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Sample records for active site titration

  1. Limitations of the potentiometric titration technique in determining the proton active site density of goethite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lützenkirchen, Johannes; Boily, Jean-François; Lövgren, Lars; Sjöberg, Staffan

    2002-10-01

    Density of proton active surface sites at mineral surfaces is a property of fundamental importance in equilibrium modeling of surface complexation reactions. In this article, methods for an experimental determination of these sites at the surface of α-FeOOH (goethite) are explored. It is shown that previously obtained saturation data of goethite with respect to protons do not yield a site density that can be considered as an intrinsic sorbent property: the results are below crystallographically expected values and values for different ionic media in terms of composition and concentration yield different numbers - for example, chloride would yield higher values than nitrate at the same concentration, and higher electrolyte concentration would favor higher apparent maxima. Although site saturation might be explained by electrostatic repulsion, which is more efficient at high electrolyte concentration or for certain ions, further independent experimental results show that no saturation occurs on goethite down to ph ≡ -log[H +] = 2.2 and possibly to ph = 1.0 in 0.6 M NaCl. For those very low pH values, the experimental charging curve was obtained by coulometric back titration (using the Gran plot) or titrations with tris (hydroxymethyl)-aminomethane of the supernatant of acidified goethite suspension. These experimental data are to our knowledge the first high quality data at such low pHs. However, small errors in the determination of proton concentrations (1%) are shown to strongly affect the shape of the charging curve for ph < 2. Furthermore, goethite dissolution (proton consumption and iron reduction in coulometric titrations) and liquid junction effects interfere at low ph, hampering the straightforward application of coulometric Gran titrations over the whole pH range. From these experiments, it can nonetheless be ascertained that a minimum of 2.5 protons/nm 2 can be adsorbed at the goethite surface from the point of zero charge (ph 9.4) to pH 0.9. Although

  2. Active-site titration analysis of surface influence on immobilized Candida antarctica Lipase B activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix morphology and surface polarity effects were investigated for Candida antarctica lipase B immobilization. Measurements of the amount of lipase immobilized (bicinchoninic acid method) and the catalyst’s tributyrin hydrolysis activity, coupled with a determination of the lipase’s functional fr...

  3. A rapid and direct method for the determination of active site accessibility in proteins based on ESI-MS and active site titrations.

    PubMed

    O'Farrell, Norah; Kreiner, Michaela; Moore, Barry D; Parker, Marie-Claire

    2006-11-01

    We have developed an electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) technique that can be applied to rapidly determine the number of intact active sites in proteins. The methodology relies on inhibiting the protein with an active-site irreversible inhibitor and then using ESI-MS to determine the extent of inhibition. We have applied this methodology to a test system: a serine protease, subtilisin Carlsberg, and monitored the extent of inhibition by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), an irreversible serine hydrolase inhibitor as a function of the changes in immobilisation and hydration conditions. Two types of enzyme preparation were investigated, lyophilised enzymes and protein-coated microcrystals (PCMC).

  4. Potentiometric/turbidometric titration of antiperspirant actives.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Clifford T; Hem, Stanley L; Guenin, Eric; Mattai, Jairajh; Afflito, John

    2003-01-01

    A titration procedure that simultaneously monitors the pH and turbidity of an antiperspirant solution during neutralization with sodium hydroxide was developed to characterize antiperspirant actives. Aluminum chloride, aluminum chlorohydrate (ACH), and aluminum zirconium glycine complex (AZG) gave distinctive pH/turbidity profiles. The activated forms of aluminum chlorohydrate (ACH') and aluminum zirconium glycine complex (AZG') produced more turbidity than the non-activated forms. On an equimolar basis, AZG' produced more turbidity than any of the antiperspirant actives tested. PMID:12715089

  5. Potentiometric Acid-Base Titrations with Activated Graphite Electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riyazuddin, P.; Devika, D.

    1997-10-01

    Dry cell graphite (DCG) electrodes activated with potassium permanganate are employed as potentiometric indicator electrodes for acid-base titrations. Special attention is given to an indicator probe comprising activated DCG-non-activiated DCG electrode couple. This combination also proves suitable for the titration of strong or weak acids.

  6. Role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators.

    PubMed

    Karapetyan, Sargis; Buchler, Nicolas E

    2015-12-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ultrasensitivity that is specific for repression. We then use stochastic simulation to show that multiple binding sites increase the coherence of oscillations by mitigating the binary noise. Slow values of DNA unbinding rate are also effective in alleviating molecular noise due to the increased distance from the bifurcation point. Our work demonstrates how the number of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics, which are often omitted in biophysical models of gene circuits, can have a significant impact on the temporal and stochastic dynamics of genetic oscillators.

  7. Role of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics in titration-based oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapetyan, Sargis; Buchler, Nicolas E.

    2015-12-01

    Genetic oscillators, such as circadian clocks, are constantly perturbed by molecular noise arising from the small number of molecules involved in gene regulation. One of the strongest sources of stochasticity is the binary noise that arises from the binding of a regulatory protein to a promoter in the chromosomal DNA. In this study, we focus on two minimal oscillators based on activator titration and repressor titration to understand the key parameters that are important for oscillations and for overcoming binary noise. We show that the rate of unbinding from the DNA, despite traditionally being considered a fast parameter, needs to be slow to broaden the space of oscillatory solutions. The addition of multiple, independent DNA binding sites further expands the oscillatory parameter space for the repressor-titration oscillator and lengthens the period of both oscillators. This effect is a combination of increased effective delay of the unbinding kinetics due to multiple binding sites and increased promoter ultrasensitivity that is specific for repression. We then use stochastic simulation to show that multiple binding sites increase the coherence of oscillations by mitigating the binary noise. Slow values of DNA unbinding rate are also effective in alleviating molecular noise due to the increased distance from the bifurcation point. Our work demonstrates how the number of DNA binding sites and slow unbinding kinetics, which are often omitted in biophysical models of gene circuits, can have a significant impact on the temporal and stochastic dynamics of genetic oscillators.

  8. Association constants of Pb2+ with binding sites of fungal biomass using metal-based titrations.

    PubMed

    Naja, G; Mustin, C; Volesky, B; Berthelin, J

    2006-01-01

    Biosorption is perceived as an alternative method for toxic heavy metal removal/recovery from aqueous effluents. This work focused on derivation of some key quantitative physico-chemical characteristics of a representative biosorbent material required for its further effective exploitation. The newly developed acid-base and metal-based titrator allowed the characterization of the chemisorption active sites of Rhizopus arrhizus biomass and the study of their metal affinity. This experimental approach, combined with an analytical method consisting of transforming the initial data enabled the calculation of the number and capacity of the reactive sites (Qads) and the metal affinity constants (Km) for lead sorption by R. arrhizus biomass. The pKm values for Rhizopus biomass varied between -3 and -6 for sites releasing no protons, -1 and 1 for sites releasing one proton, and > 8 for sites releasing two protons - combined with the Pb precipitation phenomenon. At low temperatures, the active binding site number was lower at lower lead concentrations whereas the precipitation was promoted at higher lead concentration values. Lead adsorption contributed modestly (11%) to its overall uptake and occurred at low lead concentrations onto strong and medium affinity binding sites. Micro-precipitation quickly commenced around active binding sites distinguished by their weak affinity whenever the solution lead concentrations reached 10(-6) or 10(-5) M and represented more than 85% of the total sorbed metal quantity. The work also demonstrated the usefulnes of the methodology reported here for characterizing complex biosorbent materials.

  9. Titration of free hydroxyl and strained siloxane sites on silicon dioxide with fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    McCrate, Joseph M; Ekerdt, John G

    2013-09-24

    A technique enabling the detection and quantification of low density sites on planar SiO2 surfaces is demonstrated. Fluorescent probes are used to titrate free hydroxyl and strained siloxane sites on the surface of amorphous SiO2 substrates in vacuum. The titration of free hydroxyl sites was performed to validate the method and to provide a reference for the measurement of the strained siloxane site density. Perylene derivatives with different functional groups are chemisorbed onto the surface sites, enabling in situ photoluminescence (PL) measurements of the bound fluorophores. An amine functional group is used to selectively titrate strained siloxane sites, while an alcohol group is used for the titration of free hydroxyl sites. Emission intensity was found to be nonlinear with coverage for bound fluorophore densities greater than 0.1 nm(-2), necessitating the removal of molecules from the surface into a solution to obtain accurate density measurements. For lower densities, the coverage of bound fluorophores can be estimated directly from in situ PL measurements. The measured areal densities of bound fluorophores after titrating free hydroxyl sites are in good agreement with literature values for the densities of such sites on high surface area silica. PL measurements of SiO2 surfaces titrated with an amine derivative of perylene indicate that strained siloxane sites exist for vacuum pretreatment temperatures of 300 °C and increase with increasing pretreatment temperature. Densities of strained siloxane sites on the silica surface are estimated at 0.004-0.02 nm(-2) for pretreatment temperatures of 300-700 °C, demonstrating the sensitivity of this technique.

  10. Rational Catalyst Design of Titanium-Silica Materials Aided by Site-Specific Titration Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Todd Robert

    Silica-supported titanium materials are widely used for thermocatalytic applications such as hydroxylation of alkanes and aromatics, oxidation of alcohols and ethers, ammoximation of carbonyls, and sulfoxidations, while Ti-based materials are widely studied for photocatalytic applications such as photo-oxidation of organic substrates and photo-reduction of CO 2. However, the underlying phenomena of how to synthesize, identify, and control the active structures in these materials is not well understood because of the narrow scope of previous work. Studies of titanium-based catalysts typically focus on materials where the metal is present as either highly-dispersed Ti cations or in bulk crystalline TiO2 form, neglecting the numerous and potentially useful intermediate structures. Furthermore, these works typically focus on a single synthesis technique and rely upon bulk characterization techniques to understand the materials. Here rigorous titanium-silica synthesis-structure-function relationships are established by examining several different synthetic method and utilizing characterization techniques that enable an atomic-level understanding of the materials. The materials studied span the range from isolated Ti cations to clustered TiOx domains, polymeric TiO x domains, anatase-like 2D TiO2 domains, and 3D crystalline TiO2. Tools to quantify accessible TiO x and tetrahedral Ti sites are developed, utilizing the selective titration of titanium with phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). Catalytic properties are probed with the photocatalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol and the thermocatalytic epoxidation of cis-cyclooctene with H2O2 . PPA titration data indicate that the rate of benzyl alcohol photo-oxidation is independent of titanium coordination, while the rate of alkene epoxidation with H2O2 is proportional to the number of tetrahedral titanium sites on the catalyst. PPA titration data also enables the estimation of TiO2 particle size and reveals an important distinction

  11. Defining the Q-site of Escherichia coli fumarate reductase by site-directed mutagenesis, fluorescence quench titrations and EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rothery, Richard A; Seime, Andrea M; Spiers, A-M Caroline; Maklashina, Elena; Schröder, Imke; Gunsalus, Robert P; Cecchini, Gary; Weiner, Joel H

    2005-01-01

    We have used fluorescence quench titrations, EPR spectroscopy and steady-state kinetics to study the effects of site-directed mutants of FrdB, FrdC and FrdD on the proximal menaquinol (MQH(2)) binding site (Q(P)) of Escherichia coli fumarate reductase (FrdABCD) in cytoplasmic membrane preparations. Fluorescence quench (FQ) titrations with the fluorophore and MQH(2) analog 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HOQNO) indicate that the Q(P) site is defined by residues from FrdB, FrdC and FrdD. In FQ titrations, wild-type FrdABCD binds HOQNO with an apparent K(d) of 2.5 nM, and the following mutations significantly increase this value: FrdB-T205H (K(d) = 39 nM); FrdB-V207C (K(d) = 20 nM); FrdC-E29L (K(d) = 25 nM); FrdC-W86R (no detectable binding); and FrdD-H80K (K(d) = 20 nM). In all titrations performed, data were fitted to a monophasic binding equation, indicating that no additional high-affinity HOQNO binding sites exist in FrdABCD. In all cases where HOQNO binding is detectable by FQ titration, it can also be observed by EPR spectroscopy. Steady-state kinetic studies of fumarate-dependent quinol oxidation indicate that there is a correlation between effects on HOQNO binding and effects on the observed K(m) and k(cat) values, except in the FrdC-E29L mutant, in which HOQNO binding is observed, but no enzyme turnover is detected. In this case, EPR studies indicate that the lack of activity arises because the enzyme can only remove one electron from reduced MQH(2), resulting in it being trapped in a form with a bound menasemiquinone radical anion. Overall, the data support a model for FrdABCD in which there is a single redox-active and dissociable Q-site.

  12. Fitting two- and three-site binding models to isothermal titration calorimetric data

    PubMed Central

    Brautigam, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    As isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) gains popularity for the characterization of enthalpies and equilibrium association constants of simple 1:1 biomolecular interactions, its use for more complex systems is growing. The method is increasingly used to study interactions in which a single binding partner (molecule “A”) interacts with multiple copies of a second partner (“B”); thus examinations of ABB and ABBB interactions are not uncommon. The structure of ITC data (commonly formatted as isotherms) has a strong bearing on the ability of the researcher to extract the necessary parameters from them. Usually, only 10-30 injections are recorded in a single ITC experiment. Even if replicates are performed, the data must support the extraction of up to twelve parameters from an ABBB system conducted in triplicate. Further, the refinement of some of the parameters is largely driven by only a subset of the data. The ability of ITC data to guide the deterministic estimation of these parameters may therefore be questioned. This work assesses the ability of both empirical and simulated ITC data of ABB and ABBB systems to support the simultaneous estimation of the desired thermodynamic parameters. The results demonstrate that multiphasic isotherms tend to (but do not always) support the estimation of multiple parameters. On the other hand, uniphasic data obtained from multi-site binding systems are more problematic. In all cases, a thorough exploration of how precisely the estimated parameters are specified by the data is justified. PMID:25484338

  13. Effect of Surface Site Interactions on Potentiometric Titration of Hematite (α-Fe2O3) Crystal Faces

    SciTech Connect

    Chatman, Shawn ME; Zarzycki, Piotr P.; Preocanin, Tajana; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2013-02-01

    Time dependent potentiometric pH titrations were used to study the effect of atomic scale surface structure on the protonation behavior of the structurally well defined hematite/aqueous electrolyte interfaces. Our recently proposed thermodynamic model [1,23] was applied to measured acidimetric and alkalimetric titration hysteresis loops, collected from highly organized (001), (012), and (113) crystal face terminations using pH equilibration times ranging from 15 to 30 mins. Hysteresis loop areas indicate that (001) faces equilibrate faster than the (012) and (113) faces, consistent with the different expected ensembles of singly, doubly, and triply coordinated surface sites on each face. Strongly non-linear hysteretic pH-potential relationships were found, with slopes exceeding Nernstian, collectively indicating that protonation and deprotonation is much more complex than embodied in present day surface complexation models. The asymmetrical shape of the acidimetric and alkalimetric titration branches were used to illustrate a proposed steric "leaky screen" repulsion/trapping interaction mechanism that stems from high affinity singly-coordinated sites electrostatically and sterically screening lower affinity doubly and triply coordinated sites. Our data indicate that site interaction is the dominant phenomenon defining surface potential accumulation behavior on single crystal faces of metal oxide minerals.

  14. Titration of biologically active amyloid–β seeds in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Rodrigo; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Soto, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that misfolded Amyloid-β (Aβ) spreads in disease following a prion-like mechanism. Several properties characteristics of infectious prions have been shown for the induction of Aβ aggregates. However, a detailed titration of Aβ misfolding transmissibility and estimation of the minimum concentration of biologically active Aβ seeds able to accelerate pathological changes has not yet been performed. In this study, brain extracts from old tg2576 animals were serially diluted and intra-cerebrally injected into young subjects from the same transgenic line. Animals were sacrificed several months after treatment and brain slices were analyzed for amyloid pathology. We observed that administration of misfolded Aβ was able to significantly accelerate amyloid deposition in young mice, even when the original sample was diluted a million times. The titration curve obtained in this experiment was compared to the natural Aβ load spontaneously accumulated by these mice overtime. Our findings suggest that administration of the largest dose of Aβ seeds led to an acceleration of pathology equivalent to over a year. These results show that active Aβ seeds present in the brain can seed amyloidosis in a titratable manner, similarly as observed for infectious prions. PMID:25879692

  15. Calorimetry, activity, and micro-FTIR analysis of CO chemisorption, titration, and oxidation on supported Pt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sermon, Paul A.; Self, Valerie A.; Vong, Mariana S. W.; Wurie, Alpha T.

    1990-01-01

    The value of in situ analysis on CO chemisorption, titration and oxidation over supported Pt catalysts using calorimetry, catalytic and micro-FTIR methods is illustrated using silica- and titania-supported samples. Isothermal CO-O and O2-CO titrations have not been widely used on metal surfaces and may be complicated if some oxide supports are reduced by CO titrant. However, they can illuminate the kinetics of CO oxidation on metal/oxide catalysts since during such titrations all O and CO coverages are scanned as a function of time. There are clear advantages in following the rates of the catalyzed CO oxidation via calorimetry and gc-ms simultaneously. At lower temperatures the evidence they provide is complementary. CO oxidation and its catalysis of CO oxidation have been extensively studied with hysteresis and oscillations apparent, and the present results suggest the benefits of a combined approach. Silica support porosity may be important in defining activity-temperature hysteresis. FTIR microspectroscopy reveals the chemical heterogeneity of the catalytic surfaces used; it is interesting that the evidence with regard to the dominant CO surface species and their reactivities with regard to surface oxygen for present oxide-supported Pt are different from those seen on graphite-supported Pt.

  16. Inhibition of beta-amylase activity by calcium, magnesium and zinc ions determined by spectrophotometry and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Dahot, M Umar; Saboury, A A; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A

    2004-04-01

    The inhibition effect of metal ions on beta amylase activity was studied. The inhibitor-binding constant (Ki) was determined by spectrophotometric and isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) methods. The binding of calcium, magnesium and zinc ion as inhibitors at the active site of barley beta amylase was studied at pH = 4.8 (sodium acetate 16 mM) and T = 300K. The Ki and enthalpy of binding for calcium (13.4, 13.1 mM and -14.3 kJ/mol), magnesium (18.6, 17.8mM and -17.7 kJ/mol) and zinc (17.5, 17.7 mM and -20.0 kJ/mol) were found by spectrophotometric and ITC methods respectively.

  17. [Photometric micro-titration model of DPPH radicals scavenging activity and its application].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yun-tao; Wei, Wei; Ye, Li-qing; Li, Xiao-fen; Liu, Ping; Zhang, Hong-jiao; Yang, Lu; Yu, Jiao-jiao; Cha, Jia-wei

    2015-02-01

    In the present paper, the stoichiometric ratio (R) for the interreaction of DPPH radicals with the antoxidant was employed as a evaluation index for DPPH radicals scavenging activity of antioxidants. This evaluation index was related only with the stoichiometric relationship between DPPH radicals and the antioxidant, not the relationship with the initial DPPH amount and the volume of sample, which could offer a solution for the problem of poor comparability of EC50 under different conditions. A novel photometric micro-titration method was proposed for the determination of the stoichiometric ratio (R) for the interreaction of DPPH radicals with the antoxidant. The titration equation was established based on the absorbance difference (deltaA) of DPPH radicals in the titration process and the added amount of antoxidant. The stoichiometric ratio (R) for the reaction of DPPH radicals with the addition amount of antoxidant was determined by the titration equation obtained, while, the DPPH median elimination concentration (EC50) of antoxidant can be calculated by the stoichiometric ratio (R). The above photometric micro-titration model was verified using rutin as DPPH radicals scavenger. As experiment results, the stoichiometric ratio (R) of DPPH radicals to rutin was determined to be in the range of 1.817-1.846. The calculated value of EC50 was 1.196 x 10(-3), 2.392 x 10(-3), 4.819 x 10(-3) and 7.292 x 10(-3) mg x mL(-1) for 1.12 x 10(-7), 2.24 x 10(-7), 4.48 x 10(-7) and 6.72 x 10(-7) mol of the additon amount of DPPH radicals, respectively. The proposed method has better precision and reliability with smaller amount of sample than conventional method. While, the obtained stoichiometric ratio value (R) of rutin was employed to calculate the rutin median elimination concentration for DPPH EC50) according to the conditions as reported in the literatures, and the calculated results were consistent with that reported in the literatures.

  18. Determination of peroxyl radical scavenging activity of flavonoids and plant extracts using an automatic potentiometric titrator.

    PubMed

    Sano, Mitsuaki; Yoshida, Risa; Degawa, Masakuni; Miyase, Toshio; Yoshino, Kyoji

    2003-05-01

    A novel potentiometric method for evaluation of peroxyl radical scavenging activity of flavonoids and plant extracts was developed. The oxidation of potassium iodide (KI) was performed in acetonitrilephosphate buffer (1:1) containing antioxidant using 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride as a peroxyl radical generator. The amount of iodine released from KI during a 20-min free radical oxidation was determined quantitatively using an automatic potentiometric titrator with sodium thiosulfate. The radical scavenging activity of the sample was expressed as the inhibition ratio for iodine release of the control group mediated by the radical. The results obtained from some authentic polyphenols correlated well with those of previous reports. This is a simple, time-saving method requiring less than 30 min and is useful in assessing the radical scavenging activity of antioxidants in plant extracts. We describe the radical scavenging activities of various flavonoids including 21 kinds of tea catechins and vegetable extracts by this method.

  19. Alternating sites reactivity is a common feature of thiamin diphosphate-dependent enzymes as evidenced by isothermal titration calorimetry studies of substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Schröder-Tittmann, Kathrin; Meyer, Danilo; Arens, Johannes; Wechsler, Cindy; Tietzel, Michael; Golbik, Ralph; Tittmann, Kai

    2013-04-16

    Thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes play vital roles in cellular metabolism in all kingdoms of life. In previous kinetic and structural studies, a communication between the active centers in terms of a negative cooperativity had been suggested for some but not all ThDP enzymes, which typically operate as functional dimers. To further underline this hypothesis and to test its universality, we investigated the binding of substrate analogue methyl acetylphosphonate (MAP) to three different ThDP-dependent enzymes acting on substrate pyruvate, namely, the Escherichia coli E1 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, E. coli acetohydroxyacid synthase isoenzyme I, and the Lactobacillus plantarum pyruvate oxidase using isothermal titration calorimetry. The results unambiguously show for all three enzymes studied that only one active center of the functional dimers accomplishes covalent binding of the substrate analogue, supporting the proposed alternating sites reactivity as a common feature of all ThDP enzymes and resolving the recent controversy in the field.

  20. Charge-patterning phase transition on a surface lattice of titratable sites adjacent to an electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Joel; Thurston, George

    We discuss a model for a charge-patterning phase transition on a two-dimensional square lattice of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed on a square lattice in a dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and an aqueous salt solution. Within Debye-Huckel theory, the analytical form of the electrostatic repulsion between protonated sites exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease beyond short distances. The problem can thus be mapped onto the two-dimensional antiferromagnetic Ising model with this longer-range interaction, which we study with Monte Carlo simulations. As we increase pH, the occupation probability of a site decreases from 1 at low pH to 0 at high pH. For sufficiently-strong interaction strengths, a phase transition occurs as the occupation probability of 1/2 is approached: the charges arrange themselves into a checkerboard pattern. This ordered phase persists over a range of pH until a transition occurs back to a disordered state. This state is the analogue of the Neel state in the antiferromagnetic Ising spin model. More complicated ordered phases are expected for sufficiently strong interactions (with occupation probabilities of 1/4 and 3/4) and if the lattice is triangular rather than square. This work was supported by NIH EY018249 (GMT).

  1. Fluorometric titration approach for calibration of quantity of binding site of purified monoclonal antibody recognizing epitope/hapten nonfluorescent at 340 nm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolan; Hu, Xiaolei; Xu, Bangtian; Wang, Xin; Qin, Jialin; He, Chenxiong; Xie, Yanling; Li, Yuanli; Liu, Lin; Liao, Fei

    2014-06-17

    A fluorometric titration approach was proposed for the calibration of the quantity of monoclonal antibody (mcAb) via the quench of fluorescence of tryptophan residues. It applied to purified mcAbs recognizing tryptophan-deficient epitopes, haptens nonfluorescent at 340 nm under the excitation at 280 nm, or fluorescent haptens bearing excitation valleys nearby 280 nm and excitation peaks nearby 340 nm to serve as Förster-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET) acceptors of tryptophan. Titration probes were epitopes/haptens themselves or conjugates of nonfluorescent haptens or tryptophan-deficient epitopes with FRET acceptors of tryptophan. Under the excitation at 280 nm, titration curves were recorded as fluorescence specific for the FRET acceptors or for mcAbs at 340 nm. To quantify the binding site of a mcAb, a universal model considering both static and dynamic quench by either type of probes was proposed for fitting to the titration curve. This was easy for fitting to fluorescence specific for the FRET acceptors but encountered nonconvergence for fitting to fluorescence of mcAbs at 340 nm. As a solution, (a) the maximum of the absolute values of first-order derivatives of a titration curve as fluorescence at 340 nm was estimated from the best-fit model for a probe level of zero, and (b) molar quantity of the binding site of the mcAb was estimated via consecutive fitting to the same titration curve by utilizing such a maximum as an approximate of the slope for linear response of fluorescence at 340 nm to quantities of the mcAb. This fluorometric titration approach was proved effective with one mcAb for six-histidine and another for penicillin G.

  2. A potential high-throughput method for the determination of lipase activity by potentiometric flow injection titrations.

    PubMed

    Vahl, Katja; Kahlert, Heike; Böttcher, Dominique; Wardenga, Rainer; Komorsky-Lovrić, Sebojka; Bornscheuer, Uwe; Scholz, Fritz

    2008-03-01

    Potentiometric FIA titrations were performed to determine enzyme activities of lipase type B from Candida antarctica, CAL-B. Two substrates, triacetin and tributyrin were hydrolyzed in phosphate buffer solutions, and the concentration change of the base component of the buffer was titrated in a carrier solution containing hydrochloric acid and potassium chloride. The system was calibrated with butyric acid and acetic acid, respectively. FIA titration peaks were evaluated with respect to peak height and peak area. Butyric acid and acetic acid could be titrated in the buffer solution from 3x10(-3) mol L(-1) to 0.1 mol L(-1). The detection limit of enzyme activity was determined to be 0.07 U mL(-1) (15 min reaction time) and the minimum activity was calculated to be 0.035 units corresponding to 35 nmol min(-1). The specific activities of lipase B for the hydrolysis of tributyrin and triacetin were determined as 16+/-2 U mg(-1) and 2+/-0.2 U mg(-1) (per mg commercial lipase preparation), respectively.

  3. Quantification of active mitochondrial permeability transition pores using GNX-4975 inhibitor titrations provides insights into molecular identity

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Andrew P.; Halestrap, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by the novel inhibitor GNX-4975 was characterized. Titration of MPTP activity in de-energized rat liver mitochondria allowed determination of the number of GNX-4975-binding sites and their dissociation constant (Ki). Binding sites increased in number when MPTP opening was activated by increasing [Ca2+], phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or KSCN, and decreased when MPTP opening was inhibited with bongkrekic acid (BKA) or ADP. Values ranged between 9 and 50 pmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, but the Ki remained unchanged at ∼1.8 nM when the inhibitor was added before Ca2+. However, when GNX-4975 was added after Ca2+ it was much less potent with a Ki of ∼140 nM. These data imply that a protein conformational change is required to form the MPTP complex and generate the GNX-4975-binding site. Occupation of the latter with GNX-4975 prevents the Ca2+ binding that triggers pore opening. We also demonstrated that GNX-4975 stabilizes an interaction between the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), held in its ‘c’ conformation with carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the phosphate carrier (PiC) bound to immobilized PAO. No components of the F1Fo-ATP synthase bound significantly to immobilized PAO. Our data are consistent with our previous proposal that the MPTP may form at an interface between the PiC and ANT (or other similar mitochondrial carrier proteins) when they adopt novel conformations induced by factors that sensitize the MPTP to [Ca2+]. We propose that GNX-4975 binds to this interface preventing a calcium-triggered event that opens the interface into a pore. PMID:26920024

  4. Quantification of active mitochondrial permeability transition pores using GNX-4975 inhibitor titrations provides insights into molecular identity.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Andrew P; Halestrap, Andrew P

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by the novel inhibitor GNX-4975 was characterized. Titration of MPTP activity in de-energized rat liver mitochondria allowed determination of the number of GNX-4975-binding sites and their dissociation constant (Ki). Binding sites increased in number when MPTP opening was activated by increasing [Ca(2+)], phenylarsine oxide (PAO) or KSCN, and decreased when MPTP opening was inhibited with bongkrekic acid (BKA) or ADP. Values ranged between 9 and 50 pmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, but the Ki remained unchanged at ∼1.8 nM when the inhibitor was added before Ca(2+) However, when GNX-4975 was added after Ca(2+) it was much less potent with a Ki of ∼140 nM. These data imply that a protein conformational change is required to form the MPTP complex and generate the GNX-4975-binding site. Occupation of the latter with GNX-4975 prevents the Ca(2+) binding that triggers pore opening. We also demonstrated that GNX-4975 stabilizes an interaction between the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT), held in its 'c' conformation with carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the phosphate carrier (PiC) bound to immobilized PAO. No components of the F1Fo-ATP synthase bound significantly to immobilized PAO. Our data are consistent with our previous proposal that the MPTP may form at an interface between the PiC and ANT (or other similar mitochondrial carrier proteins) when they adopt novel conformations induced by factors that sensitize the MPTP to [Ca(2+)]. We propose that GNX-4975 binds to this interface preventing a calcium-triggered event that opens the interface into a pore.

  5. Isothermal titration calorimetry determination of individual rate constants of trypsin catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, César; Condado-Morales, Itzel; Olguin, Luis F; Costas, Miguel

    2015-06-15

    Determination of individual rate constants for enzyme-catalyzed reactions is central to the understanding of their mechanism of action and is commonly obtained by stopped-flow kinetic experiments. However, most natural substrates either do not fluoresce/absorb or lack a significant change in their spectra while reacting and, therefore, are frequently chemically modified to render adequate molecules for their spectroscopic detection. Here, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to obtain Michaelis-Menten plots for the trypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of several substrates at different temperatures (278-318K): four spectrophotometrically blind lysine and arginine N-free esters, one N-substituted arginine ester, and one amide. A global fitting of these data provided the individual rate constants and activation energies for the acylation and deacylation reactions, and the ratio of the formation and dissociation rates of the enzyme-substrate complex, leading also to the corresponding free energies of activation. The results indicate that for lysine and arginine N-free esters deacylation is the rate-limiting step, but for the N-substituted ester and the amide acylation is the slowest step. It is shown that ITC is able to produce quality kinetic data and is particularly well suited for those enzymatic reactions that cannot be measured by absorption or fluorescence spectroscopy.

  6. A colorimetric LDH assay for the titration of infectivity and the evaluation of anti-viral activity against ortho- and paramyxoviruses.

    PubMed

    Mori, S; Watanabe, W; Shigeta, S

    1995-12-01

    A rapid and precise screening assay was developed for in vitro evaluation of anti-orthomyxo- and anti-paramyxovirus agents. The procedure is spectrophotometrical assessment for viability of cells via extracellular leakage of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH). HMV-II cells, a human melanoma cell line was found to be suitable for the titration of virus infectivity and screening of anti-viral agents for orthomyxo- and paramyxoviruses. Comparative titration of infectivity of stock viruses by the LDH and the MTT in site reduction of 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) methods with HMV-II cells as well as plaque titration with MDCK, Vero and HeLa cells was carried out. The LDH method was comparable or more sensitive for influenza viruses (FLUV)-A, B, C, parainfluenza viruses (PFLUV)-1, 2 and less sensitive for PFLUV-3, mumps virus (MPSV), measles viruses (MLSV) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) than the plaque titration. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-1, 2, 4-triazol-3-carboxamide (ribavirin) and 5-ethynyl-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-imidazole-4-carboxamide (EICAR) against orthomyxo- and paramyxoviruses were examined comparatively by the LDH, MTT and plaque reduction (PR) methods. The EC50 values of FLUV-C and PFLUV-1 were able to be evaluated only by the LDH but not by the MTT and PR methods. The LDH method with HMV-II cells simplifies the assay procedure and permits the evaluation of a large number of compounds for anti-orthomyxo- and anti-paramyxoviruses activity in vitro.

  7. Systemic heparinization during peripheral vascular surgery: thromboelastographic, activated coagulation time, and heparin titration monitoring.

    PubMed

    Martin, P; Greenstein, D; Gupta, N K; Walker, D R; Kester, R C

    1994-04-01

    Fifteen patients (9 male, 6 female) undergoing peripheral vascular surgery were monitored during surgery for evidence of subclinical anticoagulation using the activated coagulation time (ACT), thromboelastography (TEG), and heparin titration monitoring. Assessments were made at 30-minute intervals before and after the occlusion clamp. Mean (+/- SD) ACT values preoperatively were 111 (17) seconds, and 10 minutes after 5,000 IU of heparin, the ACT was 264 (57) seconds (P < 0.001). Intraoperatively, there was a significant decline in ACT values at 30 minutes (ACT 228 [50] sec, P < 0.005) and 60 minutes (200 [46] sec, P < 0.001) postheparin. No significant difference in ACT was observed between samples drawn distally and proximally to the clamp. TEG profiles were abolished in all patients immediately following heparinization. However, in 2 patients nearly complete return of the TEG coagulation profile was observed prior to the termination of the procedure and was associated with ACT values less than 160 seconds. The heparin device was unable to accurately monitor heparin elimination at these low doses. Variability of patient response to heparinization necessitates the use of intraoperative monitoring of anticoagulation during peripheral vascular surgery.

  8. Microscale Titration in Schools Titration Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the requirements of the National Titration Competition and describes how a team in a local competition used the technique. Compares microscale titration to conventional titration. Outlines the benefits of employing microscale techniques. (DDR)

  9. Radiometric acid-base titrations.

    PubMed

    Erdey, L; Gimesi, O; Szabadváry, F

    1969-03-01

    Acid-base titrations can be performed with radiometric end-point detection by use of labelled metal salts (e.g., ZnCl(2), HgCl(2)). Owing to the formation or dissolution of the corresponding hydroxide after the equivalence point, the activity of the titrated solution linearly increases or decreases as excess of standard solution is added. The end-point of the titration is determined graphically.

  10. Determination of the catalytic activity of binuclear metallohydrolases using isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Marcelo M; Ely, Fernanda; Lonhienne, Thierry; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    Binuclear metallohydrolases are a large and diverse family of enzymes that are involved in numerous metabolic functions. An increasing number of members find applications as drug targets or in processes such as bioremediation. It is thus essential to have an assay available that allows the rapid and reliable determination of relevant catalytic parameters (k cat, K m, and k cat/K m). Continuous spectroscopic assays are frequently only possible by using synthetic (i.e., nonbiological) substrates that possess a suitable chromophoric marker (e.g., nitrophenol). Isothermal titration calorimetry, in contrast, affords a rapid assay independent of the chromophoric properties of the substrate-the heat associated with the hydrolytic reaction can be directly related to catalytic properties. Here, we demonstrate the efficiency of the method on several selected examples of this family of enzymes and show that, in general, the catalytic parameters obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry are in good agreement with those obtained from spectroscopic assays.

  11. Inhibition of influenza virus multiplication by alkyl derivatives of benzimidazole. II. Measurement of inhibitory activity by hemagglutination titrations.

    PubMed

    TAMM, I; FOLKERS, K; HORSFALL, F L

    1953-09-01

    The activity of compounds which inhibit the multiplication of influenza virus can be measured in chorioallantoic membrane cultures in vitro by means of hemagglutination titrations on the medium. Studies on the reproducibility of virus reproduction in membrane cultures have revealed the major variables which affect the results and thus have led to the development of a precise technique. Under strictly controlled experimental conditions, the extent of reproduction of the virus in membrane cultures is predictable within narrow limits of variation. With 10(5.5) EID(50) of influenza B virus, Lee strain, and 5.75 cm.(2) of chorioallantoic membrane per ml., the ratio of infective virus particles to susceptible allantoic cells appears to be approximately 1:28. Under these conditions, the evidence indicates that two cycles of multiplication occur and nearly maximal hemagglutination titers are found with culture medium at 36 hours. The extent of the deviation in the absolute titer in different experiments was only 0.112 log unit. At a concentration of 0.0017 M, 2,5-dimethylbenzimidazole caused inhibition of the multiplication of influenza B virus, Lee strain, which persisted for at least 70 hours as measured by hemagglutination titrations on the culture medium. The degree of inhibition was closely comparable to that demonstrated by infectivity titrations on the membrane at the end of the first cycle of virus reproduction (1).

  12. Evaluation of Thiol Raman Activities and pKa Values Using Internally Referenced Raman-Based pH Titration.

    PubMed

    Suwandaratne, Nuwanthi; Hu, Juan; Siriwardana, Kumudu; Gadogbe, Manuel; Zhang, Dongmao

    2016-04-01

    Thiols, including organothiol and thiol-containing biomolecules, are among the most important classes of chemicals that are used broadly in organic synthesis, biological chemistry, and nanosciences. Thiol pKa values are key indicators of thiol reactivity and functionality. Reported herein is an internally referenced Raman-based pH titration method that enables reliable quantification of thiol pKa values for both mono- and dithiols in water. The degree of thiol ionization is monitored directly using the peak intensity of the S-H stretching feature in the 2600 cm(-1) region relative to an internal reference peak as a function of the titration solution's pH. The thiol pKa values and Raman activity relative to its internal reference were then determined by curve fitting the experimental data with equations derived on the basis of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Using this Raman titration method, we determined for the first time the first and second thiol pKa values for 1,2-benzenedithiol in water. This Raman-based method is convenient to implement, and its underlying theory is easy to follow. It should therefore have broad application for thiol pKa determinations and verification.

  13. [Rigorous algorithms for calculating the exact concentrations and activity levels of all the different species during acid-base titrations in water].

    PubMed

    Burgot, G; Burgot, J L

    2000-10-01

    The principles of two algorithms allowing the calculations of the concentration and activity levels of the different species during acid-base titrations in water are described. They simulate titrations at constant and variable ionic strengths respectively. They are designed so acid and base strengths, their concentrations and the titrant volume added can be chosen freely. The calculations are based on rigorous equations with a general scope. They are sufficiently compact to be processed on pocket calculators. The algorithms can easily simulate pH-metric, spectrophotometric, conductometric and calorimetric titrations, and hence allow determining concentrations and some physico-chemical constants related to the occurring chemical systems.

  14. The Titration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilner, Cary

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the development of concentration and organizational skills, patience, self-discipline, attention to detail, and appreciation for error analysis through an expanded titration project. Describes the various activities in the extended project and the materials and instructional support needed. Stresses the advantage to students in their…

  15. [2-site competitive immunoenzyme analysis based on monoclonal antibodies for the detection and titration of antihemagglutinating measles antibodies].

    PubMed

    Nagieva, F G; Nikulina, V G; Krasnova, N I; Barkova, E P; Karmanova, R I; Pikhtianen, A I; Andzhaparidze, O G

    1991-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies (MCA) to measles virus (strain Leningrad-16) hemagglutinin, a competitive enzyme immunoassay (cEIA) was developed for the detection and titration of antihemagglutinating antibodies in human sera. Serum samples from children, collected in measles foci, were tested in cEIA, SP-EIA, HI, and PHA tests. The results evidence a high correlation of antihemagglutinin titres in cEIA and HI tests, the correlation coefficient of cEIA and PHA being 97.7%. The cEIA based on MCA to measles virus hemagglutinin is highly specific for the detection and titration of measles antihemagglutinins, it does not involve the use of simian erythrocytes. A significant advantage of this test system consists in the possibility of using unpurified antigen prepared from the infected cell lysate.

  16. Charge-regulation phase transition on surface lattices of titratable sites adjacent to electrolyte solutions: An analog of the Ising antiferromagnet in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shore, Joel D.; Thurston, George M.

    2015-12-01

    We report a charge-patterning phase transition on two-dimensional square lattices of titratable sites, here regarded as protonation sites, placed in a low-dielectric medium just below the planar interface between this medium and a salt solution. We calculate the work-of-charging matrix of the lattice with use of a linear Debye-Hückel model, as input to a grand-canonical partition function for the distribution of occupancy patterns. For a large range of parameter values, this model exhibits an approximate inverse cubic power-law decrease of the voltage produced by an individual charge, as a function of its in-lattice separation from neighboring titratable sites. Thus, the charge coupling voltage biases the local probabilities of proton binding as a function of the occupancy of sites for many neighbors beyond the nearest ones. We find that even in the presence of these longer-range interactions, the site couplings give rise to a phase transition in which the site occupancies exhibit an alternating, checkerboard pattern that is an analog of antiferromagnetic ordering. The overall strength W of this canonical charge coupling voltage, per unit charge, is a function of the Debye length, the charge depth, the Bjerrum length, and the dielectric coefficients of the medium and the solvent. The alternating occupancy transition occurs above a curve of thermodynamic critical points in the (p H-p K ,W ) plane, the curve representing a charge-regulation analog of variation of the Néel temperature of an Ising antiferromagnet as a function of an applied, uniform magnetic field. The analog of a uniform magnetic field in the antiferromagnet problem is a combination of p H-p K and W , and 1 /W is the analog of the temperature in the antiferromagnet problem. We use Monte Carlo simulations to study the occupancy patterns of the titratable sites, including interactions out to the 37th nearest-neighbor category (a distance of √{74 } lattice constants), first validating simulations

  17. Evaluation of thiol Raman activities and pKa values using internally referenced Ramanbased pH titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwandaratne, Nuwanthi

    Thiols are one of the most important classes of chemicals used broadly in organic synthesis, biological chemistry, and nanosciences. Thiol pKa values are key indicators of thiol reactivity and functionality. This study is an internally-referenced Raman-based pH titration method that enables reliable quantification of thiol pKa values for both mono- and di-thiols in water. The degree of thiol ionization is monitored directly using the peak intensity of the S-H stretching feature relative to an internal reference peak as a function of solution pH. The thiol pKa values and Raman activity relative to its internal reference were then determined by curve-fitting the experimental data with equations derived on the basis of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Using this Raman titration method, first and second thiol pKa values for 1,2-benzenedithol in water were determined for the first time. This method is convenient to implement and its underlying theory is easy to follow.

  18. Phosphorus-doped and undoped glassy carbon indicator electrodes in controlled-current potentiometric titrations of bromide- or chloride-containing active ingredients in some pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Abramović, Biljana F; Guzsvány, Valéria J; Gaál, Ferenc F

    2005-02-23

    Phosphorus-doped glassy carbon (as a novel material) and glassy carbon (Sigri commercial sample) were applied as potentiometric indicator electrodes in the titrimetric determination of active components with bromide or chloride in their molecules in different pharmaceutical preparations (Buscopan, Prostigmine, Isoptin, Bedoxin, Akineton and Trodon). After the necessary pre-treatment of the electrode surfaces and sample dissolution, the halide was titrated with a standard solution of silver nitrate (indirect determination). Amounts of 10-20 micromol of the investigated active ingredients per titration were determined with a relative standard deviation that, depending on the nature of indicator electrode, determined molecules and filler components, was in the range of 0.3-2.7%. The results obtained were compared with those of the official methods and with those obtained by potentiometric titrations using silver electrode. The titrimetric procedures developed are relatively fast, easy, economical and can be used to analyse of a large number of pharmaceutical products.

  19. Electrostatic coupling to pH-titrating sites as a source of cooperativity in protein-ligand binding.

    PubMed Central

    Spassov, V.; Bashford, D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes an alternative mechanism for the cooperative binding of charged ligands to proteins. The ligand-binding sites are electrostatically coupled to protein side chains that can undergo protonation and deprotonation. The binding of one ligand alters the protein's protonation equilibrium in a manner that makes the the binding of the second ligand more favorable. This mechanism requires no conformational change to produce a cooperative effect, although it is not exclusive of conformational change. We present a theoretical description of the mechanism, and calculations on three kinds of systems: A model system containing one protonation site and two ligand-binding sites; a model system containing two protonation sites and two ligand-binding sites; and calbindin D9k, which contains two Ca2+-binding sites and 30 protonation sites. For the one-protonation-site model, it is shown that the influence of the protonation site can only be cooperative. The competition of this effect with the anticooperative effect of ligand-ligand repulsion is studied in detail. For the two-protonation site model, the effect can be either cooperative or, in special cases, anticooperative. For calbindin D9k, the calculations predict that six protonation sites in or near the ligand-binding sites make a cooperative contribution that approximately cancels the anticooperative effect of Ca2+-Ca2+ repulsion, accounting for more than half of the total cooperative effect that is needed to overcome repulsion and produce the net cooperativity observed experimentally. We argue that cooperative mechanisms of the kind described here are likely when there is more than one ligand-binding site in a protein domain. PMID:9761483

  20. Theory of titration curves-VII The properties of derivative titration curves for strong acid-strong base and other isovalent ion-combination titrations.

    PubMed

    Meites, T; Meites, L

    1970-06-01

    This paper deals with isovalent ion-combination titrations based on reactions that can be represented by the equation M(n+) + X(n-) --> MX, where the activity of the product MX is invariant throughout a titration, and with the derivative titration curves obtained by plotting d[M(+)]/dfversus f for such titrations. It describes some of the ways in which such curves can be obtained; it compares and contrasts them both with potentiometric titration curves, which resemble them in shape, and with segmented titration curves, from which they are derived; and it discusses their properties in detail.

  1. Isothermal titration calorimetric studies on the binding of deoxytrimannoside derivatives with artocarpin: implications for a deep-seated combining site in lectins.

    PubMed

    Rani, P G; Bachhawat, K; Reddy, G B; Oscarson, S; Surolia, A

    2000-09-01

    The carbohydrate binding specificity of the seed lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia, artocarpin, has been elucidated by the enzyme-linked lectin absorbent assay [Misquith, S., et al (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 30393-30401], wherein it was demonstrated to be a Man/Glc specific lectin with high affinity for the trisaccharide present in the core of all N-linked oligosaccharide chains of glycoproteins. As a consequence of this characterization, the binding epitopes of this trisaccharide, 3, 6-di(alpha-D-mannopyranosyl)-D-mannose, for artocarpin were investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry using its monodeoxy as well as Glc and Gal analogues. The thermodynamic data presented here implicate 2-, 3-, 4-, and 6-hydroxyl groups of the alpha(1-3) Man and alpha(1-6) Man residues, and the 2- and 4-OH groups of the central Man residue, in binding to artocarpin. Nevertheless, alpha(1-3) Man is the primary contributor to the binding affinity, unlike other Man/Glc binding lectins which exhibit a preference for alpha(1-6) Man. In addition, unlike the binding reactions of most lectins reported so far, the interaction of mannotriose involves all of its hydroxyl groups with the combining site of the lectin. Moreover, the free energy and enthalpy contributions to binding of individual hydroxyl groups of the trimannoside estimated from the corresponding monodeoxy analogues show nonlinearity, suggesting differential contributions of the solvent and protein to the thermodynamics of binding of the analogues. Thus, this study not only provides evidence for the extended site recognition of artocarpin for the trimannoside epitope but also suggests that its combining site is best described as a deep cleft as opposed to shallow indentations implicated in other lectins.

  2. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Conformational Transitions in Human AP Endonuclease 1 and Its Active Site Mutant during Abasic Site Repair†

    PubMed Central

    Kanazhevskaya, Lyubov Yu.; Koval, Vladimir V.; Zharkov, Dmitry O.; Strauss, Phyllis R.; Fedorova, Olga S.

    2010-01-01

    AP endonuclease 1 (APE 1) is a crucial enzyme of the base excision repair pathway (BER) in human cells. APE1 recognizes apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites and makes a nick in the phosphodiester backbone 5′ to them. The conformational dynamics and presteady-state kinetics of wild-type APE1 and its active site mutant, Y171F-P173L-N174K, have been studied. To observe conformational transitions occurring in the APE1 molecule during the catalytic cycle, we detected intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of the enzyme under single turnover conditions. DNA duplexes containing a natural AP site, its tetrahydrofuran analogue, or a 2′-deoxyguanosine residue in the same position were used as specific substrates or ligands. The stopped-flow experiments have revealed high flexibility of the APE1 molecule and the complexity of the catalytic process. The fluorescent traces indicate that wild-type APE1 undergoes at least four conformational transitions during the processing of abasic sites in DNA. In contrast, nonspecific interactions of APE1 with undamaged DNA can be described by a two-step kinetic scheme. Rate and equilibrium constants were extracted from the stopped-flow and fluorescence titration data for all substrates, ligands, and products. A replacement of three residues at the enzymatic active site including the replacement of tyrosine 171 with phenylalanine in the enzyme active site resulted in a 2 × 104-fold decrease in the reaction rate and reduced binding affinity. Our data indicate the important role of conformational changes in APE1 for substrate recognition and catalysis. PMID:20575528

  4. A Unified Titration Formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaister, P.

    1999-01-01

    In a number of standard titrations, a volume of a monoprotic base MOH at a specific concentration is added to a volume of a monoprotic acid HA at a specific concentrations. Four different types of titration are possible, depending on whether the acid and base are strong or weak. In a recent article, some of these cases are discussed in detail. However, a single unifying formula covering all four cases has been determined.

  5. A PC-based titrator for flow gradient titrations

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a PC (personal computer) based titrator which was developed for gradient flow titrations. Concentration gradients were generated electrolytically or volumetrically in small tubes. Complete titration curves can be recorded on-line and evaluated automatically. The titrator can be used with all liquid flow detectors with low axial dispersion. The titrator was evaluated for the titration of thiosulphate with electrogenerated triiodide and for the titration of ammonia with electrogenerated hypobromite after continuous gas dialytic separation of ammonia from the sample solution. PMID:18924977

  6. A novel view of pH titration in biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Onufriev, A; Case, D A; Ullmann, G M

    2001-03-27

    When individual titratable sites in a molecule interact with each other, their pH titration can be considerably more complex than that of an independent site described by the classical Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. We propose a novel framework that decomposes any complex titration behavior into simple standard components. The approach maps the set of N interacting sites in the molecule onto a set of N independent, noninteracting quasi-sites, each characterized by a pK'(a) value. The titration curve of an individual site in the molecule is a weighted sum of Henderson-Hasselbalch curves corresponding to the quasi-sites. The total protonation curve is the unweighted sum of these Henderson-Hasselbalch curves. We show that pK'(a) values correspond to deprotonation constants available from methods that can be used to assess total proton uptake or release, and establish their connection to protonation curves of individual residues obtained by NMR or infrared spectroscopy. The new framework is tested on a small molecule diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA) exhibiting nonmonotonic titration curves, where it gives an excellent fit to experimental data. We demonstrate that the titration curve of a site in a group of interacting sites can be accurately reconstructed, if titration curves of the other sites are known. The application of the new framework to the protein rubredoxin demonstrates its usefulness in calculating and interpreting complicated titration curves.

  7. Simple sensor for potentiometric titrations

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.

    1982-01-01

    A sensor for potentiometric titrations was prepared by coating a spectroscopic graphite rod with a solution of poly(vinyl chloride) and dioctylphthalate in tetrahydrofuran. The reference was an Ag/AgCl single-junction electrode. The sensor was used in the following potentiometric titrations: (1) precipitation titrations, (2) acid-base titrations, (3) compleximetric titrations, and (4) redox titrations. A survey of its use in such titrations is presented. Preparation of the coated-graphite sensor is simple and rapid. Moreover, it is quite inexpensive. A limitation is its applicability in aqueous media only, because organic solvents will dissolve the membrane. 5 figures, 4 tables.

  8. Counting Active Sites on Titanium Oxide-Silica Catalysts for Hydrogen Peroxide Activation through In Situ Poisoning with Phenylphosphonic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Todd R.; Boston, Andrew M.; Thompson, Anthony B.; Gray, Kimberly A.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2015-06-04

    Quantifying specific active sites in supported catalysts improves our understanding and assists in rational design. Supported oxides can undergo significant structural changes as surface densities increase from site-isolated cations to monolayers and crystallites, which changes the number of kinetically relevant sites. Herein, TiOx domains are titrated on TiOx–SiO2 selectively with phenylphosphonic acid (PPA). An ex situ method quantifies all fluid-accessible TiOx, whereas an in situ titration during cis-cyclooctene epoxidation provides previously unavailable values for the number of tetrahedral Ti sites on which H2O2 activation occurs. We use this method to determine the active site densities of 22 different catalysts with different synthesis methods, loadings, and characteristic spectra and find a single intrinsic turnover frequency for cis-cyclooctene epoxidation of (40±7) h-1. This simple method gives molecular-level insight into catalyst structure that is otherwise hidden when bulk techniques are used.

  9. Production of ⁶¹Cu by the natZn(p,α) reaction: Improved separation and specific activity determination by titration with three chelators

    DOE PAGES

    Asad, Ali H.; Smith, Suzanne V.; Morandeau, Laurence M.; Chan, Sun; Jeffery, Charmaine M.; Price, Roger I.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the cyclotron-based production of position-emitting ⁶¹Cu using the (p,α) reaction at 11.7 MeV was investigated starting from natural-zinc (natZn) and enriched ⁶⁴Zn-foil targets, as well as its subsequent purification. For natZn, a combination of three resins were assessed to separate ⁶¹Cu from contaminating 66,67,68Ga and natZn. The specific activity of the purified ⁶¹Cu determined using ICP-MS analysis ranged from 143.3±14.3(SD) to 506.2±50.6 MBq/μg while the titration method using p-SCN-Bn-DOTA, p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and diamsar gave variable results (4.7±0.2 to 412.5±15.3 MBq/μg), with diamsar lying closest to the ICP-MS values. Results suggest that the p-SCN-Bn-DOTA and p-SCN-Bn-NOTA titration methods aremore » significantly affected by the presence of trace-metal contaminants.« less

  10. Production of ⁶¹Cu by the natZn(p,α) reaction: Improved separation and specific activity determination by titration with three chelators

    SciTech Connect

    Asad, Ali H.; Smith, Suzanne V.; Morandeau, Laurence M.; Chan, Sun; Jeffery, Charmaine M.; Price, Roger I.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the cyclotron-based production of position-emitting ⁶¹Cu using the (p,α) reaction at 11.7 MeV was investigated starting from natural-zinc (natZn) and enriched ⁶⁴Zn-foil targets, as well as its subsequent purification. For natZn, a combination of three resins were assessed to separate ⁶¹Cu from contaminating 66,67,68Ga and natZn. The specific activity of the purified ⁶¹Cu determined using ICP-MS analysis ranged from 143.3±14.3(SD) to 506.2±50.6 MBq/μg while the titration method using p-SCN-Bn-DOTA, p-SCN-Bn-NOTA and diamsar gave variable results (4.7±0.2 to 412.5±15.3 MBq/μg), with diamsar lying closest to the ICP-MS values. Results suggest that the p-SCN-Bn-DOTA and p-SCN-Bn-NOTA titration methods are significantly affected by the presence of trace-metal contaminants.

  11. Gasometric titration for dimethylaluminum chloride analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Maligres, Peter; Eckenroad, Kyle; Simmons, Bryon

    2016-06-01

    A gasometric titration method was developed to quantitate active alkylaluminum content in dimethylaluminum chloride solution to perform the stoichiometry calculation for the reaction charge. The procedure was reproducible with good precision, and the results showed good correlation with ICP-MS method. The gasometric titration is a simple, inexpensive alternative to analysis via ICP-MS which provides more selective analysis of methylaluminum species without the need for inertion.

  12. Universal tracer monitored titrations.

    PubMed

    DeGrandpre, Michael D; Martz, Todd R; Hart, Robert D; Elison, David M; Zhang, Alice; Bahnson, Anna G

    2011-12-15

    Titrations, while primarily known as the chemical rite of passage for fledgling science students, are still widely used for chemical analysis. With its many years of existence and improvement, the method would seem an unlikely candidate for innovation, yet it is desirable, in this age of autonomous sensing where analyzers may be sent into space or to the bottom of the ocean, to have a simplified titrimetric method that does not rely upon volumetric or gravimetric measurement of sample and titrant. In previous work on the measurement of seawater alkalinity, we found that use of a tracer in the titrant eliminates the need to measure mass or volume. Here, we show the versatility of the method for diverse types of titrations and tracers. The results suggest that tracers may be employed in all types of titrations, opening the door for greatly simplified laboratory and field-based chemical analysis.

  13. Filtrates & Residues: Olfactory Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, John T.; Eddy, Roberta M.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an experiment that uses a unique acid-base indicator--the odor of raw onion--to indicate the end point of the titration of sodium hydroxide with hydrochloric acid. Allows the student to detect the completion of the neutralization reaction by olfaction rather than sight. (JRH)

  14. A hot-cell titration system

    SciTech Connect

    Klatt, L.N.

    1988-07-01

    Operation of nuclear fuel reprocessing plant requires an analytical support laboratory capable of meeting the process control, product quality, and nuclear safeguard requirements. Because of the radioactivity accompanying many of the samples, the analytical instruments must be selected, modified, or specifically developed for use in hot cells. Titrimetric procedures have been successfully used in hot cells and are generally immune to radiation induced bias. This report describes a titration system designed for operation in a hot-cell environment. The potentiometric titration system has operated successfully for four years in support of nuclear fuel reprocessing research and development activities. Details of the hardware, electronic, and software control and data analysis systems are presented. Interchangeable burets with a capacity of 5, 10, and 25 mL are available; the means of the absolute error in delivered volume for these burets are 0.9, 1.1, and 1.8 ..mu..L, respectively. Results of evaluation studies how that the accuracy and precision of analysis results obtained with the potentiometric system are limited by statistical uncertainties associated with the standard titrant, sample preparation procedure, and the equilibrium constant of the titration reaction and not by titrator performance factors. The system is also capable of performing amperometric titrations. Changing between the potentiometric and amperometric modes of operation involves changing the in-cell transducers, the in-cell electronics, and the titrator control program. 22 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  16. Ion-selective electrodes in potentiometric titrations; a new method for processing and evaluating titration data.

    PubMed

    Granholm, Kim; Sokalski, Tomasz; Lewenstam, Andrzej; Ivaska, Ari

    2015-08-12

    A new method to convert the potential of an ion-selective electrode to concentration or activity in potentiometric titration is proposed. The advantage of this method is that the electrode standard potential and the slope of the calibration curve do not have to be known. Instead two activities on the titration curve have to be estimated e.g. the starting activity before the titration begins and the activity at the end of the titration in the presence of large excess of titrant. This new method is beneficial when the analyte is in a complexed matrix or in a harsh environment which affects the properties of the electrode and the traditional calibration procedure with standard solutions cannot be used. The new method was implemented both in a method of linearization based on the Grans's plot and in determination of the stability constant of a complex and the concentration of the complexing ligand in the sample. The new method gave accurate results when using titrations data from experiments with samples of known composition and with real industrial harsh black liquor sample. A complexometric titration model was also developed.

  17. Differential Binding Models for Direct and Reverse Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Isaac; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2016-03-10

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a technique to measure the stoichiometry and thermodynamics from binding experiments. Identifying an appropriate mathematical model to evaluate titration curves of receptors with multiple sites is challenging, particularly when the stoichiometry or binding mechanism is not available. In a recent theoretical study, we presented a differential binding model (DBM) to study calorimetry titrations independently of the interaction among the binding sites (Herrera, I.; Winnik, M. A. J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 8659-8672). Here, we build upon our DBM and show its practical application to evaluate calorimetry titrations of receptors with multiple sites independently of the titration direction. Specifically, we present a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with the general form d[S]/dV that can be integrated numerically to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of free and bound species S at every injection step and, subsequently, to evaluate the volume-normalized heat signal (δQ(V) = δq/dV) of direct and reverse calorimetry titrations. Additionally, we identify factors that influence the shape of the titration curve and can be used to optimize the initial concentrations of titrant and analyte. We demonstrate the flexibility of our updated DBM by applying these differentials and a global regression analysis to direct and reverse calorimetric titrations of gadolinium ions with multidentate ligands of increasing denticity, namely, diglycolic acid (DGA), citric acid (CIT), and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and use statistical tests to validate the stoichiometries for the metal-ligand pairs studied.

  18. Digital image-based titrations.

    PubMed

    Gaiao, Edvaldo da Nobrega; Martins, Valdomiro Lacerda; Lyra, Wellington da Silva; de Almeida, Luciano Farias; da Silva, Edvan Cirino; Araújo, Mário César Ugulino

    2006-06-16

    The exploitation of digital images obtained from a CCD camera (WebCam) as a novel instrumental detection technique for titration is proposed for the first time. Named of digital image-based (DIB) titration, it also requires, as a traditional titration (for example, spectrophotometric, potentiometric, conductimetric), a discontinuity in titration curves where there is an end point, which is associated to the chemical equivalence condition. The monitored signal in the DIB titration is a RGB-based value that is calculated, for each digital image, by using a proposed procedure based on the red, green, and blue colour system. The DIB titration was applied to determine HCl and H3PO4 in aqueous solutions and total alkalinity in mineral and tap waters. Its results were compared to the spectrophotometric (SPEC) titration and, by applying the paired t-test, no statistic difference between the results of both methods was verified at the 95% confidence level. Identical standard deviations were obtained by both titrations in the determinations of HCl and H3PO4, with a slightly better precision for DIB titration in the determinations of total alkalinity. The DIB titration shows to be an efficient and promising tool for quantitative chemical analysis and, as it employs an inexpensive device (WebCam) as analytical detector, it offers an economically viable alternative to titrations that need instrumental detection.

  19. Identifying functional sites based on prediction of charged group behavior.

    PubMed

    Ondrechen, Mary Jo

    2004-09-01

    This protocol describes the implementation and interpretation of THEMATICS, a simple computational predictor of functional information for proteins from the three-dimensional structure. This method is based on the computation of the electrical potential function for the protein and the calculation of the predicted titration curves for each of the titratable groups in the protein. While most of the titratable residues in a protein have predicted titration behavior that fits the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, the ionizable residues in the active site generally deviate dramatically from the typical behavior. From the calculated titration curves, one identifies those residues that deviate significantly from Henderson-Hasselbalch behavior. A cluster of two or more of such deviant titratable residues in physical proximity is a reliable predictor of active-site location.

  20. Catalysis: Elusive active site in focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labinger, Jay A.

    2016-08-01

    The identification of the active site of an iron-containing catalyst raises hopes of designing practically useful catalysts for the room-temperature conversion of methane to methanol, a potential fuel for vehicles. See Letter p.317

  1. Quantitative high-throughput screening: A titration-based approach that efficiently identifies biological activities in large chemical libraries

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, James; Auld, Douglas S.; Jadhav, Ajit; Johnson, Ronald L.; Simeonov, Anton; Yasgar, Adam; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Christopher P.

    2006-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical compounds to identify modulators of molecular targets is a mainstay of pharmaceutical development. Increasingly, HTS is being used to identify chemical probes of gene, pathway, and cell functions, with the ultimate goal of comprehensively delineating relationships between chemical structures and biological activities. Achieving this goal will require methodologies that efficiently generate pharmacological data from the primary screen and reliably profile the range of biological activities associated with large chemical libraries. Traditional HTS, which tests compounds at a single concentration, is not suited to this task, because HTS is burdened by frequent false positives and false negatives and requires extensive follow-up testing. We have developed a paradigm, quantitative HTS (qHTS), tested with the enzyme pyruvate kinase, to generate concentration–response curves for >60,000 compounds in a single experiment. We show that this method is precise, refractory to variations in sample preparation, and identifies compounds with a wide range of activities. Concentration–response curves were classified to rapidly identify pyruvate kinase activators and inhibitors with a variety of potencies and efficacies and elucidate structure–activity relationships directly from the primary screen. Comparison of qHTS with traditional single-concentration HTS revealed a high prevalence of false negatives in the single-point screen. This study demonstrates the feasibility of qHTS for accurately profiling every compound in large chemical libraries (>105 compounds). qHTS produces rich data sets that can be immediately mined for reliable biological activities, thereby providing a platform for chemical genomics and accelerating the identification of leads for drug discovery. PMID:16864780

  2. Active Sites on the Surface of Nano-Sized SiO2-TiO2 Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valova, M. S.; Koryakova, O. V.; Maksimovskikh, A. I.; Fedorova, O. V.; Murashkevich, A. N.; Alisienok, O. A.

    2014-07-01

    The nature and amount of active sites on the surface of nano-sized SiO2-TiO2 oxides were studied by FTIR spectroscopy and back-titration methods. Increasing the TiO2 content in the SiO2-TiO2 composites increased the amount of activated surface H2O and adsorbed CO2. This increased the amount of active basic centers on the oxide surface and caused the first of two observed mechanisms for benzaldehyde adsorption (with and without its activation) to begin to prevail.

  3. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  4. Titrating haemophilia B phenotypes using siRNA strategy: evidence that antithrombotic activity is separated from bleeding liability.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Joseph M; Tadin-Strapps, Marija; Thankappan, Anil; Strapps, Walter R; DiPietro, Marti; Leander, Karen; Zhang, Zuo; Shin, Myung K; Levorse, John; Desai, Kunal; Xu, Yiming; Lai, KehDih; Wu, Weizhen; Chen, Zhu; Cai, Tian-Quan; Jochnowitz, Nina; Bentley, Ross; Hoos, Lizbeth; Zhou, Yuchen; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura; Seiffert, Dietmar; Andre, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Haemophilia A and B are characterised by a life-long bleeding predisposition, and several lines of evidence suggest that risks of atherothrombotic events may also be reduced. Establishing a direct correlation between coagulation factor levels, thrombotic risks and bleeding propensity has long been hampered by an inability to selectively and specifically inhibit coagulation factor levels. Here, the exquisite selectivity of gene silencing combined with a gene knockout (KO) approach was used to define the relative contribution of factor IX (fIX) to thrombosis and primary haemostasis in the rat. Using a lipid nanoparticle (LNP) formulation, we successfully delivered fIX siRNAs to the liver by intravenous administration. The knockdown (KD) of target gene mRNA was achieved rapidly (within 24 hour post-siRNA dosing), sustained (maintained for at least 7 days post dosing) and not associated with changes in mRNA expression levels of other coagulation factors. We found that intermediate levels of liver fIX mRNA silencing (60-95 %) translating into a 50-99 % reduction of plasma fIX activity provided protection from thrombosis without prolonging the cuticle bleeding time. Over 99 % inhibition of fIX activity was required to observe increase in bleeding, a phenotype confirmed in fIX KO rats. These data provide substantial evidence of a participation of fIX in the mechanisms regulating thrombosis prior to those regulating primary haemostasis, therefore highlighting the potential of fIX as a therapeutic target. In addition, hepatic mRNA silencing using LNP-encapsulated siRNAs may represent a promising novel approach for the chronic treatment and prevention of coagulation-dependent thrombotic disorders in humans.

  5. Conformation and hydrogen ion titration of proteins: a continuum electrostatic model with conformational flexibility.

    PubMed Central

    You, T J; Bashford, D

    1995-01-01

    A new method for including local conformational flexibility in calculations of the hydrogen ion titration of proteins using macroscopic electrostatic models is presented. Intrinsic pKa values and electrostatic interactions between titrating sites are calculated from an ensemble of conformers in which the positions of titrating side chains are systematically varied. The method is applied to the Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues of hen lysozyme. The effects of different minimization and/or sampling protocols for both single-conformer and multi-conformer calculations are studied. For single-conformer calculations it is found that the results are sensitive to the choice of all-hydrogen versus polar-hydrogen-only atomic models and to the minimization protocol chosen. The best overall agreement of single-conformer calculations with experiment is obtained with an all-hydrogen model and either a two-step minimization process or minimization using a high dielectric constant. Multi-conformational calculations give significantly improved agreement with experiment, slightly smaller shifts between model compound pKa values and calculated intrinsic pKa values, and reduced sensitivity of the intrinsic pKa calculations to the initial details of the structure compared to single-conformer calculations. The extent of these improvements depends on the type of minimization used during the generation of conformers, with more extensive minimization giving greater improvements. The ordering of the titrations of the active-site residues, Glu-35 and Asp-52, is particularly sensitive to the minimization and sampling protocols used. The balance of strong site-site interactions in the active site suggests a need for including site-site conformational correlations. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8580316

  6. Students' integration of multiple representations in a titration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Nicole M.

    A complete understanding of a chemical concept is dependent upon a student's ability to understand the microscopic or particulate nature of the phenomenon and integrate the microscopic, symbolic, and macroscopic representations of the phenomenon. Acid-base chemistry is a general chemistry topic requiring students to understand the topics of chemical reactions, solutions, and equilibrium presented earlier in the course. In this study, twenty-five student volunteers from a second semester general chemistry course completed two interviews. The first interview was completed prior to any classroom instruction on acids and bases. The second interview took place after classroom instruction, a prelab activity consisting of a titration calculation worksheet, a titration computer simulation, or a microscopic level animation of a titration, and two microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) titration experiments. During the interviews, participants were asked to define and describe acid-base concepts and in the second interview they also drew the microscopic representations of four stages in an acid-base titration. An analysis of the data showed that participants had integrated the three representations of an acid-base titration to varying degrees. While some participants showed complete understanding of acids, bases, titrations, and solution chemistry, other participants showed several alternative conceptions concerning strong acid and base dissociation, the formation of titration products, and the dissociation of soluble salts. Before instruction, participants' definitions of acid, base, and pH were brief and consisted of descriptive terms. After instruction, the definitions were more scientific and reflected the definitions presented during classroom instruction.

  7. Tracer-monitored flow titrations.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Milton K; Rocha, Diogo L; Rocha, Fábio R P; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of implementing tracer-monitored titrations in a flow system is demonstrated. A dye tracer is used to estimate the instant sample and titrant volumetric fractions without the need for volume, mass or peak width measurements. The approach was applied to spectrophotometric flow titrations involving variations of sample and titrant flow-rates (i.e. triangle programmed technique) or concentration gradients established along the sample zone (i.e. flow injection system). Both strategies required simultaneous monitoring of two absorbing species, namely the titration indicator and the dye tracer. Mixing conditions were improved by placing a chamber with mechanical stirring in the analytical path aiming at to minimize diffusional effects. Unlike most of flow-based titrations, the innovation is considered as a true titration, as it does not require a calibration curve thus complying with IUPAC definition. As an application, acidity evaluation in vinegars involving titration with sodium hydroxide was selected. Phenolphthalein and brilliant blue FCF were used as indicator and dye tracer, respectively. Effects of sample volume, titrand/titrant concentrations and flow rates were investigated aiming at improved accuracy and precision. Results were reliable and in agreement with those obtained by a reference titration procedure.

  8. Tracer-monitored flow titrations.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Milton K; Rocha, Diogo L; Rocha, Fábio R P; Zagatto, Elias A G

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of implementing tracer-monitored titrations in a flow system is demonstrated. A dye tracer is used to estimate the instant sample and titrant volumetric fractions without the need for volume, mass or peak width measurements. The approach was applied to spectrophotometric flow titrations involving variations of sample and titrant flow-rates (i.e. triangle programmed technique) or concentration gradients established along the sample zone (i.e. flow injection system). Both strategies required simultaneous monitoring of two absorbing species, namely the titration indicator and the dye tracer. Mixing conditions were improved by placing a chamber with mechanical stirring in the analytical path aiming at to minimize diffusional effects. Unlike most of flow-based titrations, the innovation is considered as a true titration, as it does not require a calibration curve thus complying with IUPAC definition. As an application, acidity evaluation in vinegars involving titration with sodium hydroxide was selected. Phenolphthalein and brilliant blue FCF were used as indicator and dye tracer, respectively. Effects of sample volume, titrand/titrant concentrations and flow rates were investigated aiming at improved accuracy and precision. Results were reliable and in agreement with those obtained by a reference titration procedure. PMID:26703261

  9. Iodine losses during Winkler titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, George P.; Stalcup, Marvel C.; Stanley, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    An experiment designed to measure iodine loss during the aliquot version of the Winkler titration for dissolved oxygen in seawater shows that 0.01-0.03 ml l -1 equivalent oxygen is lost at typical oceanic concentrations in the method presently used. A standardization technique, which mimics that employed during the titration of seawater samples, compensates for this iodine loss throughout the oceanic range. This result, contradicting an earlier report by GREEN and CARRITT (1966, Analyst, 91, 207-208), demonstrates that the whole-bottle method of oxygen titration is not to be preferred over the aliquot method.

  10. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Action levels

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, J.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide for early leak detection and to monitor performance of the active low-level waste disposal facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and the transuranic waste storage areas in SWSA 5 North. Early leak detection is accomplished by sampling runoff, groundwater, and perched water in burial trenches. Sample results are compared to action levels that represent background contamination by naturally occurring and fallout-derived radionuclides. 15 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Microscope Titration and Extraction of DNA from Liver.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Lois T.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a simple and inexpensive, one-period activity to extract DNA to make the study of DNA less abstract. A microscope titration is used to determine when cells are ready for DNA extraction. (PR)

  12. Amperometric, Bipotentiometric, and Coulometric Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, John T.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses recent review articles in various kinds of titration. Also discusses new research in apparatus and methodology, acid-base reactions, precipitation and complexing reactions, oxidation-reduction reactions, and nomenclature. Cites 338 references. (CS)

  13. Characterization of active sites in zeolite catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eckert, J.; Bug, A.; Nicol, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Atomic-level details of the interaction of adsorbed molecules with active sites in catalysts are urgently needed to facilitate development of more effective and/or environmentally benign catalysts. To this end the authors have carried out neutron scattering studies combined with theoretical calculations of the dynamics of small molecules inside the cavities of zeolite catalysts. The authors have developed the use of H{sub 2} as a probe of adsorption sites by observing the hindered rotations of the adsorbed H{sub 2} molecule, and they were able to show that an area near the four-rings is the most likely adsorption site for H{sub 2} in zeolite A while adsorption of H{sub 2} near cations located on six-ring sites decreases in strength as Ni {approximately} Co > Ca > Zn {approximately} Na. Vibrational and rotational motions of ethylene and cyclopropane adsorption complexes were used as a measure for zeolite-adsorbate interactions. Preliminary studies of the binding of water, ammonia, and methylamines were carried out in a number of related guest-host materials.

  14. Mechanistic insights into ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase catalysis involving the conserved glutamate in the active site.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Verónica I; Essigke, Timm; Cortez, Néstor; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2010-04-01

    Plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are flavoenzymes harboring one molecule of noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide that catalyze reversible reactions between obligatory one-electron carriers and obligatory two-electron carriers. A glutamate next to the C-terminus is strictly conserved in FNR and has been proposed to function as proton donor/acceptor during catalysis. However, experimental studies of this proposed function led to contradicting conclusions about the role of this glutamate in the catalytic mechanism. In the present work, we study the titration behavior of the glutamate in the active site of FNR using theoretical methods. Protonation probabilities for maize FNR were computed for the reaction intermediates of the catalytic cycle by Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations and Metropolis Monte Carlo titration. The titration behavior of the highly conserved glutamate was found to vary depending on the bound substrates NADP(H) and ferredoxin and also on the redox states of these substrates and the flavin adenine dinucleotide. Our results support the involvement of the glutamate in the FNR catalytic mechanism not only as a proton donor but also as a key residue for stabilizing and destabilizing reaction intermediates. On the basis of our findings, we propose a model rationalizing the function of the glutamate in the reaction cycle, which allows reinterpretation of previous experimental results.

  15. Active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Stringer, C.D.; Milanez, S.; Lee, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous affinity labeling studies and comparative sequence analyses have identified two different lysines at the active site of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and have suggested their essentiality to function. The essential lysines occupy positions 166 and 329 in the Rhodospirillum rubrum enzyme and positions 175 and 334 in the spinach enzyme. Based on the pH-dependencies of inactivations of the two enzymes by trinitrobenzene sulfonate, Lys-166 (R. rubrum enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 7.9 and Lys-334 (spinach enzyme) exhibits a pK/sub a/ of 9.0. These low pK/sub a/ values as well as the enhanced nucleophilicities of the lysyl residues argue that both are important to catalysis rather than to substrate binding. Lys-166 may correspond to the essential base that initiates catalysis and that displays a pK/sub a/ of 7.5 in the pH-curve for V/sub max//K/sub m/. Cross-linking experiments with 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-disulfonate stilbene demonstrate that the two active-site lysines are within 12 A. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Improving the activity of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Meizhi; Deng, Xiongwei; Bao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jieyuan; Cai, Yongjun; Jia, Yan; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2015-09-25

    Nattokinase (NK), a bacterial serine protease from Bacillus subtilis var. natto, is a potential cardiovascular drug exhibiting strong fibrinolytic activity. To broaden its commercial and medical applications, we constructed a single-mutant (I31L) and two double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) by site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and were purified to homogeneity. The kinetic parameters of enzymes were examined by spectroscopy assay and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. The substitution of Leu(31) for Ile(31) resulted in about 2-fold enhancement of catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) compared with wild-type NK. The specific activities of both double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) were significantly increased when compared with the single-mutants (M222A and T220S) and the oxidative stability of M222A/I31L mutant was enhanced with respect to wild-type NK. This study demonstrates the feasibility of improving activity of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve the activity of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  17. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  18. Redox titrations of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Clostridium thermoaceticum.

    PubMed

    Shin, W; Stafford, P R; Lindahl, P A

    1992-07-01

    Redox titrations of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH) from Clostridium thermoaceticum were performed using the reductant CO and the oxidant thionin. Titrations were followed at 420 nm, a wavelength sensitive to redox changes of the iron-sulfur clusters in the enzyme. When CODH was oxidized by just enough thionin to maximize A420, two molecules of CO per mole of CODH dimer (4 equiv/mol) reduced the enzyme fully. Likewise, 4 equiv/mol of thionin oxidized the fully-reduced enzyme to the point where A420 maximized. The four n = 1 redox sites which titrated in this region were designated group I sites. They include at least two iron-sulfur clusters, [Fe/S]A and [Fe/S]B, and two other sites, A' and B'. The [Fe4S4]2+/1+ cluster in CODH is included in this group. [Fe/S]B and B' have reduction potentials (at pH 8) below -480 mV vs NHE; [Fe/S]A and A' have reduction potentials above that value. The reduction potential of either [Fe/S]B or B' is near to the CO/CO2 couple at pH 8 (-622 mV). When CODH was oxidized by more than enough thionin to maximize A420, some of the excess thionin oxidized the so-called group II redox sites. These sites have reduction potentials more positive than group I and do not exhibit changes at 420 nm when titrated. Titration of group II sites required 1-2 equiv/mol. EPR of reduced group II sites exhibited the gav = 1.82 signal. When these sites were oxidized, the only signal present had g values at 2.075, 2.036, and 1.983.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Amperometric, Bipotentiometric, and Coulometric Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stock, John T.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on amperometric, bipotentiometric, and coulometric titration methods examining: apparatus and methodology; acid-base reactions; precipitation and complexing reactions (considering methods involving silver, mercury, EDTA or analogous reagents, and other organic compounds); and oxidation-reduction reactions (considering methods…

  20. The acid-base titration of montmorillonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, I. C.; Sposito, G.; Bourg, A. C.

    2003-12-01

    Proton binding to clay minerals plays an important role in the chemical reactivity of soils (e.g., acidification, retention of nutrients or pollutants). If should also affect the performance of clay barriers for waste disposal. The surface acidity of clay minerals is commonly modelled empirically by assuming generic amphoteric surface sites (>SOH) on a flat surface, with fitted site densities and acidity constant. Current advances in experimental methods (notably spectroscopy) are rapidly improving our understanding of the structure and reactivity of the surface of clay minerals (arrangement of the particles, nature of the reactive surface sites, adsorption mechanisms). These developments are motivated by the difficulty of modelling the surface chemistry of mineral surfaces at the macro-scale (e.g., adsorption or titration) without a detailed (molecular-scale) picture of the mechanisms, and should be progressively incorporated into surface complexation models. In this view, we have combined recent estimates of montmorillonite surface properties (surface site density and structure, edge surface area, surface electrostatic potential) with surface site acidities obtained from the titration of alpha-Al2O3 and SiO2, and a novel method of accounting for the unknown initial net proton surface charge of the solid. The model predictions were compared to experimental titrations of SWy-1 montmorillonite and purified MX-80 bentonite in 0.1-0.5 mol/L NaClO4 and 0.005-0.5 mol/L NaNO3 background electrolytes, respectively. Most of the experimental data were appropriately described by the model after we adjusted a single parameter (silanol sites on the surface of montmorillonite were made to be slightly more acidic than those of silica). At low ionic strength and acidic pH the model underestimated the buffering capacity of the montmorillonite, perhaps due to clay swelling or to the interlayer adsorption of dissolved aluminum. The agreement between our model and the experimental

  1. Sugar binding effects on the enzymatic reaction and conformation near the active site of pokeweed antiviral protein revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Hiromichi; Fukunaga, Yukihiro; Ueno, Ryosuke; Nishimoto, Etsuko

    2014-05-01

    In various trials for elucidating the physiological function of pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP), studies on the interaction with sugar are essential. The fluorescence titration curves showed that PAP retained the strong affinity against N-acetylglucosamine (NAG) and two sites in one PAP molecule co-operatively participated in the binding. In the complex of PAP with NAG, Trp208 located at the entrance lid site of substrate came closer to Tyr72 about 0.3 Å. Furthermore, the fluorescence anisotropy decay measurement demonstrated that the segmental rotation of Trp208 was enlarged by the binding of PAP with NAG. Such conformational changes around the active site closely correlate with the enzymatic activity of PAP. The N-glycosidase activity of PAP was enhanced more than two times in the presence of NAG. The obtained results consistently suggested the enzymatic activity of PAP would be regulated through the conformation change near the active site induced by the binding with NAG.

  2. Selectivity loss of Pt/CeO{sub 2} PROX catalysts at low CO concentrations: mechanism and active site study.

    SciTech Connect

    Polster, C. S.; Zhang, R.; Cyb, M. T.; Miller, J. T.; Baertsch, C. D.

    2010-07-01

    CO and H{sub 2} oxidation were studied over a series of Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts with differing Pt loadings and dispersions. Kinetic rate analysis confirms the presence of dual Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) and Mars and van Krevelen (M-vK) pathways and is used to explain the loss in CO oxidation selectivity at low CO concentrations. In situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) shows the strong CO coverage dependence on both CO and O{sub 2} concentrations and explains the transition from L-H to M-vK reaction character. Redox site measurements are performed on Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts by anaerobic titrations under conditions where the M-vK pathway dominates the reaction rate. Similar redox site densities per interfacial Pt atom suggest that interfacial Pt-O-Ce sites are responsible for M-vK redox activity.

  3. Viral DNA synthesis-dependent titration of a cellular repressor activates transcription of the human adenovirus type 2 IVa2 gene.

    PubMed

    Iftode, C; Flint, S J

    2004-12-21

    Synthesis of progeny DNA genomes in cells infected by human subgroup C adenoviruses leads to several changes in viral gene expression. These changes include transcription from previously silent, late promoters, such as the IV(a2) promoter, and a large increase in the efficiency of major-late (ML) transcription. Some of these changes appear to take place sequentially, because the product of the IV(a2) gene has been implicated in stimulation of ML transcription. Our previous biochemical studies suggested that IV(a2) transcription is regulated by viral DNA synthesis-dependent relief of transcriptional repression by a cellular protein that we termed IV(a2)-RF. To test the relevance of such a repressor-titration mechanism during the viral infectious cycle, we introduced into the endogenous IV(a2) promoter two mutations that impair in vitro-binding of IV(a2)-RF, but introduce no change (Rep7) or one conservative amino acid substitution (Rep6) into the overlapping coding sequence for the viral DNA polymerase. The results of run-on transcription assays indicated that both mutations induced earlier-than-normal and more efficient IV(a2) transcription. Both mutations were also observed to result in modest increases in the efficiency of viral DNA synthesis. However, measurement of the concentration of IV(a2) transcripts as a function of IV(a2) template concentration demonstrated that the Rep mutations increased by up to 60-fold the efficiency with which IV(a2) templates were used during the initial period of the late phase of infection, as predicted by the repressor titration hypothesis. These mutations also increased the efficiency of ML transcription in infected cells.

  4. Distinguishing two groups of flavin reductases by analyzing the protonation state of an active site carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Verónica I; Cortez, Néstor; Matthias Ullmann, G

    2011-07-01

    Flavin-containing reductases are involved in a wide variety of physiological reactions such as photosynthesis, nitric oxide synthesis, and detoxification of foreign compounds, including therapeutic drugs. Ferredoxin-NADP(H)-reductase (FNR) is the prototypical enzyme of this family. The fold of this protein is highly conserved and occurs as one domain of several multidomain enzymes such as the members of the diflavin reductase family. The enzymes of this family have emerged as fusion of a FNR and a flavodoxin. Although the active sites of these enzymes are very similar, different enzymes function in opposite directions, that is, some reduce oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) and some oxidize reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). In this work, we analyze the protonation behavior of titratable residues of these enzymes through electrostatic calculations. We find that a highly conserved carboxylic acid in the active site shows a different titration behavior in different flavin reductases. This residue is deprotonated in flavin reductases present in plastids, but protonated in bacterial counterparts and in diflavin reductases. The protonation state of the carboxylic acid may also influence substrate binding. The physiological substrate for plastidic enzymes is NADP(+), but it is NADPH for the other mentioned reductases. In this article, we discuss the relevance of the environment of this residue for its protonation and its importance in catalysis. Our results allow to reinterpret and explain experimental data. PMID:21538544

  5. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphates to the Active Site of the DNA Polymerase of Bacteriophage T7

    SciTech Connect

    B Akabayov; C Richardson

    2011-12-31

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg{sup 2+}, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg{sup 2+} to an active site because Mg{sup 2+} is spectroscopically silent and Mg{sup 2+} binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg{sup 2+} with Mn{sup 2+}:Mn{sup 2+} that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn{sup 2+} is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn{sup 2+} that is free in solution and Mn{sup 2+} bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor.

  6. Binding of Mn-deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates to the active site of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7

    PubMed Central

    Akabayov, Barak; Richardson, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Divalent metal ions are crucial as cofactors for a variety of intracellular enzymatic activities. Mg2+, as an example, mediates binding of deoxyribonucleoside 5′-triphosphates followed by their hydrolysis in the active site of DNA polymerase. It is difficult to study the binding of Mg2+ to an active site because Mg2+ is spectroscopically silent and Mg2+ binds with low affinity to the active site of an enzyme. Therefore, we substituted Mg2+ with Mn2+:Mn2+ that is not only visible spectroscopically but also provides full activity of the DNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7. In order to demonstrate that the majority of Mn2+ is bound to the enzyme, we have applied site-directed titration analysis of T7 DNA polymerase using X-ray near edge spectroscopy. Here we show how X-ray near edge spectroscopy can be used to distinguish between signal originating from Mn2+ that is free in solution and Mn2+ bound to the active site of T7 DNA polymerase. This method can be applied to other enzymes that use divalent metal ions as a cofactor. PMID:23761703

  7. Metal ions bound at the active site of the junction-resolving enzyme T7 endonuclease I.

    PubMed

    Hadden, Jonathan M; Déclais, Anne-Cécile; Phillips, Simon E V; Lilley, David M J

    2002-07-01

    T7 endonuclease I is a nuclease that is selective for the structure of the four-way DNA junction. The active site is similar to those of a number of restriction enzymes. We have solved the crystal structure of endonuclease I with a wild-type active site. Diffusion of manganese ions into the crystal revealed two peaks of electron density per active site, defining two metal ion-binding sites. Site 1 is fully occupied, and the manganese ion is coordinated by the carboxylate groups of Asp55 and Glu65, and the main chain carbonyl of Thr66. Site 2 is partially occupied, and the metal ion has a single protein ligand, the remaining carboxylate oxygen atom of Asp55. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed the sequential exothermic binding of two manganese ions in solution, with dissociation constants of 0.58 +/- 0.019 and 14 +/- 1.5 mM. These results are consistent with a two metal ion mechanism for the cleavage reaction, in which the hydrolytic water molecule is contained in the first coordination sphere of the site 1-bound metal ion.

  8. Control of active sites in flocculation: Concept of equivalent active sites''

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Flocculation and dispersion of solids are strong functions of the amount and conformation of the adsorbed polymer. Regions of dispersion and flocculation of solids with particular polymer molecules may be deduced from saturation adsorption data. The concept of equivalent active sites'' is proposed to explain flocculation and dispersion behavior irrespective of the amount or conformation of the adsorbed polymer. The concept has been further extended to study the selective flocculation process.

  9. Colorblindness and Titrations with Visual Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Harvey; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses various issues related to colorblind students performing titrations with visual indicators. Includes tables showing precisions in the titration of a weak acid by colorblind students using phenolphthalein and thymolphthalein and in the titration of a weak base by colorblind persons using methyl red and bromcresol green. (JN)

  10. Calorimetric studies of the interactions of metalloenzyme active site mimetics with zinc-binding inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sophia G; Burns, Philip T; Miceli, Amanda M; Grice, Kyle A; Karver, Caitlin E; Jin, Lihua

    2016-07-19

    The binding of drugs to metalloenzymes is an intricate process that involves several interactions, including binding of the drug to the enzyme active site metal, as well as multiple interactions between the drug and the enzyme residues. In order to determine the free energy contribution of Zn(2+) binding by known metalloenzyme inhibitors without the other interactions, valid active site zinc structural mimetics must be formed and binding studies need to be performed in biologically relevant conditions. The potential of each of five ligands to form a structural mimetic with Zn(2+) was investigated in buffer using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). All five ligands formed strong 1 : 1 (ligand : Zn(2+)) binary complexes. The complexes were used in further ITC experiments to study their interaction with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) and/or acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), two bidentate anionic zinc-chelating enzyme inhibitors. It was found that tetradentate ligands were not suitable for creating zinc structural mimetics for inhibitor binding in solution due to insufficient coordination sites remaining on Zn(2+). A stable binary complex, [Zn(BPA)](2+), which was formed by a tridentate ligand, bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (BPA), was found to bind one AHA in buffer or a methanol : buffer mixture (60 : 40 by volume) at pH 7.25 or one 8-HQ in the methanol : buffer mixture at pH 6.80, making it an effective structural mimetic for the active site of zinc metalloenzymes. These results are consistent with the observation that metalloenzyme active site zinc ions have three residues coordinated to them, leaving one or two sites open for inhibitors to bind. Our findings indicate that Zn(BPA)X2 can be used as an active site structural mimetic for zinc metalloenzymes for estimating the free energy contribution of zinc binding to the overall inhibitor active site interactions. Such use will help aid in the rational design of inhibitors to a variety of zinc metalloenzymes

  11. An elevated temperature titration calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.; Zanonato, P.L.; Choppin, G.R. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-06-01

    A variable-temperature (313 K to 353 K) titration calorimeter of high sensitivity has been constructed. The purpose of the calorimeter is to study temperature effects on the enthalpies of complex formation and of other reactions of metal cations such as hydrolysis and precipitation. Operation of the calorimetric system, including that final calculation of the heat released during titration, is automatic via computer control. Calibration tests of the calorimeter using 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol gave -(46.0 {plus minus} 0.3) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} and -(46.2 {plus minus} 0.2) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} for the enthalpy of protonation, at 318 K and at 343 K, respectively. For titrations of 2-bis(2-hydroxyethyl) amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol, enthalpy of protonation values of -(28.4 {plus minus} 0.3) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} and -(29.3 {plus minus} 0.2) kJ mol{sup {minus}1} were obtained at 318 K and at 343 K, respectively. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Dissecting the active site of a photoreceptor protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Wouter; Hara, Miwa; Ren, Jie; Moghadam, Farzaneh; Xie, Aihua; Kumauchi, Masato

    While enzymes are quite large molecules, functionally important chemical events are often limited to a small region of the protein: the active site. The physical and chemical properties of residues at such active sites are often strongly altered compared to the same groups dissolved in water. Understanding such effects is important for unraveling the mechanisms underlying protein function and for protein engineering, but has proven challenging. Here we report on our ongoing efforts on using photoactive yellow protein (PYP), a bacterial photoreceptor, as a model system for such effects. We will report on the following questions: How many residues affect active site properties? Are these residues in direct physical contact with the active site? Can functionally important residues be recognized in the crystal structure of a protein? What structural resolution is needed to understand active sites? What spectroscopic techniques are most informative? Which weak interactions dominate active site properties?

  13. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, Virginia C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program --now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human Exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines be opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  14. Mars Surveyor Project Landing Site Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Briggs, Geoffrey; Saunders, R. Stephen; Gilmore, Martha; Soderblom, Larry

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Surveyor Program -- now a cooperative program led by NASA and CNES along with other international partners -- is underway. It has the primary science objective of furthering our understanding of the biological potential and possible biological history of Mars and has the complementary objective of improving our understanding of martian climate evolution and planetary history. The missions will develop technology and acquire data necessary for eventual human exploration. Launches of orbiters, landers and rovers will take place in 2001 and in 2003; in 2005 a complete system will be launched capable of returning samples to Earth by 2008. A key aspect of the program is the selection of landing sites. This abstract 1) reports on the status of the landing site selection process that begins with the 2001 lander mission and 2) outlines the opportunities for the Mars community to provide input into the landing site selection process.

  15. Activation of Inhibitors by Sortase Triggers Irreversible Modification of the Active Site*S

    PubMed Central

    Maresso, Anthony W.; Wu, Ruiying; Kern, Justin W.; Zhang, Rongguang; Janik, Dorota; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Sortases anchor surface proteins to the cell wall of Gram-positive pathogens through recognition of specific motif sequences. Loss of sortase leads to large reductions in virulence, which identifies sortase as a target for the development of antibacterials. By screening 135,625 small molecules for inhibition, we report here that aryl (β-amino)ethyl ketones inhibit sortase enzymes from staphylococci and bacilli. Inhibition of sortases occurs through an irreversible, covalent modification of their active site cysteine. Sortases specifically activate this class of molecules via β-elimination, generating a reactive olefin intermediate that covalently modifies the cysteine thiol. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of Bacillus anthracis sortase B with and without inhibitor provides insights into the mechanism of inhibition and reveals binding pockets that can be exploited for drug discovery. PMID:17545669

  16. The bifunctional active site of s-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Roles of the active site aspartates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Markham, G D

    1999-11-12

    S-Adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes the biosynthesis of AdoMet in a unique enzymatic reaction. Initially the sulfur of methionine displaces the intact tripolyphosphate chain (PPP(i)) from ATP, and subsequently PPP(i) is hydrolyzed to PP(i) and P(i) before product release. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli AdoMet synthetase shows that the active site contains four aspartate residues. Aspartate residues Asp-16* and Asp-271 individually provide the sole protein ligand to one of the two required Mg(2+) ions (* denotes a residue from a second subunit); aspartates Asp-118 and Asp-238* are proposed to interact with methionine. Each aspartate has been changed to an uncharged asparagine, and the metal binding residues were also changed to alanine, to assess the roles of charge and ligation ability on catalytic efficiency. The resultant enzyme variants all structurally resemble the wild type enzyme as indicated by circular dichroism spectra and are tetramers. However, all have k(cat) reductions of approximately 10(3)-fold in AdoMet synthesis, whereas the MgATP and methionine K(m) values change by less than 3- and 8-fold, respectively. In the partial reaction of PPP(i) hydrolysis, mutants of the Mg(2+) binding residues have >700-fold reduced catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)), whereas the D118N and D238*N mutants are impaired less than 35-fold. The catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by Mg(2+) site mutants is improved by AdoMet, like the wild type enzyme. In contrast AdoMet reduces the catalytic efficiency for PPP(i) hydrolysis by the D118N and D238*N mutants, indicating that the events involved in AdoMet activation are hindered in these methionyl binding site mutants. Ca(2+) uniquely activates the D271A mutant enzyme to 15% of the level of Mg(2+), in contrast to the approximately 1% Ca(2+) activation of the wild type enzyme. This indicates that the Asp-271 side chain size is a discriminator between the activating ability of Ca(2+) and the

  17. The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.

    1991-01-01

    The active site of ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase requires interacting domains of adjacent, identical subunits. Most active-site residues are located within the loop regions of an eight-stranded {beta}/{alpha}-barrel which constitutes the larger C-terminal domain; additional key residues are located within a segment of the smaller N-terminal domain which partially covers the mouth of the barrel. Site-directed mutagenesis of the gene encoding the enzyme from Rhodospirillum rubrum has been used to delineate functions of active-site residues. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Savannah River Site prioritization of transition activities

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.H.

    1993-11-01

    Effective management of SRS conversion from primarily a production facility to other missions (or Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D)) requires a systematic and consistent method of prioritizing the transition activities. This report discusses the design of a prioritizing method developed to achieve systematic and consistent methods of prioritizing these activities.

  19. DOE site performance assessment activities. Radioactive Waste Technical Support Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Information on performance assessment capabilities and activities was collected from eight DOE sites. All eight sites either currently dispose of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or plan to dispose of LLW in the near future. A survey questionnaire was developed and sent to key individuals involved in DOE Order 5820.2A performance assessment activities at each site. The sites surveyed included: Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Paducah), Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (Portsmouth), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The questionnaire addressed all aspects of the performance assessment process; from waste source term to dose conversion factors. This report presents the information developed from the site questionnaire and provides a comparison of site-specific performance assessment approaches, data needs, and ongoing and planned activities. All sites are engaged in completing the radioactive waste disposal facility performance assessment required by DOE Order 5820.2A. Each site has achieved various degrees of progress and have identified a set of critical needs. Within several areas, however, the sites identified common needs and questions.

  20. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-15

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites.

  1. Mutations of fumarase that distinguish between the active site and a nearby dicarboxylic acid binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, T.; Lees, M.; Banaszak, L.

    1997-01-01

    Two mutant forms of fumarase C from E. coli have been made using PCR and recombinant DNA. The recombinant form of the protein included a histidine arm on the C-terminal facilitating purification. Based on earlier studies, two different carboxylic acid binding sites, labeled A- and B-, were observed in crystal structures of the wild type and inhibited forms of the enzyme. A histidine at each of the sites was mutated to an asparagine. H188N at the A-site resulted in a large decrease in specific activity, while the H129N mutation at the B-site had essentially no effect. From the results, we conclude that the A-site is indeed the active site, and a dual role for H188 as a potential catalytic base is proposed. Crystal structures of the two mutant proteins produced some unexpected results. Both mutations reduced the affinity for the carboxylic acids at their respective sites. The H129N mutant should be particularly useful in future kinetic studies because it sterically blocks the B-site with the carboxyamide of asparagine assuming the position of the ligand's carboxylate. In the H188N mutation at the active site, the new asparagine side chain still interacts with an active site water that appears to have moved slightly as a result of the mutation. PMID:9098893

  2. Binding of chrysoidine to catalase: spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingjun; Hao, Fang; Li, Jiarong; Chen, Dongliang; Liu, Rutao

    2013-11-01

    Chrysoidine is an industrial azo dye and the presence of chrysoidine in water and food has become an environmental concern due to its negative effects on human beings. In this work, the interactions between chrysoidine and bovine liver catalase (BLC) were explored. Obvious loss in catalytic activity was observed after incubation of BLC with chrysoidine, and the inhibition effect of BLC was found to be of the non-competitive type. No profound conformational change of BLC occurs in the presence of chrysoidine as revealed by UV-vis absorption, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy studies. Isothermal titration calorimetry results indicate that catalase has two sets of binding sites for chrysoidine. Further, molecular docking simulations show that chrysoidine is located within the bottleneck in the main channel of the substrate to the active site of BLC, which explain the activity inhibition of BLC by chrysoidine. PMID:24001681

  3. Ionizable Side Chains at Catalytic Active Sites of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Liang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic active sites of enzymes of known structure can be well defined by a modern program of computational geometry. The CASTp program was used to define and measure the volume of the catalytic active sites of 573 enzymes in the Catalytic Site Atlas database. The active sites are identified as catalytic because the amino acids they contain are known to participate in the chemical reaction catalyzed by the enzyme. Acid and base side chains are reliable markers of catalytic active sites. The catalytic active sites have 4 acid and 5 base side chains, in an average volume of 1072 Å3. The number density of acid side chains is 8.3 M (in chemical units); the number density of basic side chains is 10.6 M. The catalytic active site of these enzymes is an unusual electrostatic and steric environment in which side chains and reactants are crowded together in a mixture more like an ionic liquid than an ideal infinitely dilute solution. The electrostatics and crowding of reactants and side chains seems likely to be important for catalytic function. In three types of analogous ion channels, simulation of crowded charges accounts for the main properties of selectivity measured in a wide range of solutions and concentrations. It seems wise to use mathematics designed to study interacting complex fluids when making models of the catalytic active sites of enzymes. PMID:22484856

  4. [Sensitivity of methods of titration of the vaccine strain of porcine fever virus].

    PubMed

    Koritskaia, M A; Demkina, M M; Vlasova, A N

    2005-01-01

    Methods of titration of the CS vaccine strain of classical swine fever virus were compared in vitro and vivo. The titration in the TL and PK-15 cell culture without cytopathic effect is based on the detection of virus antigen by labeled antibodies. The infection intensity in the cell culture virtually correlated with the antigenic and immunogenic activity of dry vaccine used for swine.

  5. A General Simulator for Acid-Base Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Levie, Robert

    1999-07-01

    General formal expressions are provided to facilitate the automatic computer calculation of acid-base titration curves of arbitrary mixtures of acids, bases, and salts, without and with activity corrections based on the Davies equation. Explicit relations are also given for the buffer strength of mixtures of acids, bases, and salts.

  6. Structure-Function Relationship of the Chloroplastic Glutaredoxin S12 with an Atypical WCSYS Active Site*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Jeremy; Koh, Cha San; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Winger, Alison M.; Gualberto, Jose Manuel; Corbier, Catherine; Decottignies, Paulette; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Glutaredoxins (Grxs) are efficient catalysts for the reduction of mixed disulfides in glutathionylated proteins, using glutathione or thioredoxin reductases for their regeneration. Using GFP fusion, we have shown that poplar GrxS12, which possesses a monothiol 28WCSYS32 active site, is localized in chloroplasts. In the presence of reduced glutathione, the recombinant protein is able to reduce in vitro substrates, such as hydroxyethyldisulfide and dehydroascorbate, and to regenerate the glutathionylated glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Although the protein possesses two conserved cysteines, it is functioning through a monothiol mechanism, the conserved C terminus cysteine (Cys87) being dispensable, since the C87S variant is fully active in all activity assays. Biochemical and crystallographic studies revealed that Cys87 exhibits a certain reactivity, since its pKa is around 5.6. Coupled with thiol titration, fluorescence, and mass spectrometry analyses, the resolution of poplar GrxS12 x-ray crystal structure shows that the only oxidation state is a glutathionylated derivative of the active site cysteine (Cys29) and that the enzyme does not form inter- or intramolecular disulfides. Contrary to some plant Grxs, GrxS12 does not incorporate an iron-sulfur cluster in its wild-type form, but when the active site is mutated into YCSYS, it binds a [2Fe-2S] cluster, indicating that the single Trp residue prevents this incorporation. PMID:19158074

  7. Risks and Benefits of Rapid Clozapine Titration.

    PubMed

    Lochhead, Jeannie D; Nelson, Michele A; Schneider, Alan L

    2016-05-18

    Clozapine is often considered the gold standard for the treatment of schizophrenia. Clinical guidelines suggest a gradual titration over 2 weeks to reduce the risks of adverse events such as seizures, hypotension, agranulocytosis, and myocarditis. The slow titration often delays time to therapeutic response. This raises the question of whether, in some patients, it may be safe to use a more rapid clozapine titration. The following case illustrates the potential risks associated with the use of multiple antipsychotics and rapid clozapine titration. We present the case of a young man with schizophrenia who developed life threatening neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) during rapid clozapine titration and treatment with multiple antipsychotics. We were unable to find another case in the literature of NMS associated with rapid clozapine titration. This case is meant to urge clinicians to carefully evaluate the risks and benefits of rapid clozapine titration, and to encourage researchers to further evaluate the safety of rapid clozapine titration. Rapid clozapine titration has implications for decreasing health care costs associated with prolonged hospitalizations, and decreasing the emotional suffering associated with uncontrolled symptoms of psychosis. Clozapine is considered the most effective antipsychotic available thus efforts should focus on developing strategies that would allow for safest and most efficient use of clozapine to encourage its utilization for treatment resistance schizophrenia.

  8. Logarithmic diagrams in acid-base titrations and estimation of titration errors.

    PubMed

    Wänninen, E

    1980-01-01

    The use of a logarithmic diagram for the estimation of the pH-value at the equivalence point and the titration error when a solution containing one or two acids is titrated with standard alkali is described.

  9. Isothermal titration calorimetry of RNA.

    PubMed

    Salim, Nilshad N; Feig, Andrew L

    2009-03-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a fast and robust method to study the physical basis of molecular interactions. A single well-designed experiment can provide complete thermodynamic characterization of a binding reaction, including K(a), DeltaG, DeltaH, DeltaS and reaction stoichiometry (n). Repeating the experiment at different temperatures allows determination of the heat capacity change (DeltaC(P)) of the interaction. Modern calorimeters are sensitive enough to probe even weak biological interactions making ITC a very popular method among biochemists. Although ITC has been applied to protein studies for many years, it is becoming widely applicable in RNA biochemistry as well, especially in studies which involve RNA folding and RNA interactions with small molecules, proteins and with other RNAs. This review focuses on best practices for planning, designing and executing effective ITC experiments when one or more of the reactants is an RNA. PMID:18835447

  10. Human uroporphyrinogen III synthase: NMR-based mapping of the active site.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Luis; Kuti, Miklos; Bishop, David F; Mezei, Mihaly; Zeng, Lei; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Desnick, Robert J

    2008-05-01

    Uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) catalyzes the cyclization and D-ring isomerization of hydroxymethylbilane (HMB) to uroporphyrinogen (URO'gen) III, the cyclic tetrapyrrole and physiologic precursor of heme, chlorophyl, and corrin. The deficient activity of human URO-synthase results in the autosomal recessive cutaneous disorder, congenital erythropoietic porphyria. Mapping of the structural determinants that specify catalysis and, potentially, protein-protein interactions is lacking. To map the active site and assess the enzyme's possible interaction in a complex with hydroxymethylbilane-synthase (HMB-synthase) and/or uroporphyrinogen-decarboxylase (URO-decarboxylase) by NMR, an efficient expression and purification procedure was developed for these cytosolic enzymes of heme biosynthesis that enabled preparation of special isotopically-labeled protein samples for NMR characterization. Using an 800 MHz instrument, assignment of the URO-synthase backbone (13)C(alpha) (100%), (1)H(alpha) (99.6%), and nonproline (1)H(N) and (15)N resonances (94%) was achieved as well as 85% of the side-chain (13)C and (1)H resonances. NMR analyses of URO-synthase titrated with competitive inhibitors N(D)-methyl-1-formylbilane (NMF-bilane) or URO'gen III, revealed resonance perturbations of specific residues lining the cleft between the two major domains of URO synthase that mapped the enzyme's active site. In silico docking of the URO-synthase crystal structure with NMF-bilane and URO'gen III was consistent with the perturbation results and provided a 3D model of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The absence of chemical shift changes in the (15)N spectrum of URO-synthase mixed with the homogeneous HMB-synthase holoenzyme or URO-decarboxylase precluded occurrence of a stable cytosolic enzyme complex. PMID:18004775

  11. The effect of the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid on the activity in catalyzing aldol condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xiaofang; Yu Xiaobo; Wu Shujie; Liu Bo; Liu Heng; Guan Jingqi; Kan Qiubin

    2011-02-15

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts containing carboxylic and amine groups, which were immobilized at defined distance from one another on the mesoporous solid were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), elemental analysis, and back titration. Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance was more active than maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance in aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes. It appears that the distance between acidic site and basic site immobilized on mesoporous solid should be an essential factor for catalysis optimization. -- Graphical abstract: Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance and maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance were synthesized by immobilizing lysine onto carboxyl-SBA-15. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Proximal-C-A-SBA-15 with a proximal acid-base distance. {yields} Maximum-C-A-SBA-15 with a maximum acid-base distance. {yields} Compared to maximum-C-A-SBA-15, proximal-C-A-SBA-15 was more active toward aldol condensation reaction between acetone and various aldehydes.

  12. Molecular Titration Promotes Oscillations and Bistability in Minimal Network Models with Monomeric Regulators.

    PubMed

    Cuba Samaniego, Christian; Giordano, Giulia; Kim, Jongmin; Blanchini, Franco; Franco, Elisa

    2016-04-15

    Molecular titration is emerging as an important biochemical interaction mechanism within synthetic devices built with nucleic acids and the CRISPR/Cas system. We show that molecular titration in the context of feedback circuits is a suitable mechanism to enhance the emergence of oscillations and bistable behaviors. We consider biomolecular modules that can be inhibited or activated by input monomeric regulators; the regulators compete with constitutive titrating species to determine the activity of their target. By tuning the titration rate and the concentration of titrating species, it is possible to modulate the delay and convergence speed of the transient response, and the steepness and dead zone of the stationary response of the modules. These phenomena favor the occurrence of oscillations when modules are interconnected to create a negative feedback loop; bistability is favored in a positive feedback interconnection. Numerical simulations are supported by mathematical analysis showing that the capacity of the closed loop systems to exhibit oscillations or bistability is structural.

  13. A conformational switch in the active site of BT_2972, a methyltransferase from an antibiotic resistant pathogen B. thetaiotaomicron.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Veerendra; Sivaraman, J

    2011-01-01

    Methylation is one of the most common biochemical reactions involved in cellular and metabolic functions and is catalysed by the action of methyltransferases. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is an antibiotic-resistant bacterium that confers resistance through methylation, and as yet, there is no report on the structure of methyltransferases from this bacterium. Here, we report the crystal structure of an AdoMet-dependent methyltransferase, BT_2972 and its complex with AdoMet and AdoHcy for B. thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 strain along with isothermal titration calorimetric assessment of the binding affinities. Comparison of the apo and complexed BT_2972 structures reveals a significant conformational change between open and closed forms of the active site that presumably regulates the association with cofactors and may aid interaction with substrate. Together, our analysis suggests that BT_2972 is a small molecule methyltransferase and might catalyze two O-methylation reaction steps involved in the ubiquinone biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22140448

  14. A Tabular Approach to Titration Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kieran F.

    2012-01-01

    Titrations are common laboratory exercises in high school and university chemistry courses, because they are easy, relatively inexpensive, and they illustrate a number of fundamental chemical principles. While students have little difficulty with calculations involving a single titration step, there is a significant leap in conceptual difficulty…

  15. Titration behaviour of three strains of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Hendry, D A; Durham, A C

    1980-01-15

    Hydrogen ion titration curves of the virions and proteins of three strains of tobacco mosaic virus (Y-TAMV, U2, and cowpea) were measured in the absence and the presence of Ca2+, Mg2+, or Mn2+ ions, and compared with the analogous curves for the type strain (vulgare). Extinction coefficients were also measured for all four strains' virions and proteins. Y-TAMV is very like vulgare in its cation affinities: the virion has probably three groups per protein subunit that titrate near neutral pH and significantly bind metal ions; the RNA-free protein has very little affinity for Ca2+, although moderate Ca2+ concentrations favour the existence of larger polymers. U2 and cowpea strain virions bind cations significantly more strongly than do Y-TAMV or vulgare virions: their polymerized proteins, too, have significant affinities for Ca2+ ions, which make their titration and sedimentation behaviours relatively sensitive to added calcium. These cation-binding differences correspond well with the differences between the strains' protein sequences. The features common to all four strains are that the virions are apparently structurally invariant and have at least one site per subunit with Ca2+ affinity in the region of 10(-5)M, while the RNA-free proteins lack the high-affinity sites but have weaker Ca2+ affinities in the region of 10(-3)M. Some of the cation-binding sites probably lie near the central holes of the virions.

  16. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  17. A novel approach to predict active sites of enzyme molecules.

    PubMed

    Chou, Kuo-Chen; Cai, Yu-dong

    2004-04-01

    Enzymes are critical in many cellular signaling cascades. With many enzyme structures being solved, there is an increasing need to develop an automated method for identifying their active sites. However, given the atomic coordinates of an enzyme molecule, how can we predict its active site? This is a vitally important problem because the core of an enzyme molecule is its active site from the viewpoints of both pure scientific research and industrial application. In this article, a topological entity was introduced to characterize the enzymatic active site. Based on such a concept, the covariant discriminant algorithm was formulated for identifying the active site. As a paradigm, the serine hydrolase family was demonstrated. The overall success rate by jackknife test for a data set of 88 enzyme molecules was 99.92%, and that for a data set of 50 independent enzyme molecules was 99.91%. Meanwhile, it was shown through an example that the prediction algorithm can also be used to find any typographic error of a PDB file in annotating the constituent amino acids of catalytic triad and to suggest a possible correction. The very high success rates are due to the introduction of a covariance matrix in the prediction algorithm that makes allowance for taking into account the coupling effects among the key constituent atoms of active site. It is anticipated that the novel approach is quite promising and may become a useful high throughput tool in enzymology, proteomics, and structural bioinformatics. PMID:14997541

  18. Growth exponents in surface models with non-active sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Figueiredo, W.; Aarão Reis, F. D. A.

    2006-11-01

    In this work, we studied the role played by the inactive sites present on the substrate of a growing surface. In our model, one particle sticks at the surface if the site where it falls is an active site. However, we allow the deposited particle to diffuse along the surface in accordance with some mechanism previously defined. Using Monte Carlo simulations, and some analytical results, we have investigated the model in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions considering different relaxation mechanisms. We show that the consideration of non-active sites is a crucial point in the model. In fact, we have seen that the saturation regime is not observed for any value of the density of inactive sites. Besides, the growth exponent β turns to be one, at long times, whatever the mechanism of diffusion we consider in one and two dimensions.

  19. A small ribozyme with dual-site kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Maxwell, Adam W.R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoryl transfer onto backbone hydroxyls is a recognized catalytic activity of nucleic acids. We find that kinase ribozyme K28 possesses an unusually complex active site that promotes (thio)phosphorylation of two residues widely separated in primary sequence. After allowing the ribozyme to radiolabel itself by phosphoryl transfer from [γ-32P]GTP, DNAzyme-mediated cleavage yielded two radiolabeled cleavage fragments, indicating phosphorylation sites within each of the two cleavage fragments. These sites were mapped by alkaline digestion and primer extension pausing. Enzymatic digestion and mutational analysis identified nucleotides important for activity and established the active structure as being a constrained pseudoknot with unusual connectivity that may juxtapose the two reactive sites. Nuclease sensitivities for nucleotides near the pseudoknot core were altered in the presence of GTPγS, indicating donor-induced folding. The 5′ target site was more strongly favored in full-length ribozyme K28 (128 nt) than in truncated RNAs (58 nt). Electrophoretic mobilities of self-thiophosphorylated products on organomercurial gels are distinct from the 5′ mono-thiophosphorylated product produced by reaction with polynucleotide kinase, potentially indicating simultaneous labeling of both sites within individual RNA strands. Our evidence supports a single, compact structure with local dynamics, rather than global rearrangement, as being responsible for dual-site phosphorylation. PMID:22618879

  20. Surface Titrations of Perlite Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Alkan; Do

    1998-11-01

    The surface charge behaviour of unexpanded and expanded perlite samples in KNO3 and NaCl solutions were investigated as a function of pH and ionic strength. The solutions of KNO3 and NaCl ranging from 10(-3) to 1.0 M were used. The potentiometric titration method was used to determine the surface charge of perlite samples. It was confirmed that the perlite samples had no the point of zero charge and was negatively charged in the pH range of 3-10. The double extrapolation method was used for determining the intrinsic equilibrium constants for simple ionization and complex ionization reactions. The values obtained are pKinta2 = 2.5 and p*KintK+ = 2.3 in KNO3 solutions and pKinta2 = 3.0 and p*KintNa+ = 2.4 in NaCl solutions for unexpanded perlite, and pKinta2 = 2.6 and p*KintK+ = 2.4 in KNO3 solutions and pKinta2 = 2.7 and pKintNa+ = 2.4 in NaCl solutions for expanded perlite. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  1. Architecture and active site of particulate methane monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria, organisms that live on methane gas as their sole carbon source. Understanding pMMO function has important implications for bioremediation applications and for the development of new, environmentally friendly catalysts for the direct conversion of methane to methanol. Crystal structures of pMMOs from three different methanotrophs reveal a trimeric architecture, consisting of three copies each of the pmoB, pmoA, and pmoC subunits. There are three distinct metal centers in each protomer of the trimer, mononuclear and dinuclear copper sites in the periplasmic regions of pmoB and a mononuclear site within the membrane that can be occupied by copper or zinc. Various models for the pMMO active site have been proposed within these structural constraints, including dicopper, tricopper, and diiron centers. Biochemical and spectroscopic data on pMMO and recombinant soluble fragments, denoted spmoB proteins, indicate that the active site involves copper and is located at the site of the dicopper center in the pmoB subunit. Initial spectroscopic evidence for O2 binding at this site has been obtained. Despite these findings, questions remain about the active site identity and nuclearity and will be the focus of future studies. PMID:22725967

  2. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  3. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  4. The use of graphite electrodes in potentiometric titrations

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.S.

    1987-04-01

    The use of various types of graphite as indicator electrodes in potentiometry has been limited to acid-base and redox titrations. We have expanded the range of feasible titrations to: (1) precipitation titrations; (2) acid-base titrations; (3) compleximetric titrations; and (4) redox titrations. Graphite covered with an organic membrane containing poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) and a plasticizer is particularly useful in monitoring the endpoints of titrations in which insoluble ion-pairs are formed. The potentiometric titration of fluoride vs La(III) or Th(IV), or of sulfate vs Pb (II) or Ba(II), which can be monitored with a plain carbon rod, is discussed.

  5. Quantification of reverse transcriptase activity by real-time PCR as a fast and accurate method for titration of HIV, lenti- and retroviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Jolien; Naessens, Evelien; Vanderstraeten, Hanne; Landi, Alessia; Iannucci, Veronica; Van Nuffel, Anouk; Taghon, Tom; Pizzato, Massimo; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of retroviruses in cell culture supernatants and other biological preparations is required in a diverse spectrum of laboratories and applications. Methods based on antigen detection, such as p24 for HIV, or on genome detection are virus specific and sometimes suffer from a limited dynamic range of detection. In contrast, measurement of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity is a generic method which can be adapted for higher sensitivity using real-time PCR quantification (qPCR-based product-enhanced RT (PERT) assay). We present an evaluation of a modified SYBR Green I-based PERT assay (SG-PERT), using commercially available reagents such as MS2 RNA and ready-to-use qPCR mixes. This assay has a dynamic range of 7 logs, a sensitivity of 10 nU HIV-1 RT and outperforms p24 ELISA for HIV titer determination by lower inter-run variation, lower cost and higher linear range. The SG-PERT values correlate with transducing and infectious units in HIV-based viral vector and replication-competent HIV-1 preparations respectively. This assay can furthermore quantify Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus-derived vectors and can be performed on different instruments, such as Roche Lightcycler® 480 and Applied Biosystems ABI 7300. We consider this test to be an accurate, fast and relatively cheap method for retroviral quantification that is easily implemented for use in routine and research laboratories.

  6. Quantification of Reverse Transcriptase Activity by Real-Time PCR as a Fast and Accurate Method for Titration of HIV, Lenti- and Retroviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Vermeire, Jolien; Naessens, Evelien; Vanderstraeten, Hanne; Landi, Alessia; Iannucci, Veronica; Van Nuffel, Anouk; Taghon, Tom; Pizzato, Massimo; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of retroviruses in cell culture supernatants and other biological preparations is required in a diverse spectrum of laboratories and applications. Methods based on antigen detection, such as p24 for HIV, or on genome detection are virus specific and sometimes suffer from a limited dynamic range of detection. In contrast, measurement of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity is a generic method which can be adapted for higher sensitivity using real-time PCR quantification (qPCR-based product-enhanced RT (PERT) assay). We present an evaluation of a modified SYBR Green I-based PERT assay (SG-PERT), using commercially available reagents such as MS2 RNA and ready-to-use qPCR mixes. This assay has a dynamic range of 7 logs, a sensitivity of 10 nU HIV-1 RT and outperforms p24 ELISA for HIV titer determination by lower inter-run variation, lower cost and higher linear range. The SG-PERT values correlate with transducing and infectious units in HIV-based viral vector and replication-competent HIV-1 preparations respectively. This assay can furthermore quantify Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus-derived vectors and can be performed on different instruments, such as Roche Lightcycler® 480 and Applied Biosystems ABI 7300. We consider this test to be an accurate, fast and relatively cheap method for retroviral quantification that is easily implemented for use in routine and research laboratories. PMID:23227216

  7. Micro coulometric titration in a liquid drop.

    PubMed

    Kanyanee, Tinakorn; Fuekhad, Pongwasin; Grudpan, Kate

    2013-10-15

    Miniaturized coulometric titration in a liquid drop has been investigated. Assays of ascorbic acid and thiosulfate with iodine titration were chosen as models. Constant volumes of falling liquid drops containing sample or reagent are manipulated via gravimetrical force to move along a slope hydrophobic path and directed to stop or to move out from an electrode. Such manipulation is useful for delivery of sample and reagents, in a way of flow without tubing. Electrochemical generation of titrant, in this case, iodine, is started at the electrode and micro coulometric titration can be performed in a drop by applying constant current. Timing in the titration can be made via naked eye with a stopwatch or via recording with a webcam camera connecting to a computer to detect the change due to the blue color complex of the excess iodine and starch.

  8. Micro coulometric titration in a liquid drop.

    PubMed

    Kanyanee, Tinakorn; Fuekhad, Pongwasin; Grudpan, Kate

    2013-10-15

    Miniaturized coulometric titration in a liquid drop has been investigated. Assays of ascorbic acid and thiosulfate with iodine titration were chosen as models. Constant volumes of falling liquid drops containing sample or reagent are manipulated via gravimetrical force to move along a slope hydrophobic path and directed to stop or to move out from an electrode. Such manipulation is useful for delivery of sample and reagents, in a way of flow without tubing. Electrochemical generation of titrant, in this case, iodine, is started at the electrode and micro coulometric titration can be performed in a drop by applying constant current. Timing in the titration can be made via naked eye with a stopwatch or via recording with a webcam camera connecting to a computer to detect the change due to the blue color complex of the excess iodine and starch. PMID:24054589

  9. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  10. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined.

  11. Active chemisorption sites in functionalized ionic liquids for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guokai; Wang, Jianji; Zhang, Suojiang

    2016-07-25

    Development of novel technologies for the efficient and reversible capture of CO2 is highly desired. In the last decade, CO2 capture using ionic liquids has attracted intensive attention from both academia and industry, and has been recognized as a very promising technology. Recently, a new approach has been developed for highly efficient capture of CO2 by site-containing ionic liquids through chemical interaction. This perspective review focuses on the recent advances in the chemical absorption of CO2 using site-containing ionic liquids, such as amino-based ionic liquids, azolate ionic liquids, phenolate ionic liquids, dual-functionalized ionic liquids, pyridine-containing ionic liquids and so on. Other site-containing liquid absorbents such as amine-based solutions, switchable solvents, and functionalized ionic liquid-amine blends are also investigated. Strategies have been discussed for how to activate the existent reactive sites and develop novel reactive sites by physical and chemical methods to enhance CO2 absorption capacity and reduce absorption enthalpy. The carbon capture mechanisms of these site-containing liquid absorbents are also presented. Particular attention has been paid to the latest progress in CO2 capture in multiple-site interactions by amino-free anion-functionalized ionic liquids. In the last section, future directions and prospects for carbon capture by site-containing ionic liquids are outlined. PMID:27243042

  12. Studies on the active site of pig plasma amine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Collison, D; Knowles, P F; Mabbs, F E; Rius, F X; Singh, I; Dooley, D M; Cote, C E; McGuirl, M

    1989-01-01

    Amine oxidase from pig plasma (PPAO) has two bound Cu2+ ions and at least one pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) moiety as cofactors. It is shown that recovery of activity by copper-depleted PPAO is linear with respect to added Cu2+ ions. Recovery of e.s.r. and optical spectral characteristics of active-site copper parallel the recovery of catalytic activity. These results are consistent with both Cu2+ ions contributing to catalysis. Further e.s.r. studies indicate that the two copper sites in PPAO, unlike those in amine oxidases from other sources, are chemically distinct. These comparative studies establish that non-identity of the Cu2+ ions in PPAO is not a requirement for amine oxidase activity. It is shown through the use of a new assay procedure that there are two molecules of PQQ bound per molecule of protein in PPAO; only the more reactive of these PQQ moieties is required for activity. PMID:2559715

  13. Potentiometric titrations using pencil and graphite sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    The cost of various commercial indicating electrodes ranges from about $40 for pH electrodes to as much as $355 for a potassium ion-selective electrode. This cost can be reduced to less than $1.50, and in some cases to mere pennies by making sensors from graphite rods and pencils for use in potentiometric titrations. The same sensor can be used for many types of these titrations (acid/base, compleximetric, precipitation, and redox). 8 references, 2 tables.

  14. [Semiautomatic potentiometric titration of gastric juice].

    PubMed

    Mnuskina, M M; Meerov, G I; Nadezhina, L S; Semenov, V P; Chekanina, M I; Savchenko, V P; Grinzaĭd, E L

    1990-01-01

    Using commercial equipment manufactured in this country, the authors have assembled a unit for semiautomatic potentiometric titration and developed a method for such titration, permitting a rapid determination of free and bound HCl and the total acidity of the gastric juice. The equipment and method are recommended for wide use at laboratories of therapeutic institutions, of biologic factories manufacturing medicinal commercial gastric juice, and of research institutes.

  15. Computer simulation of the active site of human serum cholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Kefang Jiao; Song Li; Zhengzheng Lu

    1996-12-31

    The first 3D-structure of acetylchelinesterase from Torpedo California electric organ (T.AChE) was published by JL. Sussman in 1991. We have simulated 3D-structure of human serum cholinesterase (H.BuChE) and the active site of H.BuChE. It is discovered by experiment that the residue of H.BuChE is still active site after a part of H.BuChE is cut. For example, the part of 21KD + 20KD is active site of H.BuChE. The 20KD as it is. Studies on these peptides by Hemelogy indicate that two active peptides have same negative electrostatic potential maps diagram. These negative electrostatic areas attached by acetyl choline with positive electrostatic potency. We predict that 147...236 peptide of AChE could be active site because it was as 20KD as with negative electrostatic potential maps. We look forward to proving from other ones.

  16. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  17. Multi-site Phosphorylation Regulates Bim Stability and Apoptotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Anette; Barrett, Tamera; Flavell, Richard A.; Davis, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim is established to be an important mediator of signaling pathways that induce cell death. Multi-site phosphorylation of Bim by several members of the MAP kinase group is implicated as a regulatory mechanism that controls the apoptotic activity of Bim. To test the role of Bim phosphorylation in vivo, we constructed mice with a series of mutant alleles that express phosphorylation-defective Bim proteins. We show that mutation of the phosphorylation site Thr-112 causes decreased binding of Bim to the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2 and can increase cell survival. In contrast, mutation of the phosphorylation sites Ser-55, Ser-65, and Ser-73 can cause increased apoptosis because of reduced proteasomal degradation of Bim. Together, these data indicate that phosphorylation can regulate Bim by multiple mechanisms and that the phosphorylation of Bim on different sites can contribute to the sensitivity of cellular apoptotic responses. PMID:18498746

  18. Water in the Active Site of Ketosteroid Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Hanoian, Philip; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to investigate the structural and dynamical properties of water in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) to provide insight into the role of these water molecules in the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. This reaction is thought to proceed via a dienolate intermediate that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding with residues Tyr16 and Asp103. A comparative study was performed for the wild-type (WT) KSI and the Y16F, Y16S, and Y16F/Y32F/Y57F (FFF) mutants. These systems were studied with three different bound ligands: equilenin, which is an intermediate analog, and the intermediate states of two steroid substrates. Several distinct water occupation sites were identified in the active site of KSI for the WT and mutant systems. Three additional sites were identified in the Y16S mutant that were not occupied in WT KSI or the other mutants studied. The number of water molecules directly hydrogen bonded to the ligand oxygen was approximately two waters in the Y16S mutant, one water in the Y16F and FFF mutants, and intermittent hydrogen bonding of one water molecule in WT KSI. The molecular dynamics trajectories of the Y16F and FFF mutants reproduced the small conformational changes of residue 16 observed in the crystal structures of these two mutants. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical calculations of 1H NMR chemical shifts of the protons in the active site hydrogen-bonding network suggest that the presence of water in the active site does not prevent the formation of short hydrogen bonds with far-downfield chemical shifts. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the active site water molecules exchange much more frequently for WT KSI and the FFF mutant than for the Y16F and Y16S mutants. This difference is most likely due to the hydrogen-bonding interaction between Tyr57 and an active site water molecule that is persistent in the Y16F and Y16S mutants but absent in the FFF mutant and significantly less

  19. The depletion and regeneration of dissolution-active sites at the mineral-water interface: II. regeneration of active sites on α-Fe 2O 3 at pH 3 and pH 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, Sherry D.; Eggleston, Carrick M.

    2000-11-01

    Periods of transient nonsteady state dissolution can contain much information about dissolution mechanisms. Here, pH-jump-induced dissolution transients are used to explore the kinetics of production, at pH 3 and pH 6, of α-Fe 2O 3 surface sites active for dissolution at pH 1. We find that such sites are generated in a matter of minutes or less at higher pH. The steady state dissolution rate of hematite at pH 1 is ≤10.7 pmol m -2 s -1, whereas the rate of active site production at pH 6 in the first 30 min. of aging is at least 119 pmol m -2 s -1. Apparently, active sites are produced relatively slowly at low pH and relatively rapidly at circumneutral pH, despite the fact that dissolution rates are near a minimum at circumneutral pH. Using aqueous water exchange rates as a proxy for surface ligand exchange rates, this is qualitatively consistent with relatively slow water exchange by aqueous Fe 3+ ions at low pH and relatively rapid water exchange by Fe 3+ hydrolysis products (e.g., Fe(OH) 2+) at circumneutral pH. Consequently, the highest overall dissolution rates are achieved not at steady state at low pH, but by cycling between neutral and low pH. Our results call into question the assumption that oxide mineral surfaces, particularly those of iron and aluminum oxides, are inert on the time scale of proton or ligand adsorption (e.g., during the acid-base titrations typically used to measure oxide surface charge due to proton adsorption).

  20. Activation of phenylalanine hydroxylase by phenylalanine does not require binding in the active site.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Khan, Crystal A; Hinck, Cynthia S; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2014-12-16

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH), a liver enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine, is activated by phenylalanine. The lack of activity at low levels of phenylalanine has been attributed to the N-terminus of the protein's regulatory domain acting as an inhibitory peptide by blocking substrate access to the active site. The location of the site at which phenylalanine binds to activate the enzyme is unknown, and both the active site in the catalytic domain and a separate site in the N-terminal regulatory domain have been proposed. Binding of catecholamines to the active-site iron was used to probe the accessibility of the active site. Removal of the regulatory domain increases the rate constants for association of several catecholamines with the wild-type enzyme by ∼2-fold. Binding of phenylalanine in the active site is effectively abolished by mutating the active-site residue Arg270 to lysine. The k(cat)/K(phe) value is down 10⁴ for the mutant enzyme, and the K(m) value for phenylalanine for the mutant enzyme is >0.5 M. Incubation of the R270K enzyme with phenylalanine also results in a 2-fold increase in the rate constants for catecholamine binding. The change in the tryptophan fluorescence emission spectrum seen in the wild-type enzyme upon activation by phenylalanine is also seen with the R270K mutant enzyme in the presence of phenylalanine. Both results establish that activation of PheH by phenylalanine does not require binding of the amino acid in the active site. This is consistent with a separate allosteric site, likely in the regulatory domain.

  1. Chemical Modification of Papain and Subtilisin: An Active Site Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Vincent, Mireille; Dickman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    An experiment using methyle methanethiosulfonate (MMTS) and phenylmethylsulfonyl flouride (PMSF) to specifically modify the cysteine and serine residues in the active sites of papain and subtilism respectively is demonstrated. The covalent modification of these enzymes and subsequent rescue of papain shows the beginning biochemist that proteins…

  2. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes.

  3. Changes in active site histidine hydrogen bonding trigger cryptochrome activation.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abir; Manahan, Craig C; Top, Deniz; Yee, Estella F; Lin, Changfan; Young, Michael W; Thiel, Walter; Crane, Brian R

    2016-09-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) is the principal light sensor of the insect circadian clock. Photoreduction of the Drosophila CRY (dCRY) flavin cofactor to the anionic semiquinone (ASQ) restructures a C-terminal tail helix (CTT) that otherwise inhibits interactions with targets that include the clock protein Timeless (TIM). All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that flavin reduction destabilizes the CTT, which undergoes large-scale conformational changes (the CTT release) on short (25 ns) timescales. The CTT release correlates with the conformation and protonation state of conserved His378, which resides between the CTT and the flavin cofactor. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations indicate that flavin reduction substantially increases the His378 pKa Consistent with coupling between ASQ formation and His378 protonation, dCRY displays reduced photoreduction rates with increasing pH; however, His378Asn/Arg variants show no such pH dependence. Replica-exchange MD simulations also support CTT release mediated by changes in His378 hydrogen bonding and verify other responsive regions of the protein previously identified by proteolytic sensitivity assays. His378 dCRY variants show varying abilities to light-activate TIM and undergo self-degradation in cellular assays. Surprisingly, His378Arg/Lys variants do not degrade in light despite maintaining reactivity toward TIM, thereby implicating different conformational responses in these two functions. Thus, the dCRY photosensory mechanism involves flavin photoreduction coupled to protonation of His378, whose perturbed hydrogen-bonding pattern alters the CTT and surrounding regions. PMID:27551082

  4. Subsite-specific contributions of different aromatic residues in the active site architecture of glycoside hydrolase family 12

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Shuai; Wu, Xiuyun; Liu, Shijia; Li, Dandan; Xu, Hao; Gao, Peiji; Chen, Guanjun; Wang, Lushan

    2015-01-01

    The active site architecture of glycoside hydrolase (GH) is a contiguous subregion of the enzyme constituted by residues clustered in the three-dimensional space, recognizing the monomeric unit of ligand through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. Mutations of the key residues in the active site architecture of the GH12 family exerted different impacts on catalytic efficiency. Binding affinities between the aromatic amino acids and carbohydrate rings were quantitatively determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and the quantum mechanical (QM) method, showing that the binding capacity order of Tyr>Trp>His (and Phe) was determined by their side-chain properties. The results also revealed that the binding constant of a certain residue remained unchanged when altering its location, while the catalytic efficiency changed dramatically. Increased binding affinity at a relatively distant subsite, such as the mutant of W7Y at the −4 subsite, resulted in a marked increase in the intermediate product of cellotetraose and enhanced the reactivity of endoglucanase by 144%; while tighter binding near the catalytic center, i.e. W22Y at the −2 subsite, enabled the enzyme to bind and hydrolyze smaller oligosaccharides. Clarification of the specific roles of the aromatics at different subsites may pave the way for a more rational design of GHs. PMID:26670009

  5. Chemical modification of chalcone isomerase by mercurials and tetrathionate. Evidence for a single cysteine residue in the active site

    SciTech Connect

    Bednar, R.A.; Fried, W.B.; Lock, Y.W.; Pramanik, B. )

    1989-08-25

    Chalcone isomerase from soybean is inactivated by stoichiometric amounts of p-mercuribenzoate or HgCl{sub 2}. Spectral titration of the enzyme with p-mercuribenzoate indicates that a single thiol group is modified. Treatment of modified enzyme with KCN or thiols results in a complete restoration of enzyme activity demonstrating that the inactivation is not due to irreversible protein denaturation. A product of the enzymatic reaction, naringenin, provides complete kinetic protection against inactivation by both mercurials. The binding constant (33 microM) for naringenin determined from the concentration dependence of the protection agrees with the inhibition constant (34 microM) for naringenin as a competitive inhibitor of the catalytic reaction. This agreement demonstrates that the observed kinetic protection results from the specific binding of naringenin to the active site. Incubation of native chalcone isomerase with sodium tetrathionate (0.1 M) results in a slow time-dependent loss of enzymatic activity. The inactivation of chalcone isomerase by tetrathionate and N-ethylmaleimide becomes very rapid in the presence of 6 M urea, indicating that the native tertiary structure is responsible for the low reactivity of the enzymatic thiol. The stoichiometric modification of reduced and denatured chalcone isomerase by ({sup 3}H) N-ethylmaleimide indicates that the enzyme contains only a single cysteine residue and does not contain any disulfides. The evidence presented suggests that the only half-cystine residue in chalcone isomerase is located in the active site and thereby provides the first clue to the location of the active site in chalcone isomerase.

  6. N-methyl-D-aspartate recognition site ligands modulate activity at the coupled glycine recognition site.

    PubMed

    Hood, W F; Compton, R P; Monahan, J B

    1990-03-01

    In synaptic plasma membranes from rat forebrain, the potencies of glycine recognition site agonists and antagonists for modulating [3H]1-[1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine ([3H]TCP) binding and for displacing strychnine-insensitive [3H]glycine binding are altered in the presence of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) recognition site ligands. The NMDA competitive antagonist, cis-4-phosphonomethyl-2-piperidine carboxylate (CGS 19755), reduces [3H]glycine binding, and the reduction can be fully reversed by the NMDA recognition site agonist, L-glutamate. Scatchard analysis of [3H]glycine binding shows that in the presence of CGS 19755 there is no change in Bmax (8.81 vs. 8.79 pmol/mg of protein), but rather a decrease in the affinity of glycine (KD of 0.202 microM vs. 0.129 microM). Similar decreases in affinity are observed for the glycine site agonists, D-serine and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate, in the presence of CGS 19755. In contrast, the affinity of glycine antagonists, 1-hydroxy-3-amino-2-pyrrolidone and 1-aminocyclobutane-1-carboxylate, at this [3H]glycine recognition site increases in the presence of CGS 19755. The functional consequence of this change in affinity was addressed using the modulation of [3H]TCP binding. In the presence of L-glutamate, the potency of glycine agonists for the stimulation of [3H]TCP binding increases, whereas the potency of glycine antagonists decreases. These data are consistent with NMDA recognition site ligands, through their interactions at the NMDA recognition site, modulating activity at the associated glycine recognition site.

  7. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: I -- Mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M.; Prakash, T.S. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Heteroflocculation has been determined to be another major reason for loss in selectivity for flocculation process. In a mathematical model developed earlier, conditions for controlling heteroflocculation were discussed. Blocking active sites to control selective adsorption of a flocculant oil a desirable solid surface is discussed. It has been demonstrated that the lower molecular weight fraction of a flocculant which is incapable of flocculating the particles is an efficient site blocking agent. The major application of selective flocculation has been in mineral processing but many potential uses exist in biological and other colloidal systems. These include purification of ceramic powders, separating hazardous solids from chemical waste, and removal of deleterious components from paper pulp.

  8. Determination of metal speciation by reverse titrations.

    PubMed

    Nuester, Jochen; van den Berg, Constant M G

    2005-01-01

    A new method is proposed to determine metal speciation by varying the concentration of a competing ligand at a constant metal concentration, with detection by cathodic stripping voltammetry. The free metal ion concentration is gradually lowered from its natural level while the method probes progressively deeper into the already complexed metal fraction: it is therefore a reverse titration rather than the forward titration which is used for conventional complexing ligand titrations. The sensitivity is greatest at the lowest free metal ion concentration, where it matters most, and the method can be carried out in a single sample aliquot in the voltammetric cell. The method is applied here to copper speciation, but in principle, it can also be used for other metals. Modeling shows that this method has good sensitivity at ligand concentrations near the metal concentration (lower as well as greater). Comparative measurements of copper speciation using reverse and forward titrations of representative water samples of oceanic and coastal origin show good agreement. The data showed that these samples did not contain low levels of strong ligands in addition to the ligands detected by the forward titrations.

  9. The site of activation of factor X by cancer procoagulant.

    PubMed

    Gordon, S G; Mourad, A M

    1991-12-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a cysteine proteinase found in a variety of malignant cells and tissues and in human amnion-chorion tissue. It initiates coagulation by activating factor X. However, the amino acid sequence of the substrate protein that determines the cleavage site of cysteine proteinases is different from that of the serine proteinases that normally activate factor X, such as factor IXa, VIIa and Russell's Viper Venom (RVV). Therefore, it was of interest to determine the site of cleavage of human factor X by CP. Purified CP was incubated with purified factor X and the reaction mixture was electrophoresed on a 10% Tris-tricine SDS-PAGE gel. The proteins were electroeluted on to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane, and stained with Coomassie blue. The heavy chain of activated factor X was cut out of the PVDF membrane and sequenced with an Applied Biosystems 477A with on-line HPLC. The primary cleavage sequence was Asp-Ala-Ala-Asp-Leu-Asp-Pro-; two other secondary sequences Ser-Ile-Thr-Trp-Lys-Pro- and Glu-Asn-Pro-Phe-Asp-Leu were found. The penultimate amino acid on the carbonyl side of the hydrolysed amide bond plays a critical role for the recognition of the cleavage site of cysteine proteinases. These data indicate that the penultimate amino acid for the primary cleavage site of factor X by CP is proline-20 and for the secondary sites, proline-13 and proline-28. This is in contrast to arginine-52 that determines the specificity of the cleavage by normal serine proteinase activation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Active-Site-Accessible, Porphyrinic Metal;#8722;Organic Framework Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Omar K.; Shultz, Abraham M.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2012-02-06

    On account of their structural similarity to cofactors found in many metallo-enzymes, metalloporphyrins are obvious potential building blocks for catalytically active, metal-organic framework (MOF) materials. While numerous porphyrin-based MOFs have already been described, versions featuring highly accessible active sites and permanent microporosity are remarkably scarce. Indeed, of the more than 70 previously reported porphyrinic MOFs, only one has been shown to be both permanently microporous and contain internally accessible active sites for chemical catalysis. Attempts to generalize the design approach used in this single successful case have failed. Reported here, however, is the synthesis of an extended family of MOFs that directly incorporate a variety of metalloporphyrins (specifically Al{sup 3+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Pd{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 3+}, and Fe{sup 3+} complexes). These robust porphyrinic materials (RPMs) feature large channels and readily accessible active sites. As an illustrative example, one of the manganese-containing RPMs is shown to be catalytically competent for the oxidation of alkenes and alkanes.

  11. Functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase.

    PubMed

    Mookhtiar, K A; Wang, F; Van Wart, H E

    1986-05-01

    A series of chemical modification reactions has been carried out to identify functional constituents of the active site of human neutrophil collagenase. The enzyme is reversibly inhibited by the transition metal chelating agent 1,10-phenanthroline, and inhibition is fully reversed by zinc. Removal of weakly bound metal ions by gel filtration inactivates collagenase, and activity is fully restored on immediate readdition of calcium. The enzyme is unaffected by reagents that modify serine, cysteine, and arginine residues. However, reaction with the carboxyl reagents cyclohexylmorpholinocarbodiimide and Woodward's Reagent K lowers the activity of the enzyme substantially. Acetylimidazole inactivates the enzyme, but activity is completely restored on addition of hydroxylamine. The enzyme is also inactivated by tetranitromethane, indicating that it contains an essential tyrosine residue. Acylation of collagenase with diethyl pyrocarbonate, diketene, acetic anhydride, or trinitrobenzenesulfonate inactivates the enzyme, and activity is not restored on addition of hydroxylamine, indicating the presence of an essential lysine residue.

  12. Acid-base titrations by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant with special reference to automatic titrations-IV Photometric titration of an acid.

    PubMed

    Pehrsson, L; Ingman, F

    1977-02-01

    In Part I of this series, evaluation methods for potentiometric titrations of acids performed by stepwise addition of titrant were introduced. These methods are non-approximative and may therefore in principle be applied to titrations of acids of any strength. This paper demonstrates that photometric titrations performed by stepwise addition of titrant may also be evaluated by the proposed methods. The photometric method is compared with the potentiometric method of monitoring the course of a titration.

  13. Unusual properties of crocodilian ovomacroglobulin shown in its methylamine treatment and sulfhydryl titration

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, H.; Osada, T.; Ikai, A.

    1986-02-01

    The inhibitory activity of chicken and crocodilian ovomacroglobulins against trypsin was measured before and after their incubation with methylamine. The result for crocodilian ovomacroglobulin showed that methylamine treatment destroyed half of its activity, in unique contrast to human alpha 2-macroglobulin and chicken ovomacroglobulin for which methylamine either destroys the inhibitory activity of the former completely or does not affect that of the latter at all. Free sulfhydryl groups of chicken and crocodilian ovomacroglobulins were titrated with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) before and after incubation with trypsin. Prior to the incubation with trypsin the chicken and crocodilian proteins respectively had 0 and 1 titratable sulfhydryl per molecule of Mr 720,000. After treatment with trypsin the crocodilian protein had 3.5-4 titratable sulfhydryls, whereas there were no titratable sulfhydryls in the chicken protein. After denaturation of the crocodilian protein in sodium dodecyl sulfate at 100 degrees C the number of titratable sulfhydryls was 4. Chicken ovomacroglobulin again did not have an appreciable number of titratable sulfhydryls under similar denaturing conditions. Incubation of crocodilian protein with (14C)methylamine showed an incorporation of at least 2 mol of methylamine per molecule. The result indicated the presence of three intramolecular thiol ester bonds in crocodilian ovomacroglobulin with differential stability against external perturbations.

  14. Nest predation increases with parental activity: Separating nest site and parental activity effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, T.E.; Scott, J.; Menge, C.

    2000-01-01

    Alexander Skutch hypothesized that increased parental activity can increase the risk of nest predation. We tested this hypothesis using ten open-nesting bird species in Arizona, USA. Parental activity was greater during the nestling than incubation stage because parents visited the nest frequently to feed their young during the nestling stage. However, nest predation did not generally increase with parental activity between nesting stages across the ten study species. Previous investigators have found similar results. We tested whether nest site effects might yield higher predation during incubation because the most obvious sites are depredated most rapidly. We conducted experiments using nest sites from the previous year to remove parental activity. Our results showed that nest sites have highly repeatable effects on nest predation risk; poor nest sites incurred rapid predation and caused predation rates to be greater during the incubation than nestling stage. This pattern also was exhibited in a bird species with similar (i.e. controlled) parental activity between nesting stages. Once nest site effects are taken into account, nest predation shows a strong proximate increase with parental activity during the nestling stage within and across species. Parental activity and nest sites exert antagonistic influences on current estimates of nest predation between nesting stages and both must be considered in order to understand current patterns of nest predation, which is an important source of natural selection.

  15. Impact of Residual Inducer on Titratable Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Afroz, Taliman; Luo, Michelle L.; Beisel, Chase L.

    2015-01-01

    Inducible expression systems are widely employed for the titratable control of gene expression, yet molecules inadvertently present in the growth medium or synthesized by the host cells can alter the response profile of some of these systems. Here, we explored the quantitative impact of these residual inducers on the apparent response properties of inducible systems. Using a simple mathematical model, we found that the presence of residual inducer shrinks the apparent dynamic range and causes the apparent Hill coefficient to converge to one. We also found that activating systems were more sensitive than repressing systems to the presence of residual inducer and the response parameters were most heavily dependent on the original Hill coefficient. Experimental interrogation of common titratable systems based on an L-arabinose inducible promoter or a thiamine pyrophosphate-repressing riboswitch in Escherichia coli confirmed the predicted trends. We finally found that residual inducer had a distinct effect on “all-or-none” systems, which exhibited increased sensitivity to the added inducer until becoming fully induced. Our findings indicate that residual inducer or repressor alters the quantitative response properties of titratable systems, impacting their utility for scientific discovery and pathway engineering. PMID:26348036

  16. Lab on paper: iodometric titration on a printed card.

    PubMed

    Myers, Nicholas M; Kernisan, Emalee N; Lieberman, Marya

    2015-04-01

    A paper test card has been engineered to perform an iodometric titration, an application that requires storage and mixing on demand of several mutually incompatible reagents. The titration is activated when a user applies a test solution to the test card: the dried reagents are reconstituted and combined through a surface-tension-enabled mixing (STEM) mechanism. The device quantifies 0.8-15 ppm of iodine atoms from iodate in aqueous solutions. This is useful, for example, to quantify iodine levels in fortified salt. A blinded internal laboratory validation established the accuracy as 1.4 ppm I and the precision as 0.9 ppm I when the test card was read by newly trained users. Using computer software to process images, the accuracy and precision both improved to 0.9 ppm I. The paper card can also detect substandard β lactam antibiotics using an iodometric back-titration. When used to quantify amoxicillin, good distinction is achieved between solutions that differ by 0.15 mg/mL over a working range of 0-0.9 mg/mL. The test card was designed to meet the World Health Organization ASSURED criteria for use in low resource settings, where laboratory-based analytical procedures are often not available.

  17. Impact of Residual Inducer on Titratable Expression Systems.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Taliman; Luo, Michelle L; Beisel, Chase L

    2015-01-01

    Inducible expression systems are widely employed for the titratable control of gene expression, yet molecules inadvertently present in the growth medium or synthesized by the host cells can alter the response profile of some of these systems. Here, we explored the quantitative impact of these residual inducers on the apparent response properties of inducible systems. Using a simple mathematical model, we found that the presence of residual inducer shrinks the apparent dynamic range and causes the apparent Hill coefficient to converge to one. We also found that activating systems were more sensitive than repressing systems to the presence of residual inducer and the response parameters were most heavily dependent on the original Hill coefficient. Experimental interrogation of common titratable systems based on an L-arabinose inducible promoter or a thiamine pyrophosphate-repressing riboswitch in Escherichia coli confirmed the predicted trends. We finally found that residual inducer had a distinct effect on "all-or-none" systems, which exhibited increased sensitivity to the added inducer until becoming fully induced. Our findings indicate that residual inducer or repressor alters the quantitative response properties of titratable systems, impacting their utility for scientific discovery and pathway engineering. PMID:26348036

  18. Active sites in char gasification: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, M.; Lilly, W.D.; Perkins, M.T.; Hradil, G.; Calo, J.M.; Suuberg, E.M.

    1987-09-01

    Among the key variables in the design of gasifiers and combustors is the reactivity of the chars which must be gasified or combusted. Significant loss of unburned char is unacceptable in virtually any process; the provision of sufficient residence time for complete conversion is essential. A very wide range of reactivities are observed, depending upon the nature of the char in a process. The current work focuses on furthering the understanding of gasification reactivities of chars. It has been well established that the reactivity of char to gasification generally depends upon three principal factors: (1) the concentration of ''active sites'' in the char; (2) mass transfer within the char; and (3) the type and concentration of catalytic impurities in the char. The present study primarily addresses the first factor. The subject of this research is the origin, nature, and fate of active sites in chars derived from parent hydrocarbons with coal-like structure. The nature and number of the active sites and their reactivity towards oxygen are examined in ''model'' chars derived from phenol-formaldehyde type resins. How the active sites are lost by the process of thermal annealing during heat treatment of chars are studied, and actual rate for the annealing process is derived. Since intrinsic char reactivities are of primary interest in the present study, a fair amount of attention was given to the model char synthesis and handling so that the effect of catalytic impurities and oxygen-containing functional groups in the chemical structure of the material were minimized, if not completely eliminated. The project would not be considered complete without comparing characteristic features of synthetic chars with kinetic behavior exhibited by natural chars, including coal chars.

  19. Brownian aggregation rate of colloid particles with several active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Nekrasov, Vyacheslav M.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Polshchitsin, Alexey A.; Yakovleva, Galina E.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2014-08-14

    We theoretically analyze the aggregation kinetics of colloid particles with several active sites. Such particles (so-called “patchy particles”) are well known as chemically anisotropic reactants, but the corresponding rate constant of their aggregation has not yet been established in a convenient analytical form. Using kinematic approximation for the diffusion problem, we derived an analytical formula for the diffusion-controlled reaction rate constant between two colloid particles (or clusters) with several small active sites under the following assumptions: the relative translational motion is Brownian diffusion, and the isotropic stochastic reorientation of each particle is Markovian and arbitrarily correlated. This formula was shown to produce accurate results in comparison with more sophisticated approaches. Also, to account for the case of a low number of active sites per particle we used Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm based on Gillespie method. Simulations showed that such discrete model is required when this number is less than 10. Finally, we applied the developed approach to the simulation of immunoagglutination, assuming that the formed clusters have fractal structure.

  20. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: FY 1991 report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from April 1991 through September 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations (SWO) and the Environmental Sciences Division, both of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. A new set of action levels was developed on the basis of a statistical analysis of background contamination. These new action levels have been used to evaluate results in this report. Results of ASEMP monitoring continue to demonstrate that no LLW (except [sup 3]H) is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II, which began in early FY 1991, was >90% complete at the end of September 1991. Results of sampling of groundwater and surface waters is presented.

  1. Inhibition and active-site modelling of prolidase.

    PubMed

    King, G F; Crossley, M J; Kuchel, P W

    1989-03-15

    Consideration of the active-site model of prolidase led us to examine azetidine, pyrrolidine and piperidine substrate analogs as potential in vivo inhibitors of the enzyme. One of these, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-proline, was shown to be a potent competitive inhibitor of porcine kidney prolidase (Ki = 90 microM); its rapid protein-mediated permeation of human and sheep erythrocytes suggests that it may be effective in vivo. The higher homolog, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-pipecolic acid, was also a potent inhibitor of the enzyme while the antihypertensive drugs, captopril and enalaprilat, were shown to have mild and no inhibitory effects, respectively. Analysis of inhibitor action and consideration of X-ray crystallographic data of relevant Mn2+ complexes allowed the active-site model of prolidase to be further refined; a new model is presented in which the substrate acts as a bidentate ligand towards the active-site manganous ion. Various aspects of the new model help to explain why Mn2+ has been 'chosen' by the enzyme in preference to other biologically available metal ions. PMID:2924773

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of Bacillus subtilis endospore protonation using isothermal titration calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrold, Zoë R.; Gorman-Lewis, Drew

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial proton and metal adsorption reactions have the capacity to affect metal speciation and transport in aqueous environments. We coupled potentiometric titration and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) analyses to study Bacillus subtilis spore-proton adsorption. We modeled the potentiometric data using a four and five-site non-electrostatic surface complexation model (NE-SCM). Heats of spore surface protonation from coupled ITC analyses were used to determine site specific enthalpies of protonation based on NE-SCMs. The five-site model resulted in a substantially better model fit for the heats of protonation but did not significantly improve the potentiometric titration model fit. The improvement observed in the five-site protonation heat model suggests the presence of a highly exothermic protonation reaction circa pH 7 that cannot be resolved in the less sensitive potentiometric data. From the log Ks and enthalpies we calculated corresponding site specific entropies. Log Ks and site concentrations describing spore surface protonation are statistically equivalent to B. subtilis cell surface protonation constants. Spore surface protonation enthalpies, however, are more exothermic relative to cell based adsorption suggesting a different bonding environment. The thermodynamic parameters defined in this study provide insight on molecular scale spore-surface protonation reactions. Coupled ITC and potentiometric titrations can reveal highly exothermic, and possibly endothermic, adsorption reactions that are overshadowed in potentiometric models alone. Spore-proton adsorption NE-SCMs derived in this study provide a framework for future metal adsorption studies.

  3. Titration of the bacteriorhodopsin Schiff base involves titration of an additional protein residue.

    PubMed

    Zadok, Uri; Asato, Alfred E; Sheves, Mordechai

    2005-06-14

    The retinal protein protonated Schiff base linkage plays a key role in the function of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) as a light-driven proton pump. In the unphotolyzed pigment, the Schiff base (SB) is titrated with a pK(a) of approximately 13, but following light absorption, it experiences a decrease in the pK(a) and undergoes several alterations, including a deprotonation process. We have studied the SB titration using retinal analogues which have intrinsically lower pK(a)'s which allow for SB titrations over a much lower pH range. We found that above pH 9 the channel for the SB titration is perturbed, and the titration rate is considerably reduced. On the basis of studies with several mutants, it is suggested that the protonation state of residue Glu204 is responsible for the channel perturbation. We suggest that above pH 12 a channel for the SB titration is restored probably due to titration of an additional protein residue. The observations may imply that during the bR photocycle and M photointermediate formation the rate of Schiff base protonation from the bulk is decreased. This rate decrease may be due to the deprotonation process of the "proton-releasing complex" which includes Glu204. In contrast, during the lifetime of the O intermediate, the protonated SB is exposed to the bulk. Possible implications for the switch mechanism, and the directionality of the proton movement, are discussed.

  4. Colorimetric Titration Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Edwin; Vassos, Basil H.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a colorimetric titration instrument usable in the undergraduate laboratory that fulfills the objectives of ruggedness, freedom from ambient light interference, and low cost. Although accessories can be added (raising the price), the basic instrument is low priced and can be used manually with a simple voltmeter. (JN)

  5. Acid Rain Analysis by Standard Addition Titration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ophardt, Charles E.

    1985-01-01

    The standard addition titration is a precise and rapid method for the determination of the acidity in rain or snow samples. The method requires use of a standard buret, a pH meter, and Gran's plot to determine the equivalence point. Experimental procedures used and typical results obtained are presented. (JN)

  6. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry in the Student Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadso, Lars; Li, Yujing; Li, Xi

    2011-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the measurement of the heat produced by the stepwise addition of one substance to another. It is a common experimental technique, for example, in pharmaceutical science, to measure equilibrium constants and reaction enthalpies. We describe a stirring device and an injection pump that can be used with a…

  7. Titration Calculations with Computer Algebra Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lachance, Russ; Biaglow, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the symbolic algebraic solution of the titration equations for a diprotic acid, as obtained using "Mathematica," "Maple," and "Mathcad." The equilibrium and conservation equations are solved symbolically by the programs to eliminate the approximations that normally would be performed by the student. Of the three programs,…

  8. Problems in the interpretation of nonaqueous titrations.

    PubMed

    Buvári-Barcza, A; Barcza, L

    2005-04-01

    Most phenomena (like promoting and leveling as well as differentiating effects) of common nonaqueous titrations can be explained by the Brönsted's concept combined with the hydrogen bond theory but some open problems are shown in connection with the use of formic acid and/or acetic anhydride.

  9. Rapid titration of viruses by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Drayman, Nir; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2011-06-01

    Traditionally, the most common methods used to titrate virus stocks are the plaque assay and the hemagglutination assay. The protocol presented here is based on the detection of viral-expressed proteins in infected cells by flow cytometry. It is simpler and more rapid than the traditional plaque-forming assay and it enables high-throughput analyses.

  10. Druggability analysis and classification of protein tyrosine phosphatase active sites

    PubMed Central

    Ghattas, Mohammad A; Raslan, Noor; Sadeq, Asil; Al Sorkhy, Mohammad; Atatreh, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases. The fact that no PTP inhibitors have reached the market so far has raised many questions about their druggability. In this study, the active sites of 17 PTPs were characterized and assessed for its ability to bind drug-like molecules. Consequently, PTPs were classified according to their druggability scores into four main categories. Only four members showed intermediate to very druggable pocket; interestingly, the rest of them exhibited poor druggability. Particularly focusing on PTP1B, we also demonstrated the influence of several factors on the druggability of PTP active site. For instance, the open conformation showed better druggability than the closed conformation, while the tight-bound water molecules appeared to have minimal effect on the PTP1B druggability. Finally, the allosteric site of PTP1B was found to exhibit superior druggability compared to the catalytic pocket. This analysis can prove useful in the discovery of new PTP inhibitors by assisting researchers in predicting hit rates from high throughput or virtual screening and saving unnecessary cost, time, and efforts via prioritizing PTP targets according to their predicted druggability. PMID:27757011

  11. Dynamics of an Active-Site Flap Contributes to Catalysis in a JAMM Family Metallo Deubiquitinase.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Amy N; Shrestha, Rashmi K; Ronau, Judith A; Babar, Aditya; Sheedlo, Michael J; Fuchs, Julian E; Paul, Lake N; Das, Chittaranjan

    2015-10-01

    The endosome-associated deubiquitinase (DUB) AMSH is a member of the JAMM family of zinc-dependent metallo isopeptidases with high selectivity for Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which play a key role in endosomal-lysosomal sorting of activated cell surface receptors. The catalytic domain of the enzyme features a flexible flap near the active site that opens and closes during its catalytic cycle. Structural analysis of its homologues, AMSH-LP (AMSH-like protein) and the fission yeast counterpart, Sst2, suggests that a conserved Phe residue in the flap may be critical for substrate binding and/or catalysis. To gain insight into the contribution of this flap in substrate recognition and catalysis, we generated mutants of Sst2 and characterized them using a combination of enzyme kinetics, X-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Our analysis shows that the Phe residue in the flap contributes key interactions during the rate-limiting step but not to substrate binding, since mutants of Phe403 exhibit a defect only in kcat but not in KM. Moreover, ITC studies show Phe403 mutants have similar KD for ubiquitin compared to the wild-type enzyme. The X-ray structures of both Phe403Ala and the Phe403Trp, in both the free and ubiquitin bound form, reveal no appreciable structural change that might impair substrate or alter product binding. We observed that the side chain of the Trp residue is oriented identically with respect to the isopeptide moiety of the substrate as the Phe residue in the wild-type enzyme, so the loss of activity seen in this mutant cannot be explained by the absence of a group with the ability to provide van der Waals interactions that facilitate the hyrdolysis of the Lys63-linked diubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the flap in the Trp mutant is quite flexible, allowing almost free rotation of the indole side chain. Therefore, it is possible that these different dynamic

  12. Tracer monitored titrations: measurement of total alkalinity.

    PubMed

    Martz, Todd R; Dickson, Andrew G; DeGrandpre, Michael D

    2006-03-15

    We introduce a new titration methodology, tracer monitored titration (TMT), in which analyses are free of volumetric and gravimetric measurements and insensitive to pump precision and reproducibility. Spectrophotometric monitoring of titrant dilution, rather than volume increment, lays the burden of analytical performance solely on the spectrophotometer. In the method described here, the titrant is a standardized mixture of acid-base indicator and strong acid. Dilution of a pulse of titrant in a titration vessel is tracked using the total indicator concentration measured spectrophotometrically. The concentrations of reacted and unreacted indicator species, derived from Beer's law, are used to calculate the relative proportions of titrant and sample in addition to the equilibrium position (pH) of the titration mixture. Because the method does not require volumetric or gravimetric additions of titrant, simple low-precision pumps can be used. Here, we demonstrate application of TMT for analysis of total alkalinity (A(T)). High-precision, high-accuracy seawater A(T) measurements are crucial for understanding, for example, the marine CaCO3 budget and saturation state, anthropogenic CO2 penetration into the oceans, calcareous phytoplankton blooms, and coral reef dynamics. We present data from 286 titrations on three types of total alkalinity standards: Na2CO3 in 0.7 mol kg x soln(-1) NaCl, NaOH in 0.7 mol kg x soln(-1) NaCl, and a seawater Certified Reference Material (CRM). Based on Na2CO3 standards, the accuracy and precision are +/-0.2 and +/-0.1% (4 and 2 micromol kg x soln(-1) for A(T) approximately 2100-2500 micromol kg x soln(-1), n = 242), using low-precision solenoid pumps to introduce sample and titrant. Similar accuracy and precision were found for analyses run 42 days after the initial experiments. Excellent performance is achieved by optimizing the spectrophotometric detection system and relying upon basic chemical thermodynamics for calculating the

  13. Current activities handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    SciTech Connect

    1981-02-27

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the activities each of the thirteen state legislatures potentially affected by the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. It contains a description of the state legislative procedural rules and a schedule of each legislative session; a summary of pending relevant legislation; the name and telephone number of legislative and state agency contacts; and the full text of all bills identified.

  14. Surfactant titration of nanoparticle-protein corona.

    PubMed

    Maiolo, Daniele; Bergese, Paolo; Mahon, Eugene; Dawson, Kenneth A; Monopoli, Marco P

    2014-12-16

    Nanoparticles (NP), when exposed to biological fluids, are coated by specific proteins that form the so-called protein corona. While some adsorbing proteins exchange with the surroundings on a short time scale, described as a "dynamic" corona, others with higher affinity and long-lived interaction with the NP surface form a "hard" corona (HC), which is believed to mediate NP interaction with cellular machineries. In-depth NP protein corona characterization is therefore a necessary step in understanding the relationship between surface layer structure and biological outcomes. In the present work, we evaluate the protein composition and stability over time and we systematically challenge the formed complexes with surfactants. Each challenge is characterized through different physicochemical measurements (dynamic light scattering, ζ-potential, and differential centrifugal sedimentation) alongside proteomic evaluation in titration type experiments (surfactant titration). 100 nm silicon oxide (Si) and 100 nm carboxylated polystyrene (PS-COOH) NPs cloaked by human plasma HC were titrated with 3-[(3-Cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS, zwitterionic), Triton X-100 (nonionic), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, anionic), and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB, cationic) surfactants. Composition and density of HC together with size and ζ-potential of NP-HC complexes were tracked at each step after surfactant titration. Results on Si NP-HC complexes showed that SDS removes most of the HC, while DTAB induces NP agglomeration. Analogous results were obtained for PS NP-HC complexes. Interestingly, CHAPS and Triton X-100, thanks to similar surface binding preferences, enable selective extraction of apolipoprotein AI (ApoAI) from Si NP hard coronas, leaving unaltered the dispersion physicochemical properties. These findings indicate that surfactant titration can enable the study of NP-HC stability through surfactant variation and also selective separation

  15. Surface Sites in Cu-Nanoparticles: Chemical Reactivity or Microscopy?

    PubMed

    Larmier, Kim; Tada, Shohei; Comas-Vives, Aleix; Copéret, Christophe

    2016-08-18

    Copper nanoparticles are widely used in catalysis and electrocatalysis, and the fundamental understanding of their activity requires reliable methods to assess the number of potentially reactive atoms exposed on the surface. Herein, we provide a molecular understanding of the difference observed in addressing surface site titration using prototypical methods: transmission electron micrscopy (TEM), H2 chemisorption, and N2O titration by a combination of experimental and theoretical study. We show in particular that microscopy does not allow assessing the amount of reactive surface sites, while H2 and N2O chemisorptions can, albeit with slightly different stoichiometries (1 O/2CuS and 1 H2/2.2CuS), which can be rationalized by density functional theory calculations. High-resolution TEM shows that the origin of the observed difference between microscopy and titration methods is due to the strong metal support interaction experienced by small copper nanoparticles with the silica surface. PMID:27490121

  16. Electrostatic fields in the active sites of lysozymes.

    PubMed

    Sun, D P; Liao, D I; Remington, S J

    1989-07-01

    Considerable experimental evidence is in support of several aspects of the mechanism that has been proposed for the catalytic activity of lysozyme. However, the enzymatically catalyzed hydrolysis of polysaccharides proceeds over 5 orders of magnitude faster than that of model compounds that mimic the configuration of the substrate in the active site of the enzyme. Although several possible explanations for this rate enhancement have been discussed elsewhere, a definitive mechanism has not emerged. Here we report striking results obtained by classical electrodynamics, which suggest that bond breakage and the consequent separation of charge in lysozyme is promoted by a large electrostatic field across the active site cleft, produced in part by a very asymmetric distribution of charged residues on the enzyme surface. Lysozymes unrelated in amino acid sequence have similar distributions of charged residues and electric fields. The results reported here suggest that the electrostatic component of the rate enhancement is greater than 9 kcal.mol-1. Thus, electrostatic interactions may play a more important role in the enzymatic mechanism than has generally been appreciated.

  17. Histidine at the active site of Neurospora tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Pfiffner, E; Lerch, K

    1981-10-13

    The involvement of histidyl residues as potential ligands to the binuclear active-site copper of Neurospora tyrosinase was explored by dye-sensitized photooxidation. The enzymatic activity of the holoenzyme was shown to be unaffected by exposure to light in the presence of methylene blue; however, irradiation of the apoenzyme under the same conditions led to a progressive loss of its ability to be reactivated with Cu2+. This photoinactivation was paralleled by a decrease in the histidine content whereas the number of histidyl residues in the holoenzyme remained constant. Copper measurements of photooxidized, reconstituted apoenzyme demonstrated the loss of binding of one copper atom per mole of enzyme as a consequence of photosensitized oxidation of three out of nine histidine residues. Their sequence positions were determined by a comparison of the relative yields of the histidine containing peptides of photooxidized holo- and apotyrosinases. The data obtained show the preferential modification of histidyl residues 188, 193, and 289 and suggest that they constitute metal ligands to one of the two active-site copper atoms. Substitution of copper by cobalt was found to afford complete protection of the histidyl residues from being modified by dye-sensitized photooxidation. PMID:6458322

  18. An Olfactory Indicator for Acid-Base Titrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flair, Mark N.; Setzer, William N.

    1990-01-01

    The use of an olfactory acid-base indicator in titrations for visually impaired students is discussed. Potential olfactory indicators include eugenol, thymol, vanillin, and thiophenol. Titrations performed with each indicator with eugenol proved to be successful. (KR)

  19. Microculture virus titration--a simple colourimetric assay for influenza virus titration.

    PubMed

    Levi, R; Beeor-Tzahar, T; Arnon, R

    1995-03-01

    Influenza antigens can be detected by several well established methods. However, when it is important to determine the titre of infective virions, a bioassay should be employed. The standard and the most widely used tests for influenza infectivity are titration carried out in embryonated hen eggs, or the plaque assay employing tissue culture techniques. A simple colourimetric assay for influenza virus detection and titration is described. Samples of allantoic fluid or mice lung homogenates were used to infect MDCK cultures in microplate wells. After an incubation period, the tetrazolium (MTT) colourimetric assay was used to determine cell viability, and when compared to untreated culture control enabled the detection and titration of several influenza strains. When samples were assayed simultaneously in embryonated eggs and by the MCVT method, good correlation in determined titres was obtained. The availability of an additional method for influenza titration allows more flexibility in the choice of titration method according to the specific needs of the study. Furthermore, this method lends itself to full automatization. Similar procedures should also be applicable to titration of other cytopathic viruses.

  20. Trichodiene synthase. Identification of active site residues by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cane, D E; Shim, J H; Xue, Q; Fitzsimons, B C; Hohn, T M

    1995-02-28

    Derivatization of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-treated trichodiene synthase with [methyl-14C]methyl methanethiosulfonate and analysis of the derived tryptic peptides suggested the presence of two cysteine residues at the active site. The corresponding C146A and C190A mutants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The C190A mutant displayed partial but significantly reduced activity, with a reduction in kcat/Km of 3000 compared to the wild-type trichodiene synthase, while the C146A mutant was essentially inactive. A hybrid trichodiene synthase, constructed from amino acids 1-309 of the Fusarium sporotrichioides enzyme and amino acids 310-383 of the Gibberella pulicaris cyclase, had steady state kinetic parameters nearly identical to those of the wild-type F. sporotrichioides enzyme. From this parent hybrid, a series of mutants was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in which the amino acids in the base-rich region, 302-306 (DRRYR), were systematically modified. Three of these mutants were overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The importance of Arg304 for catalysis was established by the observation that the R304K mutant showed a more than 25-fold increase in Km, as well as a 200-fold reduction in kcat. In addition, analysis of the incubation products of the R304K mutant by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) indicated that farnesyl diphosphate was converted not only to trichodiene but to at least two additional C15H24 hydrocarbons, mle 204. Replacement of the Tyr305 residue of trichodiene synthase with Phe had little effect on kcat, while increasing the Km by a factor of ca. 7-8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7873527

  1. The copper active site of CBM33 polysaccharide oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Hemsworth, Glyn R; Taylor, Edward J; Kim, Robbert Q; Gregory, Rebecca C; Lewis, Sally J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Parkin, Alison; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2013-04-24

    The capacity of metal-dependent fungal and bacterial polysaccharide oxygenases, termed GH61 and CBM33, respectively, to potentiate the enzymatic degradation of cellulose opens new possibilities for the conversion of recalcitrant biomass to biofuels. GH61s have already been shown to be unique metalloenzymes containing an active site with a mononuclear copper ion coordinated by two histidines, one of which is an unusual τ-N-methylated N-terminal histidine. We now report the structural and spectroscopic characterization of the corresponding copper CBM33 enzymes. CBM33 binds copper with high affinity at a mononuclear site, significantly stabilizing the enzyme. X-band EPR spectroscopy of Cu(II)-CBM33 shows a mononuclear type 2 copper site with the copper ion in a distorted axial coordination sphere, into which azide will coordinate as evidenced by the concomitant formation of a new absorption band in the UV/vis spectrum at 390 nm. The enzyme's three-dimensional structure contains copper, which has been photoreduced to Cu(I) by the incident X-rays, confirmed by X-ray absorption/fluorescence studies of both aqueous solution and intact crystals of Cu-CBM33. The single copper(I) ion is ligated in a T-shaped configuration by three nitrogen atoms from two histidine side chains and the amino terminus, similar to the endogenous copper coordination geometry found in fungal GH61. PMID:23540833

  2. Activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors via their allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; Lisá, V; el-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1996-01-01

    Ligands that bind to the allosteric-binding sites on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors alter the conformation of the classical-binding sites of these receptors and either diminish or increase their affinity for muscarinic agonists and classical antagonists. It is not known whether the resulting conformational change also affects the interaction between the receptors and the G proteins. We have now found that the muscarinic receptor allosteric modulators alcuronium, gallamine, and strychnine (acting in the absence of an agonist) alter the synthesis of cAMP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the M2 or the M4 subtype of muscarinic receptors in the same direction as the agonist carbachol. In addition, most of their effects on the production of inositol phosphates in CHO cells expressing the M1 or the M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes are also similar to (although much weaker than) those of carbachol. The agonist-like effects of the allosteric modulators are not observed in CHO cells that have not been transfected with the gene for any of the subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The effects of alcuronium on the formation of cAMP and inositol phosphates are not prevented by the classical muscarinic antagonist quinuclidinyl benzilate. These observations demonstrate for the first time that the G protein-mediated functional responses of muscarinic receptors can be evoked not only from their classical, but also from their allosteric, binding sites. This represents a new mechanism of receptor activation. PMID:8710935

  3. Plaque titration and inhibition tests for bovine parvovirus.

    PubMed

    Durham, P J; Johnson, R H

    1984-08-01

    Bovine parvovirus readily produced plaques when inoculated into 60% confluent, actively growing bovine embryonic lung cells. Incorporation of DEAE-dextran, MgCl2 and DMSO in the agarose overlay medium was found to improve plaque production, especially with the latter chemical. In contrast, protamine sulphate inhibited plaque development. It was found that plaque titration and plaque inhibition tests could be conveniently carried out in 24-well cell culture plates, using an agarose overlay containing DMSO, DEAE-dextran and foetal calf serum. The procedures were highly sensitive, when compared with other established techniques.

  4. Active-site mutations of diphtheria toxin: effects of replacing glutamic acid-148 with aspartic acid, glutamine, or serine.

    PubMed

    Wilson, B A; Reich, K A; Weinstein, B R; Collier, R J

    1990-09-18

    Glutamic acid-148, an active-site residue of diphtheria toxin identified by photoaffinity labeling with NAD, was replaced with aspartic acid, glutamine, or serine by directed mutagenesis of the F2 fragment of the toxin gene. Wild-type and mutant F2 proteins were synthesized in Escherichia coli, and the corresponding enzymic fragment A moieties (DTA) were derived, purified, and characterized. The Glu----Asp (E148D), Glu----Gln (E148Q), and Glu----Ser (E148S) mutations caused reductions in NAD:EF-2 ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of ca. 100-, 250-, and 300-fold, respectively, while causing only minimal changes in substrate affinity. The effects of the mutations on NAD-glycohydrolase activity were considerably different; only a 10-fold reduction in activity was observed for E148S, and the E148D and E148Q mutants actually exhibited a small but reproducible increase in NAD-glycohydrolytic activity. Photolabeling by nicotinamide-radiolabeled NAD was diminished ca. 8-fold in the E148D mutant and was undetectable in the other mutants. The results confirm that Glu-148 plays a crucial role in the ADP-ribosylation of EF-2 and imply an important function for the side-chain carboxyl group in catalysis. The carboxyl group is also important for photochemical labeling by NAD but not for NAD-glycohydrolase activity. The pH dependence of the catalytic parameters for the ADP-ribosyltransferase reaction revealed a group in DTA-wt that titrates with an apparent pKa of 6.2-6.3 and is in the protonated state in the rate-determining step.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Radiation inactivation study of aminopeptidase: probing the active site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamadar, V. K.; Jamdar, S. N.; Mohan, Hari; Dandekar, S. P.; Harikumar, P.

    2004-04-01

    Ionizing radiation inactivated purified chicken intestinal aminopeptidase in media saturated with gases in the order N 2O>N 2>air. The D 37 values in the above conditions were 281, 210 and 198 Gy, respectively. OH radical scavengers such as t-butanol and isopropanol effectively nullified the radiation-induced damage in N 2O. The radicals (SCN) 2•-, Br 2•- and I 2•- inactivated the enzyme, pointing to the involvement of aromatic amino acids and cysteine in its catalytic activity. The enzyme exhibited fluorescence emission at 340 nm which is characteristic of tryptophan. The radiation-induced loss of activity was accompanied by a decrease in the fluorescence of the enzyme suggesting a predominant influence on tryptophan residues. The enzyme inhibition was associated with a marked increase in the Km and a decrease in the Vmax and kcat values, suggesting an irreversible alteration in the catalytic site. The above observations were confirmed by pulse radiolysis studies.

  6. Mimicking enzymatic active sites on surfaces for energy conversion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico; Stepanow, Sebastian; Grumelli, Doris; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Kern, Klaus

    2015-07-21

    Metal-organic supramolecular chemistry on surfaces has matured to a point where its underlying growth mechanisms are well understood and structures of defined coordination environments of metal atoms can be synthesized in a controlled and reproducible procedure. With surface-confined molecular self-assembly, scientists have a tool box at hand which can be used to prepare structures with desired properties, as for example a defined oxidation number and spin state of the transition metal atoms within the organic matrix. From a structural point of view, these coordination sites in the supramolecular structure resemble the catalytically active sites of metallo-enzymes, both characterized by metal centers coordinated to organic ligands. Several chemical reactions take place at these embedded metal ions in enzymes and the question arises whether these reactions also take place using metal-organic networks as catalysts. Mimicking the active site of metal atoms and organic ligands of enzymes in artificial systems is the key to understanding the selectivity and efficiency of enzymatic reactions. Their catalytic activity depends on various parameters including the charge and spin configuration in the metal ion, but also on the organic environment, which can stabilize intermediate reaction products, inhibits catalytic deactivation, and serves mostly as a transport channel for the reactants and products and therefore ensures the selectivity of the enzyme. Charge and spin on the transition metal in enzymes depend on the one hand on the specific metal element, and on the other hand on its organic coordination environment. These two parameters can carefully be adjusted in surface confined metal-organic networks, which can be synthesized by virtue of combinatorial mixing of building synthons. Different organic ligands with varying functional groups can be combined with several transition metals and spontaneously assemble into ordered networks. The catalytically active metal

  7. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-06-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work.

  8. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  9. Spectroscopic Definition of the Ferroxidase Site in M Ferritin: Comparison of Binuclear Substrate vs. Cofactor Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Jennifer K.; Liu, Xiaofeng S.; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2008-01-01

    Maxi ferritins, 24 subunit protein nanocages, are essential in humans, plants, bacteria, and other animals for the concentration and storage of iron as hydrated ferric oxide, while minimizing free radical generation or use by pathogens. Formation of the precursors to these ferric oxides is catalyzed at a non-heme biferrous substrate site, which has some parallels with the cofactor sites in other biferrous enzymes. A combination of circular dichroism (CD), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH MCD) has been used to probe Fe(II) binding to the substrate active site in frog M ferritin. These data determined that the active site within each subunit consists of two inequivalent five-coordinate (5C) ferrous centers that are weakly anti-ferromagnetically coupled, consistent with a μ-1,3 carboxylate bridge. The active site ligand set is unusual and likely includes a terminal water bound to each Fe(II) center. The Fe(II) ions bind to the active sites in a concerted manner, and cooperativity among the sites in each subunit is observed, potentially providing a mechanism for the control of ferritin iron loading. Differences in geometric and electronic structure – including a weak ligand field, availability of two water ligands at the biferrous substrate site, and the single carboxylate bridge in ferritin – coincide with the divergent reaction pathways observed between this substrate site and the previously studied cofactor active sites. PMID:18576633

  10. An active-site lysine in avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase

    SciTech Connect

    Guidinger, P.F.; Nowak, T. )

    1991-09-10

    The participation of lysine in the catalysis by avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was studied by chemical modification and by a characterization of the modified enzyme. The rate of inactivation by 2,4-pentanedione is pseudo-first-order and linearly dependent on reagent concentration with a second-order rate constant of 0.36 {plus minus} 0.025 M{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Inactivation by pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate of the reversible reaction catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase follows bimolecular kinetics with a second-order rate constant of 7,700 {plus minus} 860 m{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Treatment of the enzyme or one lysine residue modified concomitant with 100% loss in activity. A stoichiometry of 1:1 is observed when either the reversible or the irreversible reactions catalyzed by the enzyme are monitored. A study of k{sub obs} vs pH suggests this active-site lysine has a pK{sub a} of 8.1 and a pH-independent rate constant of inactivation of 47,700 m{sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1}. Proton relaxation rate measurements suggest that pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate modification alters binding of the phosphate-containing substrates. {sup 31}P NMR relaxation rate measurements show altered binding of the substrates in the ternary enzyme {center dot}Mn{sup 2+}{center dot}substrate complex. Circular dichroism studies show little change in secondary structure of pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate modified phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. These results indicate that avian liver phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase has one reactive lysine at the active site and it is involved in the binding and activation of the phosphate-containing substrates.

  11. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  12. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution of binding site for (/sup 125/I)-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing (/sup 125/I)-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain.

  13. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  14. Determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials by coulometric titration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engleman, E.E.; Jackson, L.L.; Norton, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    A coulometric titration is used for the determination of carbonate carbon in geological materials. Carbon dioxide is evolved from the sample by the addition of 2 M perchloric acid, with heating, and is determined by automated coulometric titration. The coulometric titration showed improved speed and precision with comparable accuracy to gravimetric and gasometric techniques. ?? 1985.

  15. Simple and Automated Coulometric Titration of Acid Using Nonisolated Electrodes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Kenney, Joshua B.; Hasbrouck, Scott; Collins, Michael J.; Amend, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Coulometric titrations involve the quantification of analyte by measurements of current and time. In most coulometric titrations, the anode and cathode are placed in isolated cells that are connected by a salt bridge. By contrast, the experiments described here involve coulometric titrations (of acidic protons in solution) using a silver anode and…

  16. Acid-base titration curves for acids with very small ratios of successive dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Campbell, B H; Meites, L

    1974-02-01

    The shapes of the potentiometric acid-base titration curves obtained in the neutralizations of polyfunctional acids or bases for which each successive dissociation constant is smaller than the following one are examined. In the region 0 < < 1 (where is the fraction of the equivalent volume of reagent that has been added) the slope of the titration curve decreases as the number j of acidic or basic sites increases. The difference between the pH-values at = 0.75 and = 0.25 has (1 j)log 9 as the lower limit of its maximum value.

  17. An Active Site Water Network in the Plasminogen Activator Pla from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Eren, Elif; Murphy, Megan; Goguen, Jon; van den Berg, Bert

    2010-08-13

    The plasminogen activator Pla from Yersinia pestis is an outer membrane protease (omptin) that is important for the virulence of plague. Here, we present the high-resolution crystal structure of wild-type, enzymatically active Pla at 1.9 {angstrom}. The structure shows a water molecule located between active site residues D84 and H208, which likely corresponds to the nucleophilic water. A number of other water molecules are present in the active site, linking residues important for enzymatic activity. The R211 sidechain in loop L4 is close to the nucleophilic water and possibly involved in the stabilization of the oxyanion intermediate. Subtle conformational changes of H208 result from the binding of lipopolysaccharide to the outside of the barrel, explaining the unusual dependence of omptins on lipopolysaccharide for activity. The Pla structure suggests a model for the interaction with plasminogen substrate and provides a more detailed understanding of the catalytic mechanism of omptin proteases.

  18. Coulombic effects of remote subsites on the active site of ribonuclease A.

    PubMed

    Fisher, B M; Schultz, L W; Raines, R T

    1998-12-15

    The active-site cleft of bovine pancreatic ribonuclease A (RNase A) is lined with cationic residues that interact with a bound nucleic acid. Those residues interacting with the phosphoryl groups comprise the P0, P1, and P2 subsites, with the scissile P-O5' bond residing in the P1 subsite. Coulombic interactions between the P0 and P2 subsites and phosphoryl groups of the substrate were characterized previously [Fisher, B. M., Ha, J.-H., and Raines, R. T. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 12121-12132]. Here, the interactions between these subsites and the active-site residues His12 and His119 are described in detail. A protein variant in which the cationic residues in these subsites (Lys66 in the P0 subsite and Lys7 and Arg10 in the P2 subsite) were replaced with alanine was crystallized, both free and with bound 3'-uridine monophosphate (3'-UMP). Structures of K7A/R10A/K66A RNase A and the K7A/R10A/K66A RNase A.3'-UMP complex were determined by X-ray diffraction analysis to resolutions of 2.0 and 2.1 A, respectively. There is little observable change between these structures and that of wild-type RNase A, either free or with bound 3'-cytidine monophosphate. K7A/R10A/K66A RNase A was evaluated for its ability to cleave UpA, a dinucleotide substrate that does not span the P0 or the P2 subsites. In comparison to the wild-type enzyme, the value of kcat was decreased by 5-fold and that of kcat/Km was decreased 10-fold, suggesting that these remote subsites interact with the active site. These interactions were characterized by determining the pKa values of His12 and His119 at 0.018 and 0.142 M Na+, both in wild-type RNase A and the K7A/R10A/K66A variant. The side chains of Lys7, Arg10, and Lys66 depress the pKa values of these histidine residues, and this depression is sensitive to the salt concentration. In addition, the P0 and P2 subsites influence the interaction of His12 and His119 with each other, as demonstrated by changes in the cooperativity that gives rise to microscopic

  19. Metal active site elasticity linked to activation of homocysteine in methionine synthases

    SciTech Connect

    Koutmos, Markos; Pejchal, Robert; Bomer, Theresa M.; Matthews, Rowena G.; Smith, Janet L.; Ludwig, Martha L.

    2008-04-02

    Enzymes possessing catalytic zinc centers perform a variety of fundamental processes in nature, including methyl transfer to thiols. Cobalamin-independent (MetE) and cobalamin-dependent (MetH) methionine synthases are two such enzyme families. Although they perform the same net reaction, transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine (Hcy) to form methionine, they display markedly different catalytic strategies, modular organization, and active site zinc centers. Here we report crystal structures of zinc-replete MetE and MetH, both in the presence and absence of Hcy. Structural investigation of the catalytic zinc sites of these two methyltransferases reveals an unexpected inversion of zinc geometry upon binding of Hcy and displacement of an endogenous ligand in both enzymes. In both cases a significant movement of the zinc relative to the protein scaffold accompanies inversion. These structures provide new information on the activation of thiols by zinc-containing enzymes and have led us to propose a paradigm for the mechanism of action of the catalytic zinc sites in these and related methyltransferases. Specifically, zinc is mobile in the active sites of MetE and MetH, and its dynamic nature helps facilitate the active site conformational changes necessary for thiol activation and methyl transfer.

  20. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Program plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of transuranic (TRU) waste and active low-level waste (LLW) facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. Active LLW facilities in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 include Tumulus I and Tumulus II, the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), LLW silos, high-range wells, asbestos silos, and fissile wells. The tumulus pads and IWMF are aboveground, high-strength concrete pads on which concrete vaults containing metal boxes of LLW are placed; the void space between the boxes and vaults is filled with grout. Eventually, these pads and vaults will be covered by an engineered multilayered cap. All other LLW facilities in SWSA 6 are below ground. In addition, this plan includes monitoring of the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF) in SWSA 6, even though this facility was completed prior to the data of the DOE order. In SWSA 5 North, the TRU facilities include below-grade engineered caves, high-range wells, and unlined trenches. All samples from SWSA 6 are screened for alpha and beta activity, counted for gamma-emitting isotopes, and analyzed for tritium. In addition to these analytes, samples from SWSA 5 North are analyzed for specific transuranic elements.

  1. Characterization of Sea Lettuce Surface Functional Groups by Potentiometric Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebling, A. M.; Schijf, J.

    2008-12-01

    In pursuit of our ultimate goal to better understand the prodigious capacity of the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) for adsorbing a broad range of dissolved trace metals from seawater, we performed an initial characterization of its surface functional groups. Specifically, the number of distinct functional groups as well as their individual bulk concentrations and acid dissociation constants (pKas) were determined by potentiometric titrations in NaCl solutions of various ionic strengths (I = 0.01-5.0 M), under inert nitrogen atmosphere at 25°C. Depending on the ionic strength, Ulva samples were manually titrated down to pH 2 or 3 with 1 N HCl and then up to pH 10 with 1 N NaOH in steps of 0.1-0.2 units, continuously monitoring pH with a glass combination electrode. Titrations of a dehydrated Ulva standard reference material (BCR-279) were compared with fresh Ulva tissue cultured in our laboratory. A titration in filtered natural seawater was also compared with one in an NaCl solution of equal ionic strength. Equilibrium constants for the ionization of water in NaCl solutions as a function of ionic strength were obtained from the literature. Fits to the titration data ([H]T vs. pH) were performed with the FITEQL4.0 computer code using non-electrostatic 3-, 4-, and 5-site models, either by fixing ionic strength at its experimental value or by allowing it to be extrapolated to zero, while considering all functional group pKas and bulk concentrations as adjustable parameters. Since pKas and bulk concentrations were found to be strongly correlated, the latter were also fixed in some cases to further constrain the pKas. Whereas these calculations are currently ongoing, preliminary results point to three, possibly four, functional groups with pKas of about 4.1, 6.3, and 9.5 at I = 0. Bulk concentrations of the three groups are very similar, about 5-6×10-4 mol/g based on dry weight, which suggests that all are homogeneously distributed over the surface and

  2. Digital movie-based on automatic titrations.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ricardo Alexandre C; Almeida, Luciano F; Lyra, Wellington S; Siqueira, Lucas A; Gaião, Edvaldo N; Paiva Junior, Sérgio S L; Lima, Rafaela L F C

    2016-01-15

    This study proposes the use of digital movies (DMs) in a flow-batch analyzer (FBA) to perform automatic, fast and accurate titrations. The term used for this process is "Digital movie-based on automatic titrations" (DMB-AT). A webcam records the DM during the addition of the titrant to the mixing chamber (MC). While the DM is recorded, it is decompiled into frames ordered sequentially at a constant rate of 26 frames per second (FPS). The first frame is used as a reference to define the region of interest (ROI) of 28×13pixels and the R, G and B values, which are used to calculate the Hue (H) values for each frame. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) is calculated between the H values of the initial frame and each subsequent frame. The titration curves are plotted in real time using the r values and the opening time of the titrant valve. The end point is estimated by the second derivative method. A software written in C language manages all analytical steps and data treatment in real time. The feasibility of the method was attested by application in acid/base test samples and edible oils. Results were compared with classical titration and did not present statistically significant differences when the paired t-test at the 95% confidence level was applied. The proposed method is able to process about 117-128 samples per hour for the test and edible oil samples, respectively, and its precision was confirmed by overall relative standard deviation (RSD) values, always less than 1.0%.

  3. Digital movie-based on automatic titrations.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ricardo Alexandre C; Almeida, Luciano F; Lyra, Wellington S; Siqueira, Lucas A; Gaião, Edvaldo N; Paiva Junior, Sérgio S L; Lima, Rafaela L F C

    2016-01-15

    This study proposes the use of digital movies (DMs) in a flow-batch analyzer (FBA) to perform automatic, fast and accurate titrations. The term used for this process is "Digital movie-based on automatic titrations" (DMB-AT). A webcam records the DM during the addition of the titrant to the mixing chamber (MC). While the DM is recorded, it is decompiled into frames ordered sequentially at a constant rate of 26 frames per second (FPS). The first frame is used as a reference to define the region of interest (ROI) of 28×13pixels and the R, G and B values, which are used to calculate the Hue (H) values for each frame. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) is calculated between the H values of the initial frame and each subsequent frame. The titration curves are plotted in real time using the r values and the opening time of the titrant valve. The end point is estimated by the second derivative method. A software written in C language manages all analytical steps and data treatment in real time. The feasibility of the method was attested by application in acid/base test samples and edible oils. Results were compared with classical titration and did not present statistically significant differences when the paired t-test at the 95% confidence level was applied. The proposed method is able to process about 117-128 samples per hour for the test and edible oil samples, respectively, and its precision was confirmed by overall relative standard deviation (RSD) values, always less than 1.0%. PMID:26592600

  4. Active Site and Laminarin Binding in Glycoside Hydrolase Family 55*

    PubMed Central

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deutsch, Sam; Udell, Hannah S.; Yik, Eric J.; Bergeman, Lai F.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    The Carbohydrate Active Enzyme (CAZy) database indicates that glycoside hydrolase family 55 (GH55) contains both endo- and exo-β-1,3-glucanases. The founding structure in the GH55 is PcLam55A from the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Ishida, T., Fushinobu, S., Kawai, R., Kitaoka, M., Igarashi, K., and Samejima, M. (2009) Crystal structure of glycoside hydrolase family 55 β-1,3-glucanase from the basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. J. Biol. Chem. 284, 10100–10109). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of bacterial SacteLam55A from the highly cellulolytic Streptomyces sp. SirexAA-E with bound substrates and product. These structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, implicate Glu-502 as the catalytic acid (as proposed earlier for Glu-663 in PcLam55A) and a proton relay network of four residues in activating water as the nucleophile. Further, a set of conserved aromatic residues that define the active site apparently enforce an exo-glucanase reactivity as demonstrated by exhaustive hydrolysis reactions with purified laminarioligosaccharides. Two additional aromatic residues that line the substrate-binding channel show substrate-dependent conformational flexibility that may promote processive reactivity of the bound oligosaccharide in the bacterial enzymes. Gene synthesis carried out on ∼30% of the GH55 family gave 34 active enzymes (19% functional coverage of the nonredundant members of GH55). These active enzymes reacted with only laminarin from a panel of 10 different soluble and insoluble polysaccharides and displayed a broad range of specific activities and optima for pH and temperature. Application of this experimental method provides a new, systematic way to annotate glycoside hydrolase phylogenetic space for functional properties. PMID:25752603

  5. A new sensor for thermometric titrations.

    PubMed

    Najib, Fadhil M; Zewar, Sardir; Abdulla, Ahmad M

    2007-01-15

    A new thermometric sensor, which is a transistor (OC71), has been introduced to follow thermometric titrations successfully to clear end points. The sensor was suitable in both normal and differential modes of titration. It is possible to titrate down to 1.32micromol of HCl and 26.4micromol of H(3)BO(3)in a final 20ml solution with accuracy and precision of 1%, 2.2% and 1.4%, 2.2%, respectively. The sensor, in association with a pH glass electrode, was used for the determination of pK values of some well established weak acids such as, acetic acid (4.77), phosphoric acid (pK(1)=2.18, pK(2)=7.20 and pK(3)=12.32) as well as for a very weak acid of uncertain pK values H(3)BO(3) (pK(1)=9.20, pK(2)=12.7 and pK(3)=13.80). The sensor was also examined for kinetic catalytic determination of iron(III) in water, milk and pharmaceuticals.

  6. A monosegmented-flow Karl Fischer titrator.

    PubMed

    de Aquino, Emerson Vidal; Rohwedder, Jarbas José Rodrigues; Pasquini, Celio

    2007-02-28

    A monosegmented volumetric Karl Fischer titrator is described to mechanize the determination of water content in organic solvents. The system is based on the flow-batch characteristics of the monosegmented analysis concept and employs biamperometry to monitor the progress of the titration. The system shows accuracy and precision that are highly independent of the flow rate, does not require calibration, and is carried out in a closed system capable of minimizing contact of the sample and reagents with ambient moisture. Sample volumes in the range of 40-300muL are employed, depending on the water concentration. An automatic dilution is provided to deal with concentrated samples. The consumption of Karl Fischer reagent depends on the water content of the sample but is not larger than 100muL. The system was evaluated for determination of water in ethanol and methanol in the range 0.02-0.5% (w/w). The average relative precision estimated in that range (9-3%) is comparable to that obtained with a larger volume commercial system and no significant difference was observed between the results obtained for the two systems at the 95% confidence level. A complete titration can be performed in less than 5min employing the proposed system. PMID:19071447

  7. Active site loop conformation regulates promiscuous activity in a lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a "hot spot" in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity.

  8. Active Site Loop Conformation Regulates Promiscuous Activity in a Lactonase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; An, Jiao; Yang, Guang-Yu; Bai, Aixi; Zheng, Baisong; Lou, Zhiyong; Wu, Geng; Ye, Wei; Chen, Hai-Feng; Feng, Yan; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme promiscuity is a prerequisite for fast divergent evolution of biocatalysts. A phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL) from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkaP) exhibits main lactonase and promiscuous phosphotriesterase activities. To understand its catalytic and evolutionary mechanisms, we investigated a “hot spot” in the active site by saturation mutagenesis as well as X-ray crystallographic analyses. We found that position 99 in the active site was involved in substrate discrimination. One mutant, Y99L, exhibited 11-fold improvement over wild-type in reactivity (kcat/Km) toward the phosphotriesterase substrate ethyl-paraoxon, but showed 15-fold decrease toward the lactonase substrate δ-decanolactone, resulting in a 157-fold inversion of the substrate specificity. Structural analysis of Y99L revealed that the mutation causes a ∼6.6 Å outward shift of adjacent loop 7, which may cause increased flexibility of the active site and facilitate accommodation and/or catalysis of organophosphate substrate. This study provides for the PLL family an example of how the evolutionary route from promiscuity to specificity can derive from very few mutations, which promotes alteration in the conformational adjustment of the active site loops, in turn draws the capacity of substrate binding and activity. PMID:25706379

  9. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. PMID:25902402

  10. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes.

  11. A solution NMR study showing that active site ligands and nucleotides directly perturb the allosteric equilibrium in aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    PubMed

    Velyvis, Algirdas; Yang, Ying R; Schachman, Howard K; Kay, Lewis E

    2007-05-22

    The 306-kDa aspartate transcarbamoylase is a well studied regulatory enzyme, and it has emerged as a paradigm for understanding allostery and cooperative binding processes. Although there is a consensus that the cooperative binding of active site ligands follows the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model of allostery, there is some debate about the binding of effectors such as ATP and CTP and how they influence the allosteric equilibrium between R and T states of the enzyme. In this article, the binding of substrates, substrate analogues, and nucleotides is studied, along with their effect on the R-T equilibrium by using highly deuterated, (1)H,(13)C-methyl-labeled protein in concert with methyl-transverse relaxation optimized spectroscopy (TROSY) NMR. Although only the T state of the enzyme can be observed in spectra of wild-type unliganded aspartate transcarbamoylase, binding of active-site substrates shift the equilibrium so that correlations from the R state become visible, allowing the equilibrium constant (L') between ligand-saturated R and T forms of the enzyme to be measured quantitatively. The equilibrium constant between unliganded R and T forms (L) also is obtained, despite the fact that the R state is "invisible" in spectra, by means of an indirect process that makes use of relations that emerge from the fact that ligand binding and the R-T equilibrium are linked. Titrations with MgATP unequivocally establish that its binding directly perturbs the R-T equilibrium, consistent with the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model. This study emphasizes the utility of modern solution NMR spectroscopy in understanding protein function, even for systems with aggregate molecular masses in the hundreds of kilodaltons.

  12. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. PMID:25890482

  13. Metavanadate at the active site of the phosphatase VHZ.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Vyacheslav I; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Hengge, Alvan C

    2012-09-01

    Vanadate is a potent modulator of a number of biological processes and has been shown by crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy to interact with numerous enzymes. Although these effects often occur under conditions where oligomeric forms dominate, the crystal structures and NMR data suggest that the inhibitory form is usually monomeric orthovanadate, a particularly good inhibitor of phosphatases because of its ability to form stable trigonal-bipyramidal complexes. We performed a computational analysis of a 1.14 Å structure of the phosphatase VHZ in complex with an unusual metavanadate species and compared it with two classical trigonal-bipyramidal vanadate-phosphatase complexes. The results support extensive delocalized bonding to the apical ligands in the classical structures. In contrast, in the VHZ metavanadate complex, the central, planar VO(3)(-) moiety has only one apical ligand, the nucleophilic Cys95, and a gap in electron density between V and S. A computational analysis showed that the V-S interaction is primarily ionic. A mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of metavanadate in the active site from a dimeric vanadate species that previous crystallographic evidence has shown to be able to bind to the active sites of phosphatases related to VHZ. Together, the results show that the interaction of vanadate with biological systems is not solely reliant upon the prior formation of a particular inhibitory form in solution. The catalytic properties of an enzyme may act upon the oligomeric forms primarily present in solution to generate species such as the metavanadate ion observed in the VHZ structure. PMID:22876963

  14. Zymogen Activation and Subcellular Activity of Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme 1/Site 1 Protease*

    PubMed Central

    da Palma, Joel Ramos; Burri, Dominique Julien; Oppliger, Joël; Salamina, Marco; Cendron, Laura; de Laureto, Patrizia Polverino; Seidah, Nabil Georges; Kunz, Stefan; Pasquato, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin isozyme 1 (SKI-1)/site 1 protease (S1P) plays crucial roles in cellular homeostatic functions and is hijacked by pathogenic viruses for the processing of their envelope glycoproteins. Zymogen activation of SKI-1/S1P involves sequential autocatalytic processing of its N-terminal prodomain at sites B′/B followed by the herein newly identified C′/C sites. We found that SKI-1/S1P autoprocessing results in intermediates whose catalytic domain remains associated with prodomain fragments of different lengths. In contrast to other zymogen proprotein convertases, all incompletely matured intermediates of SKI-1/S1P showed full catalytic activity toward cellular substrates, whereas optimal cleavage of viral glycoproteins depended on B′/B processing. Incompletely matured forms of SKI-1/S1P further process cellular and viral substrates in distinct subcellular compartments. Using a cell-based sensor for SKI-1/S1P activity, we found that 9 amino acid residues at the cleavage site (P1–P8) and P1′ are necessary and sufficient to define the subcellular location of processing and to determine to what extent processing of a substrate depends on SKI-1/S1P maturation. In sum, our study reveals novel and unexpected features of SKI-1/S1P zymogen activation and subcellular specificity of activity toward cellular and pathogen-derived substrates. PMID:25378398

  15. Kinetic detection of the end-point in titrations involving slow reactions Direct titration of polyhydroxy-compounds with periodate.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, C E; Hadjiioannou, T P

    1983-03-01

    A new titration technique is described in which the end-point is determined by measuring the relative reaction rate of the titration reaction. This technique is adequate for rather slow reactions where conventional direct titrations are not applicable. The titrations are done automatically under microcomputer control. The efficiency of this technique is demonstrated with direct titrations of certain polyhydroxy-compounds with standard periodate solution. Ethylene glycol and propylene glycol (0.05-0.3 mmole), glycerol (0.06-0.17 mmole) and mannitol (0.01-0.03 mmole) were determined with average relative errors of 0.1-0.3%.

  16. Binding of copper to lysozyme: Spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyang; Song, Wei; Liu, Rutao

    2016-07-01

    Although copper is essential to all living organisms, its potential toxicity to human health have aroused wide concerns. Previous studies have reported copper could alter physical properties of lysozyme. The direct binding of copper with lysozyme might induce the conformational and functional changes of lysozyme and then influence the body's resistance to bacterial attack. To better understand the potential toxicity and toxic mechanisms of copper, the interaction of copper with lysozyme was investigated by biophysical methods including multi-spectroscopic measurements, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), molecular docking study and enzyme activity assay. Multi-spectroscopic measurements proved that copper quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme in a static process accompanied by complex formation and conformational changes. The ITC results indicated that the binding interaction was a spontaneous process with approximately three thermodynamical binding sites at 298K and the hydrophobic force is the predominant driven force. The enzyme activity was obviously inhibited by the addition of copper with catalytic residues Glu 35 and Asp 52 locating at the binding sites. This study helps to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the interaction between copper and lysozyme and provides reference for toxicological studies of copper.

  17. Binding of copper to lysozyme: Spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyang; Song, Wei; Liu, Rutao

    2016-07-01

    Although copper is essential to all living organisms, its potential toxicity to human health have aroused wide concerns. Previous studies have reported copper could alter physical properties of lysozyme. The direct binding of copper with lysozyme might induce the conformational and functional changes of lysozyme and then influence the body's resistance to bacterial attack. To better understand the potential toxicity and toxic mechanisms of copper, the interaction of copper with lysozyme was investigated by biophysical methods including multi-spectroscopic measurements, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), molecular docking study and enzyme activity assay. Multi-spectroscopic measurements proved that copper quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme in a static process accompanied by complex formation and conformational changes. The ITC results indicated that the binding interaction was a spontaneous process with approximately three thermodynamical binding sites at 298K and the hydrophobic force is the predominant driven force. The enzyme activity was obviously inhibited by the addition of copper with catalytic residues Glu 35 and Asp 52 locating at the binding sites. This study helps to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the interaction between copper and lysozyme and provides reference for toxicological studies of copper. PMID:27089183

  18. Binding of copper to lysozyme: Spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Mingyang; Song, Wei; Liu, Rutao

    2016-07-01

    Although copper is essential to all living organisms, its potential toxicity to human health have aroused wide concerns. Previous studies have reported copper could alter physical properties of lysozyme. The direct binding of copper with lysozyme might induce the conformational and functional changes of lysozyme and then influence the body's resistance to bacterial attack. To better understand the potential toxicity and toxic mechanisms of copper, the interaction of copper with lysozyme was investigated by biophysical methods including multi-spectroscopic measurements, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), molecular docking study and enzyme activity assay. Multi-spectroscopic measurements proved that copper quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of lysozyme in a static process accompanied by complex formation and conformational changes. The ITC results indicated that the binding interaction was a spontaneous process with approximately three thermodynamical binding sites at 298 K and the hydrophobic force is the predominant driven force. The enzyme activity was obviously inhibited by the addition of copper with catalytic residues Glu 35 and Asp 52 locating at the binding sites. This study helps to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the interaction between copper and lysozyme and provides reference for toxicological studies of copper.

  19. Site-specific PEGylation of lidamycin and its antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Shang, Boyang; Hu, Lei; Shao, Rongguang; Zhen, Yongsu

    2015-05-01

    In this study, N-terminal site-specific mono-PEGylation of the recombinant lidamycin apoprotein (rLDP) of lidamycin (LDM) was prepared using a polyethyleneglycol (PEG) derivative (M w 20 kDa) through a reactive terminal aldehyde group under weak acidic conditions (pH 5.5). The biochemical properties of mPEG-rLDP-AE, an enediyne-integrated conjugate, were analyzed by SDS-PAGE, RP-HPLC, SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF. Meanwhile, in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity of mPEG-rLDP-AE was evaluated by MTT assays and in xenograft model. The results indicated that mPEG-rLDP-AE showed significant antitumor activity both in vitro and in vivo. After PEGylation, mPEG-rLDP still retained the binding capability to the enediyne AE and presented the physicochemical characteristics similar to that of native LDP. It is of interest that the PEGylation did not diminish the antitumor efficacy of LDM, implying the possibility that this derivative may function as a payload to deliver novel tumor-targeted drugs. PMID:26579455

  20. Electroanalytical measurements without electrolytes: conducting polymers as probes for redox titration in non-conductive organic media.

    PubMed

    Lange, Ulrich; Mirsky, Vladimir M

    2012-09-26

    Electroanalytical methods have been applied only in conducting media. An application of conducting polymers allows to overcome this limitation. If such material is in electrochemical equilibrium with dissolved redox active species, its electrical conductivity depends on the redox potential of these species. Therefore, conductometric measurements with conducting polymers can provide about the same information as classical redox electrodes. The approach was applied for redox titration. Equivalent points obtained by this titration in aqueous and organic electrolytes were identical. Then the approach was applied for determination of bromine number by redox titration in non-conducting organic phase.

  1. Zinc sorption to three gram-negative bacteria: combined titration, modeling, and EXAFS study.

    PubMed

    Guiné, V; Spadini, L; Sarret, G; Muris, M; Delolme, C; Gaudet, J P; Martins, J M F

    2006-03-15

    The acid-base and Zn sorption properties of three bacteria, Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34, Pseudomonas putida ATCC12633, and Escherichia coli K12DH5alpha, were investigated through an original combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and equilibrium titration studies. Acid-base titration curves of the three strains were fitted with a model accounting for three conceptual reactive sites: an acidic (carboxyl and/or phosphodiester), a neutral (phosphomonoester), and a basic (amine and/or hydroxyl) group. Calculated proton and Zn equilibrium constants and site densities compare with literature data. The nature of Zn binding sites was studied by EXAFS spectroscopy. Phosphoester, carboxyl, and unexpectedly sulfhydryl ligands were identified. Their proportions depended on Zn loading and bacterial strain and were consistent with the titration results. These findings were compared to the structure and site density of the major cell wall components. It appeared that the cumulated theoretical site density of these structures (<2 Zn nm(-2)) was much lower than the total site density of the investigated strains (16-56 Zn nm(-2)). These results suggest a dominant role of extracellular polymeric substances in Zn retention processes, although Zn binding to inner cell components cannot be excluded.

  2. Hybrid [FeFe]-hydrogenases with modified active sites show remarkable residual enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Siebel, Judith F; Adamska-Venkatesh, Agnieszka; Weber, Katharina; Rumpel, Sigrun; Reijerse, Edward; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2015-02-24

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are to date the only enzymes for which it has been demonstrated that the native inorganic binuclear cofactor of the active site Fe2(adt)(CO)3(CN)2 (adt = azadithiolate = [S-CH2-NH-CH2-S](2-)) can be synthesized on the laboratory bench and subsequently inserted into the unmaturated enzyme to yield fully functional holo-enzyme (Berggren, G. et al. (2013) Nature 499, 66-70; Esselborn, J. et al. (2013) Nat. Chem. Biol. 9, 607-610). In the current study, we exploit this procedure to introduce non-native cofactors into the enzyme. Mimics of the binuclear subcluster with a modified bridging dithiolate ligand (thiodithiolate, N-methylazadithiolate, dimethyl-azadithiolate) and three variants containing only one CN(-) ligand were inserted into the active site of the enzyme. We investigated the activity of these variants for hydrogen oxidation as well as proton reduction and their structural accommodation within the active site was analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Interestingly, the monocyanide variant with the azadithiolate bridge showed ∼50% of the native enzyme activity. This would suggest that the CN(-) ligands are not essential for catalytic activity, but rather serve to anchor the binuclear subsite inside the protein pocket through hydrogen bonding. The inserted artificial cofactors with a propanedithiolate and an N-methylazadithiolate bridge as well as their monocyanide variants also showed residual activity. However, these activities were less than 1% of the native enzyme. Our findings indicate that even small changes in the dithiolate bridge of the binuclear subsite lead to a rather strong decrease of the catalytic activity. We conclude that both the Brønsted base function and the conformational flexibility of the native azadithiolate amine moiety are essential for the high catalytic activity of the native enzyme. PMID:25633077

  3. Automatic set-point titration for monitoring nitrification in SBRs.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, N; Ficara, E; Bonelli, S; Canziani, R; Ciappelloni, F; Mariani, S; Pirani, M; Ratini, P; Mazouni, D; Harmand, J

    2008-01-01

    Nitrification is usually the bottleneck of biological nitrogen removal processes. In SBRs systems, it is not often enough to monitor dissolved oxygen, pH and ORP to spot problems which may occur in nitrification processes. Therefore, automated supervision systems should be designed to include the possibility of monitoring the activity of nitrifying populations. Though the applicability of set-point titration for monitoring biological processes has been widely demonstrated in the literature, the possibility of an automated procedure is still at its early stage of industrial development. In this work, the use of an at-line automated titrator named TITAAN (TITrimetric Automated ANalyser) is presented. The completely automated sensor enables us to track nitrification rate trend with time in an SBR, detecting the causes leading to slower specific nitrification rates. It was also possible to perform early detection of toxic compounds in the influent by assessing their effect on the nitrifying biomass. Nitrifications rates were determined with average errors+/-10% (on 26 tests), never exceeding 20% as compared with UV-spectrophotometric determinations.

  4. Automatic set-point titration for monitoring nitrification in SBRs.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, N; Ficara, E; Bonelli, S; Canziani, R; Ciappelloni, F; Mariani, S; Pirani, M; Ratini, P; Mazouni, D; Harmand, J

    2008-01-01

    Nitrification is usually the bottleneck of biological nitrogen removal processes. In SBRs systems, it is not often enough to monitor dissolved oxygen, pH and ORP to spot problems which may occur in nitrification processes. Therefore, automated supervision systems should be designed to include the possibility of monitoring the activity of nitrifying populations. Though the applicability of set-point titration for monitoring biological processes has been widely demonstrated in the literature, the possibility of an automated procedure is still at its early stage of industrial development. In this work, the use of an at-line automated titrator named TITAAN (TITrimetric Automated ANalyser) is presented. The completely automated sensor enables us to track nitrification rate trend with time in an SBR, detecting the causes leading to slower specific nitrification rates. It was also possible to perform early detection of toxic compounds in the influent by assessing their effect on the nitrifying biomass. Nitrifications rates were determined with average errors+/-10% (on 26 tests), never exceeding 20% as compared with UV-spectrophotometric determinations. PMID:18701782

  5. CONDUCTIVITY TITRATION OF GELATIN SOLUTIONS WITH ACIDS.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, D I

    1923-11-20

    Titrations have been made, by the conductivity method, of gelatin solutions with hydrochloric and sulphuric acids. The results indicate an end-point at about 8.6 cc. of N/10 acid per gm. of gelatin, or a combining weight of about 1,160. These results are in fair agreement with those previously obtained by the hydrogen electrode method. Better agreement between the two methods was found in the case of deaminized gelatin. The data are in accord with a purely chemical conception of the combination between protein and acid.

  6. Tracer monitored titrations: measurement of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Martz, Todd; Takeshita, Yuichiro; Rolph, Rebecca; Bresnahan, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The tracer monitored titration (TMT) technique is evaluated for measurement of dissolved oxygen. The TMT developed in this work uses a simple apparatus consisting of a low-precision pump for titrant delivery and an optical detector based on a white LED and two photodiodes with interference filters. It is shown that the classic Winkler method can be made free of routine volumetric and gravimetric measurements by application of TMT theory, which allows tracking the amounts of titrant and sample using a chemical tracer. The measurement precision of the prototype setup was 0.3% RSD.

  7. Modeling complexometric titrations of natural water samples.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Robert J M; Rue, Eden L; Bruland, Kenneth W

    2003-04-15

    Complexometric titrations are the primary source of metal speciation data for aquatic systems, yet their interpretation in waters containing humic and fulvic acids remains problematic. In particular, the accuracy of inferred ambient free metal ion concentrations and parameters quantifying metal complexation by natural ligands has been challenged because of the difficulties inherent in calibrating common analytical methods and in modeling the diverse array of ligands present. This work tests and applies a new method of modeling titration data that combines calibration of analytical sensitivity (S) and estimation of concentrations and stability constants for discrete natural ligand classes ([Li]T and Ki) into a single step using nonlinear regression and a new analytical solution to the one-metal/two-ligand equilibrium problem. When applied to jointly model data from multiple titrations conducted at different analytical windows, it yields accurate estimates of S, [Li]T, Ki, and [Cu2+] plus Monte Carlo-based estimates of the uncertainty in [Cu2+]. Jointly modeling titration data at low-and high-analytical windows leads to an efficient adaptation of the recently proposed "overload" approach to calibrating ACSV/CLE measurements. Application of the method to published data sets yields model results with greater accuracy and precision than originally obtained. The discrete ligand-class model is also re-parametrized, using humic and fulvic acids, L1 class (K1 = 10(13) M(-1)), and strong ligands (L(S)) with K(S) > K1 as "natural components". This approach suggests that Cu complexation in NW Mediterranean Sea water can be well represented as 0.8 +/- 0.3/0.2 mg humic equiv/L, 13 +/- 1 nM L1, and 2.5 +/- 0.1 nM L(S) with [CU]T = 3 nM. In coastal seawater from Narragansett Bay, RI, Cu speciation can be modeled as 0.6 +/- 0.1 mg humic equiv/L and 22 +/- 1 nM L1 or approximately 12 nM L1 and approximately 9 nM L(S), with [CU]T = 13 nM. In both waters, the large excess

  8. Determination of lanthanum by flame photometric titration.

    PubMed

    Svehla, G; Slevin, P J

    1968-09-01

    The flame emission of lanthanum at 560 mmu decreases linearly with phosphate concentration until a 1:1 molar ratio is reached, and then remains practically constant. Lanthanum can be titrated with phosphate, the equivalence point being detected from the change in emission intensity. Errors due to consumption of solution by the atomizer can be kept low by using short spraying times and low galvanometer damping. The average error is about -1% for 0.1M solutions and less than -5% for 0.01M. The method gives good results in the presence of titanium(III), zirconium, thorium and aluminium but cerium(III) and yttrium seriously interfere. PMID:18960392

  9. Titration of serine/arginine (SR) splicing factors during adenoviral infection modulates E1A pre-mRNA alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Himmelspach, M; Cavaloc, Y; Chebli, K; Stévenin, J; Gattoni, R

    1995-10-01

    Alternative splicing of the adenovirus-2 E1A pre-mRNA involves the use of three 5' splice sites and is modulated during infection because the 13S mRNA and 9S mRNA reactions are predominant during the early and late periods, respectively. We had previously reproduced in vitro the 13S to 9S modulation with nuclear extracts isolated from infected HeLa cells and shown that high molecular weight viral RNAs are involved in this modulation, most likely by sequestering or titrating general splicing factors. To further test this hypothesis, we titrated splicing factors from an uninfected nuclear extract using competitor RNA or by progressive inactivation of splicing factors with monoclonal antibodies. We found that the 13S to 9S modulation occurs when titrating only with certain RNAs (essentially adenoviral RNAs), and also by progressively inactivating the 9G8 SR splicing factor. The demonstration that late nuclear extracts contain levels of active SR splicing factors limiting for the 13S reaction has been made by complementation experiments. We show that late nuclear extracts do not complement SR factor-deficient extracts, whereas late extracts treated with micrococcal nuclease complement them. Furthermore, complementation of late nuclear extracts with each of the three 30-35-kDa SR factors (9G8, SC35, and SF2/ASF) restores an efficient 13S mRNA reaction. Thus, our results provide evidence that the 13S to 9S modulation is triggered through a titration of SR factors required for the 13S mRNA reaction by major late transcripts that accumulate in nuclei late in infection.

  10. Acid-Base Titration of (S)-Aspartic Acid: A Circular Dichroism Spectrophotometry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.; Pedrosa de Jesus, Júlio D.

    2000-09-01

    The magnitude of the circular dichroism of (S)-aspartic acid in aqueous solutions at a fixed wavelength varies with the addition of strong base. This laboratory experiment consists of the circular dichroism spectrophotometric acid-base titration of (S)-aspartic acid in dilute aqueous solutions, and the use of the resulting data to determine the ionization constant of the protonated amino group. The work familiarizes students with circular dichroism and illustrates the possibility of performing titrations using a less usual instrumental method of following the course of a reaction. It shows the use of a chiroptical property in the determination of the concentration in solution of an optically active molecule, and exemplifies the use of a spectrophotometric titration in the determination of an ionization constant.

  11. Characterization of the active site of chloroperoxidase using physical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Chloroperoxidase (CPO) and Cytochrome P-450, two very different hemeproteins, have been shown to have similar active sites by several techniques. Recent work has demonstrated thiolate ligation from a cysteine residue to the iron in P-450. A major portion of this research has been devoted to obtaining direct evidence that CPO also has a thiolate 5th ligand from a cysteine residue. This information will provide the framework for a detailed analysis of the structure-function relationships between peroxidases, catalase and cytochrome P-450 hemeproteins. To determine whether the 5th ligand is a cysteine, methionine or a unique amino acid, specific isotope enrichment experiments were used. Preliminary /sup 1/H-NMR studies show that the carbon monoxide-CPO complex has a peak in the upfield region corresponding to alpha-protons of a thiolate amino acid. C. fumago was grown on 95% D/sub 2/O media with a small amount of /sup 1/H-cysteine added. Under these conditions C. fumago slows down the biosynthesis of cysteine by at least 50% and utilizes the exogenous cysteine in the media. GC-MS was able to show that the methylene protons next to the sulfur atom in cysteine are 80-90% protonated while these positions in methionine are approximately 73% deuterated. Comparison of the /sup 1/H-NMR spectra of CO-CPO and CO-CPO indicate the presence of a cysteine ligand in chloroperoxidase.

  12. N6-Methyldeoxyadenosine Marks Active Transcription Start Sites in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Deng, Xin; Yu, Miao; Han, Dali; Hao, Ziyang; Liu, Jianzhao; Lu, Xingyu; Dore, Louis C; Weng, Xiaocheng; Ji, Quanjiang; Mets, Laurens; He, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY N6-methyldeoxyadenosine (6mA or m6A) is a DNA modification preserved in prokaryotes to eukaryotes. It is widespread in bacteria, and functions in DNA mismatch repair, chromosome segregation, and virulence regulation. In contrast, the distribution and function of 6mA in eukaryotes have been unclear. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the 6mA landscape in the genome of Chlamydomonas using new sequencing approaches. We identified the 6mA modification in 84% of genes in Chlamydomonas. We found that 6mA mainly locates at ApT dinucleotides around transcription start sites (TSS) with a bimodal distribution, and appears to mark active genes. A periodic pattern of 6mA deposition was also observed at base resolution, which is associated with nucleosome distribution near the TSS, suggesting a possible role in nucleosome positioning. The new genome-wide mapping of 6mA and its unique distribution in the Chlamydomonas genome suggest potential regulatory roles of 6mA in gene expression in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:25936837

  13. Detection limit for activation measurements in ultralow background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trache, Livius; Chesneanu, D.; Margineanu, R.; Pantelica, A.; Ghita, D. G.; Burducea, I.; Straticiuc, M.; Tang, X. D.

    2014-09-01

    We used 12C +13C fusion at the beam energies E = 6, 7 and 8 MeV to determine the sensitivity and the limits of activation method measurements in ultralow background sites. A 13C beam of 0.5 μA from the 3 MV Tandem accelerator of the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH impinged on thick graphite targets. After about 24 hrs of irradiation targets were measured in two different laboratories: one with a heavy shielded Ge detector in the institute (at the surface) and one located underground in the microBequerel laboratory, in the salt mine of Slanic-Prahova, Romania. The 1369- and 2754 keV peaks from 24Na deactivation were clearly observed in the γ-ray spectra obtained for acquisitions lasting a few hours, or a few days. Determination of the detection limit in evaluating the cross sections for the target irradiated at Ec . m = 3 MeV indicates the fact that it is possible to measure gamma spectrum in underground laboratory down to Ec . m = 2 . 6 MeV. Cleaning the spectra with beta-gamma coincidences and increasing beam intensity 20 times will take as further down. The measurements are motivated by the study of the 12 C +12 C reaction at astrophysical energies.

  14. Disturbance opens recruitment sites for bacterial colonization in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Vuono, David C; Munakata-Marr, Junko; Spear, John R; Drewes, Jörg E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the role of immigration in shaping bacterial communities or the factors that may dictate success or failure of colonization by bacteria from regional species pools. To address these knowledge gaps, the influence of bacterial colonization into an ecosystem (activated sludge bioreactor) was measured through a disturbance gradient (successive decreases in the parameter solids retention time) relative to stable operational conditions. Through a DNA sequencing approach, we show that the most abundant bacteria within the immigrant community have a greater probability of colonizing the receiving ecosystem, but mostly as low abundance community members. Only during the disturbance do some of these bacterial populations significantly increase in abundance beyond background levels and in few cases become dominant community members post-disturbance. Two mechanisms facilitate the enhanced enrichment of immigrant populations during disturbance: (i) the availability of resources left unconsumed by established species and (ii) the increased availability of niche space for colonizers to establish and displace resident populations. Thus, as a disturbance decreases local diversity, recruitment sites become available to promote colonization. This work advances our understanding of microbial resource management and diversity maintenance in complex ecosystems. PMID:25727891

  15. Active Site Characterization of Proteases Sequences from Different Species of Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Morya, V K; Yadav, Virendra K; Yadav, Sangeeta; Yadav, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    A total of 129 proteases sequences comprising 43 serine proteases, 36 aspartic proteases, 24 cysteine protease, 21 metalloproteases, and 05 neutral proteases from different Aspergillus species were analyzed for the catalytically active site residues using MEROPS database and various bioinformatics tools. Different proteases have predominance of variable active site residues. In case of 24 cysteine proteases of Aspergilli, the predominant active site residues observed were Gln193, Cys199, His364, Asn384 while for 43 serine proteases, the active site residues namely Asp164, His193, Asn284, Ser349 and Asp325, His357, Asn454, Ser519 were frequently observed. The analysis of 21 metalloproteases of Aspergilli revealed Glu298 and Glu388, Tyr476 as predominant active site residues. In general, Aspergilli species-specific active site residues were observed for different types of protease sequences analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis of these 129 proteases sequences revealed 14 different clans representing different types of proteases with diverse active site residues.

  16. A proposed definition of the 'activity' of surface sites on lactose carriers for dry powder inhalation.

    PubMed

    Grasmeijer, Floris; Frijlink, Henderik W; de Boer, Anne H

    2014-06-01

    A new definition of the activity of surface sites on lactose carriers for dry powder inhalation is proposed which relates to drug detachment during dispersion. The new definition is expected to improve the understanding of 'carrier surface site activity', which stimulates the unambiguous communication about this subject and may aid in the rational design and interpretation of future formulation studies. In contrast to the currently prevailing view on carrier surface site activity, it follows from the newly proposed definition that carrier surface site activity depends on more variables than just the physicochemical properties of the carrier surface. Because the term 'active sites' is ambiguous, it is recommended to use the term 'highly active sites' instead to denote carrier surface sites with a relatively high activity. PMID:24613490

  17. Bivoltametric titrations using electrodes with innovative geometry.

    PubMed

    Surmann, P; Peter, B; Stark, C

    1996-09-01

    Electrodes with different surface areas were investigated for the determination of reversible, quasireversible, irreversible or electroinactive substrates. Two kinds of electrodes were constructed, a helical electrode with a given asymmetry and a platinum array electrode with a variable area. These electrodes were applied for the cerimetry of ammonium iron(II) sulfate and for the bromatometry of various organic substances. The theoretically derived effects on the shape of the voltametric titration curve are verified experimentally. It is possible to sharpen one side of the peak and to broaden the other side, depending on the system and the side of the peak one is interested in. It is possible to improve the bivoltametric determination of hydroquinone, benzocaine and sulfaguanidine by bromatometry by the directed employment of electrodes of different areas. For the bromatometric determination of electrochemically irreversible substrates the use of the electrode geometries proposed is a way to obtain a sharp bend and a steep decrease of titration curves with low values of the constant current which is a basic requirement for the accuracy.

  18. Biochemical titration of glycogen in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Joffrey; Bellot, Grégory; Pouysségur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie M

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen is the main energetic polymer of glucose in vertebrate animals and plays a crucial role in whole body metabolism as well as in cellular metabolism. Many methods to detect glycogen already exist but only a few are quantitative. We describe here a method using the Abcam Glycogen assay kit, which is based on specific degradation of glycogen to glucose by glucoamylase. Glucose is then specifically oxidized to a product that reacts with the OxiRed probe to produce fluorescence. Titration is accurate, sensitive and can be achieved on cell extracts or tissue sections. However, in contrast to other techniques, it does not give information about the distribution of glycogen in the cell. As an example of this technique, we describe here the titration of glycogen in two cell lines, Chinese hamster lung fibroblast CCL39 and human colon carcinoma LS174, incubated in normoxia (21% O2) versus hypoxia (1% O2). We hypothesized that hypoxia is a signal that prepares cells to synthesize and store glycogen in order to survive(1).

  19. Biochemical Titration of Glycogen In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Joffrey; Bellot, Grégory; Pouysségur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie M.

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen is the main energetic polymer of glucose in vertebrate animals and plays a crucial role in whole body metabolism as well as in cellular metabolism. Many methods to detect glycogen already exist but only a few are quantitative. We describe here a method using the Abcam Glycogen assay kit, which is based on specific degradation of glycogen to glucose by glucoamylase. Glucose is then specifically oxidized to a product that reacts with the OxiRed probe to produce fluorescence. Titration is accurate, sensitive and can be achieved on cell extracts or tissue sections. However, in contrast to other techniques, it does not give information about the distribution of glycogen in the cell. As an example of this technique, we describe here the titration of glycogen in two cell lines, Chinese hamster lung fibroblast CCL39 and human colon carcinoma LS174, incubated in normoxia (21% O2) versus hypoxia (1% O2). We hypothesized that hypoxia is a signal that prepares cells to synthesize and store glycogen in order to survive1. PMID:24300406

  20. Interaction of oridonin with human serum albumin by isothermal titration calorimetry and spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangrong; Yang, Zhenhua

    2015-05-01

    Oridonin has been traditionally and widely used for treatment of various human diseases due to its uniquely biological, pharmacological and physiological functions. In this study, the interaction between oridonin and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), in combination with fluorescence spectroscopy and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. We found that the hydrogen bond and van der Waals force are the major binding forces in the binding of oridonin to HSA. The binding of oridonin to HSA is driven by favorable enthalpy and unfavorable entropy. Oridonin can quench the fluorescence of HSA through a static quenching mechanism. The binding constant between oridonin and HSA is moderate and the equilibrium fraction of unbound oridonin f(u) > 60%. Binding site I is found to be the primary binding site for oridonin. Additionally, oridonin may induce conformational changes of HSA and affect its biological function as the carrier protein. The results of the current study suggest that oridonin can be stored and transported from the circulatory system to reach its target organ to provide its therapeutic effects. But its side-effect in the clinics cannot be overlook. The study provides an accurate and full basic data for clarifying the binding mechanism of oridonin with HSA and is helpful for understanding its effect on protein function during the blood transportation process and its biological activity in vivo.

  1. The quorum sensing transcriptional regulator TraR has separate binding sites for DNA and the anti-activator

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Zhida; Fuqua, Clay; Chen, Lingling

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quorum sensing transcription factor TraR is inhibited by forming TraR-TraM complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K213 is a key DNA binding residue, but not involved in interaction with TraM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations of TraM-interacting TraR residues did not affect DNA-binding of TraR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations of TraR residues reduced the TraR-TraM interaction more than those of TraM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TraM inhibition on DNA-binding of TraR is driven by thermodynamics. -- Abstract: Quorum sensing represents a mechanism by which bacteria control their genetic behaviors via diffusible signals that reflect their population density. TraR, a quorum sensing transcriptional activator in the Rhizobiaceae family, is regulated negatively by the anti-activator TraM via formation of a TraR-TraM heterocomplex. Prior structural analysis suggests that TraM and DNA bind to TraR in distinct sites. Here we combined isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) to investigate roles of TraR residues from Rhizobium sp. NGR234 in binding of both TraM and DNA. We found that K213A mutation of TraR{sub NGR} abolished DNA binding, however, did not alter TraM binding. Mutations of TraM-interfacing TraR{sub NGR} residues decreased the TraR-TraM interaction, but did not affect the DNA-binding activity of TraR{sub NGR}. Thus, our biochemical studies support the independent binding sites on TraR for TraM and DNA. We also found that point mutations in TraR{sub NGR} appeared to decrease the TraR-TraM interaction more effectively than those in TraM{sub NGR}, consistent with structural observations that individual TraR{sub NGR} residues contact with more TraM{sub NGR} residues than each TraM{sub NGR} residues with TraR{sub NGR} residues. Finally, we showed that TraM inhibition on DNA-binding of TraR was driven thermodynamically. We discussed subtle mechanistic differences in Tra

  2. Involvement of the Cys-Tyr cofactor on iron binding in the active site of human cysteine dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Arjune, Sita; Schwarz, Guenter; Belaidi, Abdel A

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur metabolism has gained increasing medical interest over the last years. In particular, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been recognized as a potential marker in oncology due to its altered gene expression in various cancer types. Human CDO is a non-heme iron-dependent enzyme, which catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, which is further metabolized to taurine or pyruvate and sulfate. Several studies have reported a unique post-translational modification of human CDO consisting of a cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157 (Cys-Tyr), which increases catalytic efficiency in a substrate-dependent manner. However, the reaction mechanism by which the Cys-Tyr cofactor increases catalytic efficiency remains unclear. In this study, steady-state kinetics were determined for wild type CDO and two different variants being either impaired or saturated with the Cys-Tyr cofactor. Cofactor formation in CDO resulted in an approximately fivefold increase in k cat and tenfold increase in k cat/K m over the cofactor-free CDO variant. Furthermore, iron titration experiments revealed an 18-fold decrease in K d of iron upon cross-link formation. This finding suggests a structural role of the Cys-Tyr cofactor in coordinating the ferrous iron in the active site of CDO in accordance with the previously postulated reaction mechanism of human CDO. Finally, we identified product-based inhibition and α-ketoglutarate and glutarate as CDO inhibitors using a simplified well plate-based activity assay. This assay can be used for high-throughput identification of additional inhibitors, which may contribute to understand the functional importance of CDO in sulfur amino acid metabolism and related diseases.

  3. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  4. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  5. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  6. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  7. 10 CFR 63.16 - Review of site characterization activities. 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Licenses Preapplication Review § 63.16 Review of... conduct of site characterization activities at the Yucca Mountain site, DOE shall report the nature and... activities at the Yucca Mountain site, NRC staff shall be permitted to visit and inspect the locations...

  8. Automated titration method for use on blended asphalts

    DOEpatents

    Pauli, Adam T.; Robertson, Raymond E.; Branthaver, Jan F.; Schabron, John F.

    2012-08-07

    A system for determining parameters and compatibility of a substance such as an asphalt or other petroleum substance uses titration to highly accurately determine one or more flocculation occurrences and is especially applicable to the determination or use of Heithaus parameters and optimal mixing of various asphalt stocks. In a preferred embodiment, automated titration in an oxygen gas exclusive system and further using spectrophotometric analysis (2-8) of solution turbidity is presented. A reversible titration technique enabling in-situ titration measurement of various solution concentrations is also presented.

  9. Rapid Clozapine Titration in Patients with Treatment Refractory Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, Cana Aksoy; Özdemir, Armağan; Sağlam, Nazife Gamze Usta; Turan, Şenol; Poyraz, Burç Çağrı; Tomruk, Nesrin; Duran, Alaattin

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of rapid clozapine titration in patients with schizophrenia in hospital settings. We conducted a retrospective two-center cohort study to compare the safety and effectiveness of clozapine with different titration rates in treatment-refractory patients with schizophrenia. In the first center, clozapine was started at 25-50 mg followed by 50-100 mg as needed every 6 h on day 1, followed by increases of 50-100 mg/day. In the second center, titration was slower; clozapine initiated with 12.5-50 mg on day 1 followed by increases of 25-50 mg/day. The number of days between starting of clozapine until discharge was shorter in the rapid titration group (22.4 ± 8.72 vs 27.0 ± 10.5, p = 0.1). Number of days of total hospital stay were significantly shorter in the rapid titration group (29.6 ± 10.6 vs 41.2 ± 14.8, p = 0.002). Hypotension was more common in the rapid titration group and one patient had suspected myocarditis. Rapid clozapine titration appeared safe and effective. The length of stay following initiation of clozapine was shorter in the rapid-titration group, although this was not statistically significant. However starting clozapine earlier together with rapid titration has significantly shortened the length of hospital stay in patients with treatment refractory schizophrenia.

  10. A computer-controlled potentiometric/spectrophotometric titrator

    PubMed Central

    Stong, John D.

    1988-01-01

    A laboratory computer controlled potentiometric titrator interfaced to a diode array spectrophotometer is described. The titrator consists of widely used, commercially available components; therefore, major attention is given to modes of interconnection and software implementation in data format and system control. Replicate potentiometric titrations of glycines gave a relative standard deviation in titre of 1.035% and a relative standard deviation in pH of 0.745%. Replicate spectrophotometric titrations of bromophenol blue were analysed at three wavelengths to yield pKa= 3.898 ± 0.075 (1.9% rsd). Methods of data presentation and manipulation are presented. PMID:18925194

  11. Evaluation of the 5 and 8 pH point titration methods for monitoring anaerobic digesters treating solid waste.

    PubMed

    Vannecke, T P W; Lampens, D R A; Ekama, G A; Volcke, E I P

    2015-01-01

    Simple titration methods certainly deserve consideration for on-site routine monitoring of volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration and alkalinity during anaerobic digestion (AD), because of their simplicity, speed and cost-effectiveness. In this study, the 5 and 8 pH point titration methods for measuring the VFA concentration and carbonate system alkalinity (H2CO3*-alkalinity) were assessed and compared. For this purpose, synthetic solutions with known H2CO3*-alkalinity and VFA concentration as well as samples from anaerobic digesters treating three different kind of solid wastes were analysed. The results of these two related titration methods were verified with photometric and high-pressure liquid chromatography measurements. It was shown that photometric measurements lead to overestimations of the VFA concentration in the case of coloured samples. In contrast, the 5 pH point titration method provides an accurate estimation of the VFA concentration, clearly corresponding with the true value. Concerning the H2CO3*-alkalinity, the most accurate and precise estimations, showing very similar results for repeated measurements, were obtained using the 8 pH point titration. Overall, it was concluded that the 5 pH point titration method is the preferred method for the practical monitoring of AD of solid wastes due to its robustness, cost efficiency and user-friendliness.

  12. GAS HYDRATES AT TWO SITES OF AN ACTIVE CONTINENTAL MARGIN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart on the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m.

  13. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: III -- Mechanism of site blocking

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    It has been shown in Parts I and II of this paper that heteroflocculation can be controlled by poisoning the sites for flocculant adsorption using a site blocking agent (SBA). An efficient SBA was determined to be the lower molecular weight fraction of the flocculant. In this paper, the underlying mechanism of SBA action is described. Also, the mathematical model detailed in Part I is used to determine the effect of different SBAs on apatite-dolomite separation efficiency. It has been demonstrated that the depression in flocculation is directly related to the site blocking parameter ([bar [Phi

  14. Dynamically achieved active site precision in enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Klinman, Judith P

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: The grand challenge in enzymology is to define and understand all of the parameters that contribute to enzymes' enormous rate accelerations. The property of hydrogen tunneling in enzyme reactions has moved the focus of research away from an exclusive focus on transition state stabilization toward the importance of the motions of the heavy atoms of the protein, a role for reduced barrier width in catalysis, and the sampling of a protein conformational landscape to achieve a family of protein substates that optimize enzyme-substrate interactions and beyond. This Account focuses on a thermophilic alcohol dehydrogenase for which the chemical step of hydride transfer is rate determining across a wide range of experimental conditions. The properties of the chemical coordinate have been probed using kinetic isotope effects, indicating a transition in behavior below 30 °C that distinguishes nonoptimal from optimal C-H activation. Further, the introduction of single site mutants has the impact of either enhancing or eliminating the temperature dependent transition in catalysis. Biophysical probes, which include time dependent hydrogen/deuterium exchange and fluorescent lifetimes and Stokes shifts, have also been pursued. These studies allow the correlation of spatially resolved transitions in protein motions with catalysis. It is now possible to define a long-range network of protein motions in ht-ADH that extends from a dimer interface to the substrate binding domain across to the cofactor binding domain, over a distance of ca. 30 Å. The ongoing challenge to obtaining spatial and temporal resolution of catalysis-linked protein motions is discussed.

  15. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  16. Monoclonal antibody against the active site of caeruloplasmin and the ELISA system detecting active caeruloplasmin.

    PubMed

    Hiyamuta, S; Ito, K

    1994-04-01

    Serum caeruloplasmin deficiency is a characteristic biochemical abnormality found in patients with Wilson's disease, but the mechanism of this disease is unknown. Although the phenylenediamine oxidase activity of serum caeruloplasmin is markedly low in patients with Wilson's disease, mRNA of caeruloplasmin exists to some extent. To investigate the deficiency of caeruloplasmin oxidase activity in Wilson's disease, we generated 14 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and selected ID1, which had the strongest reactivity, and ID2, which had neutralizing ability. We also established a system to measure active caeruloplasmin specifically using these MAbs. These MAbs and the system will be useful tools in analyzing the active site of caeruloplasmin in patients with Wilson's disease.

  17. On the accuracy of acid-base determinations from potentiometric titrations using only a few points from the titration curve.

    PubMed

    Olin, A; Wallén, B

    1977-05-01

    There are several procedures which use only a few points on the titration curve for the calculation of equivalence volumes in acid-base titrations. The accuracy of such determinations will depend on the positions of the points on the titration curve. The effects of errors in the stability constants and in the pH measurements on the accuracy of the analysis have been considered, and the results are used to establish the conditions under which these errors are minimized.

  18. Robotics and Automation Activities at the Savannah River Site: A Site Report for SUBWOG 39F

    SciTech Connect

    Teese, G.D.

    1995-09-28

    The Savannah River Site has successfully used robots, teleoperators, and remote video to reduce exposure to ionizing radiation, improve worker safety, and improve the quality of operations. Previous reports have described the use of mobile teleoperators in coping with a high level liquid waste spill, the removal of highly contaminated equipment, and the inspection of nuclear reactor vessels. This report will cover recent applications at the Savannah River, as well as systems which SRS has delivered to other DOE site customers.

  19. Control of active sites in selective flocculation: II -- Role of site blocking agents

    SciTech Connect

    Behl, S.; Moudgil, B.M. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Control of heteroflocculation using a lower molecular weight fraction of the flocculant as a site blocking agent is demonstrated in the apatite-dolomite-polyethylene oxide system. The most effective SBA (site blocking agent) was determined to be the highest molecular weight fraction of the flocculant itself which was not capable of flocculating any of the components of the mixture. In the presence of the SBA, flocculant adsorption decreased significantly on apatite particles, thereby inhibiting coflocculation.

  20. Single-experiment displacement assay for quantifying high-affinity binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Krainer, Georg; Keller, Sandro

    2015-04-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the gold standard for dissecting the thermodynamics of a biomolecular binding process within a single experiment. However, reliable determination of the dissociation constant (KD) from a single titration is typically limited to the range 100 μM>KD>1 nM. Interactions characterized by a lower KD can be assessed indirectly by so-called competition or displacement assays, provided that a suitable competitive ligand is available whose KD falls within the directly accessible window. However, this protocol is limited by the fact that it necessitates at least two titrations to characterize one high-affinity inhibitor, resulting in considerable consumption of both sample material and time. Here, we introduce a fast and efficient ITC displacement assay that allows for the simultaneous characterization of both a high-affinity ligand and a moderate-affinity ligand competing for the same binding site on a receptor within a single experiment. The protocol is based on a titration of the high-affinity ligand into a solution containing the moderate-affinity ligand bound to the receptor present in excess. The resulting biphasic binding isotherm enables accurate and precise determination of KD values and binding enthalpies (ΔH) of both ligands. We discuss the theoretical background underlying the approach, demonstrate its practical application to metal ion chelation, explore its potential and limitations with the aid of simulations and statistical analyses, and elaborate on potential applications to protein-inhibitor interactions.

  1. Automated analysis of calorimetric demicellization titrations.

    PubMed

    Textor, Martin; Keller, Sandro

    2015-09-15

    Determination of the critical micellar concentration of surfactants and of the heat of demicellization by means of isothermal titration calorimetry usually involves either calculation of the first derivative of the heat of demicellization with respect to surfactant concentration or application of a generic sigmoidal fit to the demicellization isotherm. Here, we show that a combination of both approaches provides an unbiased and reproducible data analysis strategy without the need for user input other than the calorimetric data proper. The approach is explained and exemplified using demicellization isotherms of the fluorinated surfactant F6OPC (3,3,4,4,5,5,6,6,7,7,8,8,8-tridecafluoro-n-octylphosphocholine) and the zwitterionic detergent CHAPSO (3-([3-cholamidopropyl]dimethylammonio)-2-hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate).

  2. Production and titration of lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Patrick; Trono, Didier

    2006-11-01

    Lentiviral vectors have emerged over the last decade as powerful, reliable and safe tools for stable gene transfer in a wide variety of mammalian cells. Unlike other vectors derived from oncoretroviruses, they allow for stable gene delivery into most nondividing primary cells, including neurons. This is why LVs are becoming the most useful and promising tools in the field of neuroscience, not only for research, but also for future gene and cell therapy approaches. Lentivectors (LVs) derived from HIV-1 have gradually evolved to display many desirable features aimed at increasing both their safety and their versatility. These latest designs are reviewed in this unit. This unit also describes protocols for production and titration of LVs that can be implemented in a research laboratory setting, with an emphasis on standardization to improve transposability of results between laboratories.

  3. Killed poliovirus antigen titration in humans.

    PubMed

    Salk, J; Cohen, H; Fillastre, C; Stoeckel, P; Rey, J L; Schlumberger, M; Nicolas, A; van Steenis, G; van Wezel, A L; Triau, R; Saliou, P; Barry, L F; Moreau, J P; Mérieux, C

    1978-01-01

    To establish the antigen content of a killed poliovirus vaccine sufficiently potent to induce immunity with one or two doses and to establish a reference standard vaccine which has been tested under field conditions, a titration was carried out in infants to determine the amount of each of the three antigenic types of poliovirus vaccine required to induce seroconversion with a single dose. It has been observed that over a critical range of antigen concentration there is an essentially linear relationship between antibody response and quantity of antigen administered. More than 90 percent of the groups studied had detectable antibody after receiving single injections of 80, 8 and 64 D-antigen units of Types I, II and III, respectively. Four-fold less antigen for each of the three types was less effective. The implications of these findings for an efficient immunization procedure are discussed.

  4. Rapid method for SV40 titration.

    PubMed

    Drayman, Nir; Kler, Slava; Ben-nun-Shaul, Orly; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2010-03-01

    SV40 titer is determined traditionally by the conventional plaque assay. Plaques appear after several rounds of infection and the assay takes around two weeks, which may delay research. A simpler assay was developed, based on detection of T-antigen in the infected cells by flow cytometry. Cells grown in 6-well plates are infected with serial dilutions of the viral stock, harvested 48h post-infection, stained and analyzed for T-antigen using a flow cytometer. The viral titer is calculated based on the percentage of T-antigen positive cells. The procedure is accomplished in 2 days. Unexpectedly we found that titers on different permissive African Green Monkey kidney cell lines were consistently different, suggesting variable susceptibility to SV40 infection. The method described, optimized for SV40 titration, may be adapted readily to other viruses.

  5. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry to Characterize Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano; Zambelli, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a technique that measures the heat released or absorbed during a chemical reaction as an intrinsic probe to characterize any chemical process that involves heat changes spontaneously occurring during the reaction. The general features of this method to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of enzymatic reactions (kcat, KM, ΔH) are described and discussed here together with some detailed applications to specific cases. ITC does not require any modification or labeling of the system under analysis, can be performed in solution, and needs only small amounts of enzyme. These properties make ITC an invaluable, powerful, and unique tool to extend the knowledge of enzyme kinetics to drug discovery.

  6. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry of Chiral Polymeric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Werber, Liora; Preiss, Laura C; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2015-09-01

    Chiral polymeric nanoparticles are of prime importance, mainly due to their enantioselective potential, for many applications such as catalysis and chiral separation in chromatography. In this article we report on the preparation of chiral polymeric nanoparticles by miniemulsion polymerization. In addition, we describe the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure the chiral interactions and the energetics of the adsorption of enantiomers from aqueous solutions onto chiral polymeric nanoparticles. The characterization of chirality in nano-systems is a very challenging task; here, we demonstrate that ITC can be used to accurately determine the thermodynamic parameters associated with the chiral interactions of nanoparticles. The use of ITC to measure the energetics of chiral interactions and recognition at the surfaces of chiral nanoparticles can be applied to other nanoscale chiral systems and can provide further insight into the chiral discrimination processes of nanomaterials.

  7. Macromolecular competition titration method accessing thermodynamics of the unmodified macromolecule-ligand interactions through spectroscopic titrations of fluorescent analogs.

    PubMed

    Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz; Jezewska, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of thermodynamically rigorous binding isotherms provides fundamental information about the energetics of the ligand-macromolecule interactions and often an invaluable insight about the structure of the formed complexes. The Macromolecular Competition Titration (MCT) method enables one to quantitatively obtain interaction parameters of protein-nucleic acid interactions, which may not be available by other methods, particularly for the unmodified long polymer lattices and specific nucleic acid substrates, if the binding is not accompanied by adequate spectroscopic signal changes. The method can be applied using different fluorescent nucleic acids or fluorophores, although the etheno-derivatives of nucleic acid are especially suitable as they are relatively easy to prepare, have significant blue fluorescence, their excitation band lies far from the protein absorption spectrum, and the modification eliminates the possibility of base pairing with other nucleic acids. The MCT method is not limited to the specific size of the reference nucleic acid. Particularly, a simple analysis of the competition titration experiments is described in which the fluorescent, short fragment of nucleic acid, spanning the exact site-size of the protein-nucleic acid complex, and binding with only a 1:1 stoichiometry to the protein, is used as a reference macromolecule. Although the MCT method is predominantly discussed as applied to studying protein-nucleic acid interactions, it can generally be applied to any ligand-macromolecule system by monitoring the association reaction using the spectroscopic signal originating from the reference macromolecule in the presence of the competing macromolecule, whose interaction parameters with the ligand are to be determined.

  8. Determination of microscopic acid-base parameters from NMR-pH titrations.

    PubMed

    Szakács, Zoltán; Kraszni, Márta; Noszál, Béla

    2004-03-01

    The theory and practice of proton microspeciation based on NMR-pH titrations are surveyed. Principles of bi-, tri-, tetra-, and n-protic microequilibrium systems are discussed. Evaluation methods are exemplified by case studies on bi- and tetraprotic biomolecules. Selection criteria and properties of 'reporter' NMR nuclei are described. Literature data on complete microspeciations of small ligands and site-specific basicity characterizations of peptides and proteins are critically reviewed.

  9. Continuous on-line feedback based flow titrations. Complexometric titrations of calcium and magnesium.

    PubMed

    Jo, Kyoo Dong; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2003-05-28

    The methodology of continuous feedback-based flow titrations and the principle of compensating errors [Anal. Chem. 72 (2000) 4713; Anal. Chim. Acta 435 (2001) 289] were applied to the determination of calcium and magnesium ions with EDTA. The flow of the titrant, EDTA, varied linearly in response to a controller output voltage while the total flow (F(T), the sum of the metal ion sample flow and the titrant flow) was held constant. The sample was pre-doped with a metal ion indicator; the status of the indicator color in the mixed stream was monitored by an optical detector and was used for governing the controller output as well as for interpreting the results of the titrations. The titrant flow initially ramped upward linearly. As a change in the color corresponding to the equivalence point was sensed by the detector, the controller output (instantaneous value V(H)) reversed its ramp direction, thus decreasing the titrant flow linearly at the same ramp rate. When the predefined absorbance corresponding to the equivalence point was sensed again, the controller voltage (instantaneous value V(L)) was ramped in reverse once more, going upward. Because of the lag time between a change in the controller output and its effect being sensed by the detector, the controller voltage corresponding to the actual equivalence point was the average of V(H) and V(L). Continuous sensor-governed operation of the controller resulted in a triangular waveform. The mean of this waveform during any cycle gives the equivalence point controller voltage V(E). This principle allowed true titrations with good reproducibility (0.2-0.7% R.S.D.) and throughput (33-42 s per titration).

  10. Microscale pH Titrations Using an Automatic Pipet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Edward B.; Kortz, Carrie L.; Taylor, Max A.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a microscale pH titration technique that utilizes an automatic pipet. A small aliquot (1-5 mL) of the analyte solution is titrated with repeated additions of titrant, and the pH is determined after each delivery. The equivalence point is determined graphically by either the second derivative method or a Gran plot. The pipet can be…

  11. A Closer Look at Acid-Base Olfactory Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neppel, Kerry; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Queen, Connie; Reed, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory titrations using raw onions and eugenol as acid-base indicators are reported. An in-depth investigation on olfactory titrations is presented to include requirements for potential olfactory indicators and protocols for using garlic, onions, and vanillin as acid-base olfactory indicators are tested.

  12. pH Static Titration: A Quasistatic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalowski, Tadeusz; Toporek, Marcin; Rymanowski, Maciej

    2007-01-01

    The pH-static titration is applicable to those systems where at least two types of reactions occur in comparable intensities. The commonalities in titrimetric procedure realized according to pH-static titration, irrespective of the kind of chemical processes occurring are discussed.

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Sulfate in Water by Indirect EDTA Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belle-Oudry, Deirdre

    2008-01-01

    The determination of sulfate concentration in water by indirect EDTA titration is an instructive experiment that is easily implemented in an analytical chemistry laboratory course. A water sample is treated with excess barium chloride to precipitate sulfate ions as BaSO[subscript 4](s). The unprecipitated barium ions are then titrated with EDTA.…

  14. New method for titration of virus infectivity by immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Usuba, O; Schulman, J L; Deatly, A M; Bona, C A; Moran, T M

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a new method for titration of viruses utilizing automated microtiter technology. Compared to existing methods such as plaque assay or hemagglutination titration of influenza virus, the new method offers distinct advantages in terms of time and effort. In addition because multiple replicates can easily be employed accuracy can be increased.

  15. Characterization of binding interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Doyle

    1997-02-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry is a high-accuracy method for measuring binding affinities. Titration calorimetry is a universal method that has broad impact throughout biotechnology. In recent years, microcalorimeters that are capable of characterizing binding interactions of biological macromolecules have become commercially available. Results from these studies are providing new insight into the molecular nature of macromolecular interactions.

  16. Spectrophotometric Titration of a Mixture of Calcium and Magnesium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Robert; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a spectrophotometric titration experiment which uses a manual titration spectrophotometer and manually operated buret, rather than special instrumentation. Identifies the equipment, materials, and procedures needed for the completion of the experiment. Recommends the use of this experiment in introductory quantitative analysis…

  17. Mutation at a Strictly Conserved, Active Site Tyrosine in the Copper Amine Oxidase Leads to Uncontrolled Oxygenase Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhi-wei; Datta, Saumen; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Klinman, Judith P.; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-09-07

    The copper amine oxidases carry out two copper-dependent processes: production of their own redox-active cofactor (2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalanine quinone, TPQ) and the subsequent oxidative deamination of substrate amines. Because the same active site pocket must facilitate both reactions, individual active site residues may serve multiple roles. We have examined the roles of a strictly conserved active site tyrosine Y305 in the copper amine oxidase from Hansenula polymorpha kinetically, spetroscopically (Dubois and Klinman (2006) Biochemistry 45, 3178), and, in the present work, structurally. While the Y305A enzyme is almost identical to the wild type, a novel, highly oxygenated species replaces TPQ in the Y305F active sites. This new structure not only provides the first direct detection of peroxy intermediates in cofactor biogenesis but also indicates the critical control of oxidation chemistry that can be conferred by a single active site residue.

  18. Selective coulometric release of ions from ion selective polymeric membranes for calibration-free titrations.

    PubMed

    Bhakthavatsalam, Vishnupriya; Shvarev, Alexey; Bakker, Eric

    2006-08-01

    Coulometry belongs to one of the few known calibration-free techniques and is therefore highly attractive for chemical analysis. Titrations performed by the coulometric generation of reactants is a well-known approach in electrochemistry, but suffers from limited selectivity and is therefore not generally suited for samples of varying or unknown composition. Here, the selective coulometric release of ionic reagents from ion-selective polymeric membrane materials ordinarily used for the fabrication of ion-selective electrodes is described. The selectivity of such membranes can be tuned to a significant extent by the type and concentration of ionophore and lipophilic ion-exchanger and is today well understood. An anodic current of fixed magnitude and duration may be imposed across such a membrane to release a defined quantity of ions with high selectivity and precision. Since the applied current relates to a defined ion flux, a variety of non-redox active ions may be accurately released with this technique. In this work, the released titrant's activity was measured with a second ionophore-based ion-selective electrode and corresponded well with expected dosage levels on the basis of Faraday's law of electrolysis. Initial examples of coulometric titrations explored here include the release of calcium ions for complexometric titrations, including back titrations, and the release of barium ions to determine sulfate.

  19. Identification of promiscuous ene-reductase activity by mining structural databases using active site constellations

    PubMed Central

    Steinkellner, Georg; Gruber, Christian C.; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Binter, Alexandra; Steiner, Kerstin; Winkler, Christoph; Łyskowski, Andrzej; Schwamberger, Orsolya; Oberer, Monika; Schwab, Helmut; Faber, Kurt; Macheroux, Peter; Gruber, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The exploitation of catalytic promiscuity and the application of de novo design have recently opened the access to novel, non-natural enzymatic activities. Here we describe a structural bioinformatic method for predicting catalytic activities of enzymes based on three-dimensional constellations of functional groups in active sites (‘catalophores’). As a proof-of-concept we identify two enzymes with predicted promiscuous ene-reductase activity (reduction of activated C–C double bonds) and compare them with known ene-reductases, that is, members of the Old Yellow Enzyme family. Despite completely different amino acid sequences, overall structures and protein folds, high-resolution crystal structures reveal equivalent binding modes of typical Old Yellow Enzyme substrates and ligands. Biochemical and biocatalytic data show that the two enzymes indeed possess ene-reductase activity and reveal an inverted stereopreference compared with Old Yellow Enzymes for some substrates. This method could thus be a tool for the identification of viable starting points for the development and engineering of novel biocatalysts. PMID:24954722

  20. An ionizable active-site tryptophan imparts catalase activity to a peroxidase core.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Peter C; Carpena, Xavi; Vidossich, Pietro; Fita, Ignacio; Rovira, Carme

    2014-05-21

    Catalase peroxidases (KatG's) are bifunctional heme proteins that can disproportionate hydrogen peroxide (catalatic reaction) despite their structural dissimilarity with monofunctional catalases. Using X-ray crystallography and QM/MM calculations, we demonstrate that the catalatic reaction of KatG's involves deprotonation of the active-site Trp, which plays a role similar to that of the distal His in monofunctional catalases. The interaction of a nearby mobile arginine with the distal Met-Tyr-Trp essential adduct (in/out) acts as an electronic switch, triggering deprotonation of the adduct Trp.

  1. Nuclear Site Security in the Event of Terrorist Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, M.L.; Sims, J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper, presented as a poster, identifies why ballistic protection should now be considered at nuclear sites to counter terrorist threats. A proven and flexible form of multi purpose protection is described in detail with identification of trial results that show its suitability for this role. (authors)

  2. Preliminary siting activities for new waste handling facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.D.; Hoskinson, R.L.; Kingsford, C.O.; Ball, L.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Idaho Waste Processing Facility, the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility, and the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility are new waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that have been proposed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). A prime consideration in planning for such facilities is the selection of a site. Since spring of 1992, waste management personnel at the INEL have been involved in activities directed to this end. These activities have resulted in the (a) identification of generic siting criteria, considered applicable to either treatment or disposal facilities for the purpose of preliminary site evaluations and comparisons, (b) selection of six candidate locations for siting,and (c) site-specific characterization of candidate sites relative to selected siting criteria. This report describes the information gathered in the above three categories for the six candidate sites. However, a single, preferred site has not yet been identified. Such a determination requires an overall, composite ranking of the candidate sites, which accounts for the fact that the sites under consideration have different advantages and disadvantages, that no single site is superior to all the others in all the siting criteria, and that the criteria should be assigned different weighing factors depending on whether a site is to host a treatment or a disposal facility. Stakeholder input should now be solicited to help guide the final selection. This input will include (a) siting issues not already identified in the siting, work to date, and (b) relative importances of the individual siting criteria. Final site selection will not be completed until stakeholder input (from the State of Idaho, regulatory agencies, the public, etc.) in the above areas has been obtained and a strategy has been developed to make a composite ranking of all candidate sites that accounts for all the siting criteria.

  3. Hydrogen-ion titrations of amino acids and proteins in solutions containing concentrated electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Fergg, F.; Kuehner, D.E.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes a first attempt to quantify the net charge as a function of solution pH for lysozyme and {alpha}-chymotrypsin at 0.1 M, 1.0 M and 3.0 M ionic strength, (IS). The calculations are based on the residue (titratable group) pK{sub a}`s in the amino-acid sequence of the protein. To determine these pK{sub a}`s, a simple theory was used which assumes that the pK{sub a}`s are independent from each other in the protein and are equal to their pK{sub a} values in free amino-acid solution (Independent-Site Theory, IST). Residue pK{sub a}`s were obtained from amino-acid hydrogen-ion titrations at three different KCl concentrations corresponding to 0.1M, 1.0M and 3.0M ionic strength. After construction of a suitable apparatus, the experimental procedure and data reduction were computerized to perform a large number of titrations. Most measured pK{sub a}`s showed high reproducibility (the difference of pK{sub a} values observed between two experiments was less than 0.05). For IS = 0.1M, observed pK{sub a}`s agreed with literature values to within a few hundredths of a pH unit. Furthermore, the ionic-strength dependence of the pK{sub a}`s followed the trends reported in the literature, viz. pK{sub a} values decrease with increasing ionic strength until they reach a minimum at about IS = 0.5M. At still higher IS, pK{sub a}`s increase as the ionic strength rises to 3M. The known pK{sub a}`s of all titratable groups in a protein were used with the IST to give a first approximation of how the protein net charge varies with pH at high ionic strength. A comparison of the titration curves based on the IST with experimental lysozyme and {alpha}-chymotrypsin titration data indicates acceptable agreement at IS = 0.1M. However, comparison of measured and calculated titration curves at IS = 1M and IS = 3M indicates only quantitative agreement.

  4. Active Layer and Moisture Measurements for Intensive Site 0 and 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    John Peterson

    2015-04-17

    These are measurements of Active Layer Thickness collected along several lines beginning in September, 2011 to the present. The data were collected at several time periods along the Site0 L2 Line, the Site1 AB Line, and an ERT Monitoring Line near Area A in Site1.

  5. Structural mechanism of RuBisCO activation by carbamylation of the active site lysine

    PubMed Central

    Stec, Boguslaw

    2012-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is a crucial enzyme in carbon fixation and the most abundant protein on earth. It has been studied extensively by biochemical and structural methods; however, the most essential activation step has not yet been described. Here, we describe the mechanistic details of Lys carbamylation that leads to RuBisCO activation by atmospheric CO2. We report two crystal structures of nitrosylated RuBisCO from the red algae Galdieria sulphuraria with O2 and CO2 bound at the active site. G. sulphuraria RuBisCO is inhibited by cysteine nitrosylation that results in trapping of these gaseous ligands. The structure with CO2 defines an elusive, preactivation complex that contains a metal cation Mg2+ surrounded by three H2O/OH molecules. Both structures suggest the mechanism for discriminating gaseous ligands by their quadrupole electric moments. We describe conformational changes that allow for intermittent binding of the metal ion required for activation. On the basis of these structures we propose the individual steps of the activation mechanism. Knowledge of all these elements is indispensable for engineering RuBisCO into a more efficient enzyme for crop enhancement or as a remedy to global warming. PMID:23112176

  6. Using catalytic atom maps to predict the catalytic functions present in enzyme active sites.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-09-18

    Catalytic atom maps (CAMs) are minimal models of enzyme active sites. The structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were examined to determine if proteins with CAM-like geometries in their active sites all share the same catalytic function. We combined the CAM-based search protocol with a filter based on the weighted contact number (WCN) of the catalytic residues, a measure of the "crowdedness" of the microenvironment around a protein residue. Using this technique, a CAM based on the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of trypsin was able to correctly identify catalytic triads in other enzymes within 0.5 Å rmsd of the CAM with 96% accuracy. A CAM based on the Cys-Arg-(Asp/Glu) active site residues from the tyrosine phosphatase active site achieved 89% accuracy in identifying this type of catalytic functionality. Both of these CAMs were able to identify active sites across different fold types. Finally, the PDB was searched to locate proteins with catalytic functionality similar to that present in the active site of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), whose mechanism is not known with certainty. A CAM, based on the conserved Lys-Asp-Lys-Asp tetrad in the ODCase active site, was used to search the PDB for enzymes with similar active sites. The ODCase active site has a geometry similar to that of Schiff base-forming Class I aldolases, with lowest aldolase rmsd to the ODCase CAM at 0.48 Å. The similarity between this CAM and the aldolase active site suggests that ODCase has the correct catalytic functionality present in its active site for the generation of a nucleophilic lysine. PMID:22909276

  7. Using Catalytic Atom Maps to Predict the Catalytic Functions Present in Enzyme Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R.; Houk, K. N.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic Atom Maps (CAMs) are minimal models of enzyme active sites. The structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) were examined to determine if proteins with CAM-like geometries in their active sites all share the same catalytic function. We combined the CAM-based search protocol with a filter based on the weighted contact number (WCN) of the catalytic residues, a measure of the “crowdedness” of the microenvironment around a protein residue. Using this technique, a CAM based on the Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad of trypsin was able to correctly identify catalytic triads in other enzymes within 0.5 Å RMSD of the Catalytic Atom Map with 96% accuracy. A CAM based on the Cys-Arg-(Asp/Glu) active site residues from the tyrosine phosphatase active site achieved 89% accuracy in identifying this type of catalytic functionality. Both of these Catalytic Atom Maps were able to identify active sites across different fold types. Finally, the PDB was searched to locate proteins with catalytic functionality similar to that present in the active site of orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), whose mechanism is not known with certainty. A CAM, based on the conserved Lys-Asp-Lys-Asp tetrad in the ODCase active site, was used to search the PDB for enzymes with similar active sites. The ODCase active site has a geometry similar to that of Schiff base-forming Class I aldolases, with lowest aldolase RMSD to the ODCase CAM at 0.48 Å. The similarity between this CAM and the aldolase active site suggests that ODCase has the correct catalytic functionality present in its active site for the generation of a nucleophilic lysine. PMID:22909276

  8. Active-Site Hydration and Water Diffusion in Cytochrome P450cam: A Highly Dynamic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yinglong; Baudry, Jerome Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (300 ns) are performed on both the apo- (i.e., camphor-free) and camphor-bound cytochrome P450cam (CYP101). Water diffusion into and out of the protein active site is observed without biased sampling methods. During the course of the molecular dynamics simulation, an average of 6.4 water molecules is observed in the camphor-binding site of the apo form, compared to zero water molecules in the binding site of the substrate-bound form, in agreement with the number of water molecules observed in crystal structures of the same species. However, as many as 12 water molecules can be present at a given time in the camphor-binding region of the active site in the case of apo-P450cam, revealing a highly dynamic process for hydration of the protein active site, with water molecules exchanging rapidly with the bulk solvent. Water molecules are also found to exchange locations frequently inside the active site, preferentially clustering in regions surrounding the water molecules observed in the crystal structure. Potential-of-mean-force calculations identify thermodynamically favored trans-protein pathways for the diffusion of water molecules between the protein active site and the bulk solvent. Binding of camphor in the active site modifies the free-energy landscape of P450cam channels toward favoring the diffusion of water molecules out of the protein active site.

  9. Parameterization of an Active Thermal Erosion Site, Caribou Creek, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busey, R.; Bolton, W. R.; Cherry, J. E.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2012-12-01

    Thermokarst features are thought to be an important mechanism for landscape change in permafrost-dominated cold regions, but few such features have been incorporated into full featured landscape models. The root of this shortcoming is that historic observations are not detailed enough to parameterize a model, and the models typically do not include the relevant processes for thermal erosion. A new, dynamic thermokarst feature has been identified at the Caribou-Poker Creek Research Watershed (CPCRW) in the boreal forest of Interior Alaska. Located adjacent to a traditional use trail, this feature terminates directly in Caribou Creek. Erosion within the feature is driven predominantly by fluvial interflow. CPCRW is a Long-Term Ecological Research site underlain by varying degrees of relatively warm, discontinuous permafrost. This poster will describe the suite of measurements that have been undertaken to parameterize the ERODE model for this site, including thorough surveys, time lapse- and aerial photography, and 3-D structure from motion algorithms.

  10. Blogs and Social Network Sites as Activity Systems: Exploring Adult Informal Learning Process through Activity Theory Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heo, Gyeong Mi; Lee, Romee

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses an Activity Theory framework to explore adult user activities and informal learning processes as reflected in their blogs and social network sites (SNS). Using the assumption that a web-based space is an activity system in which learning occurs, typical features of the components were investigated and each activity system then…

  11. Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Recommendations for communication activities and public participation in the Early Site Permit Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-27

    On October 24, 1992, President Bush signed into law the National Energy Policy Act of 1992. The bill is a sweeping, comprehensive overhaul of the Nation`s energy laws, the first in more than a decade. Among other provisions, the National Energy Policy Act reforms the licensing process for new nuclear power plants by adopting a new approach developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1989, and upheld in court in 1992. The NRC 10 CFR Part 52 rule is a three-step process that guarantees public participation at each step. The steps are: early site permit approval; standard design certifications; and, combined construction/operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. Licensing reform increases an organization`s ability to respond to future baseload electricity generation needs with less financial risk for ratepayers and the organization. Costly delays can be avoided because design, safety and siting issues will be resolved before a company starts to build a plant. Specifically, early site permit approval allows for site suitability and acceptability issues to be addressed prior to an organization`s commitment to build a plant. Responsibility for site-specific activities, including communications and public participation, rests with those organizations selected to try out early site approval. This plan has been prepared to assist those companies (referred to as sponsoring organizations) in planning their communications and public involvement programs. It provides research findings, information and recommendations to be used by organizations as a resource and starting point in developing their own plans.

  12. Active Site Structure and Peroxidase Activity of Oxidatively Modified Cytochrome c Species in Complexes with Cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Capdevila, Daiana A; Oviedo Rouco, Santiago; Tomasina, Florencia; Tortora, Verónica; Demicheli, Verónica; Radi, Rafael; Murgida, Daniel H

    2015-12-29

    We report a resonance Raman and UV-vis characterization of the active site structure of oxidatively modified forms of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) free in solution and in complexes with cardiolipin (CL). The studied post-translational modifications of Cyt-c include methionine sulfoxidation and tyrosine nitration, which lead to altered heme axial ligation and increased peroxidase activity with respect to those of the wild-type protein. In spite of the structural and activity differences between the protein variants free in solution, binding to CL liposomes induces in all cases the formation of a spectroscopically identical bis-His axial coordination conformer that more efficiently promotes lipid peroxidation. The spectroscopic results indicate that the bis-His form is in equilibrium with small amounts of high-spin species, thus suggesting a labile distal His ligand as the basis for the CL-induced increase in enzymatic activity observed for all protein variants. For Cyt-c nitrated at Tyr74 and sulfoxidized at Met80, the measured apparent binding affinities for CL are ∼4 times larger than for wild-type Cyt-c. On the basis of these results, we propose that these post-translational modifications may amplify the pro-apoptotic signal of Cyt-c under oxidative stress conditions at CL concentrations lower than for the unmodified protein.

  13. Titration of gold nanoparticles in phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Schadt, Mark J; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-01

    In the organic-aqueous phase transfer process of gold nanoparticles, there are two types of distinctive interfaces involving hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands, the understanding of which is important for the design of functional nanomaterials for analytical/bioanalytical applications and the control over the nanoparticles' nanoactivity and nanotoxicity in different phases. This report describes new findings of an investigation of the quantitative aspect of ligand ion pairing at the capping monolayer structure that drives the phase extraction of gold nanoparticles. Alkanethiolate-capped gold nanoparticles of 8 nm diameter with high size monodispersity (RSD ∼ 5%) were first derivatized by a ligand place exchange reaction with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid to form a mixed monolayer shell consisting of both hydrophobic (-CH3) and hydrophilic (-COOH) groups. It was followed by quantitative titration of the resulting nanoparticles with a cationic species (-NR4(+)) in a toluene phase, yielding ion pairing of -NR4(+) and -COO(-) on part of the capping monolayer. Analysis of the phase extraction allowed a quantitative determination of the percentage of ion pairing and structural changes in the capping monolayer on the nanoparticles. The results, along with morphological characterization, are discussed in terms of the interfacial structural changes and their implications on the rational design of surface-functionalized nanoparticles and fine tuning of the interfacial reactivity. PMID:26523548

  14. Titration of gold nanoparticles in phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Wen; Schadt, Mark J; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-12-01

    In the organic-aqueous phase transfer process of gold nanoparticles, there are two types of distinctive interfaces involving hydrophilic and hydrophobic ligands, the understanding of which is important for the design of functional nanomaterials for analytical/bioanalytical applications and the control over the nanoparticles' nanoactivity and nanotoxicity in different phases. This report describes new findings of an investigation of the quantitative aspect of ligand ion pairing at the capping monolayer structure that drives the phase extraction of gold nanoparticles. Alkanethiolate-capped gold nanoparticles of 8 nm diameter with high size monodispersity (RSD ∼ 5%) were first derivatized by a ligand place exchange reaction with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid to form a mixed monolayer shell consisting of both hydrophobic (-CH3) and hydrophilic (-COOH) groups. It was followed by quantitative titration of the resulting nanoparticles with a cationic species (-NR4(+)) in a toluene phase, yielding ion pairing of -NR4(+) and -COO(-) on part of the capping monolayer. Analysis of the phase extraction allowed a quantitative determination of the percentage of ion pairing and structural changes in the capping monolayer on the nanoparticles. The results, along with morphological characterization, are discussed in terms of the interfacial structural changes and their implications on the rational design of surface-functionalized nanoparticles and fine tuning of the interfacial reactivity.

  15. Identification of ice nucleation active sites on feldspar dust particles.

    PubMed

    Zolles, Tobias; Burkart, Julia; Häusler, Thomas; Pummer, Bernhard; Hitzenberger, Regina; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-03-19

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth's crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  16. Identification of Ice Nucleation Active Sites on Feldspar Dust Particles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dusts originating from Earth’s crust are known to be important atmospheric ice nuclei. In agreement with earlier studies, feldspar was found as the most active of the tested natural mineral dusts. Here we investigated in closer detail the reasons for its activity and the difference in the activity of the different feldspars. Conclusions are drawn from scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, and oil-immersion freezing experiments. K-feldspar showed by far the highest ice nucleation activity. Finally, we give a potential explanation of this effect, finding alkali-metal ions having different hydration shells and thus an influence on the ice nucleation activity of feldspar surfaces. PMID:25584435

  17. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions. PMID:25999343

  18. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  19. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  20. Statistical mechanical model of coupled transcription from multiple promoters due to transcription factor titration.

    PubMed

    Rydenfelt, Mattias; Cox, Robert Sidney; Garcia, Hernan; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) with regulatory action at multiple promoter targets is the rule rather than the exception, with examples ranging from the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) in E. coli that regulates hundreds of different genes simultaneously to situations involving multiple copies of the same gene, such as plasmids, retrotransposons, or highly replicated viral DNA. When the number of TFs heavily exceeds the number of binding sites, TF binding to each promoter can be regarded as independent. However, when the number of TF molecules is comparable to the number of binding sites, TF titration will result in correlation ("promoter entanglement") between transcription of different genes. We develop a statistical mechanical model which takes the TF titration effect into account and use it to predict both the level of gene expression for a general set of promoters and the resulting correlation in transcription rates of different genes. Our results show that the TF titration effect could be important for understanding gene expression in many regulatory settings.

  1. Statistical mechanical model of coupled transcription from multiple promoters due to transcription factor titration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydenfelt, Mattias; Cox, Robert Sidney, III; Garcia, Hernan; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) with regulatory action at multiple promoter targets is the rule rather than the exception, with examples ranging from the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) in E. coli that regulates hundreds of different genes simultaneously to situations involving multiple copies of the same gene, such as plasmids, retrotransposons, or highly replicated viral DNA. When the number of TFs heavily exceeds the number of binding sites, TF binding to each promoter can be regarded as independent. However, when the number of TF molecules is comparable to the number of binding sites, TF titration will result in correlation (“promoter entanglement”) between transcription of different genes. We develop a statistical mechanical model which takes the TF titration effect into account and use it to predict both the level of gene expression for a general set of promoters and the resulting correlation in transcription rates of different genes. Our results show that the TF titration effect could be important for understanding gene expression in many regulatory settings.

  2. An improved apparatus for intragastric titration in the conscious dog.

    PubMed

    Daly, M J; Hartley, R W; Stables, R

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus for automatic intragastric titration with on-line display of results has been described. The apparatus has been validated by titration of exogenous acid injected into the test meal in a reservoir and in vivo by assessing the secretory response of a dog with a gastric fistula to a test meal. A titration display unit provides a record of the secretory response both as a digital printout and a bar chart display. Cimetidine (2 mg kg-1h-1) significantly reduced the secretory response to a test meal.

  3. Novel titration method for surface-functionalised silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofen, Kai; Weber, Siegfried; Chan, Chiu Ping Candace; Majewski, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes three inexpensive and fast analytical methods to characterise grafted particle surfaces. The reaction of silica with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane, (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane and N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid hydrate, respectively, leads to NH2-, SO3H- or COOH-functionalised silica, which were characterised by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry and titration in nonaqueous media as well as with two titration methods in a water-based environment. In the work presented, factors influencing the titrations are pointed out and solutions are presented to overcome these limiting factors are shown.

  4. A comparison of computer methods for seawater alkalinity titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, J. L.; Dyrssen, D.; Jones, E. P.; Wedborg, M.

    1983-04-01

    Potentiometric hydrochloric acid titration of seawater provides a powerful technique for determining components of the carbonate system. Recently, questions have been raised regarding older computer procedures for extracting the carbonate system parameters from the titration curve. We compare four evaluation methods, an early Gran method, the GEOSECS Gran method, a new modified Gran method, and a curve-fitting method. We conclude that the new modified Gran method and the curve-fitting can result in a precision of better than 0.1% but because of possible problems associated with representing all relevant chemical reactions during titration, an alkalinity standard must be established before accuracies of 0.1% can be achieved.

  5. Automatic photometric titrations of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, L.; Brannock, W.W.

    1955-01-01

    Rapid nonsubjective methods have been developed for the determination of calcium and magnesium in carbonate rocks. From a single solution of the sample, calcium is titrated directly, and magnesium is titrated after a rapid removal of R2O3 and precipitation of calcium as the tungstate. A concentrated and a dilute solution of disodium ethylenediamine tetraacetate are used as titrants. The concentrated solution is added almost to the end point, then the weak solution is added in an automatic titrator to determine the end point precisely.

  6. Titratable macroions in multivalent electrolyte solutions: Strong coupling dressed ion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adžić, Nataša; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2016-06-01

    We present a theoretical description of the effect of polyvalent ions on the interaction between titratable macroions. The model system consists of two point-like macroions with dissociable sites, immersed in an asymmetric ionic mixture of monovalent and polyvalent salts. We formulate a dressed ion strong coupling theory, based on the decomposition of the asymmetric ionic mixture into a weakly electrostatically coupled monovalent salt and into polyvalent ions that are strongly electrostatically coupled to the titratable macro-ions. The charge of the macroions is not considered as fixed, but is allowed to respond to local bathing solution parameters (electrostatic potential, pH of the solution, and salt concentration) through a simple charge regulation model. The approach presented, yielding an effective polyvalent-ion mediated interaction between charge-regulated macroions at various solution conditions, describes the strong coupling equivalent of the Kirkwood-Schumaker interaction.

  7. Possible active site of the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin.

    PubMed

    Slootstra, J W; De Geus, P; Haas, H; Verrips, C T; Meloen, R H

    1995-10-01

    Epitopes on thaumatin and monellin were studied using the PEPSCAN-technology. The antibodies used were raised against thaumatin. Only antibodies that, in an ELISA, both recognized thaumatin and monellin were used in the PEPSCAN-analyses. On thaumatin two major overlapping epitopes were identified. On monellin no epitopes could be identified. The identified epitope region on thaumatin shares structural features with various peptide and protein sweeteners. It contains an aspartame-like site which is formed by Asp21 and Phe80, tips of the two extruding loops KGDAALDAGGR19-29 and CKRFGRPP77-84, which are spatially positioned next to each other. Furthermore, sub-sequences of the KGDAALDAGGR19-29 loop are similar to peptide-sweeteners such as L-Asp-D-Ala-L-Ala-methyl ester and L-Asp-D-Ala-Gly-methyl ester. Since the aspartame-like Asp21-Phe80 site and the peptide-sweetener-like sequences are also not present in non-sweet thaumatin-like proteins it is postulated that the KGDAALDAGGR19-29- and CKRFGRPP77-84 loop contain important sweet-taste determinants. This region has previously not been implicated as a sweet-taste determinant of thaumatin.

  8. Assessment of activation products in the Savannah River Site environment

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.

    1996-07-01

    This document assesses the impact of radioactive activation products released from SRS facilities since the first reactor became operational late in 1953. The isotopes reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS: {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 60}C, and {sup 65}Zn. Release pathways, emission control features, and annual releases to the aqueous and atmospheric environments are discussed. No single incident has resulted in a major acute release of activation products to the environment. The releases were the result of normal operations of the reactors and separations facilities. Releases declined over the years as better controls were established and production was reduced. The overall radiological impact of SRS activation product atmospheric releases from 1954 through 1994 on the offsite maximally exposed individual can be characterized by a total dose of 0.76 mrem. During the same period, such an individual received a total dose of 14,400 mrem from non-SRS sources of ionizing radiation present in the environment. SRS activation product aqueous releases between 1954 and 1994 resulted in a total dose of 54 mrem to the offsite maximally exposed individual. The impact of SRS activation product releases on offsite populations also has been evaluated.

  9. Direct sensing of total acidity by chronopotentiometric flash titrations at polymer membrane ion-selective electrodes.

    PubMed

    Gemene, Kebede L; Bakker, Eric

    2008-05-15

    Polymer membrane ion-selective electrodes containing lipophilic ionophores are traditionally interrogated by zero current potentiometry, which, ideally, gives information on the sample activity of ionic species. It is shown here that a discrete cathodic current pulse across an H (+)-selective polymeric membrane doped with the ionophore ETH 5294 may be used for the chronopotentiometric detection of pH in well-buffered samples. However, a reduction in the buffer capacity leads to large deviations from the expected Nernstian response slope. This is explained by the local depletion of hydrogen ions at the sample-membrane interface as a result of the galvanostatically imposed ion flux in direction of the membrane. This depletion is found to be a function of the total acidity of the sample and can be directly monitored chronopotentiometrically in a flash titration experiment. The subsequent application of a baseline potential pulse reverses the extraction process of the current pulse, allowing one to interrogate the sample with minimal perturbation. In one protocol, total acidity is found to be proportional to the magnitude of applied current at the flash titration end point. More conveniently, the square root of the flash titration end point time observed at a fixed applied current is a linear function of the total acid concentration. This suggests that it is possible to perform rapid localized pH titrations at ion-selective electrodes without the need for volumetric titrimetry. The technique is explored here for acetic acid, MES and citric acid with promising results. Polymeric membrane electrodes based on poly(vinyl chloride) plasticized with o-nitrophenyl octyl ether in a 1:2 mass ratio may be used for the detection of acids of up to ca. 1 mM concentration, with flash titration times on the order of a few seconds. Possible limitations of the technique are discussed, including variations of the acid diffusion coefficients and influence of electrical migration.

  10. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  11. Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Nanocarbon: Intrinsic Catalytic Activity and Structure-Function Relationships.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei; Liu, Wei; Guo, Xiaoling; Schlögl, Robert; Su, Dangsheng

    2015-11-01

    Physical and chemical insights into the nature and quantity of the active sites and the intrinsic catalytic activity of nanocarbon materials in alkane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reactions are reported using a novel in situ chemical titration process. A study on the structure-function relationship reveals that the active sites are identical both in nature and function on various nanocarbon catalysts. Additionally, the quantity of the active sites could be used as a metric to normalize the reaction rates, and thus to evaluate the intrinsic activity of nanocarbon catalysts. The morphology of the nanocarbon catalysts at the microscopic scale exhibits a minor influence on their intrinsic ODH catalytic activity. The number of active sites calculated from the titration process indicates the number of catalytic centers that are active (that is, working) under the reaction conditions. PMID:26388451

  12. Characterization of an Active Thermal Erosion Site, Caribou Creek, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busey, R.; Bolton, W. R.; Cherry, J. E.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this project is to estimate volume loss of soil over time from this site, provide parameterizations on erodibility of ice rich permafrost and serve as a baseline for future landscape evolution simulations. Located in the zone of discontinuous permafrost, the interior region of Alaska (USA) is home to a large quantity of warm, unstable permafrost that is both high in ice content and has soil temperatures near the freezing point. Much of this permafrost maintains a frozen state despite the general warming air temperature trend in the region due to the presence of a thick insulating organic mat and a dense root network in the upper sub-surface of the soil column. At a rapidly evolving thermo-erosion site, located within the Caribou-Poker Creeks Research Watershed (part of the Bonanza Creek LTER) near Chatanika, Alaska (N65.140, W147.570), the protective organic layer and associated plants were disturbed by an adjacent traditional use trail and the shifting of a groundwater spring. These triggers have led to rapid geomorphological change on the landscape as the soil thaws and sediment is transported into the creek at the valley bottom. Since 2006 (approximately the time of initiation), the thermal erosion has grown to 170 meters length, 3 meters max depth, and 15 meters maximum width. This research combines several data sets: DGPS survey, imagery from an extremely low altitude pole-based remote sensing (3 to 5 meters above ground level), and imagery from an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) at about 60m altitude.

  13. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  14. Active Site Metal Occupancy and Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterase Activity of Thermotoga maritima HD-GYP.

    PubMed

    Miner, Kyle D; Kurtz, Donald M

    2016-02-16

    HD-GYPs make up a subclass of the metal-dependent HD phosphohydrolase superfamily and catalyze conversion of cyclic di(3',5')-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) to 5'-phosphoguanylyl-(3'→5')-guanosine (pGpG) and GMP. Until now, the only reported crystal structure of an HD-GYP that also exhibits c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity contains a His/carboxylate ligated triiron active site. However, other structural and phylogenetic correlations indicate that some HD-GYPs contain dimetal active sites. Here we provide evidence that an HD-GYP c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase, TM0186, from Thermotoga maritima can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. We show that an as-isolated iron-containing TM0186 has an oxo/carboxylato-bridged diferric site, and that the reduced (diferrous) form is necessary and sufficient to catalyze conversion of c-di-GMP to pGpG, but that conversion of pGpG to GMP requires more than two metals per active site. Similar c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activities were obtained with divalent iron or manganese. On the basis of activity correlations with several putative metal ligand residue variants and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that TM0186 can accommodate both di- and trimetal active sites. Our results also suggest that a Glu residue conserved in a subset of HD-GYPs is required for formation of the trimetal site and can also serve as a labile ligand to the dimetal site. Given the anaerobic growth requirement of T. maritima, we suggest that this HD-GYP can function in vivo with either divalent iron or manganese occupying di- and trimetal sites.

  15. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins' active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  16. Marine Biology Field Trip Sites. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauls, John

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  17. Endolysosomes Are the Principal Intracellular Sites of Acid Hydrolase Activity.

    PubMed

    Bright, Nicholas A; Davis, Luther J; Luzio, J Paul

    2016-09-12

    The endocytic delivery of macromolecules from the mammalian cell surface for degradation by lysosomal acid hydrolases requires traffic through early endosomes to late endosomes followed by transient (kissing) or complete fusions between late endosomes and lysosomes. Transient or complete fusion results in the formation of endolysosomes, which are hybrid organelles from which lysosomes are re-formed. We have used synthetic membrane-permeable cathepsin substrates, which liberate fluorescent reporters upon proteolytic cleavage, as well as acid phosphatase cytochemistry to identify which endocytic compartments are acid hydrolase active. We found that endolysosomes are the principal organelles in which acid hydrolase substrates are cleaved. Endolysosomes also accumulated acidotropic probes and could be distinguished from terminal storage lysosomes, which were acid hydrolase inactive and did not accumulate acidotropic probes. Using live-cell microscopy, we have demonstrated that fusion events, which form endolysosomes, precede the onset of acid hydrolase activity. By means of sucrose and invertase uptake experiments, we have also shown that acid-hydrolase-active endolysosomes and acid-hydrolase-inactive, terminal storage lysosomes exist in dynamic equilibrium. We conclude that the terminal endocytic compartment is composed of acid-hydrolase-active, acidic endolysosomes and acid hydrolase-inactive, non-acidic, terminal storage lysosomes, which are linked and function in a lysosome regeneration cycle. PMID:27498570

  18. Outside-binding site mutations modify the active site's shapes in neuraminidase from influenza A H1N1.

    PubMed

    Tolentino-Lopez, Luis; Segura-Cabrera, Aldo; Reyes-Loyola, Paola; Zimic, Mirko; Quiliano, Miguel; Briz, Veronica; Muñoz-Fernández, Angeles; Rodríguez-Pérez, Mario; Ilizaliturri-Flores, Ian; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2013-01-01

    The recent occurrence of 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic as well as others has raised concern of a far more dangerous outcome should this virus becomes resistant to current drug therapies. The number of clinical cases that are resistant to oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) is larger than the limited number of neuraminidase (NA) mutations (H275Y, N295S, and I223R) that have been identified at the active site and that are associated to oseltamivir resistance. In this study, we have performed a comparative analysis between a set of NAs that have the most representative mutations located outside the active site. The recently crystallized NA-oseltamivir complex (PDB ID: 3NSS) was used as a wild-type structure. After selecting the target NA sequences, their three-dimensional (3D) structure was built using 3NSS as a template by homology modeling. The 3D NA models were refined by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The refined models were used to perform a docking study, using oseltamivir as a ligand. Furthermore, the docking results were refined by free-energy analysis using the MM-PBSA method. The analysis of the MD simulation results showed that the NA models reached convergence during the first 10 ns. Visual inspection and structural measures showed that the mutated NA active sites show structural variations. The docking and MM-PBSA results from the complexes showed different binding modes and free energy values. These results suggest that distant mutations located outside the active site of NA affect its structure and could be considered to be a new source of resistance to oseltamivir, which agrees with reports in the clinical literature.

  19. Active site proton delivery and the lyase activity of human CYP17A1

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Yogan; Gregory, Michael C.; Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2014-01-03

    equivalents and protons are funneled into non-productive pathways. This is similar to previous work with other P450 catalyzed hydroxylation. However, catalysis of carbon–carbon bond scission by the T306A mutant was largely unimpeded by disruption of the CYP17A1 acid-alcohol pair. The unique response of CYP17A1 lyase activity to mutation of Thr306 is consistent with a reactive intermediate formed independently of proton delivery in the active site, and supports involvement of a nucleophilic peroxo-anion rather than the traditional Compound I in catalysis.

  20. A Titration Technique for Demonstrating a Magma Replenishment Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodder, A. P. W.

    1983-01-01

    Conductiometric titrations can be used to simulate subduction-setting volcanism. Suggestions are made as to the use of this technique in teaching volcanic mechanisms and geochemical indications of tectonic settings. (JN)

  1. THE TITRATION OF YELLOW FEVER VIRUS IN STEGOMYIA MOSQUITOES

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nelson C.; Frobisher, Martin; Lloyd, Wray

    1933-01-01

    Titrations were made of yellow fever virus in stegomyia mosquitoes, using rhesus monkeys as test animals. It was found that: (a) The average mosquito immediately after engorging on highly infectious blood contained between 1 and 2 million lethal doses of virus. The titer of freshly ingested blood was as high as 1 billion lethal doses of virus per cubic centimeter. (b) During the fortnight succeeding a meal on infectious blood there occurred a reduction of titratable virus to not more than 1 per cent of that present in the freshly fed insects. (c) The titer was somewhat higher at later periods. This rise in titer signified possibly not a multiplication, but merely an increase of extracellular virus and of that easily freed by grinding to a titratable form. (d) At no later stage did the quantity of titratable virus equal that demonstrable in freshly fed insects. PMID:19870190

  2. Automatic Titrators in the Analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kathryn R.

    1998-09-01

    In 1995 the University of Florida received an NSF-ILI grant to purchase six automatic titrators, which have now been successfully integrated into the analytical and physical chemistry teaching laboratories. After they have mastered fundamental techniques, students in the introductory analytical laboratory gain experience with automated analyses in three experiments: the iodimetric analysis of ascorbic acid, the determination of polymer molecular weight, and the analysis of chloride by ion selective electrode. The titrators are also used in the instrumental analysis laboratory for Karl Fischer titrations and the coulometric analysis of EDTA. A physical chemistry experiment, the kinetics of methyl acetate hydrolysis, has also been modified for use with the titrators Instructor write-ups for all experiments may be obtained via JCE Online.

  3. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  4. Encroachment of Human Activity on Sea Turtle Nesting Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziskin, D.; Aubrecht, C.; Elvidge, C.; Tuttle, B.; Baugh, K.; Ghosh, T.

    2008-12-01

    The encroachment of anthropogenic lighting on sea turtle nesting sites poses a serious threat to the survival of these animals [Nicholas, 2001]. This danger is quantified by combining two established data sets. The first is the Nighttime Lights data produced by the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center [Elvidge et al., 1997]. The second is the Marine Turtle Database produced by the World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC). The technique used to quantify the threat of encroachment is an adaptation of the method described in Aubrecht et al. [2008], which analyzes the stress on coral reef systems by proximity to nighttime lights near the shore. Nighttime lights near beaches have both a direct impact on turtle reproductive success since they disorient hatchlings when they mistake land-based lights for the sky-lit surf [Lorne and Salmon, 2007] and the lights are also a proxy for other anthropogenic threats. The identification of turtle nesting sites with high rates of encroachment will hopefully steer conservation efforts to mitigate their effects [Witherington, 1999]. Aubrecht, C, CD Elvidge, T Longcore, C Rich, J Safran, A Strong, M Eakin, KE Baugh, BT Tuttle, AT Howard, EH Erwin, 2008, A global inventory of coral reef stressors based on satellite observed nighttime lights, Geocarto International, London, England: Taylor and Francis. In press. Elvidge, CD, KE Baugh, EA Kihn, HW Kroehl, ER Davis, 1997, Mapping City Lights with Nighttime Data from the DMSP Operational Linescan System, Photogrammatic Engineering and Remote Sensing, 63:6, pp. 727-734. Lorne, JK, M Salmon, 2007, Effects of exposure to artificial lighting on orientation of hatchling sea turtles on the beach and in the ocean, Endangered Species Research, Vol. 3: 23-30. Nicholas, M, 2001, Light Pollution and Marine Turtle Hatchlings: The Straw that Breaks the Camel's Back?, George Wright Forum, 18:4, p77-82. Witherington, BE, 1999, Reducing Threats To Nesting Habitat, Research and Management Techniques for

  5. Papain labelled with fluorescent thiol-specific reagents as a probe for characterization of interactions between cysteine proteinases and their protein inhibitors by competitive titrations.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, P; Raub-Segall, E; Olson, S T; Björk, I

    1991-06-01

    Papain was labelled by attachment of the fluorescent groups 2-(4'-acetamidoanilino)naphthalene-6-sulphonic acid (AANS) or N-(acetylaminoethyl)-8-naphthylamine-1-sulphonic acid (AEDANS) to the active-site cysteine residue, with the aim of using the labelled papains as probes in competitive titrations of unlabelled cysteine proteinases with their inhibitors. The interaction between the labelled papains and cystatins was accompanied by an increase in fluorescence emission of up to 38-fold for AANS-papain and approximately 3.5-fold for AEDANS-papain. Fluorescence titrations gave dissociation equilibrium constants of 3.1 and 0.6 microM for the binding of chicken cystatin and recombinant human cystatin C respectively to AANS-papain and of 11.9 microM for the binding of chicken cystatin to AEDANS-papain. The kinetics of interaction of chicken cystatin with AANS-papain showed an unusual biphasic dependence of the observed pseudo-first-order rate constant on inhibitor concentration, consistent with the reaction occurring via both pathways of a general two-step binding mechanism. AANS-papain was selected as the most suitable probe for competitive titrations of unlabelled active or inactivated cysteine proteinases with inhibitors. This technique, which provides stoichiometries and dissociation constants for the interaction between unlabelled enzyme and inhibitor, allows monitoring of the interactions by a large fluorescent signal in a wavelength region where the interacting proteins do not contribute to the observed fluorescence. Such competitive titrations of active papain or actinidin with chicken cystatin or recombinant human cystatin C all gave inhibitor/enzyme stoichiometries of close to 1.0. A dissociation constant of 1.8 microM for the reaction of chicken cystatin with a papain derivative, S-[N-(3-carboxypropyl)succinimidyl]-papain, was also determined by the same technique. These results show the usefulness of the fluorescent papains for the characterization of

  6. Overexpression of the influenza virus polymerase can titrate out inhibition by the murine Mx1 protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, T; Pavlovic, J; Staeheli, P; Krystal, M

    1992-07-01

    The murine Mx1 protein is an interferon-inducible protein which confers selective resistance to influenza virus infection both in vitro and in vivo. The precise mechanism by which the murine Mx1 specifically inhibits replication of influenza virus is not known. Previously, sensitive replication systems for influenza virus ribonucleoprotein, in which a synthetic influenza virus-like ribonucleoprotein is replicated and transcribed by influenza virus proteins provided in trans, have been developed. With these systems, the antiviral activity of the murine Mx1 protein was examined. It was found that continued expression of influenza polymerase polypeptides via vaccinia virus vectors can titrate out the inhibitory action of the murine Mx1 protein. This titration of inhibitory activity also occurs when the viral PB2 protein alone is overexpressed, suggesting that an antiviral target for the murine Mx1 polypeptide is the viral PB2 protein.

  7. Reduction of Urease Activity by Interaction with the Flap Covering the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Macomber, Lee; Minkara, Mona S.; Hausinger, Robert P.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing appreciation for the human microbiome coupled with the global rise of antibiotic resistant organisms, it is imperative that new methods be developed to specifically target pathogens. To that end, a novel computational approach was devised to identify compounds that reduce the activity of urease, a medically important enzyme of Helicobacter pylori, Proteus mirabilis, and many other microorganisms. Urease contains a flexible loop that covers its active site; Glide was used to identify small molecules predicted to lock this loop in an open conformation. These compounds were screened against the model urease from Klebsiella aerogenes and the natural products epigallocatechin and quercetin were shown to inhibit at low and high micromolar concentrations, respectively. These molecules exhibit a strong time-dependent inactivation of urease that was not due to their oxygen sensitivity. Rather, these compounds appear to inactivate urease by reacting with a specific Cys residue located on the flexible loop. Substitution of this cysteine by alanine in the C319A variant increased the urease resistance to both epigallocatechin and quercetin, as predicted by the computational studies. Protein dynamics are integral to the function of many enzymes; thus, identification of compounds that lock an enzyme into a single conformation presents a useful approach to define potential inhibitors. PMID:25594724

  8. Application of inhibitor titrations for the detection of oxidative phosphorylation defects in saponin-skinned muscle fibers of patients with mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A V; Winkler, K; Kirches, E; Lins, H; Feistner, H; Kunz, W S

    1997-04-12

    Inhibitor titrations were applied to characterize functional changes in mitochondrial energy metabolism in the skeletal muscle of patients with mitochondrial diseases. For this we titrated the maximal mitochondrial respiration rate of saponin-skinned muscle fibers isolated from the skeletal muscle biopsy with the specific inhibitors of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes I, IV and V-rotenone, azide and oligomycin. For three patients with deletions of mitochondrial DNA and one patient with a complex I deficiency the titrations revealed at rather normal respiration activities of saponin-skinned fibers significant differences to healthy controls: (i) The inhibitor titration curves of the affected enzyme were much steeper and (ii) for almost complete inhibition of respiration a smaller amount of the inhibitor is necessary. The detailed analysis of the titration curves within the framework of metabolic control theory indicated elevated flux control coefficients of the respective complex of respiratory chain. On the other hand, for one patient with a mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, decreased respiration activities of skinned fibers but no redistribution of flux control was observed. We conclude, therefore, that application of inhibitor titrations and the quantitative description of the titration curve can be a valuable approach to elucidate functional defects of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

  9. Thermodynamics of the lysozyme--salt interaction from calorimetric titrations.

    PubMed

    Boncina, Matjaz; Lah, Jurij; Rescic, Jurij; Vlachy, Vojko

    2010-04-01

    It is well-known that the addition of salts influences the properties of proteins in solution. The essential nature of this phenomenon is far from being fully understood, partly due to the absence of the relevant thermodynamic information. To help fill this gap, in this work isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was employed to study the ion-lysozyme association in aqueous buffer solutions at pH = 4.0. ITC curves measured for NaCl, NaBr, NaI, NaNO3, NaSCN, KCl, CaCl2, and BaCl2 salts at three different temperatures were described by a model assuming two sets of independent binding sites on the lysozyme. The resulting thermodynamic parameters of binding of anions (counterions) to the first class of sites (N approximately 7) indicate that the binding constant (K approximately 102 M-1) increases in the order Cl- < Br- < I- < NO3- < SCN-. The anion-lysozyme association is entropy driven, accompanied by a small favorable enthalpy contribution and a positive change in heat capacity. It seems that the entropy and heat capacity increase is due to the water released upon binding, while the net exothermic effect originates from the anion-NH3+ pair formation. Moreover, the results reveal that the nature of the cation has little effect on the thermodynamics of the anion-lysozyme association under the given experimental conditions. Taken together, it seems that the observed thermodynamics of association is a result of a combination of both electrostatic and short-range interactions. The anion ordering reflects the strength of water mediated interactions between anions and lysozyme.

  10. Number of independent parameters in the potentiometric titration of humic substances.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Thomas; Manceau, Alain

    2010-03-16

    With the advent of high-precision automatic titrators operating in pH stat mode, measuring the mass balance of protons in solid-solution mixtures against the pH of natural and synthetic polyelectrolytes is now routine. However, titration curves of complex molecules typically lack obvious inflection points, which complicates their analysis despite the high-precision measurements. The calculation of site densities and median proton affinity constants (pK) from such data can lead to considerable covariance between fit parameters. Knowing the number of independent parameters that can be freely varied during the least-squares minimization of a model fit to titration data is necessary to improve the model's applicability. This number was calculated for natural organic matter by applying principal component analysis (PCA) to a reference data set of 47 independent titration curves from fulvic and humic acids measured at I = 0.1 M. The complete data set was reconstructed statistically from pH 3.5 to 9.8 with only six parameters, compared to seven or eight generally adjusted with common semi-empirical speciation models for organic matter, and explains correlations that occur with the higher number of parameters. Existing proton-binding models are not necessarily overparametrized, but instead titration data lack the sensitivity needed to quantify the full set of binding properties of humic materials. Model-independent conditional pK values can be obtained directly from the derivative of titration data, and this approach is the most conservative. The apparent proton-binding constants of the 23 fulvic acids (FA) and 24 humic acids (HA) derived from a high-quality polynomial parametrization of the data set are pK(H,COOH)(FA) = 4.18 +/- 0.21, pK(H,Ph-OH)(FA) = 9.29 +/- 0.33, pK(H,COOH)(HA) = 4.49 +/- 0.18, and pK(H,Ph-OH)(HA) = 9.29 +/- 0.38. Their values at other ionic strengths are more reliably calculated with the empirical Davies equation than any existing model fit. PMID

  11. Spectroscopic definition of the copper active sites in mordenite: selective methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vanelderen, Pieter; Snyder, Benjamin E R; Tsai, Ming-Li; Hadt, Ryan G; Vancauwenbergh, Julie; Coussens, Olivier; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-05-20

    Two distinct [Cu-O-Cu](2+) sites with methane monooxygenase activity are identified in the zeolite Cu-MOR, emphasizing that this Cu-O-Cu active site geometry, having a ∠Cu-O-Cu ∼140°, is particularly formed and stabilized in zeolite topologies. Whereas in ZSM-5 a similar [Cu-O-Cu](2+) active site is located in the intersection of the two 10 membered rings, Cu-MOR provides two distinct local structures, situated in the 8 membered ring windows of the side pockets. Despite their structural similarity, as ascertained by electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy, the two Cu-O-Cu active sites in Cu-MOR clearly show different kinetic behaviors in selective methane oxidation. This difference in reactivity is too large to be ascribed to subtle differences in the ground states of the Cu-O-Cu sites, indicating the zeolite lattice tunes their reactivity through second-sphere effects. The MOR lattice is therefore functionally analogous to the active site pocket of a metalloenzyme, demonstrating that both the active site and its framework environment contribute to and direct reactivity in transition metal ion-zeolites.

  12. Studies of Mg2+/Ca2+ complexes of naturally occurring dinucleotides: potentiometric titrations, NMR, and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stern, Noa; Major, Dan Thomas; Gottlieb, Hugo Emilio; Weizman, Daniel; Sayer, Alon Haim; Blum, Eliav; Fischer, Bilha

    2012-08-01

    Dinucleotides (Np(n)N'; N and N' are A, U, G, or C, n = 2-7) are naturally occurring physiologically active compounds. Despite the interest in dinucleotides, the composition of their complexes with metal ions as well as their conformations and species distribution in living systems are understudied. Therefore, we investigated a series of Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) complexes of Np(n)N's. Potentiometric titrations indicated that a longer dinucleotide polyphosphate (N is A or G, n = 3-5) linker yields more stable complexes (e.g., log K of 2.70, 3.27, and 3.73 for Ap(n)A-Mg(2+), n = 3, 4, 5, respectively). The base (A or G) or ion (Mg(2+) or Ca(2+)) has a minor effect on K(M)(ML) values. In a physiological medium, the longer Ap(n)As (n = 4, 5) are predicted to occur mostly as the Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) complexes. (31)P NMR monitored titrations of Np(n)N's with Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) ions showed that the middle phosphates of the dinucleotides coordinate with Mg(2+)/Ca(2+). Multidimensional potential of mean force (PMF) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations suggest that Ap(2)A and Ap(4)A coordinate Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) ions in both inner-sphere and outer-sphere modes. The PMF MD simulations additionally provide a detailed picture of the possible coordination sites, as well as the cation binding process. Moreover, both NMR and MD simulations showed that the conformation of the nucleoside moieties in Np(n)N'-Mg(2+)/Ca(2+) complexes remains the same as that of free mononucleotides.

  13. School Pharmacist/School Environmental Hygienic Activities at School Site.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Akiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The "School Health and Safety Act" was enforced in April 2009 in Japan, and "school environmental health standards" were established by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. In Article 24 of the Enforcement Regulations, the duties of the school pharmacist have been clarified; school pharmacists have charged with promoting health activities in schools and carrying out complete and regular checks based on the "school environmental health standards" in order to protect the health of students and staff. In supported of this, the school pharmacist group of Japan Pharmaceutical Association has created and distributed digital video discs (DVDs) on "check methods of school environmental health standards" as support material. We use the DVD to ensure the basic issues that school pharmacists deal with, such as objectives, criteria, and methods for each item to be checked, advice, and post-measures. We conduct various workshops and classes, and set up Q&A committees so that inquiries from members are answered with the help of such activities. In addition, school pharmacists try to improve the knowledge of the school staff on environmental hygiene during their in-service training. They also conduct "drug abuse prevention classes" at school and seek to improve knowledge and recognition of drugs, including "dangerous drugs". PMID:27252053

  14. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Kenny, Paul J; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-05-29

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets.

  15. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability.

  16. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability. PMID:25671686

  17. Site specific rationale for technical impracticability of active groundwater restoration at a former manufactured gas plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, C.M.; Walden, R.H.; MacFarlane, I.D.

    1995-12-31

    The National Contingency Plan (40 CFR Part 300 ) requires that remedial strategies must, at minimum, protect human health and the environment and meet applicable and relevant or appropriate requirements (ARARs). Where groundwater is impacted, maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) and maximum contaminant level goals (MCLGs) set under the Safe Drinking Water Act are often used as ARARs, whether or not the aquifer is a reasonably anticipated future source of drinking water. The US Environmental Protection Agency now recognizes the difficulty of groundwater restoration at sites where dense nonaqueous phase liquids are present, particularly in certain complex hydrogeological settings (EPA 1993). However, demonstration of impracticability generally does not occur until active remediation (e.g., pump and treat) has been shown to be ineffective. A case study of a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) is used to demonstrate how physical and chemical properties of the aquifer and coal tar, the major waste product from MGP sites, influence the feasibility of active restoration. Field characterization investigations, laboratory studies, and groundwater modeling are integrated into a demonstration following EPA guidelines. Laboratory studies included microbiological characterization and natural biodegradation and suggest that intrinsic bioremediation is occurring at this site. This work will be useful as EPA continues to develop presumptive remedies for cleanup under Superfund.

  18. Dissecting electrostatic interactions in Bacillus circulans xylanase through NMR-monitored pH titrations.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Lawrence P; Naito, Daigo; Baturin, Simon J; Okon, Mark; Joshi, Manish D; Nielsen, Jens E

    2011-09-01

    NMR-monitored pH titration curves of proteins provide a rich source of structural and electrostatic information. Although relatively straightforward to measure, interpreting pH-dependent chemical shift changes to obtain site-specific acid dissociation constants (pK (A) values) is challenging. In order to analyze the biphasic titrations exhibited by the side chain (13)C(γ) nuclei of the nucleophilic Glu78 and general acid/base Glu172 in Bacillus circulans xylanase, we have revisited the formalism for the ionization equilibria of two coupled acidic residues. In general, fitting NMR-monitored pH titration curves for such a system will only yield the two macroscopic pK (A) values that reflect the combined effects of both deprotonation reactions. However, through the use of mutations complemented with ionic strength-dependent measurements, we are able to extract the four microscopic pK (Ai) values governing the branched acid/base equilibria of Glu78 and Glu172 in BcX. These data, confirmed through theoretical calculations, help explain the pH-dependent mechanism of this model GH11 xylanase by demonstrating that the kinetically determined pK (A) values and hence catalytic roles of these two residues result from their electrostatic coupling.

  19. Prediction of aluminum, uranium, and co-contaminants precipitation and adsorption during titration of acidic sediments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Luo, Wensui; Watson, David B; Brooks, Scott C; Gu, Baohua

    2013-06-01

    Batch and column recirculation titration tests were performed with contaminated acidic sediments. A generic geochemical model was developed combining precipitation, cation exchange, and surface complexation reactions to describe the observed pH and metal ion concentrations in experiments with or without the presence of CO2. Experimental results showed a slow pH increase due to strong buffering by Al hydrolysis and precipitation and CO2 uptake. The cation concentrations generally decreased at higher pH than those observed in previous tests without CO2. Using amorphous Al(OH)3 and basaluminite precipitation reactions and a cation exchange selectivity coefficient K(Na\\Al) of 0.3, the model approximately described the observed (1) pH titration curve, (2) Ca, Mg, and Mn concentration by cation exchange, and (3) U concentrations by surface complexation with Fe hydroxides at pH < 5 and with liebigite (Ca2UO2(CO3)3·10H2O) precipitation at pH > 5. The model indicated that the formation of aqueous carbonate complexes and competition with carbonate for surface sites could inhibit U and Ni adsorption and precipitation. Our results suggested that the uncertainty in basaluminite solubility is an important source of prediction uncertainty and ignoring labile solid phase Al underestimates the base requirement in titration of acidic sediments.

  20. Prediction of aluminum, uranium, and co-contaminants precipitation and adsorption during titration of acidic sediments.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guoping; Luo, Wensui; Watson, David B; Brooks, Scott C; Gu, Baohua

    2013-06-01

    Batch and column recirculation titration tests were performed with contaminated acidic sediments. A generic geochemical model was developed combining precipitation, cation exchange, and surface complexation reactions to describe the observed pH and metal ion concentrations in experiments with or without the presence of CO2. Experimental results showed a slow pH increase due to strong buffering by Al hydrolysis and precipitation and CO2 uptake. The cation concentrations generally decreased at higher pH than those observed in previous tests without CO2. Using amorphous Al(OH)3 and basaluminite precipitation reactions and a cation exchange selectivity coefficient K(Na\\Al) of 0.3, the model approximately described the observed (1) pH titration curve, (2) Ca, Mg, and Mn concentration by cation exchange, and (3) U concentrations by surface complexation with Fe hydroxides at pH < 5 and with liebigite (Ca2UO2(CO3)3·10H2O) precipitation at pH > 5. The model indicated that the formation of aqueous carbonate complexes and competition with carbonate for surface sites could inhibit U and Ni adsorption and precipitation. Our results suggested that the uncertainty in basaluminite solubility is an important source of prediction uncertainty and ignoring labile solid phase Al underestimates the base requirement in titration of acidic sediments. PMID:23641798

  1. Dissecting electrostatic interactions in Bacillus circulans xylanase through NMR-monitored pH titrations.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Lawrence P; Naito, Daigo; Baturin, Simon J; Okon, Mark; Joshi, Manish D; Nielsen, Jens E

    2011-09-01

    NMR-monitored pH titration curves of proteins provide a rich source of structural and electrostatic information. Although relatively straightforward to measure, interpreting pH-dependent chemical shift changes to obtain site-specific acid dissociation constants (pK (A) values) is challenging. In order to analyze the biphasic titrations exhibited by the side chain (13)C(γ) nuclei of the nucleophilic Glu78 and general acid/base Glu172 in Bacillus circulans xylanase, we have revisited the formalism for the ionization equilibria of two coupled acidic residues. In general, fitting NMR-monitored pH titration curves for such a system will only yield the two macroscopic pK (A) values that reflect the combined effects of both deprotonation reactions. However, through the use of mutations complemented with ionic strength-dependent measurements, we are able to extract the four microscopic pK (Ai) values governing the branched acid/base equilibria of Glu78 and Glu172 in BcX. These data, confirmed through theoretical calculations, help explain the pH-dependent mechanism of this model GH11 xylanase by demonstrating that the kinetically determined pK (A) values and hence catalytic roles of these two residues result from their electrostatic coupling. PMID:21947911

  2. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  3. The calculation of surface orbital energies for specific types of active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.; Cole, F.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p, and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on dispersed metal catalysts. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  4. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  5. Activity of site-specific endonucleases on complexes of plasmid DNA with multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V. P.; Krylova, H. V.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Veligura, A. A.; Shulitsky, B. G.; Asayonok, A. A.; Vaskovtsev, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    We have synthesized and investigated structural and functional properties of plasmid DNA complexes with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for detection of changes in structural state of the plasmid DNA at its recognition by site-specific endonuclease. It has been also established that the site-specific endonuclease is functionally active on the surface of MWCNTs.

  6. 77 FR 5560 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... project proposals on those leases) in identified Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) on the OCS offshore New Jersey... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the... site assessment plans (SAPs) on those leases. BOEM may issue one or more commercial wind energy...

  7. The balance of flexibility and rigidity in the active site residues of hen egg white lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Jian-Xun; Jiang, Fan

    2011-05-01

    The crystallographic temperature factors (B factor) of individual atoms contain important information about the thermal motion of the atoms in a macromolecule. Previously the theory of flexibility of active site has been established based on the observation that the enzyme activity is sensitive to low concentration denaturing agents. It has been found that the loss of enzyme activity occurs well before the disruption of the three-dimensional structural scaffold of the enzyme. To test the theory of conformational flexibility of enzyme active site, crystal structures were perturbed by soaking in low concentration guanidine hydrochloride solutions. It was found that many lysozyme crystals tested could still diffract until the concentration of guanidine hydrochloride reached 3 M. It was also found that the B factors averaged over individually collected data sets were more accurate. Thus it suggested that accurate measurement of crystal temperature factors could be achieved for medium-high or even medium resolution crystals by averaging over multiple data sets. Furthermore, we found that the correctly predicted active sites included not only the more flexible residues, but also some more rigid residues. Both the flexible and the rigid residues in the active site played an important role in forming the active site residue network, covering the majority of the substrate binding residues. Therefore, this experimental prediction method may be useful for characterizing the binding site and the function of a protein, such as drug targeting.

  8. Chemical modification studies on arginine kinase: essential cysteine and arginine residues at the active site.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wen-Jing; Li, Miao; Wang, Xiao-Yun

    2007-12-01

    Chemical modification was used to elucidate the essential amino acids in the catalytic activity of arginine kinase (AK) from Migratoria manilensis. Among six cysteine (Cys) residues only one Cys residue was determined to be essential in the active site by Tsou's method. Furthermore, the AK modified by DTNB can be fully reactivated by dithiothreitol (DTT) in a monophasic kinetic course. At the same time, this reactivation can be slowed down in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the essential Cys is located near the ATP binding site. The ionizing groups at the AK active site were studied and the standard dissociation enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) was 12.38kcal/mol, showing that the dissociation group may be the guanidino of arginine (Arg). Using the specific chemical modifier phenylglyoxal (PG) demonstrated that only one Arg, located near the ATP binding site, is essential for the activity of AK. PMID:17765964

  9. 1993 annual report of hazardous waste activities for the Oak Ridge K-25 site

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report is a detailed listing of all of the Hazardous Waste activities occurring at Martin Marietta`s K-25 site. Contained herein are hazardous waste notification forms, waste stream reports, generator fee forms and various TSDR reports.

  10. A Geochemical Reaction Model for Titration of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Parker, J. C.; Gu, B.; Luo, W.; Brooks, S. C.; Spalding, B. P.; Jardine, P. M.; Watson, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    This study investigates geochemical reactions during titration of contaminated soil and groundwater at the Oak Ridge Reservation in eastern Tennessee. The soils and groundwater exhibits low pH and high concentrations of aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, various trace metals such as nickel and cobalt, and radionuclides such as uranium and technetium. The mobility of many of the contaminant species diminishes with increasing pH. However, base additions to increase pH are strongly buffered by various precipitation/dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions. The ability to predict acid-base behavior and associated geochemical effects is thus critical to evaluate remediation performance of pH manipulation strategies. This study was undertaken to develop a practical but generally applicable geochemical model to predict aqueous and solid-phase speciation during soil and groundwater titration. To model titration in the presence of aquifer solids, an approach proposed by Spalding and Spalding (2001) was utilized, which treats aquifer solids as a polyprotic acid. Previous studies have shown that Fe and Al-oxyhydroxides strongly sorb dissolved Ni, U and Tc species. In this study, since the total Fe concentration is much smaller than that of Al, only ion exchange reactions associated with Al hydroxides are considered. An equilibrium reaction model that includes aqueous complexation, precipitation, ion exchange, and soil buffering reactions was developed and implemented in the code HydroGeoChem 5.0 (HGC5). Comparison of model results with experimental titration curves for contaminated groundwater alone and for soil- water systems indicated close agreement. This study is expected to facilitate field-scale modeling of geochemical processes under conditions with highly variable pH to develop practical methods to control contaminant mobility at geochemically complex sites.

  11. Enzyme kinetics determined by single-injection isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Transtrum, Mark K; Hansen, Lee D; Quinn, Colette

    2015-04-01

    The purposes of this paper are (a) to examine the effect of calorimeter time constant (τ) on heat rate data from a single enzyme injection into substrate in an isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC), (b) to provide information that can be used to predict the optimum experimental conditions for determining the rate constant (k2), Michaelis constant (KM), and enthalpy change of the reaction (ΔRH), and (c) to describe methods for evaluating these parameters. We find that KM, k2 and ΔRH can be accurately estimated without correcting for the calorimeter time constant, τ, if (k2E/KM), where E is the total active enzyme concentration, is between 0.1/τ and 1/τ and the reaction goes to at least 99% completion. If experimental conditions are outside this domain and no correction is made for τ, errors in the inferred parameters quickly become unreasonable. A method for fitting single-injection data to the Michaelis-Menten or Briggs-Haldane model to simultaneously evaluate KM, k2, ΔRH, and τ is described and validated with experimental data. All four of these parameters can be accurately inferred provided the reaction time constant (k2E/KM) is larger than 1/τ and the data include enzyme saturated conditions.

  12. Anisotropic Covalency Contributions to Superexchange Pathways in Type One Copper Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Type one (T1) Cu sites deliver electrons to catalytic Cu active sites: the mononuclear type two (T2) Cu site in nitrite reductases (NiRs) and the trinuclear Cu cluster in the multicopper oxidases (MCOs). The T1 Cu and the remote catalytic sites are connected via a Cys-His intramolecular electron-transfer (ET) bridge, which contains two potential ET pathways: P1 through the protein backbone and P2 through the H-bond between the Cys and the His. The high covalency of the T1 Cu–S(Cys) bond is shown here to activate the T1 Cu site for hole superexchange via occupied valence orbitals of the bridge. This covalency-activated electronic coupling (HDA) facilitates long-range ET through both pathways. These pathways can be selectively activated depending on the geometric and electronic structure of the T1 Cu site and thus the anisotropic covalency of the T1 Cu–S(Cys) bond. In NiRs, blue (π-type) T1 sites utilize P1 and green (σ-type) T1 sites utilize P2, with P2 being more efficient. Comparing the MCOs to NiRs, the second-sphere environment changes the conformation of the Cys-His pathway, which selectively activates HDA for superexchange by blue π sites for efficient turnover in catalysis. These studies show that a given protein bridge, here Cys-His, provides different superexchange pathways and electronic couplings depending on the anisotropic covalencies of the donor and acceptor metal sites. PMID:25310460

  13. Probing impact of active site residue mutations on stability and activity of Neisseria polysaccharea amylosucrase.

    PubMed

    Daudé, David; Topham, Christopher M; Remaud-Siméon, Magali; André, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    The amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea is a transglucosidase from the GH13 family of glycoside-hydrolases that naturally catalyzes the synthesis of α-glucans from the widely available donor sucrose. Interestingly, natural molecular evolution has modeled a dense hydrogen bond network at subsite -1 responsible for the specific recognition of sucrose and conversely, it has loosened interactions at the subsite +1 creating a highly promiscuous subsite +1. The residues forming these subsites are considered to be likely involved in the activity as well as the overall stability of the enzyme. To assess their role, a structure-based approach was followed to reshape the subsite -1. A strategy based on stability change predictions, using the FoldX algorithm, was considered to identify the best candidates for site-directed mutagenesis and guide the construction of a small targeted library. A miniaturized purification protocol was developed and both mutant stability and substrate promiscuity were explored. A range of 8 °C between extreme melting temperature values was observed and some variants were able to synthesize series of oligosaccharides with distributions differing from that of the parental enzyme. The crucial role of subsite -1 was thus highlighted and the biocatalysts generated can now be considered as starting points for further engineering purposes.

  14. 'Unconventional' coordination chemistry by metal chelating fragments in a metalloprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Blachly, Patrick G; Marts, Amy R; Woodruff, Tessa M; de Oliveira, César A F; McCammon, J Andrew; Tierney, David L; Cohen, Seth M

    2014-04-01

    The binding of three closely related chelators: 5-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (allothiomaltol, ATM), 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiomaltol, TM), and 3-hydroxy-4H-pyran-4-thione (thiopyromeconic acid, TPMA) to the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) has been investigated. Two of these ligands display a monodentate mode of coordination to the active site Zn(2+) ion in hCAII that is not recapitulated in model complexes of the enzyme active site. This unprecedented binding mode in the hCAII-thiomaltol complex has been characterized by both X-ray crystallography and X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, the steric restrictions of the active site force the ligands into a 'flattened' mode of coordination compared with inorganic model complexes. This change in geometry has been shown by density functional computations to significantly decrease the strength of the metal-ligand binding. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the mode of binding by small metal-binding groups can be significantly influenced by the protein active site. Diminishing the strength of the metal-ligand bond results in unconventional modes of metal coordination not found in typical coordination compounds or even carefully engineered active site models, and understanding these effects is critical to the rational design of inhibitors that target clinically relevant metalloproteins.

  15. Site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of the active site of porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.I.; Roessner, C.A.; Stolowich, N.J.; Karuso, P.; Williams, H.J.; Grant, S.K.; Gonzalez, M.D.; Hoshino, T. )

    1988-10-18

    The active site of porphobilinogen (PBG){sup 1} deaminase from Escherichia coli has been found to contain an unusual dipyrromethane derived from four molecules of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) covalently linked to Cys-242, one of the two cysteine residues conserved in E. coli and human deaminase. By use of a hemA{sup {minus}} strain of E. coli the enzyme was enriched from (5-{sup 13}C)ALA and examined by {sup 1}H-detected multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy, which revealed all of the salient features of a dipyrromethane composed of two PBG units linked heat to tail and terminating in a CH{sub 2}-S bond to a cysteine residue. Site-specific mutagenesis of Cys-99 and Cys-242, respectively, has shown that substitution of Ser for Cys-99 does not affect the enzymatic activity, whereas substitution of Ser for Cys-242 removes essentially all of the catalytic activity as measured by the conversion of the substrate PBG to uro'gen I. The NMR spectrum of the covalent complex of deaminase with the suicide inhibitor 2-bromo-(2,11-{sup 13}C{sub 2})PBG reveals that the aminomethyl terminus of the inhibitor reacts with the enzyme's cofactor at the {alpha}-free pyrrole. NMR spectroscopy of the ES{sub 2} complex confirmed a PBG-derived head-to-tail dipyrromethane attached to the {alpha}-free pyrrole position of the enzyme. A mechanistic rationale for deaminase is presented.

  16. Nuclear waste: Status of DOE`s nuclear waste site characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    1987-12-31

    Three potential nuclear waste repository sites have been selected to carry out characterization activities-the detailed geological testing to determine the suitability of each site as a repository. The sites are Hanford in south-central Washington State, Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada, and Deaf Smith in the Texas Panhandle. Two key issues affecting the total program are the estimations of the site characterization completion data and costs and DOE`s relationship with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission which has been limited and its relations with affected states and Indian tribes which continue to be difficult.

  17. XAFS Study of the Photo-Active Site of Mo/MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Daisuke; Ichikuni, Nobuyuki; Shimazu, Shogo

    2007-02-01

    An Mo/MCM-41 catalyst was prepared and used for study of propene and 1-butene photo-metathesis reactions. XAFS analysis revealed that hydrogen reduction leads to a decreased role for the Mo=O site. The Mo-O site plays an important role for the olefin photo-metathesis reaction on the H2 reduced Mo/MCM-41. From EXAFS analysis, the active site of photo-metathesis reaction is the Mo=O part for oxidized Mo/MCM-41, whereas it is the Mo-O site for reduced Mo/MCM-41.

  18. The Three Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen 85 Isoforms Have Unique Substrates and Activities Determined by Non-active Site Regions*

    PubMed Central

    Backus, Keriann M.; Dolan, Michael A.; Barry, Conor S.; Joe, Maju; McPhie, Peter; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Lowary, Todd L.; Davis, Benjamin G.; Barry, Clifton E.

    2014-01-01

    The three isoforms of antigen 85 (A, B, and C) are the most abundant secreted mycobacterial proteins and catalyze transesterification reactions that synthesize mycolated arabinogalactan, trehalose monomycolate (TMM), and trehalose dimycolate (TDM), important constituents of the outermost layer of the cellular envelope of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These three enzymes are nearly identical at the active site and have therefore been postulated to exist to evade host immunity. Distal to the active site is a second putative carbohydrate-binding site of lower homology. Mutagenesis of the three isoforms at this second site affected both substrate selectivity and overall catalytic activity in vitro. Using synthetic and natural substrates, we show that these three enzymes exhibit unique selectivity; antigen 85A more efficiently mycolates TMM to form TDM, whereas C (and to a lesser extent B) has a higher rate of activity using free trehalose to form TMM. This difference in substrate selectivity extends to the hexasaccharide fragment of cell wall arabinan. Mutation of secondary site residues from the most active isoform (C) into those present in A or B partially interconverts this substrate selectivity. These experiments in combination with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that differences in the N-terminal helix α9, the adjacent Pro216–Phe228 loop, and helix α5 are the likely cause of changes in activity and substrate selectivity. These differences explain the existence of three isoforms and will allow for future work in developing inhibitors. PMID:25028517

  19. A rapid method for titrating baculovirus stocks using the Sf-9 Easy Titer cell line.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Ralph; Esposito, Dominic

    2009-09-01

    A new rapid method for titrating baculovirus stocks has been developed using a novel cell line Sf-9 Easy Titer (Sf-9ET). The Sf-9ET cell line has been transfected with plasmid DNA containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene under the control of the baculovirus polyhedrin promoter. When used in the titration assay, the Sf-9ET cells turn green when they are infected with baculovirus due to the activation of the polyhedrin promoter/eGFP complex by baculovirus gene products expressed during the infection. Using a 96-well plate format end-point dilution assay, baculovirus titers can be determined in three days using a fluorescence microscope.

  20. Transcriptional activation through ETS domain binding sites in the cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV gene

    SciTech Connect

    Virbasius, J.V.; Scarpulla, R.C. )

    1991-11-01

    A mutational analysis of the rat cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV (RCO4) promoter region revealed the presence of a major control element consisting of a tandemly repeated pair of binding sites for a nuclear factor from HeLa cells. This factor was designated NRF-2 (nuclear respiratory factor 2) because a functional recognition site was also found in the human ATP synthase {beta}-subunit gene. Deletion or site-directed point mutations of the NRF-2 binding sites in the RCO4 promoter resulted in substantial loss of transcriptional activity, and synthetic oligomers of the NRF-2 binding sites from both genes stimulated a heterologous promoter when cloned in cis. NRF-2 binding a transcriptional activation required a purine-rich core sequence, GGAA. This motif is characteristic of the recognition site for a family of activators referred to as ETS domain proteins because of the similarity within their DNA-binding domains to the ets-1 proto-oncogene product. NRF-2 recognized an authentic Ets-1 site within the Moloney murine sarcoma virus long terminal repeat, and this site was able to compete for NRF-2 binding to the RCO4 promoter sequence. However, in contrast to Ets-1, which appears to be exclusive to lymphoid tissues, NRF-2 has the broad tissue distribution expected of a regulator of respiratory chain expression.

  1. Quantitative, directional measurement of electric field heterogeneity in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Fafarman, Aaron T; Sigala, Paul A; Schwans, Jason P; Fenn, Timothy D; Herschlag, Daniel; Boxer, Steven G

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the electrostatic forces and features within highly heterogeneous, anisotropic, and chemically complex enzyme active sites and their connection to biological catalysis remains a longstanding challenge, in part due to the paucity of incisive experimental probes of electrostatic properties within proteins. To quantitatively assess the landscape of electrostatic fields at discrete locations and orientations within an enzyme active site, we have incorporated site-specific thiocyanate vibrational probes into multiple positions within bacterial ketosteroid isomerase. A battery of X-ray crystallographic, vibrational Stark spectroscopy, and NMR studies revealed electrostatic field heterogeneity of 8 MV/cm between active site probe locations and widely differing sensitivities of discrete probes to common electrostatic perturbations from mutation, ligand binding, and pH changes. Electrostatic calculations based on active site ionization states assigned by literature precedent and computational pK(a) prediction were unable to quantitatively account for the observed vibrational band shifts. However, electrostatic models of the D40N mutant gave qualitative agreement with the observed vibrational effects when an unusual ionization of an active site tyrosine with a pK(a) near 7 was included. UV-absorbance and (13)C NMR experiments confirmed the presence of a tyrosinate in the active site, in agreement with electrostatic models. This work provides the most direct measure of the heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of the electrostatic environment within an enzyme active site, and these measurements provide incisive benchmarks for further developing accurate computational models and a foundation for future tests of electrostatics in enzymatic catalysis.

  2. Molecular dynamics explorations of active site structure in designed and evolved enzymes.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Sílvia; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Noey, Elizabeth L; Houk, K N

    2015-04-21

    This Account describes the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to reveal how mutations alter the structure and organization of enzyme active sites. As proposed by Pauling about 70 years ago and elaborated by many others since then, biocatalysis is efficient when functional groups in the active site of an enzyme are in optimal positions for transition state stabilization. Changes in mechanism and covalent interactions are often critical parts of enzyme catalysis. We describe our explorations of the dynamical preorganization of active sites using MD, studying the fluctuations between active and inactive conformations normally concealed to static crystallography. MD shows how the various arrangements of active site residues influence the free energy of the transition state and relates the populations of the catalytic conformational ensemble to the enzyme activity. This Account is organized around three case studies from our laboratory. We first describe the importance of dynamics in evaluating a series of computationally designed and experimentally evolved enzymes for the Kemp elimination, a popular subject in the enzyme design field. We find that the dynamics of the active site is influenced not only by the original sequence design and subsequent mutations but also by the nature of the ligand present in the active site. In the second example, we show how microsecond MD has been used to uncover the role of remote mutations in the active site dynamics and catalysis of a transesterase, LovD. This enzyme was evolved by Tang at UCLA and Codexis, Inc., and is a useful commercial catalyst for the production of the drug simvastatin. X-ray analysis of inactive and active mutants did not reveal differences in the active sites, but relatively long time scale MD in solution showed that the active site of the wild-type enzyme preorganizes only upon binding of the acyl carrier protein (ACP) that delivers the natural acyl group to the active site. In the absence of bound ACP

  3. Sequences flanking the core-binding site modulate glucocorticoid receptor structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Schöne, Stefanie; Jurk, Marcel; Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Dror, Iris; Lebars, Isabelle; Kieffer, Bruno; Imhof, Petra; Rohs, Remo; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2016-09-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds as a homodimer to genomic response elements, which have particular sequence and shape characteristics. Here we show that the nucleotides directly flanking the core-binding site, differ depending on the strength of GR-dependent activation of nearby genes. Our study indicates that these flanking nucleotides change the three-dimensional structure of the DNA-binding site, the DNA-binding domain of GR and the quaternary structure of the dimeric complex. Functional studies in a defined genomic context show that sequence-induced changes in GR activity cannot be explained by differences in GR occupancy. Rather, mutating the dimerization interface mitigates DNA-induced changes in both activity and structure, arguing for a role of DNA-induced structural changes in modulating GR activity. Together, our study shows that DNA sequence identity of genomic binding sites modulates GR activity downstream of binding, which may play a role in achieving regulatory specificity towards individual target genes.

  4. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  5. An overlapping kinase and phosphatase docking site regulates activity of the retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Hirschi, Alexander; Cecchini, Matthew; Steinhardt, Rachel C; Schamber, Michael R; Dick, Frederick A; Rubin, Seth M

    2010-09-01

    The phosphorylation state and corresponding activity of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) are modulated by a balance of kinase and phosphatase activities. Here we characterize the association of Rb with the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c). A crystal structure identifies an enzyme docking site in the Rb C-terminal domain that is required for efficient PP1c activity toward Rb. The phosphatase docking site overlaps with the known docking site for cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk), and PP1 competition with Cdk-cyclins for Rb binding is sufficient to retain Rb activity and block cell-cycle advancement. These results provide the first detailed molecular insights into Rb activation and establish a novel mechanism for Rb regulation in which kinase and phosphatase compete for substrate docking. PMID:20694007

  6. Chemical force titrations of amine- and sulfonic acid-modified poly(dimethylsiloxane).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Oleschuk, Richard D; Horton, J Hugh

    2005-02-15

    Chemical force titrations-measurements of the adhesive interaction between a pair of suitably chemically modified atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip and sample surfaces as a function of pH-have been carried out for various combinations of silanol, amine, carboxylic acid, and sulfonic acid functional groups on both tip and sample. The primary surface material studied was poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). Surface modification was carried out using a plasma oxidation process to form silanol sites; further modification with amine or sulfonic acid sites was carried out by reaction of the silanol sites with the appropriate trialkoxysilane derivative. AFM tips were also modified using trialkoxysilane compounds. In the cases of tip/sample combinations with the same functional group on each, surface pK(1/2) values could be determined. In several "mixed" tip/sample combinations, a peak appeared in the titration curve midway between the surface pK(1/2) values of the tip and sample, consistent with an ionic H-bonding model for the interactions. The amine/sulfonic acid pair showed more complex behavior; the amine-terminated tip/sulfonic acid-terminated PDMS surface force titration curve consisted of two peaks centered at pH 4 and pH 8. Reversing the tip/sample pair resulted in the peak positions being shifted upward by 1.0 pH unit. The peak appearing at lower pH is assigned to electrostatic interactions between the two oppositely charged surfaces, whereas the higher pH peak is believed to arise due to ionic H-bonding interactions. AFM images show the effects on surface patterning of amine- and sulfonic acid-modified PDMS surfaces that have undergone two different oxidation methods (air plasma oxidation and Tesla coil oxidation). The surface morphologies of freshly prepared and 24 h aged air plasma oxidized PDMS are also discussed in this study.

  7. NMR-monitored titration of acid-stress bacterial chaperone HdeA reveals that Asp and Glu charge neutralization produces a loosened dimer structure in preparation for protein unfolding and chaperone activation.

    PubMed

    Garrison, McKinzie A; Crowhurst, Karin A

    2014-02-01

    HdeA is a periplasmic chaperone found in several gram-negative pathogenic bacteria that are linked to millions of cases of dysentery per year worldwide. After the protein becomes activated at low pH, it can bind to other periplasmic proteins, protecting them from aggregation when the bacteria travel through the stomach on their way to colonize the intestines. It has been argued that one of the major driving forces for HdeA activation is the protonation of aspartate and glutamate side chains. The goal for this study, therefore, was to investigate, at the atomic level, the structural impact of this charge neutralization on HdeA during the transition from near-neutral conditions to pH 3.0, in preparation for unfolding and activation of its chaperone capabilities. NMR spectroscopy was used to measure pKa values of Asp and Glu residues and monitor chemical shift changes. Measurements of R2/R1 ratios from relaxation experiments confirm that the protein maintains its dimer structure between pH 6.0 and 3.0. However, calculated correlation times and changes in amide protection from hydrogen/deuterium exchange experiments provide evidence for a loosening of the tertiary and quaternary structures of HdeA; in particular, the data indicate that the dimer structure becomes progressively weakened as the pH decreases. Taken together, these results provide insight into the process by which HdeA is primed to unfold and carry out its chaperone duties below pH 3.0, and it also demonstrates that neutralization of aspartate and glutamate residues is not likely to be the sole trigger for HdeA dissociation and unfolding.

  8. Structural and Kinetic Analyses of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Active Site Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Crichlow, G.; Lubetsky, J; Leng, L; Bucala, R; Lolis, E

    2009-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a secreted protein expressed in numerous cell types that counters the antiinflammatory effects of glucocorticoids and has been implicated in sepsis, cancer, and certain autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the structure of MIF contains a catalytic site resembling the tautomerase/isomerase sites of microbial enzymes. While bona fide physiological substrates remain unknown, model substrates have been identified. Selected compounds that bind in the tautomerase active site also inhibit biological functions of MIF. It had previously been shown that the acetaminophen metabolite, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI), covalently binds to the active site of MIF. In this study, kinetic data indicate that NAPQI inhibits MIF both covalently and noncovalently. The structure of MIF cocrystallized with NAPQI reveals that the NAPQI has undergone a chemical alteration forming an acetaminophen dimer (bi-APAP) and binds noncovalently to MIF at the mouth of the active site. We also find that the commonly used protease inhibitor, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), forms a covalent complex with MIF and inhibits the tautomerase activity. Crystallographic analysis reveals the formation of a stable, novel covalent bond for PMSF between the catalytic nitrogen of the N-terminal proline and the sulfur of PMSF with complete, well-defined electron density in all three active sites of the MIF homotrimer. Conclusions are drawn from the structures of these two MIF-inhibitor complexes regarding the design of novel compounds that may provide more potent reversible and irreversible inhibition of MIF.

  9. Complexometric titrations: new reagents and concepts to overcome old limitations.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Bakker, Eric

    2016-07-21

    Chelators and end point indicators are the most important parts of complexometric titrations. The most widely used universal chelator ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and its derivatives can strongly coordinate with different metal ions. Their limited selectivity often requires the use of masking agents, and the multiple pKa values of the chelators necessitate a careful adjustment of pH during the procedure. Real world requirements for pH independent, selective and sensitive chelators and indicators call for a new design of these reagents. New concepts and structures of chelators and indicators have indeed recently emerged. We present here recent developments on chelators and indicators for complexometric titrations. Many of these advances were made possible only recently by moving the titration from a homogeneous to a heterogeneous phase using a new class of chelators and indicators based on highly selective ionophores embedded in ion-selective nanosphere emulsions. In view of achieving titrations in situ by complete instrumental control, thin layer electrochemistry has recently been shown to be an attractive concept that replaces the traditional cumbersome titration protocol with a direct reagent free sensing tool. PMID:27272695

  10. Potentiometric titration and equivalent weight of humic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pommer, A.M.; Breger, I.A.

    1960-01-01

    The "acid nature" of humic acid has been controversial for many years. Some investigators claim that humic acid is a true weak acid, while others feel that its behaviour during potentiometric titration can be accounted for by colloidal adsorption of hydrogen ions. The acid character of humic acid has been reinvestigated using newly-derived relationships for the titration of weak acids with strong base. Re-interpreting the potentiometric titration data published by Thiele and Kettner in 1953, it was found that Merck humic acid behaves as a weak polyelectrolytic acid having an equivalent weight of 150, a pKa of 6.8 to 7.0, and a titration exponent of about 4.8. Interdretation of similar data pertaining to the titration of phenol-formaldehyde and pyrogallol-formaldehyde resins, considered to be analogs for humic acid by Thiele and Kettner, leads to the conclusion that it is not possible to differentiate between adsorption and acid-base reaction for these substances. ?? 1960.

  11. Surface characterization of hydroxyapatite: potentiometric titrations coupled with solubility measurements.

    PubMed

    Skartsila, Kyriaki; Spanos, Nikos

    2007-04-15

    The acid-base properties of synthetically prepared and well-characterized hydroxyapatite (HAP) in contact with KNO3 solutions were investigated at 25 degrees C, through potentiometric titrations, zeta-potential measurements, and surface complex modeling. Aliquots of suspension were withdrawn every 0.5 pH unit during the titration procedure and analyzed for calcium and phosphate. It was found that, even for rapid titration experiments, a remarkable amount of H+ ions (H+dissol.) is consumed in the bulk solution in reacting with species coming from the dissolution of HAP. These H+ ions must be taken into account in the H+ mass balance, in order for true value for the point of zero charge (pzc=6.5+/-0.2) and consequently true value for the surface charge (sigma0) to be obtained. Besides the conventional potentiometric titration technique, it was found that pzc may be determined much more easily as the intersection point of the suspension titration curve and the blank one modified to include the amount of H+dissol. obtained at one ionic strength. Finally, a surface complexation model was proposed for the development of surface charge. Experimental data were satisfactorily fitted by using the value of 4.2 F m-2 for the capacitance.

  12. Complexometric titrations: new reagents and concepts to overcome old limitations.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Bakker, Eric

    2016-07-21

    Chelators and end point indicators are the most important parts of complexometric titrations. The most widely used universal chelator ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) and its derivatives can strongly coordinate with different metal ions. Their limited selectivity often requires the use of masking agents, and the multiple pKa values of the chelators necessitate a careful adjustment of pH during the procedure. Real world requirements for pH independent, selective and sensitive chelators and indicators call for a new design of these reagents. New concepts and structures of chelators and indicators have indeed recently emerged. We present here recent developments on chelators and indicators for complexometric titrations. Many of these advances were made possible only recently by moving the titration from a homogeneous to a heterogeneous phase using a new class of chelators and indicators based on highly selective ionophores embedded in ion-selective nanosphere emulsions. In view of achieving titrations in situ by complete instrumental control, thin layer electrochemistry has recently been shown to be an attractive concept that replaces the traditional cumbersome titration protocol with a direct reagent free sensing tool.

  13. Enhanced Enzyme Kinetic Stability by Increasing Rigidity within the Active Site*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yuan; An, Jiao; Yang, Guangyu; Wu, Geng; Zhang, Yong; Cui, Li; Feng, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important issue for protein engineers. Understanding how rigidity in the active site affects protein kinetic stability will provide new insight into enzyme stabilization. In this study, we demonstrated enhanced kinetic stability of Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) by mutating the structurally flexible residues within the active site. Six residues within 10 Å of the catalytic Ser105 residue with a high B factor were selected for iterative saturation mutagenesis. After screening 2200 colonies, we obtained the D223G/L278M mutant, which exhibited a 13-fold increase in half-life at 48 °C and a 12 °C higher T5015, the temperature at which enzyme activity is reduced to 50% after a 15-min heat treatment. Further characterization showed that global unfolding resistance against both thermal and chemical denaturation also improved. Analysis of the crystal structures of wild-type CalB and the D223G/L278M mutant revealed that the latter formed an extra main chain hydrogen bond network with seven structurally coupled residues within the flexible α10 helix that are primarily involved in forming the active site. Further investigation of the relative B factor profile and molecular dynamics simulation confirmed that the enhanced rigidity decreased fluctuation of the active site residues at high temperature. These results indicate that enhancing the rigidity of the flexible segment within the active site may provide an efficient method for improving enzyme kinetic stability. PMID:24448805

  14. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  15. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  16. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (20″×14″) upright format signs specified in 29 CFR 1910.145(d)(4) and this paragraph; and (iii... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an...

  17. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (20″×14″) upright format signs specified in 29 CFR 1910.145(d)(4) and this paragraph; and (iii... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an...

  18. 40 CFR 61.154 - Standard for active waste disposal sites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (20″×14″) upright format signs specified in 29 CFR 1910.145(d)(4) and this paragraph; and (iii... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard for active waste disposal... for Asbestos § 61.154 Standard for active waste disposal sites. Each owner or operator of an...

  19. 77 FR 39508 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... specific project proposals on those leases) in an identified Wind Energy Area (WEA) on the OCS offshore... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the... Activities on the Atlantic OCS Offshore RI and MA'' to: Program Manager, Office of Renewable Energy...

  20. Effects of resource activities upon repository siting and waste containment with reference to bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, J.; Rowe, J.

    1980-02-01

    The primary consideration for the suitability of a nuclear waste repository site is the overall ability of the repository to safely contain radioactive waste. This report is a discussion of the past, present, and future effects of resource activities on waste containment. Past and present resource activities which provide release pathways (i.e., leaky boreholes, adjacent mines) will receive initial evaluation during the early stages of any repository site study. However, other resource activities which may have subtle effects on containment (e.g., long-term pumping causing increased groundwater gradients, invasion of saline water causing lower retardation) and all potential future resource activities must also be considered during the site evaluation process. Resource activities will affect both the siting and the designing of repositories. Ideally, sites should be located in areas of low resource activity and low potential for future activity, and repository design should seek to eliminate or minimize the adverse effects of any resource activity. Buffer zones should be created to provide areas in which resource activities that might adversely affect containment can be restricted or curtailed. This could mean removing large areas of land from resource development. The impact of these frozen assets should be assessed in terms of their economic value and of their effect upon resource reserves. This step could require a major effort in data acquisition and analysis followed by extensive numerical modeling of regional fluid flow and mass transport. Numerical models should be used to assess the effects of resource activity upon containment and should include the cumulative effects of different resource activities. Analysis by other methods is probably not possible except for relatively simple cases.

  1. Computational approaches to the determination of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C R A; French, S A; Sokol, A A; Thomas, J M

    2005-04-15

    We apply quantum chemical methods to the study of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in mesoporous silica and metal oxide catalysts. Our approach is based on the use of both molecular cluster and embedded cluster (QM/MM) techniques, where the active site and molecular complex are described using density functional theory (DFT) and the embedding matrix simulated by shell model potentials. We consider three case studies: alkene epoxidation over the microporous TS-1 catalyst; methanol synthesis on ZnO and Cu/ZnO and C-H bond activation over Li-doped MgO.

  2. Computational approaches to the determination of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Catlow, C R A; French, S A; Sokol, A A; Thomas, J M

    2005-04-15

    We apply quantum chemical methods to the study of active site structures and reaction mechanisms in mesoporous silica and metal oxide catalysts. Our approach is based on the use of both molecular cluster and embedded cluster (QM/MM) techniques, where the active site and molecular complex are described using density functional theory (DFT) and the embedding matrix simulated by shell model potentials. We consider three case studies: alkene epoxidation over the microporous TS-1 catalyst; methanol synthesis on ZnO and Cu/ZnO and C-H bond activation over Li-doped MgO. PMID:15901543

  3. Rapid binding of a cationic active site inhibitor to wild type and mutant mouse acetylcholinesterase: Brownian dynamics simulation including diffusion in the active site gorge.

    PubMed

    Tara, S; Elcock, A H; Kirchhoff, P D; Briggs, J M; Radic, Z; Taylor, P; McCammon, J A

    1998-12-01

    It is known that anionic surface residues play a role in the long-range electrostatic attraction between acetylcholinesterase and cationic ligands. In our current investigation, we show that anionic residues also play an important role in the behavior of the ligand within the active site gorge of acetylcholinesterase. Negatively charged residues near the gorge opening not only attract positively charged ligands from solution to the enzyme, but can also restrict the motion of the ligand once it is inside of the gorge. We use Brownian dynamics techniques to calculate the rate constant kon, for wild type and mutant acetylcholinesterase with a positively charged ligand. These calculations are performed by allowing the ligand to diffuse within the active site gorge. This is an extension of previously reported work in which a ligand was allowed to diffuse only to the enzyme surface. By setting the reaction criteria for the ligand closer to the active site, better agreement with experimental data is obtained. Although a number of residues influence the movement of the ligand within the gorge, Asp74 is shown to play a particularly important role in this function. Asp74 traps the ligand within the gorge, and in this way helps to ensure a reaction.

  4. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  5. Denaturation studies of active-site labeled papain using electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Z A; Butterfiel, D A

    1991-01-01

    A spin-labeled p-chloromercuribenzoate (SL-PMB) and a fluorescence probe, 6-acryloyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (Acrylodan), both of which bind to the single SH group located in the active site of papain, were used to investigate the interaction of papain (EC 3.4.22.2) with two protein denaturants. It was found that the active site of papain was highly stable in urea solution, but underwent a large conformational change in guanidine hydrochloride solution. Electron paramagnetic resonance and fluorescence results were in agreement and both paralleled enzymatic activity of papain with respect to both the variation in pH and denaturation. These results strongly suggest that SL-PMB and Acrylodan labels can be used to characterize the physical state of the active site of the enzyme. PMID:1657229

  6. Higher order inclusion complexes and secondary interactions studied by global analysis of calorimetric titrations.

    PubMed

    Schönbeck, Christian; Holm, René; Westh, Peter

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigates the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) as a tool for studying molecular systems in which weaker secondary interactions are present in addition to a dominant primary interaction. Such systems are challenging since the signal pertaining to the stronger primary interaction tends to overshadow the signal from the secondary interaction. The methodology presented here enables a complete and precise thermodynamic characterization of both the primary and the weaker secondary interaction, exemplified by the binding of β-cyclodextrin to the primary and secondary binding sites of the bile salt glycodeoxycholate. Global regression analysis of calorimetric experiments at various concentrations and temperatures provide a precise determination of ΔH, ΔG°, and ΔC(p) for both binding sites in glycodeoxycholate (K1 = 5.67 ± 0.05 × 10(3) M(-1), K2 = 0.31 ± 0.02 × 10(3) M(-1)). The results are validated by a (13)C NMR titration and negative controls with a bile salt with no secondary binding site (glycocholate) (K = 2.96 ± 0.01 × 10(3) M(-1)). The method proved useful for detailed analysis of ITC data and may strengthen its use as a tool for studying molecular systems by advanced binding models.

  7. Determination of sulphite in wine by coulometric titration.

    PubMed

    Lowinsohn, D; Bertotti, M

    2001-09-01

    A method for the determination of both free and bound S(IV) in white wine samples by coulometric titration with electrogenerated iodine is described, the S(IV) speciation being performed by extracting SO2 from samples acidified wiith hydrochloric acid. Titrations of samples treated with NaOH led to the total S(IV) concentration, the results being in agreement with the ones obtained by the distillation procedure as well as by using the classical Monier-Williams method. An average recovery of 97% was obtained for samples spiked with S(IV) in the range 0.4-1.2 mM, which demonstrated the validity of the proposed procedure. The repeatability was 1.3% and the limit of detection was estimated as 0.01 mM. Results from direct titrations of wine added to the electrochemical cell are reported, which give indications of the stability of adducts towards the reaction with iodine.

  8. Differential titration of bases in glacial acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Castellano, T; Medwick, T; Shinkai, J H; Bailey, L

    1981-01-01

    A study of bases in acetic acid and their differential titration was carried out. The overall basicity constants for 20 bases were measured in acetic acid, and the differential titration of five binary mixtures of variable delta pKb values in acetic acid was followed using a glass electrode-modified calomel electrode system. Agreement with literature values was good. A leveling diagram was constructed that indicated that bases stronger than aqueous pKb 10 are leveled to an acetous pKb 5.69, whereas weaker bases are not leveled but instead exhibit their own intrinsic basicity, with the acetous pKb to aqueous pKb values being linearly related (slope 1.18, correlation coefficient 0.962). A minimum acetous delta pKb of four units is required for the satisfactory differential titration of two bases in acetic acid.

  9. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-01-01

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32–1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11620.001 PMID:26673079

  10. Catalysis-dependent selenium incorporation and migration in the nitrogenase active site iron-molybdenum cofactor.

    PubMed

    Spatzal, Thomas; Perez, Kathryn A; Howard, James B; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-12-16

    Dinitrogen reduction in the biological nitrogen cycle is catalyzed by nitrogenase, a two-component metalloenzyme. Understanding of the transformation of the inert resting state of the active site FeMo-cofactor into an activated state capable of reducing dinitrogen remains elusive. Here we report the catalysis dependent, site-selective incorporation of selenium into the FeMo-cofactor from selenocyanate as a newly identified substrate and inhibitor. The 1.60 Å resolution structure reveals selenium occupying the S2B site of FeMo-cofactor in the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe-protein, a position that was recently identified as the CO-binding site. The Se2B-labeled enzyme retains substrate reduction activity and marks the starting point for a crystallographic pulse-chase experiment of the active site during turnover. Through a series of crystal structures obtained at resolutions of 1.32-1.66 Å, including the CO-inhibited form of Av1-Se2B, the exchangeability of all three belt-sulfur sites is demonstrated, providing direct insights into unforeseen rearrangements of the metal center during catalysis.

  11. Error assessment in recombinant baculovirus titration: evaluation of different methods.

    PubMed

    Roldão, António; Oliveira, Rui; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Alves, Paula M

    2009-07-01

    The success of baculovirus/insect cells system in heterologous protein expression depends on the robustness and efficiency of the production workflow. It is essential that process parameters are controlled and include as little variability as possible. The multiplicity of infection (MOI) is the most critical factor since irreproducible MOIs caused by inaccurate estimation of viral titers hinder batch consistency and process optimization. This lack of accuracy is related to intrinsic characteristics of the method such as the inability to distinguish between infectious and non-infectious baculovirus. In this study, several methods for baculovirus titration were compared. The most critical issues identified were the incubation time and cell concentration at the time of infection. These variables influence strongly the accuracy of titers and must be defined for optimal performance of the titration method. Although the standard errors of the methods varied significantly (7-36%), titers were within the same order of magnitude; thus, viral titers can be considered independent of the method of titration. A cost analysis of the baculovirus titration methods used in this study showed that the alamarblue, real time Q-PCR and plaque assays were the most expensive techniques. The remaining methods cost on average 75% less than the former methods. Based on the cost, time and error analysis undertaken in this study, the end-point dilution assay, microculture tetrazolium assay and flow cytometric assay were found to be the techniques that combine all these three main factors better. Nevertheless, it is always recommended to confirm the accuracy of the titration either by comparison with a well characterized baculovirus reference stock or by titration using two different methods and verification of the variability of results.

  12. Anion-exchange nanospheres as titration reagents for anionic analytes.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Xie, Xiaojiang; Bakker, Eric

    2015-08-18

    We present here anion-exchange nanospheres as novel titration reagents for anions. The nanospheres contain a lipophilic cation for which the counterion is initially Cl(-). Ion exchange takes place between Cl(-) in the nanospheres and a more lipophilic anion in the sample, such as ClO4(-) and NO3(-). Consecutive titration in the same sample solution for ClO4(-) and NO3(-) were demonstrated. As an application, the concentration of NO3(-) in spinach was successfully determined using this method.

  13. Accuracy of the endpoint assay for virus titration.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, L K; Smyth, G K; Greenfield, P F

    1992-01-01

    The statistics of estimators used with the endpoint assay for virus titration were investigated. For a standard assay with 10 wells/dilution, the graphical estimator traditionally used was found to produce estimates with significant positive bias and a relatively low accuracy. Furthermore, the graphical estimator was found to be inconsistent. A superior estimator based on the maximum likelihood principle was developed. The results are discussed in relation to the choice between the endpoint titration assay and the plaque assay, and an alternative two-stage assay is presented.

  14. Analyzing a kinetic titration series using affinity biosensors.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Robert; Katsamba, Phinikoula S; Nordin, Helena; Pol, Ewa; Myszka, David G

    2006-02-01

    The classical method of measuring binding constants with affinity-based biosensors involves testing several analyte concentrations over the same ligand surface and regenerating the surface between binding cycles. Here we describe an alternative approach to collecting kinetic binding data, which we call "kinetic titration." This method involves sequentially injecting an analyte concentration series without any regeneration steps. Through a combination of simulation and experimentation, we show that this method can be as robust as the classical method of analysis. In addition, kinetic titrations can be more efficient than the conventional data collection method and allow us to fully characterize analyte binding to ligand surfaces that are difficult to regenerate.

  15. A fully automatic system for acid-base coulometric titrations.

    PubMed

    Cladera, A; Caro, A; Estela, J M; Cerdà, V

    1990-01-01

    An automatic system for acid-base titrations by electrogeneration of H(+) and OH(-) ions, with potentiometric end-point detection, was developed. The system includes a PC-compatible computer for instrumental control, data acquisition and processing, which allows up to 13 samples to be analysed sequentially with no human intervention.The system performance was tested on the titration of standard solutions, which it carried out with low errors and RSD. It was subsequently applied to the analysis of various samples of environmental and nutritional interest, specifically waters, soft drinks and wines.

  16. Substrate Shuttling Between Active Sites of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase in Not Required to Generate Coproporphyrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.; Warby, C; Whitby, F; Kushner, J; Hill, C

    2009-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D; EC 4.1.1.37), the fifth enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway, is required for the production of heme, vitamin B12, siroheme, and chlorophyll precursors. URO-D catalyzes the sequential decarboxylation of four acetate side chains in the pyrrole groups of uroporphyrinogen to produce coproporphyrinogen. URO-D is a stable homodimer, with the active-site clefts of the two subunits adjacent to each other. It has been hypothesized that the two catalytic centers interact functionally, perhaps by shuttling of reaction intermediates between subunits. We tested this hypothesis by construction of a single-chain protein (single-chain URO-D) in which the two subunits were connected by a flexible linker. The crystal structure of this protein was shown to be superimposable with wild-type activity and to have comparable catalytic activity. Mutations that impaired one or the other of the two active sites of single-chain URO-D resulted in approximately half of wild-type activity. The distributions of reaction intermediates were the same for mutant and wild-type sequences and were unaltered in a competition experiment using I and III isomer substrates. These observations indicate that communication between active sites is not required for enzyme function and suggest that the dimeric structure of URO-D is required to achieve conformational stability and to create a large active-site cleft.

  17. Crystal structure of an avian influenza polymerase PA[subscript N] reveals an endonuclease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Puwei; Bartlam, Mark; Lou, Zhiyong; Chen, Shoudeng; Zhou, Jie; He, Xiaojing; Lv, Zongyang; Ge, Ruowen; Li, Xuemei; Deng, Tao; Fodor, Ervin; Rao, Zihe; Liu, Yingfang

    2009-11-10

    The heterotrimeric influenza virus polymerase, containing the PA, PB1 and PB2 proteins, catalyses viral RNA replication and transcription in the nucleus of infected cells. PB1 holds the polymerase active site and reportedly harbours endonuclease activity, whereas PB2 is responsible for cap binding. The PA amino terminus is understood to be the major functional part of the PA protein and has been implicated in several roles, including endonuclease and protease activities as well as viral RNA/complementary RNA promoter binding. Here we report the 2.2 angstrom (A) crystal structure of the N-terminal 197 residues of PA, termed PA(N), from an avian influenza H5N1 virus. The PA(N) structure has an alpha/beta architecture and reveals a bound magnesium ion coordinated by a motif similar to the (P)DX(N)(D/E)XK motif characteristic of many endonucleases. Structural comparisons and mutagenesis analysis of the motif identified in PA(N) provide further evidence that PA(N) holds an endonuclease active site. Furthermore, functional analysis with in vivo ribonucleoprotein reconstitution and direct in vitro endonuclease assays strongly suggest that PA(N) holds the endonuclease active site and has critical roles in endonuclease activity of the influenza virus polymerase, rather than PB1. The high conservation of this endonuclease active site among influenza strains indicates that PA(N) is an important target for the design of new anti-influenza therapeutics.

  18. Design, construction, and calibration of an isothermal titration calorimeter and its application in the study of the adsorption of phenolic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Giraldo, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    An isothermal calorimetric titration was designed and built, and some of the results obtained are presented here. For this purpose, a Calvet heat-conducting microcalorimeter was developed and connected to a titration unit built for this experiment to record titration thermograms. The microcalorimeter was electrically calibrated to establish its sensitivity and reproducibility, obtaining K = 13.56 ± 0.21 W V-1. Additionally, the equipment was tested using the heat of neutralisation for the tris-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane-HCl (THAM-HCl) system, obtaining ΔH = -30.92 ± 0.03 kJ mol-1. The unit was assembled to obtain titration heats and the corresponding thermodynamic variables (ΔH, ΔG, ΔS, and Ke) with a system of phenolic derivatives-activated carbon (synthesised from potato peel).

  19. Design, construction, and calibration of an isothermal titration calorimeter and its application in the study of the adsorption of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Piraján, Juan Carlos; Giraldo, Liliana

    2012-01-01

    An isothermal calorimetric titration was designed and built, and some of the results obtained are presented here. For this purpose, a Calvet heat-conducting microcalorimeter was developed and connected to a titration unit built for this experiment to record titration thermograms. The microcalorimeter was electrically calibrated to establish its sensitivity and reproducibility, obtaining K = 13.56 ± 0.21 W V(-1). Additionally, the equipment was tested using the heat of neutralisation for the tris-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane-HCl (THAM-HCl) system, obtaining ΔH = -30.92 ± 0.03 kJ mol(-1). The unit was assembled to obtain titration heats and the corresponding thermodynamic variables (ΔH, ΔG, ΔS, and K(e)) with a system of phenolic derivatives-activated carbon (synthesised from potato peel).

  20. Evaluation of physical activity web sites for use of behavior change theories.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Amol; Patrick, Kevin; Sallis, James F; Calfas, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) Web sites were assessed for their use of behavior change theories, including constructs of the health belief model, Transtheoretical Model, social cognitive theory, and the theory of reasoned action and planned behavior. An evaluation template for assessing PA Web sites was developed, and content validity and interrater reliability were demonstrated. Two independent raters evaluated 24 PA Web sites. Web sites varied widely in application of theory-based constructs, ranging from 5 to 48 on a 100-point scale. The most common intervention strategies were general information, social support, and realistic goal areas. Coverage of theory-based strategies was low, varying from 26% for social cognitive theory to 39% for health belief model. Overall, PA Web sites provided little assessment, feedback, or individually tailored assistance for users. They were unable to substantially tailor the on-line experience for users at different stages of change or different demographic characteristics.

  1. A rapid Q-PCR titration protocol for adenovirus and helper-dependent adenovirus vectors that produces biologically relevant results.

    PubMed

    Gallaher, Sean D; Berk, Arnold J

    2013-09-01

    Adenoviruses are employed in the study of cellular processes and as expression vectors used in gene therapy. The success and reproducibility of these studies is dependent in part on having accurate and meaningful titers of replication competent and helper-dependent adenovirus stocks, which is problematic due to the use of varied and divergent titration protocols. Physical titration methods, which quantify the total number of viral particles, are used by many, but are poor at estimating activity. Biological titration methods, such as plaque assays, are more biologically relevant, but are time consuming and not applicable to helper-dependent gene therapy vectors. To address this, a protocol was developed called "infectious genome titration" in which viral DNA is isolated from the nuclei of cells ~3 h post-infection, and then quantified by Q-PCR. This approach ensures that only biologically active virions are counted as part of the titer determination. This approach is rapid, robust, sensitive, reproducible, and applicable to all forms of adenovirus. Unlike other Q-PCR-based methods, titers determined by this protocol are well correlated with biological activity.

  2. Titrations using an apparatus for recording the antilogarithm of pH or pM.

    PubMed

    Johansson, A

    1974-12-01

    A titration apparatus plotting either the concentration of sample ion or the concentration of titrant ion has been tested. An antilog apparatus, converting measured e.m.f. values into concentrations is connected to ordinary titration equipment. The instrument has been tested by means of acid-base titrations (titrations of mixtures of weak acids and of a weak and a strong acid), precipitation titrations (determination of the chloride concentration in tap-water, titration of mixtures of halides), titrations with ion-selective electrodes (determination of the fluoride content of toothpaste) and complexometric titrations (determination of copper with EDTA, using mercuric ion as indicator ion and amalgamated silver rod as indicator electrode, or using a copper-selective indicator electrode). The method considerably simplifies the evaluation of the results as compared to conventional potentiometric titrations.

  3. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  4. Active site of tripeptidyl peptidase II from human erythrocytes is of the subtilisin type.

    PubMed Central

    Tomkinson, B; Wernstedt, C; Hellman, U; Zetterqvist, O

    1987-01-01

    The present report presents evidence that the amino acid sequence around the serine of the active site of human tripeptidyl peptidase II is of the subtilisin type. The enzyme from human erythrocytes was covalently labeled at its active site with [3H]diisopropyl fluorophosphate, and the protein was subsequently reduced, alkylated, and digested with trypsin. The labeled tryptic peptides were purified by gel filtration and repeated reversed-phase HPLC, and their amino-terminal sequences were determined. Residue 9 contained the radioactive label and was, therefore, considered to be the active serine residue. The primary structure of the part of the active site (residues 1-10) containing this residue was concluded to be Xaa-Thr-Gln-Leu-Met-Asx-Gly-Thr-Ser-Met. This amino acid sequence is homologous to the sequence surrounding the active serine of the microbial peptidases subtilisin and thermitase. These data demonstrate that human tripeptidyl peptidase II represents a potentially distinct class of human peptidases and raise the question of an evolutionary relationship between the active site of a mammalian peptidase and that of the subtilisin family of serine peptidases. PMID:3313395

  5. Evolution of anatase surface active sites probed by in situ sum-frequency phonon spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Chen, Shiyou; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Yang, Deheng; Shen, Yuen Ron; Liu, Wei-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Surface active sites of crystals often govern their relevant surface chemistry, yet to monitor them in situ in real atmosphere remains a challenge. Using surface-specific sum-frequency spectroscopy, we identified the surface phonon mode associated with the active sites of undercoordinated titanium ions and conjoint oxygen vacancies, and used it to monitor them on anatase (TiO2) (101) under ambient conditions. In conjunction with theory, we determined related surface structure around the active sites and tracked the evolution of oxygen vacancies under ultraviolet irradiation. We further found that unlike in vacuum, the surface oxygen vacancies, which dominate the surface reactivity, are strongly regulated by ambient gas molecules, including methanol and water, as well as weakly associated species, such as nitrogen and hydrogen. The result revealed a rich interplay between prevailing ambient species and surface reactivity, which can be omnipresent in environmental and catalytic applications of titanium dioxides. PMID:27704049

  6. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Michael K; Mehta, Angad P; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H; Begley, Tadhg P; Ealick, Steven E

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  7. Solvent Tuning of Electrochemical Potentials in the Active Sites of HiPIP Versus Ferredoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, A.; Francis, E.J.; Adams, M.W.W.; Babini, E.; Takahashi, Y.; Fukuyama, K.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B.; Solomon, E.I.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept. /Georgia U. /Bologna U. /Osaka U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2009-04-29

    A persistent puzzle in the field of biological electron transfer is the conserved iron-sulfur cluster motif in both high potential iron-sulfur protein (HiPIP) and ferredoxin (Fd) active sites. Despite this structural similarity, HiPIPs react oxidatively at physiological potentials, whereas Fds are reduced. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy uncovers the substantial influence of hydration on this variation in reactivity. Fe-S covalency is much lower in natively hydrated Fd active sites than in HiPIPs but increases upon water removal; similarly, HiPIP covalency decreases when unfolding exposes an otherwise hydrophobically shielded active site to water. Studies on model compounds and accompanying density functional theory calculations support a correlation of Fe-S covalency with ease of oxidation and therefore suggest that hydration accounts for most of the difference between Fd and HiPIP reduction potentials.

  8. Non-canonical active site architecture of the radical SAM thiamin pyrimidine synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenwick, Michael K.; Mehta, Angad P.; Zhang, Yang; Abdelwahed, Sameh H.; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2015-03-27

    Radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) enzymes use a [4Fe-4S] cluster to generate a 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical. Canonical radical SAM enzymes are characterized by a β-barrel-like fold and SAM anchors to the differentiated iron of the cluster, which is located near the amino terminus and within the β-barrel, through its amino and carboxylate groups. Here we show that ThiC, the thiamin pyrimidine synthase in plants and bacteria, contains a tethered cluster-binding domain at its carboxy terminus that moves in and out of the active site during catalysis. In contrast to canonical radical SAM enzymes, we predict that SAM anchors to an additional active site metal through its amino and carboxylate groups. Superimposition of the catalytic domains of ThiC and glutamate mutase shows that these two enzymes share similar active site architectures, thus providing strong evidence for an evolutionary link between the radical SAM and adenosylcobalamin-dependent enzyme superfamilies.

  9. Wasp recruitment to the T cell:APC contact site occurs independently of Cdc42 activation.

    PubMed

    Cannon, J L; Labno, C M; Bosco, G; Seth, A; McGavin, M H; Siminovitch, K A; Rosen, M K; Burkhardt, J K

    2001-08-01

    Cdc42 and WASP are critical regulators of actin polymerization whose function during T cell signaling is poorly understood. Using a novel reagent that specifically detects Cdc42-GTP in fixed cells, we found that activated Cdc42 localizes to the T cell:APC contact site in an antigen-dependent manner. TCR signaling alone was sufficient to induce localization of Cdc42-GTP, and functional Lck and Zap-70 kinases were required. WASP also localized to the T cell:APC contact site in an antigen-dependent manner. Surprisingly, WASP localization was independent of the Cdc42 binding domain but required the proline-rich domain. Our results indicate that localized WASP activation requires the integration of multiple signals: WASP is recruited via interaction with SH3 domain-containing proteins and is activated by Cdc42-GTP concentrated at the same site. PMID:11520460

  10. Mutations Closer to the Active Site Improve the Promiscuous Aldolase Activity of 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase More Effectively than Distant Mutations.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehran; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Baas, Bert-Jan; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2016-07-01

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which catalyzes enol-keto tautomerization as part of a degradative pathway for aromatic hydrocarbons, promiscuously catalyzes various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. These include the aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde. Here, we demonstrate that 4-OT can be engineered into a more efficient aldolase for this condensation reaction, with a >5000-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) and a >10(7) -fold change in reaction specificity, by exploring small libraries in which only "hotspots" are varied. The hotspots were identified by systematic mutagenesis (covering each residue), followed by a screen for single mutations that give a strong improvement in the desired aldolase activity. All beneficial mutations were near the active site of 4-OT, thus underpinning the notion that new catalytic activities of a promiscuous enzyme are more effectively enhanced by mutations close to the active site. PMID:27238293

  11. Titrating the Cost of Plant Toxins Against Predators: a Case Study with Common Duikers, Sylvicapra grimmia.

    PubMed

    Abu Baker, Mohammad A

    2015-10-01

    Foragers face many variables that influence their food intake. These may include habitat structure, time, climate, resource characteristic, food quality, and plant defenses. I conducted foraging experiments using common duikers that involved: 1) testing the effect of plant toxins on foraging, and 2) titrating toxin intake against safety. I used giving up densities (GUDs, food remaining after foraging) to test for selection among trays containing alfalfa pellets treated with water, with 10% oxalic acid, or 10% quebracho tannin. Pairs of trays were placed within islands of woody vegetation and out in open grass. I also conducted a titration experiment by offering the duikers a choice between a patch with water-treated pellets placed at a risky site, or a patch with one of three oxalic acid-treated pellets at a safe site. This made it possible to determine the concentration of oxalic acid at which the cost of toxin in the safe site equals the predation cost at the risky site. The common duikers showed no selectivity among the three treatments at 10% concentration, however, GUDs in the open grass (i.e., safe) were significantly lower than in the wooded islands (i.e., risky). As the oxalic acid concentration increased at the safe sites, the duiker's food intake from the risky sites increased significantly. The results demonstrate that foraging hazards may come in different forms such as predation and plant toxins, and their interactions may alter habitat use, foraging patterns, and perceptions of risk. These variables occur under natural situations, altering the overall habitat quality. PMID:26364293

  12. Energetics of cooperative protein-DNA interactions: comparison between quantitative deoxyribonuclease footprint titration and filter binding.

    PubMed

    Senear, D F; Brenowitz, M; Shea, M A; Ackers, G K

    1986-11-18

    Using the binding of cI repressor protein to the lambda right and left operators as a model system, we have analyzed the two common experimental techniques for studying the interactions of genome regulatory proteins with multiple, specific sites on DNA. These are the quantitative DNase footprint titration technique [Brenowitz, M., Senear, D. F., Shea, M. A., & Ackers, G. K. (1986) Methods Enzymol. 130, 132-181] and the nitrocellulose filter binding assay [Riggs, A., Suzuki, H., & Bourgeois, S. (1970) J. Mol. Biol. 48, 67-83]. The footprint titration technique provides binding curves that separately represent the fractional saturation for each site. In principle, such data contain the information necessary to determine the thermodynamic constants for local site binding and cooperativity. We show that in practice, this is not possible for all values of the constants in multisite systems, such as the lambda operators. We show how these constants can nevertheless be uniquely determined by using additional binding data from a small number of mutant operators in which the number of binding sites has been reduced. The filter binding technique does not distinguish binding to the individual sites and yields only macroscopic binding parameters which are composite averages of the various local site and cooperativity constants. Moreover, the resolution of even macroscopic constants from filter binding data for multisite systems requires ad hoc assumptions as to a relationship between the number of ligands bound and the filter retention of the complex. Our results indicate that no such relationship exists. Hence, the technique does not permit determination of thermodynamically valid interaction constants (even macroscopic) in multisite systems.

  13. Titrating the Cost of Plant Toxins Against Predators: a Case Study with Common Duikers, Sylvicapra grimmia.

    PubMed

    Abu Baker, Mohammad A

    2015-10-01

    Foragers face many variables that influence their food intake. These may include habitat structure, time, climate, resource characteristic, food quality, and plant defenses. I conducted foraging experiments using common duikers that involved: 1) testing the effect of plant toxins on foraging, and 2) titrating toxin intake against safety. I used giving up densities (GUDs, food remaining after foraging) to test for selection among trays containing alfalfa pellets treated with water, with 10% oxalic acid, or 10% quebracho tannin. Pairs of trays were placed within islands of woody vegetation and out in open grass. I also conducted a titration experiment by offering the duikers a choice between a patch with water-treated pellets placed at a risky site, or a patch with one of three oxalic acid-treated pellets at a safe site. This made it possible to determine the concentration of oxalic acid at which the cost of toxin in the safe site equals the predation cost at the risky site. The common duikers showed no selectivity among the three treatments at 10% concentration, however, GUDs in the open grass (i.e., safe) were significantly lower than in the wooded islands (i.e., risky). As the oxalic acid concentration increased at the safe sites, the duiker's food intake from the risky sites increased significantly. The results demonstrate that foraging hazards may come in different forms such as predation and plant toxins, and their interactions may alter habitat use, foraging patterns, and perceptions of risk. These variables occur under natural situations, altering the overall habitat quality.

  14. Testing the applicability of rapid on-site enzymatic activity detection for surface water monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, Philipp; Vogl, Wolfgang; Juri, Koschelnik; Markus, Epp; Maximilian, Lackner; Markus, Oismüller; Monika, Kumpan; Peter, Strauss; Regina, Sommer; Gabriela, Ryzinska-Paier; Farnleitner Andreas, H.; Matthias, Zessner

    2015-04-01

    On-site detection of enzymatic activities has been suggested as a rapid surrogate for microbiological pollution monitoring of water resources (e.g. using glucuronidases, galactosidases, esterases). Due to the possible short measuring intervals enzymatic methods have high potential as near-real time water quality monitoring tools. This presentation describes results from a long termed field test. For twelve months, two ColiMinder devices (Vienna Water Monitoring, Austria) for on-site determination of enzymatic activity were tested for stream water monitoring at the experimental catchment HOAL (Hydrological Open Air Laboratory, Center for Water Resource Systems, Vienna University of Technology). The devices were overall able to follow and reflect the diverse hydrological and microbiological conditions of the monitored stream during the test period. Continuous data in high temporal resolution captured the course of enzymatic activity in stream water during diverse rainfall events. The method also proofed sensitive enough to determine diurnal fluctuations of enzymatic activity in stream water during dry periods. The method was able to capture a seasonal trend of enzymatic activity in stream water that matches the results gained from Colilert18 analysis for E. coli and coliform bacteria of monthly grab samples. Furthermore the comparison of ColiMinder data with measurements gained at the same test site with devices using the same method but having different construction design (BACTcontrol, microLAN) showed consistent measuring results. Comparative analysis showed significant differences between measured enzymatic activity (modified fishman units and pmol/min/100ml) and cultivation based analyses (most probable number, colony forming unit). Methods of enzymatic activity measures are capable to detect ideally the enzymatic activity caused by all active target bacteria members, including VBNC (viable but nonculturable) while cultivation based methods cannot detect VBNC

  15. Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzner, R.E.; Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

  16. Quantifying accessible sites and reactivity on titania–silica (photo)catalysts: Refining TOF calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Todd R.; Campos, Michael P.; Gray, Kimberly A.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2014-01-01

    It can be difficult to determine the number of active atoms accessible to the fluid phase in mixed oxide catalysts, as required for obtaining true turnover frequencies (TOF). Here, we utilize the selective titration of surface Ti atoms with phenylphosphonic acid (PPA) on TiO2–SiO2 materials to estimate the number of reactant-accessible sites. TiO2–SiO2 composites were synthesized over a range of Ti loadings from grafting of titanocene dichloride (Cp2TiCl2) or tetraethoxy orthotitanate (TEOT) on SiO2 and sol–gel co-hydrolysis of Si and Ti alkoxides. The materials were characterized by DRUV–vis, XRD, BET, and XANES. Despite the significant morphological and electronic differences, materials prepared by Cp2TiCl2 and TEOT yielded a near-constant TOF of 0.14 h-1 (±0.04) across Ti loadings, for benzyl alcohol photooxidation, when normalizing rates by sites titrated by PPA. The fraction of Ti atoms titrated by PPA was strongly dependent on synthesis method and surface density. PPA titration and benzyl alcohol photooxidation may be useful measures of surface accessibility in other supported oxides.

  17. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Benjamin E R; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L; Hallaert, Simon D; Böttger, Lars H; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2016-08-18

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(ii), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species-α-Fe(ii) and α-O-are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive 'spectator' iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(ii) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(ii) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(iv)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function-producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an 'entatic' state-might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts. PMID:27535535

  18. The active site of low-temperature methane hydroxylation in iron-containing zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Benjamin E. R.; Vanelderen, Pieter; Bols, Max L.; Hallaert, Simon D.; Böttger, Lars H.; Ungur, Liviu; Pierloot, Kristine; Schoonheydt, Robert A.; Sels, Bert F.; Solomon, Edward I.

    2016-08-01

    An efficient catalytic process for converting methane into methanol could have far-reaching economic implications. Iron-containing zeolites (microporous aluminosilicate minerals) are noteworthy in this regard, having an outstanding ability to hydroxylate methane rapidly at room temperature to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at an extra-lattice active site called α-Fe(II), which is activated by nitrous oxide to form the reactive intermediate α-O; however, despite nearly three decades of research, the nature of the active site and the factors determining its exceptional reactivity are unclear. The main difficulty is that the reactive species—α-Fe(II) and α-O—are challenging to probe spectroscopically: data from bulk techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility are complicated by contributions from inactive ‘spectator’ iron. Here we show that a site-selective spectroscopic method regularly used in bioinorganic chemistry can overcome this problem. Magnetic circular dichroism reveals α-Fe(II) to be a mononuclear, high-spin, square planar Fe(II) site, while the reactive intermediate, α-O, is a mononuclear, high-spin Fe(IV)=O species, whose exceptional reactivity derives from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. These findings illustrate the value of our approach to exploring active sites in heterogeneous systems. The results also suggest that using matrix constraints to activate metal sites for function—producing what is known in the context of metalloenzymes as an ‘entatic’ state—might be a useful way to tune the activity of heterogeneous catalysts.

  19. A Tale of Two Isomerases: Compact versus Extended Active Sites in Ketosteroid Isomerase and Phosphoglucose Isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Somarowthu, Srinivas; Brodkin, Heather R.; D’Aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Beuning, Penny J.

    2012-07-11

    Understanding the catalytic efficiency and specificity of enzymes is a fundamental question of major practical and conceptual importance in biochemistry. Although progress in biochemical and structural studies has enriched our knowledge of enzymes, the role in enzyme catalysis of residues that are not nearest neighbors of the reacting substrate molecule is largely unexplored experimentally. Here computational active site predictors, THEMATICS and POOL, were employed to identify functionally important residues that are not in direct contact with the reacting substrate molecule. These predictions then guided experiments to explore the active sites of two isomerases, Pseudomonas putida ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) and human phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), as prototypes for very different types of predicted active sites. Both KSI and PGI are members of EC 5.3 and catalyze similar reactions, but they represent significantly different degrees of remote residue participation, as predicted by THEMATICS and POOL. For KSI, a compact active site of mostly first-shell residues is predicted, but for PGI, an extended active site in which residues in the first, second, and third layers around the reacting substrate are predicted. Predicted residues that have not been previously tested experimentally were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis. In human PGI, single-point mutations of the predicted second- and third-shell residues K362, H100, E495, D511, H396, and Q388 show significant decreases in catalytic activity relative to that of the wild type. The results of these experiments demonstrate that, as predicted, remote residues are very important in PGI catalysis but make only small contributions to catalysis in KSI.

  20. SABER: A computational method for identifying active sites for new reactions

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-01-01

    A software suite, SABER (Selection of Active/Binding sites for Enzyme Redesign), has been developed for the analysis of atomic geometries in protein structures, using a geometric hashing algorithm (Barker and Thornton, Bioinformatics 2003;19:1644–1649). SABER is used to explore the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to locate proteins with a specific 3D arrangement of catalytic groups to identify active sites that might be redesigned to catalyze new reactions. As a proof-of-principle test, SABER was used to identify enzymes that have the same catalytic group arrangement present in o-succinyl benzoate synthase (OSBS). Among the highest-scoring scaffolds identified by the SABER search for enzymes with the same catalytic group arrangement as OSBS were l-Ala d/l-Glu epimerase (AEE) and muconate lactonizing enzyme II (MLE), both of which have been redesigned to become effective OSBS catalysts, demonstrated by experiments. Next, we used SABER to search for naturally existing active sites in the PDB with catalytic groups similar to those present in the designed Kemp elimination enzyme KE07. From over 2000 geometric matches to the KE07 active site, SABER identified 23 matches that corresponded to residues from known active sites. The best of these matches, with a 0.28 Å catalytic atom RMSD to KE07, was then redesigned to be compatible with the Kemp elimination using RosettaDesign. We also used SABER to search for potential Kemp eliminases using a theozyme predicted to provide a greater rate acceleration than the active site of KE07, and used Rosetta to create a design based on the proteins identified. PMID:22492397

  1. SABER: a computational method for identifying active sites for new reactions.

    PubMed

    Nosrati, Geoffrey R; Houk, K N

    2012-05-01

    A software suite, SABER (Selection of Active/Binding sites for Enzyme Redesign), has been developed for the analysis of atomic geometries in protein structures, using a geometric hashing algorithm (Barker and Thornton, Bioinformatics 2003;19:1644-1649). SABER is used to explore the Protein Data Bank (PDB) to locate proteins with a specific 3D arrangement of catalytic groups to identify active sites that might be redesigned to catalyze new reactions. As a proof-of-principle test, SABER was used to identify enzymes that have the same catalytic group arrangement present in o-succinyl benzoate synthase (OSBS). Among the highest-scoring scaffolds identified by the SABER search for enzymes with the same catalytic group arrangement as OSBS were L-Ala D/L-Glu epimerase (AEE) and muconate lactonizing enzyme II (MLE), both of which have been redesigned to become effective OSBS catalysts, demonstrated by experiments. Next, we used SABER to search for naturally existing active sites in the PDB with catalytic groups similar to those present in the designed Kemp elimination enzyme KE07. From over 2000 geometric matches to the KE07 active site, SABER identified 23 matches that corresponded to residues from known active sites. The best of these matches, with a 0.28 Å catalytic atom RMSD to KE07, was then redesigned to be compatible with the Kemp elimination using RosettaDesign. We also used SABER to search for potential Kemp eliminases using a theozyme predicted to provide a greater rate acceleration than the active site of KE07, and used Rosetta to create a design based on the proteins identified. PMID:22492397

  2. Preliminary examination of the impacts of repository site characterization activities and facility construction and operation activities on Hanford air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Glantz, C.S.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1986-04-01

    Air quality impacts that would result from site characterization activities and from the construction and operation of a high-level nuclear wste repository at Hanford are estimated using two simple atmospheric dispersion models, HANCHI and CHISHORT. Model results indicate that pollutant concentrations would not exceed ambient air quality standards at any point outside the Hanford fenceline or at any publicly accessible location within the Hanford Site. The increase in pollutant concentrations in nearby communities due to site activities would be minimal. HANCHI and CHISHORT are documented in the appendices of this document. Further study of the repository's impact on air quality will be conducted when more detailed project plans and work schedules are available.

  3. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-12-15

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser(696) and Ser(698) in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser(886) and/or Ser(893) in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser(717) in the JM, and at Ser(733), Thr(752), Ser(783), Ser(864), Ser(911), Ser(958) and Thr(998) in the kinase domain. The LC-ESI-MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr(890), Ser(893) and Thr(894)) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr(890), Ser(893), Thr(894) and Thr(899), differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response.

  4. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  5. FIA titrations of phenothiazine derivatives in aqueous micellar and non-aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Nemcová, Irena; Nesmerák, Karel; Rychlovský, Petr; Koutníková, Jitka

    2005-02-15

    New methods of flow injection analysis (FIA) neutralization titrations of phenothiazine derivatives in aqueous micellar medium of a cationic surfactant using potentiometric and spectrophotometric detection were proposed; titrations with a mixing gradient chamber and high-speed titrations were compared. The FIA titration method in non-aqueous media based on an official method of determination (titration with perchloric acid in anhydrous acetic acid) was also developed. Under optimized reaction conditions and flow-through parameters, the calibration range and equations, the sensitivity, and the repeatability of all methods were found and discussed. All titrations were assayed for medicinal forms.

  6. Characterisation of iron binding ligands in seawater by reverse titration.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Jeffrey A; Gledhill, Martha; Connelly, Douglas P; Achterberg, Eric P

    2013-03-01

    Here we demonstrate the use of reverse titration - competitive ligand exchange-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (RT-CLE-ACSV) for the analysis of iron (Fe) binding ligands in seawater. In contrast to the forward titration, which examines excess ligands in solution, RT-CLE-ACSV examines the existing Fe-ligand complexes by increasing the concentration of added (electroactive) ligand (1-nitroso-2-naphthol) and analysis of the proportion of Fe bound to the added ligand. The data manipulation allows the accurate characterisation of ligands at equal or lower concentrations than Fe in seawater, and disregards electrochemically inert dissolved Fe such as some colloidal phases. The method is thus superior to the forward titration in environments with high Fe and low ligand concentrations or high concentrations of inert Fe. We validated the technique using the siderophore ligand ferrioxamine B, and observed a stability constant [Formula: see text] of 0.74-4.37×10(21) mol(-1), in agreement with previous results. We also successfully analysed samples from coastal waters and a deep ocean hydrothermal plume. Samples from these environments could not be analysed with confidence using the forward titration, highlighting the effectiveness of the RT-CLE-ACSV technique in waters with high concentrations of inert Fe.

  7. Coulometric titration of ruthenium and iridium by the generated hydroquinone

    SciTech Connect

    Organeysan, L.S.; Butakova, N.A.

    1986-05-10

    This paper studies the electrogeneration of hydroquinone from solutions of quinone on platinum and glass-carbon electrodes in HC1 and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ media of different concentrations, to select the optimal conditions for the coulometric titration of Ru(IV) and Ir(IV).

  8. Analysis of the purity of cetrimide by titrations.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Claus D; Nielsen, Hans B; Andersen, Jens E T

    2006-01-01

    The purity of cetrimide, trimethyl tetradecyl ammonium bromide (TTAB), which is an important preservative of many cosmetic and pharmaceutical products, was determined by three independent methods of titration. Traditionally, cetrimide was analysed by an assay method of the European Pharmacopoeia, which showed consistently a low purity of cetrimide with associated large standard deviations, however. A systematic 3% bias of the European Pharmacopoeia assay method was identified by comparing the result with results of two alternative methods of titration that exhibited high precision and high accuracy. Titration by perchloric acid showed a 99.69% +/- 0.05% purity of cetrimide, and titration by silver nitrate showed a 99.85% +/- 0.05% purity, while the traditional assay method predicted a purity of only 97.1% +/- 0.4%. It was found that the discrepancy could be identified as differences in selectivity during the extraction step of the European Pharmacopoeia assay method. The distribution coefficients between chloroform and water of cetrimide and the corresponding iodide species (TTAI) were thus determined as 2150 +/- 50 M(-1) and 68000 +/- 4000 M(-1), respectively.

  9. Determination of Acidity Constants by Gradient Flow-Injection Titration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conceicao, Antonio C. L.; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E.

    2006-01-01

    A three-hour laboratory experiment, designed for an advanced undergraduate course in instrumental analysis that illustrates the application of the gradient chamber flow-injection titration (GCFIT) method with spectrophotometric detection to determine acidity constants is presented. The procedure involves the use of an acid-base indicator to obtain…

  10. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry Can Provide Critical Thinking Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Dale E.; Goode, David R.; Seney, Caryn S.; Boatwright, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    College chemistry faculties might not have considered including isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in their majors' curriculum because experimental data from this instrumental method are often analyzed via automation (software). However, the software-based data analysis can be replaced with a spreadsheet-based analysis that is readily…

  11. Coulometric calcium pump for thin layer sample titrations.

    PubMed

    Ghahraman Afshar, Majid; Crespo, Gastón A; Bakker, Eric

    2015-10-01

    A selective electrochemical calcium pump based on a fast diffusive calcium ionophore-based membrane is reported. An initially nonpolarized ionophore-based membrane allows one to establish a net calcium flux by applying a potential step function (i.e., 250 mV for 30 s). The resulting calcium flux is released into a microliter scale thin layer reservoir, and the resulting ion perturbation is monitored by either a potentiometric or a coulometric readout. This chemical perturbation in the thin layer thus acts as a titration agent that is precisely controlled by coulometry. A linear correlation between released and detected calcium is confirmed by the two different readout modes. Having demonstrated the efficiency of the calcium pump in background electrolyte solutions, a complexometric titration with known concentrations of EDTA in the thin layer sample was performed. With the potentiometric readout, titrations in the range of 0.25-0.75 mM gave a precision of 3%, whereas the coulometric readout gave a range of 0.02-0.12 mM and a precision of 2%. Improved precision is expected by better control of the thin layer geometry by microfabrication. The significance of this work is that the coupling of a selective calcium pump with a thin layer element can give rise to rapid and complete sample concentration changes and result in a promising platform for titrations either on the laboratory bench or for in situ measurements in environmental or diagnostic settings.

  12. Chemical force titrations of functionalized Si(111) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mengistu, Tadesse Z; Goel, Vishya; Horton, J Hugh; Morin, Sylvie

    2006-06-01

    Chemical force titrations-plots of the adhesive force between an atomic force microscope tip and sample as a function of pH-were acquired on alkyl monolayer-derivatized Si(111) surfaces. Gold-coated AFM tips modified with thioalkanoic acid self-assembled monolayers (SAM) were employed. Alkyl monolayer-derivatized Si(111) surfaces terminated with methyl, carboxyl, and amine groups were produced via hydrosilylation reactions between 1-alkene reagents and H-terminated silicon. The functionalized surfaces were characterized using standard surface science techniques (AFM, FTIR, and XPS). Titration of the methyl-terminated surface using the modified (carboxyl-terminated) atomic force microscope tip resulted in a small pH-independent hydrophobic interaction. Titration of the amine-terminated surface using the same tip resulted in the determination of a surface pKa of 5.8 for the amine from the pH value from the maximum in the force titration curve. A pK(1/2) of 4.3 was determined for the carboxyl-terminated Si(111) in a similar way. These results will be discussed in relation to the modified Si(111) surface chemistry and organic layer structure, as well as with respect to existing results on Au surfaces modified with SAMs bearing the same functional groups.

  13. Asphalt compatibility testing using the automated Heithaus titration test

    SciTech Connect

    Pauli, A.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Heithaus titration test or variations of the test have been used for over 35 years to predict compatibilities of blends of asphalts from different crude sources. Asphalt compatibility is determined from three calculated parameters that measure the state of peptization of an asphalt or asphalt blend. The parameter p{sub a} is a measure of the peptizability of the asphaltenes. The parameter p{sub a} is a measure of the peptizing power of the maltenes, and the parameter P, derived from p{sub a} and p{sub o} values, is a measure of the overall state of peptization of the asphalt or asphalt blend. In Heithaus original procedure, samples of asphalt were dissolved in toluene and titrated with n-heptane in order to initiate flocculation. The onset of flocculation was detected either by photography or by spotting a filter paper with a small amount of the titrated solution. Recently, an {open_quotes}automated{close_quotes} procedure, after Hotier and Robin, has been developed for use with asphalt. In the automated method UV-visible spectrophotometric detection measures the onset of flocculation as a peak with the percent transmittance plotted as a function of the volume of titrating solvent added to a solution of asphalt. The automated procedure has proven to be less operator dependent and much faster than the original Heithaus procedure. Results from the automated procedure show the data to be consistent with results from the original, {open_quotes}classical{close_quotes} Heithaus procedure.

  14. Using Spreadsheets to Produce Acid-Base Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawley, Martin James; Parkinson, John

    1995-01-01

    Describes two spreadsheets for producing acid-base titration curves, one uses relatively simple cell formulae that can be written into the spreadsheet by inexperienced students and the second uses more complex formulae that are best written by the teacher. (JRH)

  15. A Low-Cost Device for Automatic Photometric Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Fábio R. P.; Reis, Boaventura F.

    2000-02-01

    Electronics is an important topic in chemistry courses. However, the introduction of basic concepts is often difficult and the lab instruments are frequently seen as "black boxes". To address this problem, we propose the construction of a simple, low-cost (about $150 U.S.) automatic photometric titrator employing a light-emitting diode (LED) and a phototransistor. The electronic circuit can be assembled by the students themselves. The device was employed to implement a common procedure in chemical labs, making feasible the introduction of concepts related to electronics in undergraduate chemistry courses. The titrator is able to work automatically, since a feedback system permits stopping the addition of titrant solution when the end-point is achieved. With this demonstration, it can be stressed that automatic procedures can be implemented without expensive instruments. Additionally, a classical procedure becomes more attractive to the students and its importance to chemical analysis can be emphasized. The feasibility of the titrator was demonstrated by acid-base titrations of HCl solutions with NaOH in the presence of phenolphthalein and by iodimetric determination of ascorbic acid in vitamin C tablets and lemon juice. Precise results (0.7% relative standard deviation, n = 10) in agreement at the 95% confidence level with those attained by a conventional procedure were obtained.

  16. The active titration method for measuring local hydroxyl radical concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprengnether, Michele; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1994-01-01

    We are developing a method for measuring ambient OH by monitoring its rate of reaction with a chemical species. Our technique involves the local, instantaneous release of a mixture of saturated cyclic hydrocarbons (titrants) and perfluorocarbons (dispersants). These species must not normally be present in ambient air above the part per trillion concentration. We then track the mixture downwind using a real-time portable ECD tracer instrument. We collect air samples in canisters every few minutes for roughly one hour. We then return to the laboratory and analyze our air samples to determine the ratios of the titrant to dispersant concentrations. The trends in these ratios give us the ambient OH concentration from the relation: dlnR/dt = -k(OH). A successful measurement of OH requires that the trends in these ratios be measureable. We must not perturb ambient OH concentrations. The titrant to dispersant ratio must be spatially invariant. Finally, heterogeneous reactions of our titrant and dispersant species must be negligible relative to the titrant reaction with OH. We have conducted laboratory studies of our ability to measure the titrant to dispersant ratios as a function of concentration down to the few part per trillion concentration. We have subsequently used these results in a gaussian puff model to estimate our expected uncertainty in a field measurement of OH. Our results indicate that under a range of atmospheric conditions we expect to be able to measure OH with a sensitivity of 3x10(exp 5) cm(exp -3). In our most optimistic scenarios, we obtain a sensitivity of 1x10(exp 5) cm(exp -3). These sensitivity values reflect our anticipated ability to measure the ratio trends. However, because we are also using a rate constant to obtain our (OH) from this ratio trend, our accuracy cannot be better than that of the rate constant, which we expect to be about 20 percent.

  17. Wobble Pairs of the HDV Ribozyme Play Specific Roles in Stabilization of Active Site Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sripathi, Kamali N.; Banáš, Pavel; Reblova, Kamila; Šponer, Jiři; Otyepka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only known human pathogen whose genome contains a catalytic RNA motif (ribozyme). The overall architecture of the HDV ribozyme is that of a double-nested pseudoknot, with two GU pairs flanking the active site. Although extensive studies have shown that mutation of either wobble results in decreased catalytic activity, little work has focused on linking these mutations to specific structural effects on catalytic fitness. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations based on an activated structure to probe the active site dynamics as a result of wobble pair mutations. In both wild-type and mutant ribozymes, the in-line fitness of the active site (as a measure of catalytic proficiency) strongly depends on the presence of a C75(N3H3+)N1(O5′) hydrogen bond, which positions C75 as the general acid for the reaction. Our mutational analyses show that each GU wobble supports catalytically fit conformations in distinct ways; the reverse G25U20 wobble promotes high in-line fitness, high occupancy of the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) general-acid hydrogen bond and stabilization of the G1U37 wobble, while the G1U37 wobble acts more locally by stabilizing high in-line fitness and the C75(N3H3+)G1(O5′) hydrogen bond. We also find that stable type I A-minor and P1.1 hydrogen bonding above and below the active site, respectively, prevent local structural disorder from spreading and disrupting global conformation. Taken together, our results define specific, often redundant architectural roles for several structural motifs of the HDV ribozyme active site, expanding the known roles of these motifs within all HDV-like ribozymes and other structured RNAs. PMID:25631765

  18. Applications of isothermal titration calorimetry - the research and technical developments from 2011 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Robert J

    2016-10-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry is a widely used biophysical technique for studying the formation or dissociation of molecular complexes. Over the last 5 years, much work has been published on the interpretation of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data for single binding and multiple binding sites. As over 80% of ITC papers are on macromolecules of biological origin, this interpretation is challenging. Some researchers have attempted to link the thermodynamics constants to events at the molecular level. This review highlights work carried out using binding sites characterized using x-ray crystallography techniques that allow speculation about individual bond formation and the displacement of individual water molecules during ligand binding and link these events to the thermodynamic constants for binding. The review also considers research conducted with synthetic binding partners where specific binding events like anion-π and π-π interactions were studied. The revival of assays that enable both thermodynamic and kinetic information to be collected from ITC data is highlighted. Lastly, published criticism of ITC research from a physical chemistry perspective is appraised and practical advice provided for researchers unfamiliar with thermodynamics and its interpretation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Tuned by metals: the TET peptidase activity is controlled by 3 metal binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Matteo; Girard, Eric; Franzetti, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    TET aminopeptidases are dodecameric particles shared in the three life domains involved in various biological processes, from carbon source provider in archaea to eye-pressure regulation in humans. Each subunit contains a dinuclear metal site (M1 and M2) responsible for the enzyme catalytic activity. However, the role of each metal ion is still uncharacterized. Noteworthy, while mesophilic TETs are activated by Mn2+, hyperthermophilic TETs prefers Co2+. Here, by means of anomalous x-ray crystallography and enzyme kinetics measurements of the TET3 aminopeptidase from the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTET3), we show that M2 hosts the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while M1 stabilizes the TET3 quaternary structure and controls the active site flexibility in a temperature dependent manner. A new third metal site (M3) was found in the substrate binding pocket, modulating the PfTET3 substrate preferences. These data show that TET activity is tuned by the molecular interplay among three metal sites. PMID:26853450

  20. Human Activities in Natura 2000 Sites: A Highly Diversified Conservation Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiafouli, Maria A.; Apostolopoulou, Evangelia; Mazaris, Antonios D.; Kallimanis, Athanasios S.; Drakou, Evangelia G.; Pantis, John D.

    2013-05-01

    The Natura 2000 network was established across the European Union's (EU) Member States with the aim to conserve biodiversity, while ensuring the sustainability of human activities. However, to what kind and to what extent Natura 2000 sites are subject to human activities and how this varies across Member States remains unspecified. Here, we analyzed 111,269 human activity records from 14,727 protected sites in 20 Member States. The frequency of occurrence of activities differs among countries, with more than 86 % of all sites being subjected to agriculture or forestry. Activities like hunting, fishing, urbanization, transportation, and tourism are more frequently recorded in south European sites than in northern or eastern ones. The observed variations indicate that Natura 2000 networks are highly heterogeneous among EU Member States. Our analysis highlights the importance of agriculture in European landscapes and indicates possible targets for policy interventions at national, European, or "sub-European" level. The strong human presence in the Natura 2000 network throughout Member States, shows that conservation initiatives could succeed only by combining social and ecological sustainability and by ensuring the integration of policies affecting biodiversity.

  1. Active-Site Monovalent Cations Revealed in a 1.55 Å Resolution Hammerhead Ribozyme Structure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael; Schultz, Eric P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.

    2013-01-01

    We have obtained a 1.55 Å crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme derived from Schistosoma mansoni in conditions that permit detailed observations of Na+ ion binding in the ribozyme's active site. At least two such Na+ ions are observed. The first Na+ ion binds to the N7 of G10.1 and the adjacent A9 phosphate in a manner identical to that previously observed for divalent cations. A second Na+ ion binds to the Hoogsteen face of G12, the general base in the hammerhead cleavage reaction, thereby potentially dissipating the negative charge of the catalytically active enolate form of the nucleotide base. A potential but more ambiguous third site bridges the A9 and scissile phosphates in a manner consistent with previous predictions. Hammerhead ribozymes have been observed to be active in the presence of high concentrations of monovalent cations, including Na+, but the mechanism by which monovalent cations substitute for divalent cations in hammerhead catalysis remains unclear. Our results enable us to suggest that Na+ directly and specifically substitutes for divalent cations in the hammerhead active site. The detailed geometry of the pre-catalytic active site complex is also revealed with a new level of precision, thanks to the quality of the electron density maps obtained from what is currently the highest resolution ribozyme structure in the protein data bank. PMID:23711504

  2. Structure of inorganic pyrophosphatase from Staphylococcus aureus reveals conformational flexibility of the active site.

    PubMed

    Gajadeera, Chathurada S; Zhang, Xinyi; Wei, Yinan; Tsodikov, Oleg V

    2015-02-01

    Cytoplasmic inorganic pyrophosphatase (PPiase) is an enzyme essential for survival of organisms, from bacteria to human. PPiases are divided into two structurally distinct families: family I PPiases are Mg(2+)-dependent and present in most archaea, eukaryotes and prokaryotes, whereas the relatively less understood family II PPiases are Mn(2+)-dependent and present only in some archaea, bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. Staphylococcus aureus (SA), a dangerous pathogen and a frequent cause of hospital infections, contains a family II PPiase (PpaC), which is an attractive potential target for development of novel antibacterial agents. We determined a crystal structure of SA PpaC in complex with catalytic Mn(2+) at 2.1Å resolution. The active site contains two catalytic Mn(2+) binding sites, each half-occupied, reconciling the previously observed 1:1 Mn(2+):enzyme stoichiometry with the presence of two divalent metal ion sites in the apo-enzyme. Unexpectedly, despite the absence of the substrate or products in the active site, the two domains of SA PpaC form a closed active site, a conformation observed in structures of other family II PPiases only in complex with substrate or product mimics. A region spanning residues 295-298, which contains a conserved substrate binding RKK motif, is flipped out of the active site, an unprecedented conformation for a PPiase. Because the mutant of Arg295 to an alanine is devoid of activity, this loop likely undergoes an induced-fit conformational change upon substrate binding and product dissociation. This closed conformation of SA PPiase may serve as an attractive target for rational design of inhibitors of this enzyme. PMID:25576794

  3. Analysis of active site residues of the antiviral protein from summer leaves from Phytolacca americana by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Poyet, J L; Hoeveler, A; Jongeneel, C V

    1998-12-30

    The summer leaf isoform of the pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) antiviral protein, PAP II, was produced in high yields from inclusion bodies in recombinant E. coli. On the basis of its sequence similarity with the spring leaf isoform (PAP I) and with the A chain of ricin, a three-dimensional model of the protein was constructed as an aid in the design of active site mutants. PAP II variants mutated in residues Asp 88 (D88N), Tyr 117 (Y117S), Glu 172 (E172Q), Arg 175 (R175H) and a combination of Asp 88 and Arg 175 (D88N/R175H) were produced in E. coli and assayed for their ability to inhibit protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate. All of these mutations had effects deleterious to the enzymatic activity of PAP II. The results were interpreted in the light of three reaction mechanisms proposed for ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs). We conclude that none of the proposed mechanisms is entirely consistent with the data presented here.

  4. NMR structure of the active conformation of the Varkud satellite ribozyme cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Mitchell, G. Thomas; Gendron, Patrick; Major, François; Andersen, Angela A.; Collins, Richard A.; Legault, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Substrate cleavage by the Neurospora Varkud satellite (VS) ribozyme involves a structural change in the stem-loop I substrate from an inactive to an active conformation. We have determined the NMR solution structure of a mutant stem-loop I that mimics the active conformation of the cleavage site internal loop. This structure shares many similarities, but also significant differences, with the previously determined structures of the inactive internal loop. The active internal loop displays different base-pairing interactions and forms a novel RNA fold composed exclusively of sheared G-A base pairs. From chemical-shift mapping we identified two Mg2+ binding sites in the active internal loop. One of the Mg2+ binding sites forms in the active but not the inactive conformation of the internal loop and is likely important for catalysis. Using the structure comparison program mc-search, we identified the active internal loop fold in other RNA structures. In Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA, this RNA fold is directly involved in a long-range tertiary interaction. An analogous tertiary interaction may form between the active internal loop of the substrate and the catalytic domain of the VS ribozyme. The combination of NMR and bioinformatic approaches presented here has identified a novel RNA fold and provides insights into the structural basis of catalytic function in the Neurospora VS ribozyme. PMID:12782785

  5. Immobilized low-activity waste site borehole 299-E17-21

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P.; Reynolds, K.D.; Horton, D.G.

    1998-08-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is the group at the Hanford Site responsible for the safe underground storage of liquid waste from previous Hanford Site operations, the storage and disposal of immobilized tank waste, and closure of underground tanks. The current plan is to dispose of immobilized low-activity tank waste (ILAW) in new facilities in the southcentral part of 200-East Area and in four existing vaults along the east side of 200-East Area. Boreholes 299-E17-21, B8501, and B8502 were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site in support of the Performance Assessment activities for the disposal options. This report summarizes the initial geologic findings, field tests conducted on those boreholes, and ongoing studies. One deep (480 feet) borehole and two shallow (50 feet) boreholes were drilled at the southwest corner of the ILAW site. The primary factor dictating the location of the boreholes was their characterization function with respect to developing the geohydrologic model for the site and satisfying associated Data Quality Objectives. The deep borehole was drilled to characterize subsurface conditions beneath the ILAW site, and two shallow boreholes were drilled to support an ongoing environmental tracer study. The tracer study will supply information to the Performance Assessment. All the boreholes provide data on the vadose zone and saturated zone in a previously uncharacterized area.

  6. Maintenance of plastid RNA editing activities independently of their target sites

    PubMed Central

    Tillich, Michael; Poltnigg, Peter; Kushnir, Sergei; Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian

    2006-01-01

    RNA editing in plant organelles is mediated by site-specific, nuclear-encoded factors. Previous data suggested that the maintenance of these factors depends on the presence of their rapidly evolving cognate sites. The surprising ability of allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) to edit a foreign site in the chloroplast ndhA messenger RNA was thought to be inherited from its diploid male ancestor, Nicotiana tomentosiformis. Here, we show that the same ndhA editing activity is also present in Nicotiana sylvestris, which is the female diploid progenitor of tobacco and which lacks the ndhA site. Hence, heterologous editing is not simply a result of tobacco's allopolyploid genome organization. Analyses of other editing sites after sexual or somatic transfer between land plants showed that heterologous editing occurs at a surprisingly high frequency. This suggests that the corresponding editing activities are conserved despite the absence of their target sites, potentially because they serve other functions in the plant cell. PMID:16415790

  7. A facile reflux procedure to increase active surface sites form highly active and durable supported palladium@platinum bimetallic nanodendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Xu, Guangran; Zhang, Geng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Jun

    2015-11-01

    A series of well-dispersed bimetallic Pd@Pt nanodendrites uniformly supported on XC-72 carbon black are fabricated by using different capping agents. These capping agents are essential for the branched morphology control. However, the surfactant adsorbed on the nanodendrites surface blocks the access of reactant molecules to the active surface sites, and the catalytic activities of these bimetallic nanodendrites are significantly restricted. Herein, a facile reflux procedure to effectively remove the capping agent molecules without significantly affecting their sizes is reported for activating supported nanocatalysts. More significantly, the structure and morphology of the nanodendrites can also be retained, enhancing the numbers of active surface sites, catalytic activity and stability toward methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation reactions. The as-obtained hot water reflux-treated Pd@Pt/C catalyst manifests superior catalytic activity and stability both in terms of surface and mass specific activities, as compared to the untreated catalysts and the commercial Pt/C and Pd/C catalysts. We anticipate that this effective and facile removal method has more general applicability to highly active nanocatalysts prepared with various surfactants, and should lead to improvements in environmental protection and energy production.

  8. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Herter, Susanne; Kranz, David C; Turner, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C–H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations. PMID:26664590

  9. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Paul P; Eichler, Anja; Herter, Susanne; Kranz, David C; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C-H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations.

  10. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Paul P; Eichler, Anja; Herter, Susanne; Kranz, David C; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C-H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations. PMID:26664590

  11. Molecular dioxygen enters the active site of 12/15-lipoxygenase via dynamic oxygen access channels.

    PubMed

    Saam, Jan; Ivanov, Igor; Walther, Matthias; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Kuhn, Hartmut

    2007-08-14

    Cells contain numerous enzymes that use molecular oxygen for their reactions. Often, their active sites are buried deeply inside the protein, which raises the question whether there are specific access channels guiding oxygen to the site of catalysis. Choosing 12/15-lipoxygenase as a typical example for such oxygen-dependent enzymes, we determined the oxygen distribution within the protein and defined potential routes for oxygen access. For this purpose, we have applied an integrated strategy of structural modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic measurements. First, we computed the 3D free-energy distribution for oxygen, which led to identification of four oxygen channels in the protein. All channels connect the protein surface with a region of high oxygen affinity at the active site. This region is localized opposite to the nonheme iron providing a structural explanation for the reaction specificity of this lipoxygenase isoform. The catalytically most relevant path can be obstructed by L367F exchange, which leads to a strongly increased Michaelis constant for oxygen. The blocking mechanism is explained in detail by reordering the hydrogen-bonding network of water molecules. Our results provide strong evidence that the main route for oxygen access to the active site of the enzyme follows a channel formed by transiently interconnected cavities whereby the opening and closure are governed by side chain dynamics. PMID:17675410

  12. CO Oxidation on Au/TiO2: Condition-Dependent Active Sites and Mechanistic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang-Gang; Cantu, David C; Lee, Mal-Soon; Li, Jun; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Rousseau, Roger

    2016-08-24

    We present results of ab initio electronic structure and molecular dynamics simulations (AIMD), as well as a microkinetic model of CO oxidation catalyzed by TiO2 supported Au nanocatalysts. A coverage-dependent microkinetic analysis, based on energetics obtained with density functional methods, shows that the dominant kinetic pathway, activated oxygen species, and catalytic active sites are all strongly depended on both temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Under oxidizing conditions and T < 400 K, the prevalent pathway involves a dynamic single atom catalytic mechanism. This reaction is catalyzed by a transient Au-CO species that migrates from the Au-cluster onto a surface oxygen adatom. It subsequently reacts with the TiO2 support via a Mars van Krevelen mechanism to form CO2 and finally the Au atom reintegrates back into the gold cluster to complete the catalytic cycle. At 300 ≤ T ≤ 600 K, oxygen-bound single Oad-Au(+)-CO sites and the perimeter Au-sites of the nanoparticle work in tandem to optimally catalyze the reaction. Above 600 K, a variety of alternate pathways associated with both single-atom and the perimeter sites of the Au nanoparticle are found to be active. Under low oxygen pressures, Oad-Au(+)-CO species can be a source of catalyst deactivation and the dominant pathway involves only Au-perimeter sites. A detailed comparison of the current model and the existing literature resolves many apparent inconsistencies in the mechanistic interpretations. PMID:27480512

  13. A unique DNase activity shares the active site with ATPase activity of the RecA/Rad51 homologue (Pk-REC) from a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Rashid, N; Morikawa, M; Kanaya, S; Atomi, H; Imanaka, T

    1999-02-19

    A RecA/Rad51 homologue from Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 (Pk-REC) is the smallest protein among various RecA/Rad51 homologues. Nevertheless, Pk-Rec is a super multifunctional protein and shows a deoxyribonuclease activity. This deoxyribonuclease activity was inhibited by 3 mM or more ATP, suggesting that the catalytic centers of the ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities are overlapped. To examine whether these two enzymatic activities share the same active site, a number of site-directed mutations were introduced into Pk-REC and the ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities of the mutant proteins were determined. The mutant enzyme in which double mutations Lys-33 to Ala and Thr-34 to Ala were introduced, fully lost both of these activities, indicating that Lys-33 and/or Thr-34 are important for both ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities. The mutation of Asp-112 to Ala slightly and almost equally reduced both ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities. In addition, the mutation of Glu-54 to Gln did not seriously affect the ATPase, deoxyribonuclease, and UV tolerant activities. These results strongly suggest that the active sites of the ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities of Pk-REC are common. It is noted that unlike Glu-96 in Escherichia coli RecA, which has been proposed to be a catalytic residue for the ATPase activity, the corresponding residual Glu-54 in Pk-REC is not involved in the catalytic function of the protein.

  14. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  15. Active sites and mechanisms for direct oxidation of benzene to phenol over carbon catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wen, Guodong; Wu, Shuchang; Li, Bo; Dai, Chunli; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-03-23

    The direct oxidation of benzene to phenol with H2 O2 as the oxidizer, which is regarded as an environmentally friendly process, can be efficiently catalyzed by carbon catalysts. However, the detailed roles of carbon catalysts, especially what is the active site, are still a topic of debate controversy. Herein, we present a fundamental consideration of possible mechanisms for this oxidation reaction by using small molecular model catalysts, Raman spectra, static secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), DFT calculations, quasi in situ ATR-IR and UV spectra. Our study indicates that the defects, being favorable for the formation of active oxygen species, are the active sites for this oxidation reaction. Furthermore, one type of active defect, namely the armchair configuration defect was successfully identified.

  16. Effect of temperature on the acid-base properties of the alumina surface: microcalorimetry and acid-base titration experiments.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Pierre; Marmier, Nicolas; Hurel, Charlotte; Morel-Desrosiers, Nicole

    2006-06-15

    Sorption reactions on natural or synthetic materials that can attenuate the migration of pollutants in the geosphere could be affected by temperature variations. Nevertheless, most of the theoretical models describing sorption reactions are at 25 degrees C. To check these models at different temperatures, experimental data such as the enthalpies of sorption are thus required. Highly sensitive microcalorimeters can now be used to determine the heat effects accompanying the sorption of radionuclides on oxide-water interfaces, but enthalpies of sorption cannot be extracted from microcalorimetric data without a clear knowledge of the thermodynamics of protonation and deprotonation of the oxide surface. However, the values reported in the literature show large discrepancies and one must conclude that, amazingly, this fundamental problem of proton binding is not yet resolved. We have thus undertaken to measure by titration microcalorimetry the heat effects accompanying proton exchange at the alumina-water interface at 25 degrees C. Based on (i) the surface sites speciation provided by a surface complexation model (built from acid-base titrations at 25 degrees C) and (ii) results of the microcalorimetric experiments, calculations have been made to extract the enthalpic variations associated respectively to first and second deprotonation of the alumina surface. Values obtained are deltaH1 = 80+/-10 kJ mol(-1) and deltaH2 = 5+/-3 kJ mol(-1). In a second step, these enthalpy values were used to calculate the alumina surface acidity constants at 50 degrees C via the van't Hoff equation. Then a theoretical titration curve at 50 degrees C was calculated and compared to the experimental alumina surface titration curve. Good agreement between the predicted acid-base titration curve and the experimental one was observed.

  17. Sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 reporter mice reveal receptor activation sites in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Mari; Tucker, Ana E.; Tran, Jennifer; Bergner, Jennifer B.; Turner, Ewa M.; Proia, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the GPCR sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1) by sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) regulates key physiological processes. S1P1 activation also has been implicated in pathologic processes, including autoimmunity and inflammation; however, the in vivo sites of S1P1 activation under normal and disease conditions are unclear. Here, we describe the development of a mouse model that allows in vivo evaluation of S1P1 activation. These mice, known as S1P1 GFP signaling mice, produce a S1P1 fusion protein containing a transcription factor linked by a protease cleavage site at the C terminus as well as a β-arrestin/protease fusion protein. Activated S1P1 recruits the β-arrestin/protease, resulting in the release of the transcription factor, which stimulates the expression of a GFP reporter gene. Under normal conditions, S1P1 was activated in endothelial cells of lymphoid tissues and in cells in the marginal zone of the spleen, while administration of an S1P1 agonist promoted S1P1 activation in endothelial cells and hepatocytes. In S1P1 GFP signaling mice, LPS-mediated systemic inflammation activated S1P1 in endothelial cells and hepatocytes via hematopoietically derived S1P. These data demonstrate that S1P1 GFP signaling mice can be used to evaluate S1P1 activation and S1P1-active compounds in vivo. Furthermore, this strategy could be potentially applied to any GPCR to identify sites of receptor activation during normal physiology and disease. PMID:24667638

  18. A three-dimensional model of mammalian tyrosinase active site accounting for loss of function mutations.

    PubMed

    Schweikardt, Thorsten; Olivares, Concepción; Solano, Francisco; Jaenicke, Elmar; García-Borrón, José Carlos; Decker, Heinz

    2007-10-01

    Tyrosinases are the first and rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of melanin pigments responsible for colouring hair, skin and eyes. Mutation of tyrosinases often decreases melanin production resulting in albinism, but the effects are not always understood at the molecular level. Homology modelling of mouse tyrosinase based on recently published crystal structures of non-mammalian tyrosinases provides an active site model accounting for loss-of-function mutations. According to the model, the copper-binding histidines are located in a helix bundle comprising four densely packed helices. A loop containing residues M374, S375 and V377 connects the CuA and CuB centres, with the peptide oxygens of M374 and V377 serving as hydrogen acceptors for the NH-groups of the imidazole rings of the copper-binding His367 and His180. Therefore, this loop is essential for the stability of the active site architecture. A double substitution (374)MS(375) --> (374)GG(375) or a single M374G mutation lead to a local perturbation of the protein matrix at the active site affecting the orientation of the H367 side chain, that may be unable to bind CuB reliably, resulting in loss of activity. The model also accounts for loss of function in two naturally occurring albino mutations, S380P and V393F. The hydroxyl group in S380 contributes to the correct orientation of M374, and the substitution of V393 for a bulkier phenylalanine sterically impedes correct side chain packing at the active site. Therefore, our model explains the mechanistic necessity for conservation of not only active site histidines but also adjacent amino acids in tyrosinase. PMID:17850513

  19. Identification of active sites in gold-catalyzed hydrogenation of acrolein.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Christian; Hofmeister, Herbert; Radnik, Jörg; Claus, Peter

    2003-02-19

    The active sites of supported gold catalysts, favoring the adsorption of C=O groups of acrolein and subsequent reaction to allyl alcohol, have been identified as edges of gold nanoparticles. After our recent finding that this reaction preferentially occurs on single crystalline particles rather than multiply twinned ones, this paper reports on a new approach to distinguish different features of the gold particle morphology. Elucidation of the active site issue cannot be simply done by varying the size of gold particles, since the effects of faceting and multiply twinned particles may interfere. Therefore, modification of the gold particle surface by indium has been used to vary the active site characteristics of a suitable catalyst, and a selective decoration of gold particle faces has been observed, leaving edges free. This is in contradiction to theoretical predictions, suggesting a preferred occupation of the low-coordinated edges of the gold particles. On the bimetallic catalyst, the desired allyl alcohol is the main product (selectivity 63%; temperature 593 K, total pressure p(total) = 2 MPa). From the experimentally proven correlation between surface structure and catalytic behavior, the edges of single crystalline gold particles have been identified as active sites for the preferred C=O hydrogenation. PMID:12580618

  20. Evidence for surface Ag + complexes as the SERS-active sites on Ag electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Kawanami, O.; Honda, K.; Pettinger, B.

    1983-12-01

    Evidence is given that SERS-active sites at Ag electrodes are associated with Ag + ions, forming sparingly soluble surface complexes with ligands such as pyridine molecules and halide ions. Such surface Ag + complexes contribute a factor of >800 to the overall (10 7-fold) enhancement, possibly via a resonance Raman effect.

  1. Strategies and Activities for Using Local Communities as Environmental Education Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Charles E.; Lockwood, Linda G.

    Presented are over 100 environmental education activities which use the local community for a learning site and resource. These lessons are grouped under seven topical headings: (1) biological neighbors, (2) physical environs, (3) built environs, (4) social environs, (5) understanding ourselves, (6) influencing change, and (7) improvement and…

  2. 78 FR 18576 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Experimental Sites Data Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Experimental Sites Data Collection Instrument... information collection requirements and provide the requested data in the desired format. ED is soliciting... collection instrument will be used to collect specific information/performance data for analysis of...

  3. Penicillin Use in Meningococcal Disease Management: Active Bacterial Core Surveillance Sites, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Blain, Amy E.; Mandal, Sema; Wu, Henry; MacNeil, Jessica R.; Harrison, Lee H.; Farley, Monica M.; Lynfield, Ruth; Miller, Lisa; Nichols, Megin; Petit, Sue; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Zansky, Shelley M.; Anderson, Raydel; Harcourt, Brian H.; Mayer, Leonard W.; Clark, Thomas A.; Cohn, Amanda C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2009, in the Active Bacterial Core surveillance sites, penicillin was not commonly used to treat meningococcal disease. This is likely because of inconsistent availability of antimicrobial susceptibility testing and ease of use of third-generation cephalosporins. Consideration of current practices may inform future meningococcal disease management guidelines. PMID:27704009

  4. The Thumbs Up Ecology Curriculum: A Fun Group of School Site Activities for Sixth Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, John; And Others

    This guide is a collection of "fun" school site activities for sixth graders. Some of the topics covered are: animals, trees, energy and lifestyle, land use and you, energy conservation, and car-pooling. Each section offers both introductory information about the topic as well as questions to ponder such as what, so what, now what, and another way…

  5. 78 FR 33908 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... identified Wind Energy Area (WEA) on the OCS offshore Rhode Island (RI) and Massachusetts (MA). The revised... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance and Site Assessment Activities on the.... BOEM may issue one or more commercial wind energy leases in the WEA. The competitive lease process...

  6. 77 FR 3460 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-24

    ... published a final rule under 10 CFR Part 765 in the Federal Register on May 23, 1994, (59 FR 26714) to carry... for reimbursement. DOE amended the final rule on June 3, 2003, (68 FR 32955) to adopt several... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department...

  7. 75 FR 71677 - Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... published a final rule under 10 CFR Part 765 in the Federal Register on May 23, 1994, (59 FR 26714) to carry... for reimbursement. DOE amended the final rule on June 3, 2003, (68 FR 32955) to adopt several... Reimbursement for Costs of Remedial Action at Active Uranium and Thorium Processing Sites AGENCY: Department...

  8. Archaeological Activity Report: Post-Review Discoveries Within 45BN431 at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2

    SciTech Connect

    T. E. Marceau; J. J. Sharpe

    2006-12-21

    During monitoring of remedial activities at Solid Waste Site 128-F-2 on August 19, 2005, a concentration of mussel shell was discovered in the west wall of a trench in the northen section of the waste site.

  9. [Titration and stability tests for antimeasles vaccine].

    PubMed

    Ayala-González, M

    1990-07-01

    Production and quality of the vaccines, are important activities in the prevention of measles disease. Edmonston-Zagreb measles vaccine is the main strain attenuated virus distributed in México. In order to evaluate the titer of Edmonston-Zagreb and Schwarz vaccines, 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID50/0.5 mL) and plaque-forming units (PFU) are performed in the National Laboratory of Public Health. Furthermore PFU is a method used in the stability vaccine test. Validation criteria are described in this paper.

  10. Conformational dynamics of the active site loop of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase illuminated by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John C; Markham, George D

    2003-07-15

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase, methionine adenosyltransferase, a.k.a. MAT) is one of numerous enzymes that have a flexible polypeptide loop that moves to gate access to the active site in a motion that is closely coupled to catalysis. Crystallographic studies of this tetrameric enzyme have shown that the loop is closed in the absence of bound substrates. However, the loop must open to allow substrate binding and a variety of data indicate that the loop is closed during the catalytic steps. Previous kinetic studies indicate that during turnover loop motion occurs on a time scale of 10(-2)s, ca. 10-fold faster than chemical transformations and turnover. Site-directed spin labeling has been used to introduce nitroxide groups at two positions in the loop to illuminate how the motion of the loop is affected by substrate binding. The two loop mutants constructed, G105C and D107C, retain wild type levels of MAT activity; attachment of a methanethiosulfonate spin label to convert the cysteine to the "R1" residue reduced the k(cat) only for the labeled D107R1 form (7-fold). The K(m) value for methionine increased 2- to 4-fold for the cysteine mutants and 2- to 7-fold for the labeled proteins, whereas the K(m) for ATP was changed by at most 2-fold. EPR spectra for both labeled proteins are nearly identical and show the presence of two major spin label environments with rotational diffusion rates differing by approximately 10-fold; the slower rate is ca. 4-fold faster than the estimated protein rotational rate. The spectra are not altered by addition of substrates or products. At both positions the less mobile conformation constitutes ca. 65% of the total species, indicating an equilibrium that only slightly favors one form, that in which the label is more immobilized. The equilibrium constant that relates the two forms is comparable to the equilibrium constant of 1.5 for a conformational change that was previously deduced from the

  11. [Titration of Ebola and Marburg viruses by plaque formation under semi liquid agar].

    PubMed

    Ustinova, E N; Shestopalov, A M; Bakulina, L F; Chepurnov, A A

    2003-01-01

    The method of titration of Ebola and Marburg viruses using plaque formation under semifluid agar cover is considered. Advantages of this method over conventional method of titration of these viruses with the use of hard agar cover are discussed.

  12. Spectroscopic studies of single and double variants of M ferritin: lack of conversion of a biferrous substrate site into a cofactor site for O2 activation.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Yeonju; Schwartz, Jennifer K; Haldar, Suranjana; Behera, Rabindra K; Tosha, Takehiko; Theil, Elizabeth C; Solomon, Edward I

    2014-01-28

    Ferritin has a binuclear non-heme iron active site that functions to oxidize iron as a substrate for formation of an iron mineral core. Other enzymes of this class have tightly bound diiron cofactor sites that activate O2 to react with substrate. Ferritin has an active site ligand set with 1-His/4-carboxylate/1-Gln rather than the 2-His/4-carboxylate set of the cofactor site. This ligand variation has been thought to make a major contribution to this biferrous substrate rather than cofactor site reactivity. However, the Q137E/D140H double variant of M ferritin, has a ligand set that is equivalent to most of the diiron cofactor sites, yet did not rapidly react with O2 or generate the peroxy intermediate observed in the cofactor sites. Therefore, in this study, a combined spectroscopic methodology of circular dichroism (CD)/magnetic CD (MCD)/variable temperature, variable field (VTVH) MCD has been applied to evaluate the factors required for the rapid O2 activation observed in cofactor sites. This methodology defines the coordination environment of each iron and the bridging ligation of the biferrous active sites in the double and corresponding single variants of frog M ferritin. Based on spectral changes, the D140H single variant has the new His ligand binding, and the Q137E variant has the new carboxylate forming a μ-1,3 bridge. The spectra for the Q137E/D140H double variant, which has the cofactor ligand set, however, reflects a site that is more coordinately saturated than the cofactor sites in other enzymes including ribonucleotide reductase, indicating the presence of additional water ligation. Correlation of this double variant and the cofactor sites to their O2 reactivities indicates that electrostatic and steric changes in the active site and, in particular, the hydrophobic nature of a cofactor site associated with its second sphere protein environment, make important contributions to the activation of O2 by the binuclear non-heme iron enzymes.

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Titration of Polyoxocations in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, James R.

    2005-09-01

    The aqueous complex ion Al30O8(OH)56(H2O)26 18+(Al30) has a variety of bridging and terminal amphoteric surface functional groups which deprotonate over a pH range of 4–7. Their relative degree of protonation is calculated here from a series of molecular dynamics simulations in what appear to be the first molecular dynamics simulations of an acidometric titration. In these simulations, a model M30O8(OH)56(H2O)26 18+ ion is embedded in aqueous solution and titrated with hydroxide ions in the presence of a charge-compensating background of perchlorate ions. Comparison with titration of a model M13O4(OH)24(H2O)12 7+ reveals that the M30 ion is more acidic than the M13 ion due to the presence of acidic nH2O functional groups. The higher acidities of the functional groups on the M30 ion appear to result from enhanced hydration. Metal–oxygen bond lengths are calculated for the ion in solution, an isolated ion in the gas phase, and in its crystalline hydrate sulfate salt. Gas-phase and crystalline bond lengths do not correlate well with those calculated in solution. The acidities do not relate in any simple way to the number of metals coordinating the surface functional group or the M-O bond length. Moreover, the calculated acidity in solution does not correlate with proton affinities calculated for the isolated ion in the absence of solvent. It is concluded that the search for simple indicators of structure–reactivity relationships at the level of individual reactive sites faces major limitations, unless specific information on the hydration states of the functional groups is available.

  14. Tools for building a comprehensive modeling system for virtual screening under real biological conditions: The Computational Titration algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Glen E; Fornabaio, Micaela; Chen, Deliang L; Abraham, Donald J; Spyrakis, Francesca; Cozzini, Pietro; Mozzarelli, Andrea

    2006-05-01

    Computational tools utilizing a unique empirical modeling system based on the hydrophobic effect and the measurement of logP(o/w) (the partition coefficient for solvent transfer between 1-octanol and water) are described. The associated force field, Hydropathic INTeractions (HINT), contains much rich information about non-covalent interactions in the biological environment because of its basis in an experiment that measures interactions in solution. HINT is shown to be the core of an evolving virtual screening system that is capable of taking into account a number of factors often ignored such as entropy, effects of solvent molecules at the active site, and the ionization states of acidic and basic residues and ligand functional groups. The outline of a comprehensive modeling system for virtual screening that incorporates these features is described. In addition, a detailed description of the Computational Titration algorithm is provided. As an example, three complexes of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) are analyzed with our system and these results are compared with the experimental free energies of binding.

  15. Characterization of the active site properties of CYP4F12.

    PubMed

    Eksterowicz, John; Rock, Dan A; Rock, Brooke M; Wienkers, Larry C; Foti, Robert S

    2014-10-01

    Cytochrome P450 4F12 is a drug-metabolizing enzyme that is primarily expressed in the liver, kidney, colon, small intestine, and heart. The properties of CYP4F12 that may impart an increased catalytic selectivity (decreased promiscuity) were explored through in vitro metabolite elucidation, kinetic isotope effect experiments, and computational modeling of the CYP4F12 active site. By using astemizole as a probe substrate for CYP4F12 and CYP3A4, it was observed that although CYP4F12 favored astemizole O-demethylation as the primary route of metabolism, CYP3A4 was capable of metabolizing astemizole at multiple sites on the molecule. Deuteration of astemizole at the site of O-demethylation resulted in an isotope effect of 7.1 as well as an 8.3-fold decrease in the rate of clearance for astemizole by CYP4F12. Conversely, although an isotope effect of 3.8 was observed for the formation of the O-desmethyl metabolite when deuterated astemizole was metabolized by CYP3A4, there was no decrease in the clearance of astemizole. Development of a homology model of CYP4F12 based on the crystal structure of cytochrome P450 BM3 predicted an active site volume for CYP4F12 that was approximately 76% of the active site volume of CYP3A4. As predicted, multiple favorable binding orientations were available for astemizole docked into the active site of CYP3A4, but only a single binding orientation with the site of O-demethylation oriented toward the heme was identified for CYP4F12. Overall, it appears that although CYP4F12 may be capable of binding similar ligands to other cytochrome P450 enzymes such as CYP3A4, the ability to achieve catalytically favorable orientations may be inherently more difficult because of the increased steric constraints of the CYP4F12 active site. PMID:25074871

  16. A modular treatment of molecular traffic through the active site of cholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Botti, SA; Felder, CE; Lifson, S; Sussman, JL; Silman, I

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for the molecular traffic of ligands, substrates, and products through the active site of cholinesterases (ChEs). First, we describe a common treatment of the diffusion to a buried active site of cationic and neutral species. We then explain the specificity of ChEs for cationic ligands and substrates by introducing two additional components to this common treatment. The first module is a surface trap for cationic species at the entrance to the active-site gorge that operates through local, short-range electrostatic interactions and is independent of ionic strength. The second module is an ionic-strength-dependent steering mechanism generated by long-range electrostatic interactions arising from the overall distribution of charges in ChEs. Our calculations show that diffusion of charged ligands relative to neutral isosteric analogs is enhanced approximately 10-fold by the surface trap, while electrostatic steering contributes only a 1.5- to 2-fold rate enhancement at physiological salt concentration. We model clearance of cationic products from the active-site gorge as analogous to the escape of a particle from a one-dimensional well in the presence of a linear electrostatic potential. We evaluate the potential inside the gorge and provide evidence that while contributing to the steering of cationic species toward the active site, it does not appreciably retard their clearance. This optimal fine-tuning of global and local electrostatic interactions endows ChEs with maximum catalytic efficiency and specificity for a positively charged substrate, while at the same time not hindering clearance of the positively charged products. PMID:10545346

  17. Characterization and sequencing of the active site of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, Wing-Kin; Dong, Jian-Guo; Yang, S.F. ); Kenny, J.W.; Thompson, G.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase the key enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis, is inactivated by its substrate S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). Apple ACC synthase was purified with an immunoaffinity gel, and its active site was probed with NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} or Ado({sup 14}C)Met. Peptide sequencing of both {sup 3}H- and {sup 14}C-labeled peptides revealed a common dodecapeptide of Ser-Leu-Ser-Xaa-Asp-Leu-Gly-Leu-Pro-Gly-Phe-Arg, where Xaa was the modified, radioactive residue in each case. Acid hydrolysis of the {sup 3}H-labeled enzyme released radioactive N-pyridoxyllysine, indicating that the active-site peptide contained lysine at position 4. Mass spectrometry of the {sup 14}C-labeled peptide indicated a protonated molecular ion at m/z 1390.6, from which the mass of Xaa was calculated to be 229, a number that is equivalent to the mass of a lysine residue alkylated by the 2-aminobutyrate portion of AdoMet, as we previously proposed. These results indicate that the same active-site lysine binds the PLP and convalently links to the 2-aminobutyrate portion of AdoMet during inactivation. The active site of tomato ACC synthase was probed in the same manner with Ado ({sup 14}C)Met. Sequencing of the tomato active-site peptide revealed two highly conserved dodecapeptides; the minor peptide possessed a sequence identical to that of the apple enzyme, whereas the major peptide differed from the minor peptide in that methionine replaced leucine at position 6.

  18. Detection analysis of surface hydroxyl active sites and simulation calculation of the surface dissociation constants of aqueous diatomite suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-02-01

    The surface properties of the diatomite were investigated using nitrogen adsorption/deadsorption isotherms, TG-DSC, FTIR, and XPS, and surface protonation-deprotonation behavior was determined by continuous acid-base potentiometric titration technique. The diatomite sample with porous honeycomb structure has a BET specific surface area of 10.21 m2/g and large numbers of surface hydroxyl functional groups (i.e. tbnd Si-OH, tbnd Fe-OH, and tbnd Al-OH). These surface hydroxyls can be protonated or deprotonated depending on the pH of the suspension. The experimental potentiometric data in two different ionic strength solutions (0.1 and 0.05 mol/L NaCl) were fitted using ProtoFit GUI V2.1 program by applying diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites and minimizing the sum of squares between a dataset derivative function and a model derivative function. The optimized surface parameters (i.e. surface dissociation constants (log K1, log K2) and surface site concentrations (log C)) of the sample were obtained. Based on the optimized surface parameters, the surface species distribution was calculated using Program-free PHREEQC 3.1.2. Thus, this work reveals considerable new information about surface protonation-deprotonation processes and surface adsorptive behaviors of the diatomite, which helps us to effectively use the cheap and cheerful diatomite clay adsorbent.

  19. Substrate binding properties of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Bilal; Tuncel, Aytug; Green, Abigail R; Koper, Kaan; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Okita, Thomas W; Kang, ChulHee

    2015-06-01

    Substrate binding properties of the large (LS) and small (SS) subunits of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were investigated by using isothermal titration calorimetry. Our results clearly show that the wild type heterotetramer (S(WT)L(WT)) possesses two distinct types of ATP binding sites, whereas the homotetrameric LS and SS variant forms only exhibited properties of one of the two binding sites. The wild type enzyme also exhibited significantly increased affinity to this substrate compared to the homotetrameric enzyme forms. No stable binding was evident for the second substrate, glucose-1-phosphate, in the presence or absence of ATPγS suggesting that interaction of glucose-1-phosphate is dependent on hydrolysis of ATP and supports the Theorell-Chance bi bi reaction mechanism.

  20. Substrate binding properties of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Bilal; Tuncel, Aytug; Green, Abigail R; Koper, Kaan; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Okita, Thomas W; Kang, ChulHee

    2015-06-01

    Substrate binding properties of the large (LS) and small (SS) subunits of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were investigated by using isothermal titration calorimetry. Our results clearly show that the wild type heterotetramer (S(WT)L(WT)) possesses two distinct types of ATP binding sites, whereas the homotetrameric LS and SS variant forms only exhibited properties of one of the two binding sites. The wild type enzyme also exhibited significantly increased affinity to this substrate compared to the homotetrameric enzyme forms. No stable binding was evident for the second substrate, glucose-1-phosphate, in the presence or absence of ATPγS suggesting that interaction of glucose-1-phosphate is dependent on hydrolysis of ATP and supports the Theorell-Chance bi bi reaction mechanism. PMID:25953126

  1. Lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells can be focused at sites of tumor growth by products of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, R.J.; Gruber, S.A.; Sawyer, M.D.; Hoffman, R.; Ochoa, A.; Bach, F.H.; Simmons, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    Successful adoptive cancer immunotherapy presumably depends on the accumulation of tumoricidal leukocytes at the sites of tumor growth. Large numbers of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells can be generated in vitro by growth in high concentrations of interleukin-2 (IL-2), but relatively few arrive at the tumor site after intravenous injection. We hypothesize that the delivery of LAK cells to tumor sites may be augmented by previously demonstrated lymphocyte-recruiting factors, including activated macrophage products such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor. /sup 111/Indium-labeled LAK cells were injected intravenously into syngeneic mice bearing the macrophage activator endotoxin (LPS) in one hind footpad, and saline solution was injected into the contralateral footpad. Significantly more activity was recovered from the LPS-bearing footpad at all times during a 96-hour period. Recombinant IL-1 also attracted more LAK cells after injection into tumor-free hind footpads. Furthermore, LAK cells preferentially homed to hind footpads that were bearing 3-day established sarcomas after intralesional injections of LPS, IL-1, or tumor necrosis factor when compared with contralateral tumor-bearing footpads injected with saline solution alone. In preliminary experiments, mice with hind-footpad tumors appeared to survive longer after combined systemic IL-2 and LAK therapy if intralesional LPS was administered. These studies demonstrate that macrophage activation factors that have been shown capable of attracting circulating normal lymphocytes can also effectively attract LAK cells from the circulation. By the stimulation of macrophages at the sites of tumor growth, more LAK cells can be attracted. It is hoped that by focusing the migration of LAK cells to tumors, LAK cells and IL-2 would effect tumor regression more efficiently and with less toxicity.

  2. Use of chicken cell line LSCC-H32 for titration of animal viruses and exogenous chicken interferon.

    PubMed

    Roth, S; Kaaden, O R

    1985-03-01

    The chicken embryo cell line LSCC-H32 was tested for the propagation and titration of several animal viruses of the families Toga-, Reo-, Rhabdo-, Herpeto-, Orthomyxo-, Paramyxo-, and Poxviridae and compared with secondary chicken embryo cells. The LSCC-H32 cells were demonstrated to be as susceptible for most of the tested viruses as were secondary chicken embryo cells. Both produced comparably sized virus plaques. The titers of Sindbis and Semliki Forest viruses in LSCC-H32 cells were 5- to 40-fold higher than in secondary chicken embryo cells or BHK-21 cells, respectively. Furthermore, exogenous chicken standard interferon was titrated in the LSCC-H32 cells, and a 50% plaque titer reduction of the challenging vesicular stomatitis virus was achieved by 0.12 IU of a standard chicken interferon preparation. Endogenous chicken interferon could not be induced by treatment of the cells with polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid. Due to its high plating efficiency and metabolic activities, the LSCC-H32 cell line provides a useful cell system for the titration and large-scale production of the tested animal viruses and for the titration of exogenous chicken interferon.

  3. Use of chicken cell line LSCC-H32 for titration of animal viruses and exogenous chicken interferon.

    PubMed

    Roth, S; Kaaden, O R

    1985-03-01

    The chicken embryo cell line LSCC-H32 was tested for the propagation and titration of several animal viruses of the families Toga-, Reo-, Rhabdo-, Herpeto-, Orthomyxo-, Paramyxo-, and Poxviridae and compared with secondary chicken embryo cells. The LSCC-H32 cells were demonstrated to be as susceptible for most of the tested viruses as were secondary chicken embryo cells. Both produced comparably sized virus plaques. The titers of Sindbis and Semliki Forest viruses in LSCC-H32 cells were 5- to 40-fold higher than in secondary chicken embryo cells or BHK-21 cells, respectively. Furthermore, exogenous chicken standard interferon was titrated in the LSCC-H32 cells, and a 50% plaque titer reduction of the challenging vesicular stomatitis virus was achieved by 0.12 IU of a standard chicken interferon preparation. Endogenous chicken interferon could not be induced by treatment of the cells with polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid. Due to its high plating efficiency and metabolic activities, the LSCC-H32 cell line provides a useful cell system for the titration and large-scale production of the tested animal viruses and for the titration of exogenous chicken interferon. PMID:2581511

  4. Threshold occupancy and specific cation binding modes in the hammerhead ribozyme active site are required for active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Giambaşu, George M.; Sosa, Carlos P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between formation of active in-line attack conformations and monovalent (Na+) and divalent (Mg2+) metal ion binding in the hammerhead ribozyme has been explored with molecular dynamics simulations. To stabilize repulsions between negatively charged groups, different requirements of threshold occupancy of metal ions were observed in the reactant and activated precursor states both in the presence or absence of a Mg2+ in the active site. Specific bridging coordination patterns of the ions are correlated with the formation of active in-line attack conformations and can be accommodated in both cases. Furthermore, simulation results suggest that the hammerhead ribozyme folds to form an electronegative recruiting pocket that attracts high local concentrations of positive charge. The present simulations help to reconcile experiments that probe the metal ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis and support the supposition that Mg2+, in addition to stabilizing active conformations, plays a specific chemical role in catalysis. PMID:19265710

  5. Locomotor activity influences muscle architecture and bone growth but not muscle attachment site morphology

    PubMed Central

    Rabey, Karyne N.; Green, David J.; Taylor, Andrea B.; Begun, David R.; Richmond, Brian G.; McFarlin, Shannon C.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to make behavioural inferences from skeletal remains is critical to understanding the lifestyles and activities of past human populations and extinct animals. Muscle attachment site (enthesis) morphology has long been assumed to reflect muscle strength and activity during life, but little experimental evidence exists to directly link activity patterns with muscle development and the morphology of their attachments to the skeleton. We used a mouse model to experimentally test how the level and type of activity influences forelimb muscle architecture of spinodeltoideus, acromiodeltoideus, and superficial pectoralis, bone growth rate and gross morphology of their insertion sites. Over an 11-week period, we collected data on activity levels in one control group and two experimental activity groups (running, climbing) of female wild-type mice. Our results show that both activity type and level increased bone growth rates influenced muscle architecture, including differences in potential muscular excursion (fibre length) and potential force production (physiological cross-sectional area). However, despite significant influences on muscle architecture and bone development, activity had no observable effect on enthesis morphology. These results suggest that the gross morphology of entheses is less reliable than internal bone structure for making inferences about an individual’s past behaviour. PMID:25467113

  6. Roles of s3 site residues of nattokinase on its activity and substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuming; Feng, Chi; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-09-01

    Nattokinase (Subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with high fibrinolytic activity. To probe their roles on protease activity and substrate specificity, three residues of S3 site (Gly(100), Ser(101) and Leu(126)) were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetics parameters of 20 mutants were measured using tetrapeptides as substrates, and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. Results of mutation analysis showed that Gly(100) and Ser(101) had reverse steric and electrostatic effects. Residues with bulky or positively charged side chains at position 100 decreased the substrate binding and catalytic activity drastically, while residues with the same characters at position 101 could obviously enhance protease and fibrinolytic activity of NK. Mutation of Leu(126) might impair the structure of the active cleft and drastically decreased the activity of NK. Kinetics studies of the mutants showed that S3 residues were crucial to keep protease activity while they moderately affected substrate specificity of NK. The present study provided some original insight into the P3-S3 interaction in NK and other subtilisins, as well as showed successful protein engineering cases to improve NK as a potential therapeutic agent.

  7. Asymmetry of the active site loop conformation between subunits of glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminomutase in solution.

    PubMed

    Campanini, Barbara; Bettati, Stefano; di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Contestabile, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminomutase (GSAM) is a dimeric, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)- dependent enzyme catalysing in plants and some bacteria the isomerization of L-glutamate-1-semialdehyde to 5-aminolevulinate, a common precursor of chlorophyll, haem, coenzyme B12, and other tetrapyrrolic compounds. During the catalytic cycle, the coenzyme undergoes conversion from pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP) to PLP. The entrance of the catalytic site is protected by a loop that is believed to switch from an open to a closed conformation during catalysis. Crystallographic studies indicated that the structure of the mobile loop is related to the form of the cofactor bound to the active site, allowing for asymmetry within the dimer. Since no information on structural and functional asymmetry of the enzyme in solution is available in the literature, we investigated the active site accessibility by determining the cofactor fluorescence quenching of PMP- and PLP-GSAM forms. PLP-GSAM is partially quenched by potassium iodide, suggesting that at least one catalytic site is accessible to the anionic quencher and therefore confirming the asymmetry observed in the crystal structure. Iodide induces release of the cofactor from PMP-GSAM, apparently from only one catalytic site, therefore suggesting an asymmetry also in this form of the enzyme in solution, in contrast with the crystallographic data.

  8. Sequences flanking the core-binding site modulate glucocorticoid receptor structure and activity

    PubMed Central

    Schöne, Stefanie; Jurk, Marcel; Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Dror, Iris; Lebars, Isabelle; Kieffer, Bruno; Imhof, Petra; Rohs, Remo; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds as a homodimer to genomic response elements, which have particular sequence and shape characteristics. Here we show that the nucleotides directly flanking the core-binding site, differ depending on the strength of GR-dependent activation of nearby genes. Our study indicates that these flanking nucleotides change the three-dimensional structure of the DNA-binding site, the DNA-binding domain of GR and the quaternary structure of the dimeric complex. Functional studies in a defined genomic context show that sequence-induced changes in GR activity cannot be explained by differences in GR occupancy. Rather, mutating the dimerization interface mitigates DNA-induced changes in both activity and structure, arguing for a role of DNA-induced structural changes in modulating GR activity. Together, our study shows that DNA sequence identity of genomic binding sites modulates GR activity downstream of binding, which may play a role in achieving regulatory specificity towards individual target genes. PMID:27581526

  9. Alkyl isocyanates as active site-directed inactivators of guinea pig liver transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Gross, M; Whetzel, N K; Folk, J E

    1975-10-10

    Alkyl isocyanates are effective inactivators of guinea pig liver transglutaminase. Based on the specificity of the reaction the protection against inactivation by glutamine substrate, and the essential nature of calcium for the inactivation reaction, it is concluded that these reagents act as amide substrate analogs and, thus function in an active site-specific manner. Support for the contention that inactivation results from alkyl thiocarbamate ester formation through the single active site sulfhydryl group of the enzyme is (a) the loss of one free--SH group and the incorporation of 1 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme in the reaction, (b) similarity in chemical properties of the inactive enzyme derivative formed to those previously reported for another alkyl thiocarbamoylenzyme and an alkyl thiocarbamoylcysteine derivative, and (c) the finding that labeled peptides from digests of [methyl-14C]thiocarbamoyltransglutaminase and those from digests of iodoacetamide-inactivated enzyme occupy similar positions on peptide maps. Transglutaminase was found to be inactivated neither by urethan anlogs of its active ester substrates nor by urea analogs of its amide substrates. It is concluded on the basis of these findings that inactive carbamoylenzyme derivatives are formed only by direct addition of the transglutaminase active--SH group to the isocyanate C--N double bond, and not, like several serine active site enzymes, by nucleophilic displacement with urethan analogs of substrate, or by nucleophilic displacement with urea analogs of substrate. PMID:240837

  10. Sequences flanking the core-binding site modulate glucocorticoid receptor structure and activity.

    PubMed

    Schöne, Stefanie; Jurk, Marcel; Helabad, Mahdi Bagherpoor; Dror, Iris; Lebars, Isabelle; Kieffer, Bruno; Imhof, Petra; Rohs, Remo; Vingron, Martin; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds as a homodimer to genomic response elements, which have particular sequence and shape characteristics. Here we show that the nucleotides directly flanking the core-binding site, differ depending on the strength of GR-dependent activation of nearby genes. Our study indicates that these flanking nucleotides change the three-dimensional structure of the DNA-binding site, the DNA-binding domain of GR and the quaternary structure of the dimeric complex. Functional studies in a defined genomic context show that sequence-induced changes in GR activity cannot be explained by differences in GR occupancy. Rather, mutating the dimerization interface mitigates DNA-induced changes in both activity and structure, arguing for a role of DNA-induced structural changes in modulating GR activity. Together, our study shows that DNA sequence identity of genomic binding sites modulates GR activity downstream of binding, which may play a role in achieving regulatory specificity towards individual target genes. PMID:27581526

  11. Alternative poly(A) site utilization during adenovirus infection coincides with a decrease in the activity of a poly(A) site processing factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, K P; Weiss, E A; Nevins, J R

    1993-01-01

    The recognition and processing of a pre-mRNA to create a poly(A) addition site, a necessary step in mRNA biogenesis, can also be a regulatory event in instances in which the frequency of use of a poly(A) site varies. One such case is found during the course of an adenovirus infection. Five poly(A) sites are utilized within the major late transcription unit to produce more than 20 distinct mRNAs during the late phase of infection. The proximal half of the major late transcription unit is also expressed during the early phase of a viral infection. During this early phase of expression, the L1 poly(A) site is used three times more frequently than the L3 poly(A) site. In contrast, the L3 site is used three times more frequently than the L1 site during the late phase of infection. Recent experiments have suggested that the recognition of the poly(A) site GU-rich downstream element by the CF1 processing factor may be a rate-determining step in poly(A) site selection. We demonstrate that the interaction of CF1 with the L1 poly(A) site is less stable than the interaction of CF1 with the L3 poly(A) site. We also find that there is a substantial decrease in the level of CF1 activity when an adenovirus infection proceeds to the late phase. We suggest that this reduction in CF1 activity, coupled with the relative instability of the interaction with the L1 poly(A) site, contributes to the reduced use of the L1 poly(A) site during the late stage of an adenovirus infection. Images PMID:8384308

  12. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites. PMID:26893379

  13. Fibromodulin Interacts with Collagen Cross-linking Sites and Activates Lysyl Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kalamajski, Sebastian; Bihan, Dominique; Bonna, Arkadiusz; Rubin, Kristofer; Farndale, Richard W

    2016-04-01

    The hallmark of fibrotic disorders is a highly cross-linked and dense collagen matrix, a property driven by the oxidative action of lysyl oxidase. Other fibrosis-associated proteins also contribute to the final collagen matrix properties, one of which is fibromodulin. Its interactions with collagen affect collagen cross-linking, packing, and fibril diameter. We investigated the possibility that a specific relationship exists between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase, potentially imparting a specific collagen matrix phenotype. We mapped the fibromodulin-collagen interaction sites using the collagen II and III Toolkit peptide libraries. Fibromodulin interacted with the peptides containing the known collagen cross-linking sites and the MMP-1 cleavage site in collagens I and II. Interestingly, the interaction sites are closely aligned within the quarter-staggered collagen fibril, suggesting a multivalent interaction between fibromodulin and several collagen helices. Furthermore, we detected an interaction between fibromodulin and lysyl oxidase (a major collagen cross-linking enzyme) and mapped the interaction site to 12 N-terminal amino acids on fibromodulin. This interaction also increases the activity of lysyl oxidase. Together, the data suggest a fibromodulin-modulated collagen cross-linking mechanism where fibromodulin binds to a specific part of the collagen domain and also forms a complex with lysyl oxidase, targeting the enzyme toward specific cross-linking sites.

  14. Communication: Active space decomposition with multiple sites: Density matrix renormalization group algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Shane M.; Shiozaki, Toru

    2014-12-07

    We extend the active space decomposition method, recently developed by us, to more than two active sites using the density matrix renormalization group algorithm. The fragment wave functions are described by complete or restricted active-space wave functions. Numerical results are shown on a benzene pentamer and a perylene diimide trimer. It is found that the truncation errors in our method decrease almost exponentially with respect to the number of renormalization states M, allowing for numerically exact calculations (to a few μE{sub h} or less) with M = 128 in both cases. This rapid convergence is because the renormalization steps are used only for the interfragment electron correlation.

  15. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ``ligands`` with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ``ligands``. These ``complexes`` are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ``ligands`` attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  16. A Frontier Molecular Orbital determination of the active sites on dispersed metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, R.L.; Lahanas, K.M.

    1992-01-01

    An angular overlap calculation has been used to determine the s, p and d orbital energy levels of the different types of surface sites present on a dispersed metal catalysts. The basis for these calculations is the reported finding that a large number of catalyzed reactions take place on single atom active sites on the metal surface. Thus, these sites can be considered as surface complexes made up of the central active atom surrounded by near-neighbor metal atom ligands'' with localized surface orbitals perturbed only by these ligands''. These complexes'' are based on a twelve coordinate species with the ligands'' attached to the t{sub 2g} orbitals and the coordinate axes coincident with the direction of the e{sub g} orbitals on the central atom. These data can permit a Frontier Molecular Orbital treatment of specific site activities as long as the surface orbital availability for overlap with adsorbed substrates is considered along with its energy value and symmetry.

  17. Mapping Topoisomerase IV Binding and Activity Sites on the E. coli Genome

    PubMed Central

    Lebailly, Elise; Pages, Carine; Cornet, Francois; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Catenation links between sister chromatids are formed progressively during DNA replication and are involved in the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion. Topo IV is a bacterial type II topoisomerase involved in the removal of catenation links both behind replication forks and after replication during the final separation of sister chromosomes. We have investigated the global DNA-binding and catalytic activity of Topo IV in E. coli using genomic and molecular biology approaches. ChIP-seq revealed that Topo IV interaction with the E. coli chromosome is controlled by DNA replication. During replication, Topo IV has access to most of the genome but only selects a few hundred specific sites for its activity. Local chromatin and gene expression context influence site selection. Moreover strong DNA-binding and catalytic activities are found at the chromosome dimer resolution site, dif, located opposite the origin of replication. We reveal a physical and functional interaction between Topo IV and the XerCD recombinases acting at the dif site. This interaction is modulated by MatP, a protein involved in the organization of the Ter macrodomain. These results show that Topo IV, XerCD/dif and MatP are part of a network dedicated to the final step of chromosome management during the cell cycle. PMID:27171414

  18. Functional mimicry of the active site of glutathione peroxidase by glutathione imprinted selenium-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Mao, Shi-zhong; Liu, Xiao-man; Huang, Xin; Xu, Jia-yun; Liu, Jun-qiu; Luo, Gui-min; Shen, Jia-cong

    2008-01-01

    For imitating the active site of antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx), an artificial enzyme selenosubtilisin was employed as a scaffold for reconstructing substrate glutathione (GSH) specific binding sites by a bioimprinting strategy. GSH was first covalently linked to selenosubtilisin to form a covalent complex GSH-selenosubtilisin through a Se-S bond, then the GSH molecule was used as a template to cast a complementary binding site for substrate GSH recognition. The bioimprinting procedure consists of unfolding the conformation of selenosubtilisin and fixing the new conformation of the complex GSH-selenosubtilisin. Thus a new specificity for naturally occurring GPx substrate GSH was obtained. This bioimprinting procedure facilitates the catalytic selenium moiety of the imprinted selenosubtilisin to match the reactive thiol group of GSH in the GSH binding site, which contributes to acceleration of the intramolecular catalysis. These imprinted selenium-containing proteins exhibited remarkable rate enhancement for the reduction of H2O2 by GSH. The average GPx activity was found to be 462 U/micromol, and it was approximately 100 times that for unimprinted selenosubtilisin. Compared with ebselen, a well-known GPx mimic, an activity enhancement of 500-fold was observed. Detailed steady-state kinetic studies demonstrated that the novel selenoenzyme followed a ping-pong mechanism similar to the naturally occurring GPx. PMID:18163571

  19. Evidence for Oxygen Binding at the Active Site of Particulate Methane Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Cutsail, George E.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that converts methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. The enzyme consists of three subunits, pmoB, pmoA, and pmoC, organized in an α3β3γ3 trimer. Studies of intact pMMO and a recombinant soluble fragment of the pmoB subunit, denoted spmoB, indicate that the active site is located within the soluble region of pmoB at the site of a crystallographically modeled dicopper center. In this work, we have investigated the reactivity of pMMO and spmoB with oxidants. Upon reduction and treatment of spmoB with O2 and H2O2 or pMMO with H2O2, an absorbance feature at 345 nm is generated. The energy and intensity of this band are similar to that of the μ-η2:η2-peroxo CuII 2 species formed in several dicopper enzymes and model compounds. The feature is not observed in inactive spmoB variants in which the dicopper center is disrupted, consistent with O2 binding to the proposed active site. Reaction of the 345 nm species with CH4 results in disappearance of the spectroscopic feature, suggesting that this O2 intermediate is mechanistically relevant. Taken together, these observations provide strong new support for the identity and location of the pMMO active site. PMID:22540911

  20. The ribotoxin restrictocin recognizes its RNA substrate by selective engagement of active site residues.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Matthew J; Korennykh, Alexei V; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Correll, Carl C

    2011-04-12

    Restrictocin and related fungal endoribonucleases from the α-sarcin family site-specifically cleave the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) on the ribosome to inhibit translation and ultimately trigger cell death. Previous studies showed that the SRL folds into a bulged-G motif and tetraloop, with restrictocin achieving a specificity of ∼1000-fold by recognizing both motifs only after the initial binding step. Here, we identify contacts within the protein-RNA interface and determine the extent to which each one contributes to enzyme specificity by examining the effect of protein mutations on the cleavage of the SRL substrate compared to a variety of other RNA substrates. As with other biomolecular interfaces, only a subset of contacts contributes to specificity. One contact of this subset is critical, with the H49A mutation resulting in quantitative loss of specificity. Maximum catalytic activity occurs when both motifs of the SRL are present, with the major contribution involving the bulged-G motif recognized by three lysine residues located adjacent to the active site: K110, K111, and K113. Our findings support a kinetic proofreading mechanism in which the active site residues H49 and, to a lesser extent, Y47 make greater catalytic contributions to SRL cleavage than to suboptimal substrates. This systematic and quantitative analysis begins to elucidate the principles governing RNA recognition by a site-specific endonuclease and may thus serve as a mechanistic model for investigating other RNA modifying enzymes. PMID:21417210