hippocampal slices prepared from APP/PSEN1 double TG mice (males only) at 6 and 9 months post-irradiation. Our electrophysiological recordings indicate that most of the radiation-induced synaptic decrements can be observed at 9 months rather than 6 months post-irradiation and they are differently expressed in TG and wild-type (WT) mice. Presynaptic excitability evaluated by the amplitude of fiber volleys was significantly increased in non-irradiated TG mice when compared with non-irradiated WT mice, and irradiation did not cause further alterations. The post-synaptic, dendritic excitability, evaluated by the initial slope of the excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSPs), was reduced in TG mice exposed to 0.5 Gy, but increased relative to WT mice at the same dose. Interestingly, the suppressive effect on EPSP in TG mice was not observed at 1 Gy. Post-synaptic firing of action potentials, evaluated by the amplitude of population spikes (PS), was increased in non-irradiated TG mice when compared with WT controls. However, these increases

  16. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-09-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues.

  17. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  18. Protein kinase C activation potentiates gating of the vanilloid receptor VR1 by capsaicin, protons, heat and anandamide

    PubMed Central

    Vellani, Vittorio; Mapplebeck, Sarah; Moriondo, Andrea; Davis, John B; McNaughton, Peter A

    2001-01-01

    The effects of activation of protein kinase C (PKC) on membrane currents gated by capsaicin, protons, heat and anandamide were investigated in primary sensory neurones from neonatal rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and in HEK293 cells (human embryonic kidney cell line) transiently or stably expressing the human vanilloid receptor hVR1. Maximal activation of PKC by a brief application of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) increased the mean membrane current activated by a low concentration of capsaicin by 1.65-fold in DRG neurones and 2.18-fold in stably transfected HEK293 cells. Bradykinin, which activates PKC, also enhanced the response to capsaicin in DRG neurones. The specific PKC inhibitor RO31-8220 prevented the enhancement caused by PMA. Activation of PKC did not enhance the membrane current at high concentrations of capsaicin, showing that PKC activation increases the probability of channel opening rather than unmasking channels. Application of PMA alone activated an inward current in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with VR1. The current was suppressed by the VR1 antagonist capsazepine. PMA did not, however, activate a current in the large majority of DRG neurones nor in HEK293 cells stably transfected with VR1. Removing external Ca2+ enhanced the response to a low concentration of capsaicin 2.40-fold in DRG neurones and 3.42-fold in HEK293 cells. Activation of PKC in zero Ca2+ produced no further enhancement of the response to capsaicin in either DRG neurones or HEK293 cells stably transfected with VR1. The effects of PKC activation on the membrane current gated by heat, anandamide and low pH were qualitatively similar to those on the capsaicin-gated current. The absence of a current activated by PMA in most DRG neurones or in stably transfected HEK293 cells suggests that activation of PKC does not directly open VR1 channels, but instead increases the probability that they will be activated by capsaicin, heat, low pH or anandamide. Removal of calcium

  19. The Sortase A enzyme that attaches proteins to the cell wall of Bacillus anthracis contains an unusual active site architecture.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Ethan M; Robson, Scott; Marohn, Melanie; Clubb, Robert T

    2010-07-23

    The pathogen Bacillus anthracis uses the Sortase A (SrtA) enzyme to anchor proteins to its cell wall envelope during vegetative growth. To gain insight into the mechanism of protein attachment to the cell wall in B. anthracis we investigated the structure, backbone dynamics, and function of SrtA. The NMR structure of SrtA has been determined with a backbone coordinate precision of 0.40 +/- 0.07 A. SrtA possesses several novel features not previously observed in sortase enzymes including the presence of a structurally ordered amino terminus positioned within the active site and in contact with catalytically essential histidine residue (His(126)). We propose that this appendage, in combination with a unique flexible active site loop, mediates the recognition of lipid II, the second substrate to which proteins are attached during the anchoring reaction. pK(a) measurements indicate that His(126) is uncharged at physiological pH compatible with the enzyme operating through a "reverse protonation" mechanism. Interestingly, NMR relaxation measurements and the results of a model building study suggest that SrtA recognizes the LPXTG sorting signal through a lock-in-key mechanism in contrast to the prototypical SrtA enzyme from Staphylococcus aureus.

  20. Carbonic anhydrase II binds to and increases the activity of the epithelial sodium-proton exchanger, NHE3

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Devishree; Liu, Lei; Wiebe, Shane A.; Casey, Joseph R.; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Alexander, R. Todd

    2016-01-01

    Two-thirds of sodium filtered by the renal glomerulus is reabsorbed from the proximal tubule via a sodium/proton exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3)-dependent mechanism. Since sodium and bicarbonate reabsorption are coupled, we postulated that the molecules involved in their reabsorption [NHE3 and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII)] might physically and functionally interact. Consistent with this, CAII and NHE3 were closely associated in a renal proximal tubular cell culture model as revealed by a proximity ligation assay. Direct physical interaction was confirmed in solid-phase binding assays with immobilized CAII and C-terminal NHE3 glutathione-S-transferase fusion constructs. To assess the effect of CAII on NHE3 function, we expressed NHE3 in a proximal tubule cell line and measured NHE3 activity as the rate of intracellular pH recovery, following an acid load. NHE3-expressing cells had a significantly greater rate of intracellular pH recovery than controls. Inhibition of endogenous CAII activity with acetazolamide significantly decreased NHE3 activity, indicating that CAII activates NHE3. To ascertain whether CAII binding per se activates NHE3, we expressed NHE3 with wild-type CAII, a catalytically inactive CAII mutant (CAII-V143Y), or a mutant unable to bind other transporters (CAII-HEX). NHE3 activity increased upon wild-type CAII coexpression, but not in the presence of the CAII V143Y or HEX mutant. Together these studies support an association between CAII and NHE3 that alters the transporter’s activity. PMID:26041446

  1. Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium: Role of Glutamate 186 in Catalysis Revealed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis, Alternate Substrates, and Active-site Inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-D-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium (SXA) is the most active enzyme known for catalyzing hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylooligosaccharides to D xylose. Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation states of catalytic ...

  2. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  3. Proton Inventory and Dynamics in the Nia-S to Nia-C Transition of a [NiFe] Hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Brandon L; Wu, Chang-Hao; Vansuch, Gregory E; Adams, Michael W W; Dyer, R Brian

    2016-03-29

    Hydrogenases (H2ases) represent one of the most striking examples of biological proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) chemistry, functioning in facile proton reduction and H2 oxidation involving long-range proton and electron transport. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies of the [NiFe] H2ases have identified several catalytic intermediates, but the details of their interconversion are still a matter of debate. Here we use steady state and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, sensitive to the CO ligand of the active site iron, as a probe of the proton inventory as well as electron and proton transfer dynamics in the soluble hydrogenase I from Pyrococcus furiosus. Subtle shifts in infrared signatures associated with the Nia-C and Nia-S states as a function of pH revealed an acid-base equilibrium associated with an ionizable amino acid near the active site. Protonation of this residue was found to correlate with the photoproduct distribution that results from hydride photolysis of the Nia-C state, in which one of the two photoproduct states becomes inaccessible at low pH. Additionally, the ability to generate Nia-S via PCET from Nia-C was weakened at low pH, suggesting prior protonation of the proton acceptor. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of electron and proton transfer with respect to the various proton inventories was utilized to develop a chemical model for reversible hydride oxidation involving two intermediates differing in their hydrogen bonding character.

  4. Calcineurin homologous proteins regulate the membrane localization and activity of sodium/proton exchangers in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Allman, Erik; Wang, Qian; Walker, Rachel L; Austen, Molly; Peters, Maureen A; Nehrke, Keith

    2016-02-01

    Calcineurin B homologous proteins (CHP) are N-myristoylated, EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding proteins that bind to and regulate Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, which occurs through a variety of mechanisms whose relative significance is incompletely understood. Like mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans has three CHP paralogs, but unlike mammals, worms can survive CHP loss-of-function. However, mutants for the CHP ortholog PBO-1 are unfit, and PBO-1 has been shown to be required for proton signaling by the basolateral Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHX-7 and for proton-coupled intestinal nutrient uptake by the apical Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHX-2. Here, we have used this genetic model organism to interrogate PBO-1's mechanism of action. Using fluorescent tags to monitor Na(+)/H(+) exchanger trafficking and localization, we found that loss of either PBO-1 binding or activity caused NHX-7 to accumulate in late endosomes/lysosomes. In contrast, NHX-2 was stabilized at the apical membrane by a nonfunctional PBO-1 protein and was only internalized following its complete loss. Additionally, two pbo-1 paralogs were identified, and their expression patterns were analyzed. One of these contributed to the function of the excretory cell, which acts like a kidney in worms, establishing an alternative model for testing the role of this protein in membrane transporter trafficking and regulation. These results lead us to conclude that the role of CHP in Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulation differs between apical and basolateral transporters. This further emphasizes the importance of proper targeting of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers and the critical role of CHP family proteins in this process.

  5. Fractionation factors and activation energies for exchange of the low barrier hydrogen bonding proton in peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketone complexes of chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Westler, W M; Cleland, W W; Markley, J L; Frey, P A

    1998-12-08

    NMR investigations have been carried out of complexes between bovine chymotrypsin Aalpha and a series of four peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones, listed here in order of increasing affinity for chymotrypsin: N-Acetyl-L-Phe-CF3, N-Acetyl-Gly-L-Phe-CF3, N-Acetyl-L-Val-L-Phe-CF3, and N-Acetyl-L-Leu-L-Phe-CF3. The D/H fractionation factors (phi) for the hydrogen in the H-bond between His 57 and Asp 102 (His 57-Hdelta1) in these four complexes at 5 degreesC were in the range phi = 0.32-0.43, expected for a low-barrier hydrogen bond. For this series of complexes, measurements also were made of the chemical shifts of His 57-Hepsilon1 (delta2,2-dimethylsilapentane-5-sulfonic acid 8.97-9. 18), the exchange rate of the His 57-Hdelta1 proton with bulk water protons (284-12.4 s-1), and the activation enthalpies for this hydrogen exchange (14.7-19.4 kcal.mol-1). It was found that the previously noted correlations between the inhibition constants (Ki 170-1.2 microM) and the chemical shifts of His 57-Hdelta1 (delta2, 2-dimethylsilapentane-5-sulfonic acid 18.61-18.95) for this series of peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones with chymotrypsin [Lin, J., Cassidy, C. S. & Frey, P. A. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 11940-11948] could be extended to include the fractionation factors, hydrogen exchange rates, and hydrogen exchange activation enthalpies. The results support the proposal of low barrier hydrogen bond-facilitated general base catalysis in the addition of Ser 195 to the peptidyl carbonyl group of substrates in the mechanism of chymotrypsin-catalyzed peptide hydrolysis. Trends in the enthalpies for hydrogen exchange and the fractionation factors are consistent with a strong, double-minimum or single-well potential hydrogen bond in the strongest complexes. The lifetimes of His 57-Hdelta1, which is solvent shielded in these complexes, track the strength of the hydrogen bond. Because these lifetimes are orders of magnitude shorter than those of the complexes themselves, the enzyme must have a

  6. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  7. Revealing the nature of the active site on the carbon catalyst for C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Sun, XiaoYing; Li, Bo; Su, Dangsheng

    2014-09-28

    A reactivity descriptor for the C-H bond activation on the nanostructured carbon catalyst is proposed. Furthermore the calculations reveal that the single ketone group can be an active site in ODH reaction.

  8. Cellular Active N-Hydroxyurea FEN1 Inhibitors Block Substrate Entry to the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Exell, Jack C.; Thompson, Mark J.; Finger, L. David; Shaw, Steven J.; Debreczeni, Judit; Ward, Thomas A.; McWhirter, Claire; Siöberg, Catrine L. B.; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Mark Abbott, W.; Jones, Clifford D.; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Durant, Stephen T.; Grasby, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    The structure-specific nuclease human flap endonuclease-1 (hFEN1) plays a key role in DNA replication and repair and may be of interest as an oncology target. We present the first crystal structure of inhibitor-bound hFEN1 and show a cyclic N-hydroxyurea bound in the active site coordinated to two magnesium ions. Three such compounds had similar IC50 values but differed subtly in mode of action. One had comparable affinity for protein and protein–substrate complex and prevented reaction by binding to active site catalytic metal ions, blocking the unpairing of substrate DNA necessary for reaction. Other compounds were more competitive with substrate. Cellular thermal shift data showed engagement of both inhibitor types with hFEN1 in cells with activation of the DNA damage response evident upon treatment. However, cellular EC50s were significantly higher than in vitro inhibition constants and the implications of this for exploitation of hFEN1 as a drug target are discussed. PMID:27526030

  9. Effect of NaCl Salts on the Activation Energy of Excited-State Proton Transfer Reaction of Coumarin 183.

    PubMed

    Joung, Joonyoung F; Kim, Sangin; Park, Sungnam

    2015-12-17

    Coumarin 183 (C183) was used as a photoacid to study excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. Here, we studied the effect of ions on the ESPT of C183 in aqueous NaCl solutions using a steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) method. The acid dissociation equilibrium of excited-state C183 and the activation energy for the ESPT of C183 were determined as a function of NaCl concentration. The change in the equilibrium constant was found to be correlated with the solvation energy of deprotonated C183. Frequency-resolved TCSPC signals measured at several temperatures were analyzed by using a global fitting analysis method which enabled us to extract all the rate constants involving the ESPT reaction and the spectra of individual species. The activation energy for the ESPT reaction of C183 was highly dependent on NaCl concentration. Quantum chemical calculations were used to calculate the local hydrogen-bond (H-bond) configurations around C183 in aqueous NaCl solutions. It was found that the activation energy for the ESPT was determined by the local H-bond configurations around C183 which were significantly influenced by the dissolved ions.

  10. Mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP activates proton conductance but does not block store-operated Ca(2+) current in liver cells.

    PubMed

    To, Minh-Son; Aromataris, Edoardo C; Castro, Joel; Roberts, Michael L; Barritt, Greg J; Rychkov, Grigori Y

    2010-03-15

    Uncouplers of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, including carbonilcyanide p-triflouromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and carbonilcyanide m-cholorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), are widely used in experimental research to investigate the role of mitochondria in cellular function. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to interpret the results obtained in intact cells using FCCP and CCCP, as these agents not only inhibit mitochondrial potential, but may also affect membrane potential and cell volume. Here we show by whole-cell patch clamping that in primary rat hepatocytes and H4IIE liver cells, FCCP induced large proton currents across the plasma membrane, but did not activate any other observable conductance. In intact hepatocytes FCCP inhibits thapsigargin-activated store-operated Ca(2+) entry, but in patch clamping under the conditions of strong Ca(2+) buffering it has no effect on store-operated Ca(2+) current (I(SOC)). These results indicate that there is no direct connection between mitochondria and activation of I(SOC) in liver cells and support the notion of indirect regulation of I(SOC) by mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering.

  11. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  12. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  13. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  14. Are nest sites actively chosen? Testing a common assumption for three non-resource limited birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, A. E.; Elliot, S. L.; Hart, A. G.

    2009-09-01

    Many widely-accepted ecological concepts are simplified assumptions about complex situations that remain largely untested. One example is the assumption that nest-building species choose nest sites actively when they are not resource limited. This assumption has seen little direct empirical testing: most studies on nest-site selection simply assume that sites are chosen actively (and seek explanations for such behaviour) without considering that sites may be selected randomly. We used 15 years of data from a nestbox scheme in the UK to test the assumption of active nest-site choice in three cavity-nesting bird species that differ in breeding and migratory strategy: blue tit ( Cyanistes caeruleus), great tit ( Parus major) and pied flycatcher ( Ficedula hypoleuca). Nest-site selection was non-random (implying active nest-site choice) for blue and great tits, but not for pied flycatchers. We also considered the relative importance of year-specific and site-specific factors in determining occupation of nest sites. Site-specific factors were more important than year-specific factors for the tit species, while the reverse was true for pied flycatchers. Our results show that nest-site selection, in birds at least, is not always the result of active choice, such that choice should not be assumed automatically in studies of nesting behaviour. We use this example to highlight the need to test key ecological assumptions empirically, and the importance of doing so across taxa rather than for single "model" species.

  15. Motion mitigation for lung cancer patients treated with active scanning proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grassberger, Clemens; Dowdell, Stephen; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Motion interplay can affect the tumor dose in scanned proton beam therapy. This study assesses the ability of rescanning and gating to mitigate interplay effects during lung treatments. Methods: The treatments of five lung cancer patients [48 Gy(RBE)/4fx] with varying tumor size (21.1–82.3 cm{sup 3}) and motion amplitude (2.9–30.6 mm) were simulated employing 4D Monte Carlo. The authors investigated two spot sizes (σ ∼ 12 and ∼3 mm), three rescanning techniques (layered, volumetric, breath-sampled volumetric) and respiratory gating with a 30% duty cycle. Results: For 4/5 patients, layered rescanning 6/2 times (for the small/large spot size) maintains equivalent uniform dose within the target >98% for a single fraction. Breath sampling the timing of rescanning is ∼2 times more effective than the same number of continuous rescans. Volumetric rescanning is sensitive to synchronization effects, which was observed in 3/5 patients, though not for layered rescanning. For the large spot size, rescanning compared favorably with gating in terms of time requirements, i.e., 2x-rescanning is on average a factor ∼2.6 faster than gating for this scenario. For the small spot size however, 6x-rescanning takes on average 65% longer compared to gating. Rescanning has no effect on normal lung V{sub 20} and mean lung dose (MLD), though it reduces the maximum lung dose by on average 6.9 ± 2.4/16.7 ± 12.2 Gy(RBE) for the large and small spot sizes, respectively. Gating leads to a similar reduction in maximum dose and additionally reduces V{sub 20} and MLD. Breath-sampled rescanning is most successful in reducing the maximum dose to the normal lung. Conclusions: Both rescanning (2–6 times, depending on the beam size) as well as gating was able to mitigate interplay effects in the target for 4/5 patients studied. Layered rescanning is superior to volumetric rescanning, as the latter suffers from synchronization effects in 3/5 patients studied. Gating minimizes the

  16. Exploring the active site of tripeptidyl-peptidase II through studies of pH dependence of reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Sandra; Lindås, Ann-Christin; Hamnevik, Emil; Widersten, Mikael; Tomkinson, Birgitta

    2012-04-01

    Tripeptidyl-peptidase II (TPP II) is a subtilisin-like serine protease which forms a large enzyme complex (>4MDa). It is considered a potential drug target due to its involvement in specific physiological processes. However, information is scarce concerning the kinetic characteristics of TPP II and its active site features, which are important for design of efficient inhibitors. To amend this, we probed the active site by determining the pH dependence of TPP II catalysis. Access to pure enzyme is a prerequisite for kinetic investigations and herein we introduce the first efficient purification system for heterologously expressed mammalian TPP II. The pH dependence of kinetic parameters for hydrolysis of two different chromogenic substrates, Ala-Ala-Phe-pNA and Ala-Ala-Ala-pNA, was determined for murine, human and Drosophila melanogaster TPP II as well as mutant variants thereof. The investigation demonstrated that TPP II, in contrast to subtilisin, has a bell-shaped pH dependence of k(cat)(app)/K(M) probably due to deprotonation of the N-terminal amino group of the substrate at higher pH. Since both the K(M) and k(cat)(app) are lower for cleavage of AAA-pNA than for AAF-pNA we propose that the former can bind non-productively to the active site of the enzyme, a phenomenon previously observed with some substrates for subtilisin. Two mutant variants, H267A and D387G, showed bell-shaped pH-dependence of k(cat)(app), possibly due to an impaired protonation of the leaving group. This work reveals previously unknown differences between TPP II orthologues and subtilisin as well as features that might be conserved within the entire family of subtilisin-like serine peptidases.

  17. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  18. Structural characterization of single nucleotide variants at ligand binding sites and enzyme active sites of human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kazunori D.; Nishi, Hafumi; Nakata, Junichi; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-01-01

    Functional sites on proteins play an important role in various molecular interactions and reactions between proteins and other molecules. Thus, mutations in functional sites can severely affect the overall phenotype. Progress of genome sequencing projects has yielded a wealth of information on single nucleotide variants (SNVs), especially those with less than 1% minor allele frequency (rare variants). To understand the functional influence of genetic variants at a protein level, we investigated the relationship between SNVs and protein functional sites in terms of minor allele frequency and the structural position of variants. As a result, we observed that SNVs were less abundant at ligand binding sites, which is consistent with a previous study on SNVs and protein interaction sites. Additionally, we found that non-rare variants tended to be located slightly apart from enzyme active sites. Examination of non-rare variants revealed that most of the mutations resulted in moderate changes of the physico-chemical properties of amino acids, suggesting the existence of functional constraints. In conclusion, this study shows that the mapping of genetic variants on protein structures could be a powerful approach to evaluate the functional impact of rare genetic variations. PMID:27924270

  19. Lamellipodial actin mechanically links myosin activity with adhesion site formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannone, Gregory; Dubin-Thaler, Benjamin; Rossier, Olivier; Cai, Yunfei; Chaga, Oleg; Jiang, Guoying; Beaver, William; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther; Freund, Yoav; Borisy, Gary; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell motility proceeds by cycles of edge protrusion, adhesion and retraction. Whether these functions are coordinated by biochemical or biomechanical processes is unknown. We find that myosin II pulls the rear of the lamellipodial actin network, causing upward bending, edge retraction and initiation of new adhesion sites. The network then separates from the edge and condenses over the myosin. Protrusion resumes as lamellipodial actin regenerates from the front and extends rearward until it reaches newly assembled myosin, initiating the next cycle. Upward bending, observed by evanescence and electron microscopy, results in ruffle formation when adhesion strength is low. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy shows that the regenerating lamellipodium forms a cohesive, separable layer of actin above the lamellum. Thus, actin polymerization periodically builds a mechanical link, the lamellipodium, connecting myosin motors with the initiation of adhesion sites, suggesting that the major functions driving motility are coordinated by a biomechanical process. PMID:17289574

  20. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  1. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  2. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine.

    PubMed

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-11-13

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO(2). We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O(2) and CO(2) bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO(2) defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg(2+) surrounded by three H(2)O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming.

  3. Amide proton exchange rates of a bound pepsin inhibitor determined by isotope-edited proton NMR experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Luly, J.R.; Stein, H.H.; BaMaung, N.

    1987-09-30

    From a series of isotope-edited proton NMR spectra, amide proton exchange rates were measured at 20 C, 30 C, and 40/sup 0/C for a tightly bound /sup 15/N-labeled tripeptide inhibitor of porcine pepsin (IC50 = 1.7 X 10(-) M). Markedly different NH exchange rates were observed for the three amide protons of the bound inhibitor. The P1 NH exchanged much more slowly than the P2 NH and P3 NH. These results are discussed in terms of the relative solvent accessibility in the active site and the role of the NH protons of the inhibitor for hydrogen bonding to the enzyme. In this study a useful approach is demonstrated for obtaining NH exchange rates on ligands bound to biomacromolecules, the knowledge of which could be of potential utility in the design of therapeutically useful nonpeptide enzyme inhibitors from peptide leads.

  4. Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Silver-Coated Nylon Dressing Plus Active DC Microcurrent for Healing of Autogenous Skin Donor Sites Edward W. Malin, MD, Chaya M. Galin, BSN, RN... microcurrent in comparison to silver-coated dressing with sham microcurrent on wound-closure time for autogenous skin donor sites. Methods: Four...hundred five patients were screened for treatment of their donor sites using a silver-coated nylon dressing with either sham or active microcurrent

  5. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  6. 76 FR 30696 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  7. 76 FR 24871 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... from eligible active uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of...). Title X requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs...

  8. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell model for aging predictions: Simulated equivalent active surface area loss and comparisons with durability tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, C.; Gérard, M.; Quinaud, M.; d'Arbigny, J.; Bultel, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) lifetime is one of the major challenges to optimize both material properties and dynamic control of the fuel cell system. In this study, by a multiscale modeling approach, a mechanistic catalyst dissolution model is coupled to a dynamic PEMFC cell model to predict the performance loss of the PEMFC. Results are compared to two 2000-h experimental aging tests. More precisely, an original approach is introduced to estimate the loss of an equivalent active surface area during an aging test. Indeed, when the computed Electrochemical Catalyst Surface Area profile is fitted on the experimental measures from Cyclic Voltammetry, the computed performance loss of the PEMFC is underestimated. To be able to predict the performance loss measured by polarization curves during the aging test, an equivalent active surface area is obtained by a model inversion. This methodology enables to successfully find back the experimental cell voltage decay during time. The model parameters are fitted from the polarization curves so that they include the global degradation. Moreover, the model captures the aging heterogeneities along the surface of the cell observed experimentally. Finally, a second 2000-h durability test in dynamic operating conditions validates the approach.

  9. A model of the rabies virus glycoprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Neri, P; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Spreafico, A; Niccolai, N

    1993-06-01

    The glycoprotein from the neurotropic rabies virus shows a significant homology with the alpha neurotoxin that binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The crystal structure of the alpha neurotoxins suggests that the Arg 37 guanidinium group and the Asp 31 side-chain carboxylate of the erabutoxin have stereochemical features resembling those of acetylcholine. Conformational studies on the Asn194-Ser195-Arg196-Gly197 tetrapeptide, an essential part of the binding site of the rabies virus glycoprotein, indicate that the side chains of Asn and Arg could also mimic the acetylcholine structure. This observation is consistent with the recently proposed mechanism of the viral infection.

  10. Generation of proton aurora by magnetosonic waves.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Wang, Yongfu; He, Zhaoguo; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Qinghua

    2014-06-05

    Earth's proton aurora occurs over a broad MLT region and is produced by the precipitation of low-energy (2-10 keV) plasmasheet protons. Proton precipitation can alter chemical compositions of the atmosphere, linking solar activity with global climate variability. Previous studies proposed that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can resonate with protons, producing proton scattering precipitation. A long-outstanding question still remains whether there is another mechanism responsible for the proton aurora. Here, by performing satellite data analysis and diffusion equation calculations, we show that fast magnetosonic waves can produce trapped proton scattering that yields proton aurora. This provides a new insight into the mechanism of proton aurora. Furthermore, a ray-tracing study demonstrates that magnetosonic wave propagates over a broad MLT region, consistent with the global distribution of proton aurora.

  11. Generation of proton aurora by magnetosonic waves

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Qiugang; Wang, Yongfu; He, Zhaoguo; Su, Zhenpeng; Yang, Chang; Zhou, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    Earth's proton aurora occurs over a broad MLT region and is produced by the precipitation of low-energy (2–10 keV) plasmasheet protons. Proton precipitation can alter chemical compositions of the atmosphere, linking solar activity with global climate variability. Previous studies proposed that electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves can resonate with protons, producing proton scattering precipitation. A long-outstanding question still remains whether there is another mechanism responsible for the proton aurora. Here, by performing satellite data analysis and diffusion equation calculations, we show that fast magnetosonic waves can produce trapped proton scattering that yields proton aurora. This provides a new insight into the mechanism of proton aurora. Furthermore, a ray-tracing study demonstrates that magnetosonic wave propagates over a broad MLT region, consistent with the global distribution of proton aurora. PMID:24898626

  12. A nickel hydride complex in the active site of methyl-coenzyme m reductase: implications for the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Jeffrey; Finazzo, Cinzia; Piskorski, Rafal; Ebner, Sieglinde; Duin, Evert C; Goenrich, Meike; Thauer, Rudolf K; Reiher, Markus; Schweiger, Arthur; Hinderberger, Dariush; Jaun, Bernhard

    2008-08-20

    Methanogenic archaea utilize a specific pathway in their metabolism, converting C1 substrates (i.e., CO2) or acetate to methane and thereby providing energy for the cell. Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) catalyzes the key step in the process, namely methyl-coenzyme M (CH3-S-CoM) plus coenzyme B (HS-CoB) to methane and CoM-S-S-CoB. The active site of MCR contains the nickel porphinoid F430. We report here on the coordinated ligands of the two paramagnetic MCR red2 states, induced when HS-CoM (a reversible competitive inhibitor) and the second substrate HS-CoB or its analogue CH3-S-CoB are added to the enzyme in the active MCR red1 state (Ni(I)F430). Continuous wave and pulse EPR spectroscopy are used to show that the MCR red2a state exhibits a very large proton hyperfine interaction with principal values A((1)H) = [-43,-42,-5] MHz and thus represents formally a Ni(III)F430 hydride complex formed by oxidative addition to Ni(I). In view of the known ability of nickel hydrides to activate methane, and the growing body of evidence for the involvement of MCR in "reverse" methanogenesis (anaerobic oxidation of methane), we believe that the nickel hydride complex reported here could play a key role in helping to understand both the mechanism of "reverse" and "forward" methanogenesis.

  13. A nuclear Overhauser enhancement study on the imino proton resonances of a DNA pentadecamer comprising the specific target site of the cyclic AMP receptor protein in the ara BAD operon.

    PubMed

    Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M; Jones, M B; Jiricny, J

    1984-01-09

    A 500 MHz 1H-NMR study on a synthetic DNA pentadecamer comprising the specific target site of the cAMP receptor protein in the ara BAD operon is presented. Using pre-steady state NOE measurements, unambiguous assignments of all the imino proton resonances and associated adenine (H2) resonances are obtained. From the NOE data interbase pair interproton distances involving the imino and adenine (H2) protons are determined. It is shown that these distances are very similar to those expected for classical B DNA (RMS difference of 0.5 A), but are significantly different from those expected for classical A DNA (RMS difference of 1.1 A).

  14. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... effects of the treatment. top of page What equipment is used? Proton beam therapy uses special machines, ... tumor cells. top of page Who operates the equipment? With backgrounds in mechanical, electrical, software, hardware and ...

  15. Active Site Hydrophobicity and the Convergent Evolution of Paraoxonase Activity in Structurally Divergent Enzymes: The Case of Serum Paraoxonase 1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a native lactonase capable of promiscuously hydrolyzing a broad range of substrates, including organophosphates, esters, and carbonates. Structurally, PON1 is a six-bladed β-propeller with a flexible loop (residues 70–81) covering the active site. This loop contains a functionally critical Tyr at position 71. We have performed detailed experimental and computational analyses of the role of selected Y71 variants in the active site stability and catalytic activity in order to probe the role of Y71 in PON1’s lactonase and organophosphatase activities. We demonstrate that the impact of Y71 substitutions on PON1’s lactonase activity is minimal, whereas the kcat for the paraoxonase activity is negatively perturbed by up to 100-fold, suggesting greater mutational robustness of the native activity. Additionally, while these substitutions modulate PON1’s active site shape, volume, and loop flexibility, their largest effect is in altering the solvent accessibility of the active site by expanding the active site volume, allowing additional water molecules to enter. This effect is markedly more pronounced in the organophosphatase activity than the lactonase activity. Finally, a detailed comparison of PON1 to other organophosphatases demonstrates that either a similar “gating loop” or a highly buried solvent-excluding active site is a common feature of these enzymes. We therefore posit that modulating the active site hydrophobicity is a key element in facilitating the evolution of organophosphatase activity. This provides a concrete feature that can be utilized in the rational design of next-generation organophosphate hydrolases that are capable of selecting a specific reaction from a pool of viable substrates. PMID:28026940

  16. Using Proton Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy to Understand Brain "Activation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baslow, Morris H.; Guilfoyle, David N.

    2007-01-01

    Upon stimulation, areas of the brain associated with specific cognitive processing tasks may undergo observable physiological changes, and measures of such changes have been used to create brain maps for visualization of stimulated areas in task-related brain "activation" studies. These perturbations usually continue throughout the period of the…

  17. Proteome-wide analysis of nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations in active sites of human proteins.

    PubMed

    Dingerdissen, Hayley; Motwani, Mona; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2013-03-01

    An enzyme's active site is essential to normal protein activity such that any disruptions at this site may lead to dysfunction and disease. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variations (nsSNVs), which alter the amino acid sequence, are one type of disruption that can alter the active site. When this occurs, it is assumed that enzyme activity will vary because of the criticality of the site to normal protein function. We integrate nsSNV data and active site annotations from curated resources to identify all active-site-impacting nsSNVs in the human genome and search for all pathways observed to be associated with this data set to assess the likely consequences. We find that there are 934 unique nsSNVs that occur at the active sites of 559 proteins. Analysis of the nsSNV data shows an over-representation of arginine and an under-representation of cysteine, phenylalanine and tyrosine when comparing the list of nsSNV-impacted active site residues with the list of all possible proteomic active site residues, implying a potential bias for or against variation of these residues at the active site. Clustering analysis shows an abundance of hydrolases and transferases. Pathway and functional analysis shows several pathways over- or under-represented in the data set, with the most significantly affected pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism. We provide a table of 32 variation-substrate/product pairs that can be used in targeted metabolomics experiments to assay the effects of specific variations. In addition, we report the significant prevalence of aspartic acid to histidine variation in eight proteins associated with nine diseases including glycogen storage diseases, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, Parkinson's disease and several cancers.

  18. Measurement of stray radiation within a scanning proton therapy facility: EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise of active dosimetry systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, J. Trompier, F.; Mares, V.; Schinner, K.; Wielunski, M.; Romero-Expósito, M.; Domingo, C.; Trinkl, S.; Dufek, V.; Klodowska, M.; Liszka, M.; Stolarczyk, L.; Olko, P.; Kubancak, J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To characterize stray radiation around the target volume in scanning proton therapy and study the performance of active neutron monitors. Methods: Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS WG9—Radiation protection in medicine) carried out a large measurement campaign at the Trento Centro di Protonterapia (Trento, Italy) in order to determine the neutron spectra near the patient using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry (BSS) systems. In addition, the work focused on acknowledging the performance of different commercial active dosimetry systems when measuring neutron ambient dose equivalents, H{sup ∗}(10), at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room. Detectors included three TEPCs—tissue equivalent proportional counters (Hawk type from Far West Technology, Inc.) and six rem-counters (WENDI-II, LB 6411, RadEye™ NL, a regular and an extended-range NM2B). Meanwhile, the photon component of stray radiation was deduced from the low-lineal energy transfer part of TEPC spectra or measured using a Thermo Scientific™ FH-40G survey meter. Experiments involved a water tank phantom (60 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}) representing the patient that was uniformly irradiated using a 3 mm spot diameter proton pencil beam with 10 cm modulation width, 19.95 cm distal beam range, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field size. Results: Neutron spectrometry around the target volume showed two main components at the thermal and fast energy ranges. The study also revealed the large dependence of the energy distribution of neutrons, and consequently of out-of-field doses, on the primary beam direction (directional emission of intranuclear cascade neutrons) and energy (spectral composition of secondary neutrons). In addition, neutron mapping within the facility was conducted and showed the highest H{sup ∗}(10) value of ∼51 μSv Gy{sup −1}; this was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H{sup ∗}(10) values

  19. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  20. Investigation of activation cross-section data of proton induced nuclear reactions on rhenium.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Yamazaki, H; Baba, M; Mohammadi, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2013-07-01

    In the frame of systematic investigations of activation cross-section data for different applications the excitation functions of (nat)Re(p,x)(185)Os, (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181m)Os, (186g)Re, (184m)Re, (184g)Re, (183)Re, (182m)Re, (182g)Re and (181g)Re reactions were measured up to 70MeV. The data for the (nat)Re(p,x) (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181g)Os,(186g)Re, (184m)Re,(182m)Re, (182g)Re, and (181)Re reactions are reported for the first time. The activation method, the stacked foil irradiation technique and γ-spectroscopy for activity detection were used. The experimental data were compared with predictions of three theoretical codes. From the measured cross-section thick target integral yields were also calculated and presented.

  1. V-ATPase Proton Pumping Activity Is Required for Adult Zebrafish Appendage Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Joana; Aires, Rita; Becker, Jörg D.; Jacinto, António; Certal, Ana C.; Rodríguez-León, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ion channels and transporters generates ion-specific fluxes that encode electrical and/or chemical signals with biological significance. Even though it is long known that some of those signals are crucial for regeneration, only in recent years the corresponding molecular sources started to be identified using mainly invertebrate or larval vertebrate models. We used adult zebrafish caudal fin as a model to investigate which and how ion transporters affect regeneration in an adult vertebrate model. Through the combined use of biophysical and molecular approaches, we show that V-ATPase activity contributes to a regeneration-specific H+ ef`flux. The onset and intensity of both V-ATPase expression and H+ efflux correlate with the different regeneration rate along the proximal-distal axis. Moreover, we show that V-ATPase inhibition impairs regeneration in adult vertebrate. Notably, the activity of this H+ pump is necessary for aldh1a2 and mkp3 expression, blastema cell proliferation and fin innervation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of V-ATPase during adult vertebrate regeneration. PMID:24671205

  2. V-ATPase proton pumping activity is required for adult zebrafish appendage regeneration.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Joana; Aires, Rita; Becker, Jörg D; Jacinto, António; Certal, Ana C; Rodríguez-León, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    The activity of ion channels and transporters generates ion-specific fluxes that encode electrical and/or chemical signals with biological significance. Even though it is long known that some of those signals are crucial for regeneration, only in recent years the corresponding molecular sources started to be identified using mainly invertebrate or larval vertebrate models. We used adult zebrafish caudal fin as a model to investigate which and how ion transporters affect regeneration in an adult vertebrate model. Through the combined use of biophysical and molecular approaches, we show that V-ATPase activity contributes to a regeneration-specific H+ ef`flux. The onset and intensity of both V-ATPase expression and H+ efflux correlate with the different regeneration rate along the proximal-distal axis. Moreover, we show that V-ATPase inhibition impairs regeneration in adult vertebrate. Notably, the activity of this H+ pump is necessary for aldh1a2 and mkp3 expression, blastema cell proliferation and fin innervation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the role of V-ATPase during adult vertebrate regeneration.

  3. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; ...

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5more » s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.« less

  4. Structure of the 2-Aminopurine-Cytosine Base Pair Formed in the Polymerase Active Site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Reha-Krantz, Linda J.; Hariharan, Chithra; Subuddhi, Usharani; Xia, Shuangluo; Zhao, Chao; Beckman, Jeff; Christian, Thomas; Konigsberg, William

    2011-11-21

    The adenine base analogue 2-aminopurine (2AP) is a potent base substitution mutagen in prokaryotes because of its enhanceed ability to form a mutagenic base pair with an incoming dCTP. Despite more than 50 years of research, the structure of the 2AP-C base pair remains unclear. We report the structure of the 2AP-dCTP base pair formed within the polymerase active site of the RB69 Y567A-DNA polymerase. A modified wobble 2AP-C base pair was detected with one H-bond between N1 of 2AP and a proton from the C4 amino group of cytosine and an apparent bifurcated H-bond between a proton on the 2-amino group of 2-aminopurine and the ring N3 and O2 atoms of cytosine. Interestingly, a primer-terminal region rich in AT base pairs, compared to GC base pairs, facilitated dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. We propose that the increased flexibility of the nucleotide binding pocket formed in the Y567A-DNA polymerase and increased 'breathing' at the primer-terminal junction of A+T-rich DNA facilitate dCTP binding opposite template 2AP. Thus, interactions between DNA polymerase residues with a dynamic primer-terminal junction play a role in determining base selectivity within the polymerase active site of RB69 DNA polymerase.

  5. WE-D-17A-05: Measurement of Stray Radiation Within An Active Scanning Proton Therapy Facility: EURADOS WG9 Intercomparison Exercise of Active Dosimetry Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, J; Trompier, F; Stolarczyk, L; Klodowska, M; Liszka, M; Olko, P; Algranati, C; Fellin, F; Schwarz, M; Domingo, C; Romero-Exposito, M; Dufek, V; Frojdh, E; George, S; Harrison, R; Kubancak, J; Ploc, O; Knezevic, Z; Majer, M; Miljanic, S; and others

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intercomparison of active dosemeters in the measurement of stray radiation at the Trento active-scanning proton therapy facility. Methods: EURADOS WG9 carried out a large intercomparison exercise to test different dosemeters while measuring secondary neutrons within a 230 MeV scanned proton therapy facility. Detectors included two Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS), three tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCHawk) and six rem-counters (Wendi II, Berthold, RadEye, a regular and an extended-range Anderson and Braun NM2B counters). Measurements of neutron ambient dose equivalents, H*(10), were done at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room while irradiating a water tank phantom with a 10 × 10 × 10 cc field. Results: A generally good agreement on H*(10) values was observed for the tested detectors. At distance of 2.25 m and angles 45°, 90° and 180° with respect to the beam axis, BSS and proportional counters agreed within 30%. Higher differences (up to 60%) were observed at the closest and farthest distances, i.e. at positions where detectors sensitivity, energy, fluence and angular response are highly dependent on neutron spectra (flux and energy). The highest neutron H*(10) value, ∼60 microSv/Gy, was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H*(10) decreased significantly with the distance from the isocenter dropping to 1.1 microSv/Gy at 4.25 m and 90° from beam axis, ∼2 nanoSv/Gy at the entrance of the maze, 0.2 nanoSv/Gy at the door outside the room and below detection limit in the gantry control room and at an adjacent room. These values remain considerately lower than those of passively scattered proton beams. BSS and Hawk unfolded spectra provide valuable inputs when studying the response of each detector. Conclusion: TEPCs and BSS enable accurate measurements of stray neutrons while other rem-meters also give satisfactory results but require further improvements to reduce uncertainties.

  6. Proton dynamics in cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Cancer remains a leading cause of death in the world today. Despite decades of research to identify novel therapeutic approaches, durable regressions of metastatic disease are still scanty and survival benefits often negligible. While the current strategy is mostly converging on target-therapies aimed at selectively affecting altered molecular pathways in tumor cells, evidences are in parallel pointing to cell metabolism as a potential Achilles' heel of cancer, to be disrupted for achieving therapeutic benefit. Critical differences in the metabolism of tumor versus normal cells, which include abnormal glycolysis, high lactic acid production, protons accumulation and reversed intra-extracellular pH gradients, make tumor site a hostile microenvironment where only cancer cells can proliferate and survive. Inhibiting these pathways by blocking proton pumps and transporters may deprive cancer cells of a key mechanism of detoxification and thus represent a novel strategy for a pleiotropic and multifaceted suppression of cancer cell growth. Research groups scattered all over the world have recently started to investigate various aspects of proton dynamics in cancer cells with quite encouraging preliminary results. The intent of unifying investigators involved in this research line led to the formation of the "International Society for Proton Dynamics in Cancer" (ISPDC) in January 2010. This is the manifesto of the newly formed society where both basic and clinical investigators are called to foster translational research and stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration for the development of more specific and less toxic therapeutic strategies based on proton dynamics in tumor cell biology. PMID:20550689

  7. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  8. Functional analyses for tRNase Z variants: an aspartate and a histidine in the active site are essential for the catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Elbarbary, Reyad A; Takaku, Hiroaki; Nashimoto, Masayuki

    2008-12-01

    We performed functional analyses for various single amino-acid substitution variants of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and human tRNase Zs. The well-conserved six histidine, His(I)-His(VI), and two aspartate, Asp(I) and Asp(II), residues together with metal ions are thought to form the active site of tRNase Z. The Mn(2+)-rescue analysis for Thermotoga maritima tRNase Z(S) has suggested that Asp(I) and His(V) directly contribute the proton transfer for the catalysis, and a catalytic mechanism has been proposed. However, experimental evidence supporting the proposed mechanism was limited. Here we intensively examined E. coli and B. subtilis tRNase Z(S) variants and human tRNase Z(L) variants for cleavage activities on pre-tRNAs in the presence of Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) ions. We observed that the Mn(2+) ions cannot rescue the activities of Asp(I)Ala and His(V)Ala variants from each species, which are lost in the presence of Mg(2+). This observation may support the proposed catalytic mechanism.

  9. Marine Biology Field Trip Sites. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  10. The nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans uses a single specific proton pathway.

    PubMed

    ter Beek, Josy; Krause, Nils; Reimann, Joachim; Lachmann, Peter; Ädelroth, Pia

    2013-10-18

    The NO reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans reduces NO to N2O (2NO + 2H(+) + 2e(-) → N2O + H2O) with electrons donated by periplasmic cytochrome c (cytochrome c-dependent NO reductase; cNOR). cNORs are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily of integral membrane proteins, comprising the O2-reducing, proton-pumping respiratory enzymes. In contrast, although NO reduction is as exergonic as O2 reduction, there are no protons pumped in cNOR, and in addition, protons needed for NO reduction are derived from the periplasmic solution (no contribution to the electrochemical gradient is made). cNOR thus only needs to transport protons from the periplasm into the active site without the requirement to control the timing of opening and closing (gating) of proton pathways as is needed in a proton pump. Based on the crystal structure of a closely related cNOR and molecular dynamics simulations, several proton transfer pathways were suggested, and in principle, these could all be functional. In this work, we show that residues in one of the suggested pathways (denoted pathway 1) are sensitive to site-directed mutation, whereas residues in the other proposed pathways (pathways 2 and 3) could be exchanged without severe effects on turnover activity with either NO or O2. We further show that electron transfer during single-turnover reduction of O2 is limited by proton transfer and can thus be used to study alterations in proton transfer rates. The exchange of residues along pathway 1 showed specific slowing of this proton-coupled electron transfer as well as changes in its pH dependence. Our results indicate that only pathway 1 is used to transfer protons in cNOR.

  11. An active site mutation increases the polymerase activity of the guinea pig-lethal Marburg virus.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Alexander; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Becker, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) causes severe, often fatal, disease in humans and transient illness in rodents. Sequential passaging of MARV in guinea pigs resulted in selection of a lethal virus containing 4 aa changes. A D184N mutation in VP40 (VP40D184N), which leads to a species-specific gain of viral fitness, and three mutations in the active site of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase L, which were investigated in the present study for functional significance in human and guinea pig cells. The transcription/replication activity of L mutants was strongly enhanced by a substitution at position 741 (S741C), and inhibited by other substitutions (D758A and A759D) in both species. The polymerase activity of L carrying the S741C substitution was eightfold higher in guinea pig cells than in human cells upon co-expression with VP40D184N, suggesting that the additive effect of the two mutations provides MARV a replicative advantage in the new host.

  12. Study of supported bilayer lipid membranes for use in chemo-electric energy conversion via active proton transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarles, Stephen A.; Sundaresan, Vishnu B.; Leo, Donald J.

    2007-09-01

    Bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) have been studied extensively due to functional and structural similarities to cell membranes, fostering research to understand ion-channel protein functions, measure bilayer mechanical properties, and identify self-assembly mechanisms. BLMs have traditionally been formed across single pores in substrates such as PTFE (Teflon). The incorporation of ion-channel proteins into the lipid bilayer enables the selective transfer of ions and fluid through the BLM. Processes of this nature have led to the measurement of ion current flowing across the lipid membrane and have been used to develop sensors that signal the presence of a particular reactant (glucose, urea, penicillin), improve drug recognition in cells, and develop materials capable of creating chemical energy from light. Recent research at Virginia Tech has shown that the incorporation of proton transporters in a supported BLM formed across an array of pores can convert chemical energy available in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) into electricity. Experimental results from this work show that the system-named Biocell-is capable of developing 2µW/cm2 of membrane area with 15μl of ATPase. Efforts to increase the power output and conversion efficiency of this process while moving toward a packaged device present a unique engineering problem. The bilayer, as host to the active proton transporters, must therefore be formed evenly across a porous substrate, remain stable and yet fluid-like for protein interaction, and exhibit a large seal resistance. This article presents the ongoing work to characterize the Biocell using impedance analysis. Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is used to study the effect of adding ATPase proteins to POPS:POPE bilayer lipid membranes and correlate structural changes evident in the impedance data to the energy-conversion capability of various partial and whole Biocell assemblies. The specific membrane resistance of a pure BLM drops from 40-120k

  13. Encroachment of Human Activity on Sea Turtle Nesting Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, D.; Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.; Tuttle, B.; Baugh, K.; Ghosh, T.

    2008-12-01

    The encroachment of anthropogenic lighting on sea turtle nesting sites poses a serious threat to the survival of these animals [Nicholas, 2001]. This danger is quantified by combining two established data sets. The first is the Nighttime Lights data produced by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center [Elvidge et al., 1997]. The second is the Marine Turtle Database produced by the World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC). The technique used to quantify the threat of encroachment is an adaptation of the method described in Aubrecht et al. [2008], which analyzes the stress on coral reef systems by proximity to nighttime lights near the shore. Nighttime lights near beaches have both a direct impact on turtle reproductive success since they disorient hatchlings when they mistake land-based lights for the sky-lit surf [Lorne and Salmon, 2007] and the lights are also a proxy for other anthropogenic threats. The identification of turtle nesting sites with high rates of encroachment will hopefully steer conservation efforts to mitigate their effects [Witherington, 1999]. Aubrecht, C, CD Elvidge, T Longcore, C Rich, J Safran, A Strong, M Eakin, KE Baugh, BT Tuttle, AT Howard, EH Erwin, 2008, A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights, Geocarto International, London, England: Taylor and Francis. In press. Elvidge, CD, KE Baugh, EA Kihn, HW Kroehl, ER Davis, 1997, Mapping City Lights with Nighttime Data from the DMSP Operational Linescan System, Photogrammatic Engineering and Remote Sensing, 63:6, pp. 727-734. Lorne, JK, M Salmon, 2007, Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean, Endangered Species Research, Vol. 3: 23-30. Nicholas, M, 2001, Light Pollution and Marine Turtle Hatchlings: The Straw that Breaks the Camel's Back?, George Wright Forum, 18:4, p77-82. Witherington, BE, 1999, Reducing Threats To Nesting Habitat, Research and Management Techniques for

  14. Zn{sup 2+} induces apoptosis in human highly metastatic SHG-44 glioma cells, through inhibiting activity of the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Shangrong; Li, Shu Jie

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Hv1 is expressed in highly metastatic glioma cell. •Zn{sup 2+} ions induces apoptosis in highly metastatic glioma cells. •Zn{sup 2+} ions markedly inhibit proton secretion. •Zn{sup 2+} ions reduce the gelatinase activity. •Inhibition of Hv1 activity via Zn{sup 2+} ions can effectively retard the cancer growth. -- Abstract: In contrast to the voltage-gated K{sup +} channels, the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 contains a voltage-sensor domain but lacks a pore domain. Here, we showed that Hv1 is expressed in the highly metastatic glioma cell SHG-44, but lowly in the poorly metastatic glioma cell U-251. Inhibition of Hv1 activity by 140 μM zinc chloride induces apoptosis in the human highly metastatic glioma cells. Zn{sup 2+} ions markedly inhibit proton secretion, and reduce the gelatinase activity in the highly metastatic glioma cells. In vivo, the glioma tumor sizes of the implantation of the SHG-44 xenografts in nude mice that were injected zinc chloride solution, were dramatically smaller than that in the controlled groups. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of Hv1 activity via Zn{sup 2+} ions can effectively retard the cancer growth and suppress the cancer metastasis by the decrease of proton extrusion and the down-regulation of gelatinase activity. Our results suggest that Zn{sup 2+} ions may be used as a potential anti-glioma drug for glioma therapy.

  15. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  16. Barium ions selectively activate BK channels via the Ca2+-bowl site.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Xu-Hui; Lingle, Christopher J

    2012-07-10

    Activation of Ca(2+)-dependent BK channels is increased via binding of micromolar Ca(2+) to two distinct high-affinity sites per BK α-subunit. One site, termed the Ca(2+) bowl, is embedded within the second RCK domain (RCK2; regulator of conductance for potassium) of each α-subunit, while oxygen-containing residues in the first RCK domain (RCK1) have been linked to a separate Ca(2+) ligation site. Although both sites are activated by Ca(2+) and Sr(2+), Cd(2+) selectively favors activation via the RCK1 site. Divalent cations of larger ionic radius than Sr(2+) are thought to be ineffective at activating BK channels. Here we show that Ba(2+), better known as a blocker of K(+) channels, activates BK channels and that this effect arises exclusively from binding at the Ca(2+)-bowl site. Compared with previous estimates for Ca(2+) bowl-mediated activation by Ca(2+), the affinity of Ba(2+) to the Ca(2+) bowl is reduced about fivefold, and coupling of binding to activation is reduced from ∼3.6 for Ca(2+) to about ∼2.8 for Ba(2+). These results support the idea that ionic radius is an important determinant of selectivity differences among different divalent cations observed for each Ca(2+)-binding site.

  17. Structure and Reactivity of the Phosphotriesterase Active Site

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    characterize different catalytic conformations for chorismate mutase . Preliminary evidence for water binding in phosphotriesterase suggests that activity in...MD/QM study of the chorismate mutase catalyzed Claisen rearrangement reaction. 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 22.Day, P.N.J., J.H.; Gordon,M.S.; Webb,S.P...Claisen rearrangement of an unusual substrate in chorismate mutase . 2001.subm. J.Phys.Chem.B 38.Stevens, W.J., Basch,H., Krauss,M., Compact effective

  18. Solar neutrinos, solar flares, solar activity cycle and the proton decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raychaudhuri, P.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that there may be a correlation between the galactic cosmic rays and the solar neutrino data, but it appears that the neutrino flux which may be generated during the large solar cosmic ray events cannot in any way effect the solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. Only initial stage of mixing between the solar core and solar outer layers after the sunspot maximum in the solar activity cycle can explain the higher (run number 27 and 71) of solar neutrino data in Davis experiment. But solar flare induced atmospheric neutrino flux may have effect in the nucleon decay detector on the underground. The neutrino flux from solar cosmic rays may be a useful guide to understand the background of nucleon decay, magnetic monopole search, and the detection of neutrino flux in sea water experiment.

  19. Reduced sodium/proton exchanger NHE3 activity causes congenital sodium diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Janecke, Andreas R; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Yin, Jianyi; Petersen, Britt-Sabina; Franke, Andre; Lechner, Silvia; Fuchs, Irene; Melancon, Serge; Uhlig, Holm H; Travis, Simon; Marinier, Evelyne; Perisic, Vojislav; Ristic, Nina; Gerner, Patrick; Booth, Ian W; Wedenoja, Satu; Baumgartner, Nadja; Vodopiutz, Julia; Frechette-Duval, Marie-Christine; De Lafollie, Jan; Persad, Rabindranath; Warner, Neil; Tse, C Ming; Sud, Karan; Zachos, Nicholas C; Sarker, Rafiquel; Zhu, Xinjun; Muise, Aleixo M; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Witt, Heiko; Zoller, Heinz; Donowitz, Mark; Müller, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Congenital sodium diarrhea (CSD) refers to an intractable diarrhea of intrauterine onset with high fecal sodium loss. CSD is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Syndromic CSD is caused by SPINT2 mutations. While we recently described four cases of the non-syndromic form of CSD that were caused by dominant activating mutations in intestinal receptor guanylate cyclase C (GC-C), the genetic cause for the majority of CSD is still unknown. Therefore, we aimed to determine the genetic cause for non-GC-C non-syndromic CSD in 18 patients from 16 unrelated families applying whole-exome sequencing and/or chromosomal microarray analyses and/or direct Sanger sequencing. SLC9A3 missense, splicing and truncation mutations, including an instance of uniparental disomy, and whole-gene deletion were identified in nine patients from eight families with CSD. Two of these nine patients developed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) at 4 and 16 years of age. SLC9A3 encodes Na(+)/H(+) antiporter 3 (NHE3), which is the major intestinal brush-border Na(+)/H(+) exchanger. All mutations were in the NHE3 N-terminal transport domain, and all missense mutations were in the putative membrane-spanning domains. Identified SLC9A3 missense mutations were functionally characterized in plasma membrane NHE null fibroblasts. SLC9A3 missense mutations compromised NHE3 activity by reducing basal surface expression and/or loss of basal transport function of NHE3 molecules, whereas acute regulation was normal. This study identifies recessive mutations in NHE3, a downstream target of GC-C, as a cause of CSD and implies primary basal NHE3 malfunction as a predisposition for IBD in a subset of patients.

  20. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma: Predictive Value for the Site of Postradiotherapy Relapse in a Prospective Longitudinal Study

    SciTech Connect

    Laprie, Anne Catalaa, Isabelle; Cassol, Emmanuelle; McKnight, Tracy R.; Berchery, Delphine; Marre, Delphine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Berry, Isabelle; Moyal, Elizabeth Cohen-Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI)-defined, metabolically abnormal tumor regions and subsequent sites of relapse in data from patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) in a prospective clinical trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three examinations were performed prospectively for 9 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme studied in a Phase I trial combining Tipifarnib and RT. The patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRSI before treatment and every 2 months until relapse. The MRSI data were categorized by the choline (Cho)/N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratio (CNR) as a measure of spectroscopic abnormality. CNRs corresponding to T1 and T2 MRI for 1,207 voxels were evaluated before RT and at recurrence. Results: Before treatment, areas of CNR2 (CNR {>=}2) represented 25% of the contrast-enhancing (T1CE) regions and 10% of abnormal T2 regions outside T1CE (HyperT2). The presence of CNR2 was often an early indicator of the site of relapse after therapy. In fact, 75% of the voxels within the T1CE+CNR2 before therapy continued to exhibit CNR2 at relapse, compared with 22% of the voxels within the T1CE with normal CNR (p < 0.05). The location of new contrast enhancement with CNR2 corresponded in 80% of the initial HyperT2+CNR2 vs. 20.7% of the HyperT2 voxels with normal CNR (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Metabolically active regions represented a small percentage of pretreatment MRI abnormalities and were predictive for the site of post-RT relapse. The incorporation of MRSI data in the definition of RT target volumes for selective boosting may be a promising avenue leading to increased local control of glioblastomas.

  1. Pathways of H2 toward the Active Site of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vitor H.; Baptista, António M.; Soares, Cláudio M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen (H2), but little is known about the diffusion of H2 toward the active site. Here we analyze pathways for H2 permeation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent. Various MD simulation replicates were done, to improve the sampling of the system states. H2 easily permeates hydrogenase in every simulation and it moves preferentially in channels. All H2 molecules that reach the active site made their approach from the side of the Ni ion. H2 is able to reach distances of <4 Å from the active site, although after 6 Å permeation is difficult. In this region we mutated Val-67 into alanine and perform new MD simulations. These simulations show an increase of H2 inside the protein and at lower distances from the active site. This valine can be a control point in the H2 access to the active center. PMID:16731562

  2. Exploring the proton pump and exit pathway for pumped protons in cytochrome ba3 from Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Yang; Choi, Sylvia K; Vakkasoglu, Ahmet Selim; Chen, Ying; Hemp, James; Fee, James A; Gennis, Robert B

    2012-04-03

    The heme-copper oxygen reductases are redox-driven proton pumps. In the current work, the effects of mutations in a proposed exit pathway for pumped protons are examined in the ba(3)-type oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus, leading from the propionates of heme a(3) to the interface between subunits I and II. Recent studies have proposed important roles for His376 and Asp372, both of which are hydrogen-bonded to propionate-A of heme a(3), and for Glu126(II) (subunit II), which is hydrogen-bonded to His376. Based on the current results, His376, Glu126(II), and Asp372 are not essential for either oxidase activity or proton pumping. In addition, Tyr133, which is hydrogen-bonded to propionate-D of heme a(3), was also shown not to be essential for function. However, two mutations of the residues hydrogen-bonded to propionate-A, Asp372Ile and His376Asn, retain high electron transfer activity and normal spectral features but, in different preparations, either do not pump protons or exhibit substantially diminished proton pumping. It is concluded that either propionate-A of heme a(3) or possibly the cluster of groups centered about the conserved water molecule that hydrogen-bonds to both propionates-A and -D of heme a(3) is a good candidate to be the proton loading site.

  3. Site selectivity in the protonation of a phosphinito bridged Pt(I)-Pt(I) complex: a combined NMR and density-functional theory mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Latronico, Mario; Polini, Flavia; Gallo, Vito; Mastrorilli, Piero; Calmuschi-Cula, Beatrice; Englert, Ulli; Re, Nazzareno; Repo, Timo; Räisänen, Minna

    2008-11-03

    The protonation of the dinuclear phosphinito bridged complex [(PHCy2)Pt(mu-PCy2){kappa(2)P,O-mu-P(O)Cy2}Pt(PHCy2)] (Pt-Pt) (1) by Brønsted acids affords hydrido bridged Pt-Pt species the structure of which depends on the nature and on the amount of the acid used. The addition of 1 equiv of HX (X = Cl, Br, I) gives products of formal protonation of the Pt-Pt bond of formula syn-[(PHCy2)(X)Pt(mu-PCy2)(mu-H)Pt(PHCy2){kappaP-P(O)Cy2}] (Pt-Pt) (5, X = Cl; 6, X = Br; 8, X = I), containing a Pt-X bond and a dangling kappa P-P(O)Cy2 ligand. Uptake of a second equivalent of HX results in the protonation of the P(O)Cy2 ligand with formation of the complexes [(PHCy2)(X)Pt(mu-PCy2)(mu-H)Pt(PHCy2){kappaP-P(OH)Cy2}]X (Pt-Pt) (3, X = Cl; 4, X = Br; 9, X = I). Each step of protonation is reversible, thus reactions of 3, 4, with NaOH give, first, the corresponding neutral complexes 5, 6, and then the parent compound 1. While the complexes 3 and 4 are indefinitely stable, the iodine analogue 9 transforms into anti-[(PHCy2)(I)Pt(mu-PCy2)(mu-H)Pt(PHCy2)(I)] (Pt-Pt) (7) deriving from substitution of an iodo group for the P(OH)Cy2 ligand. Complexes 3 and 4 are isomorphous crystallizing in the triclinic space group P1 and show an intramolecular hydrogen bond and an interaction between the halide counteranion and the POH hydrogen. The occurrence of such an interaction also in solution was ascertained for 3 by (35)Cl NMR. Multinuclear NMR spectroscopy (including (31)P-(1)H HOESY) and density-functional theory calculations indicate that the mechanism of the reaction starts with a prior protonation of the oxygen with formation of an intermediate (12) endowed with a six membered Pt(1)-X...H-O-P-Pt(2) ring that evolves into thermodynamically stable products featuring the hydride ligand bridging the Pt atoms. Energy profiles calculated for the various steps of the reaction between 1 and HCl showed very low barriers for the proton transfer and the subsequent rearrangement to 12, while a barrier

  4. Maintenance of plastid RNA editing activities independently of their target sites.

    PubMed

    Tillich, Michael; Poltnigg, Peter; Kushnir, Sergei; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2006-03-01

    RNA editing in plant organelles is mediated by site-specific, nuclear-encoded factors. Previous data suggested that the maintenance of these factors depends on the presence of their rapidly evolving cognate sites. The surprising ability of allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) to edit a foreign site in the chloroplast ndhA messenger RNA was thought to be inherited from its diploid male ancestor, Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Here, we show that the same ndhA editing activity is also present in Nicotiana sylvestris, which is the female diploid progenitor of tobacco and which lacks the ndhA site. Hence, heterologous editing is not simply a result of tobacco's allopolyploid genome organization. Analyses of other editing sites after sexual or somatic transfer between land plants showed that heterologous editing occurs at a surprisingly high frequency. This suggests that the corresponding editing activities are conserved despite the absence of their target sites, potentially because they serve other functions in the plant cell.

  5. Structure of a potentially open state of a proton-activated pentameric ligand-gated ion channel.

    PubMed

    Hilf, Ricarda J C; Dutzler, Raimund

    2009-01-01

    The X-ray structure of a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel from Erwinia chrysanthemi (ELIC) has recently provided structural insight into this family of ion channels at high resolution. The structure shows a homo-pentameric protein with a barrel-stave architecture that defines an ion-conduction pore located on the fivefold axis of symmetry. In this structure, the wide aqueous vestibule that is encircled by the extracellular ligand-binding domains of the five subunits narrows to a discontinuous pore that spans the lipid bilayer. The pore is constricted by bulky hydrophobic residues towards the extracellular side, which probably serve as barriers that prevent the diffusion of ions. This interrupted pore architecture in ELIC thus depicts a non-conducting conformation of a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel, the thermodynamically stable state in the absence of bound ligand. As ligand binding promotes pore opening in these ion channels and the specific ligand for ELIC has not yet been identified, we have turned our attention towards a homologous protein from the cyanobacterium Gloebacter violaceus (GLIC). GLIC was shown to form proton-gated channels that are activated by a pH decrease on the extracellular side and that do not desensitize after activation. Both prokaryotic proteins, ELIC and GLIC form ion channels that are selective for cations over anions with poor discrimination among monovalent cations, characteristics that resemble the conduction properties of the cation-selective branch of the family that includes acetylcholine and serotonin receptors. Here we present the X-ray structure of GLIC at 3.1 A resolution. The structure reveals a conformation of the channel that is distinct from ELIC and that probably resembles the open state. In combination, both structures suggest a novel gating mechanism for pentameric ligand-gated ion channels where channel opening proceeds by a change in the tilt of the pore-forming helices.

  6. A Processive Carbohydrate Polymerase That Mediates Bifunctional Catalysis Using a Single Active Site

    PubMed Central

    May, John F.; Levengood, Matthew R.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Brown, Christopher D.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Even in the absence of a template, glycosyltransferases can catalyze the synthesis of carbohydrate polymers of specific sequence. The paradigm has been that one enzyme catalyzes the formation of one type of glycosidic linkage, yet certain glycosyltransferases generate polysaccharide sequences composed of two distinct linkage types. In principle, bifunctional glycosyltransferases can possess separate active sites for each catalytic activity or one active site with dual activities. We encountered the fundamental question of one or two distinct active sites in our investigation of the galactosyltransferase GlfT2. GlfT2 catalyzes the formation of mycobacterial galactan, a critical cell-wall polymer composed of galactofuranose residues connected with alternating, regioisomeric linkages. We found that GlfT2 mediates galactan polymerization using only one active site that manifests dual regioselectivity. Structural modeling of the bifunctional glycosyltransferases hyaluronan synthase and cellulose synthase suggests that these enzymes also generate multiple glycosidic linkages using a single active site. These results highlight the versatility of glycosyltransferases for generating polysaccharides of specific sequence. We postulate that a hallmark of processive elongation of a carbohydrate polymer by a bifunctional enzyme is that one active site can give rise to two separate types of glycosidic bonds. PMID:22217153

  7. Positional effects of hydroxy groups on catalytic activity of proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Iridium(III) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Suna, Yuki; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Wang, Wan-Hui; Kambayashi, Hide; Manaka, Yuichi; Muckerman, James T.; Himeda, Yuichiro

    2014-11-12

    Proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Ir(III) complexes possessing a bipyridine ligand with two hydroxy groups at the 3,3'-, 4,4'-, 5,5'- or 6,6'-positions (3DHBP, 4DHBP, 5DHBP, or 6DHBP) were systematically investigated. UV-vis titration data provided average pK a values of the hydroxy groups on the ligands. Both hydroxy groups were found to deprotonate in the pH 4.6–5.6 range for the 4–6DHBP complexes. One of the hydroxy groups of the 3DHBP complex exhibited the low pKa value of < 0.4 because the deprotonation is facilitated by the strong intramolecular hydrogen bond formed between the generated oxyanion and the remaining hydroxy group, which in turn leads to an elevated pKa value of ~13.6 for the second deprotonation step. The crystal structures of the 4– and 6DHBP complexes obtained from basic aqueous solutions revealed their deprotonated forms. The intramolecular hydrogen bond in the 3DHBP complex was also observed in the crystal structures. The catalytic activities of these complexes in aqueous phase reactions, at appropriate pH, for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (pH 8.5), dehydrogenation of formic acid (pH 1.8), transfer hydrogenation reactions using formic acid/formate as a hydrogen source (pH 7.2 and 2.6) were investigated to compare the positional effects of the hydroxy groups. The 4– and 6DHBP complexes exhibited remarkably enhanced catalytic activities under basic conditions because of the resonance effect of the strong electrondonating oxyanions, whereas the 5DHBP complex exhibited negligible activity despite the presence of electron-donating groups. The 3DHBP complex exhibited relatively high catalytic activity at low pH owing to the one strong electron-donating oxyanion group stabilized by the intramolecular hydrogen bond. DFT calculations were employed to study the mechanism of CO₂ hydrogenation by the 4DHBP and 6DHBP complexes, and comparison of the activation free energies of the H₂ heterolysis and CO

  8. Positional effects of hydroxy groups on catalytic activity of proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Iridium(III) complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Suna, Yuki; Fujita, Etsuko; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; ...

    2014-11-12

    Proton-responsive half-sandwich Cp*Ir(III) complexes possessing a bipyridine ligand with two hydroxy groups at the 3,3'-, 4,4'-, 5,5'- or 6,6'-positions (3DHBP, 4DHBP, 5DHBP, or 6DHBP) were systematically investigated. UV-vis titration data provided average pK a values of the hydroxy groups on the ligands. Both hydroxy groups were found to deprotonate in the pH 4.6–5.6 range for the 4–6DHBP complexes. One of the hydroxy groups of the 3DHBP complex exhibited the low pKa value of < 0.4 because the deprotonation is facilitated by the strong intramolecular hydrogen bond formed between the generated oxyanion and the remaining hydroxy group, which in turn leadsmore » to an elevated pKa value of ~13.6 for the second deprotonation step. The crystal structures of the 4– and 6DHBP complexes obtained from basic aqueous solutions revealed their deprotonated forms. The intramolecular hydrogen bond in the 3DHBP complex was also observed in the crystal structures. The catalytic activities of these complexes in aqueous phase reactions, at appropriate pH, for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (pH 8.5), dehydrogenation of formic acid (pH 1.8), transfer hydrogenation reactions using formic acid/formate as a hydrogen source (pH 7.2 and 2.6) were investigated to compare the positional effects of the hydroxy groups. The 4– and 6DHBP complexes exhibited remarkably enhanced catalytic activities under basic conditions because of the resonance effect of the strong electrondonating oxyanions, whereas the 5DHBP complex exhibited negligible activity despite the presence of electron-donating groups. The 3DHBP complex exhibited relatively high catalytic activity at low pH owing to the one strong electron-donating oxyanion group stabilized by the intramolecular hydrogen bond. DFT calculations were employed to study the mechanism of CO₂ hydrogenation by the 4DHBP and 6DHBP complexes, and comparison of the activation free energies of the H₂ heterolysis and CO₂ insertion steps

  9. Fluoroquinolones: A micro-species equilibrium in the protonation of amphoteric compounds.

    PubMed

    Nurchi, Valeria M; Crisponi, Guido; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Peana, Massimiliano; Medici, Serenella; Veclani, Daniele; Tolazzi, Marilena; Melchior, Andrea

    2016-10-10

    The knowledge of the speciation of fluoroquinolones is of great actuality for the implications on the activity, bioavailability and pharmacokinetics. Literature reports a number of contrasting evaluations on the existence of tautomeric forms of mono-protonated species, described by a set of protonation micro-constants. Here the protonation sequence and the related protonation constants of four representative molecules are evaluated by a combined potentiometric-spectrophotometric method. The experimental observations necessary to differentiate between a protonation scheme represented by macro-constants alone, and the one that requires the introduction of a micro-protonation scheme, are clearly delineated based on a careful analysis of experimental data and of simulated models. The role of the medium was investigated and UV-vis spectra in water- methanol solution were analyzed. The existence of the zwitterionic species alone at physiological pH in water, and an increase of the relative amount of the neutral species with the lipophilicity of the medium were remarked. This surely affects the bioavailability of FQs, with the increase of the neutral species when the molecules approach the local lipophilic environment close to the cellular membranes. NMR studies allowed the attribution of the protonation sites of the different forms. Quantum chemical evaluation of all the possible existent forms with different protonation degrees and in different sites strongly substantiates the experimental results. The study of the relevant frontier molecular orbitals completed the detailed theoretical characterization of the species.

  10. Mouse SGLT3a generates proton-activated currents but does not transport sugar.

    PubMed

    Barcelona, Stephanie; Menegaz, Danusa; Díez-Sampedro, Ana

    2012-04-15

    Sodium-glucose cotransporters (SGLTs) are secondary active transporters belonging to the SLC5 gene family. SGLT1, a well-characterized member of this family, electrogenically transports glucose and galactose. Human SGLT3 (hSGLT3), despite sharing a high amino acid identity with human SGLT1 (hSGLT1), does not transport sugar, although functions as a sugar sensor. In contrast to humans, two different genes in mice and rats code for two different SGLT3 proteins, SGLT3a and SGLT3b. We previously cloned and characterized mouse SGLT3b (mSGLT3b) and showed that, while it does transport sugar like SGLT1, it likely functions as a physiological sugar sensor like hSGLT3. In this study, we cloned mouse SGLT3a (mSGLT3a) and characterized it by expressing it in Xenopus laevis oocytes and performing electrophysiology and sugar transport assays. mSGLT3a did not transport sugar, and sugars did not induce currents at pH 7.4, though acidic pH induced inward currents that increased in the presence of sugar. Moreover, mutation of residue 457 from glutamate to glutamine resulted in a Na(+)-dependent transport of sugar that was inhibited by phlorizin. To corroborate our results in oocytes, we expressed and characterized mSGLT3a in mammalian cells and confirmed our findings. In addition, we cloned, expressed, and characterized rat SGLT3a in oocytes and found characteristics similar to mSGLT3a. In summary, acidic pH induces currents in mSGLT3a, and sugar-induced currents are increased at acidic pH, but wild-type SGLT3a does not transport sugar.

  11. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M.; Kenny, Paul J.; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. PMID:25869137

  12. Elucidation of the Proton Transport Mechanism in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    PubMed Central

    Maupin, C. Mark; McKenna, Robert; Silverman, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) is one of the fastest known enzymes, which utilizes a rate-limiting proton transport (PT) step in its enzymatic reaction. To evaluate the PT event at an atomistic level, the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) method has been utilized in this work. It is observed that the PT event in HCA II exploits a transient active site water cluster to transport the excess proton between the catalytic zinc-bound water/hydroxide and the proton shuttling residue, His64. This PT event is found to be dependent on the enzyme's ability to form and stabilize the active site water cluster in addition to its ability to orient His64 in a favorable conformation. Evaluation of the PT free energy barrier for different orientations of His64 reveals this residue's vital role as a proton transporter and elucidates its direct effect on the barrier to PT through the active site water. It is suggested that the rate-limiting step oscillates between the active site water PT event to His64 and the de/protonation of His64 depending on the exogenous buffer concentration and the orientation of His64. In the absence of a PT acceptor/donor at position 64, it is found that the excess proton will utilize one of three distinct paths to enter/leave the active site. This latter result not only allows for an increased understanding of how enzymes capitalize on the protein/solvent interface to guide excess protons to/from areas of interest, it also provides valuable insight into the chemical rescue experiments on HCA II mutants. PMID:19438233

  13. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  14. 75 FR 71677 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department of... uranium and thorium processing site licensees for reimbursement under Title X of the Energy Policy Act of... requires DOE to reimburse eligible uranium and thorium licensees for certain costs of...

  15. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...). (e) For all asbestos-containing waste material received, the owner or operator of the active waste... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an...

  16. Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Production by [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+: Removing the Distinction Between Endo- and Exo- Protonation Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Houston JS; Wiese, Stefan; Roberts, John A.; Bullock, R. Morris; Helm, Monte L.

    2015-04-03

    A new Ni(II) complex, [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+ (7PPh2NH = 3,6-triphenyl-1-aza-3,6-diphosphacycloheptane) has been synthesized, and its electrochemical properties are reported. The 7PPh2NH ligand features an NH, ensuring properly positioned protonated amine groups (N–H+) for electrocatalysis, regardless of whether protonation occurs exo- or endo- to the metal center. The compound is an electrocatalyst for H2 production in the presence of organic acids (pKa range 10–13 in CH3CN) with turnover frequencies ranging from 160–770 s-1 at overpotentials between 320–470 mV, as measured at the half peak potential of the catalytic wave. In stark contrast to [Ni(PR2NR'2)2]2+ and other [Ni(7PPh2NR')]2+ complexes, catalytic turnover frequencies for H2 production by [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+ do not show catalytic rate enhancement upon the addition of H2O. This finding supports the assertion that [Ni(7PPh2NH)2]2+ eliminates the distinction between the endo- and exo-protonation isomers. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  17. Effects of histidine protonation and rotameric states on virtual screening of M. tuberculosis RmlC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Meekyum Olivia; Nichols, Sara E.; Wang, Yi; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-03-01

    While it is well established that protonation and tautomeric states of ligands can significantly affect the results of virtual screening, such effects of ionizable residues of protein receptors are less well understood. In this study, we focus on histidine protonation and rotameric states and their impact on virtual screening of Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme RmlC. Depending on the net charge and the location of proton(s), a histidine can adopt three states: HIP (+1 charged, both δ- and ɛ-nitrogens protonated), HID (neutral, δ-nitrogen protonated), and HIE (neutral, ɛ-nitrogen protonated). Due to common ambiguities in X-ray crystal structures, a histidine may also be resolved as three additional states with its imidazole ring flipped. Here, we systematically investigate the predictive power of 36 receptor models with different protonation and rotameric states of two histidines in the RmlC active site by using results from a previous high-throughput screening. By measuring enrichment factors and area under the receiver operating characteristic curves, we show that virtual screening results vary depending on hydrogen bonding networks provided by the histidines, even in the cases where the ligand does not obviously interact with the side chain. Our results also suggest that, even with the help of widely used pKa prediction software, assigning histidine protonation and rotameric states for virtual screening can still be challenging and requires further examination and systematic characterization of the receptor-ligand complex.

  18. Unmasking tandem site interaction in human acetylcholinesterase. Substrate activation with a cationic acetanilide substrate.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Joseph L; Cusack, Bernadette; Davies, Matthew P; Fauq, Abdul; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2003-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains a narrow and deep active site gorge with two sites of ligand binding, an acylation site (or A-site) at the base of the gorge, and a peripheral site (or P-site) near the gorge entrance. The P-site contributes to catalytic efficiency by transiently binding substrates on their way to the acylation site, where a short-lived acyl enzyme intermediate is produced. A conformational interaction between the A- and P-sites has recently been found to modulate ligand affinities. We now demonstrate that this interaction is of functional importance by showing that the acetylation rate constant of a substrate bound to the A-site is increased by a factor a when a second molecule of substrate binds to the P-site. This demonstration became feasible through the introduction of a new acetanilide substrate analogue of acetylcholine, 3-(acetamido)-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (ATMA), for which a = 4. This substrate has a low acetylation rate constant and equilibrates with the catalytic site, allowing a tractable algebraic solution to the rate equation for substrate hydrolysis. ATMA affinities for the A- and P-sites deduced from the kinetic analysis were confirmed by fluorescence titration with thioflavin T as a reporter ligand. Values of a >1 give rise to a hydrolysis profile called substrate activation, and the AChE site-specific mutant W86F, and to a lesser extent wild-type human AChE itself, showed substrate activation with acetylthiocholine as the substrate. Substrate activation was incorporated into a previous catalytic scheme for AChE in which a bound P-site ligand can also block product dissociation from the A-site, and two additional features of the AChE catalytic pathway were revealed. First, the ability of a bound P-site ligand to increase the substrate acetylation rate constant varied with the structure of the ligand: thioflavin T accelerated ATMA acetylation by a factor a(2) of 1.3, while propidium failed to accelerate. Second, catalytic rate

  19. Structure and nuclearity of active sites in Fe-zeolites: comparison with iron sites in enzymes and homogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zecchina, Adriano; Rivallan, Mickaël; Berlier, Gloria; Lamberti, Carlo; Ricchiardi, Gabriele

    2007-07-21

    Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite zeolites efficiently catalyse several oxidation reactions which find close analogues in the oxidation reactions catalyzed by homogeneous and enzymatic compounds. The iron centres are highly dispersed in the crystalline matrix and on highly diluted samples, mononuclear and dinuclear structures are expected to become predominant. The crystalline and robust character of the MFI framework has allowed to hypothesize that the catalytic sites are located in well defined crystallographic positions. For this reason these catalysts have been considered as the closest and best defined heterogeneous counterparts of heme and non heme iron complexes and of Fenton type Fe(2+) homogeneous counterparts. On this basis, an analogy with the methane monooxygenase has been advanced several times. In this review we have examined the abundant literature on the subject and summarized the most widely accepted views on the structure, nuclearity and catalytic activity of the iron species. By comparing the results obtained with the various characterization techniques, we conclude that Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite are not the ideal samples conceived before and that many types of species are present, some active and some other silent from adsorptive and catalytic point of view. The relative concentration of these species changes with thermal treatments, preparation procedures and loading. Only at lowest loadings the catalytically active species become the dominant fraction of the iron species. On the basis of the spectroscopic titration of the active sites by using NO as a probe, we conclude that the active species on very diluted samples are isolated and highly coordinatively unsaturated Fe(2+) grafted to the crystalline matrix. Indication of the constant presence of a smaller fraction of Fe(2+) presumably located on small clusters is also obtained. The nitrosyl species formed upon dosing NO from the gas phase on activated Fe-ZSM-5 and Fe-silicalite, have been analyzed

  20. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; Nørskov, Jens K.; Studt, Felix

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidation reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.

  1. Monocopper active site for partial methane oxidation in Cu-exchanged 8MR zeolites

    DOE PAGES

    Kulkarni, Ambarish R.; Zhao, Zhi -Jian; Siahrostami, Samira; ...

    2016-08-17

    Direct conversion of methane to methanol using oxygen is experiencing renewed interest owing to the availability of new natural gas resources. Copper-exchanged zeolites such as mordenite and ZSM-5 have shown encouraging results, and di- and tri-copper species have been suggested as active sites. Recently, small eight-membered ring (8MR) zeolites including SSZ-13, -16, and -39 have been shown to be active for methane oxidation, but the active sites and reaction mechanisms in these 8MR zeolites are not known. In this work, we use density functional theory (DFT) calculations to systematically evaluate monocopper species as active sites for the partial methane oxidationmore » reaction in Cu-exchanged SSZ-13. On the basis of kinetic and thermodynamic arguments, we suggest that [CuIIOH]+ species in the 8MR are responsible for the experimentally observed activity. Furthermore, our results successfully explain the available spectroscopic data and experimental observations including (i) the necessity of water for methanol extraction and (ii) the effect of Si/Al ratio on the catalyst activity. Monocopper species have not yet been suggested as an active site for the partial methane oxidation reaction, and our results suggest that [CuIIOH]+ active site may provide complementary routes for methane activation in zeolites in addition to the known [Cu–O–Cu]2+ and Cu3O3 motifs.« less

  2. The General Base in the Thymidylate Synthase Catalyzed Proton Abstraction

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ananda K.; Islam, Zahidul; Krueger, Jonathan; Abeysinghe, Don Thelma; Kohen, Amnon

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme thymidylate synthase (TSase), an important chemotherapeutic drug target, catalyzes the formation of 2′-deoxythymidine-5′-monophosphate (dTMP), a precursor of one of the DNA building blocks. TSase catalyzes a multi-step mechanism that includes the abstraction of a proton from the C5 of the substrate 2′-deoxyuridine-5′-monophosphate (dUMP). Previous studies on ecTSase proposed that an active-site residue, Y94 serves the role of the general base abstracting this proton. However, since Y94 is neither very basic, nor connected to basic residues, nor located close enough to the pyrimidine proton to be abstracted, the actual identity of this base remains enigmatic. Based on crystal structures, an alternative hypothesis is that the nearest potential proton-acceptor of C5 of dUMP is a water molecule that is part of a hydrogen bond (H-bond) network comprised of several water molecules and several protein residues including H147, E58, N177, and Y94. Here, we examine the role of the residue Y94 in the proton abstraction step by removing its hydroxyl group (Y94F mutant). We investigated the effect of the mutation on the temperature dependence of intrinsic kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and found that these KIEs are more temperature dependent than those of the wild-type enzyme (WT). These results suggest that the phenolic –OH of Y94 is a component of the transition state for the proton abstraction step. The findings further support the hypothesis that no single functional group is the general base, but a network of bases and hydroxyls (from water molecules and tyrosine) sharing H-bonds across the active site can serve the role of the general base to remove the pyrimidine proton. PMID:25912171

  3. Persistent activation of nuclear factor-kappa B and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in bone marrow cells after exposure of mice to protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rithidech, Kanokporn; Reungpatthanaphong, Paiboon; Honikel, Louise; Whorton, Elbert

    Protons are the most abundant component of solar particle events (SPEs) in space. Information is limited on early-and late-occurring in vivo biological effects of exposure to protons at doses and dose rates that are similar to what astronauts encounter in space. We conducted a study series to fill this knowledge gap. We focused on the biological effects of 100 MeV/n protons, which are one of the most abundant types of protons induced during SPEs. We gave BALB/cJ mice a whole-body exposure to 0.5 or 1.0 Gy of 100 MeV/n protons, delivered at 0.5 or 1.0 cGy/min. These doses and dose rates of protons were selected because they are comparable to those of SPEs taking place in space. For each dose and dose rate of 100 MeV/n protons, mice exposed to 0 Gy of protons served as sham controls. Mice included in this study were also part of a study series conducted to examine the extent and the mechanisms involved in in vivo induction of genomic instability (expressed as late-occurring chromosome instability) by 100 MeV/n protons. Bone marrow (BM) cells were collected from groups of mice for analyses at different times post-exposure, i.e. early time-points (1.5, 3, and 24 hr) and late time-points (1 and 6 months). At each harvest time, there were five mice per treatment group. Several endpoints were used to investigate the biological effects of 100 MeV/n protons in BM cells from irradiated and sham control mice. The scope of this study was to determine the dose-rate effects of 0.5 Gy of 100 MeV/n protons in BM cells on the kinetics of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) activation and the expression of selected NF-kappa B target proteins known to be involved in inflammatory response, i.e. pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6). Significantly high levels (p values ranging from p¡0.01 and p¡0.05) of activated NF-kappa B were observed in BM cells collected from irradiated mice, relative to those obtained from the corresponding sham controls, at all time

  4. 1993 annual report of hazardous waste activities for the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is a detailed listing of all of the Hazardous Waste activities occurring at Martin Marietta`s K-25 site. Contained herein are hazardous waste notification forms, waste stream reports, generator fee forms and various TSDR reports.

  5. Functional polymers for anhydrous proton transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikkannagari, Nagamani

    Anhydrous proton conducting polymers are highly sought after for applications in high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). N-heterocycles (eg. imidazole, triazole, and benzimidazole), owing to their amphoteric nature, have been widely studied to develop efficient anhydrous proton transporting polymers. The proton conductivity of N-heterocyclic polymers is influenced by several factors and the design and development of polymers with a delicate balance among various synergistic and competing factors to provide appreciable proton conductivities has been a challenging task. In this thesis, the proton transport (PT) characteristics of polymers functionalized with two diverse classes of functional groups--- N-heterocycles and phenols have been investigated and efforts have been made to develop the molecular design criteria for the design and development of efficient proton transporting functional groups and polymers. The proton conduction pathway in 1H-1,2,3-triazole polymers is probed by employing structurally analogous N-heterocyclic (triazole, imidazole, and pyrazole) and benz-N-heterocyclic (benzotriazole, benzimidazole, and benzopyrazole) polymers. Imidazole-like pathway was found to dominate the proton conductivity of triazole and pyrazole-like pathway makes only a negligible contribution, if any. Polymers containing benz-N-heterocycles exhibited higher proton conductivity than those with the corresponding N-heterocycles. Pyrazole-like functional groups, i.e. the molecules with two nitrogen atoms adjacent to each other, were found not to be good candidates for PT applications. A new class of proton transporting functional groups, phenols, has been introduced for anhydrous PT. One of the highlighting features of phenols over N-heterocycles is that the hydrogen bond donor/acceptor reorientation can happen on a single -OH site, allowing for facile reorientational dynamics in Grotthuss PT and enhanced proton conductivities in phenolic polymers

  6. Acetylene hydratase: a non-redox enzyme with tungsten and iron-sulfur centers at the active site.

    PubMed

    Kroneck, Peter M H

    2016-03-01

    In living systems, tungsten is exclusively found in microbial enzymes coordinated by the pyranopterin cofactor, with additional metal coordination provided by oxygen and/or sulfur, and/or selenium atoms in diverse arrangements. Prominent examples are formate dehydrogenase, formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase, and aldehyde oxidoreductase all of which catalyze redox reactions. The bacterial enzyme acetylene hydratase (AH) stands out of its class as it catalyzes the conversion of acetylene to acetaldehyde, clearly a non-redox reaction and a reaction distinct from the reduction of acetylene to ethylene by nitrogenase. AH harbors two pyranopterins bound to W, and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. W is coordinated by four dithiolene sulfur atoms, one cysteine sulfur, and one oxygen ligand. AH activity requires a strong reductant suggesting W(IV) as the active oxidation state. Two different types of reaction pathways have been proposed. The 1.26 Å structure reveals a water molecule coordinated to W which could gain a partially positive net charge by the adjacent protonated Asp-13, enabling a direct attack of C2H2. To access the W-Asp site, a substrate channel was evolved distant from where it is found in other members of the DMSOR family. Computational studies of this second shell mechanism led to unrealistically high energy barriers, and alternative pathways were proposed where C2H2 binds directly to W. The architecture of the catalytic cavity, the specificity for C2H2 and the results from site-directed mutagenesis do not support this first shell mechanism. More investigations including structural information on the binding of C2H2 are needed to present a conclusive answer.

  7. Proton-beam vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Which is best for treating prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Paul L; Trofimov, Alexei; Zietman, Anthony L

    2008-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of proton therapy for the treatment of many cancers. With its unique dose-distribution properties, proton therapy has the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio of prostate radiation by allowing for an increase in dose without a substantial increase in side effects. While much evidence supports this notion in the context of many oncologic sites, only limited clinical data have compared protons to photons in prostate cancer. Therefore, the increasing enthusiasm for the use of protons in prostate cancer has aroused considerable concern. Some have questioned its ability to limit morbidity, and others have questioned its value relative to the cost. In addition, theoretical concerns have been raised about a potential additional risk for secondary malignancies. In this article, we review the current status of the evidence supporting the use of protons in prostate cancer and discuss the active controversies that surround this modality.

  8. The surface chemistry of heterogeneous catalysis: mechanisms, selectivity, and active sites.

    PubMed

    Zaera, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    The role of chemical kinetics in defining the requirements for the active sites of heterogeneous catalysts is discussed. A personal view is presented, with specific examples from our laboratory to illustrate the role of the chemical composition, structure, and electronic properties of specific surface sites in determining reaction activity and selectivity. Manipulation of catalytic behavior via the addition of chemical modifiers and by tuning of the reaction conditions is also introduced.

  9. Nuclear waste: Status of DOE`s nuclear waste site characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-31

    Three potential nuclear waste repository sites have been selected to carry out characterization activities-the detailed geological testing to determine the suitability of each site as a repository. The sites are Hanford in south-central Washington State, Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada, and Deaf Smith in the Texas Panhandle. Two key issues affecting the total program are the estimations of the site characterization completion data and costs and DOE`s relationship with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which has been limited and its relations with affected states and Indian tribes which continue to be difficult.

  10. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Liver Breast Esophagus Rectum Skull base sarcomas Pediatric brain tumors Head and neck - see the Head and Neck Cancer page Eye ... Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Brain Tumor Treatment Brain Tumors Prostate Cancer Lung Cancer ... related to Proton Therapy Videos related ...

  11. Proton Radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    Tommasino, Francesco; Durante, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed. PMID:25686476

  12. Number and locations of agonist binding sites required to activate homomeric Cys-loop receptors.

    PubMed

    Rayes, Diego; De Rosa, María José; Sine, Steven M; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2009-05-06

    Homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors contain five identical agonist binding sites, each formed at a subunit interface. To determine the number and locations of binding sites required to generate a stable active state, we constructed a receptor subunit with a mutation that disables the agonist binding site and a reporter mutation that alters unitary conductance and coexpressed mutant and nonmutant subunits. Although receptors with a range of different subunit compositions are produced, patch-clamp recordings reveal that the amplitude of each single-channel opening event reports the number and, for certain subunit combinations, the locations of subunits with intact binding sites. We find that receptors with three binding sites at nonconsecutive subunit interfaces exhibit maximal mean channel open time, receptors with binding sites at three consecutive or two nonconsecutive interfaces exhibit intermediate open time, and receptors with binding sites at two consecutive or one interface exhibit brief open time. Macroscopic recordings after rapid application of agonist reveal that channel activation slows and the extent of desensitization decreases as the number of binding sites per receptor decreases. The overall results provide a framework for defining mechanisms of activation and drug modulation for homo-pentameric Cys-loop receptors.

  13. Invited award contribution for ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry. Geometric and electronic structure contributions to function in bioinorganic chemistry: active sites in non-heme iron enzymes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, E I

    2001-07-16

    Spectroscopy has played a major role in the definition of structure/function correlations in bioinorganic chemistry. The importance of spectroscopy combined with electronic structure calculations is clearly demonstrated by the non-heme iron enzymes. Many members of this large class of enzymes activate dioxygen using a ferrous active site that has generally been difficult to study with most spectroscopic methods. A new spectroscopic methodology has been developed utilizing variable temperature, variable field magnetic circular dichroism, which enables one to obtain detailed insight into the geometric and electronic structure of the non-heme ferrous active site and probe its reaction mechanism on a molecular level. This spectroscopic methodology is presented and applied to a number of key mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes leading to a general mechanistic strategy for O2 activation. These studies are then extended to consider the new features present in the binuclear non-heme iron enzymes and applied to understand (1) the mechanism of the two electron/coupled proton transfer to dioxygen binding to a single iron center in hemerythrin and (2) structure/function correlations over the oxygen-activating enzymes stearoyl-ACP Delta9-desaturase, ribonucleotide reductase, and methane monooxygenase. Electronic structure/reactivity correlations for O2 activation by non-heme relative to heme iron enzymes will also be developed.

  14. p-Coumaric acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum: structural insights into the active site and decarboxylation catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Angulo, Iván; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Campillo, Nuria; Páez, Juan A; Muñoz, Rosario; Mancheño, José M

    2010-05-15

    p-Coumaric acid decarboxylases (PDCs) catalyze the nonoxidative decarboxylation of hydroxycinnamic acids to generate the corresponding vinyl derivatives. Despite the biotechnological relevance of PDCs in food industry, their catalytic mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we report insights into the structural basis of catalysis for the homodimeric PDC from Lactobacillus plantarum (LpPDC). The global fold of LpPDC is based on a flattened beta-barrel surrounding an internal cavity. Crystallographic and functional analyses of single-point mutants of residues located within this cavity have permitted identifying a potential substrate-binding pocket and also to provide structural evidences for rearrangements of surface loops so that they can modulate the accessibility to the active site. Finally, combination of the structural and functional data with in silico results enables us to propose a two-step catalytic mechanism for decarboxylation of p-coumaric acid by PDCs where Glu71 is involved in proton transfer, and Tyr18 and Tyr20 are involved in the proper substrate orientation and in the release of the CO(2) product.

  15. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    This Account describes the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how mutations alter the structure and organization of enzyme active sites. As proposed by Pauling about 70 years ago and elaborated by many others since then, biocatalysis is efficient when functional groups in the active site of an enzyme are in optimal positions for transition state stabilization. Changes in mechanism and covalent interactions are often critical parts of enzyme catalysis. We describe our explorations of the dynamical preorganization of active sites using MD, studying the fluctuations between active and inactive conformations normally concealed to static crystallography. MD shows how the various arrangements of active site residues influence the free energy of the transition state and relates the populations of the catalytic conformational ensemble to the enzyme activity. This Account is organized around three case studies from our laboratory. We first describe the importance of dynamics in evaluating a series of computationally designed and experimentally evolved enzymes for the Kemp elimination, a popular subject in the enzyme design field. We find that the dynamics of the active site is influenced not only by the original sequence design and subsequent mutations but also by the nature of the ligand present in the active site. In the second example, we show how microsecond MD has been used to uncover the role of remote mutations in the active site dynamics and catalysis of a transesterase, LovD. This enzyme was evolved by Tang at UCLA and Codexis, Inc., and is a useful commercial catalyst for the production of the drug simvastatin. X-ray analysis of inactive and active mutants did not reveal differences in the active sites, but relatively long time scale MD in solution showed that the active site of the wild-type enzyme preorganizes only upon binding of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) that delivers the natural acyl group to the active site. In the absence of bound ACP

  16. Proton-coupled electron transfer dynamics in the catalytic mechanism of a [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Greene, Brandon L; Wu, Chang-Hao; McTernan, Patrick M; Adams, Michael W W; Dyer, R Brian

    2015-04-08

    The movement of protons and electrons is common to the synthesis of all chemical fuels such as H2. Hydrogenases, which catalyze the reversible reduction of protons, necessitate transport and reactivity between protons and electrons, but a detailed mechanism has thus far been elusive. Here, we use a phototriggered chemical potential jump method to rapidly initiate the proton reduction activity of a [NiFe] hydrogenase. Coupling the photochemical initiation approach to nanosecond transient infrared and visible absorbance spectroscopy afforded direct observation of interfacial electron transfer and active site chemistry. Tuning of intramolecular proton transport by pH and isotopic substitution revealed distinct concerted and stepwise proton-coupled electron transfer mechanisms in catalysis. The observed heterogeneity in the two sequential proton-associated reduction processes suggests a highly engineered protein environment modulating catalysis and implicates three new reaction intermediates; Nia-I, Nia-D, and Nia-SR(-). The results establish an elementary mechanistic understanding of catalysis in a [NiFe] hydrogenase with implications in enzymatic proton-coupled electron transfer and biomimetic catalyst design.

  17. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  18. Two interacting binding sites for quinacrine derivatives in the active site of trypanothione reductase – a template for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Saravanamuthu, Ahilan; Vickers, Tim J.; Bond, Charles S.; Peterson, Mark R.; Hunter, William N.; Fairlamb, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Trypanothione reductase is a key enzyme in the trypanothione-based redox metabolism of pathogenic trypanosomes. Since this system is absent in humans, being replaced with glutathione and glutathione reductase, it offers a target for selective inhibition. The rational design of potent inhibitors requires accurate structures of enzyme-inhibitor complexes, but this is lacking for trypanothione reductase. We therefore used quinacrine mustard, an alkylating derivative of the competitive inhibitor quinacrine, to probe the active site of this dimeric flavoprotein. Quinacrine mustard irreversibly inactivates Trypanosoma cruzi trypanothione reductase, but not human glutathione reductase, in a time-dependent manner with a stoichiometry of two inhibitors bound per monomer. The rate of inactivation is dependent upon the oxidation state of trypanothione reductase, with the NADPH-reduced form being inactivated significantly faster than the oxidised form. Inactivation is slowed by clomipramine and a melarsen oxide-trypanothione adduct (both are competitive inhibitors) but accelerated by quinacrine. The structure of the trypanothione reductase-quinacrine mustard adduct was determined to 2.7 Å, revealing two molecules of inhibitor bound in the trypanothione-binding site. The acridine moieties interact with each other through π-stacking effects, and one acridine interacts in a similar fashion with a tryptophan residue. These interactions provide a molecular explanation for the differing effects of clomipramine and quinacrine on inactivation by quinacrine mustard. Synergism with quinacrine occurs as a result of these planar acridines being able to stack together in the active site cleft, thereby gaining an increased number of binding interactions, whereas antagonism occurs with non-planar molecules, such as clomipramine, where stacking is not possible. PMID:15102853

  19. The three Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen 85 isoforms have unique substrates and activities determined by non-active site regions.

    PubMed

    Backus, Keriann M; Dolan, Michael A; Barry, Conor S; Joe, Maju; McPhie, Peter; Boshoff, Helena I M; Lowary, Todd L; Davis, Benjamin G; Barry, Clifton E

    2014-09-05

    The three isoforms of antigen 85 (A, B, and C) are the most abundant secreted mycobacterial proteins and catalyze transesterification reactions that synthesize mycolated arabinogalactan, trehalose monomycolate (TMM), and trehalose dimycolate (TDM), important constituents of the outermost layer of the cellular envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These three enzymes are nearly identical at the active site and have therefore been postulated to exist to evade host immunity. Distal to the active site is a second putative carbohydrate-binding site of lower homology. Mutagenesis of the three isoforms at this second site affected both substrate selectivity and overall catalytic activity in vitro. Using synthetic and natural substrates, we show that these three enzymes exhibit unique selectivity; antigen 85A more efficiently mycolates TMM to form TDM, whereas C (and to a lesser extent B) has a higher rate of activity using free trehalose to form TMM. This difference in substrate selectivity extends to the hexasaccharide fragment of cell wall arabinan. Mutation of secondary site residues from the most active isoform (C) into those present in A or B partially interconverts this substrate selectivity. These experiments in combination with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that differences in the N-terminal helix α9, the adjacent Pro(216)-Phe(228) loop, and helix α5 are the likely cause of changes in activity and substrate selectivity. These differences explain the existence of three isoforms and will allow for future work in developing inhibitors.

  20. Fragment-based identification of determinants of conformational and spectroscopic change at the ricin active site

    SciTech Connect

    Carra,J.; McHugh, C.; Mulligan, S.; Machiesky, L.; Soares, A.; Millard, C.

    2007-01-01

    We found that amide ligands can bind weakly but specifically to the ricin active site, producing significant shifts in positions of the critical active site residues Arg180 and Tyr80. These results indicate that fragment-based drug discovery methods are capable of identifying minimal bonding determinants of active-site side-chain rearrangements and the mechanistic origins of spectroscopic shifts. Our results suggest that tryptophan fluorescence provides a sensitive probe for the geometric relationship of arginine-tryptophan pairs, which often have significant roles in protein function. Using the unusual characteristics of the RTA system, we measured the still controversial thermodynamic changes of site-specific urea binding to a protein, results that are relevant to understanding the physical mechanisms of protein denaturation.

  1. Mechanism of adenylate kinase. Demonstration of a functional relationship between aspartate 93 and Mg2+ by site-directed mutagenesis and proton, phosphorus-31, and magnesium-25 NMR.

    PubMed

    Yan, H G; Tsai, M D

    1991-06-04

    Earlier magnetic resonance studies suggested no direct interaction between Mg2+ ions and adenylate kinase (AK) in the AK.MgATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate) complex. However, recent NMR studies concluded that the carboxylate of aspartate 119 accepts a hydrogen bond from a water ligand of the bound Mg2+ ion in the muscle AK.MgATP complex [Fry, D.C., Kuby, S.A., & Mildvan, A.S. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 4680-4694]. On the other hand, in the 2.6-A crystal structure of the yeast AK.MgAP5A [P1,P5-bis(5'-adenosyl)pentaphosphate] complex, the Mg2+ ion is in proximity to aspartate 93 [Egner, U., Tomasselli, A.G., & Schulz, G.E. (1987) J. Mol. Biol. 195, 649-658]. Substitution of Asp-93 with alanine resulted in no change in dissociation constants, 4-fold increases in Km, and a 650-fold decrease in kcat. Notable changes have been observed in the chemical shifts of the aromatic protons of histidine 36 and a few other aromatic residues. However, the results of detailed analyses of the free enzymes and the AK.MgAP5A complexes by one- and two-dimensional NMR suggested that the changes are due to localized perturbations. Thus it is concluded that Asp-93 stabilizes the transition state by ca. 3.9 kcal/mol. The next question is how. Since proton NMR results indicated that binding of Mg2+ to the AK.AP5A complex induces some changes in the proton NMR signals of WT but not those of D93A, the functional role of Asp-93 should be in binding to Mg2+.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  3. All the catalytic active sites of MoS2 for hydrogen evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guoqing; Zhang, Du; Qiao, Qiao; Yu, Yifei; Peterson, David; Zafar, Abdullah; Kumar, Raj; Curtarolo, Stefano; Hunte, Frank; Shannon, Steve; Zhu, Yimei; Yang, Weitao; Cao, Linyou

    2016-11-29

    MoS2 presents a promising low-cost catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), but the understanding about its active sites has remained limited. Here we present an unambiguous study of the catalytic activities of all possible reaction sites of MoS2, including edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries. We demonstrate that, in addition to the well-known catalytically active edge sites, sulfur vacancies provide another major active site for the HER, while the catalytic activity of grain boundaries is much weaker. Here, the intrinsic turnover frequencies (Tafel slopes) of the edge sites, sulfur vacancies, and grain boundaries are estimated to be 7.5 s–1 (65–75 mV/dec), 3.2 s–1 (65–85 mV/dec), and 0.1 s–1 (120–160 mV/dec), respectively. We also demonstrate that the catalytic activity of sulfur vacancies strongly depends on the density of the vacancies and the local crystalline structure in proximity to the vacancies. Unlike edge sites, whose catalytic activity linearly depends on the length, sulfur vacancies show optimal catalytic activities when the vacancy density is in the range of 7–10%, and the number of sulfur vacancies in high crystalline quality MoS2 is higher than that in low crystalline quality MoS2, which may be related with the proximity of different local crystalline structures to the vacancies.

  4. Investigation of activation cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natMo up to 40 MeV: New data and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tárkányi, F.; Ditrói, F.; Hermanne, A.; Takács, S.; Ignatyuk, A. V.

    2012-06-01

    Cross-sections of proton induced nuclear reactions on natural molybdenum have been studied in the frame of a systematic investigation of charged particle induced nuclear reactions on metals for different applications. The excitation functions of 93mTc, 93gTc(m+), 94mTc, 94gTc, 95mTc, 95gTc, 96gTc(m+), 99mTc, 90Mo(cum), 93mMo, 99Mo(cum), 90Nb(cum), 92mNb, 95mNb, 95gNb, 96Nb and 88Zr(cum), 89Zr(cum) were measured up to 40 MeV proton energy by a using stacked foil technique and activation method. The main goals of this work were to study the production possibility of the medically important 99mTc and its 99Mo parent nucleus, to get experimental data for accelerator technology, for monitoring of proton beam, for thin layer activation technique and for testing nuclear reaction theories. The experimental data were compared with critically analysed published data and with the results of model calculations, obtained by using the ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE-II and TALYS codes.

  5. Dose-rate effects of protons on in vivo activation of nuclear factor-kappa B and cytokines in mouse bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rithidech, K.N.; Rusek, A.; Reungpatthanaphong, P.; Honikel, L.; Simon, S.R.

    2010-05-28

    The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation and cytokine expression in bone marrow (BM) cells of exposed mice as a function of the dose rate of protons. The cytokines included in this study are pro-inflammatory [i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}), interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), and IL-6] and anti-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., IL-4 and IL-10). We gave male BALB/cJ mice a whole-body exposure to 0 (sham-controls) or 1.0 Gy of 100 MeV protons, delivered at 5 or 10 mGy min{sup -1}, the dose and dose rates found during solar particle events in space. As a reference radiation, groups of mice were exposed to 0 (sham-controls) or 1 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays (10 mGy min{sup -1}). After irradiation, BM cells were collected at 1.5, 3, 24 h, and 1 month for analyses (five mice per treatment group per harvest time). The results indicated that the in vivo time course of effects induced by a single dose of 1 Gy of 100 MeV protons or {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays, delivered at 10 mGy min{sup -1}, was similar. Although statistically significant levels of NF-{kappa}B activation and pro-inflammatory cytokines in BM cells of exposed mice when compared to those in the corresponding sham controls (Student's t-test, p < 0.05 or < 0.01) were induced by either dose rate, these levels varied over time for each protein. Further, only a dose rate of 5 mGy min{sup -1} induced significant levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The results indicate dose-rate effects of protons.

  6. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  7. Alternating electron and proton transfer steps in photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Klauss, André; Haumann, Michael; Dau, Holger

    2012-10-02

    Water oxidation by cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is pivotal in oxygenic photosynthesis, the process that powers life on Earth, and is the paradigm for engineering solar fuel-production systems. Each complete reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation requires the removal of four electrons and four protons from the catalytic site, a manganese-calcium complex and its protein environment in photosystem II. In time-resolved photothermal beam deflection experiments, we monitored apparent volume changes of the photosystem II protein associated with charge creation by light-induced electron transfer (contraction) and charge-compensating proton relocation (expansion). Two previously invisible proton removal steps were detected, thereby filling two gaps in the basic reaction-cycle model of photosynthetic water oxidation. In the S(2) → S(3) transition of the classical S-state cycle, an intermediate is formed by deprotonation clearly before electron transfer to the oxidant (Y Z OX). The rate-determining elementary step (τ, approximately 30 µs at 20 °C) in the long-distance proton relocation toward the protein-water interface is characterized by a high activation energy (E(a) = 0.46 ± 0.05 eV) and strong H/D kinetic isotope effect (approximately 6). The characteristics of a proton transfer step during the S(0) → S(1) transition are similar (τ, approximately 100 µs; E(a) = 0.34 ± 0.08 eV; kinetic isotope effect, approximately 3); however, the proton removal from the Mn complex proceeds after electron transfer to . By discovery of the transient formation of two further intermediate states in the reaction cycle of photosynthetic water oxidation, a temporal sequence of strictly alternating removal of electrons and protons from the catalytic site is established.

  8. Conversion of citrate synthase into citryl-CoA lyase as a result of mutation of the active-site aspartic acid residue to glutamic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Man, W J; Li, Y; O'Connor, C D; Wilton, D C

    1991-01-01

    The active-site aspartic acid residue, Asp-362, of Escherichia coli citrate synthase was changed by site-directed mutagenesis to Glu-362, Asn-362 or Gly-362. Only very low catalytic activity could be detected with the Asp----Asn and Asp----Gly mutations. The Asp----Glu mutation produced an enzyme that expressed about 0.8% of the overall catalytic rate, and the hydrolysis step in the reaction, monitored as citryl-CoA hydrolysis, was inhibited to a similar extent. However, the condensation reaction, measured in the reverse direction as citryl-CoA cleavage to oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA, was not affected by the mutation, and this citryl-CoA lyase activity was the major catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme. This high condensation activity in an enzyme in which the subsequent hydrolysis step was about 98% inhibited permitted considerable exchange of the methyl protons of acetyl-CoA during catalysis by the mutant enzyme. The Km for oxaloacetate was not significantly altered in the D362E mutant enzyme, whereas the Km for acetyl-CoA was about 5 times lower. A mechanism is proposed in which Asp-362 is involved in the hydrolysis reaction of this enzyme, and not as a base in the deprotonation of acetyl-CoA as recently suggested by others. [Karpusas, Branchaud & Remington (1990) Biochemistry 29, 2213-2219; Alter, Casazza, Zhi, Nemeth, Srere & Evans, (1990) Biochemistry 29, 7557-7563]. PMID:1684105

  9. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  10. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups.

  11. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  12. Proton maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensley, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    New calculations are reported which confirm the ability of an a priori random, initial-phase proton beam to drive a simple, single-stage microwave cavity maser or transit-time oscillator (TTO) to saturation conversion efficiencies of about 11 percent. The required initial TE(011) mode field can be provided from beam ramp-up bandwidth of excitation to a low level from an external source. A saturation field of 45 tesla and output power of 0.2 TW are calculated using an electron insulation field of 10 tesla and a 3 MeV, 400 Ka/sq cm beam. Results are compared to those for an electron beam of the same energy and geometry, and it is shown that proton beams potentially can provide a three order of magnitude increase in overall microwave power production density over that obtainable from electron beam TTOs.

  13. Enhancement of Polymerase Activity of the Large Fragment in DNA Polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus by Site-Directed Mutagenesis at the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Zhang, Beilei; Wang, Meng; Ou, Yanghui

    2016-01-01

    The large fragment of DNA polymerase I from Geobacillus stearothermophilus GIM1.543 (Bst DNA polymerase) with 5′-3′ DNA polymerase activity while in absence of 5′-3′ exonuclease activity possesses high thermal stability and polymerase activity. Bst DNA polymerase was employed in isothermal multiple self-matching initiated amplification (IMSA) which amplified the interest sequence with high selectivity and was widely applied in the rapid detection of human epidemic diseases. However, the detailed information of commercial Bst DNA polymerase is unpublished and well protected by patents, which makes the high price of commercial kits. In this study, wild-type Bst DNA polymerase (WT) and substitution mutations for improving the efficiency of DNA polymerization were expressed and purified in E. coli. Site-directed substitutions of four conserved residues (Gly310, Arg412, Lys416, and Asp540) in the activity site of Bst DNA polymerase influenced efficiency of polymerizing dNTPs. The substitution of residue Gly310 by alanine or leucine and residue Asp540 by glutamic acid increased the efficiency of polymerase activity. All mutants with higher polymerizing efficiency were employed to complete the rapid detection of EV71-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) by IMSA approach with relatively shorter period which is suitable for the primary diagnostics setting in rural and underdeveloped areas. PMID:27981047

  14. In silico analysis of Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase active site with toxic industrial dyes.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Narayana, Siva Lakshmi; Ramakrishna, V; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Srinivas, M

    2012-05-01

    Laccases belong to multicopper oxidases, a widespread class of enzymes implicated in many oxidative functions in various industrial oxidative processes like production of fine chemicals to bioremediation of contaminated soil and water. In order to understand the mechanisms of substrate binding and interaction between substrates and Pycnoporus cinnabarinus laccase, a homology model was generated. The resulted model was further validated and used for docking studies with toxic industrial dyes- acid blue 74, reactive black 5 and reactive blue 19. Interactions of chemical mediators with the laccase was also examined. The docking analysis showed that the active site always cannot accommodate the dye molecules, due to constricted nature of the active site pocket and steric hindrance of the residues whereas mediators are relatively small and can easily be accommodated into the active site pocket, which, thereafter leads to the productive binding. The binding properties of these compounds along with identification of critical active site residues can be used for further site-directed mutagenesis experiments in order to identify their role in activity and substrate specificity, ultimately leading to improved mutants for degradation of these toxic compounds.

  15. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  16. Substrate shuttling between active sites of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase is not required to generate coproporphyrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, John D.; Warby, Christy A.; Whitby, Frank G.; Kushner, James P.; Hill, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of the four acetate side chains on the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer with the active site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single chain protein (scURO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposible with wild-type activity and have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of scURO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distribution of reaction intermediates was the same for mutant and wild-type sequences, and was unaltered in a competition experiment using the I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function, and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and create a large active site cleft. PMID:19362562

  17. Substrate Shuttling Between Active Sites of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase in Not Required to Generate Coproporphyrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.; Warby, C; Whitby, F; Kushner, J; Hill, C

    2009-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of four acetate side chains in the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer, with the active-site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single-chain protein (single-chain URO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposable with wild-type activity and to have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of single-chain URO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distributions of reaction intermediates were the same for mutant and wild-type sequences and were unaltered in a competition experiment using I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and to create a large active-site cleft.

  18. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  19. Transcriptional activation by LR1 at the Eµ enhancer and switch region sites

    PubMed Central

    Hanakahi, L. A.; Maizels, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    LR1 is a B cell-specific, sequence-specific duplex DNA binding activity which is induced in B cells carrying out class switch recombination. Here we identify several properties of LR1 which enable it to function in transcriptional regulation. We show that LR1 contributes to transcriptional activation by the Eµ immunoglobulin heavy chain intron enhancer by binding to a site within the enhancer core. We further show that LR1 bends DNA upon binding. In addition, we show that LR1 is itself a bona fide transcriptional activator, as multimerized LR1 sites produce an element which can enhance transcription from a minimal promoter. In order for class switch recombination to occur, an activating signal must be transmitted via the Eµ core, and both S regions targeted for recombination must be actively transcribed. The properties of LR1 that we have identified suggest distinct potential functions of LR1 duplex DNA binding activity in class switch recombination. First, LR1 may contribute to recombinational activation by the Eµ core. Second, there are multiple potential LR1 duplex binding sites in each of the G-rich switch regions, and LR1 bound at contiguous sites may enhance recombination by stimulating transcription of the S regions. PMID:10908319

  20. Water exit pathways and proton pumping mechanism in B-type cytochrome c oxidase from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Longhua; Skjevik, Åge A; Han Du, Wen-Ge; Noodleman, Louis; Walker, Ross C; Götz, Andreas W

    2016-09-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a vital enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of molecular oxygen to water and pumps protons across mitochondrial and bacterial membranes. While proton uptake channels as well as water exit channels have been identified for A-type CcOs, the means by which water and protons exit B-type CcOs remain unclear. In this work, we investigate potential mechanisms for proton transport above the dinuclear center (DNC) in ba3-type CcO of Thermus thermophilus. Using long-time scale, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for several relevant protonation states, we identify a potential mechanism for proton transport that involves propionate A of the active site heme a3 and residues Asp372, His376 and Glu126(II), with residue His376 acting as the proton-loading site. The proposed proton transport process involves a rotation of residue His376 and is in line with experimental findings. We also demonstrate how the strength of the salt bridge between residues Arg225 and Asp287 depends on the protonation state and that this salt bridge is unlikely to act as a simple electrostatic gate that prevents proton backflow. We identify two water exit pathways that connect the water pool above the DNC to the outer P-side of the membrane, which can potentially also act as proton exit transport pathways. Importantly, these water exit pathways can be blocked by narrowing the entrance channel between residues Gln151(II) and Arg449/Arg450 or by obstructing the entrance through a conformational change of residue Tyr136, respectively, both of which seem to be affected by protonation of residue His376.

  1. Regulation of Dpp activity by tissue-specific cleavage of an upstream site within the prodomain

    PubMed Central

    Sopory, Shailaja; Kwon, Sunjong; Wehrli, Marcel; Christian, Jan L.

    2010-01-01

    BMP4 is synthesized as an inactive precursor that is cleaved at two sites during maturation: initially at a site (S1) adjacent to the ligand domain, and then at an upstream site (S2) within the prodomain. Cleavage at the second site regulates the stability of mature BMP4 and this in turn influences its signaling intensity and range of action. The Drosophila ortholog of BMP4, Dpp, functions as a long- or short-range signaling molecule in the wing disc or embryonic midgut, respectively but mechanisms that differentially regulate its bioactivity in these tissues have not been explored. In the current studies we demonstrate, by dpp mutant rescue, that cleavage at the S2 site of proDpp is required for development of the wing and leg imaginal discs, whereas cleavage at the S1 site is sufficient to rescue Dpp function in the midgut. Both the S1 and S2 site of proDpp are cleaved in the wing disc, and S2-cleavage is essential to generate sufficient ligand to exceed the threshold for pMAD activation at both short- and long-range in most cells. By contrast, proDpp is cleaved at the S1 site alone in the embryonic mesoderm and this generates sufficient ligand to activate physiological target genes in neighboring cells. These studies provide the first biochemical and genetic evidence that that selective cleavage of the S2 site of proDPP provides a tissue-specific mechanism for regulating Dpp activity, and that differential cleavage can contribute to, but is not an absolute determinant of signaling range. PMID:20659445

  2. Multiple active site residues are important for photochemical efficiency in the light-activated enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR).

    PubMed

    Menon, Binuraj R K; Hardman, Samantha J O; Scrutton, Nigel S; Heyes, Derren J

    2016-08-01

    Protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) catalyzes the light-driven reduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide), an essential, regulatory step in chlorophyll biosynthesis. The unique requirement of the enzyme for light has provided the opportunity to investigate how light energy can be harnessed to power biological catalysis and enzyme dynamics. Excited state interactions between the Pchlide molecule and the protein are known to drive the subsequent reaction chemistry. However, the structural features of POR and active site residues that are important for photochemistry and catalysis are currently unknown, because there is no crystal structure for POR. Here, we have used static and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements of a number of active site variants to study the role of a number of residues, which are located in the proposed NADPH/Pchlide binding site based on previous homology models, in the reaction mechanism of POR. Our findings, which are interpreted in the context of a new improved structural model, have identified several residues that are predicted to interact with the coenzyme or substrate. Several of the POR variants have a profound effect on the photochemistry, suggesting that multiple residues are important in stabilizing the excited state required for catalysis. Our work offers insight into how the POR active site geometry is finely tuned by multiple active site residues to support enzyme-mediated photochemistry and reduction of Pchlide, both of which are crucial to the existence of life on Earth.

  3. An Electromagnetic Interference Study of Potential Transmitter Sites for the HF Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-19

    heating . The measurements described in this report were conducted at a number of candidate HAARP transmitter sites in the vicinity of Fairbanks...employ the High Power Auroral Stimulation (HIPAS) RF heating facility [1], located in the Chena River valley area near Fairbanks. HAARP will be an...Potential Transmitter Sites for the HF Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) JOSEP11 A. GOLDSTEIN EDWARD 1. KENNEDY ADRIAN S. ELEY 4 IMICHlAEL A. RuPAR C

  4. Probing the catalytic mechanism of bovine CD38/NAD+ glycohydrolase by site directed mutagenesis of key active site residues.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Isabelle; Kellenberger, Esther; Cakir-Kiefer, Céline; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Schuber, Francis

    2014-07-01

    Bovine CD38/NAD(+) glycohydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to nicotinamide and ADP-ribose and the formation of cyclic ADP-ribose via a stepwise reaction mechanism. Our recent crystallographic study of its Michaelis complex and covalently-trapped intermediates provided insights into the modalities of substrate binding and the molecular mechanism of bCD38. The aim of the present work was to determine the precise role of key conserved active site residues (Trp118, Glu138, Asp147, Trp181 and Glu218) by focusing mainly on the cleavage of the nicotinamide-ribosyl bond. We analyzed the kinetic parameters of mutants of these residues which reside within the bCD38 subdomain in the vicinity of the scissile bond of bound NAD(+). To address the reaction mechanism we also performed chemical rescue experiments with neutral (methanol) and ionic (azide, formate) nucleophiles. The crucial role of Glu218, which orients the substrate for cleavage by interacting with the N-ribosyl 2'-OH group of NAD(+), was highlighted. This contribution to catalysis accounts for almost half of the reaction energy barrier. Other contributions can be ascribed notably to Glu138 and Asp147 via ground-state destabilization and desolvation in the vicinity of the scissile bond. Key interactions with Trp118 and Trp181 were also proven to stabilize the ribooxocarbenium ion-like transition state. Altogether we propose that, as an alternative to a covalent acylal reaction intermediate with Glu218, catalysis by bCD38 proceeds through the formation of a discrete and transient ribooxocarbenium intermediate which is stabilized within the active site mostly by electrostatic interactions.

  5. Identification of epoxide functionalities in protonated monofunctional analytes by using ion/molecule reactions and collision-activated dissociation in different ion trap tandem mass spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Eismin, Ryan J; Fu, Mingkun; Yem, Sonoeun; Widjaja, Fanny; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2012-01-01

    A mass spectrometric method has been delineated for the identification of the epoxide functionalities in unknown monofunctional analytes. This method utilizes gas-phase ion/molecule reactions of protonated analytes with neutral trimethyl borate (TMB) followed by collision-activated dissociation (CAD) in an ion trapping mass spectrometer (tested for a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance and a linear quadrupole ion trap). The ion/molecule reaction involves proton transfer from the protonated analyte to TMB, followed by addition of the analyte to TMB and elimination of methanol. Based on literature, this reaction allows the general identification of oxygen-containing analytes. Vinyl and phenyl epoxides can be differentiated from other oxygen-containing analytes, including other epoxides, based on the loss of a second methanol molecule upon CAD of the addition/methanol elimination product. The only other analytes found to undergo this elimination are some amides but they also lose O = B-R (R = group bound to carbonyl), which allows their identification. On the other hand, other epoxides can be differentiated from vinyl and phenyl epoxides and from other monofunctional analytes based on the loss of (CH(3)O)(2)BOH or formation of protonated (CH(3)O)(2)BOH upon CAD of the addition/methanol elimination product. For propylene oxide and 2,3-dimethyloxirane, the (CH(3)O)(2)BOH fragment is more basic than the hydrocarbon fragment, and the diagnostic ion (CH(3)O)(2)BOH (2) (+) is formed. These reactions involve opening of the epoxide ring. The only other analytes found to undergo (CH(3)O)(2)BOH elimination are carboxylic acids, but they can be differentiated from the rest based on several published ion/molecule reaction methods. Similar results were obtained in the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance and linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

  6. SU-E-J-141: Activity-Equivalent Path Length Approach for the 3D PET-Based Dose Reconstruction in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Attili, A; Vignati, A; Giordanengo, S; Kraan, A; Dalmasso, F; Battistoni, G

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Ion beam therapy is sensitive to uncertainties from treatment planning and dose delivery. PET imaging of induced positron emitter distributions is a practical approach for in vivo, in situ verification of ion beam treatments. Treatment verification is usually done by comparing measured activity distributions with reference distributions, evaluated in nominal conditions. Although such comparisons give valuable information on treatment quality, a proper clinical evaluation of the treatment ultimately relies on the knowledge of the actual delivered dose. Analytical deconvolution methods relating activity and dose have been studied in this context, but were not clinically applied. In this work we present a feasibility study of an alternative approach for dose reconstruction from activity data, which is based on relating variations in accumulated activity to tissue density variations. Methods: First, reference distributions of dose and activity were calculated from the treatment plan and CT data. Then, the actual measured activity data were cumulatively matched with the reference activity distributions to obtain a set of activity-equivalent path lengths (AEPLs) along the rays of the pencil beams. Finally, these AEPLs were used to deform the original dose distribution, yielding the actual delivered dose. The method was tested by simulating a proton therapy treatment plan delivering 2 Gy on a homogeneous water phantom (the reference), which was compared with the same plan delivered on a phantom containing inhomogeneities. Activity and dose distributions were were calculated by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo toolkit. Results: The main features of the observed dose distribution in the inhomogeneous situation were reproduced using the AEPL approach. Variations in particle range were reproduced and the positions, where these deviations originated, were properly identified. Conclusions: For a simple inhomogeneous phantom the 3D dose reconstruction from PET-activity

  7. A Bioinspired Molybdenum Complex as a Catalyst for the Photo- and Electroreduction of Protons.

    PubMed

    Porcher, Jean-Philippe; Fogeron, Thibault; Gomez-Mingot, Maria; Derat, Etienne; Chamoreau, Lise-Marie; Li, Yun; Fontecave, Marc

    2015-11-16

    A molybdenum-dithiolene-oxo complex was prepared as a model of some active sites of Mo/W-dependent enzymes. The ligand, a quinoxaline-pyran-fused dithiolene, mimics molybdopterin present in these active sites. For the first time, this type of complex was shown to be active as a catalyst for the photoreduction of protons with excellent turnover numbers (500) and good stability in aqueous/organic media and for the electroreduction of protons in acetonitrile with remarkable rate constants (1030 s(-1) at -1.3 V versus Ag/AgCl). DFT calculations provided insight into the catalytic cycle of the reaction, suggesting that the oxo ligand plays a key role in proton exchange. These results provide a basis to optimize this new class of H2 -evolving catalysts.

  8. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides.

  9. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  10. Kinetics of nucleotide entry into RNA polymerase active site provides mechanism for efficiency and fidelity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Sexton, Rachel E; Feig, Michael

    2017-04-01

    During transcription, RNA polymerase II elongates RNA by adding nucleotide triphosphates (NTPs) complementary to a DNA template. Structural studies have suggested that NTPs enter and exit the active site via the narrow secondary pore but details have remained unclear. A kinetic model is presented that integrates molecular dynamics simulations with experimental data. Previous simulations of trigger loop dynamics and the dynamics of matched and mismatched NTPs in and near the active site were combined with new simulations describing NTP exit from the active site via the secondary pore. Markov state analysis was applied to identify major states and estimate kinetic rates for transitions between those states. The kinetic model predicts elongation and misincorporation rates in close agreement with experiment and provides mechanistic hypotheses for how NTP entry and exit via the secondary pore is feasible and a key feature for achieving high elongation and low misincorporation rates during RNA elongation.

  11. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides. PMID:27704049

  12. Gamma exposure rates due to neutron activation of soil: site of Hood detonation, Operation Plumbbob

    SciTech Connect

    Auxier, J.A.; Ohnesorge, W.F.

    1980-06-01

    This paper is the result of some recent discussions of exposure rates within the first few hours of the Hood detonation of the Plumbbob series due to neutron activation of soil. We estimated the exposure rates from 1/2 to 3 h after the detonation from ground zero to 1000 yards from ground zero. The area was assumed to be uncontaminated by fallout. Soil samples from the area of the Nevada Test Site at which the Hood device was detonated were sent to ORNL by Dr. John Malik of Los Alamos and by Mr. Gordon Jacks of the Nevada Test Site. These samples were irradiated at the DOSAR facility and the resulting activity analyzed. Calculations of exposure rates were then made based on the analyzed activity and the measured thermal neutron fluences at DOSAR and at the Hood Site.

  13. Systematic mutagenesis of the active site omega loop of TEM-1 beta-lactamase.

    PubMed Central

    Petrosino, J F; Palzkill, T

    1996-01-01

    Beta-Lactamase is a bacterial protein that provides resistance against beta-lactam antibiotics. TEM-1 beta-lactamase is the most prevalent plasmid-mediated beta-lactamase in gram-negative bacteria. Normally, this enzyme has high levels of hydrolytic activity for penicillins, but mutant beta-lactamases have evolved with activity toward a variety of beta-lactam antibiotics. It has been shown that active site substitutions are responsible for changes in the substrate specificity. Since mutant beta-lactamases pose a serious threat to antimicrobial therapy, the mechanisms by which mutations can alter the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase are of interest. Previously, screens of random libraries encompassing 31 of 55 active site amino acid positions enabled the identification of the residues responsible for maintaining the substrate specificity of TEM-1 beta-lactamase. In addition to substitutions found in clinical isolates, many other specificity-altering mutations were als