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Sample records for active site-directed inhibitor

  1. Active site-directed plasmin inhibitors: Extension on the P2 residue.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Koushi; Gohda, Keigo; Teno, Naoki; Wanaka, Keiko; Tsuda, Yuko

    2016-02-15

    Based on the structure of YO-2 [N-(trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarbonyl)-l-Tyr(O-picolyl)-NH-octyl], active site-directed plasmin (Plm) inhibitors were explored. The picolyl moiety in the Tyr(O-picolyl) residue (namely, the P2 residue) was replaced with smaller or larger groups, such as hydrogen, tert-butyl, benzyl, (2-naphthyl)methyl, and (quinolin-2-yl)methyl. Those efforts produced compound 17 {N-(trans-4-aminomethylcyclohexanecarbonyl)-l-Tyr[O-(quinolin-2-yl)methyl]-NH-octyl} [IC50=0.22 and 77μM for Plm and urokinase (UK), respectively], which showed not only 2.4-fold greater Plm inhibition than YO-2, but also an improvement in selectivity (Plm/UK) by 35-fold. The docking experiments of the Plm-17 complexes disclosed that the amino group of the tranexamyl moiety interacted with the side-chain of Asp753 which formed S1 site.

  2. X-ray structure at 1.75 resolution of a norovirus 3C protease linked to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton; Hussey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses are recognized universally as the most important cause of human epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Viral replication requires a 3C cysteine protease that cleaves a 200kDa viral polyprotein into its constituent functional proteins. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the Southampton norovirus 3C protease (SV3CP) bound to an active site-directed peptide inhibitor (MAPI) which has been refined at 1.75 resolution, following initial MAD phasing with a selenomethionine derivative. The inhibitor, acetyl-Glu-Phe-Gln-Leu-Gln-X, based on a 3C protease cleavage recognition sequences in the 200kDa polyprotein substrate, reacts covalently through its propenylethylester group (X) with the active site nucleophile, Cys 139. The 3C protease-inhibitor structure permits, for the first time, the identification of substrate recognition and binding groups and provides important new information for the development of antiviral prophylactics.

  3. Probing the location and function of the conserved histidine residue of phosphoglucose isomerase by using an active site directed inhibitor N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, M.; Chane, T. L.; Sun, Y. J.; Hsiao, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase (EC 5.3.1.9) catalyzes the interconversion of D-glucopyranose-6-phosphate and D-fructofuranose-6-phosphate by promoting an intrahydrogen transfer between C1 and C2. A conserved histidine exists throughout all phosphoglucose isomerases and was hypothesized to be the base catalyzing the isomerization reaction. In the present study, this conserved histidine, His311, of the enzyme from Bacillus stearothermophilus was subjected to mutational analysis, and the mutational effect on the inactivation kinetics by N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate was investigated. The substitution of His311 with alanine, asparagine, or glutamine resulted in the decrease of activity, in k(cat)/K(M), by a factor of 10(3), indicating the importance of this residue. N-bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate inactivated irreversibly the activity of wild-type phosphoglucose isomerase; however, His311 --> Ala became resistant to this inhibitor, indicating that His311 is located in the active site and is responsible for the inactivation of the enzyme by this active site-directed inhibitor. The pKa of His311 was estimated to be 6.31 according to the pH dependence of the inactivation. The proximity of this value with the pKa value of 6.35, determined from the pH dependence of k(cat)/K(M), supports a role of His311 as a general base in the catalysis. PMID:10595547

  4. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  5. Structural basis for the inhibition of RNase H activity of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase by RNase H active site-directed inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G Sridhar; Smith, Robert F; Daniels, Christopher L; Abeywickrema, Pravien D; Reid, John C; Loughran, H Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J; Williams, Peter D; Darke, Paul L; Hazuda, Daria J; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-08-01

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  6. Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium: Role of Glutamate 186 in Catalysis Revealed by Site-Directed Mutagenesis, Alternate Substrates, and Active-site Inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-D-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium (SXA) is the most active enzyme known for catalyzing hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylooligosaccharides to D xylose. Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation states of catalytic ...

  7. Active site-directed inhibitors of cytochrome P-450scc. Structural and mechanistic implications of a side chain-substituted series of amino-steroids.

    PubMed

    Sheets, J J; Vickery, L E

    1983-10-10

    A series of analogues of cholesterol, each having a shortened side chain and a primary amine group, were prepared and tested for their effects on bovine adrenocortical cholesterol side chain cleavage cytochrome P-450 (P-450scc). A previous study had shown that one derivative, 22-amino-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3 beta-ol, is a potent competitive inhibitor of the enzyme and forms a complex in which the steroid ring binds to the cholesterol site and the side chain amine forms a bond with the heme iron (Sheets, J. J., and Vickery, L. E. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 5773-5777). In the studies reported here, the 23-amine derivative, 23-amino-24-nor-5-cholen-3 beta-ol, was found to be an equally potent inhibitor and to be competitive with respect to cholesterol (Ki = 38 nM). Binding of the 23-amine to P-450scc also caused formation of a low spin complex with an absorption maximum at 422 nm, indicative of a nitrogen-donor ligand. Other derivatives in which the side chain amine was linked closer to the steroid, 17 beta-amino-5-androsten-3 beta-ol and (20 R + S)-20-amino-5-pregnen-3 beta-ol, were found to be only very weak inhibitors (I50 greater than 100 microM) and did not produce the 422 nm spectral form when bound. Derivatives in which the amine was attached a greater distance from the steroid ring, 24-amino-5-cholen-3 beta-ol and 25-amino-26,27-bisnor-5-cholesten-3 beta-ol, caused a progressive decrease in inhibitory potency and a failure to produce the 422 nm form on binding. The dependence of the type of interaction of these amino-steroids with P-450scc upon the amine position establishes that the steroid binding site and the heme catalytic site of the enzyme are fixed within a specific distance of one another. The heme appears to be located sufficiently close to the position that the side chain of cholesterol would occupy to allow for direct attack of an iron-bound oxidant to occur during hydroxylation and side chain cleavage.

  8. Discovery of novel STAT3 small molecule inhibitors via in silico site-directed fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenying; Xiao, Hui; Lin, Jiayuh; Li, Chenglong

    2013-06-13

    Constitutive activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been validated as an attractive therapeutic target for cancer therapy. To stop both STAT3 activation and dimerization, a viable strategy is to design inhibitors blocking its SH2 domain phosphotyrosine binding site that is responsible for both actions. A new fragment-based drug design (FBDD) strategy, in silico site-directed FBDD, was applied in this study. A designed novel compound, 5,8-dioxo-6-(pyridin-3-ylamino)-5,8-dihydronaphthalene-1-sulfonamide (LY5), was confirmed to bind to STAT3 SH2 by fluorescence polarization assay. In addition, four out of the five chosen compounds have IC50 values lower than 5 μM for the U2OS cancer cells. 8 (LY5) has an IC50 range in 0.5-1.4 μM in various cancer cell lines. 8 also suppresses tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model. This study has demonstrated the utility of this approach and could be used to other drug targets in general. PMID:23651330

  9. Discovery of Tyk2 inhibitors via the virtual site-directed fragment-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Jang, Woo Dae; Kim, Jun-Tae; Son, Hoon Young; Park, Seung Yeon; Cho, Young Sik; Koo, Tae-sung; Lee, Hyuk; Kang, Nam Sook

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we synthesized compound 12 with potent Tyk2 inhibitory activity from FBDD study and carried out a cell-based assay for Tyk2/STAT3 signaling activation upon IFNα5 stimulation. Compound 12 completely suppressed the IFNα5-mediated Tyk2/STAT3 signaling pathway as well as the basal levels of pSTAT3. Stimulation with IFNα/β leads to the tyrosine phosphorylation of the JAK1 and Tyk2 receptor-associated kinases with subsequent STATs activation, transmitting signals from the cell surface receptor to the nucleus. In conclusion, the potency of compound 12 to interrupt the signal transmission of Tyk2/STAT3 appeared to be equivalent or superior to that of the reference compound. PMID:26231159

  10. Improving the activity of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Meizhi; Deng, Xiongwei; Bao, Wei; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jieyuan; Cai, Yongjun; Jia, Yan; Zheng, Zhongliang; Zou, Guolin

    2015-09-25

    Nattokinase (NK), a bacterial serine protease from Bacillus subtilis var. natto, is a potential cardiovascular drug exhibiting strong fibrinolytic activity. To broaden its commercial and medical applications, we constructed a single-mutant (I31L) and two double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) by site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and were purified to homogeneity. The kinetic parameters of enzymes were examined by spectroscopy assay and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. The substitution of Leu(31) for Ile(31) resulted in about 2-fold enhancement of catalytic efficiency (Kcat/KM) compared with wild-type NK. The specific activities of both double-mutants (M222A/I31L and T220S/I31L) were significantly increased when compared with the single-mutants (M222A and T220S) and the oxidative stability of M222A/I31L mutant was enhanced with respect to wild-type NK. This study demonstrates the feasibility of improving activity of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve the activity of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  11. A mutant trypsin-like enzyme from Streptomyces fradiae, created by site-directed mutagenesis, improves affinity chromatography for protein trypsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Katoh, T; Kikuchi, N; Nagata, K; Yoshida, N

    1996-08-01

    The Ser-170 residue of a trypsin-like enzyme from Streptomyces fradiae (SFT), which is considered to be the active-site serine, was replaced with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis to improve the affinity chromatography step for a Kazal-type trypsin inhibitor pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI). The resulting mutant SFT, designated as [S170A]SFT, was expressed in Streptomyces lividans and purified to homogeneity. [S170A]SFT was catalytically inactive, but still had the ability to bind tightly to PSTI and to soybean trypsin inhibitor with dissociation constants of 3.1 x 10(-7) M and 1.9 x 10(-8) M respectively. We further demonstrated that recombinant human PSTI secreted into Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture broth could be purified to homogeneity with a one-step [S170A]SFT-affinity column. The purified PSTI contained no molecules intramolecularly cleaved by active trypsin, which are found when trypsin-affinity chromatography is used for the purification. This eliminated the need for further separation of intact PSTI from intramolecularly cleaved PSTI by high-performance liquid chromatography, thus simplifying and improving its purification process.

  12. Trichodiene synthase. Identification of active site residues by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cane, D E; Shim, J H; Xue, Q; Fitzsimons, B C; Hohn, T M

    1995-02-28

    Derivatization of 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid)-treated trichodiene synthase with [methyl-14C]methyl methanethiosulfonate and analysis of the derived tryptic peptides suggested the presence of two cysteine residues at the active site. The corresponding C146A and C190A mutants were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The C190A mutant displayed partial but significantly reduced activity, with a reduction in kcat/Km of 3000 compared to the wild-type trichodiene synthase, while the C146A mutant was essentially inactive. A hybrid trichodiene synthase, constructed from amino acids 1-309 of the Fusarium sporotrichioides enzyme and amino acids 310-383 of the Gibberella pulicaris cyclase, had steady state kinetic parameters nearly identical to those of the wild-type F. sporotrichioides enzyme. From this parent hybrid, a series of mutants was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in which the amino acids in the base-rich region, 302-306 (DRRYR), were systematically modified. Three of these mutants were overexpressed and purified to homogeneity. The importance of Arg304 for catalysis was established by the observation that the R304K mutant showed a more than 25-fold increase in Km, as well as a 200-fold reduction in kcat. In addition, analysis of the incubation products of the R304K mutant by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) indicated that farnesyl diphosphate was converted not only to trichodiene but to at least two additional C15H24 hydrocarbons, mle 204. Replacement of the Tyr305 residue of trichodiene synthase with Phe had little effect on kcat, while increasing the Km by a factor of ca. 7-8.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7873527

  13. [Enhancing glutamate decarboxylase activity by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot].

    PubMed

    Ke, Piyu; Huang, Jun; Hu, Sheng; Zhao, Weirui; Lü, Changjiang; Yu, Kai; Lei, Yinlin; Wang, Jinbo; Mei, Lehe

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate into γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and is the only enzyme of GABA biosynthesis. Improving GAD activity and thermostability will be helpful for the highly efficient biosynthesis of GABA. According to the Ramachandran plot information of GAD 1407 three-dimensional structure from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC No. 1306, we identified the unstable site K413 as the mutation target, constructed the mutant GAD by site-directed mutagenesis and measured the thermostability and activity of the wide type and mutant GAD. Mutant K413A led to a remarkably slower inactivation rate, and its half-life at 50 °C reached 105 min which was 2.1-fold higher than the wild type GAD1407. Moreover, mutant K413I exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity in comparison with the wide type GAD1407, although it had little improvement in thermostability of GAD. Ramachandran plot can be considered as a potential approach to increase GAD thermostability and activity. PMID:27443004

  14. [Enhancing glutamate decarboxylase activity by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot].

    PubMed

    Ke, Piyu; Huang, Jun; Hu, Sheng; Zhao, Weirui; Lü, Changjiang; Yu, Kai; Lei, Yinlin; Wang, Jinbo; Mei, Lehe

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate into γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and is the only enzyme of GABA biosynthesis. Improving GAD activity and thermostability will be helpful for the highly efficient biosynthesis of GABA. According to the Ramachandran plot information of GAD 1407 three-dimensional structure from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC No. 1306, we identified the unstable site K413 as the mutation target, constructed the mutant GAD by site-directed mutagenesis and measured the thermostability and activity of the wide type and mutant GAD. Mutant K413A led to a remarkably slower inactivation rate, and its half-life at 50 °C reached 105 min which was 2.1-fold higher than the wild type GAD1407. Moreover, mutant K413I exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity in comparison with the wide type GAD1407, although it had little improvement in thermostability of GAD. Ramachandran plot can be considered as a potential approach to increase GAD thermostability and activity.

  15. Critical role of arg433 in rat transketolase activity as probed by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Y; Song, B J; Jeng, J; Kallarakal, A T

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that one arginine per monomer at an unknown position is essential for enzyme activity of the homodimeric transketolase (TK) [Kremer, Egan and Sable (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 2405-2410]. To identify the critical arginine, four highly conserved arginine residues of rat TK (Arg102, Arg350, Arg433 and Arg506) were replaced with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. Wild-type and mutant TK proteins were produced in Escherichia coli and characterized. The Arg102-->Ala mutant exhibited similar catalytic activity to the wild-type enzyme, whereas Arg350-->Ala, Arg506-->Ala and Arg433-->Ala mutants exhibited 36.7, 37.0 and 6.1% of the wild-type activity respectively. Three recombinant proteins (wild-type, Arg350-->Ala and Arg433-->Ala) were purified to apparent homogeneity using Ni2+-affinity chromatography and further characterized. All these proteins were able to form homodimers (148 kDa), as shown by immunoblot analysis subsequent to non-denaturing gel electrophoresis. The Arg433-->Ala mutant protein was less stable than the wild-type and Arg350-->Ala proteins at 55 degrees C. Kinetic analyses revealed that both Vmax and Km values were markedly affected in the Arg433-->Ala mutant. The Km values for two substrates xylulose 5-phosphate and ribose 5-phosphate were 11.5- and 24.3-fold higher respectively. The kcat/Km values of the Arg433-->Ala mutant for the two substrates were less than 1% of those of the wild-type protein. Molecular modelling of the rat TK revealed that Arg433 of one monomer has three potential hydrogen-bond interactions with the catalytically important highly conserved loop of the other monomer. Thus, our biochemical analyses and modelling data suggest the critical role of the previously uncharacterized Arg433 in TK activity. PMID:9657977

  16. Structural insights into the ATP binding pocket of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase by site-directed mutagenesis, inhibitor binding analysis, and homology modeling.

    PubMed

    Gunby, Rosalind H; Ahmed, Shaheen; Sottocornola, Roberta; Gasser, Marc; Redaelli, Sara; Mologni, Luca; Tartari, Carmen J; Belloni, Valentina; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Scapozza, Leonardo

    2006-09-21

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a valid target for anticancer therapy; however, potent ALK inhibitors suitable for clinical use are lacking. Because the majority of described kinase inhibitors bind in the ATP pocket of the kinase domain, we have characterized this pocket in ALK using site-directed mutagenesis, inhibition studies, and molecular modeling. Mutation of the gatekeeper residue, a key structural determinant influencing inhibitor binding, rendered the fusion protein, NPM/ALK, sensitive to inhibition by SKI-606 in the nanomolar range, while PD173955 inhibited the NPM/ALK mutant at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, both wild type and mutant NPM/ALK were insensitive to imatinib. Computer modeling indicated that docking solutions obtained with a homology model representing the intermediate conformation of the ALK kinase domain reflected closely experimental data. The good agreement between experimental and virtual results indicate that the ALK molecular models described here are useful tools for the rational design of ALK selective inhibitors. In addition, 4-phenylamino-quinoline compounds may have potential as templates for ALK inhibitors. PMID:16970400

  17. Site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis is a PCR-based method to mutate specified nucleotides of a sequence within a plasmid vector. This technique allows one to study the relative importance of a particular amino acid for protein structure and function. Typical mutations are designed to disrupt or map protein-protein interactions, mimic or block posttranslational modifications, or to silence enzymatic activity. Alternatively, noncoding changes are often used to generate rescue constructs that are resistant to knockdown via RNAi.

  18. Engineering lower inhibitor affinities in beta-D-xylosidase by site-directed mutagenesis of Trp 145

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta- D-xylosidase catalyzes hydrolysis of xylooligosaccharides to D-xylose monosaccharides. beta-Xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium, SXA, is the most active catalyst known for the reaction; however, its activity is inhibited by D-xylose and D-glucose (Ki values of ~10-2 M). Higher Ki’s could...

  19. Engineering lower inhibitor affinities in beta-D-xylosidase of Selenomonas ruminantium by site-directed mutagenesis of Trp145

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-D-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium is the most active enzyme reported for catalyzing hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylooligosaccharides to D-xylose. One property that could use improvement is its relatively high affinities for D-glucose and D-xylose (Ki~10 mM), wh...

  20. Alkyl isocyanates as active site-directed inactivators of guinea pig liver transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Gross, M; Whetzel, N K; Folk, J E

    1975-10-10

    Alkyl isocyanates are effective inactivators of guinea pig liver transglutaminase. Based on the specificity of the reaction the protection against inactivation by glutamine substrate, and the essential nature of calcium for the inactivation reaction, it is concluded that these reagents act as amide substrate analogs and, thus function in an active site-specific manner. Support for the contention that inactivation results from alkyl thiocarbamate ester formation through the single active site sulfhydryl group of the enzyme is (a) the loss of one free--SH group and the incorporation of 1 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme in the reaction, (b) similarity in chemical properties of the inactive enzyme derivative formed to those previously reported for another alkyl thiocarbamoylenzyme and an alkyl thiocarbamoylcysteine derivative, and (c) the finding that labeled peptides from digests of [methyl-14C]thiocarbamoyltransglutaminase and those from digests of iodoacetamide-inactivated enzyme occupy similar positions on peptide maps. Transglutaminase was found to be inactivated neither by urethan anlogs of its active ester substrates nor by urea analogs of its amide substrates. It is concluded on the basis of these findings that inactive carbamoylenzyme derivatives are formed only by direct addition of the transglutaminase active--SH group to the isocyanate C--N double bond, and not, like several serine active site enzymes, by nucleophilic displacement with urethan analogs of substrate, or by nucleophilic displacement with urea analogs of substrate. PMID:240837

  1. Antifreeze activity enhancement by site directed mutagenesis on an antifreeze protein from the beetle Rhagium mordax.

    PubMed

    Friis, Dennis Steven; Kristiansen, Erlend; von Solms, Nicolas; Ramløv, Hans

    2014-05-01

    The ice binding motifs of insect antifreeze proteins (AFPs) mainly consist of repetitive TxT motifs aligned on a flat face of the protein. However, these motifs often contain non-threonines that disrupt the TxT pattern. We substituted two such disruptive amino acids located in the ice binding face of an AFP from Rhagium mordax with threonine. Furthermore, a mutant with an extra ice facing TxT motif was constructed. These mutants showed enhanced antifreeze activity compared to the wild type at low concentrations. However, extrapolating the data indicates that the wild type will become the most active at concentrations above 270 μmol.

  2. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes. PMID:25902402

  3. Extensive site-directed mutagenesis reveals interconnected functional units in the alkaline phosphatase active site.

    PubMed

    Sunden, Fanny; Peck, Ariana; Salzman, Julia; Ressl, Susanne; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes enable life by accelerating reaction rates to biological timescales. Conventional studies have focused on identifying the residues that have a direct involvement in an enzymatic reaction, but these so-called 'catalytic residues' are embedded in extensive interaction networks. Although fundamental to our understanding of enzyme function, evolution, and engineering, the properties of these networks have yet to be quantitatively and systematically explored. We dissected an interaction network of five residues in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase. Analysis of the complex catalytic interdependence of specific residues identified three energetically independent but structurally interconnected functional units with distinct modes of cooperativity. From an evolutionary perspective, this network is orders of magnitude more probable to arise than a fully cooperative network. From a functional perspective, new catalytic insights emerge. Further, such comprehensive energetic characterization will be necessary to benchmark the algorithms required to rationally engineer highly efficient enzymes.

  4. Site-directed mutagenesis of Lysine{sup 382}, the activator-binding site, of ADP-Glucose pyrophosphorylase from Anabaena PCC 6120

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Jun; Charng, Yee-yung; Preiss, J.

    1996-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that a highly conserved lysyl residue (Lys{sup 419}) near the C-terminus of Anabaena ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is involved in the binding of 3-P-glycerate, the allosteric activator. Phosphopyridoxylation of the K419R mutant enzyme modified another conserved lysyl residue (Lys{sup 382}), suggesting that this residue might be also located within the activator-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of Lys{sup 382} of the Anabaena enzyme was performed to determine the role of this residue. Replacing Lys{sup 382} with either arginine, alanine, or glutamine produced mutant enzymes with apparent affinities for 3-P-glycerate 10-160-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme. The glutamic acid mutant enzyme was inhibited by 3-P-glycerate. These mutations had lesser impact on the kinetic constants for the substrates and inhibitor, P{sub i}, and on the thermal stability. These results indicate that both the charge and size of the residue at position 382 influence the binding of 3-P-glycerate. Site-directed mutagenesis was also performed to obtain a K382R-K419R double mutant. The apparent affinity for 3-P-glycerate of this double-mutant enzyme was 104-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme, and the specificity for activator of this mutant enzyme was altered. The K382R-K419R enzyme could not be phosphopyridoxylated, suggesting that other lysine residues are not involved in the binding of 3-P-glycerate. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Newly identified essential amino acid residues affecting Δ8-sphingolipid desaturase activity revealed by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Fen; Song, Li-Ying; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Yin, Wei-Bo; Chen, Yu-Hong; Wang, Richard R-C; Hu, Zan-Min

    2011-12-01

    In order to identify amino acid residues crucial for the enzymatic activity of Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturases, a sequence comparison was performed among Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturases and Δ(6)-fatty acid desaturases from various plants. In addition to the known conserved cytb(5) (cytochrome b(5)) HPGG motif and three conserved histidine boxes, they share additional 15 completely conserved residues. A series of site-directed mutants were generated using our previously isolated Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase gene from Brassica rapa to evaluate the importance of these residues to the enzyme function. The mutants were functionally characterized by heterologous expression in yeast, allowing the identification of the products of the enzymes. The results revealed that residues H63, N203, D208, D210, and G368 were obligatorily required for the enzymatic activity, and substitution of the residues F59, W190, W345, L369 and Q372 markedly decreased the enzyme activity. Among them, replacement of the residues W190, L369 and Q372 also has significant influence on the ratio of the two enzyme products. Information obtained in this work provides the molecular basis for the Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase activity and aids in our understanding of the structure-function relationships of the membrane-bound desaturases.

  6. Beta-D-xylosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium: Role of Glutamate 186 in Catalysis Revealed by Site-directed Mutagenesis, Alternate Substrates, and Inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Beta-D-xylosidase/alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase from Selenomonas ruminantium (SXA) is the most active enzyme known for catalyzing hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-D-xylooligosaccharides to D-xylose. Catalysis and inhibitor binding by the GH43 beta-xylosidase are governed by the protonation states of catalytic ...

  7. Site-directed mutagenesis of tobacco anionic peroxidase: Effect of additional aromatic amino acids on stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Poloznikov, A A; Zakharova, G S; Chubar, T A; Hushpulian, D M; Tishkov, V I; Gazaryan, I G

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco anionic peroxidase (TOP) is known to effectively catalyze luminol oxidation without enhancers, in contrast to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). To pursue structure-activity relationship studies for TOP, two amino acids have been chosen for mutation, namely Thr151, close to the heme plane, and Phe140 at the entrance to the active site pocket. Three mutant forms TOP F140Y, T151W and F140Y/T151W have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and reactivated to yield active enzymes. Single-point mutations introducing additional aromatic amino acid residues at the surface of TOP exhibit a significant effect on the enzyme catalytic activity and stability as judged by the results of steady-state and transient kinetics studies. TOP T151W is up to 4-fold more active towards a number of aromatic substrates including luminol, whereas TOP F140Y is 2-fold more stable against thermal inactivation and 8-fold more stable in the reaction course. These steady-state observations have been rationalized with the help of transient kinetic studies on the enzyme reaction with hydrogen peroxide in a single turnover regime. The stopped-flow data reveal (a) an increased stability of F140Y Compound I towards hydrogen peroxide, and thus, a higher operational stability as compared to the wild-type enzyme, and (b) a lesser leakage of oxidative equivalents from TOP T151W Compound I resulting in the increased catalytic activity. The results obtained show that TOP unique properties can be further improved for practical applications by site-directed mutagenesis.

  8. Structure of Bacillus subtilis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase in complex with acivicin: diversity of the binding mode of a classical and electrophilic active-site-directed glutamate analogue

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Hiratake, Jun; Wada, Kei

    2014-02-01

    The binding modes of acivicin, a classical and an electrophilic active-site-directed glutamate analogue, to bacterial γ-glutamyltranspeptidases were found to be diverse. γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) is an enzyme that plays a central role in glutathione metabolism, and acivicin is a classical inhibitor of GGT. Here, the structure of acivicin bound to Bacillus subtilis GGT determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.8 Å resolution is presented, in which it binds to the active site in a similar manner to that in Helicobacter pylori GGT, but in a different binding mode to that in Escherichia coli GGT. In B. subtilis GGT, acivicin is bound covalently through its C3 atom with sp{sup 2} hybridization to Thr403 O{sup γ}, the catalytic nucleophile of the enzyme. The results show that acivicin-binding sites are common, but the binding manners and orientations of its five-membered dihydroisoxazole ring are diverse in the binding pockets of GGTs.

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution NMR spectroscopy of the active site of porphobilinogen deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.I.; Roessner, C.A.; Stolowich, N.J.; Karuso, P.; Williams, H.J.; Grant, S.K.; Gonzalez, M.D.; Hoshino, T. )

    1988-10-18

    The active site of porphobilinogen (PBG){sup 1} deaminase from Escherichia coli has been found to contain an unusual dipyrromethane derived from four molecules of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) covalently linked to Cys-242, one of the two cysteine residues conserved in E. coli and human deaminase. By use of a hemA{sup {minus}} strain of E. coli the enzyme was enriched from (5-{sup 13}C)ALA and examined by {sup 1}H-detected multiple quantum coherence spectroscopy, which revealed all of the salient features of a dipyrromethane composed of two PBG units linked heat to tail and terminating in a CH{sub 2}-S bond to a cysteine residue. Site-specific mutagenesis of Cys-99 and Cys-242, respectively, has shown that substitution of Ser for Cys-99 does not affect the enzymatic activity, whereas substitution of Ser for Cys-242 removes essentially all of the catalytic activity as measured by the conversion of the substrate PBG to uro'gen I. The NMR spectrum of the covalent complex of deaminase with the suicide inhibitor 2-bromo-(2,11-{sup 13}C{sub 2})PBG reveals that the aminomethyl terminus of the inhibitor reacts with the enzyme's cofactor at the {alpha}-free pyrrole. NMR spectroscopy of the ES{sub 2} complex confirmed a PBG-derived head-to-tail dipyrromethane attached to the {alpha}-free pyrrole position of the enzyme. A mechanistic rationale for deaminase is presented.

  10. Conformational dynamics of the active site loop of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase illuminated by site-directed spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John C; Markham, George D

    2003-07-15

    S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (ATP: L-methionine S-adenosyltransferase, methionine adenosyltransferase, a.k.a. MAT) is one of numerous enzymes that have a flexible polypeptide loop that moves to gate access to the active site in a motion that is closely coupled to catalysis. Crystallographic studies of this tetrameric enzyme have shown that the loop is closed in the absence of bound substrates. However, the loop must open to allow substrate binding and a variety of data indicate that the loop is closed during the catalytic steps. Previous kinetic studies indicate that during turnover loop motion occurs on a time scale of 10(-2)s, ca. 10-fold faster than chemical transformations and turnover. Site-directed spin labeling has been used to introduce nitroxide groups at two positions in the loop to illuminate how the motion of the loop is affected by substrate binding. The two loop mutants constructed, G105C and D107C, retain wild type levels of MAT activity; attachment of a methanethiosulfonate spin label to convert the cysteine to the "R1" residue reduced the k(cat) only for the labeled D107R1 form (7-fold). The K(m) value for methionine increased 2- to 4-fold for the cysteine mutants and 2- to 7-fold for the labeled proteins, whereas the K(m) for ATP was changed by at most 2-fold. EPR spectra for both labeled proteins are nearly identical and show the presence of two major spin label environments with rotational diffusion rates differing by approximately 10-fold; the slower rate is ca. 4-fold faster than the estimated protein rotational rate. The spectra are not altered by addition of substrates or products. At both positions the less mobile conformation constitutes ca. 65% of the total species, indicating an equilibrium that only slightly favors one form, that in which the label is more immobilized. The equilibrium constant that relates the two forms is comparable to the equilibrium constant of 1.5 for a conformational change that was previously deduced from the

  11. Molecular docking and site-directed mutagenesis of a Bacillus thuringiensis chitinase to improve chitinolytic, synergistic lepidopteran-larvicidal and nematicidal activities.

    PubMed

    Ni, Hong; Zeng, Siquan; Qin, Xu; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shan; Zhao, Xiuyun; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chitinases are useful in the biocontrol of agriculturally important pests and fungal pathogens. However, the utility of naturally occurring bacterial chitinases is often limited by their low enzyme activity. In this study, we constructed mutants of a Bacillus thuringiensis chitinase with enhanced activity based on homology modeling, molecular docking, and the site-directed mutagenesis of target residues to modify spatial positions, steric hindrances, or hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity. We first identified a gene from B. thuringiensis YBT-9602 that encodes a chitinase (Chi9602) belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 18 with conserved substrate-binding and substrate-catalytic motifs. We constructed a structural model of a truncated version of Chi9602 (Chi9602(35-459)) containing the substrate-binding domain using the homologous 1ITX protein of Bacillus circulans as the template. We performed molecular docking analysis of Chi9602(35-459) using di-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine as the ligand. We then selected 10 residues of interest from the docking area for the site-directed mutagenesis experiments and expression in Escherichia coli. Assays of the chitinolytic activity of the purified chitinases revealed that the three mutants exhibited increased chitinolytic activity. The ChiW50A mutant exhibited a greater than 60 % increase in chitinolytic activity, with similar pH, temperature and metal ion requirements, compared to wild-type Chi9602. Furthermore, ChiW50A exhibited pest-controlling activity and antifungal activity. Remarkable synergistic effects of this mutant with B. thuringiensis spore-crystal preparations against Helicoverpa armigera and Caenorhabditis elegans larvae and obvious activity against several plant-pathogenic fungi were observed.

  12. Molecular Docking and Site-directed Mutagenesis of a Bacillus thuringiensis Chitinase to Improve Chitinolytic, Synergistic Lepidopteran-larvicidal and Nematicidal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Hong; Zeng, Siquan; Qin, Xu; Sun, Xiaowen; Zhang, Shan; Zhao, Xiuyun; Yu, Ziniu; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chitinases are useful in the biocontrol of agriculturally important pests and fungal pathogens. However, the utility of naturally occurring bacterial chitinases is often limited by their low enzyme activity. In this study, we constructed mutants of a Bacillus thuringiensis chitinase with enhanced activity based on homology modeling, molecular docking, and the site-directed mutagenesis of target residues to modify spatial positions, steric hindrances, or hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity. We first identified a gene from B. thuringiensis YBT-9602 that encodes a chitinase (Chi9602) belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 18 with conserved substrate-binding and substrate-catalytic motifs. We constructed a structural model of a truncated version of Chi9602 (Chi960235-459) containing the substrate-binding domain using the homologous 1ITX protein of Bacillus circulans as the template. We performed molecular docking analysis of Chi960235-459 using di-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine as the ligand. We then selected 10 residues of interest from the docking area for the site-directed mutagenesis experiments and expression in Escherichia coli. Assays of the chitinolytic activity of the purified chitinases revealed that the three mutants exhibited increased chitinolytic activity. The ChiW50A mutant exhibited a greater than 60 % increase in chitinolytic activity, with similar pH, temperature and metal ion requirements, compared to wild-type Chi9602. Furthermore, ChiW50A exhibited pest-controlling activity and antifungal activity. Remarkable synergistic effects of this mutant with B. thuringiensis spore-crystal preparations against Helicoverpa armigera and Caenorhabditis elegans larvae and obvious activity against several plant-pathogenic fungi were observed. PMID:25678849

  13. Conformational Change in the Active Site of Streptococcal Unsaturated Glucuronyl Hydrolase Through Site-Directed Mutagenesis at Asp-115.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Yusuke; Oiki, Sayoko; Mikami, Bunzo; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial unsaturated glucuronyl hydrolase (UGL) degrades unsaturated disaccharides generated from mammalian extracellular matrices, glycosaminoglycans, by polysaccharide lyases. Two Asp residues, Asp-115 and Asp-175 of Streptococcus agalactiae UGL (SagUGL), are completely conserved in other bacterial UGLs, one of which (Asp-175 of SagUGL) acts as a general acid and base catalyst. The other Asp (Asp-115 of SagUGL) also affects the enzyme activity, although its role in the enzyme reaction has not been well understood. Here, we show substitution of Asp-115 in SagUGL with Asn caused a conformational change in the active site. Tertiary structures of SagUGL mutants D115N and D115N/K370S with negligible enzyme activity were determined at 2.00 and 1.79 Å resolution, respectively, by X-ray crystallography. The side chain of Asn-115 is drastically shifted in both mutants owing to the interaction with several residues, including Asp-175, by formation of hydrogen bonds. This interaction between Asn-115 and Asp-175 probably prevents the mutants from triggering the enzyme reaction using Asp-175 as an acid catalyst.

  14. Analysis of active site residues of the antiviral protein from summer leaves from Phytolacca americana by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Poyet, J L; Hoeveler, A; Jongeneel, C V

    1998-12-30

    The summer leaf isoform of the pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) antiviral protein, PAP II, was produced in high yields from inclusion bodies in recombinant E. coli. On the basis of its sequence similarity with the spring leaf isoform (PAP I) and with the A chain of ricin, a three-dimensional model of the protein was constructed as an aid in the design of active site mutants. PAP II variants mutated in residues Asp 88 (D88N), Tyr 117 (Y117S), Glu 172 (E172Q), Arg 175 (R175H) and a combination of Asp 88 and Arg 175 (D88N/R175H) were produced in E. coli and assayed for their ability to inhibit protein synthesis in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate. All of these mutations had effects deleterious to the enzymatic activity of PAP II. The results were interpreted in the light of three reaction mechanisms proposed for ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs). We conclude that none of the proposed mechanisms is entirely consistent with the data presented here.

  15. Improved efficacy of soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) fusion protein by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Son, Young Jun; Han, Jihye; Lee, Jae Yeon; Kim, HaHyung; Chun, Taehoon

    2015-06-01

    Soluble human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B fusion immunoglobulin (hRANK-Ig) has been considered as one of the therapeutic agents to treat osteoporosis or diseases associated with bone destruction by blocking the interaction between RANK and the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, no scientific record showing critical amino acid residues within the structural interface between the human RANKL and RANK complex is yet available. In this study, we produced several mutants of hRANK-Ig by replacement of amino acid residue(s) and tested whether the mutants had increased binding affinity to human RANKL. Based on the results from flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analyses, the replacement of E(125) with D(125), or E(125) and C(127) with D(125) and F(127) within loop 3 of cysteine-rich domain 3 of hRANK-Ig increases binding affinity to human RANKL over the wild-type hRANK-Ig. This result may provide the first example of improvement in the efficacy of hRANK-Ig by protein engineering and may give additional information to understand a more defined structural interface between hRANK and RANKL.

  16. Bromopyruvate, an active site-directed inactivator of E. coli 2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate(KHG) aldolase, modifies glutamic acid residue-45

    SciTech Connect

    Vlahos, C.J.; Dekker, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    E. coli KHG-aldolase (2-keto-4-hydroxyglutarate in equilibrium pyruvate + glyoxylate), a novel trimeric Class I aldolase, requires one active-site lysine residue (Lys 133)/subunit for Schiff-base formation as well as one arginine residue (Arg 49)/subunit for catalytic activity. The substrate analog, 3-bromopyruvate (BRPY), causes a time- and concentration-dependent loss of KHG-aldolase activity. This inactivation is regarded as active site-directed since: (a) BRPY modification results in complete loss of enzymatic activity; (b) saturation kinetics are exhibited, suggesting that a reversible complex is formed between the aldolase and BRPY prior to the rate-limiting inactivation step; (c) over 90% of the initial aldolase activity is protected by either substrate, pyruvate or KHG; (d) 1.1 mol of /sup 14/C-BRPY is bound/enzyme subunit. Peptide isolation and sequencing show that the incorporated radioactivity is associated with residue Glu-45. Denaturation of the enzyme with guanidine x HCl following treatment with excess /sup 14/C-BRPY allows for the incorporation of carbon-14 at Cys-159 and Cys-180 as well. The presence of pyruvate protects Glu-45 from being esterified but does not prevent the alkylation of the two cysteine residues. These results suggest that Glu-45 is essential for the catalytic activity of E. coli KHG-aldolase, most likely functioning as the active-site amphoteric proton donor/acceptor moiety that is involved in the overall mechanism of the reaction catalyzed by this enzyme.

  17. Site-directed mutagenesis of porcine pepsin: Possible role of Asp32, Thr33, Asp215 and Gly217 in maintaining the nuclease activity of pepsin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfang; Liu, Yu; Guo, Hui; Jiang, Wei; Dong, Ping; Liang, Xingguo

    2016-07-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of porcine pepsin was performed to identify its active sites that regulate nucleic acid (NA) digestion activity and to analyze the mechanism pepsin-mediated NA digestion. The mutation sites were distributed at the catalytic center of the enzyme (T33A, G34A, Y75H, T77A, Y189H, V214A, G217A and S219A) and at its active site (D32A and D215A) for protein digestion. Mutation of the active site residues Asp32 and Asp215 led to the inactivation of pepsin (both the NA and protein digestion activity), which demonstrated that the active sites of the pepsin protease activity were also important for its nuclease activity. Analysis of the variants revealed that T33A and G217A mutants showed a complete loss of NA digestion activity. In conclusion, residues Asp32, Thr33, Asp215 and Gly217 were related to the pepsin active sites for NA digestion. Moreover, the Y189H and V214A variants showed a loss of digestion activity on double-strand DNA (dsDNA) but only a decrease in digestion activity on single-strand DNA (ssDNA). On the contrary, the G34A variant showed a loss of digestion activity on ssDNA but only a decrease in digestion activity on dsDNA. Our findings are the first to identify the active sites of pepsin nuclease activity and lay the framework for further study of the mechanism of pepsin nuclease activity. PMID:27233129

  18. Accurate Detection of Adenylation Domain Functions in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay System Using Active Site-directed Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Miyamoto, Kengo; Konno, Sho; Kasai, Shota; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-18

    A significant gap exists between protein engineering and enzymes used for the biosynthesis of natural products, largely because there is a paucity of strategies that rapidly detect active-site phenotypes of the enzymes with desired activities. Herein, we describe a proof-of-concept study of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for the adenylation (A) domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) using a combination of active site-directed probes coupled to a 5'-O-N-(aminoacyl)sulfamoyladenosine scaffold with a biotin functionality that immobilizes probe molecules onto a streptavidin-coated solid support. The recombinant NRPSs have a C-terminal His-tag motif that is targeted by an anti-6×His mouse antibody as the primary antibody and a horseradish peroxidase-linked goat antimouse antibody as the secondary antibody. These probes can selectively capture the cognate A domains by ligand-directed targeting. In addition, the ELISA technique detected A domains in the crude cell-free homogenates from the Escherichia coli expression systems. When coupled with a chromogenic substrate, the antibody-based ELISA technique can visualize probe-protein binding interactions, which provides accurate readouts of the A-domain functions in NRPS enzymes. To assess the ELISA-based engineering of the A domains of NRPSs, we reprogramed 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB)-activating enzyme EntE toward salicylic acid (Sal)-activating enzymes and investigated a correlation between binding properties for probe molecules and enzyme catalysts. We generated a mutant of EntE that displayed negligible loss in the kcat/Km value with the noncognate substrate Sal and a corresponding 48-fold decrease in the kcat/Km value with the cognate substrate DHB. The resulting 26-fold switch in substrate specificity was achieved by the replacement of a Ser residue in the active site of EntE with a Cys toward the nonribosomal codes of Sal-activating enzymes. Bringing a laboratory ELISA technique

  19. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass.

  20. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass. PMID:26059194

  1. Site-directed mutagenesis of the glycine-rich loop of death associated protein kinase (DAPK) identifies it as a key structure for catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Laurie K; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Schavocky, James P; Watterson, D Martin; Grum-Tokars, Valerie

    2011-05-01

    Death associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a calmodulin (CaM)-regulated protein kinase that is a therapeutic target for central nervous system (CNS) disorders. We report here the results of studies that test the hypothesis of McNamara et al. (2009) that conformational selection in DAPK's glycine-rich region is key for catalytic activity. The hypothesis was tested by site-directed mutagenesis of glutamine-23 (Q23) in the middle of this loop. The glycine-rich loop exhibits localized differences in structure among DAPK conformations that correlate with different stages of the catalytic cycle. Changing the Q23 to a Valine (V23), found at the corresponding position in another CaM regulated protein kinase, results in a reduced catalytic efficiency. High resolution X-ray crystal structures of various conformations of the Q23V mutant DAPK and their superimposition with the corresponding conformations from wild type catalytic domain reveal localized changes in the glycine-rich region. The effect of the mutation on DAPK catalytic activity and the finding of only localized changes in the DAPK structure provide experimental evidence implicating conformational selection in this domain with activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium.

  2. Engineering of Recombinant Poplar Deoxy-D-Xylulose-5-Phosphate Synthase (PtDXS) by Site-Directed Mutagenesis Improves Its Activity

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Aparajita; Preiser, Alyssa L.

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), a thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) dependent enzyme, plays a regulatory role in the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), the end products of this pathway, inhibit DXS by competing with ThDP. Feedback inhibition of DXS by IDP and DMADP constitutes a significant metabolic regulation of this pathway. The aim of this work was to experimentally test the effect of key residues of recombinant poplar DXS (PtDXS) in binding both ThDP and IDP. This work also described the engineering of PtDXS to improve the enzymatic activity by reducing its inhibition by IDP and DMADP. We have designed and tested modifications of PtDXS in an attempt to reduce inhibition by IDP. This could possibly be valuable by removing a feedback that limits the usefulness of the MEP pathway in biotechnological applications. Both ThDP and IDP use similar interactions for binding at the active site of the enzyme, however, ThDP being a larger molecule has more anchoring sites at the active site of the enzyme as compared to the inhibitors. A predicted enzyme structure was examined to find ligand-enzyme interactions, which are relatively more important for inhibitor-enzyme binding than ThDP-enzyme binding, followed by their modifications so that the binding of the inhibitors can be selectively affected compared to ThDP. Two alanine residues important for binding ThDP and the inhibitors were mutated to glycine. In two of the cases, both the IDP inhibition and the overall activity were increased. In another case, both the IDP inhibition and the overall activity were reduced. This provides proof of concept that it is possible to reduce the feedback from IDP on DXS activity. PMID:27548482

  3. Site-directed immobilization of antibody using EDC-NHS-activated protein A on a bimetallic-based surface plasmon resonance chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Young-Soo; Lee, Yeon Kyung

    2014-05-01

    The characteristics of a waveguide-coupled bimetallic surface plasmon resonance (WcBiM SPR) sensor using (3-dimethylaminopropyl)-3-ethylcarbodiimide(EDC)-N-hydroxysuccinimide(NHS)-activated protein A was investigated, and the detection of IgG using the EDC-NHS-activated protein A was studied in comparison with protein A and a self-assembled monolayer (SAM). The WcBiM sensor, which has a narrower full width at half maximum (FWHM) and a steeper slope, was selected since it leads to a larger change in the reflectance in the intensity detection mode. A preparation of the EDC-NHS-activated protein A for site-directed immobilization of antibodies was relative easily compared to the engineered protein G and A. In antigen-antibody interactions, the response to IgG at the concentrations of 50, 100, and 150 ng/ml was investigated. The results showed that the sensitivity of the WcBiM sensor using the EDC-NHS-activated protein A, protein A, and SAM was 0.0185 [%/(ng/ml)], 0.0065 [%/(ng/ml)], and 0.0101 [%/(ng/ml)], respectively. The lowest detectable concentrations of IgG with the EDC-NHS-activated protein A, protein A, and SAM were 4.27, 12.83, and 8.24 ng/ml, respectively. Therefore, the increased sensitivity and lower detection capability of the WcBiM SPR chip with the EDC-NHS-activated protein A suggests that it could be used in early diagnosis where the trace level concentrations of biomolecules should be detected.

  4. Identification of essential active-site residues in the cyanogenic beta-glucosidase (linamarase) from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Keresztessy, Z; Brown, K; Dunn, M A; Hughes, M A

    2001-01-01

    The coding sequence of the mature cyanogenic beta-glucosidase (beta-glucoside glucohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.21; linamarase) was cloned into the vector pYX243 modified to contain the SUC2 yeast secretion signal sequence and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recombinant enzyme is active, glycosylated and showed similar stability to the plant protein. Michaelis constants for hydrolysis of the natural substrate, linamarin (K(m)=1.06 mM) and the synthetic p-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside (PNP-Glc; K(m)=0.36 mM), as well as apparent pK(a) values of the free enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complexes (pK(E)(1)=4.4-4.8, pK(E)(2)=6.7-7.2, pK(ES)(1)=3.9-4.4, pK(ES)(2)=8.3) were very similar to those of the plant enzyme. Site-directed mutagenesis was carried out to study the function of active-site residues based on a homology model generated for the enzyme using the MODELLER program. Changing Glu-413 to Gly destroyed enzyme activity, consistent with it being the catalytic nucleophile. The Gln-339Glu mutation also abolished activity, confirming a function in positioning the catalytic diad. The Ala-201Val mutation shifted the pK(a) of the acid/base catalyst Glu-198 from 7.22 to 7.44, reflecting a change in its hydrophobic environment. A Phe-269Asn change increased K(m) for linamarin hydrolysis 16-fold (16.1 mM) and that for PNP-Glc only 2.5-fold (0.84 mM), demonstrating that Phe-269 contributes to the cyanogenic specificity of the cassava beta-glucosidase. PMID:11139381

  5. Engineering of Alicyclobacillus hesperidum L-arabinose isomerase for improved catalytic activity and reduced pH optimum using random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chen; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Leon; Jiang, Bo; Mu, Wanmeng

    2015-12-01

    A mutation, D478N, was obtained by an error-prone polymerase chain reaction using the L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) gene from Alicyclobacillus hesperidum URH17-3-68 as the template. The mutated isomerase showed higher activity for D-galactose isomerization. The mutation site obtained from random mutagenesis was then introduced as a single-site mutation using site-directed mutagenesis. Single-site variants, D478N, D478Q, D478A, D478K, and D478R, were constructed. The optimum temperatures were all higher than 60 °C. D478A, D478N, and D478Q retained more than 80 % of the maximum relative activity of the wild-type L-AI at 75 °C. With the exception of the D478A variant, all variants showed decreased optimum pH values in the acidic range (6.0-6.5). All of the variant L-AIs could be significantly activated by the addition of Co(2+) and Mn(2+). D478N and D478Q showed higher catalytic efficiencies (k cat/K m) toward D-galactose than that of wild-type L-AI. In addition, the D478N and D478Q variants exhibited a much higher conversion ratio of D-galactose to D-tagatose at 6.0 than the wild-type L-AI. According to the molecular model, residue D478 was located on the surface of the enzyme and distant from the active site. It was supposed that the charged state of residue 478 may influence the optimum pH for substrate binding or isomerization.

  6. Ring-Closing and Cross-Metathesis with Artificial Metalloenzymes Created by Covalent Active Site-Directed Hybridization of a Lipase.

    PubMed

    Basauri-Molina, Manuel; Verhoeven, Dide G A; van Schaik, Arnoldus J; Kleijn, Henk; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M

    2015-10-26

    A series of Grubbs-type catalysts that contain lipase-inhibiting phosphoester functionalities have been synthesized and reacted with the lipase cutinase, which leads to artificial metalloenzymes for olefin metathesis. The resulting hybrids comprise the organometallic fragment that is covalently bound to the active amino acid residue of the enzyme host in an orthogonal orientation. Differences in reactivity as well as accessibility of the active site by the functionalized inhibitor became evident through variation of the anchoring motif and substituents on the N-heterocyclic carbene ligand. Such observations led to the design of a hybrid that is active in the ring-closing metathesis and the cross-metathesis of N,N-diallyl-p-toluenesulfonamide and allylbenzene, respectively, the latter being the first example of its kind in the field of artificial metalloenzymes.

  7. Small molecules inhibitors of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 - an overview.

    PubMed

    Rouch, Anne; Vanucci-Bacqué, Corinne; Bedos-Belval, Florence; Baltas, Michel

    2015-03-01

    PAI-1, a glycoprotein from the serpin family and the main inhibitor of tPA and uPA, plays an essential role in the regulation of intra and extravascular fibrinolysis by inhibiting the formation of plasmin from plasminogen. PAI-1 is also involved in pathological processes such as thromboembolic diseases, atherosclerosis, fibrosis and cancer. The inhibition of PAI-1 activity by small organic molecules has been observed in vitro and with some in vivo models. Based on these findings, PAI-1 appears as a potential therapeutic target for several pathological conditions. Over the past decades, many efforts have therefore been devoted to developing PAI-1 inhibitors. This article provides an overview of the publishing activity on small organic molecules used as PAI-1 inhibitors. The chemical synthesis of the most potent inhibitors as well as their biological and biochemical evaluations is also presented.

  8. Probing the importance of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhong-liang; Ye, Mao-qing; Zuo, Zhen-yu; Liu, Zhi-gang; Tai, Keng-chang; Zou, Guo-lin

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen bonds occurring in the catalytic triad (Asp32, His64 and Ser221) and the oxyanion hole (Asn155) are very important to the catalysis of peptide bond hydrolysis by serine proteases. For the subtilisin NK (nattokinase), a bacterial serine protease, construction and analysis of a three-dimensional structural model suggested that several hydrogen bonds formed by four residues function to stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis reaction. These four residues are Ser33, Asp60, Ser62 and Thr220. In order to remove the effect of these hydrogen bonds, four mutants (Ser33→Ala33, Asp60→Ala60, Ser62→Ala62, and Thr220→Ala220) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results of enzyme kinetics indicated that removal of these hydrogen bonds increases the free-energy of the transition state (ΔΔGT). We concluded that these hydrogen bonds are more important for catalysis than for binding the substrate, because removal of these bonds mainly affects the kcat but not the Km values. A substrate, SUB1 (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide), was used during enzyme kinetics experiments. In the present study we have also shown the results of FEP (free-energy perturbation) calculations with regard to the binding and catalysis reactions for these mutant subtilisins. The calculated difference in FEP also suggested that these four residues are more important for catalysis than binding of the substrate, and the simulated values compared well with the experimental values from enzyme kinetics. The results of MD (molecular dynamics) simulations further demonstrated that removal of these hydrogen bonds partially releases Asp32, His64 and Asn155 so that the stability of the transition state decreases. Another substrate, SUB2 (H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-p-nitroanilide), was used for FEP calculations and MD simulations. PMID:16411898

  9. Probing the importance of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhong-liang; Ye, Mao-qing; Zuo, Zhen-yu; Liu, Zhi-gang; Tai, Keng-chang; Zou, Guo-lin

    2006-05-01

    Hydrogen bonds occurring in the catalytic triad (Asp32, His64 and Ser221) and the oxyanion hole (Asn155) are very important to the catalysis of peptide bond hydrolysis by serine proteases. For the subtilisin NK (nattokinase), a bacterial serine protease, construction and analysis of a three-dimensional structural model suggested that several hydrogen bonds formed by four residues function to stabilize the transition state of the hydrolysis reaction. These four residues are Ser33, Asp60, Ser62 and Thr220. In order to remove the effect of these hydrogen bonds, four mutants (Ser33-->Ala33, Asp60-->Ala60, Ser62-->Ala62, and Thr220-->Ala220) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The results of enzyme kinetics indicated that removal of these hydrogen bonds increases the free-energy of the transition state (DeltaDeltaG(T)). We concluded that these hydrogen bonds are more important for catalysis than for binding the substrate, because removal of these bonds mainly affects the kcat but not the K(m) values. A substrate, SUB1 (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide), was used during enzyme kinetics experiments. In the present study we have also shown the results of FEP (free-energy perturbation) calculations with regard to the binding and catalysis reactions for these mutant subtilisins. The calculated difference in FEP also suggested that these four residues are more important for catalysis than binding of the substrate, and the simulated values compared well with the experimental values from enzyme kinetics. The results of MD (molecular dynamics) simulations further demonstrated that removal of these hydrogen bonds partially releases Asp32, His64 and Asn155 so that the stability of the transition state decreases. Another substrate, SUB2 (H-D-Val-Leu-Lys-p-nitroanilide), was used for FEP calculations and MD simulations.

  10. Identification of a determinant for strict NADP(H)-specificity and high sensitivity to mixed-type steroid inhibitor of rabbit aldo-keto reductase 1C33 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Ikari, Akira; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira; Kitade, Yukio

    2015-03-01

    In rabbit tissues, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily exists in six isoforms (AKRs: 1C5 and 1C29-1C33), sharing >73% amino acid sequence identity. AKR1C33 is strictly NADPH-specific, in contrast to dual NADPH/NADH specificity of the other isoforms. All coenzyme-binding residues of the structurally elucidated AKR1C5 are conserved in other isoforms, except that S217 (interacting with the pyrophosphate moiety) and T273 (interacting with the 2'-phosphate moiety) are replaced with F217 and N272, respectively, in AKR1C33. To explore the determinants for the NADPH specificity of AKR1C33, we prepared its F217S and N272T mutant enzymes. The mutation of F217S, but not N272T, converted AKR1C33 into a dually coenzyme-specific form that showed similar kcat values for NAD(P)H to those of AKR1C32. The reverse mutation (S217F) in dually coenzyme-specific AKR1C32 produced a strictly NADPH-specific form. The F217S mutation also abolished the activity towards 3-keto-5β-cholestanes that are substrates specific to AKR1C33, and markedly decreased the sensitivity to 4-pregnenes (such as deoxycorticosterone and medroxyprogesterone acetate) that were found to be potent mixed-type inhibitors of the wild-type enzyme. The results indicate the important role of F217 in the strict NADPH-dependency, as well as its involvement in the unique catalytic properties of AKR1C33.

  11. Site-directed mutagenesis of the human DNA repair enzyme HAP1: identification of residues important for AP endonuclease and RNase H activity.

    PubMed

    Barzilay, G; Walker, L J; Robson, C N; Hickson, I D

    1995-05-11

    HAP1 protein, the major apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease in human cells, is a member of a homologous family of multifunctional DNA repair enzymes including the Escherichia coli exonuclease III and Drosophila Rrp1 proteins. The most extensively characterised member of this family, exonuclease III, exhibits both DNA- and RNA-specific nuclease activities. Here, we show that the RNase H activity characteristic of exonuclease III has been conserved in the human homologue, although the products resulting from RNA cleavage are dissimilar. To identify residues important for enzymatic activity, five mutant HAP1 proteins containing single amino acid substitutions were purified and analysed in vitro. The substitutions were made at sites of conserved amino acids and targeted either acidic or histidine residues because of their known participation in the active sites of hydrolytic nucleases. One of the mutant proteins (replacement of Asp-219 by alanine) showed a markedly reduced enzymatic activity, consistent with a greatly diminished capacity to bind DNA and RNA. In contrast, replacement of Asp-90, Asp-308 or Glu-96 by alanine led to a reduction in enzymatic activity without significantly compromising nucleic acid binding. Replacement of His-255 by alanine led to only a very small reduction in enzymatic activity. Our data are consistent with the presence of a single catalytic active site for the DNA- and RNA-specific nuclease activities of the HAP1 protein. PMID:7784208

  12. The vhs1 mutant form of herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff protein retains significant internal ribosome entry site-directed RNA cleavage activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, P; Saffran, H A; Smiley, J R

    2001-01-01

    The virion host shutoff (vhs) protein of herpes simplex virus (HSV) triggers global shutoff of host protein synthesis and accelerated turnover of host and viral mRNAs during HSV infection. As well, it induces endoribonucleolytic cleavage of RNA substrates when produced in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) in vitro translation system. The vhs1 point mutation (Thr 214-->Ile) eliminates vhs function during virus infection and in transiently transfected mammalian cells and was therefore previously considered to abolish vhs activity. Here we demonstrate that the vhs1 mutant protein induces readily detectable endoribonuclease activity on RNA substrates bearing the internal ribosome entry site of encephalomyocarditis virus in the RRL assay system. These data document that the vhs1 mutation does not eliminate catalytic activity and raise the possibility that the vhs-dependent endoribonuclease employs more than one mode of substrate recognition.

  13. Identification of essential residues for binding and activation in the human 5-HT7(a) serotonin receptor by molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Impellizzeri, Agata Antonina Rita; Pappalardo, Matteo; Basile, Livia; Manfra, Ornella; Andressen, Kjetil Wessel; Krobert, Kurt Allen; Messina, Angela; Levy, Finn Olav; Guccione, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The human 5-HT7 receptor is expressed in both the central nervous system and peripheral tissues and is a potential drug target in behavioral and psychiatric disorders. We examined molecular determinants of ligand binding and G protein activation by the human 5-HT7(a) receptor. The role of several key residues in the 7th transmembrane domain (TMD) and helix 8 were elucidated combining in silico and experimental mutagenesis. Several single and two double point mutations of the 5-HT7(a) wild type receptor were made (W7.33V, E7.35T, E7.35R, E7.35D, E7.35A, R7.36V, Y7.43A, Y7.43F, Y7.43T, R8.52D, D8.53K; E7.35T-R7.36V, R8.52D-D8.53K), and their effects upon ligand binding were assessed by radioligand binding using a potent agonist (5-CT) and a potent antagonist (SB269970). In addition, the ability of the mutated 5-HT7(a) receptors to activate G protein after 5-HT-stimulation was determined through activation of adenylyl cyclase. In silico investigation on mutated receptors substantiated the predicted importance of TM7 and showed critical roles of residues E7.35, W7.33, R7.36 and Y7.43 in agonist and antagonist binding and conformational changes of receptor structure affecting adenylyl cyclase activation. Experimental data showed that mutants E7.35T and E7.35R were incapable of ligand binding and adenylyl cyclase activation, consistent with a requirement for a negatively charged residue at this position. The mutant R8.52D was unable to activate adenylyl cyclase, despite unaffected ligand binding, consistent with the R8.52 residue playing an important role in the receptor-G protein interface. The mutants Y7.43A and Y7.43T displayed reduced agonist binding and AC agonist potency, not seen in Y7.43F, consistent with a requirement for an aromatic residue at this position. Knowledge of the molecular interactions important in h5-HT7 receptor ligand binding and G protein activation will aid the design of selective h5-HT7 receptor ligands for potential pharmacological use. PMID

  14. Sequencing of the amylopullulanase (apu) gene of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E, and identification of the active site by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Mathupala, S P; Lowe, S E; Podkovyrov, S M; Zeikus, J G

    1993-08-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the dual active amylopullulanase of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus 39E (formerly Clostridium thermohydrosulfuricum) was determined. The structural gene (apu) contained a single open reading frame 4443 base pairs in length, corresponding to 1481 amino acids, with an estimated molecular weight of 162,780. Analysis of the deduced sequence of apu with sequences of alpha-amylases and alpha-1,6 debranching enzymes enabled the identification of four conserved regions putatively involved in substrate binding and in catalysis. The conserved regions were localized within a 2.9-kilobase pair gene fragment, which encoded a M(r) 100,000 protein that maintained the dual activities and thermostability of the native enzyme. The catalytic residues of amylopullulanase were tentatively identified by using hydrophobic cluster analysis for comparison of amino acid sequences of amylopullulanase and other amylolytic enzymes. Asp597, Glu626, and Asp703 were individually modified to their respective amide form, or the alternate acid form, and in all cases both alpha-amylase and pullulanase activities were lost, suggesting the possible involvement of 3 residues in a catalytic triad, and the presence of a putative single catalytic site within the enzyme. These findings substantiate amylopullulanase as a new type of amylosaccharidase.

  15. Crystal structure and mapping by site-directed mutagenesis of the collagen-binding epitope of an activated form of BM-40/SPARC/osteonectin.

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, T; Hohenester, E; Göhring, W; Timpl, R

    1998-01-01

    The extracellular calcium-binding domain (positions 138-286) of the matrix protein BM-40 possesses a binding epitope of moderate affinity for several collagen types. This epitope was predicted to reside in helix alphaA and to be partially masked by helix alphaC. Here we show that deletion of helix alphaC produces a 10-fold increase in collagen affinity similar to that seen after proteolytic cleavage of this helix. The predicted removal of the steric constraint was clearly demonstrated by the crystal structure of the mutant at 2.8 A resolution. This constitutively activated mutant was used to map the collagen-binding site following alanine mutagenesis at 13 positions. Five residues were crucial for binding, R149 and N156 in helix alphaA, and L242, M245 and E246 in a loop region connecting the two EF hands of BM-40. These residues are spatially close and form a flat ring of 15 A diameter which matches the diameter of a triple-helical collagen domain. The mutations showed similar effects on binding to collagens I and IV, indicating nearly identical binding sites on both collagens. Selected mutations in the non-activated mutant DeltaI also reduced collagen binding, consistent with the same location of the epitope but in a more cryptic form in intact BM-40. PMID:9501084

  16. Role of arginine 285 in the active site of Rhodotorula gracilis D-amino acid oxidase. A site-directed mutagenesis study.

    PubMed

    Molla, G; Porrini, D; Job, V; Motteran, L; Vegezzi, C; Campaner, S; Pilone, M S; Pollegioni, L

    2000-08-11

    Arg(285), one of the very few conserved residues in the active site of d-amino acid oxidases, has been mutated to lysine, glutamine, aspartate, and alanine in the enzyme from the yeast Rhodotorula gracilis (RgDAAO). The mutated proteins are all catalytically competent. Mutations of Arg(285) result in an increase ( approximately 300-fold) of K(m) for the d-amino acid and in a large decrease ( approximately 500-fold) of turnover number. Stopped-flow analysis shows that the decrease in turnover is paralleled by a similar decrease in the rate of flavin reduction (k(2)), the latter still being the rate-limiting step of the reaction. In agreement with data from the protein crystal structure, loss of the guanidinium group of Arg(285) in the mutated DAAOs drastically reduces the binding of several carboxylic acids (e.g. benzoate). These results highlight the importance of this active site residue in the precise substrate orientation, a main factor in this redox reaction. Furthermore, Arg(285) DAAO mutants have spectral properties similar to those of the wild-type enzyme, but show a low degree of stabilization of the flavin semiquinone and a change in the redox properties of the free enzyme. From this, we can unexpectedly conclude that Arg(285) in the free enzyme form is involved in the stabilization of the negative charge on the N(1)-C(2)=O locus of the isoalloxazine ring of the flavin. We also suggest that the residue undergoes a conformational change in order to bind the carboxylate portion of the substrate/ligand in the complexed enzyme. PMID:10821840

  17. Supramolecular Chemistry And Self-assembly Special Feature: Selective immobilization of proteins to self-assembled monolayers presenting active site-directed capture ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodneland, Christian D.; Lee, Young-Sam; Min, Dal-Hee; Mrksich, Milan

    2002-04-01

    This paper describes a method for the selective and covalent immobilization of proteins to surfaces with control over the density and orientation of the protein. The strategy is based on binding of the serine esterase cutinase to a self-assembled monolayer presenting a phosphonate ligand and the subsequent displacement reaction that covalently binds the ligand to the enzyme active site. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy showed that cutinase binds irreversibly to a monolayer presenting the capture ligand at a density of 1% mixed among tri(ethylene glycol) groups. The covalent immobilization is specific for cutinase, and the glycol-terminated monolayer effectively prevents unwanted nonspecific adsorption of proteins. To demonstrate that the method could be used to immobilize proteins of interest, a cutinase-calmodulin fusion protein was constructed and immobilized to the monolayer. SPR showed that calcineurin selectively associated with the immobilized calmodulin. This capture ligand immobilization method combines the advantages that the immobilization reaction is highly selective for the intended protein, the tether is covalent and, hence, stable, and the method avoids the need for synthetic modification and rigorous purification of proteins before immobilization. These characteristics make the method well suited to a range of applications and, in particular, for constructing protein microarrays.

  18. Protease Inhibitors from Plants with Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Young; Park, Seong-Cheol; Hwang, Indeok; Cheong, Hyeonsook; Nah, Jae-Woon; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Park, Yoonkyung

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial proteins (peptides) are known to play important roles in the innate host defense mechanisms of most living organisms, including plants, insects, amphibians and mammals. They are also known to possess potent antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and even certain viruses. Recently, the rapid emergence of microbial pathogens that are resistant to currently available antibiotics has triggered considerable interest in the isolation and investigation of the mode of action of antimicrobial proteins (peptides). Plants produce a variety of proteins (peptides) that are involved in the defense against pathogens and invading organisms, including ribosome-inactivating proteins, lectins, protease inhibitors and antifungal peptides (proteins). Specially, the protease inhibitors can inhibit aspartic, serine and cysteine proteinases. Increased levels of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors correlated with the plants resistance to the pathogen. Usually, the purification of antimicrobial proteins (peptides) with protease inhibitor activity was accomplished by salt-extraction, ultrafiltration and C18 reverse phase chromatography, successfully. We discuss the relation between antimicrobial and anti-protease activity in this review. Protease inhibitors from plants potently inhibited the growth of a variety of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains and are therefore excellent candidates for use as the lead compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents. PMID:19582234

  19. Discovering Anti-platelet Drug Combinations with an Integrated Model of Activator-Inhibitor Relationships, Activator-Activator Synergies and Inhibitor-Inhibitor Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Federica; Golla, Kalyan; Fitzpatrick, Darren J.; Casey, Fergal P.; Moran, Niamh; Shields, Denis C.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying effective therapeutic drug combinations that modulate complex signaling pathways in platelets is central to the advancement of effective anti-thrombotic therapies. However, there is no systems model of the platelet that predicts responses to different inhibitor combinations. We developed an approach which goes beyond current inhibitor-inhibitor combination screening to efficiently consider other signaling aspects that may give insights into the behaviour of the platelet as a system. We investigated combinations of platelet inhibitors and activators. We evaluated three distinct strands of information, namely: activator-inhibitor combination screens (testing a panel of inhibitors against a panel of activators); inhibitor-inhibitor synergy screens; and activator-activator synergy screens. We demonstrated how these analyses may be efficiently performed, both experimentally and computationally, to identify particular combinations of most interest. Robust tests of activator-activator synergy and of inhibitor-inhibitor synergy required combinations to show significant excesses over the double doses of each component. Modeling identified multiple effects of an inhibitor of the P2Y12 ADP receptor, and complementarity between inhibitor-inhibitor synergy effects and activator-inhibitor combination effects. This approach accelerates the mapping of combination effects of compounds to develop combinations that may be therapeutically beneficial. We integrated the three information sources into a unified model that predicted the benefits of a triple drug combination targeting ADP, thromboxane and thrombin signaling. PMID:25875950

  20. Expression of Bacillus protease (Protease BYA) from Bacillus sp. Y in Bacillus subtilis and enhancement of its specific activity by site-directed mutagenesis-improvement in productivity of detergent enzyme-.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Seiichi; Shimogaki, Hisao; Ohdera, Motoyasu; Asai, Yoshio; Oba, Kenkichi; Iwama, Masanori; Irie, Masachika

    2006-01-01

    An attempt was made to express protease BYA produced by an alkalophilic Bacillus sp. Y in Bacillus subtilis by gene engineering methods. The gene encoding protease BYA was cloned from Bacillus sp. Y, and expression vector pTA71 was constructed from the amylase promoter of Bacillus licheniformis, DNA fragments encoding the open reading frame of protease BYA, and pUB110. Protease BYA was secreted at an activity level of 5100 APU/ml in the common industrial culture medium of Bacillus subtilis transformed with pTA71. We then attempted to increase the specific activity of protease BYA by site-directed mutagenesis. Amino acid residue Ala29 next to catalytic Asp30 was replaced by one of three uncharged amino acid residues (Val29, Leu29, Ile29), and each mutant enzyme was expressed and isolated from the culture medium. Val29 mutant enzyme was secreted at an activity level of greater than 7000 APU/ml in culture medium, and its specific activity was 1.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. Other mutant enzymes had specific activity similar to that of the original one and were less stabile than the wild-type enzyme. It can be thought that the substitution at amino acid residue 29 affects the level of activity and stability of protease BYA.

  1. Expression of Bacillus protease (Protease BYA) from Bacillus sp. Y in Bacillus subtilis and enhancement of its specific activity by site-directed mutagenesis-improvement in productivity of detergent enzyme-.

    PubMed

    Tobe, Seiichi; Shimogaki, Hisao; Ohdera, Motoyasu; Asai, Yoshio; Oba, Kenkichi; Iwama, Masanori; Irie, Masachika

    2006-01-01

    An attempt was made to express protease BYA produced by an alkalophilic Bacillus sp. Y in Bacillus subtilis by gene engineering methods. The gene encoding protease BYA was cloned from Bacillus sp. Y, and expression vector pTA71 was constructed from the amylase promoter of Bacillus licheniformis, DNA fragments encoding the open reading frame of protease BYA, and pUB110. Protease BYA was secreted at an activity level of 5100 APU/ml in the common industrial culture medium of Bacillus subtilis transformed with pTA71. We then attempted to increase the specific activity of protease BYA by site-directed mutagenesis. Amino acid residue Ala29 next to catalytic Asp30 was replaced by one of three uncharged amino acid residues (Val29, Leu29, Ile29), and each mutant enzyme was expressed and isolated from the culture medium. Val29 mutant enzyme was secreted at an activity level of greater than 7000 APU/ml in culture medium, and its specific activity was 1.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme. Other mutant enzymes had specific activity similar to that of the original one and were less stabile than the wild-type enzyme. It can be thought that the substitution at amino acid residue 29 affects the level of activity and stability of protease BYA. PMID:16394504

  2. Systematic assessment of coordinated activity cliffs formed by kinase inhibitors and detailed characterization of activity cliff clusters and associated SAR information.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-27

    From currently available kinase inhibitors and their activity data, clusters of coordinated activity cliffs were systematically derived and subjected to cluster index and index map analysis. Type I-like inhibitors with well-defined IC50 measurements were found to provide a large knowledge base of activity cliff clusters for 266 targets from nine kinase groups. On the basis of index map analysis, these clusters were systematically organized according to structural similarity of inhibitors and activity cliff diversity and prioritized for structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis. From prioritized clusters, interpretable SAR information can be extracted. It is also shown that activity cliff clusters formed by ATP site-directed inhibitors often represent local SAR environments of rather different complexity and interpretability. In addition, activity cliff clusters including promiscuous kinase inhibitors have been determined. Only a small subset of inhibitors was found to change activity cliff roles in different clusters. The activity cliff clusters described herein and their index map organization substantially enrich SAR information associated with kinase inhibitors in compound subsets of limited size. The cluster and index map information is made available upon request to provide opportunities for further SAR exploration. On the basis of our analysis and the data provided, activity cliff clusters and corresponding inhibitor series for kinase targets of interest can be readily selected.

  3. Functional Stability of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    PubMed Central

    Kuru, Pinar; Toksoy Oner, Ebru; Agirbasli, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the main inhibitor of plasminogen activators, such as tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA), and a major regulator of the fibrinolytic system. PAI-1 plays a pivotal role in acute thrombotic events such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and myocardial infarction (MI). The biological effects of PAI-1 extend far beyond thrombosis including its critical role in fibrotic disorders, atherosclerosis, renal and pulmonary fibrosis, type-2 diabetes, and cancer. The conversion of PAI-1 from the active to the latent conformation appears to be unique among serpins in that it occurs spontaneously at a relatively rapid rate. Latency transition is believed to represent a regulatory mechanism, reducing the risk of thrombosis from a prolonged antifibrinolytic action of PAI-1. Thus, relying solely on plasma concentrations of PAI-1 without assessing its function may be misleading in interpreting the role of PAI-1 in many complex diseases. Environmental conditions, interaction with other proteins, mutations, and glycosylation are the main factors that have a significant impact on the stability of the PAI-1 structure. This review provides an overview on the current knowledge on PAI-1 especially importance of PAI-1 level and stability and highlights the potential use of PAI-1 inhibitors for treating cardiovascular disease. PMID:25386620

  4. Site-directed isotope labeling and ATR-FTIR difference spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin: the peptide carbonyl group of Tyr 185 is structurally active during the bR-->N transition.

    PubMed

    Ludlam, C F; Sonar, S; Lee, C P; Coleman, M; Herzfeld, J; RajBhandary, U L; Rothschild, K J

    1995-01-10

    The largest secondary structural change occurs in the bacteriorhodopsin (bR) photocycle during the M-->N transition. In this work site-directed isotope labeling (SDIL) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) difference spectroscopy were used to investigate this conformational change. L-Tyrosine containing a 13C isotope at the carbonyl carbon was selectively incorporated at Tyr 57, Tyr 147, and Tyr 185 by SDIL. This involves the cell-free expression of bR in the presence of Escherichia coli suppressor tRNA(CUATyr) aminoacylated with L-[1-13C]Tyr. ATR-FTIR difference spectroscopy reveals that of the 11 tyrosines, only the peptide carbonyl group of Tyr 185 undergoes a significant structural change during the bR-->N transition. Along with other spectroscopic evidence, this result suggests that the Tyr 185-Pro 186 region of the protein is structurally active and may function as a hinge which facilitates the tilt of the cytoplasmic portion of the F-helix in bacteriorhodopsin during the M-->N transition.

  5. Site-directed isotope labelling and FTIR spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S; Lee, C P; Coleman, M; Patel, N; Liu, X; Marti, T; Khorana, H G; RajBhandary, U L; Rothschild, K J

    1994-08-01

    Insight into integral membrane proteins function is presently limited by the difficulty of producing three-dimensional crystals. In addition, X-ray structures of proteins normally do not provide information about the protonation state and structural changes of individual residues. We report here the first use of site-directed isotope labelling and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy to detect structural changes at the level of single residues in an integral membrane protein. Two site-directed isotope labeled (SDIL) tyrosine analogues of bacteriorhodopsin were produced which exhibit normal activity. FTIR spectroscopy shows that out of 11 tyrosines, only Tyr 185 is structurally active during the early photocycle and may be part of a proton wire.

  6. Site-directed mutagenesis of the CC chemokine binding protein 35K-Fc reveals residues essential for activity and mutations that increase the potency of CC chemokine blockade.

    PubMed

    White, Gemma E; McNeill, Eileen; Christou, Ivy; Channon, Keith M; Greaves, David R

    2011-08-01

    Chemokines of the CC class are key mediators of monocyte recruitment and macrophage differentiation and have a well documented role in many inflammatory diseases. Blockade of chemokine activity is therefore an attractive target for anti-inflammatory therapy. 35K (vCCI) is a high-affinity chemokine binding protein expressed by poxviruses, which binds all human and murine CC chemokines, preventing their interaction with chemokine receptors. We developed an Fc-fusion protein of 35K with a modified human IgG1 Fc domain and expressed this construct in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. Purified 35K-Fc is capable of inhibiting CC chemokine-induced calcium flux, chemotaxis, and β-arrestin recruitment in primary macrophages and transfected cells. To elucidate the residues involved in chemokine neutralization, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of six key amino acids in 35K and expressed the mutant Fc-fusion proteins in vitro. We screened the mutants for their ability to block chemokine-induced β-arrestin recruitment in transfected cells and to inhibit primary macrophage signaling in an electric cell substrate impedance sensing assay. Using a sterile model of acute inflammation, zymosan-induced peritonitis, we confirmed that wild-type 35K-Fc can reduce monocyte recruitment, whereas one mutant (R89A) showed a more pronounced blockade of monocyte influx and another mutant (E143K) showed total loss of function. We believe that 35K-Fc will be a useful tool for exploring the role of CC chemokines in chronic inflammatory pathologies, and we have identified a higher potency form of the molecule that may have potential therapeutic applications in chronic inflammatory disease.

  7. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hi Bahl; Ha, Hunjoo

    2005-10-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the kidney. Decreased ECM degradation as well as increased ECM synthesis plays an important role in ECM remodeling that favours tissue fibrosis. Plasminogen activator (PA)/plasmin/PA inhibitor (PAI) system is involved in ECM degradation and PAI-1 plays a critical role in ECM remodeling in the kidney. Normal human kidneys do not express PAI-1 but PAI-1 is overexpressed in pathologic conditions associated with renal fibrosis including diabetic nephropathy. Reactive oxygen species mediate PAI-1 up-regulation in renal cells cultured under high glucose, hypoxia, and TGF-beta1. Recent studies utilizing PAI-1 deficient mice suggest that PAI-1 induce ECM deposition in diabetic kidney through increased ECM synthesis by TGF-beta1 up-regulation as well as through decreased ECM degradation by suppression of plasmin and MMP-2 activity.

  8. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in aging.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Koji; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Saito, Hidehiko

    2014-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a principal inhibitor of fibrinolysis, is induced in thrombotic, fibrotic, and cardiovascular diseases, which in turn primarily afflict the older population. This induction of PAI-1 may play an important role in the pathology of these diseases as PAI-1 can regulate the dissolution of fibrin and also inhibit the degradation of the extracellular matrix by reducing plasmin generation. PAI-1 expression is elevated in aged individuals and is significantly upregulated in a variety of pathologies associated with the process of aging, including myocardial and cerebral infarction, vascular (athero) sclerosis, cardiac and lung fibrosis, metabolic syndromes (e.g., hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and insulin resistance), cancer, and inflammatory/stress responses. Thus, PAI-1 may play a critical role in the development of aging-associated pathological changes. In addition, PAI-1 is recognized as a marker of senescence and a key member of a group of proteins collectively known as the senescence-messaging secretome. In this review, we highlight the role of PAI-1 in the pathophysiology of aging and aging-associated disorders.

  9. Structure-guided inhibitor design for human FAAH by interspecies active site conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Mileni, Mauro; Johnson, Douglas S.; Wang, Zhigang; Everdeen, Daniel S.; Liimatta, Marya; Pabst, Brandon; Bhattacharya, Keshab; Nugent, Richard A.; Kamtekar, Satwik; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Ahn, Kay; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2008-11-24

    The integral membrane enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) hydrolyzes the endocannabinoid anandamide and related amidated signaling lipids. Genetic or pharmacological inactivation of FAAH produces analgesic, anxiolytic, and antiinflammatory phenotypes but not the undesirable side effects of direct cannabinoid receptor agonists, indicating that FAAH may be a promising therapeutic target. Structure-based inhibitor design has, however, been hampered by difficulties in expressing the human FAAH enzyme. Here, we address this problem by interconverting the active sites of rat and human FAAH using site-directed mutagenesis. The resulting humanized rat (h/r) FAAH protein exhibits the inhibitor sensitivity profiles of human FAAH but maintains the high-expression yield of the rat enzyme. We report a 2.75-{angstrom} crystal structure of h/rFAAH complexed with an inhibitor, N-phenyl-4-(quinolin-3-ylmethyl)piperidine-1-carboxamide (PF-750), that shows strong preference for human FAAH. This structure offers compelling insights to explain the species selectivity of FAAH inhibitors, which should guide future drug design programs.

  10. Carborane-based carbonic anhydrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brynda, Jiří; Mader, Pavel; Šícha, Václav; Fábry, Milan; Poncová, Kristýna; Bakardiev, Mario; Grüner, Bohumír; Cígler, Petr; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2013-12-16

    CA inhibitors: Human carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Various carborane cages are shown to act as active-site-directed inhibitors, and substitution with a sulfamide group and other substituents leads to compounds with high selectivity towards the cancer-specific isozyme IX. Crystal structures of the carboranes in the active site provide information that can be applied to the structure-based design of specific inhibitors. PMID:24307504

  11. Molecular recognition at the active site of subtilisin BPN': crystallographic studies using genetically engineered proteinaceous inhibitor SSI (Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor).

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Y; Noguchi, S; Satow, Y; Kojima, S; Kumagai, I; Miura, K; Nakamura, K T; Mitsui, Y

    1991-06-01

    Unlike trypsin-like serine proteases having only one conspicuous binding pocket in the active site, subtilisin BPN' has two such pockets, the S1 and S4 pockets, which accommodate the P1 and P4 residues of ligands (after Schechter and Berger notation) respectively. Using computer graphics, the geometrical nature of the two pockets was carefully examined and strategies for site-directed mutagenesis studies were set up against a protein SSI (Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor), which is a strong proteinaceous inhibitor (or a substrate analogue) of subtilisin BPN'. It was decided to convert the P1 residue, methionine 73, into lysine (M73K) with or without additional conversion of the P4 residue, methionine 70, into glycine (M70G). The crystal structures of the two complexes of subtilisin BPN', one with the single mutant SSI (M73K) and the other with the double mutant SSI (M73K, M70G) were solved showing that (i) small 'electrostatic induced-fit movement' occurs in the S1 pocket upon introducing the terminal plus charge of the lysine side chain, and (ii) large 'mechanical induced-fit movement' occurs in the S4 pocket upon reducing the size of the P4 side chain from methionine to glycine. In both (i) and (ii), the induced-fit movement occurred in a concerted fashion involving both the enzyme and 'substrate' amino acid residues. The term 'substrate-assisted stabilization' was coined to stress the cooperative nature of the induced-fit movements. PMID:1891457

  12. Turing pattern formation in fractional activator-inhibitor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, B. I.; Langlands, T. A. M.; Wearne, S. L.

    2005-08-01

    Activator-inhibitor systems of reaction-diffusion equations have been used to describe pattern formation in numerous applications in biology, chemistry, and physics. The rate of diffusion in these applications is manifest in the single parameter of the diffusion constant, and stationary Turing patterns occur above a critical value of d representing the ratio of the diffusion constants of the inhibitor to the activator. Here we consider activator-inhibitor systems in which the diffusion is anomalous subdiffusion; the diffusion rates are manifest in both a diffusion constant and a diffusion exponent. A consideration of this problem in terms of continuous-time random walks with sources and sinks leads to a reaction-diffusion system with fractional order temporal derivatives operating on the spatial Laplacian. We have carried out an algebraic stability analysis of the homogeneous steady-state solution in fractional activator-inhibitor systems, with Gierer-Meinhardt reaction kinetics and with Brusselator reaction kinetics. For each class of reaction kinetics we identify a Turing instability bifurcation curve in the two-dimensional diffusion parameter space. The critical value of d , for Turing instabilities, decreases monotonically with the anomalous diffusion exponent between unity (standard diffusion) and zero (extreme subdiffusion). We have also carried out numerical simulations of the governing fractional activator-inhibitor equations and we show that the Turing instability precipitates the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns. If the diffusion of the activator and inhibitor have the same anomalous scaling properties, then the surface profiles of these patterns for values of d slightly above the critical value varies from smooth stationary patterns to increasingly rough and nonstationary patterns as the anomalous diffusion exponent varies from unity towards zero. If the diffusion of the activator is anomalous subdiffusion but the diffusion of the inhibitor

  13. Turing pattern formation in fractional activator-inhibitor systems.

    PubMed

    Henry, B I; Langlands, T A M; Wearne, S L

    2005-08-01

    Activator-inhibitor systems of reaction-diffusion equations have been used to describe pattern formation in numerous applications in biology, chemistry, and physics. The rate of diffusion in these applications is manifest in the single parameter of the diffusion constant, and stationary Turing patterns occur above a critical value of d representing the ratio of the diffusion constants of the inhibitor to the activator. Here we consider activator-inhibitor systems in which the diffusion is anomalous subdiffusion; the diffusion rates are manifest in both a diffusion constant and a diffusion exponent. A consideration of this problem in terms of continuous-time random walks with sources and sinks leads to a reaction-diffusion system with fractional order temporal derivatives operating on the spatial Laplacian. We have carried out an algebraic stability analysis of the homogeneous steady-state solution in fractional activator-inhibitor systems, with Gierer-Meinhardt reaction kinetics and with Brusselator reaction kinetics. For each class of reaction kinetics we identify a Turing instability bifurcation curve in the two-dimensional diffusion parameter space. The critical value of d , for Turing instabilities, decreases monotonically with the anomalous diffusion exponent between unity (standard diffusion) and zero (extreme subdiffusion). We have also carried out numerical simulations of the governing fractional activator-inhibitor equations and we show that the Turing instability precipitates the formation of complex spatiotemporal patterns. If the diffusion of the activator and inhibitor have the same anomalous scaling properties, then the surface profiles of these patterns for values of d slightly above the critical value varies from smooth stationary patterns to increasingly rough and nonstationary patterns as the anomalous diffusion exponent varies from unity towards zero. If the diffusion of the activator is anomalous subdiffusion but the diffusion of the inhibitor

  14. Cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation by BRAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Li, Shuoran; Xie, Michael W.; Sun, Lu; Hugo, Willy; Huang, Rong Rong; Jiao, Jing; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; Realegeno, Susan; Krystofinski, Paige; Azhdam, Ariel; Komenan, Sara Marie D.; Atefi, Mohammad; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Pellegrini, Matteo; Cochran, Alistair J.; Modlin, Robert L.; Herschman, Harvey R.; Lo, Roger S.; McBride, William H.; Segura, Tatiana; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors are highly effective therapies for the treatment of BRAFV600-mutated melanoma, with the main toxicity being a variety of hyperproliferative skin conditions due to paradoxical activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in BRAF wild-type cells. Most of these hyperproliferative skin changes improve when a MEK inhibitor is co-administered, as it blocks paradoxical MAPK activation. Here we show how the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib accelerates skin wound healing by inducing the proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. Topical treatment with vemurafenib in two wound-healing mice models accelerates cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation; addition of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor reverses the benefit of vemurafenib-accelerated wound healing. The same dosing regimen of topical BRAF inhibitor does not increase the incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in mice. Therefore, topical BRAF inhibitors may have clinical applications in accelerating the healing of skin wounds. PMID:27476449

  15. Cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation by BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Li, Shuoran; Xie, Michael W; Sun, Lu; Hugo, Willy; Huang, Rong Rong; Jiao, Jing; de-Faria, Felipe Meira; Realegeno, Susan; Krystofinski, Paige; Azhdam, Ariel; Komenan, Sara Marie D; Atefi, Mohammad; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Pellegrini, Matteo; Cochran, Alistair J; Modlin, Robert L; Herschman, Harvey R; Lo, Roger S; McBride, William H; Segura, Tatiana; Ribas, Antoni

    2016-08-01

    BRAF inhibitors are highly effective therapies for the treatment of BRAF(V600)-mutated melanoma, with the main toxicity being a variety of hyperproliferative skin conditions due to paradoxical activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in BRAF wild-type cells. Most of these hyperproliferative skin changes improve when a MEK inhibitor is co-administered, as it blocks paradoxical MAPK activation. Here we show how the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib accelerates skin wound healing by inducing the proliferation and migration of human keratinocytes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and cell cycle progression. Topical treatment with vemurafenib in two wound-healing mice models accelerates cutaneous wound healing through paradoxical MAPK activation; addition of a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor reverses the benefit of vemurafenib-accelerated wound healing. The same dosing regimen of topical BRAF inhibitor does not increase the incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas in mice. Therefore, topical BRAF inhibitors may have clinical applications in accelerating the healing of skin wounds.

  16. Unexpected Activity of a Novel Kunitz-type Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Jewhurst, Heather L.; Drysdale, Orla C.; Dvořák, Jan; Robinson, Mark W.; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Dalton, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Kunitz-type (KT) protease inhibitors are low molecular weight proteins classically defined as serine protease inhibitors. We identified a novel secreted KT inhibitor associated with the gut and parenchymal tissues of the infective juvenile stage of Fasciola hepatica, a helminth parasite of medical and veterinary importance. Unexpectedly, recombinant KT inhibitor (rFhKT1) exhibited no inhibitory activity toward serine proteases but was a potent inhibitor of the major secreted cathepsin L cysteine proteases of F. hepatica, FhCL1 and FhCL2, and of human cathepsins L and K (Ki = 0.4-27 nm). FhKT1 prevented the auto-catalytic activation of FhCL1 and FhCL2 and formed stable complexes with the mature enzymes. Pulldown experiments from adult parasite culture medium showed that rFhKT1 interacts specifically with native secreted FhCL1, FhCL2, and FhCL5. Substitution of the unusual P1 Leu15 within the exposed reactive loop of FhKT1 for the more commonly found Arg (FhKT1Leu15/Arg15) had modest adverse effects on the cysteine protease inhibition but conferred potent activity against the serine protease trypsin (Ki = 1.5 nm). Computational docking and sequence analysis provided hypotheses for the exclusive binding of FhKT1 to cysteine proteases, the importance of the Leu15 in anchoring the inhibitor into the S2 active site pocket, and the inhibitor's selectivity toward FhCL1, FhCL2, and human cathepsins L and K. FhKT1 represents a novel evolutionary adaptation of KT protease inhibitors by F. hepatica, with its prime purpose likely in the regulation of the major parasite-secreted proteases and/or cathepsin L-like proteases of its host. PMID:27422822

  17. Site-directed mutations in the lanthipeptide mutacin 1140.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shaorong; Wilson-Stanford, Shawanda; Cromwell, William; Hillman, Jeffrey D; Guerrero, Adam; Allen, Charlotte A; Sorg, Joseph A; Smith, Leif

    2013-07-01

    The oral bacterium Streptococcus mutans, strain JH1140, produces the antibiotic mutacin 1140. Mutacin 1140 belongs to a group of antibiotics called lanthipeptides. More specifically, mutacin 1140 is related to the epidermin type A(I) lanthipeptides. Mutagenesis experiments of this group of lanthipeptides have been primarily restricted to the posttranslationally modified meso-lanthionine and 3-methyllanthionine residues. Site-directed mutagenesis of the core peptide of mutacin 1140 was performed using the suicide vector pVA891. Substitutions of the N-terminal residue, the charged residue in the hinge region, and residues in ring A and intertwined rings C and D were investigated. A truncation and insertion of residues in ring A and intertwined rings C and D were also performed to determine whether or not they would alter the antimicrobial activity of the producing strain. Bioassays revealed that five of 14 mutants studied had improved antimicrobial activity against the indicator strain Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240. MICs against Streptococcus mutans UA159, Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 27336, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Clostridium difficile UK1, and Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240 were determined for three mutacin 1140 variants that had the most significant increases in bioactivity in the M. luteus bioassay. This mutagenesis study of the epidermin group of lanthipeptides shows that antimicrobial activity can be significantly improved.

  18. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling. PMID:26702150

  19. Therapeutic potential of an orally effective small molecule inhibitor of plasminogen activator inhibitor for asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Eldridge, Stephanie; Watanabe, Nobuo; Deshane, Jessy; Kuo, Hui-Chien; Jiang, Chunsun; Wang, Yong; Liu, Gang; Schwiebert, Lisa; Miyata, Toshio; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-02-15

    Asthma is one of the most common respiratory diseases. Although progress has been made in our understanding of airway pathology and many drugs are available to relieve asthma symptoms, there is no cure for chronic asthma. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a primary inhibitor of tissue-type and urokinase-type plasminogen activators, has pleiotropic functions besides suppression of fibrinolysis. In this study, we show that administration of TM5275, an orally effective small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitor, 25 days after ovalbumin (OVA) sensitization-challenge, significantly ameliorated airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced chronic asthma model. Furthermore, we show that TM5275 administration significantly attenuated OVA-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells (neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes), the increase in the levels of OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-5), the production of mucin in the airways, and airway subepithelial fibrosis. Together, the results suggest that the PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 may have therapeutic potential for asthma through suppressing eosinophilic allergic response and ameliorating airway remodeling.

  20. Determinants of the activity of beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations.

    PubMed

    Livermore, D M

    1993-01-01

    Inhibitor combinations provide one strategy to overcome beta-lactamase-mediated resistance. Their success depends, obviously, on the inhibitor being able to bind and inactivate the beta-lactamase molecules. Clavulanate, sulbactam and tazobactam are irreversible inactivators of many beta-lactamases, forming covalent complexes which resist hydrolysis. 'Suicide' kinetics are seen with some, but not all, enzymes. All three compounds inactivate staphylococcal penicillinase, the chromosomal beta-lactamases of Proteus vulgaris and Bacteroides spp., and the Class IV beta-lactamases present in some klebsiellae. Tazobactam, but not the other compounds, has moderate activity against some Class I (AmpC) chromosomal beta-lactamases, notably that of Morganella morganii, but not that of Enterobacter cloacae. Both clavulanate and tazobactam are strong inhibitors of the widely distributed TEM and SHV plasmid-mediated beta-lactamases; sulbactam is a weaker inhibitor. Other factors, aside from the affinity of the inhibitor for the enzyme, co-determine the success or failure of inhibition. Potentiation is most readily achieved if little enzyme is produced, and if the organism is very permeable to the inhibitor. Thus, resistance to inhibitor combinations is rare in strains of Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria gonorrhoeae that produce TEM-beta-lactamase, but is commoner in enterobacteria that produce this enzyme, since these are less permeable and sometimes manufacture very large amounts of enzyme. The partner beta-lactam agent is also important. Irrespective of the inhibitor used, piperacillin is easier to protect against TEM beta-lactamases and the M. morganii Class I enzyme than are ampicillin, amoxycillin or ticarcillin. This may relate to the lower affinity of piperacillin for these enzymes, or to its greater affinity for the bacterial penicillin-binding proteins. Finally, pH can affect the degree of inhibition achieved with sulphones for some beta-lactamases, notably TEM-1

  1. Structure–Activity Relationships of a Novel Capsid Targeted Inhibitor of HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Despite the considerable successes of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of HIV/AIDS, cumulative drug toxicities and the development of multidrug-resistant virus necessitate the search for new classes of antiretroviral agents with novel modes of action. The HIV-1 capsid (CA) protein has been structurally and functionally characterized as a druggable target. We have recently designed a novel small molecule inhibitor I-XW-053 using the hybrid structure based method to block the interface between CA N-terminal domains (NTD–NTD interface) with micromolar affinity. In an effort to optimize and improve the efficacy of I-XW-053, we have developed the structure activity relationship of I-XW-053 compound series using ligand efficiency methods. Fifty-six analogues of I-XW-053 were designed that could be subclassified into four different core domains based on their ligand efficiency values computed as the ratio of binding efficiency (BEI) and surface efficiency (SEI) indices. Compound 34 belonging to subcore-3 showed an 11-fold improvement over I-XW-053 in blocking HIV-1 replication in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Surface plasmon resonance experiments confirmed the binding of compound 34 to purified HIV-1 CA protein. Molecular docking studies on compound 34 and I-XW-053 to HIV-1 CA protein suggested that they both bind to NTD–NTD interface region but with different binding modes, which was further validated using site-directed mutagenesis studies. PMID:25302989

  2. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  3. Catalytic efficiency of expressed aromatase following site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kadohama, N; Zhou, D; Chen, S; Osawa, Y

    1993-05-13

    Mutant aromatase cytochrome P-450s, expressed in CHO cells after transfection with cDNAs, have been characterized in terms of their catalytic efficiencies. After solubilization from microsomes, specific aromatase P-450 content of wild-type and mutants Pro308Phe, Asp309Asn, Asp309Ala and Phe406Arg was quantitated by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Microsomal aromatase activity was determined by the 3H-water method using [1 beta-3H]androstenedione as substrate. Estimations of the actual turnover rate (catalytic efficiency) were derived from the combined data. The P-450 content in the mutants varied but was always less than that in the wild type. Hence, the decreases in the Vmax observed in the mutant enzymes did not correlate completely with reductions in catalytic effectiveness. In recent studies on the structure-function relationship of aromatase cytochrome P-450, the observed reduction of enzyme activity in terms of Vmax following site-directed mutagenesis led to the assumption that there was a corresponding loss of catalytic effectiveness. The present study reveals that a lower P-450 content can contribute significantly to decreasing catalytic activity in the mutants. In fact, in mutant Phe406Arg which exhibited virtually no catalytically active aromatase, the specific P-450 content was below the detectable level. Because of its location, the result of this latter mutation could be a major structural perturbation of the heme-binding property. Thus, interpretation of losses and reductions in aromatase activity resulting from single amino-acid replacement should take into account changes in the specific content of aromatase cytochrome P-450.

  4. Novel Mps1 Kinase Inhibitors with Potent Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Wengner, Antje M; Siemeister, Gerhard; Koppitz, Marcus; Schulze, Volker; Kosemund, Dirk; Klar, Ulrich; Stoeckigt, Detlef; Neuhaus, Roland; Lienau, Philip; Bader, Benjamin; Prechtl, Stefan; Raschke, Marian; Frisk, Anna-Lena; von Ahsen, Oliver; Michels, Martin; Kreft, Bertolt; von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Mumberg, Dominik; Ziegelbauer, Karl

    2016-04-01

    Monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) has been shown to function as the key kinase that activates the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) to secure proper distribution of chromosomes to daughter cells. Here, we report the structure and functional characterization of two novel selective Mps1 inhibitors, BAY 1161909 and BAY 1217389, derived from structurally distinct chemical classes. BAY 1161909 and BAY 1217389 inhibited Mps1 kinase activity with IC50 values below 10 nmol/L while showing an excellent selectivity profile. In cellular mechanistic assays, both Mps1 inhibitors abrogated nocodazole-induced SAC activity and induced premature exit from mitosis ("mitotic breakthrough"), resulting in multinuclearity and tumor cell death. Both compounds efficiently inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro (IC50 nmol/L range). In vivo, BAY 1161909 and BAY 1217389 achieved moderate efficacy in monotherapy in tumor xenograft studies. However, in line with its unique mode of action, when combined with paclitaxel, low doses of Mps1 inhibitor reduced paclitaxel-induced mitotic arrest by the weakening of SAC activity. As a result, combination therapy strongly improved efficacy over paclitaxel or Mps1 inhibitor monotreatment at the respective MTDs in a broad range of xenograft models, including those showing acquired or intrinsic paclitaxel resistance. Both Mps1 inhibitors showed good tolerability without adding toxicity to paclitaxel monotherapy. These preclinical findings validate the innovative concept of SAC abrogation for cancer therapy and justify clinical proof-of-concept studies evaluating the Mps1 inhibitors BAY 1161909 and BAY 1217389 in combination with antimitotic cancer drugs to enhance their efficacy and potentially overcome resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 583-92. ©2016 AACR.

  5. Arginine mimetic structures in biologically active antagonists and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Masic, Lucija Peterlin

    2006-01-01

    Peptidomimetics have found wide application as bioavailable, biostable, and potent mimetics of naturally occurring biologically active peptides. L-Arginine is a guanidino group-containing basic amino acid, which is positively charged at neutral pH and is involved in many important physiological and pathophysiological processes. Many enzymes display a preference for the arginine residue that is found in many natural substrates and in synthetic inhibitors of many trypsin-like serine proteases, e.g. thrombin, factor Xa, factor VIIa, trypsin, and in integrin receptor antagonists, used to treat many blood-coagulation disorders. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by oxidation of L-arginine in an NADPH- and O(2)-dependent process catalyzed by isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), exhibits diverse roles in both normal and pathological physiologies and has been postulated to be a contributor to the etiology of various diseases. Development of NOS inhibitors as well as analogs and mimetics of the natural substrate L-arginine, is desirable for potential therapeutic use and for a better understanding of their conformation when bound in the arginine binding site. The guanidino residue of arginine in many substrates, inhibitors, and antagonists forms strong ionic interactions with the carboxylate of an aspartic acid moiety, which provides specificity for the basic amino acid residue in the active side. However, a highly basic guanidino moiety incorporated in enzyme inhibitors or receptor antagonists is often associated with low selectivity and poor bioavailability after peroral application. Thus, significant effort is focused on the design and preparation of arginine mimetics that can confer selective inhibition for specific trypsin-like serine proteases and NOS inhibitors as well as integrin receptor antagonists and possess reduced basicity for enhanced oral bioavailability. This review will describe the survey of arginine mimetics designed to mimic the function of the

  6. Novel Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Inhibitors Prevent Diabetic Kidney Injury in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hee; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hi Bahl; Miyata, Toshio; Ha, Hunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide, but no effective therapeutic strategy is available. Because plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is increasingly recognized as a key factor in extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in diabetic nephropathy, this study examined the renoprotective effects of TM5275 and TM5441, two novel orally active PAI-1 inhibitors that do not trigger bleeding episodes, in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. TM5275 (50 mg/kg) and TM5441 (10 mg/kg) were administered orally for 16 weeks to STZ-induced diabetic and age-matched control mice. Relative to the control mice, the diabetic mice showed significantly increased (p < 0.05) plasma glucose and creatinine levels, urinary albumin excretion, kidney-to-bodyweight ratios, glomerular volume, and fractional mesangial area. Markers of fibrosis and inflammation along with PAI-1 were also upregulated in the kidney of diabetic mice, and treatment with TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited albuminuria, mesangial expansion, ECM accumulation, and macrophage infiltration in diabetic kidneys. Furthermore, in mouse proximal tubular epithelial (mProx24) cells, both TM5275 and TM5441 effectively inhibited PAI-1-induced mRNA expression of fibrosis and inflammation markers and also reversed PAI-1-induced inhibition of plasmin activity, which confirmed the efficacy of the TM compounds as PAI-1 inhibitors. These data suggest that TM compounds could be used to prevent diabetic kidney injury. PMID:27258009

  7. Unraveling the Pivotal Role of Bradykinin in ACE Inhibitor Activity.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Stefano; Bortolotto, L

    2016-10-01

    Historically, the first described effect of an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor was an increased activity of bradykinin, one of the substrates of ACE. However, in the subsequent years, molecular models describing the mechanism of action of ACE inhibitors in decreasing blood pressure and cardiovascular risk have focused mostly on the renin-angiotensin system. Nonetheless, over the last 20 years, the importance of bradykinin in regulating vasodilation, natriuresis, oxidative stress, fibrinolysis, inflammation, and apoptosis has become clearer. The affinity of ACE appears to be higher for bradykinin than for angiotensin I, thereby suggesting that ACE inhibitors may be more effective inhibitors of bradykinin degradation than of angiotensin II production. Data describing the effect of ACE inhibition on bradykinin signaling support the hypothesis that the most cardioprotective benefits attributed to ACE inhibition may be due to increased bradykinin signaling rather than to decreased angiotensin II signaling, especially when high dosages of ACE inhibitors are considered. In particular, modulation of bradykinin in the endothelium appears to be a major target of ACE inhibition. These new mechanistic concepts may lead to further development of strategies enhancing the bradykinin signaling. PMID:27260014

  8. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-05-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ.

  9. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ. PMID:25944708

  10. Protein engineering: single or multiple site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Pei-Chung; Vaisvila, Romualdas

    2013-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis techniques are invaluable tools in molecular biology to study the structural and functional properties of a protein. To expedite the time required and simplify methods for mutagenesis, we recommend two protocols in this chapter. The first method for single site-directed mutagenesis, which includes point mutations, insertions, or deletions, can be achieved by an inverse PCR strategy with mutagenic primers and the high-fidelity Phusion(®) DNA Polymerase to introduce a site-directed mutation with exceptional efficiency. The second method is for engineering multiple mutations into a gene of interest. This can be completed in one step by PCR with mutagenic primers and by assembling all mutagenized PCR products using the Gibson Assembly™ Master Mix. This method allows multiple nucleotides to be changed simultaneously, which not only saves time but also reagents compared to traditional methods of mutagenesis. PMID:23423897

  11. Characterization of NO adducts of the diiron center in protein R2 of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase and site-directed variants; implications for the O2 activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shen; Libby, Eduardo; Saleh, Lana; Xing, Gang; Bollinger, J Martin; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre

    2004-10-01

    The R2 subunit of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase contains a diiron site that reacts with O(2) to produce a tyrosine radical (Y122.). In wild-type R2 (R2-wt), the first observable reaction intermediate is a high-valent [Fe(III)-Fe(IV)] state called compound X, but in related diiron proteins such as methane monooxygenase, Delta(9)-desaturase, and ferritin, peroxodiiron(III) complexes have been characterized. Substitution of iron ligand D84 by E within the active site of R2 allows an intermediate (mu-1,2-peroxo)diiron species to accumulate. To investigate the possible involvement of a bridging peroxo species within the O(2) activation sequence of R2-wt, we have characterized the iron-nitrosyl species that form at the diiron sites in R2-wt, R2-D84E, and R2-W48F/D84E by using vibrational spectroscopy. Previous work has shown that the diiron center in R2-wt binds one NO per iron to form an antiferromagnetically coupled [(FeNO)(7)](2) center. In the wt and variant proteins, we also observe that both irons bind one NO to form a (FeNO)(7) dimer where both Fe-N-O units share a common vibrational signature. In the wt protein, nu(Fe-NO), delta(Fe-N-O), and nu(N-O) bands are observed at 445, 434 and 1742 cm(-1), respectively, while in the variant proteins the nu(Fe-NO) and delta(Fe-N-O) bands are observed approximately 10 cm(-1) higher and the nu(N-O) approximately 10 cm(-1) lower at 1735 cm(-1). These results demonstrate that all three proteins accommodate fully symmetric [(FeNO)(7)](2) species with two identical Fe-N-O units. The formation of equivalent NO adducts in the wt and variant proteins strongly favors the formation of a symmetric bridging peroxo intermediate during the O(2) activation process in R2-wt.

  12. Parathyroid hormone is not an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Arnadottir, M; Nilsson-Ehle, P

    1994-01-01

    The reduced lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities in uraemia are reflected by increased serum triglyceride concentrations and reduced HDL cholesterol concentrations. Both hyperparathyroidism and circulating inhibitor(s) of LPL have been associated with the disturbances of lipid metabolism in uraemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if parathyroid hormone (PTH) had an inhibitory effect on LPL activity. Plasma post-heparin LPL activities, plasma LPL inhibitory activities, serum PTHintact and serum PTHC-terminal concentrations were analysed in 20 patients on haemodialysis and 20 healthy controls. The effects of purified, human PTHintact and a carboxyterminal fragment of PTH (PTH39-84) on LPL activities in post-heparin plasma from healthy individuals and on the enzyme activity of purified, bovine milk LPL, activated with apolipoprotein CII, were studied. Patients had significantly higher plasma LPL inhibitory activities than controls, but there was no correlation between plasma LPL inhibitory activities and serum PTH concentrations. Neither PTHintact nor PTH39-84 had a significant effect on LPL activities in vitro. Thus there was no evidence of a direct inhibition of LPL activity by PTH under the present in-vivo or in-vitro conditions.

  13. Parathyroid hormone is not an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase activity.

    PubMed

    Arnadottir, M; Nilsson-Ehle, P

    1994-01-01

    The reduced lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activities in uraemia are reflected by increased serum triglyceride concentrations and reduced HDL cholesterol concentrations. Both hyperparathyroidism and circulating inhibitor(s) of LPL have been associated with the disturbances of lipid metabolism in uraemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if parathyroid hormone (PTH) had an inhibitory effect on LPL activity. Plasma post-heparin LPL activities, plasma LPL inhibitory activities, serum PTHintact and serum PTHC-terminal concentrations were analysed in 20 patients on haemodialysis and 20 healthy controls. The effects of purified, human PTHintact and a carboxyterminal fragment of PTH (PTH39-84) on LPL activities in post-heparin plasma from healthy individuals and on the enzyme activity of purified, bovine milk LPL, activated with apolipoprotein CII, were studied. Patients had significantly higher plasma LPL inhibitory activities than controls, but there was no correlation between plasma LPL inhibitory activities and serum PTH concentrations. Neither PTHintact nor PTH39-84 had a significant effect on LPL activities in vitro. Thus there was no evidence of a direct inhibition of LPL activity by PTH under the present in-vivo or in-vitro conditions. PMID:7870347

  14. Activator-inhibitor systems on heterogeneous ecological networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, C.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; Juanes, R.

    2012-12-01

    The consideration of activator-inhibitor systems as complex networks has broadened our knowledge of non-equilibrium reaction-diffusion processes in heterogeneous systems. For example, the Turing mechanism represents a classical model for the formation of self-organized spatial structures in non-equilibrium activator-inhibitor systems. The study of Turing patterns in networks with heterogeneous connectivity has revealed that, contrary to other models and systems, the segregation process takes place mainly in vertices of low degree. In this paper, we study the formation of vegetation patterns in semiarid ecosystems from the perspective of a heterogeneous interacting ecological network. The structure of ecological networks yields fundamental insight into the ecosystem self-organization. Using simple rules for the short-range activation and global inhibition, we reconstruct the observed power-law distribution of vegetation patch size that has been observed in semiarid ecosystems like the Kalahari transect.

  15. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    PubMed

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. PMID:25462990

  16. Active site directed irreversible inactivation of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase by the conjugated substrate analogue (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid: development of a suicide substrate.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Jordan, F

    1983-08-01

    (E)-4-(4-Chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid (CPB) was found to irreversibly inactivate brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC, EC 4.1.1.1) in a biphasic, sigmoidal manner, as is found for the kinetic behavior of substrate. An expression was derived for two-site irreversible inhibition of allosteric enzymes, and the kinetic behavior of CPB fit the expression for two-site binding. The calculated Ki's of 0.7 mM and 0.3 mM for CPB were assigned to the catalytic site and the regulatory site, respectively. The presence of pyruvic acid at high concentrations protected PDC from inactivation, whereas low concentrations of pyruvic acid accelerated inactivation by CPB. Pyruvamide, a known allosteric activator of PDC, was found to enhance inactivation by CPB. The results can be explained if pyruvamide binds only to a regulatory site, but CPB and pyruvic acid compete for both the regulatory and the catalytic centers. [1-14C]CPB was found to lose 14CO2 concurrently with the inactivation of the enzyme. Therefore, CPB was being turned over by PDC, in addition to inactivating it. CPB can be labeled a suicide-type inactivator for PDC.

  17. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  18. Characterization of novel MPS1 inhibitors with preclinical anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Jemaà, M; Galluzzi, L; Kepp, O; Senovilla, L; Brands, M; Boemer, U; Koppitz, M; Lienau, P; Prechtl, S; Schulze, V; Siemeister, G; Wengner, A M; Mumberg, D; Ziegelbauer, K; Abrieu, A; Castedo, M; Vitale, I; Kroemer, G

    2013-01-01

    Monopolar spindle 1 (MPS1), a mitotic kinase that is overexpressed in several human cancers, contributes to the alignment of chromosomes to the metaphase plate as well as to the execution of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of three novel inhibitors of MPS1 of two independent structural classes, N-(4-{2-[(2-cyanophenyl)amino][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-6-yl}phenyl)-2-phenylacetamide (Mps-BAY1) (a triazolopyridine), N-cyclopropyl-4-{8-[(2-methylpropyl)amino]-6-(quinolin-5-yl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin-3-yl}benzamide (Mps-BAY2a) and N-cyclopropyl-4-{8-(isobutylamino)imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin-3-yl}benzamide (Mps-BAY2b) (two imidazopyrazines). By selectively inactivating MPS1, these small inhibitors can arrest the proliferation of cancer cells, causing their polyploidization and/or their demise. Cancer cells treated with Mps-BAY1 or Mps-BAY2a manifested multiple signs of mitotic perturbation including inefficient chromosomal congression during metaphase, unscheduled SAC inactivation and severe anaphase defects. Videomicroscopic cell fate profiling of histone 2B-green fluorescent protein-expressing cells revealed the capacity of MPS1 inhibitors to subvert the correct timing of mitosis as they induce a premature anaphase entry in the context of misaligned metaphase plates. Hence, in the presence of MPS1 inhibitors, cells either divided in a bipolar (but often asymmetric) manner or entered one or more rounds of abortive mitoses, generating gross aneuploidy and polyploidy, respectively. In both cases, cells ultimately succumbed to the mitotic catastrophe-induced activation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Of note, low doses of MPS1 inhibitors and paclitaxel (a microtubular poison) synergized at increasing the frequency of chromosome misalignments and missegregations in the context of SAC inactivation. This resulted in massive polyploidization followed by the activation of mitotic catastrophe. A

  19. Characterization of novel MPS1 inhibitors with preclinical anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Jemaà, M; Galluzzi, L; Kepp, O; Senovilla, L; Brands, M; Boemer, U; Koppitz, M; Lienau, P; Prechtl, S; Schulze, V; Siemeister, G; Wengner, A M; Mumberg, D; Ziegelbauer, K; Abrieu, A; Castedo, M; Vitale, I; Kroemer, G

    2013-11-01

    Monopolar spindle 1 (MPS1), a mitotic kinase that is overexpressed in several human cancers, contributes to the alignment of chromosomes to the metaphase plate as well as to the execution of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Here, we report the identification and functional characterization of three novel inhibitors of MPS1 of two independent structural classes, N-(4-{2-[(2-cyanophenyl)amino][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyridin-6-yl}phenyl)-2-phenylacetamide (Mps-BAY1) (a triazolopyridine), N-cyclopropyl-4-{8-[(2-methylpropyl)amino]-6-(quinolin-5-yl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin-3-yl}benzamide (Mps-BAY2a) and N-cyclopropyl-4-{8-(isobutylamino)imidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin-3-yl}benzamide (Mps-BAY2b) (two imidazopyrazines). By selectively inactivating MPS1, these small inhibitors can arrest the proliferation of cancer cells, causing their polyploidization and/or their demise. Cancer cells treated with Mps-BAY1 or Mps-BAY2a manifested multiple signs of mitotic perturbation including inefficient chromosomal congression during metaphase, unscheduled SAC inactivation and severe anaphase defects. Videomicroscopic cell fate profiling of histone 2B-green fluorescent protein-expressing cells revealed the capacity of MPS1 inhibitors to subvert the correct timing of mitosis as they induce a premature anaphase entry in the context of misaligned metaphase plates. Hence, in the presence of MPS1 inhibitors, cells either divided in a bipolar (but often asymmetric) manner or entered one or more rounds of abortive mitoses, generating gross aneuploidy and polyploidy, respectively. In both cases, cells ultimately succumbed to the mitotic catastrophe-induced activation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Of note, low doses of MPS1 inhibitors and paclitaxel (a microtubular poison) synergized at increasing the frequency of chromosome misalignments and missegregations in the context of SAC inactivation. This resulted in massive polyploidization followed by the activation of mitotic catastrophe. A

  20. Inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Community Counts Blood Safety Inhibitors Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Videos Starting the Conversation Playing it Safe A Look at Hemophilia Joint Range of Motion My Story Links to Other Websites ...

  1. Novel cinnoline-based inhibitors of LRRK2 kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Albert W; Adler, Marc; Aubele, Danielle L; Bowers, Simeon; Franzini, Maurizio; Goldbach, Erich; Lorentzen, Colin; Neitz, R Jeffrey; Probst, Gary D; Quinn, Kevin P; Santiago, Pam; Sham, Hing L; Tam, Danny; Truong, Anh P; Ye, Xiaocong M; Ren, Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity is a therapeutic approach that may lead to new treatments for PD. Herein we report the discovery of a series of cinnoline-3-carboxamides that are potent against both wild-type and mutant LRRK2 kinase activity in biochemical assays. These compounds are also shown to be potent inhibitors in a cellular assay and to have good to excellent CNS penetration. PMID:23219325

  2. Pyrrolopyridine inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK-2).

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Vernier, William F; Mahoney, Matthew W; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Schindler, John F; Reitz, David B; Mourey, Robert J

    2007-05-31

    A new class of potent kinase inhibitors selective for mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-K2 or MK-2) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been prepared and evaluated. These inhibitors have IC50 values as low as 10 nM against the target and have good selectivity profiles against a number of kinases including CDK2, ERK, JNK, and p38. These MK-2 inhibitors have been shown to suppress TNFalpha production in U397 cells and to be efficacious in an acute inflammation model. The structure-activity relationships of this series, the selectivity for MK-2 and their activity in both in vitro and in vivo models are discussed. The observed selectivity is discussed with the aid of an MK-2/inhibitor crystal structure.

  3. Site-Directed Spectroscopic Probes of Actomyosin Structural Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, David D.; Kast, David; Korman, Vicci L.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopy of myosin and actin has entered a golden age. High-resolution crystal structures of isolated actin and myosin have been used to construct detailed models for the dynamic actomyosin interactions that move muscle. Improved protein mutagenesis and expression technologies have facilitated site-directed labeling with fluorescent and spin probes. Spectroscopic instrumentation has achieved impressive advances in sensitivity and resolution. Here we highlight the contributions of site-directed spectroscopic probes to understanding the structural dynamics of myosin II and its actin complexes in solution and muscle fibers. We emphasize studies that probe directly the movements of structural elements within the myosin catalytic and light-chain domains, and changes in the dynamics of both actin and myosin due to their alternating strong and weak interactions in the ATPase cycle. A moving picture emerges in which single biochemical states produce multiple structural states, and transitions between states of order and dynamic disorder power the actomyosin engine. PMID:19416073

  4. Methylene bisphosphonates as the inhibitors of HIV RT phosphorolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yanvarev, D V; Korovina, A N; Usanov, N N; Khomich, O A; Vepsäläinen, J; Puljula, E; Kukhanova, M K; Kochetkov, S N

    2016-08-01

    The structure-function analysis of 36 methylenebisphosphonates (BPs) as inhibitors of the phosphorolytic activity of native and drug-resistant forms of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) was performed. It was shown that with the increase of the inhibitory potential of BPs towards the phosphorolytic activity raises their ability to inhibit the RT-catalyzed DNA elongation. Herein, we report the impact of the thymidine analog mutations (TAM) on the activity of bisphosphonates, as well as some structural features of the BPs, allowing them to maintain the inhibitory activity on the enzyme resistant to nucleoside analog therapy. We estimated the Mg(2+)-coordinating group structure, the linker and the aromatic pharmacophore influence on the inhibitory potential of the BPs. Based on the 31 BPs SAR, several BPs with improved inhibitory properties were designed and synthesized. PMID:27230835

  5. Methylene bisphosphonates as the inhibitors of HIV RT phosphorolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yanvarev, D V; Korovina, A N; Usanov, N N; Khomich, O A; Vepsäläinen, J; Puljula, E; Kukhanova, M K; Kochetkov, S N

    2016-08-01

    The structure-function analysis of 36 methylenebisphosphonates (BPs) as inhibitors of the phosphorolytic activity of native and drug-resistant forms of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) was performed. It was shown that with the increase of the inhibitory potential of BPs towards the phosphorolytic activity raises their ability to inhibit the RT-catalyzed DNA elongation. Herein, we report the impact of the thymidine analog mutations (TAM) on the activity of bisphosphonates, as well as some structural features of the BPs, allowing them to maintain the inhibitory activity on the enzyme resistant to nucleoside analog therapy. We estimated the Mg(2+)-coordinating group structure, the linker and the aromatic pharmacophore influence on the inhibitory potential of the BPs. Based on the 31 BPs SAR, several BPs with improved inhibitory properties were designed and synthesized.

  6. Formation of Tankyrase Inhibitor-Induced Degradasomes Requires Proteasome Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Nina Marie; Thorvaldsen, Tor Espen; Schultz, Sebastian Wolfgang; Wenzel, Eva Maria; Stenmark, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In canonical Wnt signaling, the protein levels of the key signaling mediator β-catenin are under tight regulation by the multimeric destruction complex that mediates proteasomal degradation of β-catenin. In colorectal cancer, destruction complex activity is often compromised due to mutations in the multifunctional scaffolding protein Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC), leading to a stabilization of β-catenin. Recently, tankyrase inhibitors (TNKSi), a novel class of small molecule inhibitors, were shown to re-establish a functional destruction complex in APC-mutant cancer cell lines by stabilizing AXIN1/2, whose protein levels are usually kept low via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by the tankyrase enzymes (TNKS1/2). Surprisingly, we found that for the formation of the morphological correlates of destruction complexes, called degradasomes, functional proteasomes are required. In addition we found that AXIN2 is strongly upregulated after 6 h of TNKS inhibition. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 counteracted TNKSi-induced degradasome formation and AXIN2 stabilization, and this was accompanied by reduced transcription of AXIN2. Mechanistically we could implicate the transcription factor FoxM1 in this process, which was recently shown to be a transcriptional activator of AXIN2. We observed a substantial reduction in TNKSi-induced stabilization of AXIN2 after siRNA-mediated depletion of FoxM1 and found that proteasome inhibition reduced the active (phosphorylated) fraction of FoxM1. This can explain the decreased protein levels of AXIN2 after MG132 treatment. Our findings have implications for the design of in vitro studies on the destruction complex and for clinical applications of TNKSi. PMID:27482906

  7. Lumican: a new inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-14 activity.

    PubMed

    Pietraszek, Katarzyna; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Brézillon, Stéphane; Perreau, Corinne; Jakubiak-Augustyn, Anna; Krotkiewski, Hubert; Maquart, François-Xavier; Wegrowski, Yanusz

    2014-11-28

    We previously showed that lumican regulates MMP-14 expression. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of lumican and decorin on MMP-14 activity. In contrast to decorin, the glycosylated form of lumican was able to significantly decrease MMP-14 activity in B16F1 melanoma cells. Our results suggest that a direct interaction occurs between lumican and MMP-14. Lumican behaves as a competitive inhibitor which leads to a complete blocking of the activity of MMP-14. It binds to the catalytic domain of MMP-14 with moderate affinity (KD∼275 nM). Lumican may protect collagen against MMP-14 proteolysis, thus influencing cell-matrix interaction in tumor progression. PMID:25304424

  8. Technological advances in site-directed spin labeling of proteins.

    PubMed

    Hubbell, Wayne L; López, Carlos J; Altenbach, Christian; Yang, Zhongyu

    2013-10-01

    Molecular flexibility over a wide time range is of central importance to the function of many proteins, both soluble and membrane. Revealing the modes of flexibility, their amplitudes, and time scales under physiological conditions is the challenge for spectroscopic methods, one of which is site-directed spin labeling EPR (SDSL-EPR). Here we provide an overview of some recent technological advances in SDSL-EPR related to investigation of structure, structural heterogeneity, and dynamics of proteins. These include new classes of spin labels, advances in measurement of long range distances and distance distributions, methods for identifying backbone and conformational fluctuations, and new strategies for determining the kinetics of protein motion.

  9. Chronic monoamine oxidase-B inhibitor treatment blocks monoamine oxidase-A enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bartl, Jasmin; Müller, Thomas; Grünblatt, Edna; Gerlach, Manfred; Riederer, Peter

    2014-04-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease receive selective irreversible monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B inhibitors, but their effects on MAO-A activity are not known during long-term application. We determined MAO-A inhibition in plasma samples from patients with MAO-B inhibitor intake or without MAO-B inhibitor treatment and from healthy controls. We detected a 70 % reduction of MAO-A activity in patients with MAO-B inhibitor therapy in comparison to the other groups. Our results suggest that treatment with MAO-B inhibitor may also influence MAO-A activity in vivo, when administered daily.

  10. Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate and its triterpenoid analogs

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Latanya M.; Chen, Liwei; Daniel, Kenyon G.; Brooks, Wesley H.; Guida, Wayne C.; Lawrence, Harshani R.; Sebti, Said M.; Lawrence, Nicholas J.; Wu, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Shp2 protein tyrosine phosphate (PTP) is a novel target for anticancer drug discovery. We identified estramustine phosphate as a Shp2 PTP inhibitor from the National Cancer Institute Approved Oncology Drug set. A focused structure-activity relationship study indicated that the 17- phosphate group is required for the Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity of estramustine phosphate. A search for estramustine phosphate analogs led to identification of two triperpenoids, enoxolone and celastrol, having Shp2 PTP inhibitor activity. With the previously reported PTP1B inhibitor trodusquemine, our study reveals steroids and triterpenoids with negatively charged phosphate, carboxylate, or sulfonate groups as novel pharmacophores of selective PTP inhibitors. PMID:21193311

  11. Identification of Novel Plasmodium falciparum Hexokinase Inhibitors with Antiparasitic Activity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mindy I; Patrick, Stephen L; Blanding, Walker M; Dwivedi, Varun; Suryadi, Jimmy; Golden, Jennifer E; Coussens, Nathan P; Lee, Olivia W; Shen, Min; Boxer, Matthew B; Hall, Matthew D; Sharlow, Elizabeth R; Drew, Mark E; Morris, James C

    2016-10-01

    Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest species of malaria parasites, is dependent on glycolysis for the generation of ATP during the pathogenic red blood cell stage. Hexokinase (HK) catalyzes the first step in glycolysis, transferring the γ-phosphoryl group of ATP to glucose to yield glucose-6-phosphate. Here, we describe the validation of a high-throughput assay for screening small-molecule collections to identify inhibitors of the P. falciparum HK (PfHK). The assay, which employed an ADP-Glo reporter system in a 1,536-well-plate format, was robust with a signal-to-background ratio of 3.4 ± 1.2, a coefficient of variation of 6.8% ± 2.9%, and a Z'-factor of 0.75 ± 0.08. Using this assay, we screened 57,654 molecules from multiple small-molecule collections. Confirmed hits were resolved into four clusters on the basis of structural relatedness. Multiple singleton hits were also identified. The most potent inhibitors had 50% inhibitory concentrations as low as ∼1 μM, and several were found to have low-micromolar 50% effective concentrations against asexual intraerythrocytic-stage P. falciparum parasites. These molecules additionally demonstrated limited toxicity against a panel of mammalian cells. The identification of PfHK inhibitors with antiparasitic activity using this validated screening assay is encouraging, as it justifies additional HTS campaigns with more structurally amenable libraries for the identification of potential leads for future therapeutic development. PMID:27458230

  12. Identification by site-directed mutagenesis of three essential histidine residues in membrane dipeptidase, a novel mammalian zinc peptidase.

    PubMed

    Keynan, S; Hooper, N M; Turner, A J

    1997-08-15

    Membrane dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19) is a plasma membrane zinc peptidase that is involved in the renal metabolism of glutathione and its conjugates, such as leukotriene D4. The enzyme lacks the classical signatures of other zinc-dependent hydrolases and shows no homology with any other mammalian protein. We have used site-directed mutagenesis to explore the roles of five histidine residues in pig membrane dipeptidase that are conserved among mammalian species. When expressed in COS-1 cells, the mutants H49K and H128L exhibited a specific activity and Km for the substrate Gly-D-Phe comparable with those of the wild-type enzyme. However, the mutants H20L, H152L and H198K were inactive, but were expressed at the cell surface at equivalent levels to the wild-type, as assessed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. These three mutants were compared with regard to their ability to bind to the competitive inhibitor cilastatin, which binds with equal efficacy to native and EDTA-treated pig kidney membrane dipeptidase. Expressed wild-type enzyme and mutants H20L and H198K were efficiently bound by cilastatin-Sepharose, but H152L failed to bind. Thus His-152 appears to be involved in the binding of substrate or inhibitor, whereas His-20 and His-198 appear to be involved in catalysis. Membrane dipeptidase shares some similarity with a dipeptidase recently cloned from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. In particular, His-20 and His-198 of membrane dipeptidase are conserved in the bacterial enzyme, as are Glu-125 and His-219, previously shown to be required for catalytic activity.

  13. Extravascular fibrin, plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitors, and airway hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Wagers, Scott S.; Norton, Ryan J.; Rinaldi, Lisa M.; Bates, Jason H.T.; Sobel, Burton E.; Irvin, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying airway hyperresponsiveness are not yet fully elucidated. One of the manifestations of airway inflammation is leakage of diverse plasma proteins into the airway lumen. They include fibrinogen and thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinogen to form fibrin, a major component of thrombi. Fibrin inactivates surfactant. Surfactant on the airway surface maintains airway patency by lowering surface tension. In this study, immunohistochemically detected fibrin was seen along the luminal surface of distal airways in a patient who died of status asthmaticus and in mice with induced allergic airway inflammation. In addition, we observed altered airway fibrinolytic system protein balance consistent with promotion of fibrin deposition in mice with allergic airway inflammation. The airways of mice were exposed to aerosolized fibrinogen, thrombin, or to fibrinogen followed by thrombin. Only fibrinogen followed by thrombin resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness compared with controls. An aerosolized fibrinolytic agent, tissue-type plasminogen activator, significantly diminished airway hyperresponsiveness in mice with allergic airway inflammation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of fibrinogen and thrombin and their accumulation on the airway surface can contribute to the pathogenesis of airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:15232617

  14. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  15. Regulatory elements involved in constitutive and phorbol ester-inducible expression of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, E; Medcalf, R L; Bergonzelli, G E; Kruithof, E K

    1991-01-01

    Gene transcription rates and mRNA levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) are markedly induced by the tumor promoting agent phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. To identify promoter elements required for basal-, and phorbol ester-inducible expression, deletion mutants of the PAI-1 promoter fused to the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter gene, were transiently expressed in HT1080 cells. Constitutive CAT activity was expressed from constructs containing more than 215 bp of promoter sequence, whereas deletion to position -91 bp abolished CAT gene expression. Treatment of transfected cells with PMA resulted in a three- to ten-fold increase in CAT expression from all constructs except from the construct shortened to position -91. DNAse1 protection analysis of the promoter region between -215 and the transcription initiation site revealed numerous protected regions, including two AP1-like binding sites (AP1a and AP1b) and one CRE-like element. Site-directed mutagenesis of the AP1a site or of the CRE-like site resulted in the loss of basal CAT activity and abolished the PMA effect, whereas mutagenesis of AP1b only partially inhibited basal and PMA-mediated expression. Our results suggest that the PAI-2 promoter contains at least two elements required for basal gene transcription and PMA-mediated induction. Images PMID:1650454

  16. Potentiation of C1 inhibitor by glycosaminoglycans: dextran sulfate species are effective inhibitors of in vitro complement activation in plasma.

    PubMed

    Wuillemin, W A; te Velthuis, H; Lubbers, Y T; de Ruig, C P; Eldering, E; Hack, C E

    1997-08-15

    Activation of the complement system may contribute to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Hence, an effective inhibitor of complement might be useful to reduce tissue damage. Some glycosaminoglycans (GAG), such as heparin, are known to inhibit the interaction of C1q with activators and the assembly of the classical and the alternative pathway C3 convertases. Furthermore, they may potentiate C1 inhibitor-mediated inactivation of C1s. To search for potential complement inhibitors, we systematically investigated the complement inhibitory properties of various synthetic and naturally occurring GAG (dextran sulfates 500,000 and 5,000, heparin, N-acetylheparin, heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and chondroitin sulfates A and C). First, we assessed the effect of GAG on the second-order rate constant of the inactivation of C1s by C1 inhibitor. This rate constant increased 6- to 130-fold in the presence of the GAG, dextran sulfate being the most effective. Second, all tested GAG were found to reduce deposition of C4 and C3 on immobilized aggregated human IgG (AHG) and to reduce fluid phase formation of C4b/c and C3b/c in recalcified plasma upon incubation with AHG. Dextran sulfate again was found to be most effective. We conclude that GAG modulate complement activation in vitro and that the low molecular weight dextran sulfate (m.w. 5000) may be a candidate for pharmacologic manipulation of complement activation via potentiation of C1 inhibitor.

  17. Carbohydrate scaffolds as glycosyltransferase inhibitors with in vivo antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Zuegg, Johannes; Muldoon, Craig; Adamson, George; McKeveney, Declan; Le Thanh, Giang; Premraj, Rajaratnam; Becker, Bernd; Cheng, Mu; Elliott, Alysha G; Huang, Johnny X; Butler, Mark S; Bajaj, Megha; Seifert, Joachim; Singh, Latika; Galley, Nicola F; Roper, David I; Lloyd, Adrian J; Dowson, Christopher G; Cheng, Ting-Jen; Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Demon, Dieter; Meyer, Evelyne; Meutermans, Wim; Cooper, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of multi-drug-resistant bacteria is a global healthcare crisis, and new antibiotics are urgently required, especially those with modes of action that have low-resistance potential. One promising lead is the liposaccharide antibiotic moenomycin that inhibits bacterial glycosyltransferases, which are essential for peptidoglycan polymerization, while displaying a low rate of resistance. Unfortunately, the lipophilicity of moenomycin leads to unfavourable pharmacokinetic properties that render it unsuitable for systemic administration. In this study, we show that using moenomycin and other glycosyltransferase inhibitors as templates, we were able to synthesize compound libraries based on novel pyranose scaffold chemistry, with moenomycin-like activity, but with improved drug-like properties. The novel compounds exhibit in vitro inhibition comparable to moenomycin, with low toxicity and good efficacy in several in vivo models of infection. This approach based on non-planar carbohydrate scaffolds provides a new opportunity to develop new antibiotics with low propensity for resistance induction. PMID:26194781

  18. Carbohydrate scaffolds as glycosyltransferase inhibitors with in vivo antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Zuegg, Johannes; Muldoon, Craig; Adamson, George; McKeveney, Declan; Le Thanh, Giang; Premraj, Rajaratnam; Becker, Bernd; Cheng, Mu; Elliott, Alysha G.; Huang, Johnny X.; Butler, Mark S.; Bajaj, Megha; Seifert, Joachim; Singh, Latika; Galley, Nicola F.; Roper, David I.; Lloyd, Adrian J.; Dowson, Christopher G.; Cheng, Ting-Jen; Cheng, Wei-Chieh; Demon, Dieter; Meyer, Evelyne; Meutermans, Wim; Cooper, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of multi-drug-resistant bacteria is a global healthcare crisis, and new antibiotics are urgently required, especially those with modes of action that have low-resistance potential. One promising lead is the liposaccharide antibiotic moenomycin that inhibits bacterial glycosyltransferases, which are essential for peptidoglycan polymerization, while displaying a low rate of resistance. Unfortunately, the lipophilicity of moenomycin leads to unfavourable pharmacokinetic properties that render it unsuitable for systemic administration. In this study, we show that using moenomycin and other glycosyltransferase inhibitors as templates, we were able to synthesize compound libraries based on novel pyranose scaffold chemistry, with moenomycin-like activity, but with improved drug-like properties. The novel compounds exhibit in vitro inhibition comparable to moenomycin, with low toxicity and good efficacy in several in vivo models of infection. This approach based on non-planar carbohydrate scaffolds provides a new opportunity to develop new antibiotics with low propensity for resistance induction. PMID:26194781

  19. Efficient site-directed saturation mutagenesis using degenerate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Steffens, David L; Williams, John G K

    2007-07-01

    We describe a reliable protocol for constructing single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries consisting of all 20 naturally occurring amino acids at a specific site within a protein. Such libraries are useful for structure-function studies and directed evolution. This protocol extends the utility of Stratagene's QuikChange Site-Directed Mutagenesis Kit, which is primarily recommended for single amino acid substitutions. Two complementary primers are synthesized, containing a degenerate mixture of the four bases at the three positions of the selected codon. These primers are added to starting plasmid template and thermal cycled to produce mutant DNA molecules, which are subsequently transformed into competent bacteria. The protocol does not require purification of mutagenic oligonucleotides or PCR products. This reduces both the cost and turnaround time in high-throughput directed evolution applications. We have utilized this protocol to generate over 200 site-saturation libraries in a DNA polymerase, with a success rate of greater than 95%. PMID:17595310

  20. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides abrogate mesangial fibronectin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Jehyun; Seo, Ji Yeon; Ha, Hunjoo

    2010-12-01

    Excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation is the main feature of chronic renal disease including diabetic nephropathy. Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is known to play an important role in renal ECM accumulation in part through suppression of plasmin generation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activation. The present study examined the effect of PAI-1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) on fibronectin upregulation and plasmin/MMP suppression in primary mesangial cells cultured under high glucose (HG) or transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, major mediators of diabetic renal ECM accumulation. Growth arrested and synchronized rat primary mesangial cells were transfected with 1 µM phosphorothioate-modified antisense or control mis-match ODN for 24 hours with cationic liposome and then stimulated with 30 mM D-glucose or 2 ng/ml TGF-β1. PAI-1 or fibronectin protein was measured by Western blot analysis. Plasmin activity was determined using a synthetic fluorometric plasmin substrate and MMP-2 activity analyzed using zymography. HG and TGF-β1 significantly increased PAI-1 and fibronectin protein expression as well as decreased plasmin and MMP-2 activity. Transient transfection of mesangial cells with PAI-1 antisense ODN, but not mis-match ODN, effectively reversed basal as well as HG- and TGF-β1-induced suppression of plasmin and MMP-2 activity. Both basal and upregulated fibronectin secretion were also inhibited by PAI-1 antisense ODN. These data confirm that PAI-1 plays an important role in ECM accumulation in diabetic mesangium through suppression of protease activity and suggest that PAI-1 antisense ODN would be an effective therapeutic strategy for prevention of renal fibrosis including diabetic nephropathy.

  1. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhen; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation.

  2. Turing patterns in network-organized activator-inhibitor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, Hiroya; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2010-07-01

    Turing instability in activator-inhibitor systems provides a paradigm of non-equilibrium self-organization; it has been extensively investigated for biological and chemical processes. Turing instability should also be possible in networks, and general mathematical methods for its treatment have been formulated previously. However, only examples of regular lattices and small networks were explicitly considered. Here we study Turing patterns in large random networks, which reveal striking differences from the classical behaviour. The initial linear instability leads to spontaneous differentiation of the network nodes into activator-rich and activator-poor groups. The emerging Turing patterns become furthermore strongly reshaped at the subsequent nonlinear stage. Multiple coexisting stationary states and hysteresis effects are observed. This peculiar behaviour can be understood in the framework of a mean-field theory. Our results offer a new perspective on self-organization phenomena in systems organized as complex networks. Potential applications include ecological metapopulations, synthetic ecosystems, cellular networks of early biological morphogenesis, and networks of coupled chemical nanoreactors.

  3. Antihormonal activities of 5 alpha-reductase and aromatase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zoppi, S; Cocconi, M; Lechuga, M J; Messi, E; Zanisi, M; Motta, M

    1988-10-01

    The problem of developing androgen antagonists has been tackled so far only by synthesizing steroids able to displace testosterone and other androgens from their specific receptor sites. The observation that testosterone has to be converted intracellularly either to 5 alpha-reduced metabolites (DHT, 3 alpha-diol, etc.) or to estrogens, in order to become fully active on androgen-dependent structures (both central and peripheral), has opened the possibility of creating molecules which prevent these conversions, and which could then block the actions of testosterone. The availability of these new compounds has allowed a better understanding of the selective physiological role of each of the metabolites of testosterone, and to provide the basis for the development of new hormone antagonists to be used in those clinical conditions for which an inhibition of the actions of testosterone is foreseen. The usefulness of these enzyme inhibitors is underlined by some examples described in this paper. The results obtained may permit the formulation of the following conclusions: (1) The conversion of testosterone to its 5 alpha-reduced metabolites occurring in the neuroendocrine structures may represent an essential step for the appearance of the inhibitory feedback effect testosterone exerts on LH secretion; (2) Testosterone exhibits its negative feedback effect on FSH secretion as such and not following the local aromatization to estrogens; (3) Testosterone exerts its effect on the intrahypothalamic stores of LHRH acting as such and not following its local conversion either to 5 alpha-reduced metabolites or to estrogenic molecules; (4) Some of the new enzyme inhibitors (e.g. 4-OH-A) may represent an interesting tool for the treatment and/or the prevention of BPH and possibly of other androgen-dependent diseases (prostate carcinoma, acne etc.), as shown by their ability to prevent the in vitro conversion of testosterone to its 5 alpha-reduced metabolites both in the normal

  4. Nonpeptidic HIV protease inhibitors possessing excellent antiviral activities and therapeutic indices. PD 178390: a lead HIV protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Prasad, J V; Boyer, F E; Domagala, J M; Ellsworth, E L; Gajda, C; Hamilton, H W; Hagen, S E; Markoski, L J; Steinbaugh, B A; Tait, B D; Humblet, C; Lunney, E A; Pavlovsky, A; Rubin, J R; Ferguson, D; Graham, N; Holler, T; Hupe, D; Nouhan, C; Tummino, P J; Urumov, A; Zeikus, E; Zeikus, G; Gracheck, S J; Erickson, J W

    1999-12-01

    With the insight generated by the availability of X-ray crystal structures of various 5,6-dihydropyran-2-ones bound to HIV PR, inhibitors possessing various alkyl groups at the 6-position of 5,6-dihydropyran-2-one ring were synthesized. The inhibitors possessing a 6-alkyl group exhibited superior antiviral activities when compared to 6-phenyl analogues. Antiviral efficacies were further improved upon introduction of a polar group (hydroxyl or amino) on the 4-position of the phenethyl moiety as well as the polar group (hydroxymethyl) on the 3-(tert-butyl-5-methyl-phenylthio) moiety. The polar substitution is also advantageous for decreasing toxicity, providing inhibitors with higher therapeutic indices. The best inhibitor among this series, (S)-6-[2-(4-aminophenyl)-ethyl]-(3-(2-tert-butyl-5-methyl-phenylsulfa nyl)-4-hydroxy-6-isopropyl-5,6-dihydro-pyran-2-one (34S), exhibited an EC50 of 200 nM with a therapeutic index of > 1000. More importantly, these non-peptidic inhibitors, 16S and 34S, appear to offer little cross-resistance to the currently marketed peptidomimetic PR inhibitors. The selected inhibitors tested in vitro against mutant HIV PR showed a very small increase in binding affinities relative to wild-type HIV PR. Cmax and absolute bioavailability of 34S were higher and half-life and time above EC95 were longer compared to 16S. Thus 34S, also known as PD 178390, which displays good antiviral efficacy, promising pharmacokinetic characteristics and favorable activity against mutant enzymes and CYP3A4, has been chosen for further preclinical evaluation.

  5. MAPK pathway activation leads to Bim loss and histone deacetylase inhibitor resistance: rationale to combine romidepsin with an MEK inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arup R; Robey, Robert W; Luchenko, Victoria L; Zhan, Zhirong; Piekarz, Richard L; Gillet, Jean-Pierre; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Wilkerson, Julia; Showe, Louise C; Gottesman, Michael M; Collie, Nathan L; Bates, Susan E

    2013-05-16

    To identify molecular determinants of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDI) resistance, we selected HuT78 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) cells with romidepsin in the presence of P-glycoprotein inhibitors to prevent transporter upregulation. Resistant sublines were 250- to 385-fold resistant to romidepsin and were resistant to apoptosis induced by apicidin, entinostat, panobinostat, belinostat, and vorinostat. A custom TaqMan array identified increased insulin receptor (INSR) gene expression; immunoblot analysis confirmed increased protein expression and a four- to eightfold increase in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) phosphorylation in resistant cells compared with parental cells. Resistant cells were exquisitely sensitive to MEK inhibitors, and apoptosis correlated with restoration of proapoptotic Bim. Romidepsin combined with MEK inhibitors yielded greater apoptosis in cells expressing mutant KRAS compared with romidepsin treatment alone. Gene expression analysis of samples obtained from patients with CTCL enrolled on the NCI1312 phase 2 study of romidepsin in T-cell lymphoma suggested perturbation of the MAPK pathway by romidepsin. Immunohistochemical analysis of Bim expression demonstrated decreased expression in some skin biopsies at disease progression. These findings implicate increased activation of MEK and decreased Bim expression as a resistance mechanism to HDIs, supporting combination of romidepsin with MEK inhibitors in clinical trials.

  6. Structure-activity relationship of cyanine tau aggregation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Edward; Congdon, Erin E.; Honson, Nicolette S.; Duff, Karen E.; Kuret, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    A structure-activity relationship for symmetrical cyanine inhibitors of human tau aggregation was elaborated using a filter trap assay. Antagonist activity depended on cyanine heterocycle, polymethine bridge length, and the nature of meso- and N-substituents. One potent member of the series, 3,3’-diethyl-9-methylthiacarbocyanine iodide (compound 11), retained submicromolar potency and had calculated physical properties consistent with blood-brain barrier and cell membrane penetration. Exposure of organotypic slices prepared from JNPL3 transgenic mice (which express human tau harboring the aggregation prone P301L tauopathy mutation) to compound 11 for one week revealed a biphasic dose response relationship. Low nanomolar concentrations decreased insoluble tau aggregates to half those observed in slices treated with vehicle alone. In contrast, high concentrations (≥300 nM) augmented tau aggregation and produced abnormalities in tissue tubulin levels. These data suggest that certain symmetrical carbocyanine dyes can modulate tau aggregation in the slice biological model at concentrations well below those associated with toxicity. PMID:19432420

  7. Direct inhibitors of InhA active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Manjunatha, Ujjini H.; Rao, Srinivasa P. S.; Kondreddi, Ravinder Reddy; Noble, Christian G.; Camacho, Luis R.; Tan, Bee H.; Ng, Seow H.; Ng, Pearly Shuyi; Ma, N. L.; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Herve, Maxime; Barnes, S. Whitney; Yu, Weixuan; Kuhen, Kelli; Blasco, Francesca; Beer, David; Walker, John R.; Tonge, Peter J.; Glynne, Richard; Smith, Paul W.; Diagana, Thierry T.

    2015-01-01

    New chemotherapeutic agents are urgently required to combat the global spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The mycobacterial enoyl reductase, InhA, is one of the few clinically-validated targets in tuberculosis drug discovery. Here, we report the identification of a new class of direct InhA inhibitors, the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones, using phenotypic high-throughput whole-cell screening. This class of orally-active compounds showed potent bactericidal activity against common isoniazid-resistant TB clinical isolates. Biophysical studies revealed that 4-hydroxy-2-pyridones bound specifically to InhA in an NADH-dependent manner and blocked the enoyl-substrate binding pocket. The lead compound NITD-916 directly blocked InhA in a dose-dependent manner and showed in vivo efficacy in acute and established mouse models of infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Collectively, our structural and biochemical data open up new avenues for rational structure-guided optimization of the 4-hydroxy-2-pyridone class of compounds for the treatment of MDR-TB. PMID:25568071

  8. Relationships between plasma insulin triglyceride, body mass index, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1.

    PubMed

    Juhan-Vague, I; Vague, P; Alessi, M C; Badier, C; Valadier, J; Aillaud, M F; Atlan, C

    1987-07-01

    Low fibrinolytic activity, as measured by euglobulin (EFA), has been observed in obese subjects, and hypofibrinolysis may play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and its complications. Blood fibrinolytic activity is regulated through a complex system of activators and inhibitors, especially plasminogen activator inhibitors (PA Inhibitors). In a group of 35 non-diabetic subjects with a wide range of body mass index (BMI), EFA was negatively correlated, and PA Inhibitor activity positively correlated, with BMI and plasma insulin levels. In a population of 49 non-diabetic obese women (differing from a control group of normal weight by lower EFA and higher level, of PA Inhibitor activity, plasma insulin and triglyceride), the PA Inhibitor activity was positively correlated with BMI, insulin and triglyceride. The increase in PA Inhibitor activity was associated with a high value of PA Inhibitor 1 antigen measured by an immuno-radiometric assay, indicating that the increased activity was due to a high level of circulating PA Inhibitor 1. Plasma insulin was lowered in obese non-diabetic subjects, without modification of the body weight, by a 24 hour fast or by treatment with Metformin. After 24 hours' fast, ten obese subjects had lower levels of insulin and PA Inhibitor activity and an increase in EFA. Treatment for 15 days by 1.75 g Metformin (or placebo), on a weight maintaining diet, induced, in the Metformin group, a decrease in plasma insulin, triglyceride and PA Inhibitor activity and an increase in EFA, while no change was observed in the placebo group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Design and synthesis of conformationally restricted inhibitors of active thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFIa).

    PubMed

    Brink, Mikael; Dahlén, Anders; Olsson, Thomas; Polla, Magnus; Svensson, Tor

    2014-04-01

    A series of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-benzimidazole-5-carboxylic acid and 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-7-carboxylic acid derivatives designed as inhibitors of TAFIa has been prepared via a common hydrogenation-alkylation sequence starting from the appropriate benzimidazole and imidazopyridine system. We present a successful design strategy using a conformational restriction approach resulting in potent and selective inhibitors of TAFIa. The X-ray structure of compound 5 in complex with a H333Y/H335Q double mutant TAFI indicate that the conformational restriction is responsible for the observed potency increase. PMID:24588961

  10. Control of DNA replication in a transformed lymphoid cell line: coexistence of activator and inhibitor activities.

    PubMed

    Coffman, F D; Fresa, K L; Oglesby, I; Cohen, S

    1991-12-01

    Proliferating lymphocytes contain an intracellular factor, ADR (activator of DNA replication), which can initiate DNA synthesis in isolated quiescent nuclei. Resting lymphocytes lack ADR activity and contain an intracellular inhibitory factor that suppresses DNA synthesis in normal but not transformed nuclei. In this study we describe a MOLT-4 subline that produces both the activator and inhibitory activities which can be separated by ammonium sulfate fractionation. The inhibitor is heat stable and inhibits ADR-mediated DNA replication in a dose-dependent manner. It does not inhibit DNA polymerase alpha activity. The inhibitor must be present at the initiation of DNA replication to be effective, as it loses most of its effectiveness if it is added after replication has begun. The presence of inhibitory activity in proliferating MOLT-4 cells, taken with the previous observation that inhibitor derived from normal resting cells does not affect DNA synthesis by MOLT-4 nuclei, suggests that failure of a down-regulating signal may play an important role in proliferative disorder. PMID:1934078

  11. General method for sequence-independent site-directed chimeragenesis.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Kaori; Arnold, Frances H

    2003-07-01

    We have developed a simple and general method that allows for the facile recombination of distantly related (or unrelated) proteins at multiple discrete sites. To evaluate the sequence-independent site-directed chimeragenesis (SISDC) method, we have recombined beta-lactamases TEM-1 and PSE-4 at seven sites, examined the quality of the chimeric genes created, and screened the library of 2(8) (256) chimeras for functional enzymes. Probe hybridization and sequencing analyses revealed that SISDC generated a random library with little sequence bias and in which all targeted fragments were recombined in the desired order. Sequencing the genes from clones having functional lactamases identified 14 unique chimeras. These chimeras are characterized by a lower level of disruption, as calculated by the SCHEMA algorithm, than the library as a whole. These results illustrate the use of SISDC in creating designed chimeric protein libraries and further illustrate the ability of SCHEMA to identify chimeras whose folded structures are likely not to be disrupted by recombination. PMID:12823968

  12. Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Shih-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hsu, Shou-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Numerous epidemiological data suggest that the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEis) can improve the clinical outcomes of pneumonia. Tuberculosis (TB) is an airborne bacteria like pneumonia, and we aimed to find out whether the use of ACEis can decrease the risk of active TB. We conducted a nested case–control analysis by using a 1 million longitudinally followed cohort, from Taiwan national health insurance research database. The rate ratios (RRs) for TB were estimated by conditional logistic regression, and adjusted using a TB-specific disease risk score (DRS) with 71 TB-related covariates. From January, 1997 to December, 2011, a total of 75,536 users of ACEis, and 7720 cases of new active TB were identified. Current use (DRS adjusted RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78–0.97]), but not recent and past use of ACEis, was associated with a decrease in risk of active TB. Interestingly, it was found that chronic use (>90 days) of ACEis was associated with a further decrease in the risk of TB (aRR, 0.74, [95% CI, 0.66–0.83]). There was also a duration response effect, correlating decrease in TB risk with longer duration of ACEis use. The decrease in TB risk was also consistent across all patient subgroups (age, sex, heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases, myocardial infraction, renal diseases, and diabetes) and patients receiving other cardiovascular medicine. In this large population-based study, we found that subjects with recent and chronic use of ACEis were associated with decrease in TB risk. PMID:27175655

  13. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in senescence and aging.

    PubMed

    Eren, Mesut; Boe, Amanda E; Klyachko, Ekaterina A; Vaughan, Douglas E

    2014-09-01

    The average age of the US population continues to increase. Age is the most important determinant of disease and disability in humans, but the fundamental mechanisms of aging remain largely unknown. Many age-related diseases are associated with an impaired fibrinolytic system. Elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels are reported in age-associated clinical conditions including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, obesity and inflammation. PAI-1 levels are also elevated in animal models of aging. While the association of PAI-1 with physiological aging is well documented, it is only recently that its critical role in the regulation of aging and senescence has become evident. PAI-1 is synthesized and secreted in senescent cells and contributes directly to the development of senescence by acting downstream of p53 and upstream of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3. Pharmacologic inhibition or genetic deficiency of PAI-1 was shown to be protective against senescence and the aging-like phenotypes in kl/kl and N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester-treated wild-type mice. Further investigation into PAI-1's role in senescence and aging will likely contribute to the prevention and treatment of aging-related pathologies.

  14. Effect of wine inhibitors on free pineapple stem bromelain activity in a model wine system.

    PubMed

    Esti, Marco; Benucci, Ilaria; Liburdi, Katia; Garzillo, Anna Maria Vittoria

    2011-04-13

    The influence of potential inhibitors, naturally present in wine, on the activity of stem bromelain was investigated in order to evaluate the applicability of this enzyme for protein stabilization in white wine. Bromelain proteolytic activity was tested against a synthetic substrate (Bz-Phe-Val-Arg-pNA) in a model wine system after adding ethanol, sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), skin, seed, and gallic and ellagic tannins at the average range of their concentration in wine. All the inhibitors of stem bromelain activity tested turned out to be reversible. Ethanol was a competitive inhibitor with a rather limited effect. Gallic and ellagic tannins have no inhibitory effect on stem bromelain activity, while both seed and skin tannins were uncompetitive inhibitors. The strongest inhibition effect was revealed for sulfur dioxide, which was a mixed-type inhibitor for the enzyme activity. This study provides useful information relative to a future biotechnological application of stem bromelain in winemaking.

  15. Synergistic Activity of Combined NS5A Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nower, Peter T.; Gao, Min; Fridell, Robert; Wang, Chunfu; Hewawasam, Piyasena; Lopez, Omar; Tu, Yong; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Belema, Makonen; Roberts, Susan B.; Cockett, Mark; Sun, Jin-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Daclatasvir (DCV) is a first-in-class hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural 5A replication complex inhibitor (NS5A RCI) that is clinically effective in interferon-free combinations with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) targeting alternate HCV proteins. Recently, we reported NS5A RCI combinations that enhance HCV inhibitory potential in vitro, defining a new class of HCV inhibitors termed NS5A synergists (J. Sun, D. R. O’Boyle II, R. A. Fridell, D. R. Langley, C. Wang, S. Roberts, P. Nower, B. M. Johnson F. Moulin, M. J. Nophsker, Y. Wang, M. Liu, K. Rigat, Y. Tu, P. Hewawasam, J. Kadow, N. A. Meanwell, M. Cockett, J. A. Lemm, M. Kramer, M. Belema, and M. Gao, Nature 527:245–248, 2015, doi:10.1038/nature15711). To extend the characterization of NS5A synergists, we tested new combinations of DCV and NS5A synergists against genotype (gt) 1 to 6 replicons and gt 1a, 2a, and 3a viruses. The kinetics of inhibition in HCV-infected cells treated with DCV, an NS5A synergist (NS5A-Syn), or a combination of DCV and NS5A-Syn were distinctive. Similar to activity observed clinically, DCV caused a multilog drop in HCV, followed by rebound due to the emergence of resistance. DCV–NS5A-Syn combinations were highly efficient at clearing cells of viruses, in line with the trend seen in replicon studies. The retreatment of resistant viruses that emerged using DCV monotherapy with DCV–NS5A-Syn resulted in a multilog drop and rebound in HCV similar to the initial decline and rebound observed with DCV alone on wild-type (WT) virus. A triple combination of DCV, NS5A-Syn, and a DAA targeting the NS3 or NS5B protein cleared the cells of viruses that are highly resistant to DCV. Our data support the observation that the cooperative interaction of DCV and NS5A-Syn potentiates both the genotype coverage and resistance barrier of DCV, offering an additional DAA option for combination therapy and tools for explorations of NS5A function. PMID:26711745

  16. Inhibitors of urokinase type plasminogen activator and cytostatic activity from crude plants extracts.

    PubMed

    Zha, Xueqiang; Diaz, Ricardo; Franco, Jose Javier Rosado; Sanchez, Veronica Forbes; Fasoli, Ezio; Barletta, Gabriel; Carvajal, Augusto; Bansal, Vibha

    2013-01-01

    In view of the clear evidence that urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in the processes of tumor cell metastasis, aortic aneurysm, and multiple sclerosis, it has become a target of choice for pharmacological intervention. The goal of this study was thus to determine the presence of inhibitors of uPA in plants known traditionally for their anti-tumor properties. Crude methanol extracts were prepared from the leaves of plants (14) collected from the subtropical dry forest (Guanica, Puerto Rico), and tested for the presence of inhibitors of uPA using the fibrin plate assay. The extracts that tested positive (6) were then partitioned with petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, in a sequential manner. The resulting fractions were then tested again using the fibrin plate assay. Extracts from leaves of Croton lucidus (C. lucidus) showed the presence of a strong uPA inhibitory activity. Serial dilutions of these C. lucidus partitions were performed to determine the uPA inhibition IC₅₀ values. The chloroform extract showed the lowest IC₅₀ value (3.52 µg/mL) and hence contained the most potent uPA inhibitor. Further investigations revealed that the crude methanol extract and its chloroform and n-butanol partitions did not significantly inhibit closely related proteases such as the tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin, indicating their selectivity for uPA, and hence superior potential for medicinal use with fewer side effects. In a further evaluation of their therapeutic potential for prevention of cancer metastasis, the C. lucidus extracts displayed cytostatic activity against human pancreatic carcinoma (PaCa-2) cells, as determined through an MTS assay. The cytostatic activities recorded for each of the partitions correlated with their relative uPA inhibitory activities. There are no existing reports of uPA inhibitors being present in any of the plants reported in this study.

  17. Inhibitors of Urokinase Type Plasminogen Activator and Cytostatic Activity from Crude Plants Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Xueqiang; Diaz, Ricardo; Franco, Jose Javier Rosado; Sanchez, Veronica Forbes; Fasoli, Ezio; Barletta, Gabriel; Carvajal, Augusto; Bansal, Vibha

    2014-01-01

    In view of the clear evidence that urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in the processes of tumor cell metastasis, aortic aneurysm, and multiple sclerosis, it has become a target of choice for pharmacological intervention. The goal of this study was thus to determine the presence of inhibitors of uPA in plants known traditionally for their anti-tumor properties. Crude methanol extracts were prepared from the leaves of plants (14) collected from the subtropical dry forest (Guanica, Puerto Rico), and tested for the presence of inhibitors of uPA using the fibrin plate assay. The extracts that tested positive (6) were then partitioned with petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, in a sequential manner. The resulting fractions were then tested again using the fibrin plate assay. Extracts from leaves of Croton lucidus (C. lucidus) showed the presence of a strong uPA inhibitory activity. Serial dilutions of these C. lucidus partitions were performed to determine the uPA inhibition IC50 values. The chloroform extract showed the lowest IC50 value (3.52 μg/mL) and hence contained the most potent uPA inhibitor. Further investigations revealed that the crude methanol extract and its chloroform and n-butanol partitions did not significantly inhibit closely related proteases such as the tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) and plasmin, indicating their selectivity for uPA, and hence superior potential for medicinal use with fewer side effects. In a further evaluation of their therapeutic potential for prevention of cancer metastasis, the C. lucidus extracts displayed cytostatic activity against human pancreatic carcinoma (PaCa-2) cells, as determined through an MTS assay. The cytostatic activities recorded for each of the partitions correlated with their relative uPA inhibitory activities. There are no existing reports of uPA inhibitors being present in any of the plants reported in this study. PMID:23896619

  18. Characterization of Lassa Virus Cell Entry Inhibitors: Determination of the Active Enantiomer by Asymmetric Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Whitby, Landon R.; Lee, Andrew M.; Kunz, Stefan; Oldstone, Michael B. A.; Boger, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    The comparative characterization of a series of 4-acyl-1,6-dialkylpiperazin-2-ones as potent cell entry inhibitors of the hemorrhagic fever arenavirus Lassa (LASV) is disclosed. The resolution and examination of the individual enantiomers of the prototypical LASV cell entry inhibitor 3 (16G8) is reported and the more potent (–)-enantiomer was found to be 15-fold more active than the corresponding (+)-enantiomer. The absolute configuration of (–)-3 was established by asymmetric synthesis of the active inhibitor (–)-(S)-3 (lassamycin-1). A limited deletion scan of lassamycin-1 defined key structural features required of the prototypical inhibitors. PMID:19428249

  19. The discovery and the structural basis of an imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-based p21-activated kinase 4 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeung Kuk; Kim, Sunmin; Han, Yu Jin; Kim, Seong Hwan; Kang, Nam Sook; Lee, Hyuk; Park, SangYoun

    2016-06-01

    p21-Activated kinases (PAKs) which belong to the family of ste20 serine/threonine protein kinases regulate cytoskeletal reorganization, cell motility, cell proliferation, and oncogenic transformation which are all related to the cellular functions during cancer induction and metastasis. The fact that PAK mutations are detected in multiple tumor tissues makes PAKs a novel therapeutic drug target. In this study, an imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-based PAK4 inhibitor, KY-04045 (6-Bromo-2-(3-isopropyl-1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine), was discovered using a virtual site-directed fragment-based drug design and was validated using an inhibition assay. Although PAK4 affinity to KY-04045 seems much weaker than that of the reported PAK4 inhibitors, the location of KY-04045 is clearly defined in the structure of PAK4 co-crystallized with KY-04045. The crystal structure illustrates that the pyrazole and imidazopyridine rings of KY-04045 are sufficient for mediating PAK4 hinge loop interaction. Hence, we believe that KY-04045 can be exploited as a basic building block in designing novel imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-based PAK4 inhibitors. PMID:27117431

  20. Isoform-selective interaction of cyclooxygenase-2 with indomethacin amides studied by real-time fluorescence, inhibition kinetics, and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Timofeevski, Sergei L; Prusakiewicz, Jeffery J; Rouzer, Carol A; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2002-07-30

    Conversion of carboxylate-containing nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, such as indomethacin, to esters or amides provides potent and selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) [Kalgutkar et al. (2000) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 97, 925-930]. Synthesis of cinnamyl- or coumarinyl-substituted ethanolamide derivatives of indomethacin produced fluorescent probes of inhibitor interaction with COX-2 and COX-1. Binding of either derivative to apoCOX-2 or apoCOX-1 resulted in a rapid, reversible enhancement of fluorescence. Following this rapid phase, a slow additional increase in fluorescence was observed with apoCOX-2 but not with apoCOX-1. The slow, COX-2-specific increase in fluorescence was prevented or reversed by addition of the nonfluorescent COX inhibitor (S)-flurbiprofen. Detailed kinetic studies of the interaction of the coumarinyl derivative with COX-2 showed that the observed changes in fluorescence could be described by two sequential equilibria, the first of which is rapid, reversible, and bimolecular in the forward direction. The second equilibrium is slower, reversible, and unimolecular in both directions. The forward rate constant for the slow equilibrium determined by fluorescence enhancement [(3.1 +/- 0.6) x 10(-3) s(-1)] corresponded closely to the forward rate constant for inhibition of COX-2 activity [(6.8 +/- 2.3) x 10(-3) s(-1)], suggesting that the slow fluorescence enhancement is associated with selective COX-2 inhibition. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that residues in the carboxylate-binding region of the COX-2 active site (Arg-120, Tyr-355, and Glu-524) are critical for the binding of the indomethacin conjugates that leads to slow fluorescence enhancement and cyclooxygenase inhibition. The indomethacin conjugates described herein represent powerful tools for the investigation of a novel class of selective inhibitors of COX-2.

  1. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel; Pusey, Marc

    1998-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk'solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 4(sub 3) axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to greater than 500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 yields PHE or ALA and ASN 113 yields ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 4(sub 3) helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  2. Tetragonal Lysozyme Interactions Studied by Site Directed Mutagenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Lisa; Karr, Laurel J.; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc

    1999-01-01

    A number of recent experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that tetragonal lysozyme crystal growth proceeds by the addition of aggregates, formed by reversible self association of the solute molecules in the bulk solution. Periodic bond chain and atomic force microscopy studies have indicated that the probable growth unit is at minimum a 43 tetramer, and most likely an octamer composed of two complete turns about the 43 axis. If these results are correct, then there are intermolecular interactions which are only formed in the solution and others only formed at the joining of the growth unit to the crystal surface. We have set out to study these interactions, and the correctness of this hypothesis, using site directed mutagenesis of specific amino acid residues involved in the different bonds. We had initially expressed wild type lysozyme in S. cervasiae with yields of approximately 5 mg/L, which were eventually raised to approximately 40 mg/L. We are now moving the expression to the Pichia system, with anticipated yields of 300 to (3)500 mg/L, comparable to what can be obtained from egg whites. An additional advantage of using recombinant protein is the greater genetic homogeneity of the material obtained and the absence of any other contaminating egg proteins. The first mutation experiments are TYR 23 (Registered) PHE or ALA and ASN 113 (Registered) ALA or ASP. Both TYR 23 and ASN 113 form part of the postulated dimerization intermolecular binding site which lead to the formation of the 43 helix. Tyrosine also participates in an intermolecular hydrogen bond with ARG 114. The results of these and subsequent experiments will be discussed.

  3. Small molecule inhibitor screen identifies synergistic activity of the bromodomain inhibitor CPI203 and bortezomib in drug resistant myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Matthew B.; Liu, Selina Qiuying; Davare, Monika A.; Spurgeon, Stephen E.; Loriaux, Marc M.; Druker, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite significant therapeutic progress in multiple myeloma, drug resistance is uniformly inevitable and new treatments are needed. Our aim was to identify novel, efficacious small-molecule combinations for use in drug resistant multiple myeloma. Experimental Design A panel of 116 small molecule inhibitors was used to screen resistant myeloma cell lines for potential therapeutic targets. Agents found to have enhanced activity in the bortezomib or melphalan resistant myeloma cell lines were investigated further in combination. Synergistic combinations of interest were evaluated in primary patient cells. Results The overall single-agent drug sensitivity profiles were dramatically different between melphalan and bortezomib resistant cells, however, the bromodomain inhibitor, CPI203, was observed to have enhanced activity in both the bortezomib and melphalan resistant lines compared to their wild-type counterparts. The combination of bortezomib and CPI203 was found to be synergistic in both the bortezomib and melphalan resistant cell lines as well as in a primary multiple myeloma sample from a patient refractory to recent proteasome inhibitor treatment. The CPI203-bortezomib combination led to enhanced apoptosis and anti-proliferative effects. Finally, in contrast to prior reports of synergy between bortezomib and other epigenetic modifying agents, which implicated MYC downregulation or NOXA induction, our analyses suggest that CPI203-bortezomib synergy is independent of these events. Conclusion Our preclinical data supports a role for the clinical investigation of the bromodomain inhibitor CPI203 combined with bortezomib or alkylating agents in resistant multiple myeloma. PMID:26254279

  4. Development of Therapeutic Chimeric Uricase by Exon Replacement/Restoration and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guangrong; Yang, Weizhen; Chen, Jing; Li, Miaomiao; Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Baixue; Chen, Si; Wang, Min; Chen, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    The activity of urate oxidase was lost during hominoid evolution, resulting in high susceptibility to hyperuricemia and gout in humans. In order to develop a more “human-like” uricase for therapeutic use, exon replacement/restoration and site-directed mutagenesis were performed to obtain porcine–human uricase with higher homology to deduced human uricase (dHU) and increased uricolytic activity. In an exon replacement study, substitution of exon 6 in wild porcine uricase (wPU) gene with corresponding exon in dhu totally abolished its activity. Substitutions of exon 5, 3, and 1–2 led to 85%, 60%, and 45% loss of activity, respectively. However, replacement of exon 4 and 7–8 did not significantly change the enzyme activity. When exon 5, 6, and 3 in dhu were replaced by their counterparts in wpu, the resulting chimera H1-2P3H4P5-6H7-8 was active, but only about 28% of wPU. Multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling predicted that mutations of E24D and E83G in H1-2P3H4P5-6H7-8 were favorable for further increase of its activity. After site-directed mutagenesis, H1-2P3H4P5-6H7-8 (E24D & E83G) with increased homology (91.45%) with dHU and higher activity and catalytic efficiency than the FDA-approved porcine–baboon chimera (PBC) was obtained. It showed optimum activity at pH 8.5 and 35 °C and was stable in a pH range of 6.5–11.0 and temperature range of 20–40 °C. PMID:27213357

  5. Development of Therapeutic Chimeric Uricase by Exon Replacement/Restoration and Site-Directed Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guangrong; Yang, Weizhen; Chen, Jing; Li, Miaomiao; Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Baixue; Chen, Si; Wang, Min; Chen, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    The activity of urate oxidase was lost during hominoid evolution, resulting in high susceptibility to hyperuricemia and gout in humans. In order to develop a more "human-like" uricase for therapeutic use, exon replacement/restoration and site-directed mutagenesis were performed to obtain porcine-human uricase with higher homology to deduced human uricase (dHU) and increased uricolytic activity. In an exon replacement study, substitution of exon 6 in wild porcine uricase (wPU) gene with corresponding exon in dhu totally abolished its activity. Substitutions of exon 5, 3, and 1-2 led to 85%, 60%, and 45% loss of activity, respectively. However, replacement of exon 4 and 7-8 did not significantly change the enzyme activity. When exon 5, 6, and 3 in dhu were replaced by their counterparts in wpu, the resulting chimera H1-2P₃H₄P5-6H7-8 was active, but only about 28% of wPU. Multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling predicted that mutations of E24D and E83G in H1-2P₃H₄P5-6H7-8 were favorable for further increase of its activity. After site-directed mutagenesis, H1-2P₃H₄P5-6H7-8 (E24D & E83G) with increased homology (91.45%) with dHU and higher activity and catalytic efficiency than the FDA-approved porcine-baboon chimera (PBC) was obtained. It showed optimum activity at pH 8.5 and 35 °C and was stable in a pH range of 6.5-11.0 and temperature range of 20-40 °C. PMID:27213357

  6. Characterization of cyclo-Acetoacetyl-L-Tryptophan Dimethylallyltransferase in Cyclopiazonic Acid Biosynthesis: Substrate Promiscuity and Site Directed Mutagenesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyu; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2009-01-01

    The fungal neurotoxin α-cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a nanomolar inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase with a unique pentacyclic indole tetramic acid scaffold is assembled by a three enzyme pathway CpaS, CpaD and CpaO in Aspergillus sp. We recently characterized the first pathway-specific enzyme CpaS, a hybrid two module polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) that generates cyclo-acetoacetyl-L-tryptophan (cAATrp). Here we report the characterization of the second pathway-specific enzyme CpaD that regiospecifically dimethylallylates cAATrp to form β-cyclopiazonic acid. By exploring the tryptophan and tetramate moieties of cAATrp, we demonstrate that CpaD discriminates against free Trp but accepts tryptophan-containing thiohydantoins, diketopiperazines and linear peptides as substrates for C4-prenylation and also acts as regiospecific O-dimethylallyltransferase (DMAT) on a tyrosine-derived tetramic acid. Comparative evaluation of CpaDs from A. oryzae RIB40 and A. flavus NRRL3357 indicated the importance of the N-terminal region for its activity. Sequence alignment of CpaD with eleven homologous fungal Trp-DMATs revealed five regions of conservation suggesting the presense of critical motifs that could be diagonostic for discovering additional Trp-DMATs. Subsequent site-directed mutagenesis studies identified five polar/charged residues and five tyrosine residues within these motifs that are critical for CpaD activity. This motif characerization will enable a gene probe-based approach to discover additional biosynthetic Trp-DMATs. PMID:19877600

  7. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-12-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  8. Effects of inhibitors of tumoricidal activity upon schistosomulum killing by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    James, S L; Glaven, J A

    1987-01-01

    Larvae of the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni are efficiently killed in vitro by lymphokine-activated macrophages, leading to the hypothesis that these cells may participate in the effector mechanism of protective immunity against schistosomiasis. Larvacidal activity has also been demonstrated in the IC-21 macrophage cell line in the absence of a demonstrable respiratory burst, indicating that macrophages possess nonoxidative mechanisms of schistosomulum killing. In this study, we demonstrated that IC-21 larval killing was most effective when contact was allowed between cells and target. Nonoxidative larvacidal activity was prevented by protein synthesis inhibitors, by the inhibition of microtubule polymerization, and by tosyllysylchloromethylketone but not by other inhibitors or substrates of tryptic or chymotryptic protease activity. The addition of excess iron to the culture also prevented IC-21-mediated larval killing, suggesting that the production of an iron-binding molecule may be involved. In contrast, the addition of excess thymidine or arginine did not reverse macrophage larvacidal activity, nor did lysosomotropic agents that depress the activity of acid hydrolases. Under appropriate conditions of activation and surface membrane stimulation, IC-21 cells could be induced to release soluble cytotoxic factors retaining larvacidal activity. These observations provide insight into the mechanism of macrophage-mediated schistosome killing, in comparison to the cytotoxic mechanisms described in the better-studied tumoricidal models, and supply a basis for further biochemical investigation of macrophage function against a multicellular target. PMID:3119500

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation and site-directed mutagenesis of alcohol acyltransferase: a proposed mechanism of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Morales-Quintana, Luis; Nuñez-Tobar, María Ximena; Moya-León, María Alejandra; Herrera, Raúl

    2013-10-28

    Aroma in Vasconcellea pubescens fruit is determined by esters, which are the products of catalysis by alcohol acyltransferase (VpAAT1). VpAAT1 protein structure displayed the conserved HxxxD motif facing the solvent channel in the center of the structure. To gain insight into the role of these catalytic residues, kinetic and site-directed mutagenesis studies were carried out in VpAAT1 protein. Based on dead-end inhibition studies, the kinetic could be described in terms of a ternary complex mechanism with the H166 residue as the catalytic base. Kinetic results showed the lowest Km value for hexanoyl-CoA. Additionally, the most favorable predicted substrate orientation was observed for hexanoyl-CoA, showing a coincidence between kinetic studies and molecular docking analysis. Substitutions H166A, D170A, D170N, and D170E were evaluated in silico. The solvent channel in all mutant structures was lost, showing large differences with the native structure. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were able to describe unfavored energies for the interaction of the mutant proteins with different alcohols and acyl-CoAs. Additionally, in vitro site-directed mutagenesis of H166 and D170 in VpAAT1 induced a loss of activity, confirming the functional role of both residues for the activity, H166 being directly involved in catalysis.

  10. A thermostable trypsin inhibitor with antiproliferative activity from small pinto beans.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yau Sang; Zhang, Yanbo; Sze, Stephen Cho Wing; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2014-08-01

    Small pinto bean is a cultivar of Phaseolus vulgaris. It produces a 16-kDa trypsin inhibitor that could be purified using anion exchange and size chromatography. Q-Sepharose, Mono Q and Superdex 75 columns were employed for the isolation process. Small pinto bean trypsin inhibitor demonstrated moderate pH stability (pH 2-10) and marked heat stability, with its trypsin inhibitory activity largely retained after exposure to 100 °C for half an hour. The activity was abolished in the presence of dithiothreitol, in a dose-dependent manner, implying that disulfide bonds in small pinto bean trypsin inhibitor are crucial for the activity. The trypsin inhibitor showed a blocked N-terminus. The trypsin inhibitor only slightly inhibited the viability of breast cancer MCF7 and hepatoma HepG2 cells at 125 μM. PMID:23859150

  11. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in Cancer: Rationale and Insight for Future Therapeutic Testing.

    PubMed

    Placencio, Veronica R; DeClerck, Yves A

    2015-08-01

    Despite its function as an inhibitor of urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator (PA), PA inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) has a paradoxical protumorigenic role in cancer, promoting angiogenesis and tumor cell survival. In this review, we summarize preclinical evidence in support of the protumorigenic function of PAI-1 that has led to the testing of small-molecule PAI-1 inhibitors, initially developed as antithrombotic agents, in animal models of cancer. The review discusses the challenges and the opportunities that lay ahead to the development of efficacious and nontoxic PAI-1 inhibitors as anticancer agents.

  12. Antiviral activity of a Rac GEF inhibitor characterized with a sensitive HIV/SIV fusion assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pontow, Suzanne; Harmon, Brooke; Campbell, Nancy; Ratner, Lee

    2007-11-10

    A virus-dependent fusion assay was utilized to examine the activity of a panel of HIV-1, -2, and SIV isolates of distinct coreceptor phenotypes. This assay allowed identification of entry inhibitors, and characterization of an antagonist of a Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor, as an inhibitor of HIV-mediated fusion.

  13. The activity and location of cathepsin D inhibitor in seeds of common vetch (Vicia sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Roszkowska-Jakimiec, W; Leśniewska, J

    2004-01-01

    The activity of cathepsin D inhibitor is markedly higher in common vetch seed coat than in embryo cotyledons. The occurrence of considerable amounts of the inhibitor in the seed coat of vetch was confirmed by the fluorescent microscopic technique, with the use of fluorescein-marked cathepsin D.

  14. A nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor active on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates resistant to related inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, M E; O'Brien, J A; Ruffing, T L; Schleif, W A; Sardana, V V; Byrnes, V W; Condra, J H; Hoffman, J M; Emini, E A

    1993-01-01

    Pyridinone derivatives are potent and specific inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) and HIV-1 replication in cell culture. However, the potential clinical usefulness of these compounds as monotherapeutic agents may be limited by the selection of inhibitor-resistant viral variants. Resistance in cell culture is due primarily to mutational alterations at RT amino acid residues 103 and 181. A recombinant HIV-1 RT containing both of these mutations was used to screen a panel of pyridinone analogs for inhibitory activity. L-696,229 and L-697,661, pyridinones currently undergoing clinical evaluation, were more than 4,000-fold weaker against the mutant enzyme than against the wild-type enzyme. In contrast, one derivative of L-696,229, L-702,019 (3-[2-(4,7-dichlorobenzoxazol-2-yl)ethyl]-5-ethyl-6-methylpyrid in-2(1H)-thione), showed only three-fold different potencies against the two enzymes. L-702,019 was also a potent inhibitor of the replication of mutant HIV-1 containing the individual mutations at amino acid 103 or 181 as well as of clinical isolates resistant to L-697,661 and L-696,229. Isolation and analysis of resistant viral variants in cell culture showed that significant resistance to L-702,019 could be engendered only by multiple amino acid substitutions in RT. Accordingly, these studies demonstrated the potential of identifying second-generation specific HIV-1 RT inhibitors that can overcome the viral resistance selected by the first generation of inhibitors. PMID:7685996

  15. Dissecting the Catalytic Mechanism of Betaine-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase Using Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, C.; Gratson, A.A.; Evans, J.C.; Jiracek, J.; Collinsova, M.; Ludwig, M.L.; Garrow, T.A.

    2010-03-05

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is a zinc-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from glycine betaine (Bet) to homocysteine (Hcy) to form dimethylglycine (DMG) and methionine (Met). Previous studies in other laboratories have indicated that catalysis proceeds through the formation of a ternary complex, with a transition state mimicked by the inhibitor S-({delta}-carboxybutyl)-l-homocysteine (CBHcy). Using changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to determine the affinity of human BHMT for substrates, products, or CBHcy, we now demonstrate that the enzyme-substrate complex reaches its transition state through an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which Hcy is the first substrate to bind and Met is the last product released. Hcy, Met, and CBHcy bind to the enzyme to form binary complexes with K{sub d} values of 7.9, 6.9, and 0.28 {micro}M, respectively. Binary complexes with Bet and DMG cannot be detected with fluorescence as a probe, but Bet and DMG bind tightly to BHMT-Hcy to form ternary complexes with K{sub d} values of 1.1 and 0.73 {micro}M, respectively. Mutation of each of the seven tryptophan residues in human BHMT provides evidence that the enzyme undergoes two distinct conformational changes that are reflected in the fluorescence of the enzyme. The first is induced when Hcy binds, and the second, when Bet binds. As predicted by the crystal structure of BHMT, the amino acids Trp44 and Tyr160 are involved in binding Bet, and Glu159 in binding Hcy. Replacing these residues by site-directed mutagenesis significantly reduces the catalytic efficiency (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of the enzyme. Replacing Tyr77 with Phe abolishes enzyme activity.

  16. Discovery of HDAC Inhibitors with Potent Activity Against Multiple Malaria Parasite Life Cycle Stages

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Finn K.; Sumanadasa, Subathdrage D. M.; Stenzel, Katharina; Duffy, Sandra; Meister, Stephan; Marek, Linda; Schmetter, Rebekka; Kuna, Krystina; Hamacher, Alexandra; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Kassack, Matthias U.; Winzeler, Elizabeth A.; Avery, Vicky M.; Andrews, Katherine T.; Kurz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In this work we investigated the antiplasmodial activity of a series of HDAC inhibitors containing an alkoxyamide connecting-unit linker region. HDAC inhibitor 1a (LMK235), previously shown to be a novel and specific inhibitor of human HDAC4 and 5, was used as a starting point to rapidly construct a mini-library of HDAC inhibitors using a straightforward solid-phase supported synthesis. Several of these novel HDAC inhibitors were found to have potent in vitro activity against asexual stage P. falciparum malaria parasites. Representative compounds were shown to hyperacetylate P. falciparum histones and to inhibit deacetylase activity of recombinant PfHDAC1 and P. falciparum nuclear extracts. All compounds were also screened in vitro for activity against P. berghei exo-erythrocytic stages and selected compounds were further tested against late stage (IV and V) P. falciparum gametocytes. Of note, some compounds showed nanomolar activity against all three life cycle stages tested (asexual, exo-erythrocytic and gametocyte stages) and several compounds displayed significantly increased parasite selectivity compared to the reference HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA). These data suggest that it may be possible to develop HDAC inhibitors that target multiple malaria parasite life cycle stages. PMID:24904967

  17. Identification of quinazolinyloxy biaryl urea as a new class of SUMO activating enzyme 1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Ito, Akihiro; Hirohama, Mikako; Yoshida, Minoru; Zhang, Kam Y J

    2013-09-15

    SUMO activating enzyme 1 (SUMO E1) is the first enzyme in sumoylation pathway and an important cancer drug target. However, only a few inhibitors were reported up to now that includes three natural products, semi-synthetic protein inhibitors and one AMP mimic. Here, we report the identification of quinazolinyloxy biaryl urea as a new class of SUMO E1 inhibitors. The most active compound of this class inhibited the in vitro sumoylation with an IC50 of 13.4 μM. This compound inhibits sumoylation by blocking the formation of SUMOE1-SUMO thioester intermediate. The biological activity of the most active compound is comparable to previously reported inhibitors with properties suitable for medicinal chemistry optimization for potency and druggability.

  18. Pattern formation in a (2 + 1)-species activator-inhibitor-immobilizer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John E.

    1992-09-01

    The necessary and sufficient conditions for a Turing instability in a (2 + 1)-component reaction-diffusion system are derived. The 2-component subsystem consists of an arbitrary activator-inhibitor system in which the activator and the inhibitor diffuse at identical rates. The activator reacts with an immobile substrate to form an immobile complex which does not diffuse. It is found that the critical wavenumber and the location of the instability in parameter space are independent of the initial substrate concentration. As a special case, the (2 + 1)-variable activator-inhibitor-immobilizer system can be reduced to an activator-inhibitor system in which the activator diffuses more slowly than the inhibitor. This occurs when the time scales in the system satisfy certain constraints. The general results are applied to a (2 + 1)-variable model of the chlorite-iodide-starch reaction recently proposed by Epstein and Lengyel to explain the experimental observation of Turing patterns in a related system. I find an intrinsic wavelength which is within a factor of two of the experimentally observed wavelength, but the necessary conditions for the (2 + 1)-variable system to reduce to a two-variable activator-inhibitor system with rescaled diffusion coefficients are not satisfied.

  19. The Appearance of New Active Forms of Trypsin Inhibitor in Germinating Mung Bean (Vigna radiata) Seeds.

    PubMed

    Lorensen, E; Prevosto, R; Wilson, K A

    1981-07-01

    Ungerminated seeds of mung bean contain a single major species (F) of trypsin inhibitor with five minor species (A-E) separable on diethylaminoethyl-cellulose. During germination the level of trypsin inhibitory activity decreases from 1.8 units/grams dry weight in ungerminated cotyledons to 1.2 units/grams in cotyledons from seeds germinated 5 days. This decrease is accompanied by major changes in the distribution of inhibitory activity among the inhibitor species. By 48 hours of germination, inhibitor F has largely disappeared with an accompanying rapid increase in inhibitor C. Similarly, though less rapidly, inhibitor E decreases while inhibitor A increases. A similar sequence of changes is found in vitro when purified inhibitor F is incubated with extracts from seeds germinated 96 hours. The combined in vivo and in vitro data suggest a conversion sequence of: F --> E --> C --> A. The in vitro conversion is inhibited by phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride but not by iodoacetamide, indicating that at least the initial phases of inhibitor conversion are not catalyzed by the mung bean vicilin peptidohydrolase.

  20. Protumorigenic Activity of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Through an Antiapoptotic Function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a protease inhibitor but is paradoxically associated with poor outcomes in cancer patients. However, the mechanisms of its effects on tumor cells have not been explored. Methods Endogenous PAI-1 in human tumor cell lines (HT-1080, A549, HCT-116, and MDA-MB-231) was suppressed by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and PAI-039, a small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1, and the effects on apoptosis were examined. Tumorigenicity of PAI-1 knockdown (KD) tumor cells was examined in immunodeficient PAI-1 wild-type and knockout (KO) mice (9–15 per group), and event-free survival was analyzed by the Kaplan–Meier method. The effect of PAI-1 suppression on HT-1080 xenotransplanted tumors was evaluated for cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Genetic and pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 in the four tumor cell lines increased spontaneous apoptosis (mean fold increase relative to control: HT-1080, siRNA#1, mean = 4.0, 95% CI = 2.6 to 5.3, P < .001; siRNA#2, mean = 2.6, 95% CI = 2.4 to 2.9, P < .001, Student t test), which was blocked in the presence of recombinant PAI-1, a caspase-8 inhibitor, or Fas/FasL neutralizing antibodies and was partially attenuated by a plasmin inhibitor-aprotinin. PAI-1 KO mice implanted with PAI-1 KD HT-1080 cells had decreased tumorigenesis and prolonged survival compared with control mice (P = .002, log-rank test), and their tumors exhibited decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, five of 15 PAI-1 KO mice implanted with PAI-1 KD HT-1080 cells never developed tumors. Conclusions These data suggest that PAI-1 exerts a protective effect against tumor cell apoptosis by a mechanism that, in part, involves plasmin activation and inhibition of Fas/Fas-L-mediated apoptosis and may be a promising therapeutic target. PMID:22984202

  1. Structure-based repurposing of FDA-approved drugs as inhibitors of NEDD8-activating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hai-Jing; Liu, Li-Juan; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Wang, Hui-Min; Chan, Philip Wai Hong; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2014-07-01

    We report the discovery of an inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) by an integrated virtual screening approach. Piperacillin 1 inhibited NAE activity in cell-free and cell-based systems with high selectivity. Furthermore, piperacillin 1 was able to inhibit the degradation of the NAE downstream protein substrate p27(kip1). Our molecular modeling and kinetic studies suggested that this compound may act as a non-covalent ATP-competitive inhibitor of NAE.

  2. Immunomodulatory activity of a chymotrypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis seeds.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Alex Yuen-Kam; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Fong, Wing-Ping

    2006-09-01

    Serine protease inhibitors are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Many of them have been purified and characterized from different species. While the physicochemical properties of these protease inhibitors have been extensively investigated, their biological effects, e.g. immunomodulatory effect, remain relatively unexplored. Recently, we isolated a chymotrypsin-specific inhibitor (MCoCI) from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis (Lour) Spreng (Family Cucurbitaceae), the traditional Chinese medicine known as Mubiezhi, which has been used as an antiinflammatory agent. In the present study, the effects of MCoCI on different types of cells of the immune system, including splenocytes, splenic lymphocytes, neutrophils, bone marrow cells and macrophages, were investigated. MCoCI was shown to possess immuno-enhancing and antiinflammatory effects. MCoCI could stimulate the proliferation of different cells of the immune system, e.g. splenocytes, splenic lymphocytes and bone marrow cells, in a manner comparable to that of Concanavalin A. Moreover, MCoCI could also suppress the formation of hydrogen peroxide in neutrophils and macrophages. These immunomodulatory effects may explain some of the therapeutic actions of Mubiezhi. PMID:16733830

  3. Immunomodulatory activity of a chymotrypsin inhibitor from Momordica cochinchinensis seeds.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Alex Yuen-Kam; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Fong, Wing-Ping

    2006-09-01

    Serine protease inhibitors are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Many of them have been purified and characterized from different species. While the physicochemical properties of these protease inhibitors have been extensively investigated, their biological effects, e.g. immunomodulatory effect, remain relatively unexplored. Recently, we isolated a chymotrypsin-specific inhibitor (MCoCI) from the seeds of Momordica cochinchinensis (Lour) Spreng (Family Cucurbitaceae), the traditional Chinese medicine known as Mubiezhi, which has been used as an antiinflammatory agent. In the present study, the effects of MCoCI on different types of cells of the immune system, including splenocytes, splenic lymphocytes, neutrophils, bone marrow cells and macrophages, were investigated. MCoCI was shown to possess immuno-enhancing and antiinflammatory effects. MCoCI could stimulate the proliferation of different cells of the immune system, e.g. splenocytes, splenic lymphocytes and bone marrow cells, in a manner comparable to that of Concanavalin A. Moreover, MCoCI could also suppress the formation of hydrogen peroxide in neutrophils and macrophages. These immunomodulatory effects may explain some of the therapeutic actions of Mubiezhi.

  4. p53 Small Molecule Inhibitor Enhances Temozolomide Cytotoxic Activity against Intracranial Glioblastoma Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Dinca, Eduard B.; Lu, Kan V.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Pieper, Russell O.; Prados, Michael D.; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.; VandenBerg, Scott R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; James, C. David

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated corresponding precursor and active forms of a p53 small molecule inhibitor for effect on temozolomide (TMZ) anti-tumor activity against glioblastoma (GBM), using both in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches. Results from in vitro cell viability analysis showed that the cytotoxic activity of TMZ was substantially increased when GBMs with wild-type p53 were co-treated with the active form of p53 inhibitor, and this heightened cytotoxic response was accompanied by increased PARP cleavage as well as elevated cellular phospho-H2AX. Analysis of the same series of GBMs, as intracranial xenografts in athymic mice, and administering corresponding p53 inhibitor precursor, that is converted to the active compound in vivo, yielded results consistent with the in vitro analyses: i.e., TMZ + p53 inhibitor precursor co-treatment, of three distinct wild-type p53 GBM xenografts, resulted in significant enhancement of TMZ anti-tumor effect relative to treatment with TMZ alone, as indicated by serial bioluminescence monitoring as well as survival analysis (p < 0.001 for co-treatment survival benefit in each case). Mice receiving intracranial injection with p53 null GBM showed similar survival benefit from TMZ treatment regardless of the presence or absence of p53 inhibitor precursor. In total, our results indicate that the p53 active and precursor inhibitor pair enhance TMZ cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, respectively, and do so in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:19074867

  5. p53 Small-molecule inhibitor enhances temozolomide cytotoxic activity against intracranial glioblastoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Eduard B; Lu, Kan V; Sarkaria, Jann N; Pieper, Russell O; Prados, Michael D; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A; Vandenberg, Scott R; Berger, Mitchel S; James, C David

    2008-12-15

    In this study, we investigated the precursor and active forms of a p53 small-molecule inhibitor for their effects on temozolomide (TMZ) antitumor activity against glioblastoma (GBM), using both in vitro and in vivo experimental approaches. Results from in vitro cell viability analysis showed that the cytotoxic activity of TMZ was substantially increased when p53 wild-type (p53(wt)) GBMs were cotreated with the active form of p53 inhibitor, and this heightened cytotoxic response was accompanied by increased poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage as well as elevated cellular phospho-H2AX. Analysis of the same series of GBMs, as intracranial xenografts in athymic mice, and administering corresponding p53 inhibitor precursor, which is converted to the active compound in vivo, yielded results consistent with the in vitro analyses: TMZ + p53 inhibitor precursor cotreatment of three distinct p53(wt) GBM xenografts resulted in significant enhancement of TMZ antitumor effect relative to treatment with TMZ alone, as indicated by serial bioluminescence monitoring as well as survival analysis (P < 0.001 for cotreatment survival benefit in each case). Mice receiving intracranial injection with p53(null) GBM showed similar survival benefit from TMZ treatment regardless of the presence or absence of p53 inhibitor precursor. In total, our results indicate that the p53 active and precursor inhibitor pair enhances TMZ cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, respectively, and do so in a p53-dependent manner.

  6. The HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin inhibits plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression and secretion in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Laumen, Helmut; Skurk, Thomas; Hauner, Hans

    2008-02-01

    Human preadipocytes and adipocytes are known to produce the proatherogenic factor PAI-1 and proinflammatory cytokines, and obesity was found to be state of increased adipose production of these factors. In the present study, we investigated the effect of rosuvastatin on the regulation of PAI-1 gene expression in human adipocytes. Human preadipocytes, adipocytes in primary culture and the SGBS cell line were used as cell models. Cells were transfected using various constructs and promoter activity was measured as luciferase activity. PAI-1 expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. Rosuvastatin inhibited PAI-1 mRNA expression and secretion of the protein in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was reversed by isoprenoids. Addition of MEK-inhibitors and NFkappaB inhibitors also reduced PAI-1 expression and PAI-1 promoter luciferase activity. Further experiments revealed that rosuvastatin down-regulated the MEKK-1 mediated activation of the PAI-1 promoter. In conclusion our data suggest that rosuvastatin inhibits PAI-1 expression and release from human adipocytes via a MEKK-1-dependent but not a NFkappaB-dependent mechanism.

  7. Protease inhibitor in scorpion (Mesobuthus eupeus) venom prolongs the biological activities of the crude venom.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hakim; Xiao-Peng, Tang; Yang, Shi-Long; Lu, Qiu-Min; Lai, Ren

    2016-08-01

    It is hypothesized that protease inhibitors play an essential role in survival of venomous animals through protecting peptide/protein toxins from degradation by proteases in their prey or predators. However, the biological function of protease inhibitors in scorpion venoms remains unknown. In the present study, a trypsin inhibitor was purified and characterized from the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which enhanced the biological activities of crude venom components in mice when injected in combination with crude venom. This protease inhibitor, named MeKTT-1, belonged to Kunitz-type toxins subfamily. Native MeKTT-1 selectively inhibited trypsin with a Kivalue of 130 nmol·L(-1). Furthermore, MeKTT-1 was shown to be a thermo-stable peptide. In animal behavioral tests, MeKTT-1 prolonged the pain behavior induced by scorpion crude venom, suggesting that protease inhibitors in scorpion venom inhibited proteases and protect the functionally important peptide/protein toxins from degradation, consequently keeping them active longer. In conclusion, this was the first experimental evidence about the natural existence of serine protease inhibitor in the venom of scorpion Mesobuthus eupeus, which preserved the activity of venom components, suggests that scorpions may use protease inhibitors for survival. PMID:27608950

  8. Detection of allosteric kinase inhibitors by displacement of active site probes.

    PubMed

    Lebakken, Connie S; Reichling, Laurie J; Ellefson, Jason M; Riddle, Steven M

    2012-07-01

    Non-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) competitive, allosteric inhibitors provide a promising avenue to develop highly selective small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Although this class of compounds is growing, detection of such inhibitors can be challenging as standard kinase activity assays preferentially detect compounds that bind to active kinases in an ATP competitive manner. We have previously described a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET)-based kinase binding assay using the competitive displacement of ATP competitive active site fluorescent probes ("tracers"). Although this format has gained acceptance, published data with this and related formats are almost entirely without examples of non-ATP competitive compounds. Thus, this study addresses whether this format is useful for non-ATP competitive inhibitors. To this end, 15 commercially available non-ATP competitive inhibitors were tested for their ability to displace ATP competitive probes. Despite the diversity of both compound structures and their respective targets, 14 of the 15 compounds displaced the tracers with IC(50) values comparable to literature values. We conclude that such binding assays are well suited for the study of non-ATP competitive inhibitors. In addition, we demonstrate that allosteric inhibitors of BCR-Abl and MEK bind preferentially to the nonphosphorylated (i.e., inactive) form of the kinase, indicating that binding assays may be a preferred format in some cases.

  9. Development of an activity assay for discovery of inhibitors of lipopolysaccharide transport.

    PubMed

    Gronenberg, Luisa S; Kahne, Daniel

    2010-03-01

    The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria contains an outer leaflet composed of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that is transported to this location by a pathway that is essential for viability. It has been suggested that inhibitors of this pathway could be useful antibiotics. Herein we reconstitute the activity of the ATPase component (LptB) of the ABC transporter that initiates LPS transport and assembly. We developed a high-throughput assay and screened a library of kinase inhibitors against LptB. We identified two classes of ATP-competitive inhibitors. These are the first inhibitors of the ATPase component of any bacterial ABC transporter. The small-molecule inhibitors will be very useful tools for further biochemical studies of the proteins involved in LPS transport and assembly.

  10. Structure-activity relationships by mass spectrometry: identification of novel MMP-3 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ockey, Denise A; Dotson, Jenna L; Struble, Martin E; Stults, John T; Bourell, James H; Clark, Kevin R; Gadek, Thomas R

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of nonpeptide inhibitors of stromelysin (MMP-3) has been discovered with the use of mass spectrometry. The method relies on the development of structure-activity relationships by mass spectrometry (SAR by MS) and utilizes information derived from the binding of known inhibitors to identify novel inhibitors of a target protein with a minimum of synthetic effort. Noncovalent complexes of known inhibitors with a target protein are analyzed; these inhibitors are deconstructed into sets of fragments which compete for common or overlapping binding sites on the target protein. The binding of each fragment set can be studied independently. With the use of competition studies, novel members of each fragment set are identified from compound libraries that bind to the same site on the target protein. A novel inhibitor of the target protein was then constructed by chemically linking a combination of members of each fragment set in a manner guided by the proximity and orientation of the fragments derived from the known inhibitors. In the case of stromelysin, a novel inhibitor composed of favorably linked fragments was observed to form a 1:1 complex with stromelysin. Compounds that were not linked appropriately formed higher order complexes with stoichiometries of 2:1 or greater. These linked molecules were subsequently assessed for their ability to block stromelysin function in a chromogenic substrate assay.

  11. Enhanced enzyme stability through site-directed covalent immobilization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jeffrey Chun Yu; Hutchings, Christopher Hayden; Lindsay, Mark Jeffrey; Werner, Christopher James; Bundy, Bradley Charles

    2015-01-10

    Breakthroughs in enzyme immobilization have enabled increased enzyme recovery and reusability, leading to significant decreases in the cost of enzyme use and fueling biocatalysis growth. However, current enzyme immobilization techniques suffer from leaching, enzyme stability, and recoverability and reusability issues. Moreover, these techniques lack the ability to control the orientation of the immobilized enzymes. To determine the impact of orientation on covalently immobilized enzyme activity and stability, we apply our PRECISE (Protein Residue-Explicit Covalent Immobilization for Stability Enhancement) system to a model enzyme, T4 lysozyme. The PRECISE system uses non-canonical amino acid incorporation and the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition "click" reaction to enable directed enzyme immobilization at rationally chosen residues throughout an enzyme. Unlike previous site-specific systems, the PRECISE system is a truly covalent immobilization method. Utilizing this system, enzymes immobilized at proximate and distant locations from the active site were tested for activity and stability under denaturing conditions. Our results demonstrate that orientation control of covalently immobilized enzymes can provide activity and stability benefits exceeding that of traditional random covalent immobilization techniques. PRECISE immobilized enzymes were 50 and 73% more active than randomly immobilized enzymes after harsh freeze-thaw and chemical denaturant treatments.

  12. Orally active 7-substituted (4-benzylphthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylpiperazin-1-yl]nicotinonitriles as active-site inhibitors of sphingosine 1-phosphate lyase for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Sven; Braendlin, Nadine; Beerli, Christian; Bergsdorf, Christian; Schubart, Anna; Srinivas, Honnappa; Oberhauser, Berndt; Billich, Andreas

    2014-06-26

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) lyase has recently been implicated as a therapeutic target for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), based on studies in a genetic mouse model. Potent active site directed inhibitors of the enzyme are not known so far. Here we describe the discovery of (4-benzylphthalazin-1-yl)-2-methylpiperazin-1-yl]nicotinonitrile 5 in a high-throughput screen using a biochemical assay, and its further optimization. This class of compounds was found to inhibit catalytic activity of S1PL by binding to the active site of the enzyme, as seen in the cocrystal structure of derivative 31 with the homodimeric human S1P lyase. 31 induces profound reduction of peripheral T cell numbers after oral dosage and confers pronounced protection in a rat model of multiple sclerosis. In conclusion, this novel class of direct S1P lyase inhibitors provides excellent tools to further explore the therapeutic potential of T cell-targeted therapies in multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  13. Structure-Based Design of 1,4-Dibenzoylpiperazines as β-Catenin/B-Cell Lymphoma 9 Protein-Protein Interaction Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, John A; Yin, Jinya; Teuscher, Kevin B; Zhang, Min; Ji, Haitao

    2016-05-12

    A small-molecule inhibitor with a 1,4-dibenzoylpiperazine scaffold was designed to match the critical binding elements in the β-catenin/B-cell lymphoma 9 (BCL9) protein-protein interaction interface. Inhibitor optimization led to a potent inhibitor that can disrupt the β-catenin/BCL9 interaction and exhibit 98-fold selectivity over the β-catenin/cadherin interaction. The binding mode of new inhibitors was characterized by structure-activity relationships and site-directed mutagenesis studies. Cell-based studies demonstrated that this series of inhibitors can selectively suppress canonical Wnt signaling and inhibit growth of Wnt/β-catenin-dependent cancer cells.

  14. PTP1B inhibitor promotes endothelial cell motility by activating the DOCK180/Rac1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan; Yan, Feng; Ye, Qing; Wu, Xiao; Jiang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Promoting endothelial cell (EC) migration is important not only for therapeutic angiogenesis, but also for accelerating re-endothelialization after vessel injury. Several recent studies have shown that inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) may promote EC migration and angiogenesis by enhancing the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) signalling. In the present study, we demonstrated that PTP1B inhibitor could promote EC adhesion, spreading and migration, which were abolished by the inhibitor of Rac1 but not RhoA GTPase. PTP1B inhibitor significantly increased phosphorylation of p130Cas, and the interactions among p130Cas, Crk and DOCK180; whereas the phosphorylation levels of focal adhesion kinase, Src, paxillin, or Vav2 were unchanged. Gene silencing of DOCK180, but not Vav2, abrogated the effects of PTP1B inhibitor on EC motility. The effects of PTP1B inhibitor on EC motility and p130Cas/DOCK180 activation persisted in the presence of the VEGFR2 antagonist. In conclusion, we suggest that stimulation of the DOCK180 pathway represents an alternative mechanism of PTP1B inhibitor-stimulated EC motility, which does not require concomitant VEGFR2 activation as a prerequisite. Therefore, PTP1B inhibitor may be a useful therapeutic strategy for promoting EC migration in cardiovascular patients in which the VEGF/VEGFR functions are compromised. PMID:27052191

  15. Tricyclic Covalent Inhibitors Selectively Target Jak3 through an Active Site Thiol*

    PubMed Central

    Goedken, Eric R.; Argiriadi, Maria A.; Banach, David L.; Fiamengo, Bryan A.; Foley, Sage E.; Frank, Kristine E.; George, Jonathan S.; Harris, Christopher M.; Hobson, Adrian D.; Ihle, David C.; Marcotte, Douglas; Merta, Philip J.; Michalak, Mark E.; Murdock, Sara E.; Tomlinson, Medha J.; Voss, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    The action of Janus kinases (JAKs) is required for multiple cytokine signaling pathways, and as such, JAK inhibitors hold promise for treatment of autoimmune disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis. However, due to high similarity in the active sites of the four members (Jak1, Jak2, Jak3, and Tyk2), developing selective inhibitors within this family is challenging. We have designed and characterized substituted, tricyclic Jak3 inhibitors that selectively avoid inhibition of the other JAKs. This is accomplished through a covalent interaction between an inhibitor containing a terminal electrophile and an active site cysteine (Cys-909). We found that these ATP competitive compounds are irreversible inhibitors of Jak3 enzyme activity in vitro. They possess high selectivity against other kinases and can potently (IC50 < 100 nm) inhibit Jak3 activity in cell-based assays. These results suggest irreversible inhibitors of this class may be useful selective agents, both as tools to probe Jak3 biology and potentially as therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:25552479

  16. Targeting the RAS pathway by mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Michael K; Rogler, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Targeting of oncogenic driver mutations with small-molecule inhibitors resulted in powerful treatment options for cancer patients in recent years. The RAS (rat sarcoma) pathway is among the most frequently mutated pathways in human cancer. Whereas targeting mutant Kirsten RAS (KRAS) remains difficult, mutant B rapidly accelerated fibrosarcoma (BRAF) kinase is an established drug target in cancer. Now data show that neuroblastoma RAS (NRAS) and even Harvey RAS (HRAS) mutations could be predictive markers for treatment with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) inhibitors. This review discusses recent preclinical and clinical studies of MEK inhibitors in BRAF and RAS mutant cancer. PMID:26691679

  17. Inhibitors of enzymes catalyzing modifications to histone lysine residues: structure, function and activity.

    PubMed

    Lillico, Ryan; Stesco, Nicholas; Khorshid Amhad, Tina; Cortes, Claudia; Namaka, Mike P; Lakowski, Ted M

    2016-05-01

    Gene expression is partly controlled by epigenetic mechanisms including histone-modifying enzymes. Some diseases are caused by changes in gene expression that can be mitigated by inhibiting histone-modifying enzymes. This review covers the enzyme inhibitors targeting histone lysine modifications. We summarize the enzymatic mechanisms of histone lysine acetylation, deacetylation, methylation and demethylation and discuss the biochemical roles of these modifications in gene expression and in disease. We discuss inhibitors of lysine acetylation, deacetylation, methylation and demethylation defining their structure-activity relationships and their potential mechanisms. We show that there are potentially indiscriminant off-target effects on gene expression even with the use of selective epigenetic enzyme inhibitors.

  18. Proteasome inhibitors reduce luciferase and beta-galactosidase activity in tissue culture cells.

    PubMed

    Deroo, Bonnie J; Archer, Trevor K

    2002-06-01

    Reporter enzymes are commonly used in cell biology to study transcriptional activity of genes. Recently, reporter enzymes in combination with compounds that inhibit proteasome function have been used to study the effect of blocking transcription factor degradation on gene activation. While investigating the effect of proteasome inhibition on steroid receptor activation of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter, we found that treatment with proteasome inhibitors enhanced glucocorticoid activation of the promoter attached to a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter, but inhibited activation of MMTV attached to a firefly luciferase or beta-galactosidase reporter. MMTV RNA levels under these conditions correlated with the promoter activity observed using the CAT reporter, suggesting that proteasome inhibitor treatment interfered with luciferase or beta-galactosidase reporter assays. Washout experiments demonstrated that the majority of luciferase activity was lost if the proteasome inhibitor was added at the same time luciferase was produced, not once the functional protein was made, suggesting that proteasome inhibition interferes with production of luciferase protein. Indeed, we found that proteasome inhibitor treatment dramatically reduced the levels of luciferase and beta-galactosidase protein produced, as determined by Western blot. Thus, treatment with proteasome inhibitors interferes with luciferase and beta-galactosidase reporter assays, possibly by inhibiting production of a functional reporter protein.

  19. A straightforward ninhydrin-based method for collagenase activity and inhibitor screening of collagenase using spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanfang; Fu, Yun; Zhou, Sufeng; Kang, Lixia; Li, Changzheng

    2013-06-01

    Currently protease assay kits, requiring substrate that is either radiolabeled or fluorescence labeled and specialized instruments, are all expensive. A simple, reliable assay of protease activity and its inhibitor screening for general laboratory is rare. Here we demonstrated a straightforward ninhydrin-based method for assay of collagenase activity and its inhibitor screening using spectrophotometry. In the method, without multistep sample treatments and substrate labeling, the hydrolytic products were directly traced by ninhydrin. The method is expected to be suitable for not only the assay of collagenase activity but also the others matrix metalloproteinases activities, and can be used for kinetic study.

  20. Feedback Activation of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor Limits Response to Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hanlin; Qu, Jia; Jin, Nan; Xu, Jun; Lin, Chenchu; Chen, Yi; Yang, Xinying; He, Xiang; Tang, Shuai; Lan, Xiaojing; Yang, Xiaotong; Chen, Ziqi; Huang, Min; Ding, Jian; Geng, Meiyu

    2016-09-12

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have demonstrated clinical benefits in subtypes of hematological malignancies. However, the efficacy of HDAC inhibitors in solid tumors remains uncertain. This study takes breast cancer as a model to understand mechanisms accounting for limited response of HDAC inhibitors in solid tumors and to seek combination solutions. We discover that feedback activation of leukemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR) signaling in breast cancer limits the response to HDAC inhibition. Mechanistically, HDAC inhibition increases histone acetylation at the LIFR gene promoter, which recruits bromodomain protein BRD4, upregulates LIFR expression, and activates JAK1-STAT3 signaling. Importantly, JAK1 or BRD4 inhibition sensitizes breast cancer to HDAC inhibitors, implicating combination inhibition of HDAC with JAK1 or BRD4 as potential therapies for breast cancer. PMID:27622335

  1. Activation of Inhibitors by Sortase Triggers Irreversible Modification of the Active Site*S

    PubMed Central

    Maresso, Anthony W.; Wu, Ruiying; Kern, Justin W.; Zhang, Rongguang; Janik, Dorota; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Duban, Mark-Eugene; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Sortases anchor surface proteins to the cell wall of Gram-positive pathogens through recognition of specific motif sequences. Loss of sortase leads to large reductions in virulence, which identifies sortase as a target for the development of antibacterials. By screening 135,625 small molecules for inhibition, we report here that aryl (β-amino)ethyl ketones inhibit sortase enzymes from staphylococci and bacilli. Inhibition of sortases occurs through an irreversible, covalent modification of their active site cysteine. Sortases specifically activate this class of molecules via β-elimination, generating a reactive olefin intermediate that covalently modifies the cysteine thiol. Analysis of the three-dimensional structure of Bacillus anthracis sortase B with and without inhibitor provides insights into the mechanism of inhibition and reveals binding pockets that can be exploited for drug discovery. PMID:17545669

  2. Modulation of activation-loop phosphorylation by JAK inhibitors is binding mode dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bonenfant, Débora; Rubert, Joëlle; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Scheufler, Clemens; Marque, Fanny; Régnier, Catherine H.; De Pover, Alain; Ryckelynck, Hugues; Bhagwat, Neha; Koppikar, Priya; Goel, Aviva; Wyder, Lorenza; Tavares, Gisele; Baffert, Fabienne; Pissot-Soldermann, Carole; Manley, Paul W.; Gaul, Christoph; Voshol, Hans; Levine, Ross L.; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Radimerski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    JAK inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, myeloproliferative neoplasms and leukemias. Most of these drugs target the ATP-binding pocket and stabilize the active conformation of the JAK kinases. This type-I binding mode leads to an increase in JAK activation-loop phosphorylation, despite blockade of kinase function. Here we report that stabilizing the inactive state via type-II inhibition acts in the opposite manner, leading to a loss of activation-loop phosphorylation. We used X-ray crystallography to corroborate the binding mode and report for the first time the crystal structure of the JAK2 kinase domain in an inactive conformation. Importantly, JAK inhibitor-induced activation-loop phosphorylation requires receptor interaction, as well as intact kinase and pseudokinase domains. Hence, depending on the respective conformation stabilized by a JAK inhibitor, hyperphosphorylation of the activation-loop may or may not be elicited. PMID:22684457

  3. Characterization of inhibitor(s) of lymphocyte activation in serum from rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Binderup, L; Bramm, E; Arrigoni-Martelli, E

    1978-01-01

    Serum from adjuvant arthritic rats inhibits the concanavalin A- (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide-induced stimulation of lymph node cells, leaving the basal and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated 3H-thymidine incorporation unaffected. Con A-stimulated 3H-thymidine uptake is also inhibited in rat spleen and peripheral blood lymphocytes and in dog peripheral blood lymphocytes. The intensity of the inhibitory activity in serum is positively correlated with the intensity of the secondary lesions of adjuvant arthritis. Inhibitory activity was not found in serum from rats bearing nystatin-induced inflammation. Serum fractionation studies indicated that the inhibitory activity cannot be attributed to low molecular weight alpha2-glycoproteins or to gamma-globulins and alpha2-macroglobulins, but it is present in a fraction migrating with beta-globulins. The inhibitory activity in arthritic rat serum is reduced by treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but is unaltered by D-penicillamine. It is suggested that this inhibitory activity is part of the systemic response to an immunologically mediated inflammation. PMID:151867

  4. Transforming growth factor-beta requires its target plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 for cytostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Kortlever, Roderik M; Nijwening, Jeroen H; Bernards, René

    2008-09-01

    The cytokine transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) has strong antiproliferative activity in most normal cells but contributes to tumor progression in the later stages of oncogenesis. It is not fully understood which TGFbeta target genes are causally involved in mediating its cytostatic activity. We report here that suppression of the TGFbeta target gene encoding plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) by RNA interference leads to escape from the cytostatic activity of TGFbeta both in human keratinocytes (HaCaTs) and primary mouse embryo fibroblasts. Consistent with this, PAI-1 knock-out mouse embryo fibroblasts are also resistant to TGFbeta growth arrest. Conversely, we show that ectopic expression of PAI-1 in proliferating HaCaT cells induces a growth arrest. PAI-1 knockdown does not interfere with canonical TGFbeta signaling as judged by SMAD phosphorylation and induction of bona fide TGFbeta target genes. Instead, knockdown of PAI-1 results in sustained activation of protein kinase B. Significantly, we find that constitutive protein kinase B activity leads to evasion of the growth-inhibitory action of TGFbeta. Our data are consistent with a model in which induction of PAI-1 by TGFbeta is critical for the induction of proliferation arrest.

  5. Novel peptidomimetic inhibitors of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 dimerization and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Turkson, James; Kim, Joon S; Zhang, Shumin; Yuan, Jing; Huang, Mei; Glenn, Matthew; Haura, Eric; Sebti, Said; Hamilton, Andrew D; Jove, Richard

    2004-03-01

    The critical role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in the growth and survival of human tumor cells identifies it as a promising target for cancer drug discovery. We previously identified a Stat3 SH2 domain-binding phosphopeptide, PY*LKTK, and its tripeptide derivatives, PY*L and AY*L (where Y* represents phosphotyrosine), which inhibit Stat3 biochemical activity and biological function. Here, we report novel peptidomimetic compounds based on PY*L (or AY*L) with substitution of the Y-1 residue by benzyl, pyridyl, or pyrazinyl derivatives that are selective and greater than 5-fold more potent in disrupting Stat3 activity in vitro than lead tripeptides. The biological activities of these derivatives mirror that originally observed for peptides. In this context, the representative peptidomimetic ISS 610 with 4-cyanobenzoate substitution inhibits constitutive Stat3 activity in Src-transformed mouse fibroblasts and human breast and lung carcinoma cells. This effect is not evident with the non-phosphorylated counterpart, ISS 610NP, consistent with interaction of peptidomimetics with the SH2 domain of Stat3. Moreover, ISS 610 induces cell growth inhibition and apoptosis of Src-transformed fibroblasts that contain persistently active Stat3. We present the first report of a peptidomimetic approach to design of small-molecule inhibitors of Stat3 that are also among the first examples of disruptors of transcription factor dimerization with the potential for novel cancer therapy.

  6. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Kuldell, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signaling (2CS) systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli’s natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or “coliroids,” rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein’s local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system’s performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling. PMID:26799494

  7. Site-Directed Mutagenesis to Improve Sensitivity of a Synthetic Two-Component Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Olshefsky, Audrey; Shehata, Laila; Kuldell, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Two-component signaling (2CS) systems enable bacterial cells to respond to changes in their local environment, often using a membrane-bound sensor protein and a cytoplasmic responder protein to regulate gene expression. Previous work has shown that Escherichia coli's natural EnvZ/OmpR 2CS could be modified to construct a light-sensing bacterial photography system. The resulting bacterial photographs, or "coliroids," rely on a phosphotransfer reaction between Cph8, a synthetic version of EnvZ that senses red light, and OmpR. Gene expression changes can be visualized through upregulation of a LacZ reporter gene by phosphorylated OmpR. Unfortunately, basal LacZ expression leads to a detectable reporter signal even when cells are grown in the light, diminishing the contrast of the coliroids. We performed site-directed mutagenesis near the phosphotransfer site of Cph8 to isolate mutants with potentially improved image contrast. Five mutants were examined, but only one of the mutants, T541S, increased the ratio of dark/light gene expression, as measured by β-galactosidase activity. The ratio changed from 2.57 fold in the starting strain to 5.59 in the T541S mutant. The ratio decreased in the four other mutant strains we examined. The phenotype observed in the T541S mutant strain may arise because the serine sidechain is chemically similar but physically smaller than the threonine sidechain. This may minimally change the protein's local structure, but may be less sterically constrained when compared to threonine, resulting in a higher probability of a phosphotransfer event. Our initial success pairing synthetic biology and site-directed mutagenesis to optimize the bacterial photography system's performance encourages us to imagine further improvements to the performance of this and other synthetic systems, especially those based on 2CS signaling. PMID:26799494

  8. Low-volume multiplexed proteolytic activity assay and inhibitor analysis through a pico-injector array.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Lauffenburger, Doug A; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2015-02-21

    Secreted active proteases, from families of enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases), participate in diverse pathological processes. To simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities, a series of parallel enzyme reactions combined with a series of inhibitor analyses for proteolytic activity matrix analysis (PrAMA) are essential but limited due to the sample quantity requirements and the complexity of performing multiple reactions. To address these issues, we developed a pico-injector array to generate 72 different reactions in picoliter-volume droplets by controlling the sequence of combinational injections, which allowed simultaneous recording of a wide range of multiple enzyme reactions and measurement of inhibitor effects using small sample volumes (~10 μL). Multiple MMP activities were simultaneously determined by 9 different substrates and 2 inhibitors using injections from a pico-injector array. Due to the advantages of inhibitor analysis, the MMP/ADAM activities of MDA-MB-231, a breast cancer cell line, were characterized with high MMP-2, MMP-3 and ADAM-10 activity. This platform could be customized for a wide range of applications that also require multiple reactions with inhibitor analysis to enhance the sensitivity by encapsulating different chemical sensors.

  9. P38 MAPK inhibitors suppress biomarkers of hypertension end-organ damage, osteopontin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Nerurkar, S S; Olzinski, A R; Frazier, K S; Mirabile, R C; O'Brien, S P; Jing, J; Rajagopalan, D; Yue, T L; Willette, R N

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of target organ damage is important in defining the optimal treatment of hypertension and blood pressure-related cardiovascular disease. The aims of the present study were (1) to investigate candidate biomarkers of target organ damage, osteopontin (OPN) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), in models of malignant hypertension with well characterized end-organ pathology; and (2) to evaluate the effects of chronic treatment with a p38 MAPK inhibitor. Gene expression, plasma concentrations, and renal immunohistochemical localization of OPN and PAI-1 were measured in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats on a salt-fat diet (SFD SHR-SP) and in spontaneously hypertensive rats receiving N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME SHR). Plasma concentrations of OPN and PAI-1 increased significantly in SFD SHR-SP and L-NAME SHR as compared with controls, (2.5-4.5-fold for OPN and 2.0-9.0-fold for PAI-1). The plasma levels of OPN and PAI-1 were significantly correlated with the urinary excretion of albumin (p < 0.0001). Elevations in urinary albumin, plasma OPN and PAI-1 were abolished by chronic treatment (4-8 weeks) with a specific p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB-239063AN. OPN immunoreactivity was localized predominantly in the apical portion of tubule epithelium, while PAI-1 immunoreactivity was robust in glomeruli, tubules and renal artery endothelium. Treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor significantly reduced OPN and PAI-1 protein expression in target organs. Kidney gene expression was increased for OPN (4.9- and 7.9-fold) and PAI-1 (2.8- and 11.5-fold) in SFD SHR-SP and L-NAME SHR, respectively. In-silico pathway analysis revealed that activation of p38 MAPK was linked to OPN and PAI-1 via SPI, c-fos and c-jun; suggesting that these pathways may play an important role in p38 MAPK-dependent hypertensive renal dysfunction. The results suggest that enhanced OPN and PAI-1 expression reflects end-organ damage in hypertension and that suppression

  10. Selective COX-2 Inhibitors: A Review of Their Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Zarghi, Afshin; Arfaei, Sara

    2011-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the competitive inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (COX), the enzyme which mediates the bioconversion of arachidonic acid to inflammatory prostaglandins (PGs). Their use is associated with the side effects such as gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. The therapeutic anti-inflammatory action of NSAIDs is produced by the inhibition of COX-2, while the undesired side effects arise from inhibition of COX-1 activity. Thus, it was though that more selective COX-2 inhibitors would have reduced side effects. Based upon a number of selective COX-2 inhibitors (rofecoxib, celecoxib, valdecoxibetc.) were developed as safer NSAIDs with improved gastric safety profile. However, the recent market removal of some COXIBs such as rofecoxib due to its adverse cardiovascular side effects clearly encourages the researchers to explore and evaluate alternative templates with COX-2 inhibitory activity. Recognition of new avenues for selective COX-2 inhibitors in cancer chemotherapy and neurological diseases such as Parkinson and Alzheimer’s diseases still continues to attract investigations on the development of COX-2 inhibitors. This review highlights the various structural classes of selective COX-2 inhibitors with special emphasis on their structure-activity relationships. PMID:24250402

  11. 4-Anilino-6-phenyl-quinoline inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2).

    PubMed

    Olsson, Henric; Sjö, Peter; Ersoy, Oguz; Kristoffersson, Anna; Larsson, Joakim; Nordén, Bo

    2010-08-15

    A class of inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated kinase 2 (MK2) was discovered via high-throughput screening. This compound class demonstrates activity against the enzyme with sub-microM IC(50) values, and suppresses LPS-induced TNFalpha levels in THP-1 cells. MK2 inhibition kinetic measurements indicated mixed binding approaching non-ATP competitive inhibition.

  12. Functional Analysis by Site-Directed Mutagenesis of the NAD+-Reducing Hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, Tanja; De Lacey, Antonio L.; Friedrich, Bärbel

    2002-01-01

    The tetrameric cytoplasmic [NiFe] hydrogenase (SH) of Ralstonia eutropha couples the oxidation of hydrogen to the reduction of NAD+ under aerobic conditions. In the catalytic subunit HoxH, all six conserved motifs surrounding the [NiFe] site are present. Five of these motifs were altered by site-directed mutagenesis in order to dissect the molecular mechanism of hydrogen activation. Based on phenotypic characterizations, 27 mutants were grouped into four different classes. Mutants of the major class, class I, failed to grow on hydrogen and were devoid of H2-oxidizing activity. In one of these isolates (HoxH I64A), H2 binding was impaired. Class II mutants revealed a high D2/H+ exchange rate relative to a low H2-oxidizing activity. A representative (HoxH H16L) displayed D2/H+ exchange but had lost electron acceptor-reducing activity. Both activities were equally affected in class III mutants. Mutants forming class IV showed a particularly interesting phenotype. They displayed O2-sensitive growth on hydrogen due to an O2-sensitive SH protein. PMID:12399498

  13. Synthesis of the proteinase inhibitor LEKTI domain 6 by the fragment condensation method and regioselective disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Zoe; Barlos, Kostas K; Gatos, Dimitrios; Adermann, Knut; Deraison, Celine; Barlos, Kleomenis

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are of high pharmaceutical interest and are drug candidates for a variety of indications. Specific kallikrein inhibitors are important for their antitumor activity and their potential application to the treatment of skin diseases. In this study we describe the synthesis of domain 6 of the kallikrein inhibitor Lympho-Epithilial Kazal-Type Inhibitor (LEKTI) by the fragment condensation method and site-directed cystine bridge formation. To obtain the linear LEKTI precursor, the condensation was best performed in solution, coupling the protected fragment 1-22 to 23-68. This method yielded LEKTI domain 6 of high purity and equipotent to the recombinantly produced peptide. PMID:20069636

  14. Structure-activity relationships of substituted oxyoxalamides as inhibitors of the human soluble epoxide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Hae; Lee, In-Hee; Nishiwaki, Hisashi; Hammock, Bruce D; Nishi, Kosuke

    2014-02-01

    We explored both structure-activity relationships among substituted oxyoxalamides used as the primary pharmacophore of inhibitors of the human sEH and as a secondary pharmacophore to improve water solubility of inhibitors. When the oxyoxalamide function was modified with a variety of alkyls or substituted alkyls, compound 6 with a 2-adamantyl group and a benzyl group was found to be a potent sEH inhibitor, suggesting that the substituted oxyoxalamide function is a promising primary pharmacophore for the human sEH, and compound 6 can be a novel lead structure for the development of further improved oxyoxalamide or other related derivatives. In addition, introduction of substituted oxyoxalamide to inhibitors with an amide or urea primary pharmacophore produced significant improvements in inhibition potency and water solubility. In particular, the N,N,O-trimethyloxyoxalamide group in amide or urea inhibitors (26 and 31) was most effective among those tested for both inhibition and solubility. The results indicate that substituted oxyoxalamide function incorporated into amide or urea inhibitors is a useful secondary pharmacophore, and the resulting structures will be an important basis for the development of bioavailable sEH inhibitors.

  15. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are ∼106 times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-à-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's “closed,” inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:20498699

  16. Structure–activity studies with high-affinity inhibitors of pyroglutamyl-peptidase II

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Inhibitors of PPII (pyroglutamyl-peptidase II) (EC 3.4.19.6) have potential applications as investigative and therapeutic agents. The rational design of inhibitors is hindered, however, by the lack of an experimental structure for PPII. Previous studies have demonstrated that replacement of histidine in TRH (thyrotropin-releasing hormone) with asparagine produces a competitive PPII inhibitor (Ki 17.5 μM). To gain further insight into which functional groups are significant for inhibitory activity, we investigated the effects on inhibition of structural modifications to Glp-Asn-ProNH2 (pyroglutamyl-asparaginyl-prolineamide). Synthesis and kinetic analysis of a diverse series of carboxamide and C-terminally extended Glp-Asn-ProNH2 analogues were undertaken. Extensive quantitative structure–activity relationships were generated, which indicated that key functionalities in the basic molecular structure of the inhibitors combine in a unique way to cause PPII inhibition. Data from kinetic and molecular modelling studies suggest that hydrogen bonding between the asparagine side chain and PPII may provide a basis for the inhibitory properties of the asparagine-containing peptides. Prolineamide appeared to be important for interaction with the S2′ subsite, but some modifications were tolerated. Extension of Glp-Asn-ProNH2 with hydrophobic amino acids at the C-terminus led to a novel set of PPII inhibitors active in vitro at nanomolar concentrations. Such inhibitors were shown to enhance recovery of TRH released from rat brain slices. Glp-Asn-Pro-Tyr-Trp-Trp-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin displayed a Ki of 1 nM, making it the most potent competitive PPII inhibitor described to date. PPII inhibitors with this level of potency should find application in exploring the biological functions of TRH and PPII, and potentially provide a basis for development of novel therapeutics. PMID:15799721

  17. Designed Inhibitors of Insulin-Degrading Enzyme Regulate the Catabolism and Activity of Insulin

    SciTech Connect

    Leissring, Malcolm A.; Malito, Enrico; Hedouin, Sabrine; Reinstatler, Lael; Sahara, Tomoko; Abdul-Hay, Samer O.; Choudhry, Shakeel; Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Huzarska, Malwina; May, Philip S.; Choi, Sungwoon; Logan, Todd P.; Turk, Benjamin E.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tang, Wei-Jen; Stein, Ross L.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2010-09-20

    Insulin is a vital peptide hormone that is a central regulator of glucose homeostasis, and impairments in insulin signaling cause diabetes mellitus. In principle, it should be possible to enhance the activity of insulin by inhibiting its catabolism, which is mediated primarily by insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a structurally and evolutionarily distinctive zinc-metalloprotease. Despite interest in pharmacological inhibition of IDE as an attractive anti-diabetic approach dating to the 1950s, potent and selective inhibitors of IDE have not yet emerged. We used a rational design approach based on analysis of combinatorial peptide mixtures and focused compound libraries to develop novel peptide hydroxamic acid inhibitors of IDE. The resulting compounds are {approx} 10{sup 6} times more potent than existing inhibitors, non-toxic, and surprisingly selective for IDE vis-a-vis conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Crystallographic analysis of an IDE-inhibitor complex reveals a novel mode of inhibition based on stabilization of IDE's 'closed,' inactive conformation. We show further that pharmacological inhibition of IDE potentiates insulin signaling by a mechanism involving reduced catabolism of internalized insulin. Conclusions/Significance: The inhibitors we describe are the first to potently and selectively inhibit IDE or indeed any member of this atypical zinc-metalloprotease superfamily. The distinctive structure of IDE's active site, and the mode of action of our inhibitors, suggests that it may be possible to develop inhibitors that cross-react minimally with conventional zinc-metalloproteases. Significantly, our results reveal that insulin signaling is normally regulated by IDE activity not only extracellularly but also within cells, supporting the longstanding view that IDE inhibitors could hold therapeutic value for the treatment of diabetes.

  18. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2013-04-01

    The reports included in this report are for project activities that occurred from October 2011 through September 2012. These reports describe in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our talented and enthusiastic principal investigators (PIs). Many of the reports describe R&D efforts that were “successful” in their pursuits and resulted in a positive outcome or technology realization. As we’ve stated before, and continue to stress, in some cases the result is a “negative” finding, for instance a technology is currently impractical or out of reach. This can often be viewed erroneously as a “failure,” but is actually a valid outcome in the pursuit of high-risk research, which often leads to unforeseen new paths of discovery. Either result advances our knowledge and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or likewise avoid costly paths not appropriate for the challenges presented. The SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation and development that returns multifold to the NNSS mission. Overall the program is a strong R&D innovation engine, benefited by an enhanced mission, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum benefit. The 23 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security.

  19. Chicken scFvs with an Artificial Cysteine for Site-Directed Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    For the site-directed conjugation of chemicals and radioisotopes to the chicken-derived single-chain variable fragment (scFv), we investigated amino acid residues replaceable with cysteine. By replacing each amino acid of the 157 chicken variable region framework residues (FR, 82 residues on VH and 75 on VL) with cysteine, 157 artificial cysteine mutants were generated and characterized. At least 27 residues on VL and 37 on VH could be replaced with cysteine while retaining the binding activity of the original scFv. We prepared three VL (L5, L6 and L7) and two VH (H13 and H16) mutants as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and showed that PEG-conjugation to the sulfhydryl group of the artificial cysteine was achievable in all five mutants. Because the charge around the cysteine residue affects the in vivo stability of thiol-maleimide conjugation, we prepared 16 charge-variant artificial cysteine mutants by replacing the flanking residues of H13 with charged amino acids and determined that the binding activity was not affected in any of the mutants except one. We prepared four charge-variant H13 artificial cysteine mutants (RCK, DCE, ECD and ECE) as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and confirmed that the reactivity of the sulfhydryl group on cysteine is active and their binding activity is retained after the conjugation process. PMID:26764487

  20. Chicken scFvs with an Artificial Cysteine for Site-Directed Conjugation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Aerin; Shin, Jung Won; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Hyori; Chung, Junho

    2016-01-01

    For the site-directed conjugation of chemicals and radioisotopes to the chicken-derived single-chain variable fragment (scFv), we investigated amino acid residues replaceable with cysteine. By replacing each amino acid of the 157 chicken variable region framework residues (FR, 82 residues on VH and 75 on VL) with cysteine, 157 artificial cysteine mutants were generated and characterized. At least 27 residues on VL and 37 on VH could be replaced with cysteine while retaining the binding activity of the original scFv. We prepared three VL (L5, L6 and L7) and two VH (H13 and H16) mutants as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and showed that PEG-conjugation to the sulfhydryl group of the artificial cysteine was achievable in all five mutants. Because the charge around the cysteine residue affects the in vivo stability of thiol-maleimide conjugation, we prepared 16 charge-variant artificial cysteine mutants by replacing the flanking residues of H13 with charged amino acids and determined that the binding activity was not affected in any of the mutants except one. We prepared four charge-variant H13 artificial cysteine mutants (RCK, DCE, ECD and ECE) as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and confirmed that the reactivity of the sulfhydryl group on cysteine is active and their binding activity is retained after the conjugation process.

  1. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, H. A.

    2015-04-22

    The reports contained herein are for project activities that occurred from October 2013 through September 2014. Project life cycle is indicated under the title as well as the original proposal number (in the following format: site abbreviation--ID #--originating fiscal year; e.g., STL-03-14). Each of the reports describes in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our principal investigators. As SDRD, by definition, invests in “high-risk” and hopefully “high-payoff” research, the element of uncertainty is inherent. While many of our efforts are “successful” and result in positive outcomes or technology utilization, some fall short of expectations, but cannot be construed as “failure” in the negative sense. The latter is a natural and valid part of the process of advanced research and often leads to unforeseen new pathways to future discovery. Regardless, either result advances our knowledge base and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or avoid costly and unwarranted paths for future challenges. In summary, the SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation that returns multifold to our customers, to national security, and to the general public. The program is a vibrant R&D innovation engine, benefited by its discretionary pedigree, enhanced mission spectrum, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum taxpayer benefit. The 25 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security. Further SDRD performance metrics can be found in the appendix at the end of this report.

  2. Virtual Ligand Screening of the p300/CBP Histone Acetyltransferase: Identification of a Selective Small Molecule Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Erin M.; Yan, Gai; Mukherjee, Chandrani; Orry, Andrew; Wang, Ling; Holbert, Marc A.; Crump, Nicholas T.; Hazzalin, Catherine A.; Liszczak, Glen; Yuan, Hua; Larocca, Cecilia; Saldanha, S. Adrian; Abagyan, Ruben; Sun, Yan; Meyers, David J.; Marmorstein, Ronen; Mahadevan, Louis C.; Alani, Rhoda M.; Cole, Philip A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300/CBP is a transcriptional coactivator implicated in many gene regulatory pathways and protein acetylation events. While p300 inhibitors have been reported, a potent, selective, and readily available active-site directed small molecule inhibitor is not yet known. Here we use a structure-based, in silico screening approach to identify a commercially available pyrazolone-containing small molecule p300 HAT inhibitor, C646. C646 is a competitive p300 inhibitor with a Ki of 400 nM and is selective versus other acetyltransferases. Studies on site-directed p300 HAT mutants and synthetic modifications of C646 confirm the importance of predicted interactions in conferring potency. Inhibition of histone acetylation and cell growth by C646 in cells validate its utility as a pharmacologic probe and suggest that p300/CBP HAT is a worthy anti-cancer target. PMID:20534345

  3. Discovery of orally active pyrrolopyridine- and aminopyridine-based Met kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Zhen-Wei; Wei, Donna; Schroeder, Gretchen M.; Cornelius, Lyndon A.M.; Kim, Kyoung; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Schmidt, Robert J.; Williams, David K.; Tokarski, John S.; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S.; Manne, Veeraswamy; Kamath, Amrita; Zhang, Yueping; Marathe, Punit; Hunt, John T.; Lombardo, Louis J.; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M.

    2008-09-10

    A series of acylurea analogs derived from pyrrolopyridine and aminopyridine scaffolds were identified as potent inhibitors of Met kinase activity. The SAR at various positions of the two kinase scaffolds was investigated. These studies led to the discovery of compounds 3b and 20b, which demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic properties in mice and significant antitumor activity in a human gastric carcinoma xenograft model.

  4. Acylprolinamides: a new class of peptide deformylase inhibitors with in vivo antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Axten, Jeffrey M; Medina, Jesús R; Blackledge, Charles W; Duquenne, Céline; Grant, Seth W; Bobko, Mark A; Peng, Tony; Miller, William H; Pinckney, Theresa; Gallagher, Timothy F; Kulkarni, Swarupa; Lewandowski, Thomas; Van Aller, Glenn S; Zonis, Rimma; Ward, Paris; Campobasso, Nino

    2012-06-15

    A new class of PDF inhibitor with potent, broad spectrum antibacterial activity is described. Optimization of blood stability and potency provided compounds with improved pharmacokinetics that were suitable for in vivo experiments. Compound 5c, which has robust antibacterial activity, demonstrated efficacy in two respiratory tract infection models.

  5. A New Class of Rhomboid Protease Inhibitors Discovered by Activity-Based Fluorescence Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Eliane V.; Zeißler, Annett; Vosyka, Oliver; Zeiler, Evelyn; Sieber, Stephan; Verhelst, Steven H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Rhomboids are intramembrane serine proteases that play diverse biological roles, including some that are of potential therapeutical relevance. Up to date, rhomboid inhibitor assays are based on protein substrate cleavage. Although rhomboids have an overlapping substrate specificity, substrates cannot be used universally. To overcome the need for substrates, we developed a screening assay using fluorescence polarization activity-based protein profiling (FluoPol ABPP) that is compatible with membrane proteases. With FluoPol ABPP, we identified new inhibitors for the E. coli rhomboid GlpG. Among these was a structural class that has not yet been reported as rhomboid inhibitors: β-lactones. They form covalent and irreversible complexes with the active site serine of GlpG. The presence of alkyne handles on the β-lactones also allowed activity-based labeling. Overall, these molecules represent a new scaffold for future inhibitor and activity-based probe development, whereas the assay will allow inhibitor screening of ill-characterized membrane proteases. PMID:23991088

  6. Effect of reactive site loop elongation on the inhibitory activity of C1-inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bos, Ineke G A; Lubbers, Yvonne T P; Eldering, Eric; Abrahams, Jan Pieter; Hack, C Erik

    2004-06-01

    The serine protease inhibitor C1-Inhibitor (C1-Inh) inhibits several complement- and contact-system proteases, which play an important role in inflammation. C1-Inh has a short reactive site loop (RSL) compared to other serpins. RSL length determines the inhibitory activity of serpins. We investigated the effect of RSL elongation on inhibitory activity of C1-Inh by insertion of one or two alanine residues in the RSL. One of five mutants had an increased association rate with kallikrein, but was nevertheless a poor inhibitor because of a simultaneous high stoichiometry of inhibition (>10). The association rate of the other variants was lower than that of wild-type C1-Inh. These data suggest that the relatively weak inhibitory activity of C1-Inh is not the result of its short RSL. The short RSL of C1-Inh has, surprisingly, the optimal length for inhibition.

  7. Highly improved antiparasitic activity after introduction of an N-benzylimidazole moiety on protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bosc, Damien; Mouray, Elisabeth; Cojean, Sandrine; Franco, Caio Haddad; Loiseau, Philippe M; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H; Moraes, Carolina Borsoi; Grellier, Philippe; Dubois, Joëlle

    2016-02-15

    In our search for new protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors with improved antiparasitic activities, we modified our previously developed 3-arylthiophene series of inhibitors by replacing the thioisopropyl group by different substituted imidazolylmethanamino moieties. Twenty four new derivatives were synthesized and evaluated against human and parasite farnesyltransferases, and their anti-parasitic activity was determined against Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania donovani. Introduction of a N-p-substituted-benzylimidazole led to significantly increase the inhibition of parasite proliferation in the submicromolar range. The structure of the best inhibitors was parasite dependent. Three compounds possess IC50 values at the same range as the reference miltefosine against L. donovani proliferation and other new derivatives display high level of anti-trypanosomal activity against T. cruzi, higher or in the same order of magnitude as the reference compounds benznidazole and nifurtimox. PMID:26774924

  8. PHOTOREGULATION OF BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY BY PHOTOCROMIC REAGENTS, II. INHIBITORS OF ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE*†

    PubMed Central

    Bieth, Joseph; Vratsanos, Spyros M.; Wassermann, Norbert; Erlanger, Bernard F.

    1969-01-01

    The enzymic activity of acetylcholinesterase can be photoregulated through the mediation of photochromic inhibitors of the enzyme. N-p-phenylazophenyl-N-phenylcarbamyl fluoride, an irreversible inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, exists as two geometric isomers which are interconvertible through the action of light. The cis isomer, which predominates after exposure to light of 320 nm, is more active than the trans isomer, which results from exposure to light of 420 nm. It was possible, therefore, to use light energy to regulate the inactivation of the enzyme. Similarly, levels of acetylcholinesterase activity could be photo-regulated in a completely reversible manner by means of the photochromic reversible inhibitor p-phenylazophenyltrimethylammonium chloride. These experiments can serve as models for similar phenomena observed in nature, particularly in photoperiodic rhythms of higher animals. Images PMID:5264140

  9. Bivalent Inhibitors of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Carrie M.; Chang, Matthew E. K.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases are key players in a large number of cellular signaling pathways. Dysregulated kinase activity has been implicated in a number of diseases, and members of this enzyme family are of therapeutic interest. However, due to the fact that most inhibitors interact with the highly conserved ATP-binding sites of kinases, it is a significant challenge to develop pharmacological agents that target only one of the greater than 500 kinases present in humans. A potential solution to this problem is the development of bisubstrate and bivalent kinase inhibitors, in which an active site-directed moiety is tethered to another ligand that targets a location outside of the ATP-binding cleft. Because kinase signaling specificity is modulated by regions outside of the ATP-binding site, strategies that exploit these interactions have the potential to provide reagents with high target selectivity. This review highlights examples of kinase interaction sites that can potentially be exploited by bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors. Furthermore, an overview of efforts to target these interactions with bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors is provided. Finally, several examples of the successful application of these reagents in a cellular setting are described. PMID:24564382

  10. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R.; Fry, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes’ biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme–cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors – especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen (1O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting 1O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (−)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  11. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity by high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Franková, Lenka; Defries, Andrew; Cutler, Sean R; Fry, Stephen C

    2015-09-01

    Small molecules (xenobiotics) that inhibit cell-wall-localised enzymes are valuable for elucidating the enzymes' biological roles. We applied a high-throughput fluorescent dot-blot screen to search for inhibitors of Petroselinum xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET) activity in vitro. Of 4216 xenobiotics tested, with cellulose-bound xyloglucan as donor-substrate, 18 inhibited XET activity and 18 promoted it (especially anthraquinones and flavonoids). No compounds promoted XET in quantitative assays with (cellulose-free) soluble xyloglucan as substrate, suggesting that promotion was dependent on enzyme-cellulose interactions. With cellulose-free xyloglucan as substrate, we found 22 XET-inhibitors - especially compounds that generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) e.g., riboflavin (IC50 29 μM), retinoic acid, eosin (IC50 27 μM) and erythrosin (IC50 36 μM). The riboflavin effect was light-dependent, supporting (1)O2 involvement. Other inhibitors included tannins, sulphydryl reagents and triphenylmethanes. Some inhibitors (vulpinic acid and brilliant blue G) were relatively specific to XET, affecting only two or three, respectively, of nine other wall-enzyme activities tested; others [e.g. (-)-epigallocatechin gallate and riboflavin] were non-specific. In vivo, out of eight XET-inhibitors bioassayed, erythrosin (1 μM) inhibited cell expansion in Rosa and Zea cell-suspension cultures, and 40 μM mycophenolic acid and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibited Zea culture growth. Our work showcases a general high-throughput strategy for discovering wall-enzyme inhibitors, some being plant growth inhibitors potentially valuable as physiological tools or herbicide leads. PMID:26093490

  12. The potent Cdc7-Dbf4 (DDK) kinase inhibitor XL413 has limited activity in many cancer cell lines and discovery of potential new DDK inhibitor scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sasi, Nanda Kumar; Tiwari, Kanchan; Soon, Fen-Fen; Bonte, Dorine; Wang, Tong; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric; Weinreich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or DDK (Dbf4-dependent kinase) is required to initiate DNA replication by phosphorylating and activating the replicative Mcm2-7 DNA helicase. DDK is overexpressed in many tumor cells and is an emerging chemotherapeutic target since DDK inhibition causes apoptosis of diverse cancer cell types but not of normal cells. PHA-767491 and XL413 are among a number of potent DDK inhibitors with low nanomolar IC50 values against the purified kinase. Although XL413 is highly selective for DDK, its activity has not been extensively characterized on cell lines. We measured anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of XL413 on a panel of tumor cell lines compared to PHA-767491, whose activity is well characterized. Both compounds were effective biochemical DDK inhibitors but surprisingly, their activities in cell lines were highly divergent. Unlike PHA-767491, XL413 had significant anti-proliferative activity against only one of the ten cell lines tested. Since XL413 did not effectively inhibit DDK in multiple cell lines, this compound likely has limited bioavailability. To identify potential leads for additional DDK inhibitors, we also tested the cross-reactivity of ∼400 known kinase inhibitors against DDK using a DDK thermal stability shift assay (TSA). We identified 11 compounds that significantly stabilized DDK. Several inhibited DDK with comparable potency to PHA-767491, including Chk1 and PKR kinase inhibitors, but had divergent chemical scaffolds from known DDK inhibitors. Taken together, these data show that several well-known kinase inhibitors cross-react with DDK and also highlight the opportunity to design additional specific, biologically active DDK inhibitors for use as chemotherapeutic agents.

  13. The Potent Cdc7-Dbf4 (DDK) Kinase Inhibitor XL413 Has Limited Activity in Many Cancer Cell Lines and Discovery of Potential New DDK Inhibitor Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, Nanda Kumar; Tiwari, Kanchan; Soon, Fen-Fen; Bonte, Dorine; Wang, Tong; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H. Eric; Weinreich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase or DDK (Dbf4-dependent kinase) is required to initiate DNA replication by phosphorylating and activating the replicative Mcm2-7 DNA helicase. DDK is overexpressed in many tumor cells and is an emerging chemotherapeutic target since DDK inhibition causes apoptosis of diverse cancer cell types but not of normal cells. PHA-767491 and XL413 are among a number of potent DDK inhibitors with low nanomolar IC50 values against the purified kinase. Although XL413 is highly selective for DDK, its activity has not been extensively characterized on cell lines. We measured anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of XL413 on a panel of tumor cell lines compared to PHA-767491, whose activity is well characterized. Both compounds were effective biochemical DDK inhibitors but surprisingly, their activities in cell lines were highly divergent. Unlike PHA-767491, XL413 had significant anti-proliferative activity against only one of the ten cell lines tested. Since XL413 did not effectively inhibit DDK in multiple cell lines, this compound likely has limited bioavailability. To identify potential leads for additional DDK inhibitors, we also tested the cross-reactivity of ∼400 known kinase inhibitors against DDK using a DDK thermal stability shift assay (TSA). We identified 11 compounds that significantly stabilized DDK. Several inhibited DDK with comparable potency to PHA-767491, including Chk1 and PKR kinase inhibitors, but had divergent chemical scaffolds from known DDK inhibitors. Taken together, these data show that several well-known kinase inhibitors cross-react with DDK and also highlight the opportunity to design additional specific, biologically active DDK inhibitors for use as chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:25412417

  14. Synthesis of non-competitive inhibitors of sphingomyelinases with significant activity.

    PubMed

    Yokomatsu, Tsutomu; Murano, Tetsuo; Akiyama, Takeshi; Koizumi, Junichi; Shibuya, Shiroshi; Tsuji, Yoshiaki; Soeda, Shinji; Shimeno, Hiroshi

    2003-01-20

    A series of short-chain analogues of N-palmitoylsphingosine-1-phosphate, modified by replacement of the phosphate and the long alkenyl side chain with hydrolytically stable difluoromethylene phosphonate and phenyl, respectively, were prepared to study the structure-activity relationship for inhibition of sphingomyelinase. The study revealed that inhibition is highly dependent upon the stereochemistry of the asymmetric centers of the acylamino moiety, and resulted in identification of a non-competitive inhibitor with the same level of inhibitory activity of schyphostatin, the most potent of the few known small molecular inhibitors of sphingomyelinase.

  15. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of potent 4-fluoro-2-cyanopyrrolidine dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hiroshi; Hiratate, Akira; Takahashi, Masato; Mikami, Ayako; Saito-Hori, Masako; Munetomo, Eiji; Kitano, Kiyokazu; Chonan, Sumi; Saito, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Akio; Takaoka, Yuji; Yamamoto, Koji

    2008-04-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors are promising antidiabetic drugs, and several drugs are in the developmental stage. We previously reported that the introduction of fluorine to the 4-position of 2-cyanopyrrolidine enhanced the DPP-IV inhibitory effect. In the present report, we examined the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of 2-cyano-4-fluoropyrrolidine with N-substituted glycine at the 1-position. We report the identification of a potent and stable DPP-IV inhibitor (TS-021) with a long-term persistent plasma drug concentration and a potent antihyperglycemic activity.

  16. New direct inhibitors of InhA with antimycobacterial activity based on a tetrahydropyran scaffold.

    PubMed

    Pajk, Stane; Živec, Matej; Šink, Roman; Sosič, Izidor; Neu, Margarete; Chung, Chun-wa; Martínez-Hoyos, María; Pérez-Herrán, Esther; Álvarez-Gómez, Daniel; Álvarez-Ruíz, Emilio; Mendoza-Losana, Alfonso; Castro-Pichel, Julia; Barros, David; Ballell-Pages, Lluís; Young, Robert J; Convery, Maire A; Encinas, Lourdes; Gobec, Stanislav

    2016-04-13

    Tetrahydropyran derivative 1 was discovered in a high-throughput screening campaign to find new inhibitors of mycobacterial InhA. Following initial in-vitro profiling, a structure-activity relationship study was initiated and a focused library of analogs was synthesized and evaluated. This yielded compound 42 with improved antimycobacterial activity and low cytotoxicity. Additionally, the crystal structure of InhA in complex with inhibitor 1 was resolved, to reveal the binding mode and provide hints for further optimization. PMID:26900657

  17. A Trypsin Inhibitor from Clitoria fairchildiana Cotyledons is Active Against Digestive Enzymes of Aedes aegypti Larvae.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lucilene O; Fernandes, Kátia V S; Pádua, Dayanni de Souza; Carvalho, André de O; Lemos, Francisco J A; Gomes, Valdirene M; Oliveira, Antônia E A; Ferreira, André T da Silva; Perales, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, the principal mosquito vector of yellow fever, dengue fever and chikungunya fever virus-transmitted diseases, is an insect closely associated with humans and their housing habitats. As there is no commercially available vaccine, prevention is the most suggested form of avoiding disease spreading and a number of studies are being developed in order to give support to vector control operations. The present study reports on the identification of a trypsin inhibitor isolated from cotyledons of the Clitoria fairchildiana amazonic tree seeds, which was able to reduce by 87.93 % the activity of digestive enzymes of fourth instar A. aegypti larva. A partial amino acid sequence showed strong similarity with sequences from several trypsin inhibitors already reported in the literature. The 13,000 Da isolated inhibitor was seen to be active solely against trypsin-like enzymes, neither acting on papain, α-amylase nor on other serine proteases, such as elastase, chymotrypsin or subtilisin. At least six from seven active digestive proteases from A. aegypti larvae, visualized by zymography, were severely affected soon after exposed to the inhibitor. The strong and specific action of the isolated inhibitor against trypsin digestive enzymes of this insect vector led us to believe that this protein may be a good candidate for a prospective alternative biocontrol method. PMID:26156641

  18. Polycomb repressive complex 2 structure with inhibitor reveals a mechanism of activation and drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Brooun, Alexei; Gajiwala, Ketan S.; Deng, Ya-Li; Liu, Wei; Bolaños, Ben; Bingham, Patrick; He, You-Ai; Diehl, Wade; Grable, Nicole; Kung, Pei-Pei; Sutton, Scott; Maegley, Karen A.; Yu, Xiu; Stewart, Al E.

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) mediates gene silencing through chromatin reorganization by methylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27). Overexpression of the complex and point mutations in the individual subunits of PRC2 have been shown to contribute to tumorigenesis. Several inhibitors of the PRC2 activity have shown efficacy in EZH2-mutated lymphomas and are currently in clinical development, although the molecular basis of inhibitor recognition remains unknown. Here we report the crystal structures of the inhibitor-bound wild-type and Y641N PRC2. The structures illuminate an important role played by a stretch of 17 residues in the N-terminal region of EZH2, we call the activation loop, in the stimulation of the enzyme activity, inhibitor recognition and the potential development of the mutation-mediated drug resistance. The work presented here provides new avenues for the design and development of next-generation PRC2 inhibitors through establishment of a structure-based drug design platform. PMID:27122193

  19. A new family of covalent inhibitors block nucleotide binding to the active site of pyruvate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Hugh P.; Walsh, Martin J.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Wear, Martin A.; Boxer, Matthew B.; Shen, Min; Mcnae, Iain W.; Nowicki, Matthew W.; Michels, Paul A. M.; Auld, Douglas S.; Fothergill-Gilmore, Linda A.; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.

    2012-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pyruvate kinase (PYK) plays a central role in the metabolism of many organisms and cell types, but the elucidation of the details of its function in a systems biology context has been hampered by the lack of specific high-affinity small molecule inhibitors. High-throughput screening has been used to identify a family of saccharin derivatives which inhibit Leishmania mexicana PYK (LmPYK) activity in a time- (and dose-) dependent manner; a characteristic of irreversible inhibition. The crystal structure of 4-[(1,1-dioxo-1,2-benzothiazol-3-yl)sulfanyl]benzoic acid (DBS) complexed with LmPYK shows that the saccharin moiety reacts with an active-site lysine residue (Lys335), forming a covalent bond and sterically hindering the binding of ADP/ATP. Mutation of the lysine residue to an arginine residue eliminated the effect of the inhibitor molecule, providing confirmation of the proposed inhibitor mechanism. This lysine residue is conserved in the active sites of the four human PYK isoenzymes, which were also found to be irreversibly inhibited by DBS. X-ray structures of PYK isoforms show structural differences at the DBS binding pocket, and this covalent inhibitor of PYK provides a chemical scaffold for the design of new families of potentially isoform-specific irreversible inhibitors. PMID:22906073

  20. p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors: a review on pharmacophore mapping and QSAR studies.

    PubMed

    Gangwal, Rahul P; Bhadauriya, Anuseema; Damre, Mangesh V; Dhoke, Gaurao V; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2013-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are the serine/threonine protein kinases, which play a vital role in cellular responses to external stress signals. p38 MAP kinase inhibitors have shown anti-inflammatory effects in the preclinical disease models, primarily through inhibition of the expression of inflammatory mediators. A number of structurally diverse p38 MAP kinase inhibitors have been developed as potential anti-inflammatory agents. Most of the inhibitors have failed in the clinical trials either due to poor pharmacokinetic profile or selectivity issue, which makes p38 MAP kinase a promising target for molecular modelling studies. Several quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and pharmacophore models have been developed to identify the structural requirements essential for p38 MAP kinase inhibitory activity. In this review, we provide an overview of the presently known p38 MAP kinase inhibitors and how QSAR analyses among series of compounds have led to the development of molecular models and pharmacophores, allowing the design of novel inhibitors.

  1. Type 1 plaminogen activator inhibitor gene: Functional analysis and glucocorticoid regulation of its promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Van Zonneveld, A.J.; Curriden, S.A.; Loskutoff, D.J. )

    1988-08-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 is an important component of the fibrinolytic system and its biosynthesis is subject to complex regulation. To study this regulation at the level of transcription, the authors have identified and sequenced the promoter of the human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene. Nuclease protection experiments were performed by using endothelial cell mRNA and the transcription initiation (cap) site was established. Sequence analysis of the 5{prime} flanking region of the gene revealed a perfect TATA box at position {minus}28 to position {minus}23, the conserved distance from the cap site. Comparative functional studies with the firefly luciferase gene as a reporter gene showed that fragments derived from this 5{prime} flanking region exhibited high promoter activity when transfected into bovine aortic endothelial cells and mouse Ltk{sup {minus}} fibroblasts but were inactive when introduced into HeLa cells. These studies indicate that the fragments contain the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 promoter and that it is expressed in a tissue-specific manner. Although the fragments were also silent in rat FTO2B hepatoma cells, their promoter activity could be induced up to 40-fold with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. Promoter deletion mapping experiments and studies involving the fusion of promoter fragments to a heterologous gene indicated that dexamethasone induction is mediated by a glucocorticoid responsive element with enhancer-like properties located within the region between nucleotides {minus}305 and +75 of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 gene.

  2. Electron transport chain inhibitors induce microglia activation through enhancing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junli; Jiang, Zhongxin; Chen, Xuehong; Liu, Mengyang; Li, Jing; Liu, Na

    2016-01-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to be mediators of excessive microglial activation, yet the resources and mechanism are not fully understood. Here we stimulated murine microglial BV-2 cells and primary microglial cells with different inhibitors of electron transport chain (ETC), rotenone, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), antimycin A, and NaN3 to induce mitochondrial ROS production and we observed the role of mitochondrial ROS in microglial activation. Our results showed that ETC inhibitors resulted in significant changes in cell viability, microglial morphology, cell cycle arrest and mitochondrial ROS production in a dose-dependent manner in both primary cultural microglia and BV-2 cell lines. Moreover, ETC inhibitors, especially rotenone and antimycin A stimulated secretion of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) by microglia with marked activation of mitogen-activated proteinkinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which could be blocked by specific inhibitors of MAPK and NF-κB and mitochondrial antioxidants, Mito-TEMPO. Taken together, our results demonstrated that inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain in microglia led to production of mitochondrial ROS and therefore may activate MAPK/NF-кB dependent inflammatory cytokines release in microglia, which indicated that mitochondrial-derived ROS were contributed to microglial activation.

  3. Identification of Selective and Potent Inhibitors of Fibroblast Activation Protein and Prolyl Oligopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    Poplawski, Sarah E.; Lai, Jack H.; Li, Youhua; Jin, Zhiping; Liu, Yuxin; Wu, Wengen; Wu, Yong; Zhou, Yuhong; Sudmeier, James L.; Sanford, David G.; Bachovchin, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a serine protease selectively expressed on reactive stromal fibroblasts of epithelial carcinomas. It is widely believed to play a role in tumor invasion and metastasis and therefore to represent a potential new drug target for cancer. Investigation into its biological function, however, has been hampered by the current unavailability of selective inhibitors. The challenge has been in identifying inhibitors that are selective for FAP over both the dipeptidyl peptidases (DPPs), with which it shares exopeptidase specificity, and prolyl oligopeptidase (PREP), with which it shares endopeptidase specificity. Here, we report the first potent FAP inhibitor with selectivity over both the DPPs and PREP, N-(pyridine-4-carbonyl)-d-Ala-boroPro (ARI-3099, 6). We also report a similarly potent and selective PREP inhibitor, N-(pyridine-3-carbonyl)-Val-boroPro (ARI-3531, 22). Both are boronic acid based inhibitors, demonstrating that high selectivity can be achieved using this electrophile. The inhibitors are stable, easy to synthesize, and should prove to be useful in helping to elucidate the biological functions of these two unique and interesting enzymes, as well as their potential as drug targets. PMID:23594271

  4. In silico, in vitro and cellular analysis with a kinome-wide inhibitor panel correlates cellular LRRK2 dephosphorylation to inhibitor activity on LRRK2.

    PubMed

    Vancraenenbroeck, Renée; De Raeymaecker, Joren; Lobbestael, Evy; Gao, Fangye; De Maeyer, Marc; Voet, Arnout; Baekelandt, Veerle; Taymans, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a complex, multidomain protein which is considered a valuable target for potential disease-modifying therapeutic strategies for Parkinson's disease (PD). In mammalian cells and brain, LRRK2 is phosphorylated and treatment of cells with inhibitors of LRRK2 kinase activity can induce LRRK2 dephosphorylation at a cluster of serines including Ser910/935/955/973. It has been suggested that phosphorylation levels at these sites reflect LRRK2 kinase activity, however kinase-dead variants of LRRK2 or kinase activating variants do not display altered Ser935 phosphorylation levels compared to wild type. Furthermore, Ser910/935/955/973 are not autophosphorylation sites, therefore, it is unclear if inhibitor induced dephosphorylation depends on the activity of compounds on LRRK2 or on yet to be identified upstream kinases. Here we used a panel of 160 ATP competitive and cell permeable kinase inhibitors directed against all branches of the kinome and tested their activity on LRRK2 in vitro using a peptide-substrate-based kinase assay. In neuronal SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing LRRK2 we used compound-induced dephosphorylation of Ser935 as readout. In silico docking of selected compounds was performed using a modeled LRRK2 kinase structure. Receiver operating characteristic plots demonstrated that the obtained docking scores to the LRRK2 ATP binding site correlated with in vitro and cellular compound activity. We also found that in vitro potency showed a high degree of correlation to cellular compound induced LRRK2 dephosphorylation activity across multiple compound classes. Therefore, acute LRRK2 dephosphorylation at Ser935 in inhibitor treated cells involves a strong component of inhibitor activity on LRRK2 itself, without excluding a role for upstream kinases. Understanding the regulation of LRRK2 phosphorylation by kinase inhibitors aids our understanding of LRRK2 signaling and may lead to development of new classes of LRRK2 kinase

  5. Hepatitis C virus NS3 protease is activated by low concentrations of protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Göran; Arenas, Omar Gutiérrez; Danielson, U Helena

    2009-12-01

    The nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a bifunctional enzyme with a protease and a helicase functionality located in each of the two domains of the single peptide chain. There is little experimental evidence for a functional role of this unexpected arrangement since artificial single domain forms of both enzymes are catalytically competent. We have observed that low concentrations of certain protease inhibitors activate the protease of full-length NS3 from HCV genotype 1a with up to 100%, depending on the preincubation time and the inhibitor used. The activation was reduced, but not eliminated, by increased ionic strength, lowered glycerol concentration, or lowered pH. In all cases, it was at the expense of a significant loss of activity. Activation was not seen with the artificial protease domain of genotype 1b NS3 fused with a fragment of the NS4A cofactor. This truncated and covalently modified enzyme form was much less active and exhibited fundamentally different catalytic properties to the full-length NS3 protease without the fused cofactor. The most plausible explanation for the activation was found to involve a slow transition between two enzyme conformations, which differed in their catalytic ability and affinity for inhibitors. Equations derived based on this assumption resulted in better fits to the experimental data than the equation for simple competitive inhibition. The mechanism may involve an inhibitor-induced stabilization of the helicase domain in a conformation that enhances the protease activity, or an improved alignment of the catalytic triad in the protease. The proposed mnemonic mechanism and derived equations are viable for both these explanations and can serve as a basic framework for future studies of enzymes activated by inhibitors or other ligands.

  6. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 1: structure-activity relationships, assessments of selectivity and cellular potency.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Long, Scott A; Pierce, Betsy S; Mahoney, Matthew W; Mourey, Robert J

    2009-08-15

    Identification of potent benzothiophene inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies, selectivity assessments against CDK2, cellular potency and mechanism of action are presented. Crystallographic data provide a rationale for the observed MK2 potency as well as selectivity over CDK2 for this class of inhibitors.

  7. Molecular Design, Synthesis and Trypanocidal Activity of Dipeptidyl Nitriles as Cruzain Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Avelar, Leandro A. A.; Camilo, Cristian D.; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Fernandes, William B.; Gonçalez, Cristiana; Kenny, Peter W.; Leitão, Andrei; McKerrow, James H.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Orozco, Erika V. Meñaca; Ribeiro, Jean F. R.; Rocha, Josmar R.; Rosini, Fabiana; Saidel, Marta E.

    2015-01-01

    A series of compounds based on the dipeptidyl nitrile scaffold were synthesized and assayed for their inhibitory activity against the T. cruzi cysteine protease cruzain. Structure activity relationships (SARs) were established using three, eleven and twelve variations respectively at the P1, P2 and P3 positions. A Ki value of 16 nM was observed for the most potent of these inhibitors which reflects a degree of non-additivity in the SAR. An X-ray crystal structure was determined for the ligand-protein complex for the structural prototype for the series. Twenty three inhibitors were also evaluated for their anti-trypanosomal effects and an EC50 value of 28 μM was observed for the most potent of these. Although there remains scope for further optimization, the knowledge gained from this study is also transferable to the design of cruzain inhibitors based on warheads other than nitrile as well as alternative scaffolds. PMID:26173110

  8. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel, highly active soft ROCK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Boland, Sandro; Bourin, Arnaud; Alen, Jo; Geraets, Jacques; Schroeders, Pieter; Castermans, Karolien; Kindt, Nele; Boumans, Nicki; Panitti, Laura; Fransen, Silke; Vanormelingen, Jessica; Stassen, Jean Marie; Leysen, Dirk; Defert, Olivier

    2015-05-28

    ROCK1 and ROCK2 play important roles in numerous cellular functions, including smooth muscle cell contraction, cell proliferation, adhesion, and migration. Consequently, ROCK inhibitors are of interest for treating multiple indications including cardiovascular diseases, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, lung diseases, and eye diseases. However, systemic inhibition of ROCK is expected to result in significant side effects. Strategies allowing reduced systemic exposure are therefore of interest. In a continuing effort toward identification of ROCK inhibitors, we here report the design, synthesis, and evaluation of novel soft ROCK inhibitors displaying an ester function allowing their rapid inactivation in the systemic circulation. Those compounds display subnanomolar activity against ROCK and strong differences of functional activity between parent compounds and expected metabolites. The binding mode of a representative compound was determined experimentally in a single-crystal X-ray diffraction study. Enzymes responsible for inactivation of these compounds once they enter systemic circulation are also discussed.

  9. Bioreductively Activated Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generators as MRSA Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khodade, Vinayak S; Sharath Chandra, Mallojjala; Banerjee, Ankita; Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulipeta, Mallikarjuna; Rangarajan, Radha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2014-07-10

    The number of cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections is on the rise globally and new strategies to identify drug candidates with novel mechanisms of action are in urgent need. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a series of benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-triones, which were designed based on redox-active natural products. We find that the in vitro inhibitory activity of 6-(prop-2-ynyl)benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-trione (1f) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including a panel of patient-derived strains, is comparable or better than vancomycin. We show that the lead compound generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell, contributing to its antibacterial activity. PMID:25050164

  10. Examination of the thiamin diphosphate binding site in yeast transketolase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Meshalkina, L; Nilsson, U; Wikner, C; Kostikowa, T; Schneider, G

    1997-03-01

    The role of two conserved amino acid residues in the thiamin diphosphate binding site of yeast transketolase has been analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis. Replacement of E162, which is part of a cluster of glutamic acid residues at the subunit interface, by alanine or glutamine results in mutant enzymes with most catalytic properties similar to wild-type enzyme. The two mutant enzymes show, however, significant increases in the K0.5 values for thiamin diphosphate in the absence of substrate and in the lag of the reaction progress curves. This suggests that the interaction of E162 with residue E418, and possibly E167, from the second subunit is important for formation and stabilization of the transketolase dimer. Replacement of the conserved residue D382, which is buried upon binding of thiamin diphosphate, by asparagine and alanine, results in mutant enzymes severely impaired in thiamin diphosphate binding and catalytic efficiency. The 25-80-fold increase in K0.5 for thiamin diphosphate suggests that D382 is involved in cofactor binding, probably by electrostatic compensation of the positive charge of the thiazolium ring and stabilization of a flexible loop at the active site. The decrease in catalytic activities in the D382 mutants indicates that this residue might also be important in subsequent steps in catalysis.

  11. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration. FY2005 report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Will

    2006-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

  12. Gene expression and activity of digestive proteases in Daphnia: effects of cyanobacterial protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequency of cyanobacterial blooms has increased worldwide, and these blooms have been claimed to be a major factor leading to the decline of the most important freshwater herbivores, i.e. representatives of the genus Daphnia. This suppression of Daphnia is partly attributed to the presence of biologically active secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria. Among these metabolites, protease inhibitors are found in almost every natural cyanobacterial bloom and have been shown to specifically inhibit Daphnia's digestive proteases in vitro, but to date no physiological responses of these serine proteases to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors in Daphnia have been reported in situ at the protein and genetic levels. Results Nine digestive proteases were detected in D. magna using activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Subsequent analyses by LC-MS/MS and database search led to the identification of respective protease genes. D. magna responded to dietary protease inhibitors by up-regulation of the expression of these respective proteases at the RNA-level and by the induction of new and less sensitive protease isoforms at the protein level. The up-regulation in response to dietary trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitors ranged from 1.4-fold to 25.6-fold. These physiological responses of Daphnia, i.e. up-regulation of protease expression and the induction of isoforms, took place even after feeding on 20% cyanobacterial food for only 24 h. These physiological responses proved to be independent from microcystin effects. Conclusion Here for the first time it was shown in situ that a D. magna clone responds physiologically to dietary cyanobacterial protease inhibitors by phenotypic plasticity of the targets of these specific inhibitors, i.e. Daphnia gut proteases. These regulatory responses are adaptive for D. magna, as they increase the capacity for protein digestion in the presence of dietary protease inhibitors. The type and extent of these responses in protease expression might

  13. Host immunity contributes to the anti-melanoma activity of BRAF inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Knight, Deborah A; Ngiow, Shin Foong; Li, Ming; Parmenter, Tiffany; Mok, Stephen; Cass, Ashley; Haynes, Nicole M; Kinross, Kathryn; Yagita, Hideo; Koya, Richard C; Graeber, Thomas G; Ribas, Antoni; McArthur, Grant A; Smyth, Mark J

    2013-03-01

    The BRAF mutant, BRAF(V600E), is expressed in nearly half of melanomas, and oral BRAF inhibitors induce substantial tumor regression in patients with BRAF(V600E) metastatic melanoma. The inhibitors are believed to work primarily by inhibiting BRAF(V600E)-induced oncogenic MAPK signaling; however, some patients treated with BRAF inhibitors exhibit increased tumor immune infiltration, suggesting that a combination of BRAF inhibitors and immunotherapy may be beneficial. We used two relatively resistant variants of Braf(V600E)-driven mouse melanoma (SM1 and SM1WT1) and melanoma-prone mice to determine the role of host immunity in type I BRAF inhibitor PLX4720 antitumor activity. We found that PLX4720 treatment downregulated tumor Ccl2 gene expression and decreased tumor CCL2 expression in both Braf(V600E) mouse melanoma transplants and in de novo melanomas in a manner that was coincident with reduced tumor growth. While PLX4720 did not directly increase tumor immunogenicity, analysis of SM1 tumor-infiltrating leukocytes in PLX4720-treated mice demonstrated a robust increase in CD8(+) T/FoxP3(+)CD4(+) T cell ratio and NK cells. Combination therapy with PLX4720 and anti-CCL2 or agonistic anti-CD137 antibodies demonstrated significant antitumor activity in mouse transplant and de novo tumorigenesis models. These data elucidate a role for host CCR2 in the mechanism of action of type I BRAF inhibitors and support the therapeutic potential of combining BRAF inhibitors with immunotherapy.

  14. Effective virtual screening strategy toward covalent ligands: identification of novel NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shengping; Tan, Jiani; Lai, Zhonghui; Li, Ying; Pang, Junxia; Xiao, Jianhu; Huang, Zhangjian; Zhang, Yihua; Ji, Hui; Lai, Yisheng

    2014-06-23

    The NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) is an emerging target for cancer therapy, which regulates the degradation and turnover of a variety of cancer-related proteins by activating the cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases. Among a limited number of known NAE inhibitors, the covalent inhibitors have demonstrated the most potent efficacy through their covalently linked adducts with NEDD8. Inspired by this unique mechanism, in this study, a novel combined strategy of virtual screening (VS) was adopted with the aim to identify diverse covalent inhibitors of NAE. To be specific, a docking-enabled pharmacophore model was first built from the possible active conformations of chosen covalent inhibitors. Meanwhile, a dynamic structure-based phamacophore was also established based on the snapshots derived from molecular dynamic simulation. Subsequent screening of a focused ZINC database using these pharmacophore models combined with covalent docking discovered three novel active compounds. Among them, compound LZ3 exhibited the most potent NAE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 1.06 ± 0.18 μM. Furthermore, a cell-based washout experiment proved the proposed covalent binding mechanism for compound LZ3, which confirmed the successful application of our combined VS strategy, indicating it may provide a viable solution to systematically discover novel covalent ligands.

  15. Expression, characterization, and site-directed mutation of a multiple herbicide-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase (rAHAS) from Pseudomonas sp. Lm10.

    PubMed

    Lang, Zhi-Fei; Shen, Jing-Jing; Cai, Shu; Zhang, Jun; He, Jian; Li, Shun-Peng

    2011-08-01

    A multiple herbicide-resistant acetohydroxyacid synthase (rAHAS) gene was cloned from Pseudomonas sp. Lm10. Sequence analysis showed that the rAHAS regulatory subunit was identical to that of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 (sensitive AHAS, sAHAS), whereas six different sites [H134→N (rAHAS→sAHAS), A135→P, S136→T, I210→V, F264→Y, and S486→W] were found in the catalytic subunit. The rAHAS and sAHAS were over expressed, purified and characterized. rAHAS showed higher resistance to four kinds of AHAS-inhibitor herbicides than sAHAS. The resistance factor of rAHAS was 56.0-fold, 12.6-fold, 6.5-fold, and 9.2-fold as compared with sAHAS when metsulfuron-methyl, imazethapyr, flumetsulam, and pyriminobac-methyl used as inhibitor, respectively. The specific activity of rAHAS was lower than that of sAHAS and the K (m) value of rAHAS for pyruvate was approximately onefold higher than the corresponding value for sAHAS. Data from site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that alteration at A135, F264, and S486 resulted in resistance reduction, while the mutation at H134, S136, and I210 has little effect on the resistance. A135 was mainly responsible for resistance to imidazolinone; F264 conferred resistance to sulfonylurea and triazolopyrimidine sulfonamide; and S486 showed multiple herbicides resistance to the four herbicides. PMID:21638043

  16. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 interacts with alpha3 subunit of proteasome and modulates its activity.

    PubMed

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Osinska, Magdalena; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2011-02-25

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), a multifunctional protein, is an important physiological regulator of fibrinolysis, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and cell motility. Recent observations show that PAI-1 may also be implicated in maintaining integrity of cells, especially with respect to cellular proliferation or apoptosis. In the present study we provide evidence that PAI-1 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity. First, by using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that the α3 subunit of proteasome directly interacts with PAI-1. Then, to ensure that the PAI-1-proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-1 antibodies. Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-1-proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. Both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern but also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. Furthermore, PAI-1 induced formation of aggresomes freely located in endothelial cytoplasm. Increased PAI-1 expression abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and pd2EGFP-N1 and prevented degradation of p53 as well as IκBα, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting.

  17. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Interacts with α3 Subunit of Proteasome and Modulates Its Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Osinska, Magdalena; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S.

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1), a multifunctional protein, is an important physiological regulator of fibrinolysis, extracellular matrix homeostasis, and cell motility. Recent observations show that PAI-1 may also be implicated in maintaining integrity of cells, especially with respect to cellular proliferation or apoptosis. In the present study we provide evidence that PAI-1 interacts with proteasome and affects its activity. First, by using the yeast two-hybrid system, we found that the α3 subunit of proteasome directly interacts with PAI-1. Then, to ensure that the PAI-1-proteasome complex is formed in vivo, both proteins were coimmunoprecipitated from endothelial cells and identified with specific antibodies. The specificity of this interaction was evidenced after transfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins with anti-PAI-1 antibodies. Subsequently, cellular distribution of the PAI-1-proteasome complexes was established by immunogold staining and electron microscopy analyses. Both proteins appeared in a diffuse cytosolic pattern but also could be found in a dense perinuclear and nuclear location. Furthermore, PAI-1 induced formation of aggresomes freely located in endothelial cytoplasm. Increased PAI-1 expression abrogated degradation of degron analyzed after cotransfection of HeLa cells with pCMV-PAI-1 and pd2EGFP-N1 and prevented degradation of p53 as well as IκBα, as evidenced both by confocal microscopy and Western immunoblotting. PMID:21135093

  18. HSP90 inhibitors decrease AID levels and activity in mice and in human cells.

    PubMed

    Montamat-Sicotte, Damien; Litzler, Ludivine C; Abreu, Cecilia; Safavi, Shiva; Zahn, Astrid; Orthwein, Alexandre; Müschen, Markus; Oppezzo, Pablo; Muñoz, Denise P; Di Noia, Javier M

    2015-08-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes in antigen-activated B cells, underpinning antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. AID can also be pathogenic by contributing to autoimmune diseases and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, AID can exert noncanonical functions when aberrantly expressed in epithelial cells. The lack of specific inhibitors prevents therapeutic applications to modulate AID functions. Here, we have exploited our previous finding that the HSP90 molecular chaperoning pathway stabilizes AID in B cells, to test whether HSP90 inhibitors could target AID in vivo. We demonstrate that chronic administration of HSP90 inhibitors decreases AID protein levels and isotype switching in immunized mice. HSP90 inhibitors also reduce disease severity in a mouse model of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia in which AID accelerates disease progression. We further show that human AID protein levels are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition in normal and leukemic B cells, and that HSP90 inhibition prevents AID-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition in a human breast cancer cell line in vitro. Thus, we provide proof-of-concept that HSP90 inhibitors indirectly target AID in vivo and that endogenous human AID is widely sensitive to them, which could have therapeutic applications.

  19. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition.

  20. Herbacetin Is a Novel Allosteric Inhibitor of Ornithine Decarboxylase with Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Joon; Roh, Eunmiri; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Oi, Naomi; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Pugliese, Angelo; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Chen, Hanyong; Cho, Eun Jin; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kang, Sun Chul; Paul, Souren; Kang, Hee Eun; Jung, Ji Won; Lee, Sung-Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Reddy, Kanamata; Yeom, Young Il; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2016-03-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the first step of polyamine biosynthesis that is associated with cell growth and tumor formation. Existing catalytic inhibitors of ODC have lacked efficacy in clinical testing or displayed unacceptable toxicity. In this study, we report the identification of an effective and nontoxic allosteric inhibitor of ODC. Using computer docking simulation and an in vitro ODC enzyme assay, we identified herbacetin, a natural compound found in flax and other plants, as a novel ODC inhibitor. Mechanistic investigations defined aspartate 44 in ODC as critical for binding. Herbacetin exhibited potent anticancer activity in colon cancer cell lines expressing high levels of ODC. Intraperitoneal or oral administration of herbacetin effectively suppressed HCT116 xenograft tumor growth and also reduced the number and size of polyps in a mouse model of APC-driven colon cancer (ApcMin/+). Unlike the well-established ODC inhibitor DFMO, herbacetin treatment was not associated with hearing loss. Taken together, our findings defined the natural product herbacetin as an allosteric inhibitor of ODC with chemopreventive and antitumor activity in preclinical models of colon cancer, prompting its further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:26676750

  1. Inhibitors of SRC kinases impair antitumor activity of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Winiarska, Magdalena; Bojarczuk, Kamil; Pyrzynska, Beata; Bil, Jacek; Siernicka, Marta; Dwojak, Michal; Bobrowicz, Malgorzata; Miazek, Nina; Zapala, Piotr; Zagozdzon, Agnieszka; Krol, Magdalena; Syta, Aleksandra; Podszywalow-Bartnicka, Paulina; Pilch, Zofia; Dabrowska-Iwanicka, Anna; Juszczynski, Przemyslaw; Efremov, Dimitar G; Slabicki, Mikolaj; Zenz, Thorsten; Roy, Aude Le; Olive, Daniel; Rygiel, Tomasz P; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Golab, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials with SRC family kinases (SFKs) inhibitors used alone or in a combination with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently underway in the treatment of B-cell tumors. However, molecular interactions between these therapeutics have not been studied so far. A transcriptional profiling of tumor cells incubated with SFKs inhibitors revealed strong downregulation of MS4A1 gene encoding CD20 antigen. In a panel of primary and established B-cell tumors we observed that SFKs inhibitors strongly affect CD20 expression at the transcriptional level, leading to inhibition of anti-CD20 mAbs binding and increased resistance of tumor cells to complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Activation of the AKT signaling pathway significantly protected cells from dasatinib-triggered CD20 downregulation. Additionally, SFKs inhibitors suppressed antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by direct inhibition of natural killer cells. Abrogation of antitumor activity of rituximab was also observed in vivo in a mouse model. Noteworthy, the effects of SFKs inhibitors on NK cell function are largely reversible. The results of our studies indicate that development of optimal combinations of novel treatment modalities with anti-CD20 mAbs should be preceded by detailed preclinical evaluation of their effects on target cells. PMID:25517315

  2. Complement receptor 2-mediated targeting of complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Hongbin; He, Chun; Knaak, Christian; Guthridge, Joel M; Holers, V Michael; Tomlinson, Stephen

    2003-06-01

    In a strategy to specifically target complement inhibitors to sites of complement activation and disease, recombinant fusion proteins consisting of a complement inhibitor linked to a C3 binding region of complement receptor (CR) 2 were prepared and characterized. Natural ligands for CR2 are C3 breakdown products deposited at sites of complement activation. Fusion proteins were prepared consisting of a human CR2 fragment linked to either the N terminus or C terminus of soluble forms of the membrane complement inhibitors decay accelerating factor (DAF) or CD59. The targeted complement inhibitors bound to C3-opsonized cells, and all were significantly more effective (up to 20-fold) than corresponding untargeted inhibitors at protecting target cells from complement. CR2 fusion proteins also inhibited CR3-dependent adhesion of U937 cells to C3 opsonized erythrocytes, indicating a second potential anti-inflammatory mechanism of CR2 fusion proteins, since CR3 is involved in endothelial adhesion and diapedesis of leukocytes at inflammatory sites. Finally, the in vivo validity of the targeting strategy was confirmed by the demonstration that CR2-DAF, but not soluble DAF, targets to the kidney in mouse models of lupus nephritis that are associated with renal complement deposition. PMID:12813023

  3. HSP90 inhibitors decrease AID levels and activity in mice and in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Montamat-Sicotte, Damien; Liztler, Ludivine C; Abreu, Cecilia; Safavi, Shiva; Zahn, Astrid; Orthwein, Alexandre; Muschen, Markus; Oppezzo, Pablo; Muñoz, Denise P; Di Noia, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes in antigen-activated B cells, underpinning antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. AID can also be pathogenic by contributing to autoimmune diseases and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, AID can exert non-canonical functions when aberrantly expressed in epithelial cells. The lack of specific inhibitors prevents therapeutic applications to modulate AID functions. Here, we have exploited our previous finding that the HSP90 molecular chaperoning pathway stabilizes AID in B cells, to test whether HSP90 inhibitors could target AID in vivo. We demonstrate that chronic administration of HSP90 inhibitors decreases AID protein levels and isotype switching in immunized mice. HSP90 inhibitors also reduce disease severity in a mouse model of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia in which AID accelerates disease progression. We further show that human AID protein levels are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition in normal and leukemic B cells, and that HSP90 inhibition prevents AID-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition in a human breast cancer cell line in vitro. Thus, we provide proof-of-concept that HSP90 inhibitors indirectly target AID in vivo and that endogenous human AID is widely sensitive to them, which could have therapeutic applications. PMID:25912253

  4. The EMT-activator ZEB1 induces bone metastasis associated genes including BMP-inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Kerstin; Preca, Bogdan-Tiberius; Brummer, Tilman; Brabletz, Simone; Stemmler, Marc P.; Brabletz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell invasion, dissemination and metastasis is triggered by an aberrant activation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), often mediated by the transcription factor ZEB1. Disseminating tumor cells must acquire specific features that allow them to colonize at different organ sites. Here we identify a set of genes that is highly expressed in breast cancer bone metastasis and activated by ZEB1. This gene set includes various secreted factors, e.g. the BMP-inhibitor FST, that are described to reorganize the bone microenvironment. By inactivating BMP-signaling, BMP-inhibitors are well-known to induce osteolysis in development and disease. We here demonstrate that the expression of ZEB1 and BMP-inhibitors is correlated with bone metastasis, but not with brain or lung metastasis of breast cancer patients. In addition, we show that this correlated expression pattern is causally linked, as ZEB1 induces the expression of the BMP-inhibitors NOG, FST and CHRDL1 both by directly increasing their gene transcription, as well as by indirectly suppressing their reduction via miR-200 family members. Consequently, ZEB1 stimulates BMP-inhibitor mediated osteoclast differentiation. These findings suggest that ZEB1 is not only driving EMT, but also contributes to the formation of osteolytic bone metastases in breast cancer. PMID:25973542

  5. Effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, vildagliptin on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tani, Shigemasa; Takahashi, Atsuhiko; Nagao, Ken; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2015-02-15

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors may affect the serum levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) associated with triglyceride (TG) metabolism, which is a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease, in diabetic patients. We conducted an 8-week, prospective, randomized study in which we assigned type 2 diabetic patients who were inadequately controlled with antidiabetic therapy to the vildagliptin group (50 mg bid, n = 49) or the control group (n = 49). The primary efficacy parameter was the change in the serum level of PAI-1, and the secondary end point was the change in the serum levels of TG-rich lipoproteins. In the vildagliptin group, significant decrease of the serum PAI-1 level by 16.3% (p <0.0001) and significant decreases of the serum TG, remnant-like particle cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B levels by 12.1% (p = 0.002), 13.9% (p = 0.003), and 9.5% (p <0.0001), respectively, were observed. No such changes were observed in the control group. Multivariate regression analyses identified the absolute change from the baseline (Δ) of the PAI-1, but not that of the fasting blood glucose or hemoglobin A1c, as independent predictors of the ΔTG, Δ remnant-like particle cholesterol, and Δ apolipoprotein B. In conclusion, treatment of type 2 diabetes with vildagliptin might prevent the progression of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients by decreasing the serum PAI-1 levels and improving TG metabolism.

  6. Proteolytic and Trypsin Inhibitor Activity in Germinating Jojoba Seeds (Simmondsia chinensis).

    PubMed

    Samac, D; Storey, R

    1981-12-01

    Changes in proteolytic activity (aminopeptidase, carboxypeptidase, endopeptidase) were followed during germination (imbibition through seedling development) in extracts from cotyledons of jojoba seeds (Simmondsia chinensis). After imbibition, the cotyledons contained high levels of sulfhydryl aminopeptidase activity (APA) but low levels of serine carboxypeptidase activity (CPA). CPA increased with germination through the apparent loss of a CPA inhibitor substance in the seed. Curves showing changes in endopeptidase activity (EPA) assayed at pH 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 during germination were distinctly different. EPA at pH 4, 5, 6, and 7 showed characteristics of sulfhydryl enzymes while activity at pH 8 was probably due to a serine type enzyme. EPA at pH 6 was inhibited early in germination by one or more substances in the seed. Activities at pH 5 and later at pH 6 were the highest of all EPA throughout germination and increases in these activities were associated with a rapid loss of protein from the cotyledons of the developing seedling.Jojoba cotyledonary extracts were found to inhibit the enzymic activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and pepsin but not the protease from Aspergillus saotoi. The heat-labile trypsin inhibitor substance(s) was found in commercially processed jojoba seed meal and the albumin fraction of seed proteins. Trypsin inhibitor activity decreased with germination.

  7. Differential regulation of plasminogen activator and inhibitor gene transcription by the tumor suppressor p53.

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, C; Pebler, S; Otte, J; von der Ahe, D

    1995-01-01

    The ability of p53 to activate or repress transcription suggests that its biological function as tumor suppressor is in part accomplished by regulating a number of genes including such required for inhibition of cell growth. We here give evidence that p53 also may regulate genes responsible for the proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix, which is considered a crucial feature for local invasion and metastasis of neoplastic cells. An important and highly regulated cascade of such proteolytic events involves the plasminogen activator system. We show that wild-type p53 represses transcription from the enhancer and promoter of the human urokinase-type (u-PA) and the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) gene through a non-DNA binding mechanism. Oncogenic mutants lost the repressing activity. In contrast, wild-type but not mutant p53 specifically binds to and activates the promoter of the plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) gene. Interestingly, one of the p53 mutants (273his) inhibited PAI-1 promoter activity. Our results suggest that altered function of oncogenic forms of p53 may lead to altered expression of the plasminogen activators and their inhibitor(s) and thus to altered activation of the plasminogen/plasmin system during tumor progression. Images PMID:7479001

  8. Administration of C1 inhibitor reduces neutrophil activation in patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Caliezi, Christoph; van Mierlo, Gerard; Eerenberg-Belmer, Anke; Sulzer, Irmela; Hack, C Erik; Wuillemin, Walter A

    2003-07-01

    Forty patients with severe sepsis or septic shock recently received C1 inhibitor. In the present study we studied the effect of C1 inhibitor therapy on circulating elastase-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complex (EA) and lactoferrin (LF) levels in these patients to gain further insight about agonists involved in the activation of neutrophils in human sepsis. Elevated levels of EA and LF were found in 65 and 85% of the septic patients, respectively. Patients with elevated EA levels had higher organ dysfunction scores, higher levels of cytokines, and higher levels of complement activation products than patients with normal EA levels. C1 inhibitor therapy reduced EA as well as complement activation and IL-8 release in the patients with elevated EA on admission. We conclude that neutrophil activation in human sepsis correlates with the severity of organ dysfunction and involves complement and interleukin-8 as agonists. The effect of C1 inhibitor therapy on neutrophils may provide an explanation for the beneficial, although mild, effects of this treatment on organ dysfunction in sepsis.

  9. Metabolic factors, adipose tissue, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in Type 2 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) production by adipose tissue is increased in obesity, and its circulating levels are high in type 2 diabetes. PAI-1 increases cardiovascular risk by favoring clot stability, interfering with vascular remodeling, or both. We investigated in obese diabetic per...

  10. The biological activity of a-mangostin, a larvicidal botanic mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha-mangostin derived from mangosteen was identified as a mosquito sterol carrier protein-2 inhibitor via high throughput insecticide screening. Alpha-mangostin was tested for its larvicidal activity against 3rd instar larvae of six mosquito species and the LC50 values range from 0.84 to 2.90 ppm....

  11. In Vitro Antimalarial Activity of Different Inhibitors of the Plasmodial Isoprenoid Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Marcia F; Saito, Alexandre Y; Peres, Valnice J; Oliveira, Antonio C; Katzin, Alejandro M

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that fosmidomycin, risedronate, and nerolidol exert antimalarial activity in vitro. We included squalestatin, an inhibitor of the isoprenoid metabolism in Erwinia uredovora, and found that combinations of compounds which act on different targets of the plasmodial isoprenoid pathway possess important supra-additivity effects. PMID:26055383

  12. In Vitro Antimalarial Activity of Different Inhibitors of the Plasmodial Isoprenoid Synthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Marcia F.; Saito, Alexandre Y.; Peres, Valnice J.; Oliveira, Antonio C.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that fosmidomycin, risedronate, and nerolidol exert antimalarial activity in vitro. We included squalestatin, an inhibitor of the isoprenoid metabolism in Erwinia uredovora, and found that combinations of compounds which act on different targets of the plasmodial isoprenoid pathway possess important supra-additivity effects. PMID:26055383

  13. Enhanced release of plasminogen activator inhibitor(s) but not of plasminogen activators by cultured rat glial cells treated with interleukin-1.

    PubMed

    Rogister, B; Leprince, P; Delree, P; Van Damme, J; Billiau, A; Moonen, G

    1990-01-01

    Astroglial cells are known to proliferate during development of the nervous system, as well as during post-traumatic gliosis. We have previously shown that the proliferation of cultured astrocytes can be stimulated by the urokinase-type (uPA) of plasminogen activator (PA) and that astrocytes are able to release such uPA upon stimulation with basic fibroblast growth factor, which is known to act as a mitogen for these cells. Here we report studies on the effects of human interleukin-1 (IL-1) on the release of PA activity by cultured newborn rat astroglial cells. Whereas there is controversy in the literature as to whether IL-1 stimulates multiplication of astroglial cells, we failed to observe such an effect in our system. We did observe, however, a dose-dependent decrease in PA activity in the supernatant of the IL-1 treated cultures. Further analysis revealed that this apparent decrease in PA release was in fact due to an increased release of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI). A similar IL-1 induced increase in PAI release was also found to occur in cultures of transformed astrocytes (human glioma LN18) and in cultured Schwann cells, but not in cultures of neurons or neuronal tumour cells. Since protease inhibitors are known to possess neuritogenic properties, our results suggest that IL-1, by its capacity to induce PAI, may promote neuritogenesis.

  14. Antiepileptic Activity of Preferential Inhibitors of Persistent Sodium Current

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lyndsey L.; Thompson, Christopher H.; Hawkins, Nicole A.; Nath, Ravi D.; Petersohn, Adam A.; Rajamani, Sridharan; Bush, William S.; Frankel, Wayne N.; Vanoye, Carlos G.; Kearney, Jennifer A.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Evidence from basic neurophysiology and molecular genetics has implicated persistent sodium current conducted by voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels as a contributor to the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Many antiepileptic drugs target NaV channels and modulate neuronal excitability mainly by a use-dependent block of transient sodium current, although suppression of persistent current may also contribute to the efficacy of these drugs. We hypothesized that a drug or compound capable of preferential inhibition of persistent sodium current would have antiepileptic activity. Methods We examined the antiepileptic activity of two selective persistent sodium current blockers ranolazine, an FDA-approved drug for treatment of angina pectoris, and GS967, a novel compound with more potent effects on persistent current, in the epileptic Scn2aQ54 mouse model. We also examined the effect of GS967 in the maximal electroshock model and evaluated effects of the compound on neuronal excitability, propensity for hilar neuron loss, development of mossy fiber sprouting and survival of Scn2aQ54 mice. Results We found that ranolazine was capable of reducing seizure frequency by ~50% in Scn2aQ54 mice. The more potent persistent current blocker GS967 reduced seizure frequency by greater than 90% in Scn2aQ54 mice and protected against induced seizures in the maximal electroshock model. GS967 greatly attenuated abnormal spontaneous action potential firing in pyramidal neurons acutely isolated from Scn2aQ54 mice. In addition to seizure suppression in vivo, GS967 treatment greatly improved the survival of Scn2aQ54 mice, prevented hilar neuron loss, and suppressed the development of hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting. Significance Our findings indicate that the selective persistent sodium current blocker GS967 has potent antiepileptic activity and this compound could inform development of new agents. PMID:24862204

  15. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  16. Structure-activity studies of 5-substituted pyridopyrimidines as adenosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cowart, M; Lee, C H; Gfesser, G A; Bayburt, E K; Bhagwat, S S; Stewart, A O; Yu, H; Kohlhaas, K L; McGaraughty, S; Wismer, C T; Mikusa, J; Zhu, C; Alexander, K M; Jarvis, M F; Kowaluk, E A

    2001-01-01

    The synthesis and SAR of a novel series of non-nucleoside pyridopyrimidine inhibitors of the enzyme adenosine kinase (AK) are described. It was found that pyridopyrimidines with a broad range of medium and large non-polar substituents at the 5-position potently inhibited AK activity. A narrower range of analogues was capable of potently inhibiting adenosine phosphorylation in intact cells indicating an enhanced ability of these analogues to penetrate cell membranes. Potent AK inhibitors were found to effectively reduce nociception in animal models of thermal hyperalgesia and persistent pain.

  17. Synthesis, antiviral activity, and bioavailability studies of gamma-lactam derived HIV protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hungate, R W; Chen, J L; Starbuck, K E; Vacca, J P; McDaniel, S L; Levin, R B; Dorsey, B D; Guare, J P; Holloway, M K; Whitter, W

    1994-09-01

    Incorporation of a gamma-lactam in hydroxyethylene isosteres results in modest inhibitors of HIV-1 protease. Additional structural activity studies have produced significantly more potent inhibitors with the introduction of the trisubstituted cyclopentane (see compound 20) as the optimum substituent for the C-terminus. This new amino acid amide surrogate can be readily prepared in large scale from (R)-pulegone. Optimized compounds (36) and (60) are potent antiviral agents and are well absorbed (15-20%) in a dog model after oral administration. PMID:7712123

  18. Probing the chemical mechanism of saccharopine reductase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae using site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, Ashwani K; West, Ann H; Cook, Paul F

    2015-10-15

    Saccharopine reductase catalyzes the reductive amination of l-α-aminoadipate-δ-semialdehyde with l-glutamate to give saccharopine. Two mechanisms have been proposed for the reductase, one that makes use of enzyme side chains as acid-base catalytic groups, and a second, in which the reaction is catalyzed by enzyme-bound reactants. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to change acid-base candidates in the active site of the reductase to eliminate their ionizable side chain. Thus, the D126A, C154S and Y99F and several double mutant enzymes were prepared. Kinetic parameters in the direction of glutamate formation exhibited modest decreases, inconsistent with the loss of an acid-base catalyst. The pH-rate profiles obtained with all mutant enzymes decrease at low and high pH, suggesting acid and base catalytic groups are still present in all enzymes. Solvent kinetic deuterium isotope effects are all larger than those observed for wild type enzyme, and approximately equal to one another, suggesting the slow step is the same as that of wild type enzyme, a conformational change to open the site and release products (in the direction of saccharopine formation). Overall, the acid-base chemistry is likely catalyzed by bound reactants, with the exception of deprotonation of the α-amine of glutamate, which likely requires an enzyme residue. PMID:26342457

  19. Site-directed introduction of disulfide groups on antibodies for highly sensitive immunosensors.

    PubMed

    Acero Sánchez, Josep Ll; Fragoso, Alex; Joda, Hamdi; Suárez, Guillaume; McNeil, Calum J; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2016-07-01

    The interface between the sample and the transducer surface is critical to the performance of a biosensor. In this work, we compared different strategies for covalent self-assembly of antibodies onto bare gold substrates by introducing disulfide groups into the immunoglobulin structure, which acted as anchor molecules able to chemisorb spontaneously onto clean gold surfaces. The disulfide moieties were chemically introduced to the antibody via the primary amines, carboxylic acids, and carbohydrates present in its structure. The site-directed modification via the carbohydrate chains exhibited the best performance in terms of analyte response using a model system for the detection of the stroke marker neuron-specific enolase. SPR measurements clearly showed the potential for creating biologically active densely packed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) in a one-step protocol compared to both mixed SAMs of alkanethiol compounds and commercial immobilization layers. The ability of the carbohydrate strategy to construct an electrochemical immunosensor was investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) transduction. Graphical Abstract Left: Functionalization strategies of bare gold substrates via direct bio-SAM using disulfide-containing antibody chemically modified via their primary amines (A), carbohydrates (B) and carboxylic acids (C). Right: Dependence of the peak height with NSE concentration at NSE21-CHO modified electrochemical immunosensor. Inset: Logarithmic calibration plot. PMID:27220524

  20. Probing the chemical mechanism of saccharopine reductase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae using site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vashishtha, Ashwani K; West, Ann H; Cook, Paul F

    2015-10-15

    Saccharopine reductase catalyzes the reductive amination of l-α-aminoadipate-δ-semialdehyde with l-glutamate to give saccharopine. Two mechanisms have been proposed for the reductase, one that makes use of enzyme side chains as acid-base catalytic groups, and a second, in which the reaction is catalyzed by enzyme-bound reactants. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to change acid-base candidates in the active site of the reductase to eliminate their ionizable side chain. Thus, the D126A, C154S and Y99F and several double mutant enzymes were prepared. Kinetic parameters in the direction of glutamate formation exhibited modest decreases, inconsistent with the loss of an acid-base catalyst. The pH-rate profiles obtained with all mutant enzymes decrease at low and high pH, suggesting acid and base catalytic groups are still present in all enzymes. Solvent kinetic deuterium isotope effects are all larger than those observed for wild type enzyme, and approximately equal to one another, suggesting the slow step is the same as that of wild type enzyme, a conformational change to open the site and release products (in the direction of saccharopine formation). Overall, the acid-base chemistry is likely catalyzed by bound reactants, with the exception of deprotonation of the α-amine of glutamate, which likely requires an enzyme residue.

  1. Characterization of a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor from Solanum tuberosum having lectin activity.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kunal R; Patel, Dhaval K; Pappachan, Anju; Prabha, C Ratna; Singh, Desh Deepak

    2016-02-01

    Plant lectins and protease inhibitors constitute a class of proteins which plays a crucial role in plant defense. In our continuing investigations on lectins from plants, we have isolated, purified and characterized a protein of about 20 kDa, named PotHg, showing hemagglutination activity from tubers of Indian potato, Solanum tuberosum. De novo sequencing and MS/MS analysis confirmed that the purified protein was a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor having two chains (15 kDa and 5 kDa). SDS and native PAGE analysis showed that the protein was glycosylated and was a heterodimer of about 15 and 5 kDa subunits. PotHg agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes with specific activity of 640 H.U./mg which was inhibited by complex sugars like fetuin. PotHg retained hemagglutination activity over a pH range 4-9 and up to 80°C. Mannose and galactose interacted with the PotHg with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.5×10(-3) M and 2.8×10(-3) M, respectively as determined through fluorescence studies. Fluorescence studies suggested the involvement of a tryptophan in sugar binding which was further confirmed through modification of tryptophan residues using N-bromosuccinimide. Circular dichroism (CD) studies showed that PotHg contains mostly β sheets (∼45%) and loops which is in line with previously characterized protease inhibitors and modeling studies. There are previous reports of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors showing lectin like activity from Peltophorum dubium and Labramia bojeri. This is the first report of a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor showing lectin like activity from a major crop plant and this makes PotHg an interesting candidate for further investigation. PMID:26645142

  2. Expression and activity of ovarian tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases during pseudopregnancy in the rat.

    PubMed

    Nothnick, W B; Edwards, D R; Leco, K J; Curry, T E

    1995-09-01

    The present study examined the role of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in tissue remodeling that occurs during luteal development and regression throughout pseudopregnancy in the rat. Pseudopregnancy was induced in immature female rats by eCG/hCG priming. Animals (n = 4 per time point) were killed on Days 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 14, and 16 of pseudopregnancy (post hCG administration), and ovaries were removed and analyzed for metalloproteinase inhibitor activity or TIMP-1, TIMP-2, and TIMP-3 mRNA expression. Inhibitory activity was highest in Day-1 samples (41.35 +/- 6.50 inhibitory units), and inhibitor activity significantly decreased (p < 0.05) thereafter to minimal values at Day 12 (8.14 +/- 2.71 inhibitory units). Methylamine hydrochloride treatment, which inactivates macroglobulin-type inhibitors, revealed that the majority of the inhibitor activity in the Day-1 samples (82.6%) and the Day-16 samples (77.3%) could be attributed to TIMPs. To further distinguish the contribution of each TIMP to this activity, Northern analysis for TIMP-1, -2, and -3 was performed. Analysis of TIMP mRNA expression revealed that TIMP-1 transcript expression was highest (p = 0.00009) at Day 1, decreased approximately 3- to 20-fold from Days 2 to 12, respectively, and again increased at Days 14-16. However, TIMP-2 expression did not change (p > 0.05) over any of the time points studied. In contrast to TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expression, TIMP-3 mRNA expression was lowest during Days 1 and 2 of pseudopregnancy, increased approximately 4-fold at Day 4, peaked at Day 8, and remained elevated throughout the remainder of pseudopregnancy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Characterization of a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor from Solanum tuberosum having lectin activity.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kunal R; Patel, Dhaval K; Pappachan, Anju; Prabha, C Ratna; Singh, Desh Deepak

    2016-02-01

    Plant lectins and protease inhibitors constitute a class of proteins which plays a crucial role in plant defense. In our continuing investigations on lectins from plants, we have isolated, purified and characterized a protein of about 20 kDa, named PotHg, showing hemagglutination activity from tubers of Indian potato, Solanum tuberosum. De novo sequencing and MS/MS analysis confirmed that the purified protein was a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor having two chains (15 kDa and 5 kDa). SDS and native PAGE analysis showed that the protein was glycosylated and was a heterodimer of about 15 and 5 kDa subunits. PotHg agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes with specific activity of 640 H.U./mg which was inhibited by complex sugars like fetuin. PotHg retained hemagglutination activity over a pH range 4-9 and up to 80°C. Mannose and galactose interacted with the PotHg with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.5×10(-3) M and 2.8×10(-3) M, respectively as determined through fluorescence studies. Fluorescence studies suggested the involvement of a tryptophan in sugar binding which was further confirmed through modification of tryptophan residues using N-bromosuccinimide. Circular dichroism (CD) studies showed that PotHg contains mostly β sheets (∼45%) and loops which is in line with previously characterized protease inhibitors and modeling studies. There are previous reports of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors showing lectin like activity from Peltophorum dubium and Labramia bojeri. This is the first report of a Kunitz-type protease inhibitor showing lectin like activity from a major crop plant and this makes PotHg an interesting candidate for further investigation.

  4. CINPA1 Is an Inhibitor of Constitutive Androstane Receptor That Does Not Activate Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug resistance. CAR inhibitors, in combination with existing chemotherapeutics, could therefore be used to attenuate multidrug resistance in cancers. Interestingly, all previously reported CAR inverse-agonists are also activators of PXR, rendering them mechanistically counterproductive in tissues where both these xenobiotic receptors are present and active. We used a directed high-throughput screening approach, followed by subsequent mechanistic studies, to identify novel, potent, and specific small-molecule CAR inhibitors that do not activate PXR. We describe here one such inhibitor, CINPA1 (CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1), capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription with an IC50 of ∼70 nM. CINPA1 1) is a specific xenobiotic receptor inhibitor and has no cytotoxic effects up to 30 µM; 2) inhibits CAR-mediated gene expression in primary human hepatocytes, where CAR is endogenously expressed; 3) does not alter the protein levels or subcellular localization of CAR; 4) increases corepressor and reduces coactivator interaction with the CAR ligand-binding domain in mammalian two-hybrid assays; and 5) disrupts CAR binding to the promoter regions of target genes in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CINPA1 could be used as a novel molecular tool for understanding CAR function. PMID:25762023

  5. Identification of inhibitors against the potential ligandable sites in the active cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Aditi; Datta, Abhijit

    2015-04-01

    The active cholera toxin responsible for the massive loss of water and ions in cholera patients via its ADP ribosylation activity is a heterodimer of the A1 subunit of the bacterial holotoxin and the human cytosolic ARF6 (ADP Ribosylation Factor 6). The active toxin is a potential target for the design of inhibitors against cholera. In this study we identified the potential ligandable sites of the active cholera toxin which can serve as binding sites for drug-like molecules. By employing an energy-based approach to identify ligand binding sites, and comparison with the results of computational solvent mapping, we identified two potential ligandable sites in the active toxin which can be targeted during structure-based drug design against cholera. Based on the probe affinities of the identified ligandable regions, docking-based virtual screening was employed to identify probable inhibitors against these sites. Several indole-based alkaloids and phosphates showed strong interactions to the important residues of the ligandable region at the A1 active site. On the other hand, 26 top scoring hits were identified against the ligandable region at the A1 ARF6 interface which showed strong hydrogen bonding interactions, including guanidines, phosphates, Leucopterin and Aristolochic acid VIa. This study has important implications in the application of hybrid structure-based and ligand-based methods against the identified ligandable sites using the identified inhibitors as reference ligands, for drug design against the active cholera toxin.

  6. Study on the activity of non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitor by 3D-QSAR modeling and molecular docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peizhen; Tian, Yueli; Zhai, Honglin; Deng, Fangfang; Xie, Meihong; Zhang, Xiaoyun

    2013-11-01

    Non-purine derivatives have been shown to be promising novel drug candidates as xanthine oxidase inhibitors. Based on three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) methods including comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), two 3D-QSAR models for a series of non-purine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors were established, and their reliability was supported by statistical parameters. Combined 3D-QSAR modeling and the results of molecular docking between non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors and XO, the main factors that influenced activity of inhibitors were investigated, and the obtained results could explain known experimental facts. Furthermore, several new potential inhibitors with higher activity predicted were designed, which based on our analyses, and were supported by the simulation of molecular docking. This study provided some useful information for the development of non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors with novel structures.

  7. [Response of N transformation related soil enzyme activities to inhibitor applications].

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijun; Wu, Zhijie; Jiang, Yong; Zhou, Likai

    2002-09-01

    With an aerobic incubation test, this paper studied the response of soil urease, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and hydroxylamine reductase to urease inhibitor hydroquinone (HQ) applied in combination with nitrification inhibitor encapsulated calcium carbide (HQ + ECC) or dicyandiamide (HQ + DCD). The results showed that HQ + DCD could inhibit urease activity and increase activities of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and hydroxylamine reductase significantly in comparison with CK, HQ and HQ + ECC. Under the condition of our test, there existed a significant relationship between soil urease, nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and hydroxylamine reductase activities and soil NH4+ and NO3- contents, NH3 volatilization and N2O emission rate, and regression analysis indicated that there were significantly positive relationships between soil urease, nitrite reductase and hydroxylamine reductase activities.

  8. Basis Tetrapeptides as Potent Intracellular Inhibitors of type A Botulinum Neurotoxin Protease Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, M.; Swaminathan, S.; Oyler, G.; Ahmed, S. A.

    2011-01-21

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are the most potent of all toxins that cause flaccid muscle paralysis leading to death. They are also potential biothreat agents. A systematic investigation of various short peptide inhibitors of the BoNT protease domain with a 17-residue peptide substrate led to arginine-arginine-glycine-cysteine having a basic tetrapeptide structure as the most potent inhibitor. When assayed in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT), the inhibitory effect was drastically reduced. Replacing the terminal cysteine with one hydrophobic residue eliminated the DTT effect but with two hydrophobic residues made the pentapeptide a poor inhibitor. Replacing the first arginine with cysteine or adding an additional cysteine at the N terminus did not improve inhibition. When assessed using mouse brain lysates, the tetrapeptides also inhibited BoNT/A cleavage of the endogenous SNAP-25. The peptides penetrated the neuronal cell lines, N2A and BE(2)-M17, without adversely affecting metabolic functions as measured by ATP production and P-38 phosphorylation. Biological activity of the peptides persisted within cultured chick motor neurons and rat and mouse cerebellar neurons for more than 40 h and inhibited BoNT/A protease action inside the neurons in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Our results define a tetrapeptide as the smallest peptide inhibitor in the backdrop of a large substrate protein of 200+ amino acids having multiple interaction regions with its cognate enzyme. The inhibitors should also be valuable candidates for drug development.

  9. Mixed lineage kinases activate MEK independently of RAF to mediate resistance to RAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Marusiak, Anna A.; Edwards, Zoe C.; Hugo, Willy; Trotter, Eleanor W.; Girotti, Maria R.; Stephenson, Natalie L.; Kong, Xiangju; Gartside, Michael G.; Fawdar, Shameem; Hudson, Andrew; Breitwieser, Wolfgang; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Marais, Richard; Lo, Roger S.; Brognard, John

    2014-01-01

    RAF inhibitor therapy yields significant reductions in tumour burden in the majority of V600E-positive melanoma patients; however, resistance occurs within 2–18 months. Here we demonstrate that the mixed lineage kinases (MLK1–4) are MEK kinases that reactivate the MEK/ERK pathway in the presence of RAF inhibitors. Expression of MLK1–4 mediates resistance to RAF inhibitors and promotes survival in V600E-positive melanoma cell lines. Furthermore, we observe upregulation of the MLKs in 9 of 21 melanoma patients with acquired drug resistance. Consistent with this observation, MLKs promote resistance to RAF inhibitors in mouse models and contribute to acquired resistance in a cell line model. Lastly, we observe that a majority of MLK1 mutations identified in patients are gain-of-function mutations. In summary, our data demonstrate a role for MLKs as direct activators of the MEK/ERK pathway with implications for melanomagenesis and resistance to RAF inhibitors. PMID:24849047

  10. Crystal Structures and Structure–Activity Relationships of Imidazothiazole Derivatives as IDO1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) is considered as a promising target for the treatment of several diseases, including neurological disorders and cancer. We report here the crystal structures of two IDO1/IDO1 inhibitor complexes, one of which shows that Amg-1 is directly bound to the heme iron of IDO1 with a clear induced fit. We also describe the identification and preliminary optimization of imidazothiazole derivatives as novel IDO1 inhibitors. Using our crystal structure information and structure–activity relationships (SAR) at the pocket-B of IDO1, we found a series of urea derivatives as potent IDO1 inhibitors and revealed that generation of an induced fit and the resulting interaction with Phe226 and Arg231 are essential for potent IDO1 inhibitory activity. The results of this study are very valuable for understanding the mechanism of IDO1 activation, which is very important for structure-based drug design (SBDD) to discover potent IDO1 inhibitors. PMID:25313323

  11. John Montgomery's legacy: carbocyclic adenosine analogues as SAH hydrolase inhibitors with broad-spectrum antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2005-01-01

    Ever since the S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy, SAH) hydrolase was recognized as a pharmacological target for antiviral agents (J. A. Montgomery et al., J. Med. Chem. 25:626-629, 1982), an increasing number of adenosine, acyclic adenosine, and carbocyclic adenosine analogues have been described as potent SAH hydrolase inhibitors endowed with broad-spectrum antiviral activity. The antiviral activity spectrum of the SAH hydrolase inhibitors include pox-, rhabdo-, filo-, arena-, paramyxo-, reo-, and retroviruses. Among the most potent SAH hydrolase inhibitors and antiviral agents rank carbocyclic 3-deazaadenosine (C-c3 Ado), neplanocin A, 3-deazaneplanocin A, the 5'-nor derivatives of carbocyclic adenosine (C-Ado, aristeromycin), and the 2-halo (i.e., 2-fluoro) and 6'-R-alkyl (i.e., 6'-R-methyl) derivatives of neplanocin A. These compounds are particularly active against poxviruses (i.e., vaccinia virus), and rhabdoviruses (i.e., vesicular stomatitis virus). The in vivo efficacy of C-c3 Ado and 3-deazaneplanocin A has been established in mouse models for vaccinia virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and Ebola virus. SAH hydrolase inhibitors such as C-c3Ado and 3-deazaneplanocin A should in thefirst place be considered for therapeutic (or prophylactic) use against poxvirus infections, including smallpox, and hemorrhagic fever virus infections such as Ebola. PMID:16438025

  12. Crystal structure of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in an active conformation with normal thermodynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Thompson, Lawrence C; Bucci, Joel C; Nissen, Poul; Gettins, Peter G W; Peterson, Cynthia B; Andreasen, Peter A; Morth, J Preben

    2011-08-26

    The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a crucial regulator in fibrinolysis and tissue remodeling. PAI-1 has been associated with several pathological conditions and is a validated prognostic marker in human cancers. However, structural information about the native inhibitory form of PAI-1 has been elusive because of its inherent conformational instability and rapid conversion to a latent, inactive structure. Here we report the crystal structure of PAI-1 W175F at 2.3 Å resolution as the first model of the metastable native molecule. Structural comparison with a quadruple mutant (14-1B) previously used as representative of the active state uncovered key differences. The most striking differences occur near the region that houses three of the four mutations in the 14-1B PAI-1 structure. Prominent changes are localized within a loop connecting β-strand 3A with the F helix, in which a previously observed 3(10)-helix is absent in the new structure. Notably these structural changes are found near the binding site for the cofactor vitronectin. Because vitronectin is the only known physiological regulator of PAI-1 that slows down the latency conversion, the structure of this region is important. Furthermore, the previously identified chloride-binding site close to the F-helix is absent from the present structure and likely to be artifactual, because of its dependence on the 14-1B mutations. Instead we found a different chlorine-binding site that is likely to be present in wild type PAI-1 and that more satisfactorily accounts for the chlorine stabilizing effect on PAI-1.

  13. Crystal Structure of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in an Active Conformation with Normal Thermodynamic Stability*

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jan K.; Thompson, Lawrence C.; Bucci, Joel C.; Nissen, Poul; Gettins, Peter G. W.; Peterson, Cynthia B.; Andreasen, Peter A.; Morth, J. Preben

    2011-01-01

    The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a crucial regulator in fibrinolysis and tissue remodeling. PAI-1 has been associated with several pathological conditions and is a validated prognostic marker in human cancers. However, structural information about the native inhibitory form of PAI-1 has been elusive because of its inherent conformational instability and rapid conversion to a latent, inactive structure. Here we report the crystal structure of PAI-1 W175F at 2.3 Å resolution as the first model of the metastable native molecule. Structural comparison with a quadruple mutant (14-1B) previously used as representative of the active state uncovered key differences. The most striking differences occur near the region that houses three of the four mutations in the 14-1B PAI-1 structure. Prominent changes are localized within a loop connecting β-strand 3A with the F helix, in which a previously observed 310-helix is absent in the new structure. Notably these structural changes are found near the binding site for the cofactor vitronectin. Because vitronectin is the only known physiological regulator of PAI-1 that slows down the latency conversion, the structure of this region is important. Furthermore, the previously identified chloride-binding site close to the F-helix is absent from the present structure and likely to be artifactual, because of its dependence on the 14-1B mutations. Instead we found a different chlorine-binding site that is likely to be present in wild type PAI-1 and that more satisfactorily accounts for the chlorine stabilizing effect on PAI-1. PMID:21697084

  14. Conversed mutagenesis of an inactive peptide to ASIC3 inhibitor for active sites determination.

    PubMed

    Osmakov, Dmitry I; Koshelev, Sergey G; Andreev, Yaroslav A; Dyachenko, Igor A; Bondarenko, Dmitry A; Murashev, Arkadii N; Grishin, Eugene V; Kozlov, Sergey A

    2016-06-15

    Peptide Ugr9-1 from the venom of sea anemone Urticina grebelnyi selectively inhibits the ASIC3 channel and significantly reverses inflammatory and acid-induced pain in vivo. A close homolog peptide Ugr 9-2 does not have these features. To find the pharmacophore residues and explore structure-activity relationships of Ugr 9-1, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of Ugr 9-2 and replaced several positions by the corresponding residues from Ugr 9-1. Mutant peptides Ugr 9-2 T9F and Ugr 9-2 Y12H were able to inhibit currents of the ASIC3 channels 2.2 times and 1.3 times weaker than Ugr 9-1, respectively. Detailed analysis of the spatial models of Ugr 9-1, Ugr 9-2 and both mutant peptides revealed the presence of the basic-aromatic clusters on opposite sides of the molecule, each of which is responsible for the activity. Additionally, Ugr9-1 mutant with truncated N- and C-termini retained similar with the Ugr9-1 action in vitro and was equally potent in vivo model of thermal hypersensitivity. All together, these results are important for studying the structure-activity relationships of ligand-receptor interaction and for the future development of peptide drugs from animal toxins. PMID:26686983

  15. Uncoupling of RNA binding and PKR kinase activation by viral inhibitor RNAs.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Sean A; Kim, Insil; Liu, Corey W; Puglisi, Joseph D

    2006-05-19

    Protein kinase RNA-activated (PKR) is a serine/threonine kinase that contains an N-terminal RNA-binding domain and a C-terminal kinase domain. Upon binding double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), PKR can become activated and phosphorylate cellular targets, such as eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha (eIF-2alpha). Phosphorylation of eIF-2alpha results in attenuation of protein translation by the ribosome in either a general or an mRNA-specific manner. Therefore, the interaction between PKR and dsRNAs represents a crucial host cell defense mechanism against viral infection. Viruses can circumvent PKR function by transcription of virus-encoded dsRNA inhibitors that bind to and inactivate PKR. We present here a biophysical characterization of the interactions between human PKR and two viral inhibitor RNAs, EBER(I) (from Epstein-Barr virus) and VA(I) (from human adenovirus). Autophosphorylation assays confirmed that both EBER(I) and VA(I) are inhibitors of PKR activation, and profiled the kinetics of the inhibition. Binding affinities of dsRNAs to PKR double-stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry and gel electrophoresis. A single stem-loop domain from each inhibitory RNA mediates the interaction with both dsRBDs of PKR. The binding sites on inhibitor RNAs and the dsRBDs of PKR have been mapped by NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments, which indicate that inhibitors of PKR employ similar surfaces of interaction as activators. Finally, we show that dsRNA binding and inactivation are non-equivalent; regions other than the dsRBD stem-loops of inhibitory RNA are required for inhibition.

  16. Lovastatin Inhibits VEGFR and AKT Activation: Synergistic Cytotoxicity in Combination with VEGFR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Addison, Christina L.; Dimitroulakos, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Background In a recent study, we demonstrated the ability of lovastatin, a potent inhibitor of mevalonate synthesis, to inhibit the function of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Lovastatin attenuated ligand-induced receptor activation and downstream signaling through the PI3K/AKT pathway. Combining lovastatin with gefitinib, a potent EGFR inhibitor, induced synergistic cytotoxicity in a variety of tumor derived cell lines. The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and EGFR share similar activation, internalization and downstream signaling characteristics. Methodology/Principal Findings The VEGFRs, particularly VEGFR-2 (KDR, Flt-1), play important roles in regulating tumor angiogenesis by promoting endothelial cell proliferation, survival and migration. Certain tumors, such as malignant mesothelioma (MM), also express both the VEGF ligand and VEGFRs that act in an autocrine loop to directly stimulate tumor cell growth and survival. In this study, we have shown that lovastatin inhibits ligand-induced VEGFR-2 activation through inhibition of receptor internalization and also inhibits VEGF activation of AKT in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and H28 MM cells employing immunofluorescence and Western blotting. Combinations of lovastatin and a VEGFR-2 inhibitor showed more robust AKT inhibition than either agent alone in the H28 MM cell line. Furthermore, combining 5 µM lovastatin treatment, a therapeutically relevant dose, with two different VEGFR-2 inhibitors in HUVEC and the H28 and H2052 mesothelioma derived cell lines demonstrated synergistic cytotoxicity as demonstrated by MTT cell viability and flow cytometric analyses. Conclusions/Significance These results highlight a novel mechanism by which lovastatin can regulate VEGFR-2 function and a potential therapeutic approach for MM through combining statins with VEGFR-2 inhibitors. PMID:20838437

  17. Evaluating and monitoring the efficacy of recombinant activated factor VIIa in patients with haemophilia and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xue; Zhao, Yongqiang; Li, Kuixing; Fan, Liankai; Hua, Baolai

    2014-10-01

    Although the use of bypassing agents has dramatically improved the management of haemophilia in patients with inhibitors, questions remain regarding optimal dosing regimens and methodology for monitoring their clinical effectiveness. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of two different doses of recombinant activated factor VIIa (rFVIIa) in patients with haemophilia and inhibitors and assessed the feasibility of using thromboelastography (TEG) and thrombin generation assays (TGA) for monitoring the response to rFVIIa. Six patients aged 9-49 years with congenital or acquired haemophilia with inhibitors who experienced a total of nine bleeding episodes were included. Seven episodes were treated with conventional rFVIIa dosing (72.7-109.1 μg/kg), and two episodes were treated with a single high-dose regimen (254.6-264.0 μg/kg). Clinical and haemostatic responses were evaluated. Haemostasis was assessed by prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), factor VII coagulant activity (FVII:C), TEG, and TGA. Six out of seven (85.7%) bleeding episodes responded to conventional rFVIIa dosing, and half (50%) responded to the high-dose regimen. No relationships between PT, aPTT, and FVII:C levels and clinical outcome were observed. However, changes in TEG and TGA parameters tended to correspond to clinical response, although large inter-individual variation in rFVIIa efficacy was noted. A good response was seen with rFVIIa in treating acute bleeding episodes in patients with haemophilia and inhibitors. Because changes in TEG and TGA may correlate with clinical outcomes of rFVIIa, TEG and TGA may be useful for monitoring rFVIIa activity in inhibitor-positive haemophilia.

  18. Site-directed mutagenesis of the substrate-binding cleft of human estrogen sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    Hempel, N; Barnett, A C; Bolton-Grob, R M; Liyou, N E; McManus, M E

    2000-09-16

    The sulfonation of estrogens by human estrogen sulfotransferase (humSULT1E1) plays a vital role in controlling the active levels of these hormones in the body. To understand more fully the structural and functional characteristics of humSULT1E1, we have carried out site-directed mutagenesis of critical amino acids found in the substrate-binding cleft. Three single amino acid mutations of humSULT1E1 (V145E, H107A, and K85A) were created in this study. Kinetic studies were used to provide information about the importance of these residues in substrate specificity and catalysis, using a variety of substrates. Lysine at position 85 has been proposed to be within hydrogen bonding distance to the 3alpha-phenol group of beta-estradiol, thereby stabilising the substrate in the active site. However, substitution to a neutral alanine at this position improved substrate specificity of humSULT1E1 for beta-estradiol, estrone, and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). The exchange of valine 145 for negatively charged glutamic acid markedly improved the ability of humSULT1E1 to sulfonate dopamine, but caused a reduction in specificity constants toward steroids tested, in particular DHEA. The presence of a histidine residue at position 107 was shown to be essential for the production of a functional protein, as substitution of this amino acid to alanine resulted in complete loss of activity of humSULT1E1 towards all substrates tested. PMID:11006110

  19. The pan-PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 activates canonical WNT signaling to confer resistance in TNBC cells: resistance reversal with WNT inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-En; Yang, Lixin; Chen, Kemin; Wang, Yafan; Liu, Yun-Ru; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Gaur, Shikha; Hu, Shuya; Yen, Yun

    2015-05-10

    The pan-PI3K inhibitors are one treatment option for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, this treatment is ineffective for unknown reasons. Here, we report that aberrant expression of wingless-type MMTV integration site family (WNT) and activated WNT signals, which crosstalk with the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway through GSK3β, plays the most critical role in resistance to pan-PI3K inhibitors in TNBC cells. GDC-0941 is a pan-PI3K inhibitor that activates the WNT/beta-catenin pathway in TNBC cells through stimulation of WNT secretion. GDC-0941-triggered WNT/beta-catenin pathway activation was observed in MDA-MB-231 and HCC1937 cells, which are TNBC cell lines showing aberrant WNT/beta-catenin activation, and not in SKBR3 and MCF7 cells. This observation is further investigated in vivo. GDC-0941 exhibited minimal tumor inhibition in MDA-MB-231 cells, but it significantly suppressed tumor growth in HER-positive SK-BR3 cells. In vivo mechanism study revealed the activation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway by GDC-0941. A synergistic effect was observed when combined treatment with GDC-0941 and the WNT inhibitor LGK974 at low concentrations in MDA-MB-231 cells. These findings indicated that WNT pathway activation conferred resistance in TNBC cells treated with GDC-0941. This resistance may be further circumvented through combined treatment with pan-PI3K and WNT inhibitors. Future clinical trials of these two inhibitors are warranted.

  20. The pan-PI3K inhibitor GDC-0941 activates canonical WNT signaling to confer resistance in TNBC cells: resistance reversal with WNT inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Huey-En; Yang, Lixin; Chen, Kemin; Wang, Yafan; Liu, Yun-Ru; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Gaur, Shikha; Hu, Shuya; Yen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The pan-PI3K inhibitors are one treatment option for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, this treatment is ineffective for unknown reasons. Here, we report that aberrant expression of wingless-type MMTV integration site family (WNT) and activated WNT signals, which crosstalk with the PI3K-AKT-mTOR signaling pathway through GSK3β, plays the most critical role in resistance to pan-PI3K inhibitors in TNBC cells. GDC-0941 is a pan-PI3K inhibitor that activates the WNT/beta-catenin pathway in TNBC cells through stimulation of WNT secretion. GDC-0941-triggered WNT/beta-catenin pathway activation was observed in MDA-MB-231 and HCC1937 cells, which are TNBC cell lines showing aberrant WNT/beta-catenin activation, and not in SKBR3 and MCF7 cells. This observation is further investigated in vivo. GDC-0941 exhibited minimal tumor inhibition in MDA-MB-231 cells, but it significantly suppressed tumor growth in HER-positive SK-BR3 cells. In vivo mechanism study revealed the activation of WNT/beta-catenin pathway by GDC-0941. A synergistic effect was observed when combined treatment with GDC-0941 and the WNT inhibitor LGK974 at low concentrations in MDA-MB-231 cells. These findings indicated that WNT pathway activation conferred resistance in TNBC cells treated with GDC-0941. This resistance may be further circumvented through combined treatment with pan-PI3K and WNT inhibitors. Future clinical trials of these two inhibitors are warranted. PMID:25857298

  1. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-03-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery.

  2. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Martinez Molina, Daniel; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery. PMID:27010513

  3. Enhancement of active corrosion protection via combination of inhibitor-loaded nanocontainers.

    PubMed

    Tedim, J; Poznyak, S K; Kuznetsova, A; Raps, D; Hack, T; Zheludkevich, M L; Ferreira, M G S

    2010-05-01

    The present work reports the synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) nanocontainers loaded with different corrosion inhibitors (vanadate, phosphate, and 2-mercaptobenzothiazolate) and the characterization of the resulting pigments by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The anticorrosion activity of these nanocontainers with respect to aluminum alloy AA2024 was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The bare metallic substrates were immersed in dispersions of nanocontainers in sodium chloride solution and tested to understand the inhibition mechanisms and efficiency. The nanocontainers were also incorporated into commercial coatings used for aeronautical applications to study the active corrosion protection properties in systems of industrial relevance. The results show that an enhancement of the active protection effect can be reached when nanocontainers loaded with different inhibitors are combined in the same protective coating system.

  4. Synthesis of Novel Tricyclic Chromenone-Based Inhibitors of IRE-1 RNase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE-1) is a kinase/RNase ER stress sensor that is activated in response to excessive accumulation of unfolded proteins, hypoxic conditions, calcium imbalance, and other stress stimuli. Activation of IRE-1 RNase function exerts a cytoprotective effect and has been implicated in the progression of cancer via increased expression of the transcription factor XBP-1s. Here, we describe the synthesis and biological evaluation of novel chromenone-based covalent inhibitors of IRE-1. Preparation of a family of 8-formyltetrahydrochromeno[3,4-c]pyridines was achieved via a Duff formylation that is attended by an unusual cyclization reaction. Biological evaluation in vitro and in whole cells led to the identification of 30 as a potent inhibitor of IRE-1 RNase activity and XBP-1s expression in wild type B cells and human mantle cell lymphoma cell lines. PMID:24749861

  5. Synthesis, biological activities and pharmacokinetic properties of new fluorinated derivatives of selective PDE4D inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brullo, Chiara; Massa, Matteo; Villa, Carla; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Rivera, Daniela; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Fedele, Ernesto; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Bertoni, Simona; Flammini, Lisa; Bruno, Olga

    2015-07-01

    A new series of selective PDE4D inhibitors has been designed and synthesized by replacing 3-methoxy group with 3-difluoromethoxy isoster moiety in our previously reported cathecolic structures. All compounds showed a good PDE4D3 inhibitory activity, most of them being inactive toward other PDE4 isoforms (PDE4A4, PDE4B2 and PDE4C2). Compound 3b, chosen among the synthesized compounds as the most promising in terms of inhibitory activity, selectivity and safety, showed an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to its non fluorinated analogue. Spontaneous locomotor activity, assessed in an open field apparatus, showed that, differently from rolipram and diazepam, selective PDE4D inhibitors, such as compounds 3b, 5b and 7b, did not affect locomotion, whereas compound 1b showed a tendency to reduce the distance traveled and to prolong the immobility period, possibly due to a poor selectivity.

  6. Structure-Activity Relationships of Novel Tryptamine-Based Inhibitors of Bacterial Transglycosylase.

    PubMed

    Sosič, Izidor; Anderluh, Marko; Sova, Matej; Gobec, Martina; Mlinarič Raščan, Irena; Derouaux, Adeline; Amoroso, Ana; Terrak, Mohammed; Breukink, Eefjan; Gobec, Stanislav

    2015-12-24

    Penicillin-binding proteins represent well-established, validated, and still very promising targets for the design and development of new antibacterial agents. The transglycosylase domain of penicillin-binding proteins is especially important, as it catalyzes polymerization of glycan chains, using the peptidoglycan precursor lipid II as a substrate. On the basis of the previous discovery of a noncovalent small-molecule inhibitor of transglycosylase activity, we systematically explored the structure-activity relationships of these tryptamine-based inhibitors. The main aim was to reduce the nonspecific cytotoxic properties of the initial hit compound and concurrently to retain the mode of its inhibition. A focused library of tryptamine-based compounds was synthesized, characterized, and evaluated biochemically. The results presented here show the successful reduction of the nonspecific cytotoxicity, and the retention of the inhibition of transglycosylase enzymatic activity, as well as the ability of these compounds to bind to lipid II and to have antibacterial actions. PMID:26588190

  7. Activity Based Profiling of Deubiquitylating Enzymes and Inhibitors in Animal Tissues.

    PubMed

    McLellan, Lauren; Forder, Cassie; Cranston, Aaron; Harrigan, Jeanine; Jacq, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like modifiers to proteins is an important signal for the regulation of a variety of biological processes including the targeting of substrates for degradation, receptor internalization, regulation of gene expression, and DNA repair. Posttranslational modification of proteins by ubiquitin controls many cellular processes, and aberrant ubiquitylation can contribute to cancer, immunopathologies, and neurodegeneration. Thus, deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) that remove ubiquitin from proteins have become attractive therapeutic targets. Monitoring the activity of DUBs in cells or in tissues is critical for understanding the biological function of DUBs in particular pathways and is essential for determining the physiological specificity and potency of small-molecule DUB inhibitors. Here, we describe a method for the homogenization of animal tissues and incubation of tissue lysates with ubiquitin-based activity probes to monitor DUB activity in mouse tissues and target engagement following treatment of animals with small-molecule DUB inhibitors. PMID:27613053

  8. CETSA screening identifies known and novel thymidylate synthase inhibitors and slow intracellular activation of 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Jafari, Rozbeh; Dan, Chen; Mateus, André; Haraldsson, Martin; Larsson, Andreas; Molina, Daniel Martinez; Artursson, Per; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Target engagement is a critical factor for therapeutic efficacy. Assessment of compound binding to native target proteins in live cells is therefore highly desirable in all stages of drug discovery. We report here the first compound library screen based on biophysical measurements of intracellular target binding, exemplified by human thymidylate synthase (TS). The screen selected accurately for all the tested known drugs acting on TS. We also identified TS inhibitors with novel chemistry and marketed drugs that were not previously known to target TS, including the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor decitabine. By following the cellular uptake and enzymatic conversion of known drugs we correlated the appearance of active metabolites over time with intracellular target engagement. These data distinguished a much slower activation of 5-fluorouracil when compared with nucleoside-based drugs. The approach establishes efficient means to associate drug uptake and activation with target binding during drug discovery. PMID:27010513

  9. Physiological and pathological roles of tissue plasminogen activator and its inhibitor neuroserpin in the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tet Woo; Tsang, Vicky W. K.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    Although its roles in the vascular space are most well-known, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is widely expressed in the developing and adult nervous system, where its activity is believed to be regulated by neuroserpin, a predominantly brain-specific member of the serpin family of protease inhibitors. In the normal physiological state, tPA has been shown to play roles in the development and plasticity of the nervous system. Ischemic damage, however, may lead to excess tPA activity in the brain and this is believed to contribute to neurodegeneration. In this article, we briefly review the physiological and pathological roles of tPA in the nervous system, which includes neuronal migration, axonal growth, synaptic plasticity, neuroprotection and neurodegeneration, as well as a contribution to neurological disease. We summarize tPA's multiple mechanisms of action and also highlight the contributions of the inhibitor neuroserpin to these processes. PMID:26528129

  10. Spiroimidazolidinone NPC1L1 inhibitors. Part 2: structure-activity studies and in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Howell, Kobporn L; DeVita, Robert J; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Meurer, Roger D; Lisnock, JeanMarie; Bull, Herbert G; McMasters, Daniel R; McCann, Margaret E; Mills, Sander G

    2010-12-01

    Ezetimibe (Zetia®), a cholesterol-absorption inhibitor (CAI) approved by the FDA for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, is believed to target the intestine protein Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) or its pathway. A spiroimidazolidinone NPC1L1 inhibitor identified by virtual screening showed moderate binding activity but was not efficacious in an in vivo rodent model of cholesterol absorption. Synthesis of analogs established the structure-activity relationships for binding activity, and resulted in compounds with in vivo efficacy, including 24, which inhibited plasma cholesterol absorption by 67% in the mouse, thereby providing proof-of-concept that non-β-lactams can be effective CAIs.

  11. Antimicrobial Activity of ILTI, a Kunitz-Type Trypsin Inhibitor from Inga laurina (SW.) Willd.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Taveira, Gabriel B; Gomes, Valdirene M; de Barros, Karina M C A; Maria-Neto, Simone

    2016-05-01

    Over the last few years, a growing number of proteinase inhibitors have been isolated from plants and particularly from seeds and have shown antimicrobial activity. A 20,000 Da serine peptidase inhibitor, named ILTI, was isolated from Inga laurina seeds and showed potent inhibitory enzymatic activity against trypsin. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ILTI on the growth of pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms. We observed that ILTI strongly inhibited in particular the growth of Candida tropicalis and Candida buinensis, inducing cellular agglomeration. However, it was ineffective against human pathogenic bacteria. We also investigated the potential of ILTI to permeabilize the plasma membrane of yeast cells. C. tropicalis and C. buinensis were incubated for 24 h with the ILTI at different concentrations, which showed that this inhibitor induced changes in the membranes of yeast cells, leading to their permeabilization. Interestingly, ILTI induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in C. tropicalis and C. buinensis cells. Finally, ILTI was coupled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and subsequent treatment of C. tropicalis and C. buinensis with DAPI revealed the presence of the labeled protein in the intracellular spaces. In conclusion, our results indicated the ability of peptidase inhibitors to induce microbial inhibition; therefore, they might offer templates for the design of new antifungal agents. PMID:26769111

  12. Effect of ace inhibitors and TMOF on growth, development, and trypsin activity of larval Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lemeire, Els; Borovsky, Dov; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2008-12-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) is a zinc metallopeptidase capable of cleaving dipeptide or dipeptideamide moieties at the C-terminal end of peptides. ACE is present in the hemolymph and reproductive tissues of insects. The presence of ACE in the hemolymph and its broad substrate specificity suggests an important role in processing of bioactive peptides. This study reports the effects of ACE inhibitors on larval growth in the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis. Feeding ACE inhibitors ad lib decreased the growth rate, inhibited ACE activity in the larval hemolymph, and down-regulated trypsin activity in the larval gut. These results indicate that S. littoralis ACE may influence trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut by interacting with a trypsin-modulating oostatic factor (TMOF). Injecting third instar larvae with a combination of Aea-TMOF and the ACE inhibitor captopril, down-regulated trypsin biosynthesis in the larval gut indicating that an Aea-TMOF gut receptor analogue could be present. Injecting captopril and enalapril into newly molted fifth instar larvae stopped larval feeding and decreased weight gain. Together, these results indicate that ACE inhibitors are efficacious in stunting larval growth and ACE plays an important role in larval growth and development. PMID:18949805

  13. Inhibition of dihydroceramide desaturase activity by the sphingosine kinase inhibitor SKI II.

    PubMed

    Cingolani, Francesca; Casasampere, Mireia; Sanllehí, Pol; Casas, Josefina; Bujons, Jordi; Fabrias, Gemma

    2014-08-01

    Sphingosine kinase inhibitor (SKI) II has been reported as a dual inhibitor of sphingosine kinases (SKs) 1 and 2 and has been extensively used to prove the involvement of SKs and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in cellular processes. Dihydroceramide desaturase (Des1), the last enzyme in the de novo synthesis of ceramide (Cer), regulates the balance between dihydroceramides (dhCers) and Cers. Both SKs and Des1 have interest as therapeutic targets. Here we show that SKI II is a noncompetitive inhibitor (Ki = 0.3 μM) of Des1 activity with effect also in intact cells without modifying Des1 protein levels. Molecular modeling studies support that the SKI II-induced decrease in Des1 activity could result from inhibition of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase. SKI II, but not the SK1-specific inhibitor PF-543, provoked a remarkable accumulation of dhCers and their metabolites, while both SKI II and PF-543 reduced S1P to almost undetectable levels. SKI II, but not PF543, reduced cell proliferation with accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase. SKI II, but not PF543, induced autophagy. These overall findings should be taken into account when using SKI II as a pharmacological tool, as some of the effects attributed to decreased S1P may actually be caused by augmented dhCers and/or their metabolites.

  14. A comparative structure-function analysis of active-site inhibitors of Vibrio cholerae cholix toxin.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Miguel R; Merrill, A Rod

    2015-09-01

    Cholix toxin from Vibrio cholerae is a novel mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (mART) toxin that shares structural and functional properties with Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A and Corynebacterium diphtheriae diphtheria toxin. Herein, we have used the high-resolution X-ray structure of full-length cholix toxin in the apo form, NAD(+) bound, and 10 structures of the cholix catalytic domain (C-domain) complexed with several strong inhibitors of toxin enzyme activity (NAP, PJ34, and the P-series) to study the binding mode of the ligands. A pharmacophore model based on the active pose of NAD(+) was compared with the active conformation of the inhibitors, which revealed a cationic feature in the side chain of the inhibitors that may determine the active pose. Moreover, a conformational search was conducted for the missing coordinates of one of the main active-site loops (R-loop). The resulting structural models were used to evaluate the interaction energies and for 3D-QSAR modeling. Implications for a rational drug design approach for mART toxins were derived.

  15. Modulation of lysyl oxidase-like 2 enzymatic activity by an allosteric antibody inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Hector M; Vaysberg, Maria; Mikels, Amanda; McCauley, Scott; Velayo, Arleene C; Garcia, Carlos; Smith, Victoria

    2010-07-01

    In this report, we assessed the steady-state enzymatic activity of lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2) against the substrates 1,5-diaminopentane (DAP), spermine, and fibrillar type I collagen. We find that both DAP and spermine are capable of activating LOXL2 to the same extent and have similar Michaelis constants (K(m) approximately 1 mm) and catalytic rates (k(cat) approximately 0.02 s(-1)). We also show that LOXL2 is capable of being inhibited by a known suicide inhibitor of lysyl oxidase (LOX), beta-aminopropionitrile, which we find is a potent inhibitor of LOXL2 activity. The modality of inhibition of beta-aminopropionitrile was also examined and found to be competitive with respect to the substrates DAP and spermine. In addition, we identified an antibody inhibitor (AB0023) of LOXL2 enzymatic function and have found that the inhibition occurs in a non-competitive manner with respect to both spermine and DAP. The binding epitope of AB0023 was mapped to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain four of human LOXL2. AB0023 binds to a region remote from the catalytic domain making AB0023 an allosteric inhibitor of LOXL2. This affords AB0023 several advantages, because it is specific for LOXL2 and inhibits the enzymatic function of LOXL2 in a non-competitive manner thereby allowing inhibition of LOXL2 regardless of substrate concentration. These results suggest that antibody allosteric modulators of enzymatic function represent a novel drug development strategy and, in the context of LOXL2, suggest that inhibitors such as these might be useful therapeutics in oncology, fibrosis, and inflammation.

  16. Computational Design of a PDZ Domain Peptide Inhibitor that Rescues CFTR Activity

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kyle E.; Cushing, Patrick R.; Boisguerin, Prisca; Madden, Dean R.; Donald, Bruce R.

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an epithelial chloride channel mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The most prevalent CFTR mutation, ΔF508, blocks folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. Recent work has shown that some ΔF508-CFTR channel activity can be recovered by pharmaceutical modulators (“potentiators” and “correctors”), but ΔF508-CFTR can still be rapidly degraded via a lysosomal pathway involving the CFTR-associated ligand (CAL), which binds CFTR via a PDZ interaction domain. We present a study that goes from theory, to new structure-based computational design algorithms, to computational predictions, to biochemical testing and ultimately to epithelial-cell validation of novel, effective CAL PDZ inhibitors (called “stabilizers”) that rescue ΔF508-CFTR activity. To design the “stabilizers”, we extended our structural ensemble-based computational protein redesign algorithm to encompass protein-protein and protein-peptide interactions. The computational predictions achieved high accuracy: all of the top-predicted peptide inhibitors bound well to CAL. Furthermore, when compared to state-of-the-art CAL inhibitors, our design methodology achieved higher affinity and increased binding efficiency. The designed inhibitor with the highest affinity for CAL (kCAL01) binds six-fold more tightly than the previous best hexamer (iCAL35), and 170-fold more tightly than the CFTR C-terminus. We show that kCAL01 has physiological activity and can rescue chloride efflux in CF patient-derived airway epithelial cells. Since stabilizers address a different cellular CF defect from potentiators and correctors, our inhibitors provide an additional therapeutic pathway that can be used in conjunction with current methods. PMID:22532795

  17. Development of a QPatch Automated Electrophysiology Assay for Identifying KCa3.1 Inhibitors and Activators

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, David Paul; Yu, Weifeng; Brown, Brandon M.; Løjkner, Lars Damgaard

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel KCa3.1 (also known as KCNN4, IK1, or the Gárdos channel) plays an important role in the activation of T and B cells, mast cells, macrophages, and microglia by regulating membrane potential, cellular volume, and calcium signaling. KCa3.1 is further involved in the proliferation of dedifferentiated vascular smooth muscle cells and fibroblast and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization responses in the vascular endothelium. Accordingly, KCa3.1 inhibitors are therapeutically interesting as immunosuppressants and for the treatment of a wide range of fibroproliferative disorders, whereas KCa3.1 activators constitute a potential new class of endothelial function preserving antihypertensives. Here, we report the development of QPatch assays for both KCa3.1 inhibitors and activators. During assay optimization, the Ca2+ sensitivity of KCa3.1 was studied using varying intracellular Ca2+ concentrations. A free Ca2+ concentration of 1 μM was chosen to optimally test inhibitors. To identify activators, which generally act as positive gating modulators, a lower Ca2+ concentration (∼200 nM) was used. The QPatch results were benchmarked against manual patch-clamp electrophysiology by determining the potency of several commonly used KCa3.1 inhibitors (TRAM-34, NS6180, ChTX) and activators (EBIO, riluzole, SKA-31). Collectively, our results demonstrate that the QPatch provides a comparable but much faster approach to study compound interactions with KCa3.1 channels in a robust and reliable assay. PMID:24351043

  18. Calorimetric studies of the interactions of metalloenzyme active site mimetics with zinc-binding inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sophia G; Burns, Philip T; Miceli, Amanda M; Grice, Kyle A; Karver, Caitlin E; Jin, Lihua

    2016-07-19

    The binding of drugs to metalloenzymes is an intricate process that involves several interactions, including binding of the drug to the enzyme active site metal, as well as multiple interactions between the drug and the enzyme residues. In order to determine the free energy contribution of Zn(2+) binding by known metalloenzyme inhibitors without the other interactions, valid active site zinc structural mimetics must be formed and binding studies need to be performed in biologically relevant conditions. The potential of each of five ligands to form a structural mimetic with Zn(2+) was investigated in buffer using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). All five ligands formed strong 1 : 1 (ligand : Zn(2+)) binary complexes. The complexes were used in further ITC experiments to study their interaction with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) and/or acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), two bidentate anionic zinc-chelating enzyme inhibitors. It was found that tetradentate ligands were not suitable for creating zinc structural mimetics for inhibitor binding in solution due to insufficient coordination sites remaining on Zn(2+). A stable binary complex, [Zn(BPA)](2+), which was formed by a tridentate ligand, bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (BPA), was found to bind one AHA in buffer or a methanol : buffer mixture (60 : 40 by volume) at pH 7.25 or one 8-HQ in the methanol : buffer mixture at pH 6.80, making it an effective structural mimetic for the active site of zinc metalloenzymes. These results are consistent with the observation that metalloenzyme active site zinc ions have three residues coordinated to them, leaving one or two sites open for inhibitors to bind. Our findings indicate that Zn(BPA)X2 can be used as an active site structural mimetic for zinc metalloenzymes for estimating the free energy contribution of zinc binding to the overall inhibitor active site interactions. Such use will help aid in the rational design of inhibitors to a variety of zinc metalloenzymes

  19. Site-directed spin labeling reveals pentameric ligand-gated ion channel gating motions.

    PubMed

    Dellisanti, Cosma D; Ghosh, Borna; Hanson, Susan M; Raspanti, James M; Grant, Valerie A; Diarra, Gaoussou M; Schuh, Abby M; Satyshur, Kenneth; Klug, Candice S; Czajkowski, Cynthia

    2013-11-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are neurotransmitter-activated receptors that mediate fast synaptic transmission. In pLGICs, binding of agonist to the extracellular domain triggers a structural rearrangement that leads to the opening of an ion-conducting pore in the transmembrane domain and, in the continued presence of neurotransmitter, the channels desensitize (close). The flexible loops in each subunit that connect the extracellular binding domain (loops 2, 7, and 9) to the transmembrane channel domain (M2-M3 loop) are essential for coupling ligand binding to channel gating. Comparing the crystal structures of two bacterial pLGIC homologues, ELIC and the proton-activated GLIC, suggests channel gating is associated with rearrangements in these loops, but whether these motions accurately predict the motions in functional lipid-embedded pLGICs is unknown. Here, using site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and functional GLIC channels reconstituted into liposomes, we examined if, and how far, the loops at the ECD/TMD gating interface move during proton-dependent gating transitions from the resting to desensitized state. Loop 9 moves ∼9 Å inward toward the channel lumen in response to proton-induced desensitization. Loop 9 motions were not observed when GLIC was in detergent micelles, suggesting detergent solubilization traps the protein in a nonactivatable state and lipids are required for functional gating transitions. Proton-induced desensitization immobilizes loop 2 with little change in position. Proton-induced motion of the M2-M3 loop was not observed, suggesting its conformation is nearly identical in closed and desensitized states. Our experimentally derived distance measurements of spin-labeled GLIC suggest ELIC is not a good model for the functional resting state of GLIC, and that the crystal structure of GLIC does not correspond to a desensitized state. These findings advance our understanding

  20. Exposing a Hidden Functional Site of C-reactive Protein by Site-directed Mutagenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay K.; Thirumalai, Avinash; Hammond, David J.; Pangburn, Michael K.; Mishra, Vinod K.; Johnson, David A.; Rusiñol, Antonio E.; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a cyclic pentameric protein whose major binding specificity, at physiological pH, is for substances bearing exposed phosphocholine moieties. Another pentameric form of CRP, which exists at acidic pH, displays binding activity for oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). The ox-LDL-binding site in CRP, which is hidden at physiological pH, is exposed by acidic pH-induced structural changes in pentameric CRP. The aim of this study was to expose the hidden ox-LDL-binding site of CRP by site-directed mutagenesis and to generate a CRP mutant that can bind to ox-LDL without the requirement of acidic pH. Mutation of Glu42, an amino acid that participates in intersubunit interactions in the CRP pentamer and is buried, to Gln resulted in a CRP mutant (E42Q) that showed significant binding activity for ox-LDL at physiological pH. For maximal binding to ox-LDL, E42Q CRP required a pH much less acidic than that required by wild-type CRP. At any given pH, E42Q CRP was more efficient than wild-type CRP in binding to ox-LDL. Like wild-type CRP, E42Q CRP remained pentameric at acidic pH. Also, E42Q CRP was more efficient than wild-type CRP in binding to several other deposited, conformationally altered proteins. The E42Q CRP mutant provides a tool to investigate the functions of CRP in defined animal models of inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis because wild-type CRP requires acidic pH to bind to deposited, conformationally altered proteins, including ox-LDL, and available animal models may not have sufficient acidosis or other possible modifiers of the pentameric structure of CRP at the sites of inflammation. PMID:22158621

  1. Aromatic inhibitors derived from ammonia-pretreated lignocellulose hinder bacterial ethanologenesis by activating regulatory circuits controlling inhibitor efflux and detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Keating, David H.; Zhang, Yaoping; Ong, Irene M.; McIlwain, Sean; Morales, Eduardo H.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Tremaine, Mary; Bothfeld, William; Higbee, Alan; Ulbrich, Arne; Balloon, Allison J.; Westphall, Michael S.; Aldrich, Josh; Lipton, Mary S.; Kim, Joonhoon; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Bukhman, Yury V.; Coon, Joshua J.; Kiley, Patricia J.; Bates, Donna M.; Landick, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Efficient microbial conversion of lignocellulosic hydrolysates to biofuels is a key barrier to the economically viable deployment of lignocellulosic biofuels. A chief contributor to this barrier is the impact on microbial processes and energy metabolism of lignocellulose-derived inhibitors, including phenolic carboxylates, phenolic amides (for ammonia-pretreated biomass), phenolic aldehydes, and furfurals. To understand the bacterial pathways induced by inhibitors present in ammonia-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, which are less well studied than acid-pretreated biomass hydrolysates, we developed and exploited synthetic mimics of ammonia-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). To determine regulatory responses to the inhibitors normally present in ACSH, we measured transcript and protein levels in an Escherichia coli ethanologen using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics during fermentation to ethanol of synthetic hydrolysates containing or lacking the inhibitors. Our study identified four major regulators mediating these responses, the MarA/SoxS/Rob network, AaeR, FrmR, and YqhC. Induction of these regulons was correlated with a reduced rate of ethanol production, buildup of pyruvate, depletion of ATP and NAD(P)H, and an inhibition of xylose conversion. The aromatic aldehyde inhibitor 5-hydroxymethylfurfural appeared to be reduced to its alcohol form by the ethanologen during fermentation, whereas phenolic acid and amide inhibitors were not metabolized. Together, our findings establish that the major regulatory responses to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors are mediated by transcriptional rather than translational regulators, suggest that energy consumed for inhibitor efflux and detoxification may limit biofuel production, and identify a network of regulators for future synthetic biology efforts. PMID:25177315

  2. Site-directed ELISA identifies a highly antigenic region of the simian immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P R; Parks, D E; Norrby, E; Lerner, R A; Purcell, R H; Chanock, R M

    1988-06-01

    The transmembrane glycoprotein (gp32) of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) contains a highly antigenic region that includes amino acid residues 606-628. A synthetic peptide representing this region was highly immunoreactive with sera from SIV-infected primates in a site-directed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). This reactivity extended across four primate species from three genera and identified infection with at least two distinct isolates of SIV. This site-directed ELISA represents a simple, accessible method with broad specificity for screening large numbers of primates for antibodies against SIV.

  3. Pevonedistat, a NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor, is active in mantle cell lymphoma and enhances rituximab activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Czuczman, Natalie M; Barth, Matthew J; Gu, Juan; Neppalli, Vishala; Mavis, Cory; Frys, Sarah E; Hu, Qiang; Liu, Song; Klener, Pavel; Vockova, Petra; Czuczman, Myron S; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J

    2016-03-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is characterized by an aggressive clinical course and inevitable development of refractory disease, stressing the need to develop alternative therapeutic strategies. To this end, we evaluated pevonedistat (MLN4924), a novel potent and selective NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor in a panel of MCL cell lines, primary MCL tumor cells, and 2 distinct murine models of human MCL. Pevonedistat exposure resulted in a dose-, time-, and caspase-dependent cell death in the majority of the MCL cell lines and primary tumor cells tested. Of interest, in the MCL cell lines with lower half-maximal inhibitory concentration (0.1-0.5 μM), pevonedistat induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest, downregulation of Bcl-xL levels, decreased nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity, and apoptosis. In addition, pevonedistat exhibited additive/synergistic effects when combined with cytarabine, bendamustine, or rituximab. In vivo, as a single agent, pevonedistat prolonged the survival of 2 MCL-bearing mouse models when compared with controls. Pevonedistat in combination with rituximab led to improved survival compared with rituximab or pevonedistat monotherapy. Our data suggest that pevonedistat has significant activity in MCL preclinical models, possibly related to effects on NF-κB activity, Bcl-xL downregulation, and G1 cell cycle arrest. Our findings support further investigation of pevonedistat with or without rituximab in the treatment of MCL. PMID:26675347

  4. Actin remodeling confers BRAF inhibitor resistance to melanoma cells through YAP/TAZ activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Hwan; Kim, Jongshin; Hong, Hyowon; Lee, Si-Hyung; Lee, June-Koo; Jung, Eunji; Kim, Joon

    2016-03-01

    The activation of transcriptional coactivators YAP and its paralog TAZ has been shown to promote resistance to anti-cancer therapies. YAP/TAZ activity is tightly coupled to actin cytoskeleton architecture. However, the influence of actin remodeling on cancer drug resistance remains largely unexplored. Here, we report a pivotal role of actin remodeling in YAP/TAZ-dependent BRAF inhibitor resistance in BRAF V600E mutant melanoma cells. Melanoma cells resistant to the BRAF inhibitor PLX4032 exhibit an increase in actin stress fiber formation, which appears to promote the nuclear accumulation of YAP/TAZ. Knockdown of YAP/TAZ reduces the viability of resistant melanoma cells, whereas overexpression of constitutively active YAP induces resistance. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerization and actomyosin tension in melanoma cells suppresses both YAP/TAZ activation and PLX4032 resistance. Our siRNA library screening identifies actin dynamics regulator TESK1 as a novel vulnerable point of the YAP/TAZ-dependent resistance pathway. These results suggest that inhibition of actin remodeling is a potential strategy to suppress resistance in BRAF inhibitor therapies.

  5. Granzyme activity in the inflamed lung is not controlled by endogenous serine proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, G M; Wolbink, A M; Cormier, Y; Hack, C E

    2000-10-01

    Numerous lung diseases, such as hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), are characterized by the presence of activated alveolar CTL and NK cells. Since these cells produce granzymes, granzyme A and B levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids from 14 normal subjects and 12 patients with HP were measured by ELISA. Median (range) BAL granzyme A and B levels were 4 (0-37) and 0 (0-6) pg/ml in normal subjects. BAL granzyme levels were significantly higher in HP patients, being at 74 (0-1,889) and 10 (0-78) pg/ml for granzymes A and B, respectively. In vitro, neither of the three main serine protease inhibitors of the lung, namely alpha1-antitrypsin, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, and elafin, showed any effect on granzyme A or B activity. In addition, granzyme A was shown to be fully active in BAL fluids. Hence, these data show that granzyme activity may be poorly controlled by protease inhibitors in inflamed tissues. Thus, granzymes could contribute to tissue remodeling and inflammation characterizing HP.

  6. Anti-diabetic activity of insulin-degrading enzyme inhibitors mediated by multiple hormones.

    PubMed

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; McFedries, Amanda; Foda, Zachariah H; Kleiner, Ralph E; Du, Xiu Quan; Leissring, Malcolm A; Tang, Wei-Jen; Charron, Maureen J; Seeliger, Markus A; Saghatelian, Alan; Liu, David R

    2014-07-01

    Despite decades of speculation that inhibiting endogenous insulin degradation might treat type-2 diabetes, and the identification of IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) as a diabetes susceptibility gene, the relationship between the activity of the zinc metalloprotein IDE and glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Although Ide(-/-) mice have elevated insulin levels, they exhibit impaired, rather than improved, glucose tolerance that may arise from compensatory insulin signalling dysfunction. IDE inhibitors that are active in vivo are therefore needed to elucidate IDE's physiological roles and to determine its potential to serve as a target for the treatment of diabetes. Here we report the discovery of a physiologically active IDE inhibitor identified from a DNA-templated macrocycle library. An X-ray structure of the macrocycle bound to IDE reveals that it engages a binding pocket away from the catalytic site, which explains its remarkable selectivity. Treatment of lean and obese mice with this inhibitor shows that IDE regulates the abundance and signalling of glucagon and amylin, in addition to that of insulin. Under physiological conditions that augment insulin and amylin levels, such as oral glucose administration, acute IDE inhibition leads to substantially improved glucose tolerance and slower gastric emptying. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of modulating IDE activity as a new therapeutic strategy to treat type-2 diabetes and expand our understanding of the roles of IDE in glucose and hormone regulation.

  7. The protease inhibitor HAI-2, but not HAI-1, regulates matriptase activation and shedding through prostasin.

    PubMed

    Friis, Stine; Sales, Katiuchia Uzzun; Schafer, Jeffrey Martin; Vogel, Lotte K; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Bugge, Thomas H

    2014-08-01

    The membrane-anchored serine proteases, matriptase and prostasin, and the membrane-anchored serine protease inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 and HAI-2, are critical effectors of epithelial development and postnatal epithelial homeostasis. Matriptase and prostasin form a reciprocal zymogen activation complex that results in the formation of active matriptase and prostasin that are targets for inhibition by HAI-1 and HAI-2. Conflicting data, however, have accumulated as to the existence of auxiliary functions for both HAI-1 and HAI-2 in regulating the intracellular trafficking and activation of matriptase. In this study, we, therefore, used genetically engineered mice to determine the effect of ablation of endogenous HAI-1 and endogenous HAI-2 on endogenous matriptase expression, subcellular localization, and activation in polarized intestinal epithelial cells. Whereas ablation of HAI-1 did not affect matriptase in epithelial cells of the small or large intestine, ablation of HAI-2 resulted in the loss of matriptase from both tissues. Gene silencing studies in intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers revealed that this loss of cell-associated matriptase was mechanistically linked to accelerated activation and shedding of the protease caused by loss of prostasin regulation by HAI-2. Taken together, these data indicate that HAI-1 regulates the activity of activated matriptase, whereas HAI-2 has an essential role in regulating prostasin-dependent matriptase zymogen activation.

  8. Structure-Activity Relationships of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Maturation Inhibitor PF-46396

    PubMed Central

    Murgatroyd, Christopher; Pirrie, Lisa; Tran, Fanny; Smith, Terry K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 maturation inhibitors are a novel class of antiretroviral compounds that consist of two structurally distinct chemical classes: betulinic acid derivatives and the pyridone-based compound PF-46396. It is currently believed that both classes act by similar modes of action to generate aberrant noninfectious particles via inhibition of CA-SP1 cleavage during Gag proteolytic processing. In this study, we utilized a series of novel analogues with decreasing similarity to PF-46396 to determine the chemical groups within PF-46396 that contribute to antiviral activity, Gag binding, and the relationship between these essential properties. A spectrum of antiviral activity (active, intermediate, and inactive) was observed across the analogue series with respect to CA-SP1 cleavage and HIV-1 (NL4-3) replication kinetics in Jurkat T cells. We demonstrate that selected inactive analogues are incorporated into wild-type (WT) immature particles and that one inactive analogue is capable of interfering with PF-46396 inhibition of CA-SP1 cleavage. Mutations that confer PF-46396 resistance can impose a defective phenotype on HIV-1 that can be rescued in a compound-dependent manner. Some inactive analogues retained the capacity to rescue PF-46396-dependent mutants (SP1-A3V, SP1-A3T, and CA-P157S), implying that they can also interact with mutant Gag. The structure-activity relationships observed in this study demonstrate that (i) the tert-butyl group is essential for antiviral activity but is not an absolute requirement for Gag binding, (ii) the trifluoromethyl group is optimal but not essential for antiviral activity, and (iii) the 2-aminoindan group is important for antiviral activity and Gag binding but is not essential, as its replacement is tolerated. IMPORTANCE Combinations of antiretroviral drugs successfully treat HIV/AIDS patients; however, drug resistance problems make the development of new mechanistic drug classes an ongoing priority. HIV-1 maturation

  9. Hepatocyte growth factor activator is a potential target proteinase for Kazal-type inhibitor in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Słowińska, Mariola; Bukowska, Joanna; Hejmej, Anna; Bilińska, Barbara; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Jankowski, Jan; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    A peculiar characteristic of turkey seminal plasma is the increased activity of serine proteinases. It is of interest if the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor controls the activity of turkey seminal plasma proteinases. Pure preparations of the Kazal-type inhibitor and anti-Kazal-type inhibitor monospecific immunoglobulin Gs were used as ligands in affinity chromatography for proteinase isolation from turkey seminal plasma. Gene expression and the immunohistochemical detection of the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor in the reproductive tract of turkey toms are described. The hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) was identified in the binding fraction in affinity chromatography. Hepatocyte growth factor activator activity was inhibited by the Kazal-type inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner. This protease was a primary physiological target for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. Numerous proteoforms of HGFA were present in turkey seminal plasma, and phosphorylation was the primary posttranslational modification of HGFA. In addition to HGFA, acrosin was a target proteinase for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. In seminal plasma, acrosin was present only in complexes with the Kazal-type inhibitor and was not present as a free enzyme. The single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor was specific for the reproductive tract. The germ cell-specific expression of Kazal-type inhibitors in the testis indicated an important function in spermatogenesis; secretion by the epithelial cells of the epididymis and the ductus deferens indicated that the Kazal-type inhibitor was an important factor involved in the changes in sperm membranes during maturation and in the maintenance of the microenvironment in which sperm maturation occurred and sperm was stored. The role of HGFA in these processes remains to be established.

  10. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor NCH-51 activates latent HIV-1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Victoriano, Ann Florence B; Imai, Kenichi; Togami, Hiroaki; Ueno, Takaharu; Asamitsu, Kaori; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Miyata, Naoki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Okamoto, Takashi

    2011-04-01

    Pharmacological manipulations to purge human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from latent reservoirs have been considered as an adjuvant therapeutic approach to highly-active antiretroviral therapy for the eradication of HIV. Our novel histone deacetylase inhibitor NCH-51 induced expression of latent HIV-1 with minimal cytotoxicity. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we observed a reduction of HDAC1 occupancy, histone hyperacetylation and the recruitment of positive transcription factors at the HIV-1 promoter in latently infected-cells under the treatment with NCH-51. Mutation studies of the long terminal repeat (LTR) revealed NCH-51 mediated gene expression through the Sp1 sites. When Sp1 expression was knocked-down by small interfering RNA, the NCH-51-mediated activation of a stably integrated HIV-1 LTR was attenuated. Moreover, the Sp1 inhibitor mithramycin A abolished the effects of NCH-51.

  11. Cellular Activity of New Small Molecule Protein Arginine Deiminase 3 (PAD3) Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Haya; Khan, Hasan A; Tjin, Caroline C; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2016-09-01

    The protein arginine deiminases (PADs) catalyze the post-translational deimination of arginine side chains. Multiple PAD isozymes have been characterized, and abnormal PAD activity has been associated with several human disease states. PAD3 has been characterized as a modulator of cell growth via apoptosis inducing factor and has been implicated in the neurodegenerative response to spinal cord injury. Here, we describe the design, synthesis, and evaluation of conformationally constrained versions of the potent and selective PAD3 inhibitor 2. The cell activity of representative inhibitors in this series was also demonstrated for the first time by rescue of thapsigargin-induced cell death in PAD3-expressing HEK293T cells. PMID:27660689

  12. Expression, purification and crystallization of human 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein with leukotriene-biosynthesis inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Shihua; McKeever, Brian M.; Wisniewski, Douglas; Miller, Douglas K.; Spencer, Robert H.; Chu, Lin; Ujjainwalla, Feroze; Yamin, Ting-Ting; Evans, Jilly F.; Becker, Joseph W.; Ferguson, Andrew D.

    2007-12-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of human 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein in complex with two leukotriene-biosynthesis inhibitors is decribed. The processes that were used to generate diffraction quality crystals are presented in detail. The nuclear membrane protein 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) plays an essential role in leukotriene synthesis. Recombinant full-length human FLAP with a C-terminal hexahistidine tag has been expressed and purified from the cytoplasmic membrane of Escherichia coli. Diffraction-quality crystals of FLAP in complex with leukotriene-synthesis inhibitor MK-591 and with an iodinated analogue of MK-591 have been grown using the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method. The crystals exhibit tetragonal symmetry (P42{sub 1}2) and diffracted to a resolution limit of 4 Å.

  13. Caspase-2 cleaves DNA fragmentation factor (DFF45)/inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD).

    PubMed

    Dahal, Giri Raj; Karki, Pratap; Thapa, Arjun; Shahnawaz, Mohammad; Shin, Song Yub; Lee, Jung Sup; Cho, Byungyun; Park, Il-Seon

    2007-12-01

    To investigate the signal transduction pathway of caspase-2, cell permeable Tat-reverse-caspase-2 was constructed, characterized and utilized for biochemical and cellular studies. It could induce the cell death as early as 2h, and caspase-2-specific VDVADase activity but not other caspase activities including DEVDase and IETDase. Interestingly, nuclear DNA fragmentation occurred and consistently DNA fragmentation factor (DFF45)/Inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD) was cleaved inside the cell as well as in vitro, suggesting a role of caspase-2 in nuclear DNA fragmentation. PMID:17945178

  14. Redundant kinase activation and resistance of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Fu, Li-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown dramatic effects against that tumors harboring EGFR activating mutations in the EGFR intracytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain and resulted in cell apoptosis. Unfortunately, a number of patients ultimately developed resistance by multiple mechanisms. Thus, elucidation of the mechanism of resistance to EGFR-TKIs can provide strategies for blocking or reversing the situation. Recent studies suggested that redundant kinase activation plays pivotal roles in escaping from the effects of EGFR-TKIs. Herein, we aimed to characterize several molecular events involved in the resistance to EGFR-TKIs mediated by redundant kinase activation. PMID:25520855

  15. Structure-activity relationships of organofluorine inhibitors of β-amyloid self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Török, Béla; Sood, Abha; Bag, Seema; Kulkarni, Aditya; Borkin, Dmitry; Lawler, Elizabeth; Dasgupta, Sujaya; Landge, Shainaz; Abid, Mohammed; Zhou, Weihong; Foster, Michelle; LeVine, Harry; Török, Marianna

    2012-05-01

    A broad group of structurally diverse small organofluorine compounds were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of β-amyloid (Aβ) self-assembly. The main goal was to generate a diverse library of compounds with the same functional group and to observe general structural features that characterize inhibitors of Aβ oligomer and fibril formation, ultimately identifying structures for further focused inhibitor design. The common structural motifs in these compounds are CF(3) -C-OH and CF(3) -C-NH groups that were proposed to be binding units in our previous studies. A broad range of potential small-molecule inhibitors were synthesized by combining various carbocyclic and heteroaromatic rings with an array of substituents, generating a total of 106 molecules. The compounds were tested by standard methods such as thioflavin-T fluorescence spectroscopy for monitoring fibril formation, biotinyl Aβ(1-42) single-site streptavidin-based assays for observing oligomer formation, and atomic force microscopy for morphological studies. These assays revealed a number of structures that show significant inhibition against either Aβ fibril or oligomer formation. A detailed analysis of the structure-activity relationship of anti-fibril and -oligomer properties is provided. These data present further experimental evidence for the distinct nature of fibril versus oligomer formation and indicate that the interaction of the Aβ peptide with chiral small molecules is not stereospecific in nature.

  16. Molecular cloning and synthesis of biologically active human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczorek, M.; Honore, N.; Ribes, V.; Dehoux, P.; Cornet, P.; Cartwright, T.; Streeck, R.E.

    1987-06-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) is a widely distributed glycoprotein that stochiometrically inactivates metalloproteinases involved in connective tissue catabolism. Here they report the cDNA cloning of TIMP from human fibroblastic MRC5 cells using a single 42-base oligonucleotide probe. Expression in S. cerevisiae of complete TIMP cDNA yielded insoluble protein aggregates. Biologically active TIMP was reconstituted from the yeast product by a denaturation/renaturation procedure.

  17. Orally bioavailable Syk inhibitors with activity in a rat PK/PD model.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Gebhard; Veenstra, Siem; Strang, Ross; Blanz, Joachim; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Berghausen, Jörg; Lee, Christian C; Zerwes, Hans-Günter

    2015-10-15

    Design and optimization of benzo- and pyrido-thiazoles/isothiazoles are reported leading to the discovery of the potent, orally bioavailable Syk inhibitor 5, which was found to be active in a rat PK/PD model. Compound 5 showed acceptable overall kinase selectivity. However, in addition to Syk it also inhibited Aurora kinase in enzymatic and cellular settings leading to findings in the micronucleus assay. As a consequence, compound 5 was not further pursued. PMID:26320624

  18. Structure activity relationship studies on chemically non-reactive glycine sulfonamide inhibitors of diacylglycerol lipase.

    PubMed

    Chupak, Louis S; Zheng, Xiaofan; Hu, Shuanghua; Huang, Yazhong; Ding, Min; Lewis, Martin A; Westphal, Ryan S; Blat, Yuval; McClure, Andrea; Gentles, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    N-Benzylic-substituted glycine sulfonamides that reversibly inhibit diacylglycerol (DAG) lipases are reported. Detailed herein are the structure activity relationships, profiling characteristics and physico-chemical properties for the first reported series of DAG lipase (DAGL) inhibitors that function without covalent attachment to the enzyme. Highly potent examples are presented that represent valuable tool compounds for studying DAGL inhibition and constitute important leads for future medicinal chemistry efforts.

  19. New Rev-export inhibitor from Alpinia galanga and structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Satoru; Shiomi, Atsushi; Kaneko, Masafumi; Ye, Ying; Yoshida, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Kimura, Tominori; Kobayashi, Motomasa; Murakami, Nobutoshi

    2009-05-01

    Bioassay-guided separation by use of the fission yeast expressing NES of Rev, an HIV-1 viral regulatory protein, disclosed 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA, 1) as a new inhibitor for nuclear export of Rev from the roots of Alpinia galanga. Both analysis for mechanism of action with biotinylated probe (2) and several synthesized analogs established crucial portions in 1 for Rev-export inhibitory activity.

  20. Site directed spin labeling studies of Escherichia coli dihydroorotate dehydrogenase N-terminal extension

    SciTech Connect

    Couto, Sheila G.; Cristina Nonato, M.

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EcDHODH is a membrane-associated enzyme and a promising target for drug design. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enzyme's N-terminal extension is responsible for membrane association. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal works as a molecular lid regulating access to the protein interior. -- Abstract: Dihydroorotate dehydrogenases (DHODHs) are enzymes that catalyze the fourth step of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. In this reaction, DHODH converts dihydroorotate to orotate, using a flavine mononucleotide as a cofactor. Since the synthesis of nucleotides has different pathways in mammals as compared to parasites, DHODH has gained much attention as a promising target for drug design. Escherichia coli DHODH (EcDHODH) is a family 2 DHODH that interacts with cell membranes in order to promote catalysis. The membrane association is supposedly made via an extension found in the enzyme's N-terminal. In the present work, we used site directed spin labeling (SDSL) to specifically place a magnetic probe at positions 2, 5, 19, and 21 within the N-terminal and thus monitor, by using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), dynamics and structural changes in this region in the presence of a membrane model system. Overall, our ESR spectra show that the N-terminal indeed binds to membranes and that it experiences a somewhat high flexibility that could be related to the role of this region as a molecular lid controlling the entrance of the enzyme's active site and thus allowing the enzyme to give access to quinones that are dispersed in the membrane and that are necessary for the catalysis.

  1. A bead-based activity screen for small-molecule inhibitors of signal transduction in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Sylvester, Juliesta E.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia is characterized by the presence of the chimeric BCR-ABL gene, which is expressed as the constitutively active Bcr-Abl kinase. Although kinase activity is directly responsible for the clinical phenotype, current diagnostic and prognostic methods focus on a genetic classification system where molecularly distinct subcategories are used to predict patient responses to small-molecule inhibitors of the Bcr-Abl kinase. Point mutations in the kinase domain are a central factor regulating inhibitor resistance; however, compensatory signaling caused by the activation of unrelated kinases can influence inhibitor efficacy. Kinase activity profiling can be used as a complementary approach to genetic screening and allows direct screening of small-molecule inhibitors. We developed a quantitative assay to monitor tyrosine kinase activities and inhibitor sensitivities in a model of chronic myelogenous leukemia using peptide reporters covalently immobilized on Luminex beads. Kinase activity is quantified by non-linear regression from well-specific internal standard curves. Using optimized synthetic substrates and peptides derived from native substrates as probes, we measured kinase inhibition in cell lysates by the signal transduction inhibitors imatinib and dasatinib. Taking advantage of a convenient 96-well plate format, this assay also allows a straightforward and quantitative analysis of the differential effects of ATP and inhibitors on kinase activity. This method for analyzing a focused signaling network benefits from rigorous statistical analysis and short processing times, thereby offering a powerful tool for drug discovery and clinical testing. PMID:20423990

  2. Effect of wine inhibitors on the proteolytic activity of papain from Carica papaya L. latex.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Ilaria; Esti, Marco; Liburdi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    The influence of potential inhibitors naturally present in wine on the proteolytic activity of papain from Carica papaya latex was investigated to evaluate its applicability in white wine protein haze stabilization. Enzymatic activity was tested against a synthetic tripeptide chromogenic substrate in wine-like acidic medium that consisted of tartaric buffer (pH 3.2) supplemented with ethanol, free sulfur dioxide (SO2 ), grape skin and seed tannins within the average ranges of concentrations that are typical in wine. The diagnosis of inhibition type, performed with the graphical method, demonstrated that all of tested wine constituents were reversible inhibitors of papain. The strongest inhibition was exerted by free SO2 , which acted as a mixed-type inhibitor, similar to grape skin and seed tannins. Finally, when tested in table white wines, the catalytic activity of papain, even when if it was ascribable to the hyperbolic behavior of Michaelis-Menten equation, was determined to be strongly affected by free SO2 and total phenol level.

  3. Novel Insights into Structure-Activity Relationships of N-Terminally Modified PACE4 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Anna; Couture, Frédéric; Levesque, Christine; Ly, Kévin; Beauchemin, Sophie; Desjardins, Roxane; Neugebauer, Witold; Dory, Yves L; Day, Robert

    2016-02-01

    PACE4 plays important roles in prostate cancer cell proliferation. The inhibition of this enzyme has been shown to slow prostate cancer progression and is emerging as a promising therapeutic strategy. In previous work, we developed a highly potent and selective PACE4 inhibitor, the multi-Leu (ML) peptide, an octapeptide with the sequence Ac-LLLLRVKR-NH2 . Here, with the objective of developing a useful compound for in vivo administration, we investigate the effect of N-terminal modifications. The inhibitory activity, toxicity, stability, and cell penetration properties of the resulting analogues were studied and compared to the unmodified inhibitor. Our results show that the incorporation of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) moiety leads to a loss of antiproliferative activity, whereas the attachment of a lipid chain preserves or improves it. However, the lipidated peptides are significantly more toxic when compared with their unmodified counterparts. Therefore, the best results were achieved not by the N-terminal extension but by the protection of both ends with the d-Leu residue and 4-amidinobenzylamide, which yielded the most stable inhibitor, with an excellent activity and toxicity profile. PMID:26751825

  4. The Trypsin Inhibitor Panulirin Regulates the Prophenoloxidase-activating System in the Spiny Lobster Panulirus argus

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; Corzo, Gerardo; Besada, Vladimir; Vega-Hurtado, Yamile; González-González, Yamile; Perera, Erick; Porto-Verdecia, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    The melanization reaction promoted by the prophenoloxidase-activating system is an essential defense response in invertebrates subjected to regulatory mechanisms that are still not fully understood. We report here the finding and characterization of a novel trypsin inhibitor, named panulirin, isolated from the hemocytes of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus with regulatory functions on the melanization cascade. Panulirin is a cationic peptide (pI 9.5) composed of 48 amino acid residues (5.3 kDa), with six cysteine residues forming disulfide bridges. Its primary sequence was determined by combining Edman degradation/N-terminal sequencing and electrospray ionization-MS/MS spectrometry. The low amino acid sequence similarity with known proteins indicates that it represents a new family of peptidase inhibitors. Panulirin is a competitive and reversible tight-binding inhibitor of trypsin (Ki = 8.6 nm) with a notable specificity because it does not inhibit serine peptidases such as subtilisin, elastase, chymotrypsin, thrombin, and plasmin. The removal of panulirin from the lobster hemocyte lysate leads to an increase in phenoloxidase response to LPS. Likewise, the addition of increasing concentrations of panulirin to a lobster hemocyte lysate, previously depleted of trypsin-inhibitory activity, decreased the phenoloxidase response to LPS in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results indicate that panulirin is implicated in the regulation of the melanization cascade in P. argus by inhibiting peptidase(s) in the pathway toward the activation of the prophenoloxidase enzyme. PMID:24047891

  5. The trypsin inhibitor panulirin regulates the prophenoloxidase-activating system in the spiny lobster Panulirus argus.

    PubMed

    Perdomo-Morales, Rolando; Montero-Alejo, Vivian; Corzo, Gerardo; Besada, Vladimir; Vega-Hurtado, Yamile; González-González, Yamile; Perera, Erick; Porto-Verdecia, Marlene

    2013-11-01

    The melanization reaction promoted by the prophenoloxidase-activating system is an essential defense response in invertebrates subjected to regulatory mechanisms that are still not fully understood. We report here the finding and characterization of a novel trypsin inhibitor, named panulirin, isolated from the hemocytes of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus with regulatory functions on the melanization cascade. Panulirin is a cationic peptide (pI 9.5) composed of 48 amino acid residues (5.3 kDa), with six cysteine residues forming disulfide bridges. Its primary sequence was determined by combining Edman degradation/N-terminal sequencing and electrospray ionization-MS/MS spectrometry. The low amino acid sequence similarity with known proteins indicates that it represents a new family of peptidase inhibitors. Panulirin is a competitive and reversible tight-binding inhibitor of trypsin (Ki = 8.6 nm) with a notable specificity because it does not inhibit serine peptidases such as subtilisin, elastase, chymotrypsin, thrombin, and plasmin. The removal of panulirin from the lobster hemocyte lysate leads to an increase in phenoloxidase response to LPS. Likewise, the addition of increasing concentrations of panulirin to a lobster hemocyte lysate, previously depleted of trypsin-inhibitory activity, decreased the phenoloxidase response to LPS in a concentration-dependent fashion. These results indicate that panulirin is implicated in the regulation of the melanization cascade in P. argus by inhibiting peptidase(s) in the pathway toward the activation of the prophenoloxidase enzyme.

  6. Synthesis, structure and antibiotic activity of aryl-substituted LpxC inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinshi; Toone, Eric J.; Zhou, Pei

    2013-01-01

    The zinc-dependent deacetylase LpxC catalyzes the committed step of lipid A biosynthesis in Gram-negative bacteria and is a validated target for development of novel antibiotics to combat multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections. Many potent LpxC inhibitors contain an essential threonyl-hydroxamate head group for high-affinity interaction with LpxC. We report the synthesis, antibiotic activity, and structural and enzymatic characterization of novel LpxC inhibitors containing an additional aryl-group in the threonyl-hydroxamate moiety, which expands the inhibitor-binding surface in LpxC. These compounds display enhanced potency against LpxC in enzymatic assays and superior antibiotic activity against F. novicida in cell culture. Comparison of the antibiotic activities of these compounds against a leaky E. coli strain and the wild-type strain reveals the contribution of the formidable outer membrane permeability barrier that reduces the compound efficacy in cell culture and emphasizes the importance of maintaining a balanced hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity profile in developing effective LpxC-targeting antibiotics. PMID:23914798

  7. Cathepsin Activity-Based Probes and Inhibitor for Preclinical Atherosclerosis Imaging and Macrophage Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elrahman, Ihab; Kosuge, Hisanori; Wises Sadan, Tommy; Ben-Nun, Yael; Meir, Karen; Rubinstein, Chen; Bogyo, Matthew; McConnell, Michael V.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, mainly due to an increasing prevalence of atherosclerosis characterized by inflammatory plaques. Plaques with high levels of macrophage infiltration are considered “vulnerable” while those that do not have significant inflammation are considered stable; cathepsin protease activity is highly elevated in macrophages of vulnerable plaques and contributes to plaque instability. Establishing novel tools for non-invasive molecular imaging of macrophages in plaques could aid in preclinical studies and evaluation of therapeutics. Furthermore, compounds that reduce the macrophage content within plaques should ultimately impact care for this disease. Methods We have applied quenched fluorescent cathepsin activity-based probes (ABPs) to a murine atherosclerosis model and evaluated their use for in vivo imaging using fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT), as well as ex vivo fluorescence imaging and fluorescent microscopy. Additionally, freshly dissected human carotid plaques were treated with our potent cathepsin inhibitor and macrophage apoptosis was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy. Results We demonstrate that our ABPs accurately detect murine atherosclerotic plaques non-invasively, identifying cathepsin activity within plaque macrophages. In addition, our cathepsin inhibitor selectively induced cell apoptosis of 55%±10% of the macrophage within excised human atherosclerotic plaques. Conclusions Cathepsin ABPs present a rapid diagnostic tool for macrophage detection in atherosclerotic plaque. Our inhibitor confirms cathepsin-targeting as a promising approach to treat atherosclerotic plaque inflammation. PMID:27532109

  8. Synthesis and anti-HIV activity of some [Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor]-C5'-linker-[Integrase Inhibitor] heterodimers as inhibitors of HIV replication.

    PubMed

    Sugeac, Elena; Fossey, Christine; Ladurée, Daniel; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Geraldine; Aubertin, Anne-Marie

    2004-12-01

    Selected for their expected ability to inhibit HIV replication, a series of eight heterodimers containing a Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor (NRTI) and an Integrase Inhibitor (INI), bound by a linker, were designed and synthesized. For the NRTIs, d4U, d2U and d4T were chosen. For the INIs, 4-[1-(4-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrrol-2-yl]-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (6) and 4-(3,5-dibenzyloxyphenyl)-2,4-dioxobutyric acid (9) (belonging to the beta-diketo acids class) were chosen. The conjugation of the two different inhibitors (NRTI and INI) was performed using an amino acid (glycine or beta-alanine) as a cleavable linker.

  9. A trypsin inhibitor from Sapindus saponaria L. seeds: purification, characterization, and activity towards pest insect digestive enzyme.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Maria Lígia R; Diz Filho, Eduardo B S; Freire, Mariadas Graças M; Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Sumikawa, Joana T; Toyama, Marcos H; Marangoni, Sérgio

    2011-01-01

    The present paper describes the purification, characterization and determination of the partial primary structure of the first trypsin inhibitor isolated from the family Sapindaceae. A highly stable, potent trypsin inhibitor (SSTI) was purified to homogeneity. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the protein consists of a two-polypeptide chain with molecular masses of approximately 15 and 3 kDa. The purified inhibitor inhibited bovine trypsin at a 1:1 M ratio. Kinetic analysis revealed that the protein is a competitive inhibitor with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 10⁻⁹ M for trypsin. The partial NH₂- terminal sequence of 36 amino acids in SSTI indicates homology with other members of the trypsin-inhibitor family from different sources. This inhibitor is highly stable in the presence of denaturing agents. SSTI showed significant inhibitory activity against trypsin-like proteases present in the larval midgut on Anagasta kuehniella, Corcyra cephalonica, Diatreae saccharalis and Anticarsia gemmatalis.

  10. Structure-activity relationship of Garcinia xanthones analogues: Potent Hsp90 inhibitors with cytotoxicity and antiangiogenesis activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoli; Wu, Yue; Hu, Mingyang; Li, Xiang; Gu, Congying; You, Qidong; Zhang, Xiaojin

    2016-10-01

    Hsp90 has long been recognized as an attractive and crucial molecular target for cancer therapy. Gambogic acid (GA), the main active compound of Gamboge hanburyi, has been reported as a natural inhibitor of Hsp90. Here, we present the structure-activity relationship of Garcinia xanthones analogues as Hsp90 inhibitors and identify that compound 25, with a simplified skeleton, had an improved inhibitory effect toward Hsp90. Compound 25 inhibited the ATPase activity of Hsp90 with an IC50 value of 3.68±0.18μM. It also exhibited potent antiproliferative activities in some solid tumor cells. In SK-BR-3 cells with high Hsp90 expression, compound 25 induced the degradation of Hsp90 client proteins including Akt and Erk1/2 without causing the heat shock response. Additionally, compound 25 inhibited angiogenesis in HUVEC cells through Hsp90 regulation of the HIF-1α pathway. These results demonstrate that compound 25 as an Hsp90 inhibitor with a new structure could be further studied for the development of tumor therapy. PMID:27527413

  11. RASA3 is a critical inhibitor of RAP1-dependent platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Lucia; Paul, David S.; Robledo, Raymond F.; Chan, E. Ricky; Getz, Todd M.; Campbell, Robert A.; Kechele, Daniel O.; Casari, Caterina; Piatt, Raymond; Caron, Kathleen M.; Mackman, Nigel; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Parrott, Matthew C.; Boulaftali, Yacine; Adams, Mark D.; Peters, Luanne L.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase RAP1 is critical for platelet activation and thrombus formation. RAP1 activity in platelets is controlled by the GEF CalDAG-GEFI and an unknown regulator that operates downstream of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor, P2Y12, a target of antithrombotic therapy. Here, we provide evidence that the GAP, RASA3, inhibits platelet activation and provides a link between P2Y12 and activation of the RAP1 signaling pathway. In mice, reduced expression of RASA3 led to premature platelet activation and markedly reduced the life span of circulating platelets. The increased platelet turnover and the resulting thrombocytopenia were reversed by concomitant deletion of the gene encoding CalDAG-GEFI. Rasa3 mutant platelets were hyperresponsive to agonist stimulation, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, activation of Rasa3 mutant platelets occurred independently of ADP feedback signaling and was insensitive to inhibitors of P2Y12 or PI3 kinase. Together, our results indicate that RASA3 ensures that circulating platelets remain quiescent by restraining CalDAG-GEFI/RAP1 signaling and suggest that P2Y12 signaling is required to inhibit RASA3 and enable sustained RAP1-dependent platelet activation and thrombus formation at sites of vascular injury. These findings provide insight into the antithrombotic effect of P2Y12 inhibitors and may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of platelet-related disorders. PMID:25705885

  12. Characterization of Inhibitor-Resistant Histone Deacetylase Activity in Plant-Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Baidyaroy, Dipnath; Brosch, Gerald; Graessle, Stefan; Trojer, Patrick; Walton, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    HC-toxin, a cyclic peptide made by the filamentous fungus Cochliobolus carbonum, is an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC) from many organisms. It was shown earlier that the HDAC activity in crude extracts of C. carbonum is relatively insensitive to HC-toxin as well as to the chemically unrelated HDAC inhibitors trichostatin and D85, whereas the HDAC activity of Aspergillus nidulans is sensitive (G. Brosch et al., Biochemistry 40:12855-12863, 2001). Here we report that HC-toxin-resistant HDAC activity was present in other, but not all, plant-pathogenic Cochliobolus species but not in any of the saprophytic species tested. The HDAC activities of the fungi Alternaria brassicicola and Diheterospora chlamydosporia, which also make HDAC inhibitors, were resistant. The HDAC activities of all C. carbonum isolates tested, except one non-toxin-producing isolate, were resistant. In a cross between a sensitive isolate and a resistant isolate, resistance genetically cosegregated with HC-toxin production. When fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography, extracts of resistant and sensitive isolates and species had two peaks of HDAC activity, one that was fully HC-toxin resistant and a second that was larger and sensitive. The first peak was consistently smaller in extracts of sensitive fungi than in resistant fungi, but the difference appeared to be insufficiently large to explain the differential sensitivities of the crude extracts. Differences in mRNA expression levels of the four known HDAC genes of C. carbonum did not account for the observed differences in HDAC activity profiles. When mixed together, resistant extracts protected extracts of sensitive C. carbonum but did not protect other sensitive Cochlibolus species or Neurospora crassa. Production of this extrinsic protection factor was dependent on TOXE, the transcription factor that regulates the HC-toxin biosynthetic genes. The results suggest that C. carbonum has multiple mechanisms of self-protection against

  13. Intracellular Activation of Tenofovir Alafenamide and the Effect of Viral and Host Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Birkus, Gabriel; Bam, Rujuta A; Willkom, Madeleine; Frey, Christian R; Tsai, Luong; Stray, Kirsten M; Yant, Stephen R; Cihlar, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (TAF) is an oral phosphonoamidate prodrug of the HIV reverse transcriptase nucleotide inhibitor tenofovir (TFV). Previous studies suggested a principal role for the lysosomal serine protease cathepsin A (CatA) in the intracellular activation of TAF. Here we further investigated the role of CatA and other human hydrolases in the metabolism of TAF. Overexpression of CatA or liver carboxylesterase 1 (Ces1) in HEK293T cells increased intracellular TAF hydrolysis 2- and 5-fold, respectively. Knockdown of CatA expression with RNA interference (RNAi) in HeLa cells reduced intracellular TAF metabolism 5-fold. Additionally, the anti-HIV activity and the rate of CatA hydrolysis showed good correlation within a large set of TFV phosphonoamidate prodrugs. The covalent hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease inhibitors (PIs) telaprevir and boceprevir potently inhibited CatA-mediated TAF activation (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 0.27 and 0.16 μM, respectively) in vitro and also reduced its anti-HIV activity in primary human CD4(+) T lymphocytes (21- and 3-fold, respectively) at pharmacologically relevant concentrations. In contrast, there was no inhibition of CatA or any significant effect on anti-HIV activity of TAF observed with cobicistat, noncovalent HIV and HCV PIs, or various prescribed inhibitors of host serine proteases. Collectively, these studies confirm that CatA plays a pivotal role in the intracellular metabolism of TAF, whereas the liver esterase Ces1 likely contributes to the hepatic activation of TAF. Moreover, this work demonstrates that a wide range of viral and host PIs, with the exception of telaprevir and boceprevir, do not interfere with the antiretroviral activity of TAF. PMID:26503655

  14. Creating Novel Activated Factor XI Inhibitors through Fragment Based Lead Generation and Structure Aided Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Fjellström, Ola; Akkaya, Sibel; Beisel, Hans-Georg; Eriksson, Per-Olof; Erixon, Karl; Gustafsson, David; Jurva, Ulrik; Kang, Daiwu; Karis, David; Knecht, Wolfgang; Nerme, Viveca; Nilsson, Ingemar; Olsson, Thomas; Redzic, Alma; Roth, Robert; Sandmark, Jenny; Tigerström, Anna; Öster, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Activated factor XI (FXIa) inhibitors are anticipated to combine anticoagulant and profibrinolytic effects with a low bleeding risk. This motivated a structure aided fragment based lead generation campaign to create novel FXIa inhibitor leads. A virtual screen, based on docking experiments, was performed to generate a FXIa targeted fragment library for an NMR screen that resulted in the identification of fragments binding in the FXIa S1 binding pocket. The neutral 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one and the weakly basic quinolin-2-amine structures are novel FXIa P1 fragments. The expansion of these fragments towards the FXIa prime side binding sites was aided by solving the X-ray structures of reported FXIa inhibitors that we found to bind in the S1-S1’-S2’ FXIa binding pockets. Combining the X-ray structure information from the identified S1 binding 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one fragment and the S1-S1’-S2’ binding reference compounds enabled structure guided linking and expansion work to achieve one of the most potent and selective FXIa inhibitors reported to date, compound 13, with a FXIa IC50 of 1.0 nM. The hydrophilicity and large polar surface area of the potent S1-S1’-S2’ binding FXIa inhibitors compromised permeability. Initial work to expand the 6-chloro-3,4-dihydro-1H-quinolin-2-one fragment towards the prime side to yield molecules with less hydrophilicity shows promise to afford potent, selective and orally bioavailable compounds. PMID:25629509

  15. Broad antiviral activity and crystal structure of HIV-1 fusion inhibitor sifuvirtide.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xue; Chong, Huihui; Zhang, Chao; Waltersperger, Sandro; Wang, Meitian; Cui, Sheng; He, Yuxian

    2012-02-24

    Sifuvirtide (SFT) is an electrostatically constrained α-helical peptide fusion inhibitor showing potent anti-HIV activity, good safety, and pharmacokinetic profiles, and it is currently under phase II clinical trials in China. In this study, we demonstrate its potent and broad anti-HIV activity by using diverse HIV-1 subtypes and variants, including subtypes A, B, and C that dominate the AIDS epidemic worldwide, and subtypes B', CRF07_BC, and CRF01_AE recombinants that are currently circulating in China, and those possessing cross-resistance to the first and second generation fusion inhibitors. To elucidate its mechanism of action, we determined the crystal structure of SFT in complex with its target N-terminal heptad repeat region (NHR) peptide (N36), which fully supports our rational inhibitor design and reveals its key motifs and residues responsible for the stability and anti-HIV activity. As anticipated, SFT adopts fully helical conformation stabilized by the multiple engineered salt bridges. The designing of SFT also provide novel inter-helical salt bridges and hydrogen bonds that improve the affinity of SFT to NHR trimer. The extra serine residue and acetyl group stabilize α-helicity of the N-terminal portion of SFT, whereas Thr-119 serves to stabilize the hydrophobic NHR pocket. In addition, our structure demonstrates that the residues critical for drug resistance, located at positions 37, 38, 41, and 43 of NHR, are irreplaceable for maintaining the stable fusogenic six-helix bundle structure. Our data present important information for developing SFT for clinical use and for designing novel HIV fusion inhibitors.

  16. Discovery of a Selective Inhibitor of Oncogenic B-Raf Kinase With Potent Antimelanoma Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, J.; Lee, J.T.; Wang, W.; Zhang, J.; Cho, H.; Mamo, S.; Bremer, R.; Gillette, S.; Kong, J.; Haass, N.K.; Sproesser, K.; Li, L.; Smalley, K.S.M.; Fong, D.; Zhu, Y.-L.; Marimuthu, A.; Nguyen, H.; Lam, B.; Liu, J.; Cheung, I.; Rice, J.

    2009-05-26

    BRAF{sup V600E} is the most frequent oncogenic protein kinase mutation known. Furthermore, inhibitors targeting 'active' protein kinases have demonstrated significant utility in the therapeutic repertoire against cancer. Therefore, we pursued the development of specific kinase inhibitors targeting B-Raf, and the V600E allele in particular. By using a structure-guided discovery approach, a potent and selective inhibitor of active B-Raf has been discovered. PLX4720, a 7-azaindole derivative that inhibits B-Raf{sup V600E} with an IC{sub 50} of 13 nM, defines a class of kinase inhibitor with marked selectivity in both biochemical and cellular assays. PLX4720 preferentially inhibits the active B-Raf{sup V600E} kinase compared with a broad spectrum of other kinases, and potent cytotoxic effects are also exclusive to cells bearing the V600E allele. Consistent with the high degree of selectivity, ERK phosphorylation is potently inhibited by PLX4720 in B-Raf{sup V600E}-bearing tumor cell lines but not in cells lacking oncogenic B-Raf. In melanoma models, PLX4720 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis exclusively in B-Raf{sup V600E}-positive cells. In B-Raf{sup V600E}-dependent tumor xenograft models, orally dosed PLX4720 causes significant tumor growth delays, including tumor regressions, without evidence of toxicity. The work described here represents the entire discovery process, from initial identification through structural and biological studies in animal models to a promising therapeutic for testing in cancer patients bearing B-Raf{sup V600E}-driven tumors.

  17. Functional observational battery and motor activity in rats after single administration of two NHE 1 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Huebler, Nicole; Gottschling, Barbara . E-mail: barbara.gottschling@merck.de; Jacobs, Maren; Landenberg, Friedrich von; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion

    2005-11-01

    Two tests, a functional observational battery (FOB) and measurement of motor activity, have been used to screen the two NHE inhibitors EMD 96785 and EMD 125021 for neurobehavioral effects. These two NHE inhibitors, which exhibit a marked selectivity for the NHE 1 isoform, are under development in the research laboratories of Merck KGaA. NHE inhibitors are developed for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction and chronic heart failure. In prior studies with EMD 96785 and EMD 125021, clinical symptoms, such as uncoordinated movements and weakness of the hindlimbs, were detected in rats. The aim of this study was the evaluation of clinical findings in more detail using a FOB and measurement of motor activity in 96 female rats. The time course and reversibility of the adverse effects were investigated. The animals were treated with EMD 96785 or EMD 125021 by intravenous injection at a single dose of 100 mg/kg and four different time points (2 h, 1 day, 7 days and 21 days after treatment) were chosen for the clinical examination. This neurobehavioral test battery clearly detected neurological activity and defined time-course characteristics after treatment with EMD 96785 or EMD 125021. The various clinical parameters were grouped into functional-related domains and most alterations were seen in the domains of central nervous system and neuromuscular system. The most prominent clinical findings were seen with the pharmacologically more potent NHE inhibitor EMD 125021 when compared to EMD 96785. The clinical symptoms were proven to be reversible by 7 days after the single treatment for both compounds.

  18. Mini Review of Phytochemicals and Plant Taxa with Activity as Microbial Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ta, Chieu Anh Kim; Arnason, John Thor

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms readily form on many surfaces in nature including plant surfaces. In order to coordinate the formation of these biofilms, microorganisms use a cell-to-cell communication system called quorum sensing (QS). As formation of biofilms on vascular plants may not be advantageous to the hosts, plants have developed inhibitors to interfere with these processes. In this mini review, research papers published on plant-derived molecules that have microbial biofilm or quorum sensing inhibition are reviewed with the objectives of determining the biosynthetic classes of active compounds, their biological activity in assays, and their families of occurrence and range. The main findings are the identification of plant phenolics, including benzoates, phenyl propanoids, stilbenes, flavonoids, gallotannins, proanthocyanidins and coumarins as important inhibitors with both activities. Some terpenes including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes also have anti-QS and anti-biofilm activities. Relatively few alkaloids were reported. Quinones and organosulfur compounds, especially from garlic, were also active. A common feature is the polar nature of these compounds. Phytochemicals with these activities are widespread in Angiosperms in temperate and tropical regions, but gymnosperms, bryophytes and pteridophytes were not represented. PMID:26712734

  19. Mini Review of Phytochemicals and Plant Taxa with Activity as Microbial Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ta, Chieu Anh Kim; Arnason, John Thor

    2015-12-26

    Microbial biofilms readily form on many surfaces in nature including plant surfaces. In order to coordinate the formation of these biofilms, microorganisms use a cell-to-cell communication system called quorum sensing (QS). As formation of biofilms on vascular plants may not be advantageous to the hosts, plants have developed inhibitors to interfere with these processes. In this mini review, research papers published on plant-derived molecules that have microbial biofilm or quorum sensing inhibition are reviewed with the objectives of determining the biosynthetic classes of active compounds, their biological activity in assays, and their families of occurrence and range. The main findings are the identification of plant phenolics, including benzoates, phenyl propanoids, stilbenes, flavonoids, gallotannins, proanthocyanidins and coumarins as important inhibitors with both activities. Some terpenes including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes also have anti-QS and anti-biofilm activities. Relatively few alkaloids were reported. Quinones and organosulfur compounds, especially from garlic, were also active. A common feature is the polar nature of these compounds. Phytochemicals with these activities are widespread in Angiosperms in temperate and tropical regions, but gymnosperms, bryophytes and pteridophytes were not represented.

  20. Inhibition of proteolytic activity of poliovirus and rhinovirus 2A proteinases by elastase-specific inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Molla, A; Hellen, C U; Wimmer, E

    1993-01-01

    A polyprotein cleavage assay has been developed to assay the proteolytic activities in vitro of the 2A proteinases encoded by poliovirus and human rhinovirus 14, which are representative members of the Enterovirus and Rhinovirus genera of picornaviruses, respectively. The elastase-specific substrate-based inhibitors elastatinal and methoxysuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-chloromethylketone (MPCMK) inhibited both 2A proteinases in vitro. The electrophoretic mobilities of both 2A proteinases were reduced upon incubation with elastatinal, whereas the mobility of a Cys-109-->Ala poliovirus 2Apro mutant was unchanged, an observation suggesting that this inhibitor may have formed a covalent bond with the active-site Cys-109 nucleophile. Iodoacetamide, calpain inhibitor 1, and antipain inhibited poliovirus 2Apro. MPCMK caused a reduction in the yields of the enteroviruses poliovirus type 1 and coxsackievirus A21 and of human rhinovirus 2 in infected HeLa cells but did not affect the growth of encephalomyocarditis virus, a picornavirus of the Cardiovirus genus. MPCMK abrogated the shutoff of host cell protein synthesis that is induced by enterovirus and rhinovirus infection and reduced the synthesis of virus-encoded polypeptides in infected cells. These results indicate that the determinants of substrate recognition by 2A proteinases resemble those of pancreatic and leukocyte elastases. These results may be relevant to the development of broad-range chemotherapeutic agents against entero- and rhinoviruses. Images PMID:8392608

  1. Electrochemical assay of α-glucosidase activity and the inhibitor screening in cell medium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Juan; Liu, Ying; Wang, Xiaonan; Chen, Yangyang; Li, Genxi

    2015-12-15

    An electrochemical method is established in this work for the assay of α-glucosidase activity and the inhibitor screening through one-step displacement reaction, which can be directly used in cell medium. The displacement reaction can be achieved via strong binding of 4-aminophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (pAPG)/magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to pyrene boric acid (PBA) immobilized on the surface of graphite electrode (GE), compared to that of dopamine (DA)/sliver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Since α-glucosidase can specifically catalyze MNPs/pAPG into MNPs/pAP which has no binding capacity with PBA, the activity of both isolated and membrane bound enzyme can be well evaluated by using this proposed method. Meanwhile, signal amplification can be accomplished via the immobilization of DA at the outer layer of AgNPs, and the accuracy can be strengthened through magnetic separation. Moreover, this method can also be utilized for inhibitor screening not only in the medium containing the enzyme but also in cell medium. With good precision and accuracy, it may be extended to other proteases and their inhibitors as well. PMID:26201984

  2. Synthesis and activity study of phosphonamidate dipeptides as potential inhibitors of VanX.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke-Wu; Cheng, Xu; Zhao, Chuan; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Jia, Chao; Feng, Lei; Xiao, Jian-Min; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Gao, Hui-Zhou; Yang, Xia; Zhai, Le

    2011-12-01

    In an effort to develop inhibitors of VanX, the phosphonamidate analogs of D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptides, N-[(1-aminoethyl) hydroxyphosphinyl]-glycine (1a), -alanine (1b), -valine (1c), -leucine (1d) and -phenylalanine (1e) were synthesized, characterized and evaluated using recombinant VanX. The crystal structure of the intermediate 6d was obtained (Deposition number: CCDC 839134), and structural analysis revealed that it is orthorhombic with a space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), the bond length of P-N is 1.62Å and angle of C-N-P is 123.6°. Phosphonamidate 1(a-e) showed to be inhibitors of VanX with IC(50) values of 0.39, 0.70, 1.12, 2.82, and 4.13mM, respectively, which revealed that the inhibition activities of the phosphonamidates were dependent on the size of R-substituent of them, with the best inhibitor 1a having the smallest substituent. Also, 1a showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) with a MIC value of 0.25 μg/ml.

  3. Engineered Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases-3 Variants Resistant to Endocytosis Have Prolonged Chondroprotective Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Christine M.; Visse, Robert; Dinakarpandian, Deendayal; Strickland, Dudley K.; Nagase, Hideaki; Troeberg, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP-3) is a central inhibitor of matrix-degrading and sheddase families of metalloproteinases. Extracellular levels of the inhibitor are regulated by the balance between its retention on the extracellular matrix and its endocytic clearance by the scavenger receptor low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). Here, we used molecular modeling to predict TIMP-3 residues potentially involved in binding to LRP1 based on the proposed LRP1 binding motif of 2 lysine residues separated by about 21 Å and mutated the candidate lysine residues to alanine individually and in pairs. Of the 22 mutants generated, 13 displayed a reduced rate of uptake by HTB94 chondrosarcoma cells. The two mutants (TIMP-3 K26A/K45A and K42A/K110A) with lowest rates of uptake were further evaluated and found to display reduced binding to LRP1 and unaltered inhibitory activity against prototypic metalloproteinases. TIMP-3 K26A/K45A retained higher affinity for sulfated glycosaminoglycans than K42A/K110A and exhibited increased affinity for ADAMTS-5 in the presence of heparin. Both mutants inhibited metalloproteinase-mediated degradation of cartilage at lower concentrations and for longer than wild-type TIMP-3, indicating that their increased half-lives improved their ability to protect cartilage. These mutants may be useful in treating connective tissue diseases associated with increased metalloproteinase activity. PMID:27582494

  4. Structure-activity relationship study of acridine analogs as haspin and DYRK2 kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cuny, Gregory D.; Robin, Maxime; Ulyanova, Natalia P.; Patnaik, Debasis; Pique, Valerie; Casano, Gilles; Liu, Ji-Feng; Lin, Xiangjie; Xian, Jun; Glicksman, Marcie A.; Stein, Ross L.; Higgins, Jonathan M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Haspin is a serine/threonine kinase required for completion of normal mitosis that is highly expressed during cell proliferation, including in a number of neoplasms. Consequently, it has emerged as a potential therapeutic target in oncology. A high throughput screen of approximately 140,000 compounds identified an acridine analog as a potent haspin kinase inhibitor. Profiling against a panel of 270 kinases revealed that the compound also exhibited potent inhibitory activity for DYRK2, another serine/threonine kinase. An optimization study of the acridine series revealed that the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of the acridine series for haspin and DYRK2 inhibition had many similarities. However, several structural differences were noted that allowed generation of a potent haspin kinase inhibitor (33, IC50 < 60 nM) with 180-fold selectivity over DYRK2. In addition, a moderately potent DYRK2 inhibitor (41, IC50 < 400 nM) with a 5.4-fold selectivity over haspin was also identified. PMID:20529681

  5. Structure–activity relationship study of acridine analogs as haspin and DYRK2 kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cuny, Gregory D.; Robin, Maxime; Ulyanova, Natalia P.; Patnaik, Debasis; Pique, Valerie; Casano, Gilles; Liu, Ji-Feng; Lin, Xiangjie; Xian, Jun; Glicksman, Marcie A.; Stein, Ross L.; Higgins, Jonathan M. G.

    2011-01-01

    Haspin is a serine/threonine kinase required for completion of normal mitosis that is highly expressed during cell proliferation, including in a number of neoplasms. Consequently, it has emerged as a potential therapeutic target in oncology. A high throughput screen of approximately 140,000 compounds identified an acridine analog as a potent haspin kinase inhibitor. Profiling against a panel of 270 kinases revealed that the compound also exhibited potent inhibitory activity for DYRK2, another serine/threonine kinase. An optimization study of the acridine series revealed that the structure–activity relationship (SAR) of the acridine series for haspin and DYRK2 inhibition had many similarities. However, several structural differences were noted that allowed generation of a potent haspin kinase inhibitor (33, IC50 <60 nM) with 180-fold selectivity over DYRK2. In addition, a moderately potent DYRK2 inhibitor (41, IC50 <400 nM) with a 5.4-fold selectivity over haspin was also identified. PMID:20836251

  6. A novel prothrombin time assay for assessing the anticoagulant activity of oral factor Xa inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Yu Chen; Wang, Zhaoqing; Knabb, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    Conventional prothrombin time (PT) assays have limited sensitivity and dynamic range in monitoring the anticoagulant activity of direct factor Xa inhibitors. Hence, new assays are needed. We modified a PT assay by adding calcium chloride (CaCl2) to the thromboplastin reagent to increase assay dynamic range and improve sensitivity. Effects of calcium and sodium ion concentrations, and sample handling, were evaluated to optimize assay performance. Increasing concentrations of calcium ions produced progressive increases in PT across the factor Xa inhibitor concentrations of 0 to 2500 nmol/L for razaxaban and apixaban. The greatest effect was seen when the thromboplastin reagent was diluted 1:2.25 with 100 mmol/L CaCl2 (thus selected for routine use). The optimized assay showed an interassay precision of 1.5 to 9.3 percentage coefficient of variation (%CV) for razaxaban and 3.1 to 4.6 %CV for apixaban. We conclude that the modified PT assay is likely to be suitable as a pharmacodynamic marker for activity at therapeutic concentrations of factor Xa inhibitors.

  7. Synthesis and activity study of phosphonamidate dipeptides as potential inhibitors of VanX.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke-Wu; Cheng, Xu; Zhao, Chuan; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Jia, Chao; Feng, Lei; Xiao, Jian-Min; Zhou, Li-Sheng; Gao, Hui-Zhou; Yang, Xia; Zhai, Le

    2011-12-01

    In an effort to develop inhibitors of VanX, the phosphonamidate analogs of D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptides, N-[(1-aminoethyl) hydroxyphosphinyl]-glycine (1a), -alanine (1b), -valine (1c), -leucine (1d) and -phenylalanine (1e) were synthesized, characterized and evaluated using recombinant VanX. The crystal structure of the intermediate 6d was obtained (Deposition number: CCDC 839134), and structural analysis revealed that it is orthorhombic with a space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), the bond length of P-N is 1.62Å and angle of C-N-P is 123.6°. Phosphonamidate 1(a-e) showed to be inhibitors of VanX with IC(50) values of 0.39, 0.70, 1.12, 2.82, and 4.13mM, respectively, which revealed that the inhibition activities of the phosphonamidates were dependent on the size of R-substituent of them, with the best inhibitor 1a having the smallest substituent. Also, 1a showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) with a MIC value of 0.25 μg/ml. PMID:22001030

  8. Structure-Based Design of an in Vivo Active Selective BRD9 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Components of the chromatin remodelling switch/sucrose nonfermentable (SWI/SNF) complex are recurrently mutated in tumors, suggesting that altering the activity of the complex plays a role in oncogenesis. However, the role that the individual subunits play in this process is not clear. We set out to develop an inhibitor compound targeting the bromodomain of BRD9 in order to evaluate its function within the SWI/SNF complex. Here, we present the discovery and development of a potent and selective BRD9 bromodomain inhibitor series based on a new pyridinone-like scaffold. Crystallographic information on the inhibitors bound to BRD9 guided their development with respect to potency for BRD9 and selectivity against BRD4. These compounds modulate BRD9 bromodomain cellular function and display antitumor activity in an AML xenograft model. Two chemical probes, BI-7273 (1) and BI-9564 (2), were identified that should prove to be useful in further exploring BRD9 bromodomain biology in both in vitro and in vivo settings. PMID:26914985

  9. Fragment-Based Drug Design of Novel Pyranopyridones as Cell Active and Orally Bioavailable Tankyrase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    de Vicente, Javier; Tivitmahaisoon, Parcharee; Berry, Pamela; Bolin, David R; Carvajal, Daisy; He, Wei; Huang, Kuo-Sen; Janson, Cheryl; Liang, Lena; Lukacs, Christine; Petersen, Ann; Qian, Hong; Yi, Lin; Zhuang, Yong; Hermann, Johannes C

    2015-09-10

    Tankyrase activity has been linked to the regulation of intracellular axin levels, which have been shown to be crucial for the Wnt pathway. Deregulated Wnt signaling is important for the genesis of many diseases including cancer. We describe herein the discovery and development of a new series of tankyrase inhibitors. These pyranopyridones are highly active in various cell-based assays. A fragment/structure based optimization strategy led to a compound with good pharmacokinetic properties that is suitable for in vivo studies and further development. PMID:26396691

  10. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  11. Identification of Potent, Selective, Cell-Active Inhibitors of the Histone Lysine Methyltransferase EZH2.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sharad K; Tian, Xinrong; LaFrance, Louis V; Duquenne, Céline; Suarez, Dominic P; Newlander, Kenneth A; Romeril, Stuart P; Burgess, Joelle L; Grant, Seth W; Brackley, James A; Graves, Alan P; Scherzer, Daryl A; Shu, Art; Thompson, Christine; Ott, Heidi M; Aller, Glenn S Van; Machutta, Carl A; Diaz, Elsie; Jiang, Yong; Johnson, Neil W; Knight, Steven D; Kruger, Ryan G; McCabe, Michael T; Dhanak, Dashyant; Tummino, Peter J; Creasy, Caretha L; Miller, William H

    2012-12-13

    The histone H3-lysine 27 (H3K27) methyltransferase EZH2 plays a critical role in regulating gene expression, and its aberrant activity is linked to the onset and progression of cancer. As part of a drug discovery program targeting EZH2, we have identified highly potent, selective, SAM-competitive, and cell-active EZH2 inhibitors, including GSK926 (3) and GSK343 (6). These compounds are small molecule chemical tools that would be useful to further explore the biology of EZH2. PMID:24900432

  12. Fragment-Based Drug Design of Novel Pyranopyridones as Cell Active and Orally Bioavailable Tankyrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tankyrase activity has been linked to the regulation of intracellular axin levels, which have been shown to be crucial for the Wnt pathway. Deregulated Wnt signaling is important for the genesis of many diseases including cancer. We describe herein the discovery and development of a new series of tankyrase inhibitors. These pyranopyridones are highly active in various cell-based assays. A fragment/structure based optimization strategy led to a compound with good pharmacokinetic properties that is suitable for in vivo studies and further development. PMID:26396691

  13. Discovery of Pyrrolopyridine−Pyridone Based Inhibitors of Met Kinase: Synthesis, X-ray Crystallographic Analysis, and Biological Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoung Soon; Zhang, Liping; Schmidt, Robert; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Wei, Donna; Williams, David K.; Lombardo, Louis J.; Trainor, George L.; Xie, Dianlin; Zhang, Yaquan; An, Yongmi; Sack, John S.; Tokarski, John S.; Darienzo, Celia; Kamath, Amrita; Marathe, Punit; Zhang, Yueping; Lippy, Jonathan; Jeyaseelan, Sr., Robert; Wautlet, Barri; Henley, Benjamin; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Manne, Veeraswamy; Hunt, John T.; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M.

    2008-10-02

    Conformationally constrained 2-pyridone analogue 2 is a potent Met kinase inhibitor with an IC50 value of 1.8 nM. Further SAR of the 2-pyridone based inhibitors of Met kinase led to potent 4-pyridone and pyridine N-oxide inhibitors such as 3 and 4. The X-ray crystallographic data of the inhibitor 2 bound to the ATP binding site of Met kinase protein provided insight into the binding modes of these inhibitors, and the SAR of this series of analogues was rationalized. Many of these analogues showed potent antiproliferative activities against the Met dependent GTL-16 gastric carcinoma cell line. Compound 2 also inhibited Flt-3 and VEGFR-2 kinases with IC{sub 50} values of 4 and 27 nM, respectively. It possesses a favorable pharmacokinetic profile in mice and demonstrates significant in vivo antitumor activity in the GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma xenograft model.

  14. Characterization of the cellular activity of PDE 4 inhibitors using two novel PDE 4 reporter cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wunder, Frank; Quednau, Ramona; Geerts, Andreas; Barg, Martina; Tersteegen, Adrian

    2013-10-01

    We report here the generation and pharmacological characterization of two novel PDE 4B1 and PDE 4D3 reporter cell lines. Intracellular cAMP levels are monitored in these cells by a cAMP-sensitive biosensor. We used the recombinant PDE 4B1 and PDE 4D3 reporter cell lines to characterize the cellular effects of various competitive and allosteric PDE 4 inhibitors. In addition, we compared the cellular activity of these PDE 4 inhibitors with the in vitro inhibition of full-length PDE 4D3 and a truncated enzyme comprising the PDE 4D3 catalytic domain. Two different groups of PDE 4 inhibitors could be identified. The first group, including competitive inhibitors like roflumilast, cilomilast and piclamilast, shows similar in vitro activity on full-length and truncated PDE 4D3 and comparably low cellular activity. The second group, including the allosteric inhibitors PMNPQ, D159153, and D159404, shows much better inhibition of full-length versus truncated PDE 4D3. In addition, these compounds show high cellular activity. Our data obtained with the prototype PDE 4 inhibitor rolipram show that rolipram has properties intermediate between the two groups. The results imply that these novel PDE 4 reporter cell lines are well-suited for the characterization of the cellular activity of PDE 4 inhibitors and may also support a better understanding of the complex PDE 4 pharmacology.

  15. Discovery and antiparasitic activity of AZ960 as a Trypanosoma brucei ERK8 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Valenciano, Ana L; Ramsey, Aaron C; Santos, Webster L; Mackey, Zachary B

    2016-10-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a lethal, vector-borne disease caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Therapeutic strategies for this neglected tropical disease suffer from disadvantages such as toxicity, high cost, and emerging resistance. Therefore, new drugs with novel modes of action are needed. We screened cultured T. brucei against a focused kinase inhibitor library to identify promising bioactive compounds. Among the ten hits identified from the phenotypic screen, AZ960 emerged as the most promising compound with potent antiparasitic activity (IC50=120nM) and was shown to be a selective inhibitor of an essential gene product, T. brucei extracellular signal-regulated kinase 8 (TbERK8). We report that AZ960 has a Ki of 1.25μM for TbERK8 and demonstrate its utility in establishing TbERK8 as a potentially druggable target in T. brucei. PMID:27519462

  16. Structure–Activity Relationships and Molecular Modeling of Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The design, synthesis, and evaluation of the potency of new isoform-selective inhibitors of sphingosine kinases 1 and 2 (SK1 and SK2), the enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of d-erythro-sphingosine to produce the key signaling lipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate, are described. Recently, we reported that 1-(4-octylphenethyl)piperidin-4-ol (RB-005) is a selective inhibitor of SK1. Here we report the synthesis of 43 new analogues of RB-005, in which the lipophilic tail, polar headgroup, and linker region were modified to extend the structure–activity relationship profile for this lead compound, which we explain using modeling studies with the recently published crystal structure of SK1. We provide a basis for the key residues targeted by our profiled series and provide further evidence for the ability to discriminate between the two isoforms using pharmacological intervention. PMID:24164513

  17. Structure-activity relationships and molecular modeling of sphingosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Baek, Dong Jae; MacRitchie, Neil; Anthony, Nahoum G; Mackay, Simon P; Pyne, Susan; Pyne, Nigel J; Bittman, Robert

    2013-11-27

    The design, synthesis, and evaluation of the potency of new isoform-selective inhibitors of sphingosine kinases 1 and 2 (SK1 and SK2), the enzyme that catalyzes the phosphorylation of d-erythro-sphingosine to produce the key signaling lipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate, are described. Recently, we reported that 1-(4-octylphenethyl)piperidin-4-ol (RB-005) is a selective inhibitor of SK1. Here we report the synthesis of 43 new analogues of RB-005, in which the lipophilic tail, polar headgroup, and linker region were modified to extend the structure-activity relationship profile for this lead compound, which we explain using modeling studies with the recently published crystal structure of SK1. We provide a basis for the key residues targeted by our profiled series and provide further evidence for the ability to discriminate between the two isoforms using pharmacological intervention.

  18. Proanthocyanidins Extracted from Rhododendron pulchrum Leaves as Source of Tyrosinase Inhibitors: Structure, Activity, and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Wei-Ming; Wang, Rui; Wei, Man-Kun; Zou, Zheng-Rong; Deng, Rong-Gen; Liu, Wei-Sheng; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the structure, anti-tyrosinase activity, and mechanism of proanthocyanidins extracted from Rhododendron pulchrum leaves. Results obtained from mass spectra of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) revealed that proanthocyanidins were complex mixtures of procyanidins, prodelphinidins, propelargonidins, and their derivatives, among which procyanidins were the main components. The anti-tyrosinase analysis results indicated that the mixtures were reversible and mixed competitive inhibitors of tyrosinase. Interactions between proanthocyanidins with substrate (L-tyrosine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) and with copper ions were the important molecular mechanisms for explaining their efficient inhibition. This research would provide scientific evidence for the use of R. pulchrum leaf proanthocyanidins as new novel tyrosinase inhibitors. PMID:26713623

  19. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Cuny, Gregory D.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-04-21

    Inosine 5´-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5´-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategymore » for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications.« less

  20. In vitro activity assays for MYST histone acetyltransferases and adaptation for high-throughput inhibitor screening

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Cheryl E.; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification that is carried out by acetyltransferases. The MYST proteins form the largest and most diverse family of acetyltransferases, which regulate gene expression, DNA repair, and cell cycle homeostasis, among other activities, by acetylating both histone and non-histone proteins. This chapter will describe methods for the preparation and biochemical characterization of MYST family acetyltransferases, including protocols for the preparation of recombinant protein, enzyme assays for measuring steady state parameters and binding assays to measure cofactor and inhibitor binding. We also provide details on adapting these assays for high throughput screening for small molecule MYST inhibitors. This chapter seeks to prepare researchers for some hurdles that they may encounter when studying the MYST proteins so that there may be better opportunity to plan appropriate controls and obtain high quality data. PMID:27372752

  1. Structure of Cryptosporidium IMP dehydrogenase bound to an inhibitor with in vivo antiparasitic activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngchang; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R; Cuny, Gregory D; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2015-05-01

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a promising target for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. Here, the structure of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) in complex with inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) and P131, an inhibitor with in vivo anticryptosporidial activity, is reported. P131 contains two aromatic groups, one of which interacts with the hypoxanthine ring of IMP, while the second interacts with the aromatic ring of a tyrosine in the adjacent subunit. In addition, the amine and NO2 moieties bind in hydrated cavities, forming water-mediated hydrogen bonds to the protein. The design of compounds to replace these water molecules is a new strategy for the further optimization of C. parvum inhibitors for both antiparasitic and antibacterial applications. PMID:25945705

  2. A calpain-2 selective inhibitor enhances learning & memory by prolonging ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Wang, Yubin; Zhu, Guoqi; Sun, Jiandong; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2016-06-01

    While calpain-1 activation is required for LTP induction by theta burst stimulation (TBS), calpain-2 activation limits its magnitude during the consolidation period. A selective calpain-2 inhibitor applied either before or shortly after TBS enhanced the degree of potentiation. In the present study, we tested whether the selective calpain-2 inhibitor, Z-Leu-Abu-CONH-CH2-C6H3 (3, 5-(OMe)2 (C2I), could enhance learning and memory in wild-type (WT) and calpain-1 knock-out (C1KO) mice. We first showed that C2I could reestablish TBS-LTP in hippocampal slices from C1KO mice, and this effect was blocked by PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK. TBS resulted in PTEN degradation in hippocampal slices from both WT and C1KO mice, and C2I treatment blocked this effect in both mouse genotypes. Systemic injection of C2I 30 min before training in the fear-conditioning paradigm resulted in a biphasic dose-response curve, with low doses enhancing and high doses inhibiting freezing behavior. The difference between the doses needed to enhance and inhibit learning matches the difference in concentrations producing inhibition of calpain-2 and calpain-1. A low dose of C2I also restored normal learning in a novel object recognition task in C1KO mice. Levels of SCOP, a ERK phosphatase known to be cleaved by calpain-1, were decreased in dorsal hippocampus early but not late following training in WT mice; C2I treatment did not affect the early decrease in SCOP levels but prevented its recovery at the later time-point and prolonged ERK activation. The results indicate that calpain-2 activation limits the extent of learning, an effect possibly due to temporal limitation of ERK activation, as a result of SCOP synthesis induced by calpain-2-mediated PTEN degradation. PMID:26907807

  3. Inhibition of dog and human gastric lipases by enantiomeric phosphonate inhibitors: a structure-activity study.

    PubMed

    Miled, Nabil; Roussel, Alain; Bussetta, Cécile; Berti-Dupuis, Liliane; Rivière, Mireille; Buono, Gérard; Verger, Robert; Cambillau, Christian; Canaan, Stéphane

    2003-10-14

    The crystal structures of gastric lipases in the apo form [Roussel, A., et al. (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 16995-17002] or in complex with the (R(P))-undecyl butyl phosphonate [C(11)Y(4)(+)] [Roussel, A., et al. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 2266-2274] have improved our understanding of the structure-activity relationships of acid lipases. In this report, we have performed a kinetic study with dog and human gastric lipases (DGL and HGL, respectively) using several phosphonate inhibitors by varying the absolute configuration of the phosphorus atom and the chain length of the alkyl/alkoxy substituents. Using the two previously determined structures and that of a new crystal structure obtained with the other (S(P))-phosphonate enantiomer [C(11)Y(4)(-)], we constructed models of phosphonate inhibitors fitting into the active site crevices of DGL and HGL. All inhibitors with a chain length of fewer than 12 carbon atoms were found to be completely buried in the catalytic crevice, whereas longer alkyl/alkoxy chains were found to point out of the cavity. The main stereospecific determinant explaining the stronger inhibition of the S(P) enantiomers is the presence of a hydrogen bond involving the catalytic histidine as found in the DGL-C(11)Y(4)(-) complex. On the basis of these results, we have built a model of the first tetrahedral intermediate corresponding to the tristearoyl-lipase complex. The triglyceride molecule completely fills the active site crevice of DGL, in contrast with what is observed with other lipases such as pancreatic lipases which have a shallower and narrower active site. For substrate hydrolysis, the supply of water molecules to the active site might be achieved through a lateral channel identified in the protein core.

  4. Baculovirus inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs) block activation of Sf-caspase-1

    PubMed Central

    Seshagiri, Somasekar; Miller, Lois K.

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the ability of Sf-caspase-1 and two mammalian caspases, caspase-1 and caspase-3, to induce apoptosis in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf-21 insect cells. While the transient expression of the pro-Sf-caspase-1 did not induce apoptosis, expression of the pro-domain deleted form, p31, or coexpression of the two subunits of mature Sf-caspase-1, p19 and p12, induced apoptosis in Sf-21 cells. The behavior of Sf-caspase-1 resembled that of the closely related mammalian caspase, caspase-3, and contrasted with that of the mammalian caspase-1, the pro-form of which was active in inducing apoptosis in Sf-21 cells. The baculovirus caspase inhibitor P35 blocked apoptosis induced by active forms of all three caspases. In contrast, members of the baculovirus inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family failed to block active caspase-induced apoptosis. However, during viral infection, expression of OpIAP or CpIAP blocked the activation of pro-Sf-caspase-1 and the associated induction of apoptosis. Thus, the mechanism by which baculovirus IAPs inhibit apoptosis is distinct from the mechanism by which P35 blocks apoptosis and involves inhibition of the activation of pro-caspases like Sf-caspase-1. PMID:9391073

  5. Exploring the Molecular Basis of Qo bc1 Complex Inhibitors Activity to Find Novel Antimalarials Hits.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Marta P; Gut, Jiri; Rodrigues, Tiago; Ribeiro, Maria H L; Lopes, Francisca; Rosenthal, Philip J; Moreira, Rui; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A

    2013-07-01

    Cytochrome bc1 complex is a crucial element in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, being indispensable for the survival of several species of Plasmodia that cause malaria and, therefore, it is a promising target for antimalarial drug development. We report a molecular docking study building on the most recently obtained X-ray structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae bc1 complex (PDB code: 3CX5) using several reported inhibitors with experimentally determined IC50 values against the Plasmodium falciparum bc1 complex. We produced a molecular docking model that correlated the calculated binding free energy with the experimental inhibitory activity of each compound. This Qo model was used to search the drug-like database included in the MOE package for novel potential bc1 complex inhibitors. Twenty three compounds were chosen to be tested for their antimalarial activity and four of these compounds demonstrated activity against the chloroquine-resistant W2 strain of P. falciparum. The most active compounds were also active against the atovaquone-resistant P. falciparum FCR3 strain and S. cerevisiae. Our study suggests the validity of the yeast bc1 complex structure as a model for the discovery of new antimalarial hits.

  6. In vitro and ex vivo activity of peptide deformylase inhibitors against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anshika; Sharma, Sadhna; Khuller, G K; Kanwar, A J

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyses removal of the N-terminal formyl group of proteins and is essential for protein maturation, growth and survival of bacteria. Thus, PDF appears to be a good antimycobacterial drug target. In the present study, various well-known PDF inhibitors, such as BB-3497, actinonin, 1,10-phenanthroline, hydroxylamine hydrochloride and galardin, were selected to evaluate their inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. All compounds were found to be active against M. tuberculosis, with MIC(90) values (lowest drug concentration at which 90% of growth was inhibited on the basis of CFU enumeration) ranging from 0.2 mg/L to 74 mg/L. BB-3497 and 1,10-phenanthroline exhibited potent in vitro antimycobacterial activity, and also showed synergism with isoniazid and rifampicin. All compounds showed a bacteriostatic mode of inhibition. Under ex vivo conditions and short-course chemotherapy, BB-3497 and actinonin were found to be significantly active, with BB-3497 exhibiting comparable efficacy to that of isoniazid. Collectively, promising activities of PDF inhibitors such as BB-3497 and actinonin suggest their potential use against M. tuberculosis.

  7. Mechanism of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 regulation by Oncostatin M and Interleukin-1 in human astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kasza, Aneta; Kiss, Daniel L.; Gopalan, Sunita; Xu, Weili; Rydel, Russell E.; Koj, Aleksander; Kordula, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Glial cells that produce and respond to various cytokines mediate inflammatory processes in the brain. Here, we show that oncostatin M (OSM) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) regulate the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) in human astrocytes. Using the PAI-1 reporter constructs we show that the −58 to −51 proximal element mediates activation by both cytokines. This element is already bound by c-fos/c-jun heterodimers in unstimulated astrocytes, and treatment with cytokine strongly stimulates both expression of c-fos and binding of c-fos/c-jun heterodimers. In addition, IL-1 activates an inhibitory mechanism that downregulates PAI-1 expression after longer exposure to this cytokine. Overexpression of dominant-negative signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1), STAT3, STAT5 and inhibitor of nuclear factor kB (IkB) suppressed OSM/IL-1-induced expression of the PAI-1 reporter construct. We conclude that OSM and IL-1 regulate the PAI-1 gene expression via up-regulating c-fos levels and subsequent binding of c-fos/c-jun heterodimers to the proximal element of the PAI-1 gene. PMID:12390531

  8. Condensed tannins from Ficus virens as tyrosinase inhibitors: structure, inhibitory activity and molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Xin; Shi, Yan; Chai, Wei-Ming; Feng, Hui-Ling; Zhuang, Jiang-Xing; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Condensed tannins from Ficus virens leaves, fruit, and stem bark were isolated and their structures characterized by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The results showed that the leaves, fruit, and stem bark condensed tannins were complex mixtures of homo- and heteropolymers of B-type procyanidins and prodelphinidins with degrees of polymerization up to hexamer, dodecamer, and pentadecamer, respectively. Antityrosinase activities of the condensed tannins were studied. The results indicated that the condensed tannins were potent tyrosinase inhibitors. The concentrations for the leaves, fruit, and stem bark condensed tannins leading to 50% enzyme activity were determined to be 131.67, 99.89, and 106.22 μg/ml on monophenolase activity, and 128.42, 43.07, and 74.27 μg/ml on diphenolase activity. The inhibition mechanism, type, and constants of the condensed tannins on the diphenolase activity were further investigated. The results indicated that the condensed tannins were reversible and mixed type inhibitors. Fluorescence quenching, copper interacting, and molecular docking techniques were utilized to unravel the molecular mechanisms of the inhibition. The results showed that the hydroxyl group on the B ring of the condensed tannins could chelate the dicopper irons of the enzyme. Moreover, the condensed tannins could reduce the enzyme product o-quinones into colourless compounds. These results would contribute to the development and design of antityrosinase agents.

  9. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  10. Antimicrobial activity of protease inhibitor from leaves of Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt.

    PubMed

    Satheesh, L Shilpa; Murugan, K

    2011-05-01

    Antimicrobial activity of protease inhibitor isolated from Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt. has been reported. A 14.3 kDa protease inhibitor (PI) was isolated and purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation (20-85% saturation), sephadex G-75, DEAE sepharose column and trypsin-sepharose affinity chromatography from the leaves of C. grandis. The purity was checked by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. PI exhibited marked growth inhibitory effects on colon cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. PI was thermostable and showed antimicrobial activity without hemolytic activity. PI strongly inhibited pathogenic microbial strains, including Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Eschershia coli, Bacillus subtilis and pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, Mucor indicus, Penicillium notatum, Aspergillus flavus and Cryptococcus neoformans. Examination by bright field microscopy showed inhibition of mycelial growth and sporulation. Morphologically, PI treated fungus showed a significant shrinkage of hyphal tips. Reduced PI completely lost its activity indicating that disulfide bridge is essential for its protease inhibitory and antifungal activity. Results reported in this study suggested that PI may be an excellent candidate for development of novel oral or other anti-infective agents. PMID:21615062

  11. The serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram suppresses activity in the neonatal rat barrel cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Akhmetshina, Dinara; Zakharov, Andrei; Vinokurova, Daria; Nasretdinov, Azat; Valeeva, Guzel; Khazipov, Roustem

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of serotonin uptake, which causes an increase in extracellular serotonin levels, disrupts the development of thalamocortical barrel maps in neonatal rodents. Previous in vitro studies have suggested that the disruptive effect of excessive serotonin on barrel map formation involves a depression at thalamocortical synapses. However, the effects of serotonin uptake inhibitors on the early thalamocortical activity patterns in the developing barrel cortex in vivo remain largely unknown. Here, using extracellular recordings of the local field potentials and multiple unit activity (MUA) we explored the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram (10-20mg/kg, intraperitoneally) on sensory evoked activity in the barrel cortex of neonatal (postnatal days P2-5) rats in vivo. We show that administration of citalopram suppresses the amplitude and prolongs the delay of the sensory evoked potentials, reduces the power and frequency of the early gamma oscillations, and suppresses sensory evoked and spontaneous neuronal firing. In the adolescent P21-29 animals, citalopram affected neither sensory evoked nor spontaneous activity in barrel cortex. We suggest that suppression of the early thalamocortical activity patterns contributes to the disruption of the barrel map development caused by SSRIs and other conditions elevating extracellular serotonin levels. PMID:27016034

  12. Boronic Acid Transition State Inhibitors Active against KPC and Other Class A β-Lactamases: Structure-Activity Relationships as a Guide to Inhibitor Design

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Laura J.; Taracila, Magdalena A.; Papp-Wallace, Krisztina M.; Bethel, Christopher R.; Caselli, Emilia; Romagnoli, Chiara; Winkler, Marisa L.; Spellberg, Brad; Prati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Boronic acid transition state inhibitors (BATSIs) are competitive, reversible β-lactamase inhibitors (BLIs). In this study, a series of BATSIs with selectively modified regions (R1, R2, and amide group) were strategically designed and tested against representative class A β-lactamases of Klebsiella pneumoniae, KPC-2 and SHV-1. Firstly, the R1 group of compounds 1a to 1c and 2a to 2e mimicked the side chain of cephalothin, whereas for compounds 3a to 3c, 4a, and 4b, the thiophene ring was replaced by a phenyl, typical of benzylpenicillin. Secondly, variations in the R2 groups which included substituted aryl side chains (compounds 1a, 1b, 1c, 3a, 3b, and 3c) and triazole groups (compounds 2a to 2e) were chosen to mimic the thiazolidine and dihydrothiazine ring of penicillins and cephalosporins, respectively. Thirdly, the amide backbone of the BATSI, which corresponds to the amide at C-6 or C-7 of β-lactams, was also changed to the following bioisosteric groups: urea (compound 3b), thiourea (compound 3c), and sulfonamide (compounds 4a and 4b). Among the compounds that inhibited KPC-2 and SHV-1 β-lactamases, nine possessed 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of ≤600 nM. The most active compounds contained the thiopheneacetyl group at R1 and for the chiral BATSIs, a carboxy- or hydroxy-substituted aryl group at R2. The most active sulfonamido derivative, compound 4b, lacked an R2 group. Compound 2b (S02030) was the most active, with acylation rates (k2/K) of 1.2 ± 0.2 × 104 M−1 s−1 for KPC-2 and 4.7 ± 0.6 × 103 M−1 s−1 for SHV-1, and demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli DH10B carrying blaSHV variants and blaKPC-2 or blaKPC-3 and against clinical strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae and E. coli producing different class A β-lactamase genes. At most, MICs decreased from 16 to 0.5 mg/liter. PMID:26729496

  13. Proteasome inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Teicher, Beverly A; Tomaszewski, Joseph E

    2015-07-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have a 20 year history in cancer therapy. The first proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib (Velcade, PS-341), a break-through multiple myeloma treatment, moved rapidly through development from bench in 1994 to first approval in 2003. Bortezomib is a reversible boronic acid inhibitor of the chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome. Next generation proteasome inhibitors include carfilzomib and oprozomib which are irreversible epoxyketone proteasome inhibitors; and ixazomib and delanzomib which are reversible boronic acid proteasome inhibitors. Two proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib are FDA approved drugs and ixazomib and oprozomib are in late stage clinical trials. All of the agents are potent cytotoxics. The disease focus for all the proteasome inhibitors is multiple myeloma. This focus arose from clinical observations made in bortezomib early clinical trials. Later preclinical studies confirmed that multiple myeloma cells were indeed more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than other tumor cell types. The discovery and development of the proteasome inhibitor class of anticancer agents has progressed through a classic route of serendipity and scientific investigation. These agents are continuing to have a major impact in their treatment of hematologic malignancies and are beginning to be explored as potential treatment agent for non-cancer indications. PMID:25935605

  14. Histone deacetylase inhibitor AR42 regulates telomerase activity in human glioma cells via an Akt-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Luen; Huang, Po-Hsien; Chiu, Hao-Chieh; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Chen, Huan-Da; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2013-05-24

    Epigenetic regulation via abnormal activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) is a mechanism that leads to cancer initiation and promotion. Activation of HDACs results in transcriptional upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and increases telomerase activity during cellular immortalization and tumorigenesis. However, the effects of HDAC inhibitors on the transcription of hTERT vary in different cancer cells. Here, we studied the effects of a novel HDAC inhibitor, AR42, on telomerase activity in a PTEN-null U87MG glioma cell line. AR42 increased hTERT mRNA in U87MG glioma cells, but suppressed total telomerase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Further analyses suggested that AR42 decreases the phosphorylation of hTERT via an Akt-dependent mechanism. Suppression of Akt phosphorylation and telomerase activity was also observed with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 further supporting the hypothesis that Akt signaling is involved in suppression of AR42-induced inhibition of telomerase activity. Finally, ectopic expression of a constitutive active form of Akt restored telomerase activity in AR42-treated cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the novel HDAC inhibitor AR42 can suppress telomerase activity by inhibiting Akt-mediated hTERT phosphorylation, indicating that the PI3K/Akt pathway plays an important role in the regulation of telomerase activity in response to this HDAC inhibitor.

  15. Determinants governing the CYP74 catalysis: conversion of allene oxide synthase into hydroperoxide lyase by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Toporkova, Yana Y; Gogolev, Yuri V; Mukhtarova, Lucia S; Grechkin, Alexander N

    2008-10-15

    Bioinformatics analyses enabled us to identify the hypothetical determinants of catalysis by CYP74 family enzymes. To examine their recognition, two mutant forms F295I and S297A of tomato allene oxide synthase LeAOS3 (CYP74C3) were prepared by site-directed mutagenesis. Both mutations dramatically altered the enzyme catalysis. Both mutant forms possessed the activity of hydroperoxide lyase, while the allene oxide synthase activity was either not detectable (F295I) or significantly reduced (S297A) compared to the wild-type LeAOS3. Thus, both sites 295 and 297 localized within the "I-helix central domain" ("oxygen binding domain") are the primary determinants of CYP74 type of catalysis.

  16. Discrimination of Active and Weakly Active Human BACE1 Inhibitors Using Self-Organizing Map and Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Hang; Wang, Maolin; Gong, Ya-Nan; Yan, Aixia

    2016-01-01

    β-secretase (BACE1) is an aspartyl protease, which is considered as a novel vital target in Alzheimer`s disease therapy. We collected a data set of 294 BACE1 inhibitors, and built six classification models to discriminate active and weakly active inhibitors using Kohonen's Self-Organizing Map (SOM) method and Support Vector Machine (SVM) method. Each molecular descriptor was calculated using the program ADRIANA.Code. We adopted two different methods: random method and Self-Organizing Map method, for training/test set split. The descriptors were selected by F-score and stepwise linear regression analysis. The best SVM model Model2C has a good prediction performance on test set with prediction accuracy, sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP) and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 89.02%, 90%, 88%, 0.78, respectively. Model 1A is the best SOM model, whose accuracy and MCC of the test set were 94.57% and 0.98, respectively. The lone pair electronegativity and polarizability related descriptors importantly contributed to bioactivity of BACE1 inhibitor. The Extended-Connectivity Finger-Prints_4 (ECFP_4) analysis found some vitally key substructural features, which could be helpful for further drug design research. The SOM and SVM models built in this study can be obtained from the authors by email or other contacts. PMID:27141991

  17. Discrimination of Active and Weakly Active Human BACE1 Inhibitors Using Self-Organizing Map and Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Li, Hang; Wang, Maolin; Gong, Ya-Nan; Yan, Aixia

    2016-01-01

    β-secretase (BACE1) is an aspartyl protease, which is considered as a novel vital target in Alzheimer`s disease therapy. We collected a data set of 294 BACE1 inhibitors, and built six classification models to discriminate active and weakly active inhibitors using Kohonen's Self-Organizing Map (SOM) method and Support Vector Machine (SVM) method. Each molecular descriptor was calculated using the program ADRIANA.Code. We adopted two different methods: random method and Self-Organizing Map method, for training/test set split. The descriptors were selected by F-score and stepwise linear regression analysis. The best SVM model Model2C has a good prediction performance on test set with prediction accuracy, sensitivity (SE), specificity (SP) and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 89.02%, 90%, 88%, 0.78, respectively. Model 1A is the best SOM model, whose accuracy and MCC of the test set were 94.57% and 0.98, respectively. The lone pair electronegativity and polarizability related descriptors importantly contributed to bioactivity of BACE1 inhibitor. The Extended-Connectivity Finger-Prints_4 (ECFP_4) analysis found some vitally key substructural features, which could be helpful for further drug design research. The SOM and SVM models built in this study can be obtained from the authors by email or other contacts.

  18. A sycamore cell wall polysaccharide and a chemically related tomato leaf polysaccharide possess similar proteinase inhibitor-inducing activities.

    PubMed

    Ryan, C A; Bishop, P; Pearce, G

    1981-09-01

    A large pectic polysaccharide, called rhamnogalacturonan I, that is solubilized by a fungal endo-alpha-1,4-polygalacturonase from the purified walls of suspension-cultured sycamore cells possesses proteinase inhibitor-inducing activity similar to that of the proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor, a pectic-like oligosaccharide fraction isolated from tomato leaves. This suggests that the proteinase inhibitor-inducing activity resides in particular polysaccharide fragments which can be released when plant cell walls are exposed to appropriate enzyme degradation as a result of either wounding or pest attack.

  19. Inhibition of human preadipocyte proteasomal activity by HIV protease inhibitors or specific inhibitor lactacystin leads to a defect in adipogenesis, which involves matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    De Barros, Sandra; Zakaroff-Girard, Alexia; Lafontan, Max; Galitzky, Jean; Bourlier, Virginie

    2007-01-01

    In a previous publication, we reported that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease inhibitors (PIs) inhibited the differentiation of human preadipocytes in primary culture, reducing the expression and secretion of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). The present work was performed to clarify this mechanism. Interestingly, HIV-PIs have been reported to be inhibitors of the proteasome complex, which is known to regulate nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation and transcription of its target genes, among them MMP-9. We thus investigated the potential involvement of the proteasome in the antiadipogenic effects of HIV-PIs. The effect of four HIV-PIs was tested on preadipocyte proteasomal activity, and chronic treatment with the specific proteasome inhibitor lactacystin was performed to evaluate alterations of adipogenesis and MMP-9 expression/secretion. Finally, modifications of the NF-kappaB pathway induced by either HIV-PIs or lactacystin were studied. We demonstrated that preadipocyte proteasomal activity was decreased by several HIV-PIs and that chronic treatment with lactacystin mimicked the effects of HIV-PIs by reducing adipogenesis and MMP-9 expression/secretion. Furthermore, we observed an intracellular accumulation of the NF-kappaB inhibitor, IkappaBbeta, with chronic treatment with HIV-PIs or lactacystin as well as a decrease in MMP-9 expression induced by acute tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulation. These results indicate that inhibition of the proteasome by specific (lactacystin) or nonspecific (HIV-PIs) inhibitors leads to a reduction of human adipogenesis, and they therefore implicate deregulation of the NF-kappaB pathway and the related decrease of the key adipogenic factor, MMP-9. This study adds significantly to recent reports that have linked HIV-PI-related lipodystrophic syndrome with altered proteasome function, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and metabolic disorders.

  20. Site-directed mutagenesis of the regulatory domain of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase identifies crucial residues for allosteric regulation and for transduction of the regulatory signals.

    PubMed

    Fresquet, V; Mora, P; Rochera, L; Ramón-Maiques, S; Rubio, V; Cervera, J

    2000-06-16

    Carbamoyl phosphate (CP), the essential precursor of pyrimidines and arginine, is made in Escherichia coli by a single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) consisting of 41.4 and 117.7 kDa subunits, which is feed-back inhibited by UMP and activated by IMP and ornithine. The large subunit catalyzes CP synthesis from ammonia in three steps, and binds the effectors in its 15 kDa C-terminal domain. Fifteen site-directed mutations were introduced in 13 residues of this domain to investigate the mechanism of allosteric modulation by UMP and IMP. Two mutations, K993A and V994A, decreased significantly or abolished enzyme activity, apparently by interfering with the step of carbamate synthesis, and one mutation, T974A, negatively affected ornithine activation. S948A, K954A, T974A, K993A and K993W/H995A abolished or greatly hampered IMP activation and UMP inhibition as well as the binding of both effectors, monitored using photoaffinity labeling and ultracentrifugation binding assays. V994A also decreased significantly IMP and UMP binding. L990A, V991A, H995A, G997A and G1008A had more modest effects or affected more the modulation by and the binding of one than of the other nucleotide. K993W, R1020A, R1021A and K1061A were without substantial effects. The results confirm the independence of the regulatory and catalytic centers, and also confirm functional predictions based on the X-ray structure of an IMP-CPS complex. They prove that the inhibitor UMP and the activator IMP bind in the same site, and exclude that the previously observed binding of ornithine and glutamine in this site were relevant for enzyme activation. K993 and V994 appear to be involved in the transmission of the regulatory signals triggered by UMP and IMP binding. These effectors possibly change the position of K993 and V994, and alter the intermolecular contacts mediated by the regulatory domain. PMID:10843852

  1. mTOR inhibitors counteract tamoxifen-induced activation of breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Karthik, Govindasamy-Muralidharan; Ma, Ran; Lövrot, John; Kis, Lorand Levente; Lindh, Claes; Blomquist, Lennart; Fredriksson, Irma; Bergh, Jonas; Hartman, Johan

    2015-10-10

    Breast cancer cells with stem cell characteristics (CSC) are a distinct cell population with phenotypic similarities to mammary stem cells. CSCs are important drivers of tumorigenesis and the metastatic process. Tamoxifen is the most widely used hormonal therapy for estrogen receptor (ER) positive cancers. In our study, tamoxifen was effective in reducing proliferation of ER + adherent cancer cells, but not their CSC population. We isolated, expanded and incubated CSC from seven breast cancers with or without tamoxifen. By genome-wide transcriptional analysis we identified tamoxifen-induced transcriptional pathways associated with ribosomal biogenesis and mRNA translation, both regulated by the mTOR-pathway. We observed induction of the key mTOR downstream targets S6K1, S6RP and 4E-BP1 in-patient derived CSCs by tamoxifen on protein level. Using the mTOR inhibitors rapamycin, everolimus and PF-04691502 (a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor) and in combination with tamoxifen, significant reduction in mammosphere formation was observed. Hence, we suggest that the CSC population play a significant role during endocrine resistance through activity of the mTOR pathway. In addition, tamoxifen further stimulates the mTOR-pathway but can be antagonized using mTOR-inhibitors. PMID:26208432

  2. Effects of pharmacological suppression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in myocardial remodeling after ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ryo; Nakajima, Takuya; Ogawa, Masahito; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Muto, Susumu; Itai, Akiko; Hirata, Yasunobu; Nagai, Ryozo; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2011-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) contributes to cardiac ventricular remodeling because migration of inflammatory cells and attenuation of extracellular matrix degradation are caused by plasmin and matrix metalloproteinase. However, the roles of PAI-1 in myocardial ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury and the following inflammatory response have not yet been well elucidated. To clarify the role of PAI-1 in myocardial I/R injury, we used a specific PAI-1 inhibitor (IMD-1622) in a rat model. The left anterior descending coronary artery was ligated and reperfusion was performed by loosening the suture after 30 minutes of arterial occlusion. A single administration of IMD-1622 (20 mg/kg) or vehicle was given intraperitoneally and then the rats were sacrificed on day 1 or day 14 after I/R. Blood pressure, echocardiograms, histopathology, and molecular examination were performed. The examinations revealed that PAI-1 inhibitor showed limited effects on cardiac dysfunction and ventricular remodeling after I/R. We conclude that the pharmacological inhibition of PAI-1 may not affect ventricular remodeling after myocardial I/R injury.

  3. Inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is a potential therapeutic strategy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Satsuki; Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Toyoshima, Masafumi; Ichimura, Atsuhiko; Dan, Takashi; Usui, Toshinori; Ishibashi, Masumi; Shigeta, Shogo; Nagase, Satoru; Miyata, Toshio; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is predictive of poor outcome in several types of cancer. The present study investigated the biological role for PAI-1 in ovarian cancer and potential of targeted pharmacotherapeutics. In patients with ovarian cancer, PAI-1 mRNA expression in tumor tissues was positively correlated with poor prognosis. To determine the role of PAI-1 in cell proliferation in ovarian cancer, the effects of PAI-1 inhibition were examined in PAI-1-expressing ovarian cancer cells. PAI-1 knockdown by small interfering RNA resulted in significant suppression of cell growth accompanied with G2/M cell cycle arrest and intrinsic apoptosis. Similarly, treatment with the small molecule PAI-1 inhibitor TM5275 effectively blocked cell proliferation of ovarian cancer cells that highly express PAI-1. Together these results suggest that PAI-1 promotes cell growth in ovarian cancer. Interestingly, expression of PAI-1 was increased in ovarian clear cell carcinoma compared with that in serous tumors. Our results suggest that PAI-1 inhibition promotes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ovarian cancer and that PAI-1 inhibitors potentially represent a novel class of anti-tumor agents.

  4. Structural Basis of the Antiproliferative Activity of Largazole a Depsipeptide Inhibitor of the Histone Deacetylases

    SciTech Connect

    K Cole; D Dowling; M Boone; A Phillips; D Christianson

    2011-12-31

    Largazole is a macrocyclic depsipeptide originally isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Symploca sp., which is indigenous to the warm, blue-green waters of Key Largo, Florida (whence largazole derives its name). Largazole contains an unusual thiazoline-thiazole ring system that rigidifies its macrocyclic skeleton, and it also contains a lipophilic thioester side chain. Hydrolysis of the thioester in vivo yields largazole thiol, which exhibits remarkable antiproliferative effects and is believed to be the most potent inhibitor of the metal-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs). Here, the 2.14 {angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of the HDAC8-largazole thiol complex is the first of an HDAC complexed with a macrocyclic inhibitor and reveals that ideal thiolate-zinc coordination geometry is the key chemical feature responsible for its exceptional affinity and biological activity. Notably, the core structure of largazole is conserved in romidepsin, a depsipeptide natural product formulated as the drug Istodax recently approved for cancer chemotherapy. Accordingly, the structure of the HDAC8-largazole thiol complex is the first to illustrate the mode of action of a new class of therapeutically important HDAC inhibitors.

  5. Protease inhibitor from insect silk-activities of derivatives expressed in vitro and in transgenic potato.

    PubMed

    Kodrík, Dalibor; Kludkiewicz, Barbara; Navrátil, Oldřich; Skoková Habuštová, Oxana; Horáčková, Vendulka; Svobodová, Zdeňka; Vinokurov, Konstantin S; Sehnal, František

    2013-09-01

    Several recombinant derivatives of serine protease inhibitor called silk protease inhibitor 2 (SPI2), which is a silk component in Galleria mellonella (Lepidoptera, Insecta), were prepared in the expression vector Pichia pastoris. Both the native and the recombinant protease inhibitors were highly active against subtilisin and proteinase K. The synthetic SPI2 gene with Ala codon in the P1 position was fused with mGFP-5 to facilitate detection of the transgene and its protein product. A construct of the fusion gene with plant regulatory elements (promoter 35S and terminator OCS) was inserted into the binary vector pRD400. The final construct was introduced into Agrobacterium tumefaciens that was then used for genetic transformation of the potato variety Velox. The transgene expression was monitored with the aid of ELISA employing polyclonal antibody against natural SPI2. In vitro tests showed increased resistance to the late blight Phytophthora infestans in several transformed lines. No effect was seen on the growth, mortality, life span or reproduction of Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera, Insecta) caterpillars, while feeding on transformed potato plants expressing the fusion protein, indicating that the transformed potatoes may be harmless to non-target organisms.

  6. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Controls Vascular Integrity by Regulating VE-Cadherin Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Anna E.; Timmerman, Ilse; Kovacevic, Igor; Hordijk, Peter L.; Adriaanse, Luc; Paatero, Ilkka; Belting, Heinz-Georg; van Buul, Jaap D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a serine protease inhibitor, is expressed and secreted by endothelial cells. Patients with PAI-1 deficiency show a mild to moderate bleeding diathesis, which has been exclusively ascribed to the function of PAI-1 in down-regulating fibrinolysis. We tested the hypothesis that PAI-1 function plays a direct role in controlling vascular integrity and permeability by keeping endothelial cell-cell junctions intact. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized PAI-039, a specific small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1, to investigate the role of PAI-1 in protecting endothelial integrity. In vivo inhibition of PAI-1 resulted in vascular leakage from intersegmental vessels and in the hindbrain of zebrafish embryos. In addition PAI-1 inhibition in human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers leads to a marked decrease of transendothelial resistance and disrupted endothelial junctions. The total level of the endothelial junction regulator VE-cadherin was reduced, whereas surface VE-cadherin expression was unaltered. Moreover, PAI-1 inhibition reduced the shedding of VE-cadherin. Finally, we detected an accumulation of VE-cadherin at the Golgi apparatus. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that PAI-1 function is important for the maintenance of endothelial monolayer and vascular integrity by controlling VE-cadherin trafficking to and from the plasma membrane. Our data further suggest that therapies using PAI-1 antagonists like PAI-039 ought to be used with caution to avoid disruption of the vessel wall. PMID:26714278

  7. Isolation, characterization and antifungal activity of proteinase inhibitors from Capsicum chinense Jacq. Seeds.

    PubMed

    Dias, Germana Bueno; Gomes, Valdirene Moreira; Pereira, Umberto Zottich; Ribeiro, Suzanna F Ferreira; Carvalho, André O; Rodrigues, Rosana; Machado, Olga L Tavares; Fernandes, Kátia Valevski Sales; Ferreira, André Teixeira S; Perales, Jonas; Da Cunha, Maura

    2013-01-01

    Capsicum species belong to the Solanaceae family and have great social, economic and agronomical significance. The present research presents data on the isolation and characterization of Capsicum chinense Jacq. peptides which were scrutinized in relation to their toxicity towards a diverse set of yeast species. The protein extract was separated with C18 reverse-phase chromatography in high performance liquid chromatography, resulting in three different peptide enriched fractions (PEFs) termed PEF1, PEF2 and PEF3. Tricine-SDS-PAGE of the PEF2 revealed peptides with molecular masses of approximately 5.0 and 8.5 kDa. These PEFs also exhibited strong antifungal activity against different yeasts. In the presence of the PEF2, Candida tropicalis exhibited morphological changes, including cellular agglomeration and formation of pseudohyphae. Determined N-terminal sequences of PEF2 and PEF3 were proven to be highly homologous to serine proteinase inhibitors, when analysed by comparative database sequence tools. For this reason were performed protease inhibitory activity assay. The PEFs displayed high inhibitory activity against trypsin and low inhibitory activity against chymotrypsin. PEF2 and PEF3 were considerably unsusceptible to a broad interval of pH and temperatures. Due to the myriad of application of Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) in fields ranging from plant protection against pathogens and pests to medicine such as in cancer and virus replication inhibition, the discovery of new PIs with new properties are of great interest.

  8. Hologram quantitative structure activity relationship, docking, and molecular dynamics studies of inhibitors for CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongqian; Du, Chunmiao; Feng, Zhiwei; Zhu, Jingyu; Li, Youyong

    2015-02-01

    CXCR4 plays a crucial role as a co-receptor with CCR5 for HIV-1 anchoring to mammalian cell membrane and is implicated in cancer metastasis and inflammation. In the current work, we study the relationship of structure and activity of AMD11070 derivatives and other inhibitors of CXCR4 using HQSAR, docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We obtain an HQSAR model (q(2) = 0.779), and the HQSAR result illustrates that AMD11070 shows a high antiretroviral activity. As HQSAR only provides 2D information, we perform docking and MD to study the interaction of It1t, AMD3100, and AMD3465 with CXCR4. Our results illustrate that the binding are affected by two crucial residues Asp97 and Glu288. The butyl amine moiety of AMD11070 contributes to its high antiretroviral activity. Without a butyl amine moiety, (2,7a-Dihydro-1H-benzoimidazol-2-ylmethyl)-methyl-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-quinolin-8-yl)-amine (compound 5a) shows low antiretroviral activity. Our results provide structural details about the interactions between the inhibitors and CXCR4, which are useful for rational drug design of CXCR4.

  9. Software-supported USER cloning strategies for site-directed mutagenesis and DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jespersen, Jakob Berg; Sommer, Morten O A; Wernersson, Rasmus; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2015-03-20

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/AMUSER/. PMID:24847672

  10. Software-supported USER cloning strategies for site-directed mutagenesis and DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Jespersen, Jakob Berg; Sommer, Morten O A; Wernersson, Rasmus; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2015-03-20

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein (GFP) to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), which in a single step reaction resulted in a 94% cloning efficiency. AMUSER also supports degenerate nucleotide primers, single insert combinatorial assembly, and flexible parameters for PCR amplification. AMUSER is freely available online at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/AMUSER/.

  11. Gedunin, a novel hsp90 inhibitor: semisynthesis of derivatives and preliminary structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Gary E L; Schmidt, Matthew D; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Blagg, Brian S J

    2008-10-23

    Gedunin (1), a tetranortriterpenoid isolated from the Indian neem tree ( Azadirachta indica), was recently shown to manifest anticancer activity via inhibition of the 90 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) folding machinery and to induce the degradation of Hsp90-dependent client proteins similar to other Hsp90 inhibitors. The mechanism of action by which gedunin induces client protein degradation remains undetermined, however, prior studies have demonstrated that it does not bind competitively versus ATP. In an effort to further probe the mechanism of action, 19 semisynthetic derivatives of gedunin were prepared and their antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 and SkBr3 breast cancer cells determined. Although no compound was found to exhibit antiproliferative activity more effective than the natural product, functionalities critical for antiproliferative activity have been identified. PMID:18816111

  12. Grassypeptolides As Natural Inhibitors of Dipeptidyl Peptidase 8 and T-Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Jason C.; Liu, Yanxia; Ratnayake, Ranjala; Hatano, Ryo; Kuribara, Akiko; Morimoto, Chiko; Ohnuma, Kei; Paul, Valerie J.; Ye, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Natural products made by marine cyanobacteria are often highly modified peptides and depsipeptides that have the potential to act as inhibitors for proteases. In the interest of finding novel protease inhibition activity and selectivity grassypeptolide A (1) was screened against a panel of proteases and found to selectively inhibit DPP8 over DPP4. Grassypeptolides were also found to inhibit IL-2 production and proliferation in activated T-cells, consistent with a putative role of DPP8 in the immune system. These effects were also observed in Jurkat cells, and DPP activity in Jurkat cell cytosol was shown to be inhibited by grassypeptolides. In silico docking suggests two possible binding modes of grassypeptolides – both at the active site of DPP8 and at one of the entrances to the internal cavity. Collectively these results suggest that grassypeptolides may be useful tool compounds in the study of DPP8 function. PMID:24591193

  13. Gedunin, a Novel Hsp90 Inhibitor: Semisynthesis of Derivatives and Preliminary Structure–Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Gary E. L.; Schmidt, Matthew D.; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Blagg, Brian S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Gedunin (1), a tetranortriterpenoid isolated from the Indian neem tree (Azadirachta indica), was recently shown to manifest anticancer activity via inhibition of the 90 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp90) folding machinery and to induce the degradation of Hsp90-dependent client proteins similar to other Hsp90 inhibitors. The mechanism of action by which gedunin induces client protein degradation remains undetermined, however, prior studies have demonstrated that it does not bind competitively versus ATP. In an effort to further probe the mechanism of action, 19 semisynthetic derivatives of gedunin were prepared and their antiproliferative activity against MCF-7 and SkBr3 breast cancer cells determined. Although no compound was found to exhibit antiproliferative activity more effective than the natural product, functionalities critical for antiproliferative activity have been identified. PMID:18816111

  14. Structure-activity relationships of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate homologues as new nuclear export signal inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Murakami, N; Zhang, S; Xu, T

    2007-09-01

    Bioassay-guided separation use of the fission yeast expressing NES of Rev, a HIV-1 viral regulatory protein, resulted in isolation of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA) from Alpinia galanga as a new Rev-transport inhibitor from the nucleus to cytoplasm. Rational design and synthesis of eleven ACA derivatives containing systematic chemical variations were made, biological evaluation of inhibitory activities of these analogues provides the basis to formulate the structure-activity relationship (SAR). The key elements observed were: (1) The para substitution of the acetoxyl and 1'-acetoxypropenyl groups at the benzene ring was essential, (2) linear ethyl and propyl chain carbonates were more active than branching chain carbonates, (3) the substitution of acetoxyl groups with alkyl carbamate groups lost or reduced the activities. This study revealed a new salient pharmacophore features as potential drug leads against the HIV virus.

  15. Da0324, an inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB activation, demonstrates selective antitumor activity on human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Xia, Yiqun; Chen, Qiuxiang; Li, Wulan; Chen, Dahui; Ye, Hui; Zhao, Chengguang; Du, Xiaojing; Shi, Dengjian; Wu, Jianzhang; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background The transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is constitutively activated in a variety of human cancers, including gastric cancer. NF-κB inhibitors that selectively kill cancer cells are urgently needed for cancer treatment. Curcumin is a potent inhibitor of NF-κB activation. Unfortunately, the therapeutic potential of curcumin is limited by its relatively low potency and poor cellular bioavailability. In this study, we presented a novel NF-κB inhibitor named Da0324, a synthetic asymmetric mono-carbonyl analog of curcumin. The purpose of this study is to research the expression of NF-κB in gastric cancer and the antitumor activity and mechanism of Da0324 on human gastric cancer cells. Methods The expressions between gastric cancer tissues/cells and normal gastric tissues/cells of NF-κB were evaluated by Western blot. The inhibition viability of compounds on human gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901, BGC-823, MGC-803, and normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell line GES-1 was assessed with the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Absorption spectrum method and high-performance liquid chromatography method detected the stability of the compound in vitro. The compound-induced changes of inducible NF-κB activation in the SGC-7901 and BGC-823 cells were examined by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence methods. The antitumor activity of compound was performed by clonogenic assay, matrigel invasion assay, flow cytometric analysis, Western blot analysis, and Hoechst 33258 staining assay. Results High levels of p65 were found in gastric cancer tissues and cells. Da0324 displayed higher growth inhibition against several types of gastric cancer cell lines and showed relatively low toxicity to GES-1. Moreover, Da0324 was more stable than curcumin in vitro. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence methods showed that Da0324 blocked NF-κB activation. In addition, Da0324 significantly inhibited tumor proliferation

  16. Eukaryotic inhibitors or activators elicit responses to chemosensory compounds by ruminal isotrichid and entodiniomorphid protozoa.

    PubMed

    Diaz, H L; Barr, K N; Godden, K R; Plank, J E; Zapata, I; Schappacher, A N; Wick, M P; Firkins, J L

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate potential signaling pathways regulating rumen protozoal chemotaxis using eukaryotic inhibitors potentially coordinated with phagocytosis as assessed by fluorescent bead uptake kinetics. Wortmannin (inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase), insulin, genistein (purported inhibitor of a receptor tyrosine kinase), U73122 (inhibitor of phospholipase C), and sodium nitroprusside (Snp, nitric oxide generator, activating protein kinase G) were preincubated with mixed ruminal protozoa for 3h before assessing uptake of fluorescent beads and chemosensory behavior to glucose, peptides, and their combination; peptides were also combined with guanosine triphosphate (GTP; a chemorepellent). Entodiniomorphids were chemoattracted to both glucose and peptides, but chemoattraction to glucose was increased by Snp and wortmannin without effect on chemoattraction to peptides. Rate of fluorescent bead uptake by an Entodinium caudatum culture decreased when beads were added simultaneously with feeding and incubated with wortmannin (statistical interaction). Wortmannin also decreased the proportion of mixed entodiniomorphids consuming beads. Isotrichid protozoa exhibited greater chemotaxis to glucose but, compared with entodiniomorphids, were chemorepelled to peptides. Wortmannin increased chemotaxis by entodiniomorphids but decreased chemotaxis to glucose by isotrichids. Motility assays documented that Snp and wortmannin decreased net swimming speed (distance among 2 points per second) but not total swimming speed (including turns) by entodiniomorphids. Wortmannin decreased both net and total swimming behavior in isotrichids. Results mechanistically explain the isotrichid migratory ecology to rapidly take up newly ingested sugars and subsequent sedimentation back to the ventral reticulorumen. In contrast, entodiniomorphids apparently integrate cellular motility with feeding behavior to consume small particulates and thereby stay associated and pass with the

  17. Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Identifies 8-Hydroxyquinolines as Cell-Active Histone Demethylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Akane; Rose, Nathan R.; Ng, Stanley S.; Quinn, Amy M.; Rai, Ganesha; Mott, Bryan T.; Beswick, Paul; Klose, Robert J.; Oppermann, Udo; Jadhav, Ajit; Heightman, Tom D.; Maloney, David J.; Schofield, Christopher J.; Simeonov, Anton

    2010-01-01

    Background Small molecule modulators of epigenetic processes are currently sought as basic probes for biochemical mechanisms, and as starting points for development of therapeutic agents. Nε-Methylation of lysine residues on histone tails is one of a number of post-translational modifications that together enable transcriptional regulation. Histone lysine demethylases antagonize the action of histone methyltransferases in a site- and methylation state-specific manner. Nε-Methyllysine demethylases that use 2-oxoglutarate as co-factor are associated with diverse human diseases, including cancer, inflammation and X-linked mental retardation; they are proposed as targets for the therapeutic modulation of transcription. There are few reports on the identification of templates that are amenable to development as potent inhibitors in vivo and large diverse collections have yet to be exploited for the discovery of demethylase inhibitors. Principal Findings High-throughput screening of a ∼236,000-member collection of diverse molecules arrayed as dilution series was used to identify inhibitors of the JMJD2 (KDM4) family of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent histone demethylases. Initial screening hits were prioritized by a combination of cheminformatics, counterscreening using a coupled assay enzyme, and orthogonal confirmatory detection of inhibition by mass spectrometric assays. Follow-up studies were carried out on one of the series identified, 8-hydroxyquinolines, which were shown by crystallographic analyses to inhibit by binding to the active site Fe(II) and to modulate demethylation at the H3K9 locus in a cell-based assay. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that diverse compound screening can yield novel inhibitors of 2OG dependent histone demethylases and provide starting points for the development of potent and selective agents to interrogate epigenetic regulation. PMID:21124847

  18. Collagen protein abnormalities produced by site-directed mutagenesis of the pro alpha 1(I) gene.

    PubMed

    Bateman, J F; Mascara, T; Cole, W G; Stacey, A; Jaenisch, R

    1989-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of collagen genes offers a powerful new approach for studying structure-function relationships. The construction of engineered mutant collagen genes coding for glycine substitutions and their expression giving rise to the osteogenesis imperfecta type II phenotype in cells and transgenic mice has recently been achieved. This paper further defines the molecular abnormalities of collagen and bone pathology resulting from the expression of the mutant genes.

  19. Metals affect the structure and activity of human plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. II. Binding affinity and conformational changes

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lawrence C; Goswami, Sumit; Peterson, Cynthia B

    2011-01-01

    Human plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) is a serine protease inhibitor with a metastable active conformation. The lifespan of the active form of PAI-1 is modulated via interaction with the plasma protein, vitronectin, and various metal ions. These metal ions fall into two categories: Type I metals, including calcium, magnesium, and manganese, stabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, whereas Type II metals, including cobalt, copper, and nickel, destabilize PAI-1 in the absence of vitronectin, but stabilize PAI-1 in its presence. To provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the unusual modulation of PAI-1 structure and activity, the binding characteristics and conformational effects of these two types of metals were further evaluated. Steady-state binding measurements using surface plasmon resonance indicated that both active and latent PAI-1 exhibit a dissociation constant in the low micromolar range for binding to immobilized nickel. Stopped-flow measurements of approach-to-equilibrium changes in intrinsic protein fluorescence indicated that the Type I and Type II metals bind in different modes that induce distinct conformational effects on PAI-1. Changes in the observed rate constants with varying concentrations of metal allowed accurate determination of binding affinities for cobalt, nickel, and copper, yielding dissociation constants of ∼40, 30, and 0.09 μM, respectively. Competition experiments that tested effects on PAI-1 stability were consistent with these measurements of affinity and indicate that copper binds tightly to PAI-1. PMID:21280128

  20. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development, FY 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2008-02-20

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2007. Twenty-nine new projects were selected for funding this year, and eight projects started in FY 2006 were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.67 million, for an average per-project cost of $153 thousand. An external audit conducted in September 2007 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: programmatic adoption of 8 SDRD-developed technologies; the filing of 9 invention disclosures for innovation evolving from SDRD projects; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD Symposium that was broadly attended by Nevada Test Site (NTS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), LDRD, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2007 projects; and the successful completion of 37 R&D projects, as presented in this report. In response to a company-wide call, authors throughout the NTS complex submitted 182 proposals for FY 2007 SDRD projects. The SDRD program has seen a dramatic increase in the yearly total of submitted proposals--from 69 in FY 2002 to 182 this year--while the number of projects funded has actually decreased from a program high of 57 in FY 2004. The overall effect of this trend has helped ensure an increasingly competitive program that benefited from a broader set of innovative ideas, making project selection both challenging and rewarding. Proposals were evaluated for technical merit, including such factors as innovation, probability of success, potential benefit, and mission applicability. Authors and reviewers benefited from the use of a shortfalls list entitled the 'NTS Technology Needs Assessment' that was compiled from NTS, National Weapons Laboratory (NWL), and

  1. The CDK4/6 inhibitor LY2835219 has potent activity in combination with mTOR inhibitor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Jiae; Bae, Yeon-Hee; Sun, Jong-Mu; Lee, Se-hoon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Keunchil; Ahn, Myung-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Deletion of CDKN2A (p16) or amplification of CCND1 (cyclin D1) occurs commonly in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and induces sustained cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 activation. Here, we report the antiproliferative activity of LY2835219, a selective CDK4/6 inhibitor through inhibition of CDK4/6-dependent Ser780 phosphorylation in retinoblastoma (RB) and induction of cell cycle arrest in HNSCC cells. In addition, we demonstrated the antitumor effects of HNSCC xenografts to LY2835219 in vivo. Given the limited effect in HNSCC as a single-agent treatment with LY2835219, a combinational strategy is required to enhance antitumor activity. At the molecular level, we found that LY2835219 inhibited activation of AKT and ERK, but not mTOR. The combination of LY2835219 with mTOR inhibitor was found to be more effective than either drug alone in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggest that a combinational treatment with LY2835219 and mTOR inhibitor is a promising therapeutic approach for HNSCC. PMID:26909611

  2. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of α-keto amides as enterovirus 71 3C protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Debin; Ma, Yuying; Zhang, Rui; Nie, Quandeng; Cui, Zhengjie; Wang, Yaxin; Shang, Luqing; Yin, Zheng

    2016-04-01

    α-Keto amide derivatives as enterovirus 71 (EV71) 3C protease (3C(pro)) inhibitors have been synthesized and assayed for their biochemical and antiviral activities. structure-activity relationship (SAR) study indicated that small moieties were primarily tolerated at P1' and the introduction of para-fluoro benzyl at P2 notably improved the potency of inhibitor. Inhibitors 8v, 8w and 8x exhibited satisfactory activity (IC50=1.32±0.26μM, 1.88±0.35μM and 1.52±0.31μM, respectively) and favorable CC50 values (CC50>100μM). α-Keto amide may represent a good choice as a warhead for EV71 3C(pro) inhibitor.

  3. Structure of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase with the Inhibitor -thujaplicinol Bound at the RNase H Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Himmel, D.; Maegley, K; Pauly, T; Bauman, J; Das, K; Dharia, C; Clark, Jr., A; Ryan, K; Hickey, M; et al.

    2009-01-01

    Novel inhibitors are needed to counteract the rapid emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) has both DNA polymerase and RNase H (RNH) enzymatic activities, but approved drugs that inhibit RT target the polymerase. Inhibitors that act against new targets, such as RNH, should be effective against all of the current drug-resistant variants. Here, we present 2.80 {angstrom} and 2.04 {angstrom} resolution crystal structures of an RNH inhibitor, {beta}-thujaplicinol, bound at the RNH active site of both HIV-1 RT and an isolated RNH domain. {beta}-thujaplicinol chelates two divalent metal ions at the RNH active site. We provide biochemical evidence that {beta}-thujaplicinol is a slow-binding RNH inhibitor with noncompetitive kinetics and suggest that it forms a tropylium ion that interacts favorably with RT and the RNA:DNA substrate.

  4. Nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors in cancer: mechanisms involved in anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Koltai, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To review the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors (PIs) based on evidences reported in the published literature. Methods: We extensively reviewed the literature concerning nelfinavir (NFV) as an off target anti-cancer drug and other PIs. A classification of PIs based on anti-cancer mode of action was proposed. Controversies regarding nelfinavir mode of action were also addressed. Conclusions: The two main mechanisms involved in anti-cancer activity are endoplasmic reticulum stress-unfolded protein response pathway and Akt inhibition. However there are many other effects, partially dependent and independent of those mentioned, that may be useful in cancer treatment, including MMP-9 and MMP-2 inhibition, down-regulation of CDK-2, VEGF, bFGF, NF-kB, STAT-3, HIF-1 alfa, IGF, EGFR, survivin, BCRP, androgen receptor, proteasome, fatty acid synthase (FAS), decrease in cellular ATP concentration and upregulation of TRAIL receptor DR5, Bax, increased radiosensitivity, and autophagy. The end result of all these effects is slower growth, decreased angiogenesis, decreased invasion and increased apoptosis, which means reduced proliferation and increased cancer cells death. PIs may be classified according to their anticancer activity at clinically achievable doses, in AKT inhibitors, ER stressors and Akt inhibitors/ER stressors. Beyond the phase I trials that have been recently completed, adequately powered and well-designed clinical trials are needed in the various cancer type settings, and specific trials where NFV is tested in association with other known anti-cancer pharmaceuticals should be sought, in order to find an appropriate place for NFV in cancer treatment. The analysis of controversies on the molecular mechanisms of NFV hints to the possibility that NFV works in a different way in tumor cells and in hepatocytes and adipocytes. PMID:26097685

  5. The role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in gastric mucosal protection

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Susan; Steele, Islay; Lyons, Suzanne; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Dimaline, Rod; Pritchard, D. Mark; Varro, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Gastric mucosal health is maintained in response to potentially damaging luminal factors. Aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) disrupt protective mechanisms leading to bleeding and ulceration. The plasminogen activator system has been implicated in fibrinolysis following gastric ulceration, and an inhibitor of this system, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, is expressed in gastric epithelial cells. In Helicobacter pylori-negative patients with normal gastric histology taking aspirin or NSAIDs, we found elevated gastric PAI-1 mRNA abundance compared with controls; the increase in patients on aspirin was independent of whether they were also taking proton pump inhibitors. In the same patients, aspirin tended to lower urokinase plasminogen activator mRNA. Immunohistochemistry indicated PAI-1 localization to epithelial cells. In a model system using MKN45 or AGS-GR cells transfected with a PAI-1 promoter-luciferase reporter construct, we found no evidence for upregulation of PAI-1 expression by indomethacin, and, in fact, cyclooxygenase products such as PGE2 and PGI2 weakly stimulated expression. Increased gastric PAI-1 mRNA was also found in mice following gavage with ethanol or indomethacin, but plasma PAI-1 was unaffected. In PAI-1−/− mice, gastric hemorrhagic lesions in response to ethanol or indomethacin were increased compared with C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, in PAI-1-H/Kβ mice in which PAI-1 is overexpressed in parietal cells, there were decreased lesions in response to ethanol and indomethacin. Thus, PAI-1 expression is increased in gastric epithelial cells in response to mucosal irritants such as aspirin and NSAIDs probably via an indirect mechanism, and PAI-1 acts as a local autoregulator to minimize mucosal damage. PMID:23494120

  6. Application of cultured human mast cells (CHMC) for the design and structure-activity relationship of IgE-mediated mast cell activation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Argade, Ankush; Bhamidipati, Somasekhar; Li, Hui; Carroll, David; Clough, Jeffrey; Keim, Holger; Sylvain, Catherine; Rossi, Alexander B; Coquilla, Christina; Issakani, Sarkiz D; Masuda, Esteban S; Payan, Donald G; Singh, Rajinder

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the optimization of small molecule inhibitors of human mast cell degranulation via anti-IgE-mediated tryptase release following cross-linking and activation of IgE-loaded FcεR1 receptors. The compounds are selective upstream inhibitors of FcεR1-dependent human mast cell degranulation and proved to be devoid of activity in downstream ionomycin mediated degranulation. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) leading to compound 26 is outlined.

  7. Enhancement of oxidative stability of the subtilisin nattokinase by site-directed mutagenesis expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Weng, MeiZhi; Zheng, ZhongLiang; Bao, Wei; Cai, YongJun; Yin, Yan; Zou, GuoLin; Zou, GouLin

    2009-11-01

    Nattokinase (subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with strong fibrinolytic activity and it is a potent cardiovascular drug. In medical and commercial applications, however, it is susceptible to chemical oxidation, and subsequent inactivation or denaturation. Here we show that the oxidative stability of NK was substantially increased by optimizing the amino acid residues Thr(220) and Met(222), which were in the vicinity of the catalytic residue Ser(221) of the enzyme. Two nonoxidative amino acids (Ser and Ala) were introduced at these sites using site-directed mutagenesis. Active enzymes were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli with periplasmic secretion and enzymes were purified to homogeneity. The purified enzymes were analyzed with respect to oxidative stability, kinetic parameters, fibrinolytic activity and thermal stability. M222A mutant was found to have a greatly increased oxidative stability compared with wild-type enzyme and it was resistant to inactivation by more than 1 M H(2)O(2), whereas the wild-type enzyme was inactivated by 0.1 M H(2)O(2) (t(1/2) approximately 11.6 min). The other mutant (T220S) also showed an obvious increase in antioxidative ability. Molecular dynamic simulations on wild-type and T220S mutant proteins suggested that a hydrogen bond was formed between Ser(220) and Asn(155), and the spatial structure of Met(222) was changed compared with the wild-type. The present study demonstrates the feasibility of improving oxidative stability of NK by site-directed mutagenesis and shows successful protein engineering cases to improve stability of NK as a potent therapeutic agent.

  8. Discovery of A-893, A New Cell-Active Benzoxazinone Inhibitor of Lysine Methyltransferase SMYD2

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A lack of useful small molecule tools has precluded thorough interrogation of the biological function of SMYD2, a lysine methyltransferase with known tumor-suppressor substrates. Systematic exploration of the structure–activity relationships of a previously known benzoxazinone compound led to the synthesis of A-893, a potent and selective SMYD2 inhibitor (IC50: 2.8 nM). A cocrystal structure reveals the origin of enhanced potency, and effective suppression of p53K370 methylation is observed in a lung carcinoma (A549) cell line. PMID:26101576

  9. Targets for dioxin: Genes for plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 and interleukin-1. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, T.R.; Guzman, K.; Dold, K.M. ); Greenlee, W.F. )

    1991-10-18

    Dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, TCDD), a widespread environmental contaminant, may elicit its effects by altering gene expression in susceptible cells. Five TCDD-responsive complementary DNA clones were isolated from a human keratinocyte cell line. One of these clones encodes plasminogen activator inhibitor-2, a factor that influences growth and differentiation by regulating proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. Another encodes the cytokine interleukin-1{beta}. Thus, TCDD alters the expression of growth regulator genes and has effects similar to those of other tumor-promoting agents that affect both inflammation and differentiation.

  10. The c-myc-regulated gene mrl encodes plasminogen activator inhibitor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, G C; Diamond, L E; Dahl, D; Cole, M D

    1990-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the c-myc-regulated gene mrl (G. C. Prendergast and M. D. Cole, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:124-134, 1989) reveals that it encodes plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a regulator of extracellular proteolysis. Comparison of the human and mouse PAI-1 promoters and cDNA 3' noncoding regions revealed several highly conserved sequence domains, potential targets for c-myc and other factors influencing PAI-1 expression. We discuss possible roles for PAI-1 in normal and neoplastic cell growth control. PMID:2406566

  11. Structure-Based Inhibitors Exhibit Differential Activities against Helicobacter pylori and Escherichia coli Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthases

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chih-Jung; Guo, Rey-Ting; Lu, I-Lin; Liu, Hun-Ge; Wu, Su-Ying; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Liang, Po-Huang

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and causes diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulcers, and stomach cancer. Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UPPS), which catalyzes consecutive condensation reactions of farnesyl pyrophosphate with eight isopentenyl pyrophosphate to form lipid carrier for bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis, represents a potential target for developing new antibiotics. In this study, we solved the crystal structure of H. pylori UPPS and performed virtual screening of inhibitors from a library of 58,635 compounds. Two hits were found to exhibit differential activities against Helicobacter pylori and Escherichia coli UPPS, giving the possibility of developing antibiotics specially targeting pathogenic H. pylori without killing the intestinal E. coli. PMID:18382620

  12. Thiol activated prodrugs of sulfur dioxide (SO2) as MRSA inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pardeshi, Kundansingh A; Malwal, Satish R; Banerjee, Ankita; Lahiri, Surobhi; Rangarajan, Radha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2015-07-01

    Drug resistant infections are becoming common worldwide and new strategies for drug development are necessary. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of 2,4-dinitrophenylsulfonamides, which are donors of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a reactive sulfur species, as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) inhibitors. N-(3-Methoxyphenyl)-2,4-dinitro-N-(prop-2-yn-1-yl)benzenesulfonamide (5e) was found to have excellent in vitro MRSA inhibitory potency. This compound is cell permeable and treatment of MRSA cells with 5e depleted intracellular thiols and enhanced oxidative species both results consistent with a mechanism involving thiol activation to produce SO2. PMID:25981687

  13. Contact system activation in patients with HAE and normal C1 inhibitor function.

    PubMed

    Ghannam, Arije; Defendi, Federica; Charignon, Delphine; Csopaki, Françoise; Favier, Bertrand; Habib, Mohammed; Cichon, Sven; Drouet, Christian

    2013-11-01

    In addition to hereditary angioedema (HAE) with C1 inhibitor (C1INH) deficiency, a type of HAE with dominant inheritance and normal C1INH function (HAE with normal C1INH) has been described. This relates to contact phase activation with exaggerated kinin formation, and mutations in the coagulation factor XII gene have been identified in some affected families, but the cause of the disease has remained elusive in a majority of families. Several triggering factors are responsible for developing kinin forming system, with participation of endothelium and mast cell component. Angioedema conditions meet the accumulation of kinins with failed kinin catabolism. PMID:24176216

  14. Global feedback control of Turing patterns in network-organized activator-inhibitor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hata, S.; Nakao, H.; Mikhailov, A. S.

    2012-06-01

    Results of the first systematic study on feedback control of nonequilibrium pattern formation in networks are reported. Effects of global feedback control on Turing patterns in network-organized activator-inhibitor system have been investigated. The feedback signal was introduced into one of the parameters of the system and was proportional to the amplitude of the developing Turing pattern. Without the control, the Turing instability corresponded to a subcritical bifurcation and hysteresis effects were observed. Sufficiently strong feedback control rendered, however, the bifurcation supercritical and eliminated the hysteresis effects.

  15. PAK4 kinase activity and somatic mutation promote carcinoma cell motility and influence inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Whale, Andrew D.; Dart, Anna; Holt, Mark; Jones, Gareth E.; Wells, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor (c-Met) are associated with cancer cell motility and invasiveness. p21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4), a potential therapeutic target, is recruited to and activated by c-Met. In response, PAK4 phosphorylates LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1) in an HGF-dependent manner in metastatic prostate carcinoma cells. PAK4 overexpression is known to induce increased cell migration speed but the requirement for kinase activity has not been established. We have used a panel of PAK4 truncations and mutations in a combination of over-expression and RNAi rescue experiments to determine the requirement for PAK4 kinase activity during carcinoma cell motility downstream of HGF. We find that neither the kinase domain alone nor a PAK4 mutant unable to bind Cdc42 is able to fully rescue cell motility in a PAK4-deficient background. Nevertheless, we find that PAK4 kinase activity and associated LIMK1 activity are essential for carcinoma cell motility, highlighting PAK4 as a potential anti-metastatic therapeutic target. We also show here that overexpression of PAK4 harboring a somatic mutation, E329K, increased the HGF-driven motility of metastatic prostate carcinoma cells. E329 lies within the G-loop region of the kinase. Our data suggest E329K mutation leads to a modest increase in kinase activity conferring resistance to competitive ATP inhibitors in addition to promoting cell migration. The existence of such a mutation may have implications for the development of PAK4-specific competitive ATP inhibitors should PAK4 be further explored for clinical inhibition. PMID:22689056

  16. Cholesterol synthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses transcriptional activity of human estrogen and androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Mafuvadze, Benford; Liang, Yayun; Hyder, Salman M

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer cells express enzymes that convert cholesterol, the synthetic precursor of steroid hormones, into estrogens and androgens, which then drive breast cancer cell proliferation. In the present study, we sought to determine whether oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC), an enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, may be targeted to suppress progression of breast cancer cells. In previous studies, we showed that the OSC inhibitor RO 48-8071 (RO) may be a ligand which could potentially be used to control the progression of estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast cancer cells. Herein, we showed, by real-time PCR analysis of mRNA from human breast cancer biopsies, no significant differences in OSC expression at various stages of disease, or between tumor and normal mammary cells. Since the growth of hormone-responsive tumors is ERα-dependent, we conducted experiments to determine whether RO affects ERα. Using mammalian cells engineered to express human ERα or ERβ protein, together with an ER-responsive luciferase promoter, we found that RO dose-dependently inhibited 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced ERα responsive luciferase activity (IC50 value, ~10 µM), under conditions that were non-toxic to the cells. RO was less effective against ERβ-induced luciferase activity. Androgen receptor (AR) mediated transcriptional activity was also reduced by RO. Notably, while ERα activity was reduced by atorvastatin, the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor did not influence AR activity, showing that RO possesses broader antitumor properties. Treatment of human BT-474 breast cancer cells with RO reduced levels of estrogen-induced PR protein, confirming that RO blocks ERα activity in tumor cells. Our findings demonstrate that an important means by which RO suppresses hormone-dependent growth of breast cancer cells is through its ability to arrest the biological activity of ERα. This warrants further investigation of RO as a potential therapeutic agent for use against hormone

  17. PGE2 reduces MMP-14 and increases plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Kamal M; Clevenger, Margarette H; Szandzik, David L; Peterson, Edward; Harding, Pamela

    2014-10-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is elevated during cardiac injury and we have previously shown that mice lacking the PGE2 EP4 receptor display dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with increased expression of the membrane type matrix metalloproteinase, MMP-14. We thus hypothesized that PGE2 regulates expression of MMP-14 and also affects fibroblast migration. Primary cultures of neonatal rat ventricular fibroblasts (NVFs) were used to test the effects of PGE2. Gene and protein expression was assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blot, MMP activity was determined by zymography and migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. PGE2 reduced expression of MMP-14 and these effects were antagonized by an EP4 antagonist. An EP4 agonist mimicked the effect of PGE2. PGE2 also increased mRNA and protein levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), an inhibitor of MMP activation. However, PGE2-stimulation of PAI-1 was mediated by the EP1/EP3 receptor and not EP4. Migration of NVF was assessed by motility in a transwell system. Treatment of NVFs with PGE2 reduced the number of cells migrating toward 10% FCS. Treatment with the EP2 agonist also reduced migration but did not affect MMP-14 expression or PAI-1. Our results suggest that PGE2 utilizes different receptors and mechanisms to ultimately decrease MMP expression and NVF migration.

  18. Release of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 from human astrocytes is regulated by intracellular ceramide.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Soeda, S; Oda, M; Ochiai, T; Kihara, T; Ono, N; Shimeno, H

    2000-12-15

    The present study underscores a regulatory role of intracellular ceramide in astrocytes for the release of an extracellular serine protease, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), and its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Treatment of cultured human astrocytes with N-acetylsphingosine, a cell-permeable short-chain ceramide analogue or daunorubicin that could increase intracellular ceramide via activation of ceramide synthase or sphingomyelin hydrolysis increased the release of t-PA and conversely decreased the PAI-1 release. Interestingly, treatment of the astrocytes with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha also increased the intracellular ceramide levels but caused the elevation of PAI-1 release without altering the t-PA release. These data suggest that the generation of ceramide in astrocytes is linked at least with the regulation of PAI-1 release. We also demonstrate that the suppression of PAI-1 release with daunorubicin accelerates the cell death of neuronally differentiated PC12 cells and suggest an antiapoptotic role of PAI-1 in the nervous system.

  19. Successful silencing of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in human vascular endothelial cells using small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Hecke, Anneke; Brooks, Hilary; Meryet-Figuière, Matthieu; Minne, Stephanie; Konstantinides, Stavros; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Lebleu, Bernard; Schäfer, Katrin

    2006-05-01

    Clinical as well as experimental evidence suggests that vascular overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, the primary physiological inhibitor of both urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator, may be involved in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We investigated the feasibility, efficacy and functional effects of PAI-1 gene silencing in human vascular endothelial cells using small interfering RNA. Double-stranded 21 bp-RNA molecules targeted at sequences within the human PAI-1 gene were constructed. Successful siRNA transfection of HUVEC was confirmed using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. One of five candidate siRNA sequences reduced PAI-1 mRNA and protein in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Suppression of PAI-1 mRNA was detected up to 72 hours after transfection. Moreover, siRNA treatment reduced the activity of PAI-1 released from HUVEC, and prevented the oxLDL- or LPS-induced upregulation of PAI-1 secretion. Importantly, siRNA treatment did not affect the expression of other endothelial-cell markers. Moreover, downregulation of PAI-1 significantly enhanced the ability of endothelial cells to adhere to vitronectin, and this effect could be reversed upon addition of recombinant PAI-1. SiRNA-mediated reduction of PAI-1 expression may be a promising strategy for dissecting the effects of PAI-1 on vascular homeostasis.

  20. Multiple CDK inhibitor dinaciclib suppresses neuroblastoma growth via inhibiting CDK2 and CDK9 activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenghu; Wang, Zhenyu; Pang, Jonathan C.; Yu, Yang; Bieerkehazhi, Shayahati; Lu, Jiaxiong; Hu, Ting; Zhao, Yanling; Xu, Xin; Zhang, Hong; Yi, Joanna S.; Liu, Shangfeng; Yang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, is responsible for approximately 15% of cancer-related mortality in children. Aberrant activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) has been shown to contribute to tumor cell progression in many cancers including NB. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors of CDKs comprise a strategic option in cancer therapy. Here we show that a novel multiple-CDK inhibitor, dinaciclib (SCH727965, MK-7965), exhibits potent anti-proliferative effects on a panel of NB cell lines by blocking the activity of CDK2 and CDK9. Dinaciclib also significantly sensitized NB cell lines to the treatment of chemotherapeutic agents such as doxorubicin (Dox) and etoposide (VP-16). Furthermore, dinaciclib revealed in vivo antitumor efficacy in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model of two NB cell lines and blocked tumor development in the TH-MYCN transgenic NB mouse model. Taken together, this study suggests that CDK2 and CDK9 are potential therapeutic targets in NB and that abrogating CDK2 and CDK9 activity by small molecules like dinaciclib is a promising strategy and a treatment option for NB patients. PMID:27378523

  1. CES1 genetic variation affects the activation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Wang, G; Shi, J; Aa, J; Comas, R; Liang, Y; Zhu, H-J

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effect of carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) genetic variation on the activation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) prodrugs. In vitro incubation study of human liver, intestine and kidney s9 fractions demonstrated that the ACEI prodrugs enalapril, ramipril, perindopril, moexipril and fosinopril are selectively activated by CES1 in the liver. The impact of CES1/CES1VAR and CES1P1/CES1P1VAR genotypes and diplotypes on CES1 expression and activity on enalapril activation was investigated in 102 normal human liver samples. Neither the genotypes nor the diplotypes affected hepatic CES1 expression and activity. Moreover, among several CES1 nonsynonymous variants studied in transfected cell lines, the G143E (rs71647871) was a loss-of-function variant for the activation of all ACEIs tested. The CES1 activity on enalapril activation in human livers with the 143G/E genotype was approximately one-third of that carrying the 143G/G. Thus, some functional CES1 genetic variants (for example, G143E) may impair ACEI activation, and consequently affect therapeutic outcomes of ACEI prodrugs. PMID:26076923

  2. Continuous method to determine the trypsin inhibitor activity in soybean flour.

    PubMed

    Coscueta, Ezequiel R; Pintado, Manuela E; Picó, Guillermo A; Knobel, Gastón; Boschetti, Carlos E; Malpiedi, Luciana Pellegrini; Nerli, Bibiana B

    2017-01-01

    The determination of trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity is of importance to evaluate the nutritional value of soybean flours. An analytical method, which involves a continuous spectrophotometric rate determination for trypsin activity against the substrate N-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide, is proposed as an alternative to the standard discontinuous assay. Stopping the reaction with acetic acid and a centrifugation/filtration step to decrease turbidity are not required, thus reducing costs and sample preparation time. The TI activity of different flour samples, determined by both assays, demonstrated to be statistically comparable, irrespective of the TI concentration level. The coefficients of variation of the novel method did not exceed 8% at any concentration level. The curves of progress reaction showed a non-linear behavior in samples without TI. A reduction of incubation time from 10min to 2min increased the method sensitivity and extended its linear range. A more economical, faster and simpler assay was developed. PMID:27507460

  3. Construction of a plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 variant without measurable affinity to vitronectin but otherwise normal.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Durand, Michelle K V; Skeldal, Sune; Dupont, Daniel M; Bødker, Julie S; Wind, Troels; Andreasen, Peter A

    2004-01-01

    Vitronectin (VN) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) have important functional interactions: VN stabilises the protease inhibitory activity of PAI-1 and PAI-1 inhibits binding of adhesion receptors to VN. Having previously mapped the PAI-1 binding area for VN, we have now constructed a PAI-1 variant, R103A-M112A-Q125A, without measurable affinity to VN, but with full protease inhibitory activity and endocytosis receptor binding. As a tool for evaluating the physiological and pathophysiological functions of the PAI-1-VN interaction, our new variant is far superior to the previously widely used PAI-1 variant Q125K, which we have found possesses an only about 10-fold reduced affinity to VN.

  4. Continuous method to determine the trypsin inhibitor activity in soybean flour.

    PubMed

    Coscueta, Ezequiel R; Pintado, Manuela E; Picó, Guillermo A; Knobel, Gastón; Boschetti, Carlos E; Malpiedi, Luciana Pellegrini; Nerli, Bibiana B

    2017-01-01

    The determination of trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity is of importance to evaluate the nutritional value of soybean flours. An analytical method, which involves a continuous spectrophotometric rate determination for trypsin activity against the substrate N-benzoyl-DL-arginine p-nitroanilide, is proposed as an alternative to the standard discontinuous assay. Stopping the reaction with acetic acid and a centrifugation/filtration step to decrease turbidity are not required, thus reducing costs and sample preparation time. The TI activity of different flour samples, determined by both assays, demonstrated to be statistically comparable, irrespective of the TI concentration level. The coefficients of variation of the novel method did not exceed 8% at any concentration level. The curves of progress reaction showed a non-linear behavior in samples without TI. A reduction of incubation time from 10min to 2min increased the method sensitivity and extended its linear range. A more economical, faster and simpler assay was developed.

  5. Front motion and localized states in an asymmetric bistable activator-inhibitor system with saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelis, Arik; Garfinkel, Alan

    2008-03-01

    We study the spatiotemporal properties of coherent states (peaks, holes, and fronts) in a bistable activator-inhibitor system that exhibits biochemical saturated autocatalysis, and in which fronts do not preserve spatial parity symmetry. Using the Gierer-Meinhardt prototype model, we find the conditions in which two distinct pinning regions are formed. The first pinning type is known in the context of variational systems while the second is structurally different due to the presence of a heteroclinic bifurcation between two uniform states. The bifurcation also separates the parameter regions of counterpropagating fronts, leading in turn to the growth or contraction of activator domains. These phenomena expand the range of pattern formation theory and its biomedical applications: activator domain retraction suggests potential therapeutic strategies for patterned pathologies, such as cardiovascular calcification.

  6. CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technique and its application in site-directed genome modification of animals.

    PubMed

    Jinwei, Zhou; Qipin, Xu; Jing, Yao; Shumin, Yu; Suizhong, Cao

    2015-10-01

    CRISPR/Cas system, which uses CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) to guide Cas nuclease to silence invading nucleic acids, is self-defense system against exogenous virus or plasmid in bacteria and archaea. Through molecular modification, the typeⅡCRISPR/Cas system has become a highly efficient site-directed genome editing technique, which is simpler than zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) and transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALENs) and easier to be designed and applied. In this review, we summarize the evolutionary history of CRISPR/Cas9 system, the working principle and modification process of type Ⅱ CRISPR/Cas and its application in animal genome modification. We also analyze the existing problems and improvement program of the CRISPR/Cas9 system as well as its application prospect combined with successful cases, which may provide innovative perspectives on improving animal traits and establishing animal models of human diseases.

  7. Role of cysteine residues in ribonuclease H from Escherichia coli. Site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification.

    PubMed Central

    Kanaya, S; Kimura, S; Katsuda, C; Ikehara, M

    1990-01-01

    The role of the three cysteine residues at positions 13, 63 and 133 in Escherichia coli RNAase H, an enzyme that is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide [Berkower, Leis & Hurwitz (1973) J. Biol. Chem. 248, 5914-5921], was examined by using both site-directed mutagenesis and chemical modification. Novel aspects that were found are as follows. First, none of the cysteine residues is required for activity. Secondly, chemical modification of either Cys-13 or Cys-133 with thiol-blocking reagents inactivates the enzyme, but that of Cys-63 does not. Thus the sensitivity of E. coli RNAase H to N-ethylmaleimide arises not from blocking of the thiol group but from steric hindrance by the modifying group incorporated at either Cys-13 or Cys-133. Images Fig. 2. PMID:2171503

  8. Site-Directed RNA Editing in Vivo Can Be Triggered by the Light-Driven Assembly of an Artificial Riboprotein

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Site-directed RNA editing allows for the manipulation of RNA and protein function by reprogramming genetic information at the RNA level. For this we assemble artificial RNA-guided editases and demonstrate their transcript repair activity in cells and in developing embryos of the annelid Platynereis dumerilii. A hallmark of our assembly strategy is the covalent attachment of guideRNA and editing enzyme by applying the SNAP-tag technology, a process that we demonstrate here to be readily triggered by light in vitro, in mammalian cell culture, and also in P. dumerilii. Lacking both sophisticated chemistry and extensive genetic engineering, this technology provides a convenient route for the light-dependent switching of protein isoforms. The presented strategy may also serve as a blue-print for the engineering of addressable machineries that apply tailored nucleic acid analogues to manipulate RNA or DNA site-specifically in living organisms. PMID:26594902

  9. Regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 expression in endothelial cells with exposure to metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Min; Mo, Yiqun; Wan, Rong; Chien, Sufan; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Qunwei

    2010-05-19

    Recent studies demonstrated that exposure to nanoparticles could enhance the adhesion of endothelial cells and modify the membrane structure of vascular endothelium. The endothelium plays an important role in the regulation of fibrinolysis, and imbalance of the fibrinolysis system potential contributes to the development of thrombosis. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is the most potent endogenous inhibitor of fibrinolysis and is involved in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the alteration of PAI-1 expression in mouse pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (MPMVEC) exposed to the metal nanoparticles that are known to be reactive, and the potential underlying mechanisms. We compared the alteration of PAI-1 expression in MPMVEC exposed to non-toxic doses of nano-size copper (II) oxide (Nano-CuO) and nano-size titanium dioxide (Nano-TiO(2)). Our results showed that Nano-CuO caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in PAI-1 expression. Moreover, exposure of MPMVEC to Nano-CuO caused reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation that was abolished by pre-treatment of cells with ROS scavengers or inhibitors, DPI, NAC and catalase. Exposure of MPMVEC to Nano-CuO also caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in p38 phosphorylation by Western blot. These effects were significantly attenuated when MPMVEC were pre-treated with DPI, NAC and catalase. To further investigate the role of p38 phosphorylation in Nano-CuO-induced PAI-1 overexpression, the p38 inhibitor, SB203580, was used to pre-treat cells prior to Nano-CuO exposure. We found that Nano-CuO-induced overexpression of PAI-1 was attenuated by p38 inhibitor pre-treatment. However, Nano-TiO(2) did not show the same results. Our results suggest that Nano-CuO caused up-regulation of PAI-1 in endothelial cells is mediated by p38 phosphorylation due to oxidative stress. These findings have important implications for understanding the potential health

  10. Activation of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) [alpha]-amylase inhibitor requires proteolytic processing of the proprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Pueyo, J.J.; Hunt, D.C.; Chrispeels, M.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain a plant defense protein that inhibits the [alpha]-amylases of mammals and insects. This [alpha]-amylase inhibitor ([alpha]Al) is synthesized as a proprotein on the endoplasmic reticulum and is proteolytically processed after arrival in the protein storage vacuoles to polypeptides of relative molecular weight (M[sub r]) 15,000 to 18,000. The authors report two types of evidence that proteolytic processing is linked to activation of the inhibitory activity. First, by surveying seed extracts of wild accessions of P. vulgaris and other species in the genus Phaseolus, they found that antibodies to [alpha]Al recognize large (M[sub r] 30,000-35,000) polypeptides as well as typical [alpha]Al processing products (M[sub r] 15,000-18,000). [alpha]Al activity was found in all extracts that had the typical [alpha]Al processed polypeptides, but was absent from seed extracts that lacked such polypeptides. Second, they made a mutant [alpha]Al in which asparagine-77 is changed to aspartic acid-77. This mutation slows down the proteolytic processing of pro-[alpha]Al when the gene is expressed in tobacco. When pro-[alpha]Al was separated from mature [alpha]Al by gel filtration, pro-[alpha]Al was found not to have [alpha]-amylase inhibitory activity. The authors interpret these results to mean that formation of the active inhibitor is causally related to proteolytic processing of the proprotein. They suggest that the polypeptide cleavage removes a conformation constraint on the precursor to produce the biochemically active molecule. 43 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, fibroblast apoptosis resistance, and aging-related susceptibility to lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Tan; Akhter, Hasina; Jiang, Chunsun; MacEwen, Mark; Ding, Qiang; Antony, Veena; Thannickal, Victor John; Liu, Rui-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal lung disorder with unknown cause and no effective treatment. The incidence of and mortality from IPF increase with age, suggesting that advanced age is a major risk factor for IPF. The mechanism underlying the increased susceptibility of the elderly to IPF, however, is unknown. In this study, we show for the first time that the protein level of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a protease inhibitor which plays an essential role in the control of fibrinolysis, was significantly increased with age in mouse lung homogenate and lung fibroblasts. Upon bleomycin challenge, old mice experienced augmented PAI-1 induction and lung fibrosis as compared to young mice. Most interestingly, we show that fewer (myo)fibroblasts underwent apoptosis and more (myo)fibroblasts with increased level of PAI-1 accumulated in the lung of old than in young mice after bleomycin challenge. In vitro studies further demonstrate that fibroblasts isolated from lungs of old mice were resistant to H2O2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis and had augmented fibrotic responses to TGF-β1, compared to fibroblasts isolated from young mice. Inhibition of PAI-1 activity with a PAI-1 inhibitor, on the other hand, eliminated the aging-related apoptosis resistance and TGF-β1 sensitivity in isolated fibroblasts. Moreover, we show that knocking down PAI-1 in human lung fibroblasts with PAI-1 siRNA significantly increased their sensitivity to apoptosis and inhibited their responses to TGF-β1. Together, the results suggest that increased PAI-1 expression may underlie the aging-related sensitivity to lung fibrosis in part by protecting fibroblasts from apoptosis.

  12. Identifying a selective substrate and inhibitor pair for the evaluation of CYP2J2 activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Caroline A; Jones, J P; Katayama, Jonathan; Kaspera, Rüdiger; Jiang, Ying; Freiwald, Sascha; Smith, Evan; Walker, Gregory S; Totah, Rheem A

    2012-05-01

    CYP2J2, an arachidonic acid epoxygenase, is recognized for its role in the first-pass metabolism of astemizole and ebastine. To fully assess the role of CYP2J2 in drug metabolism, a selective substrate and potent specific chemical inhibitor are essential. In this study, we report amiodarone 4-hydoxylation as a specific CYP2J2-catalyzed reaction with no CYP3A4, or other drug-metabolizing enzyme, involvement. Amiodarone 4-hydroxylation enabled the determination of liver relative activity factor and intersystem extrapolation factor for CYP2J2. Amiodarone 4-hydroxylation correlated with astemizole O-demethylation but not with CYP2J2 protein content in a sample of human liver microsomes. To identify a specific CYP2J2 inhibitor, 138 drugs were screened using terfenadine and astemizole as probe substrates with recombinant CYP2J2. Forty-two drugs inhibited CYP2J2 activity by ≥50% at 30 μM, but inhibition was substrate-dependent. Of these, danazol was a potent inhibitor of both hydroxylation of terfenadine (IC(50) = 77 nM) and O-demethylation of astemizole (K(i) = 20 nM), and inhibition was mostly competitive. Danazol inhibited CYP2C9, CYP2C8, and CYP2D6 with IC(50) values of 1.44, 1.95, and 2.74 μM, respectively. Amiodarone or astemizole were included in a seven-probe cocktail for cytochrome P450 (P450) drug-interaction screening potential, and astemizole demonstrated a better profile because it did not appreciably interact with other P450 probes. Thus, danazol, amiodarone, and astemizole will facilitate the ability to determine the metabolic role of CYP2J2 in hepatic and extrahepatic tissues. PMID:22328583

  13. Antitumor Activity of IMC-038525, a Novel Oral Tubulin Polymerization Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tuma, Maria Carolina; Malikzay, Asra; Ouyang, Xiaohu; Surguladze, David; Fleming, James; Mitelman, Stan; Camara, Margarita; Finnerty, Bridget; Doody, Jacqueline; Chekler, Eugene L P; Kussie, Paul; Tonra, James R

    2010-10-01

    Microtubules are a well-validated target for anticancer therapy. Molecules that bind tubulin affect dynamic instability of microtubules causing mitotic arrest of proliferating cells, leading to cell death and tumor growth inhibition. Natural antitubulin agents such as taxanes and Vinca alkaloids have been successful in the treatment of cancer; however, several limitations have encouraged the development of synthetic small molecule inhibitors of tubulin function. We have previously reported the discovery of two novel chemical series of tubulin polymerization inhibitors, triazoles (Ouyang et al. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of 1,2,4-triazoles as a novel class of potent tubulin polymerization inhibitors. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2005; 15:5154-5159) and oxadiazole derivatives (Ouyang et al. Oxadiazole derivatives as a novel class of antimitotic agents: synthesis, inhibition of tubulin polymerization, and activity in tumor cell lines. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2006; 16:1191-1196). Here, we report on the anticancer effects of a lead oxadiazole derivative in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, IMC-038525 caused mitotic arrest at nanomolar concentrations in epidermoid carcinoma and breast tumor cells, including multidrug-resistant cells. In vivo, IMC-038525 had a desirable pharmacokinetic profile with sustained plasma levels after oral dosing. IMC-038525 reduced subcutaneous xenograft tumor growth with significantly greater efficacy than the taxane paclitaxel. At efficacious doses, IMC-038525 did not cause substantial myelosuppression or peripheral neurotoxicity, as evaluated by neutrophil counts and changes in myelination of the sciatic nerve, respectively. These data indicate that IMC-038525 is a promising candidate for further development as a chemotherapeutic agent.

  14. Identification of Inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exotoxin-S ADP-Ribosyltransferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ana Filipa; Ebrahimi, Mahsa; Saleeb, Michael; Forsberg, Åke; Elofsson, Mikael; Schüler, Herwig

    2016-07-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen associated with drug resistance complications and, as such, an important object for drug discovery efforts. One attractive target for development of therapeutics is the ADP-ribosyltransferase Exotoxin-S (ExoS), an early effector of the type III secretion system that is delivered into host cells to affect their transcription pattern and cytoskeletal dynamics. The purpose of this study was to formulate a real-time assay of purified recombinant ExoS activity for high-throughput application. We characterized the turnover kinetics of the fluorescent dinucleotide 1,N(6)-etheno-NAD+ as co-substrate for ExoS. Further, we found that the toxin relied on any of five tested isoforms of human 14-3-3 to modify vH-Ras and the Rho-family GTPases Rac1, -2, and -3 and RhoC. We then used 14-3-3β-stimulated ExoS modification of vH-Ras to screen a collection of low-molecular-weight compounds selected to target the poly-ADP ribose polymerase family and identified 3-(4-oxo-3,5,6,7-tetrahydro-4H-cyclopenta[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-2-yl)propanoic acid as an ExoS inhibitor with micromolar potency. Thus, we present an optimized method to screen for inhibitors of ExoS activity that is amenable to high-throughput format and an intermediate affinity inhibitor that can serve both as assay control and as a starting point for further development. PMID:26850638

  15. Lectin, hemolysin and protease inhibitors in seed fractions with ovicidal activity against Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Salles, Hévila Oliveira; Braga, Ana Carolina Linhares; Nascimento, Maria Thayana dos Santos Canuto do; Sousa, Ana Márjory Paiva; Lima, Adriano Rodrigues; Vieira, Luiz da Silva; Cavalcante, Antônio Cézar Rocha; Egito, Antonio Silvio do; Andrade, Lúcia Betânia da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive molecules of plant species are promising alternatives for the chemical control of gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants. Extracts of native and exotic seed species from Brazil's semi-arid region were tested in vitro in an egg hatch assay and the bioactivity of their proteins was investigated. Each seed species was subjected to three extractions with three types of solvents. All the seeds showed ovicidal activity, which varied according to the solvents. Higher ovicidal activity was found in the molecule fractions of low molecular weight (<12 kDa) for Albizia lebbeck, Ipomoea asarifolia, Jatropha curcas, Libidibia ferrea, Moringa oleifera and Ricinus communis (P<0.05, Bonferroni test). The two fractions of Crotalaria spectabilis showed the same ovicidal activity (P>0.05, Bonferroni test). Hemagglutinating activity was detected in the fractions of C. spectabilis and M. oleifera fractions, hemolysin activity in the A. lebbeck and M. oleifera fractions, serine protease inhibitory activity in the A. lebbeck, I. asarifolia, J. curcas, M. oleifera and R. communis fractions, cysteine protease inhibitor activity in the M. oleifera fraction, and no protein activity in the L. ferrea fraction. The results of this work reveal new plant species with a potential for use in controlling nematode parasites in goats, thus opening a new field of research involving plant protein molecules with ovicidal properties. PMID:25054490

  16. Synthesis and Structure-activity Relationship of piperidine-derived non-urea soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pecic, Stevan; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Newcomer, Marcia E.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Zhu, Zhengxiang; Rinderspacher, Alison; Deng, Shi-Xian

    2012-01-01

    A series of potent amide non-urea inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is disclosed. The inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase leads to elevated levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), and thus inhibitors of sEH represent one of a novel approach to the development of vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory drugs. Structure-activities studies guided optimization of a lead compound, identified through high-throughput screening, gave rise to sub-nanomolar inhibitors of human sEH with stability in human liver microsomal assay suitable for preclinical development. PMID:23237835

  17. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of piperidine-derived non-urea soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pecic, Stevan; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Newcomer, Marcia E.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Zhu, Zhengxiang; Rinderspacher, Alison; Deng, Shi-Xian

    2013-09-27

    A series of potent amide non-urea inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is disclosed. The inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase leads to elevated levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), and thus inhibitors of sEH represent one of a novel approach to the development of vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory drugs. Structure–activities studies guided optimization of a lead compound, identified through high-throughput screening, gave rise to sub-nanomolar inhibitors of human sEH with stability in human liver microsomal assay suitable for preclinical development.

  18. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) inhibitors: discovery of clinically active inhibitors using high-throughput screening and parallel synthesis paradigms.

    PubMed

    Chang, George; Ruggeri, Roger B; Harwood, H James

    2002-07-01

    The inhibition of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) blocks the hepatic secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and the intestinal secretion of chylomicrons. Consequently, this mechanism provides a highly efficacious pharmacological target for the lowering of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and reduction of postprandial lipemia. The combination of these effects could afford unprecedented benefit in the treatment of atherosclerosis and consequent cardiovascular disease. The promise of this therapeutic target has attracted widespread interest in the pharmaceutical industry. Independent efforts have yielded strikingly similar series of lipophilic amide inhibitors. The way in which the evolutionary paths of distinct inhibitor series have tended to converge through the course of robotics-assisted synthesis efforts is illustrated with candidates from Bristol-Myers Squibb and Pfizer. Hanging in the balance with the exceptional potency of the compounds presented are the potential adverse effects due to blockage of intestinal fat absorption and hepatic lipid secretion. Finding a degree of efficacy that can be safely tolerated defines the dilemma surrounding the advancement of these compounds to clinical practice.

  19. Calcium regulation of tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 release from cultured human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, C; Kaji, T; Sakamoto, M; Kozuka, H; Koizumi, F

    1994-04-15

    Tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) produced by vascular endothelial cells converts plasminogen to plasmin which degrades fibrin. Since t-PA activity is greatly potentiated in the presence of fibrin (1,2), the activator is implicated in intravascular fibrinolysis. On the other hand, endothelial cells also produce plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) (3). The inhibitor associated with vascular endothelium rapidly inhibits t-PA, while that released into the liquid phase has a little anti-activator activity (4). However, clinical studies have shown that elevation of plasma PAI-1 level is a risk factor of thrombosis (5,6). It is thus suggested that the balance between t-PA and PAI-1 is important for the regulation of fibrinolysis. The release of t-PA and PAI-1 from vascular endothelial cells is regulated by physiological factors including thrombin (3,7), histamine (8), vasoconstrictor peptide endothelins (9,10) and cytokines (11). In addition, the regulation of the t-PA release and that of the PAI-1 release are not necessarily coupled. It has been shown that activated protein kinase C and cyclic AMP are involved in the stimulation and suppression, respectively, of the endothelial t-PA and PAI-1 production (12,13). However, the role of intracellular calcium in the regulation of endothelial t-PA and PAI-1 release has remained to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of calcium ionophore A23187 on the release of t-PA antigen (t-PA:Ag) and PAI-1 antigen (PAI-1:Ag) from cultured vascular endothelial cells derived from human umbilical vein.

  20. High Affinity Inha Inhibitors with Activity Against Drug-Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan,T.; Truglio, J.; Boyne, M.; Novichenok, P.; Zhang, X.; Stratton, C.; Li, H.; Kaur, T.; Amin, A.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Novel chemotherapeutics for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are required to combat the spread of tuberculosis, a disease that kills more than 2 million people annually. Using structure-based drug design, we have developed a series of alkyl diphenyl ethers that are uncompetitive inhibitors of InhA, the enoyl reductase enzyme in the MTB fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. The most potent compound has a Ki{prime} value of 1 nM for InhA and MIC{sub 99} values of 2-3 {micro}g mL{sup -1} (6-10 {micro}M) for both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of MTB. Overexpression of InhA in MTB results in a 9-12-fold increase in MIC{sub 99}, consistent with the belief that these compounds target InhA within the cell. In addition, transcriptional response studies reveal that the alkyl diphenyl ethers fail to upregulate a putative efflux pump and aromatic dioxygenase, detoxification mechanisms that are triggered by the lead compound triclosan. These diphenyl ether-based InhA inhibitors do not require activation by the mycobacterial KatG enzyme, thereby circumventing the normal mechanism of resistance to the front line drug isoniazid (INH) and thus accounting for their activity against INH-resistant strains of MTB.

  1. Identification of novel, in vivo active Chk1 inhibitors utilizing structure guided drug design.

    PubMed

    Massey, Andrew J; Stokes, Stephen; Browne, Helen; Foloppe, Nicolas; Fiumana, Andreá; Scrace, Simon; Fallowfield, Mandy; Bedford, Simon; Webb, Paul; Baker, Lisa; Christie, Mark; Drysdale, Martin J; Wood, Mike

    2015-11-01

    Chk1 kinase is a critical component of the DNA damage response checkpoint especially in cancer cells and targeting Chk1 is a potential therapeutic opportunity for potentiating the anti-tumor activity of DNA damaging chemotherapy drugs. Fragment elaboration by structure guided design was utilized to identify and develop a novel series of Chk1 inhibitors culminating in the identification of V158411, a potent ATP-competitive inhibitor of the Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. V158411 abrogated gemcitabine and camptothecin induced cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in the expected modulation of cell cycle proteins and increased cell death in cancer cells. V158411 potentiated the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine, cisplatin, SN38 and camptothecin in a variety of p53 deficient human tumor cell lines in vitro, p53 proficient cells were unaffected. In nude mice, V158411 showed minimal toxicity as a single agent and in combination with irinotecan. In tumor bearing animals, V158411 was detected at high levels in the tumor with a long elimination half-life; no pharmacologically significant in vivo drug-drug interactions with irinotecan were identified through analysis of the pharmacokinetic profiles. V158411 potentiated the anti-tumor activity of irinotecan in a variety of human colon tumor xenograft models without additional systemic toxicity. These results demonstrate the opportunity for combining V158411 with standard of care chemotherapeutic agents to potentiate the therapeutic efficacy of these agents without increasing their toxicity to normal cells. Thus, V158411 would warrant further clinical evaluation. PMID:26437226

  2. Benzophenone derivatives as cysteine protease inhibitors and biological activity against Leishmania(L.) amazonensis amastigotes.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Letícia; Alves, Karina Ferreira; Maciel-Rezende, Claudia Mara; Jesus, Larissa de Oliveira Passos; Pires, Francieli Ribeiro; Junior, Claudio Viegas; Izidoro, Mario Augusto; Júdice, Wagner Alves de Souza; dos Santos, Marcelo Henrique; Marques, Marcos José

    2015-10-01

    The leishmanicidal potential of benzophenones has been described, some of them highlighting their potential as cysteine protease inhibitors. Therefore, this work described leishmanicidal activity of nine benzophenone derivatives (1a-c;2a-c;3a-c) against intramacrophage amastigote forms of Leishmania(L.)amazonensis (IC50) and the cytotoxic effect on murine peritoneal macrophages (CC50). The derivative 1c exhibited a selectivity index SI (CC50/IC50) of 6.7, besides cytotoxicity lower than Amphotericin B (p< 0.05). Moreover it showed inhibitory activity against papain (42.8±0.3, p<0.05), and when tested on trypanosomatids cysteine proteases 1c also proved to be a potent inhibitor of rCPB2.8, rCPB3.0 and cruzain, showing non-competitive inhibition mechanism by enzymatic assays in vitro.So, benzophenone 1c is interesting drug candidate prototype, with a multi-target directed mode of action, inhibiting rCPB2.8, rCPB3.0 and cruzain.

  3. Relationship between cathepsin D, urokinase, and plasminogen activator inhibitors in malignant vs benign breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Foucré, D.; Bouchet, C.; Hacène, K.; Pourreau-Schneider, N.; Gentile, A.; Martin, P. M.; Desplaces, A.; Oglobine, J.

    1991-01-01

    The concentrations of cathepsin D (Cath D), urokinase (uPA) and two plasminogen activator inhibitors (PAI-1 and PAI-2) were analysed in the cytosols of 130 human mammary tumours (43 benign tumours and 87 primary and unilateral breast carcinomas). uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 levels were measured by antigenic immunoassays and Cath D by immunoradiometric assay. The median levels of the four parameters were significantly higher in the malignant tumours than in the benign ones. Cath D and uPA increases were 4-fold and 5-fold respectively. PAI-1 and PAI-2 increases were much more important, 74-fold and 29-fold respectively. In malignant tumours, median levels of Cath D and uPA did not vary according to classical prognostic factors (histologic grade, presence or absence of axillary lymph nodes, steroid receptors, UICC stage, tumour size, age, and menopausal status). However, PAI-1 decreased in ER+ and PR+ tumours and PAI-2 increased in menopausal women's tumours. When Cath D, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 levels in malignant tumours were compared, positive correlations were found for all combinations. The implication of plasminogen activator inhibitors in the phenomenon was surprising and merits further investigation using tools other than global antigen measurements in tumours. PMID:1931618

  4. Identification of novel, in vivo active Chk1 inhibitors utilizing structure guided drug design

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Andrew J.; Stokes, Stephen; Browne, Helen; Foloppe, Nicolas; Fiumana, Andreá; Scrace, Simon; Fallowfield, Mandy; Bedford, Simon; Webb, Paul; Baker, Lisa; Christie, Mark; Drysdale, Martin J.; Wood, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Chk1 kinase is a critical component of the DNA damage response checkpoint especially in cancer cells and targeting Chk1 is a potential therapeutic opportunity for potentiating the anti-tumor activity of DNA damaging chemotherapy drugs. Fragment elaboration by structure guided design was utilized to identify and develop a novel series of Chk1 inhibitors culminating in the identification of V158411, a potent ATP-competitive inhibitor of the Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. V158411 abrogated gemcitabine and camptothecin induced cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in the expected modulation of cell cycle proteins and increased cell death in cancer cells. V158411 potentiated the cytotoxicity of gemcitabine, cisplatin, SN38 and camptothecin in a variety of p53 deficient human tumor cell lines in vitro, p53 proficient cells were unaffected. In nude mice, V158411 showed minimal toxicity as a single agent and in combination with irinotecan. In tumor bearing animals, V158411 was detected at high levels in the tumor with a long elimination half-life; no pharmacologically significant in vivo drug-drug interactions with irinotecan were identified through analysis of the pharmacokinetic profiles. V158411 potentiated the anti-tumor activity of irinotecan in a variety of human colon tumor xenograft models without additional systemic toxicity. These results demonstrate the opportunity for combining V158411 with standard of care chemotherapeutic agents to potentiate the therapeutic efficacy of these agents without increasing their toxicity to normal cells. Thus, V158411 would warrant further clinical evaluation. PMID:26437226

  5. Evaluation of Proposed In Vivo Probe Substrates and Inhibitors for Phenotyping Transporter Activity in Humans.

    PubMed

    Momper, Jeremiah D; Tsunoda, Shirley M; Ma, Joseph D

    2016-07-01

    Drug transporters are present in various tissues and have a significant role in drug absorption, distribution, and elimination. The International Transporter Consortium has identified 7 transporters of increasing importance from evidence of clinically significant transporter-mediated drug-drug interactions. The transporters are P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein, organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1, OATP1B3, organic cation transporter 2, organic anion transporters (OAT) 1, and OAT3. Decision trees were created based on in vitro experiments to determine whether an in vivo transporter-mediated drug-drug interaction study is needed. Phenotyping is a methodology that evaluates real-time in vivo transporter activity, whereby changes in a probe substrate or probe inhibitor reflect alternations in the activity of the specified transporter. In vivo probe substrates and/or probe inhibitors have been proposed for each aforementioned transporter. In vitro findings and animal models provide the strongest evidence regarding probe specificity. However, such findings have not conclusively correlated with human phenotyping studies. Furthermore, the extent of contribution from multiple transporters in probe disposition complicates the ability to discern if study findings are the result of a specific transporter and thus provide a recommendation for a preferred probe for a drug transporter. PMID:27385182

  6. A highly sensitive telomerase activity assay that eliminates false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    An assay for telomerase activity based on asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR) on magnetic beads (MBs) and subsequent application of cycling probe technology (CPT) is described. In this assay, the telomerase reaction products are immobilized on MBs, which are then washed to remove PCR inhibitors that are commonly found in clinical samples. The guanine-rich sequences (5'-(TTAGGG)n-3') of the telomerase reaction products are then preferentially amplified by A-PCR, and the amplified products are subsequently detected via CPT, where a probe RNA with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end is hydrolyzed by RNase H in the presence of the target DNA. The catalyst-mediated cleavage of the probe RNA enhances fluorescence from the 5' end of the probe. The assay allowed us to successfully detect HeLa cells selectively over normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cells. Importantly, this selectivity produced identical results with regard to detection of HeLa cells in the absence and presence of excess NHDF cells; therefore, this assay can be used for practical clinical applications. The lower limit of detection for HeLa cells was 50 cells, which is lower than that achieved with a conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. Our assay also eliminated false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that this assay is appropriate for screening among G-quadruplex ligands to find those that inhibit telomerase activity.

  7. A highly sensitive telomerase activity assay that eliminates false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Murashima, Takashi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    An assay for telomerase activity based on asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR) on magnetic beads (MBs) and subsequent application of cycling probe technology (CPT) is described. In this assay, the telomerase reaction products are immobilized on MBs, which are then washed to remove PCR inhibitors that are commonly found in clinical samples. The guanine-rich sequences (5'-(TTAGGG)n-3') of the telomerase reaction products are then preferentially amplified by A-PCR, and the amplified products are subsequently detected via CPT, where a probe RNA with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end is hydrolyzed by RNase H in the presence of the target DNA. The catalyst-mediated cleavage of the probe RNA enhances fluorescence from the 5' end of the probe. The assay allowed us to successfully detect HeLa cells selectively over normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) cells. Importantly, this selectivity produced identical results with regard to detection of HeLa cells in the absence and presence of excess NHDF cells; therefore, this assay can be used for practical clinical applications. The lower limit of detection for HeLa cells was 50 cells, which is lower than that achieved with a conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. Our assay also eliminated false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that this assay is appropriate for screening among G-quadruplex ligands to find those that inhibit telomerase activity. PMID:24071983

  8. High affinity InhA inhibitors with activity against drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Todd J; Truglio, James J; Boyne, Melissa E; Novichenok, Polina; Zhang, Xujie; Stratton, Christopher F; Li, Huei-Jiun; Kaur, Tejinder; Amin, Amol; Johnson, Francis; Slayden, Richard A; Kisker, Caroline; Tonge, Peter J

    2006-02-17

    Novel chemotherapeutics for treating multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are required to combat the spread of tuberculosis, a disease that kills more than 2 million people annually. Using structure-based drug design, we have developed a series of alkyl diphenyl ethers that are uncompetitive inhibitors of InhA, the enoyl reductase enzyme in the MTB fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. The most potent compound has a Ki' value of 1 nM for InhA and MIC99 values of 2-3 microg mL(-1) (6-10 microM) for both drug-sensitive and drug-resistant strains of MTB. Overexpression of InhA in MTB results in a 9-12-fold increase in MIC99, consistent with the belief that these compounds target InhA within the cell. In addition, transcriptional response studies reveal that the alkyl diphenyl ethers fail to upregulate a putative efflux pump and aromatic dioxygenase, detoxification mechanisms that are triggered by the lead compound triclosan. These diphenyl ether-based InhA inhibitors do not require activation by the mycobacterial KatG enzyme, thereby circumventing the normal mechanism of resistance to the front line drug isoniazid (INH) and thus accounting for their activity against INH-resistant strains of MTB.

  9. Conformation-selective ATP-competitive inhibitors control regulatory interactions and noncatalytic functions of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Hari, Sanjay B; Merritt, Ethan A; Maly, Dustin J

    2014-05-22

    Most potent protein kinase inhibitors act by competing with ATP to block the phosphotransferase activity of their targets. However, emerging evidence demonstrates that ATP-competitive inhibitors can affect kinase interactions and functions in ways beyond blocking catalytic activity. Here, we show that stabilizing alternative ATP-binding site conformations of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38α and Erk2 with ATP-competitive inhibitors differentially, and in some cases divergently, modulates the abilities of these kinases to interact with upstream activators and deactivating phosphatases. Conformation-selective ligands are also able to modulate Erk2's ability to allosterically activate the MAPK phosphatase DUSP6, highlighting how ATP-competitive ligands can control noncatalytic kinase functions. Overall, these studies underscore the relationship between the ATP-binding and regulatory sites of MAPKs and provide insight into how ATP-competitive ligands can be designed to confer graded control over protein kinase function.

  10. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) by the naphthoquinone shikonin.

    PubMed

    Han, Tingting; Zhang, Guangping; Yan, Dong; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui; Ye, Zuguang

    2016-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key negative regulator of the fibrinolytic system. Elevated levels of PAI-1 are associated with thrombosis and cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Inhibition of PAI-1 activity represents a new strategy for antithrombotic and antifibrinolysis therapies. In this study, we systematically investigated the inhibitory effect of shikonin on PAI-1 activity. In the chromogenic substrate-based urokinase (uPA)/PAI-1 assay, we found that shikonin inhibited human PAI-1 activity with IC50 values of 30.68±2.32μM. This result was further confirmed by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)-mediated clot lysis assay. Mechanistic studies indicated that shikonin directly could bind to PAI-1 and prevent the binding of PAI-1 to uPA in a dose-dependent manner. Shikonin also blocked the formation of PAI-1/uPA complex, as shown by SDS/PAGE analysis. In the mouse arterial thrombosis model, intraperitoneal injection of shikonin at 1mgkg(-1) dose significantly prolonged tail bleeding time from 12.956±4.457min to 26.576±2.443min. It also reduced arterial thrombus weight from 0.01±0.001g to 0.006±0.001g (p<0.05). In a liver fibrosis treatment model, when shikonin was continuously injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 1mgkg(-1) over a two-week period, the hydroxyproline content in the mice plasma was significantly reduced and the degree of liver fibrosis was decreased significantly. Thus, shikonin may represent a novel small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1 that could have become a lead drug the treatment of thrombus and fibrosis. PMID:27476618

  11. Modulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) by the naphthoquinone shikonin.

    PubMed

    Han, Tingting; Zhang, Guangping; Yan, Dong; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui; Ye, Zuguang

    2016-09-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key negative regulator of the fibrinolytic system. Elevated levels of PAI-1 are associated with thrombosis and cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Inhibition of PAI-1 activity represents a new strategy for antithrombotic and antifibrinolysis therapies. In this study, we systematically investigated the inhibitory effect of shikonin on PAI-1 activity. In the chromogenic substrate-based urokinase (uPA)/PAI-1 assay, we found that shikonin inhibited human PAI-1 activity with IC50 values of 30.68±2.32μM. This result was further confirmed by urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA)-mediated clot lysis assay. Mechanistic studies indicated that shikonin directly could bind to PAI-1 and prevent the binding of PAI-1 to uPA in a dose-dependent manner. Shikonin also blocked the formation of PAI-1/uPA complex, as shown by SDS/PAGE analysis. In the mouse arterial thrombosis model, intraperitoneal injection of shikonin at 1mgkg(-1) dose significantly prolonged tail bleeding time from 12.956±4.457min to 26.576±2.443min. It also reduced arterial thrombus weight from 0.01±0.001g to 0.006±0.001g (p<0.05). In a liver fibrosis treatment model, when shikonin was continuously injected intraperitoneally at a dose of 1mgkg(-1) over a two-week period, the hydroxyproline content in the mice plasma was significantly reduced and the degree of liver fibrosis was decreased significantly. Thus, shikonin may represent a novel small molecule inhibitor of PAI-1 that could have become a lead drug the treatment of thrombus and fibrosis.

  12. Analogs of cinnamic acid benzyl amide as nonclassical inhibitors of activated JAK2 kinase.

    PubMed

    Mielecki, Marcin; Milner-Krawczyk, Małgorzata; Grzelak, Krystyna; Mielecki, Damian; Krzysko, Krystiana A; Lesyng, Bogdan; Priebe, Waldemar

    2014-01-01

    Scaffold-based analogs of cinnamic acid benzyl amide (CABA) exhibit pleiotropic effects in cancer cells, and their exact molecular mechanism of action is under investigation. The present study is part of our systemic analysis of interactions of CABA analogs with their molecular targets. These compounds were shown to inhibit Janus kinase 2 (JAK2)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and JAK2/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) signaling and thus are attractive scaffolds for anticancer drug design. To identify the potential mechanisms of action of this class of compounds, direct interactions of the selected CABA analogs with JAK2 kinase were examined. Inhibition of JAK2 enzymatic activity was assessed, and molecular modeling studies of selected compounds-(E)-2-cyano-N-[(S)-1-phenylethyl]-3-(pyridin-2-yl)acrylamide (WP1065), (E)-2-cyano-N-[(S)-1-phenylbutyl]- 3-(3-bromopyridin-2-yl)acrylamide (WP1130), and (E)-2-cyano-N-[(S)-1,4-diphenylbutyl]-3-(3-bromopyridin-2-yl)acrylamide (WP1702)-in the JAK2 kinase domain were used to support interpretation of the experimental data. Our results indicated that the tested CABA analogs are nonclassical inhibitors of activated (phosphorylated) JAK2, although markedly weaker than clinically tested ATP-competitive JAK2 inhibitors. Relatively small structural changes in the studied compounds affected interactions with JAK2, and their mode of action ranged from allosteric-noncompetitive to bisubstratecompetitive. These results demonstrated that direct inhibition of JAK2 enzymatic activity by the WP1065 (half-maximal inhibitory concentration [IC₅₀] = 14.8 µM), WP1130 (IC₅₀ = 3.8 µM), and WP1702 (IC₅₀ = 2.9 µM) potentially contributes, albeit minimally, to suppression of the JAK2/STAT signaling pathways in cancer cells and that additional specific structural modifications may amplify JAK2-inhibitory effects.

  13. Design and prediction of new acetylcholinesterase inhibitor via quantitative structure activity relationship of huprines derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuqun; Hou, Bo; Yang, Huaiyu; Zuo, Zhili

    2016-05-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important enzyme in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Comparative quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses on some huprines inhibitors against AChE were carried out using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), and hologram QSAR (HQSAR) methods. Three highly predictive QSAR models were constructed successfully based on the training set. The CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR models have values of r (2) = 0.988, q (2) = 0.757, ONC = 6; r (2) = 0.966, q (2) = 0.645, ONC = 5; and r (2) = 0.957, q (2) = 0.736, ONC = 6. The predictabilities were validated using an external test sets, and the predictive r (2) values obtained by the three models were 0.984, 0.973, and 0.783, respectively. The analysis was performed by combining the CoMFA and CoMSIA field distributions with the active sites of the AChE to further understand the vital interactions between huprines and the protease. On the basis of the QSAR study, 14 new potent molecules have been designed and six of them are predicted to be more active than the best active compound 24 described in the literature. The final QSAR models could be helpful in design and development of novel active AChE inhibitors.

  14. Protein Inhibitors of Activated STAT (Pias1 and Piasy) Differentially Regulate Pituitary Homeobox 2 (PITX2) Transcriptional Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianbo; Sun, Zhao; Zhang, Zichao; Saadi, Irfan; Wang, Jun; Li, Xiao; Gao, Shan; Engle, Jamison J.; Kuburas, Adisa; Fu, Xueyao; Yu, Wenjie; Klein, William H.; Russo, Andrew F.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2013-01-01

    Protein inhibitors of activated STAT (Pias) proteins can act independent of sumoylation to modulate the activity of transcription factors and Pias proteins interacting with transcription factors can either activate or repress their activity. Pias proteins are expressed in many tissues and cells during development and we asked if Pias proteins regulated the pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2) homeodomain protein, which modulates developmental gene expression. Piasy and Pias1 proteins are expressed during craniofacial/tooth development and directly interact and differentially regulate PITX2 transcriptional activity. Piasy and Pias1 are co-expressed in craniofacial tissues with PITX2. Yeast two-hybrid, co-immunoprecipitation and pulldown experiments demonstrate Piasy and Pias1 interactions with the PITX2 protein. Piasy interacts with the PITX2 C-terminal tail to attenuate its transcriptional activity. In contrast, Pias1 interacts with the PITX2 C-terminal tail to increase PITX2 transcriptional activity. The E3 ligase activity associated with the RING domain in Piasy is not required for the attenuation of PITX2 activity, however, the RING domain of Pias1 is required for enhanced PITX2 transcriptional activity. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays reveal PITX2 interactions with Piasy and Pias1 in the nucleus. Piasy represses the synergistic activation of PITX2 with interacting co-factors and Piasy represses Pias1 activation of PITX2 transcriptional activity. In contrast, Pias1 did not affect the synergistic interaction of PITX2 with transcriptional co-factors. Last, we demonstrate that Pias proteins form a complex with PITX2 and Lef-1, and PITX2 and β-catenin. Lef-1, β-catenin, and Pias interactions with PITX2 provide new molecular mechanisms for the regulation of PITX2 transcriptional activity and the activity of Pias proteins. PMID:23515314

  15. Unexpected Activity of a Novel Kunitz-type Inhibitor: INHIBITION OF CYSTEINE PROTEASES BUT NOT SERINE PROTEASES.

    PubMed

    Smith, David; Tikhonova, Irina G; Jewhurst, Heather L; Drysdale, Orla C; Dvořák, Jan; Robinson, Mark W; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Dalton, John P

    2016-09-01

    Kunitz-type (KT) protease inhibitors are low molecular weight proteins classically defined as serine protease inhibitors. We identified a novel secreted KT inhibitor associated with the gut and parenchymal tissues of the infective juvenile stage of Fasciola hepatica, a helminth parasite of medical and veterinary importance. Unexpectedly, recombinant KT inhibitor (rFhKT1) exhibited no inhibitory activity toward serine proteases but was a potent inhibitor of the major secreted cathepsin L cysteine proteases of F. hepatica, FhCL1 and FhCL2, and of human cathepsins L and K (Ki = 0.4-27 nm). FhKT1 prevented the auto-catalytic activation of FhCL1 and FhCL2 and formed stable complexes with the mature enzymes. Pulldown experiments from adult parasite culture medium showed that rFhKT1 interacts specifically with native secreted FhCL1, FhCL2, and FhCL5. Substitution of the unusual P1 Leu(15) within the exposed reactive loop of FhKT1 for the more commonly found Arg (FhKT1Leu(15)/Arg(15)) had modest adverse effects on the cysteine protease inhibition but conferred potent activity against the serine protease trypsin (Ki = 1.5 nm). Computational docking and sequence analysis provided hypotheses for the exclusive binding of FhKT1 to cysteine proteases, the importance of the Leu(15) in anchoring the inhibitor into the S2 active site pocket, and the inhibitor's selectivity toward FhCL1, FhCL2, and human cathepsins L and K. FhKT1 represents a novel evolutionary adaptation of KT protease inhibitors by F. hepatica, with its prime purpose likely in the regulation of the major parasite-secreted proteases and/or cathepsin L-like proteases of its host.

  16. Screening and purification of a novel trypsin inhibitor from Prosopis juliflora seeds with activity toward pest digestive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, S; Franco, O L; Tagliari, P D; Bloch, C; Mohan, M; Thayumanavan, B

    2005-08-01

    Several pests are capable of decreasing crop production causing severe economical and social losses. Aiming to find novel molecules that could impede the digestion process of different pests, a screening of alpha-amylase and trypsin-like proteinase inhibitors was carried out in Prosopis juliflora, showing the presence of both in dry seeds. Furthermore, a novel trypsin inhibitor, with molecular mass of 13,292 Da, was purified showing remarkable in vitro activity against T. castaneum and C. maculatus.

  17. Novel 2-oxoimidazolidine-4-carboxylic acid derivatives as Hepatitis C virus NS3-4A serine protease inhibitors: synthesis, activity, and X-ray crystal structure of an enzyme inhibitor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Arasappan, Ashok; Njoroge, F. George; Parekh, Tejal N.; Yang, Xiaozheng; Pichardo, John; Butkiewicz, Nancy; Prongay, Andrew; Yao, Nanhua; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor

    2008-06-30

    Synthesis and HCV NS3 serine protease inhibitory activity of some novel 2-oxoimidazolidine-4-carboxylic acid derivatives are reported. Inhibitors derived from this new P2 core exhibited activity in the low {micro}M range. X-ray structure of an inhibitor, 15c bound to the protease is presented.

  18. Functionally stable plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in a family with cardiovascular disease and vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Agirbasli, Mehmet; Eren, Mesut; Yasar, Songul; Delil, Kenan; Goktay, Fatih; Oner, Ebru Toksoy; Vaughan, Douglas E

    2014-07-01

    Vitiligo is a common skin condition with a complex pathophysiology characterized by the lack of pigmentation due to melanocyte degeneration. In this study, we investigated PAI-1 antigen (Ag) and activity levels in a 34 year old male with extensive vascular disease, alopecia areata and vitiligo. Fasting PAI-1 Ag and activity levels were measured at 9 a.m. in the subject and family members. Both PAI-1 Ag (67 ± 38 vs. 18.6 ± 6.5 ng/ml, P < 0.001) and specific activity (15.8 ± 10.0 vs. 7.6 ± 6.0 IU/pmol, P < 0.04) levels of PAI-1 were moderately elevated in subjects compared to the controls. PAI-1 kinetic studies demonstrated a markedly enhanced stability of plasma PAI-1 activity in the family members. Specific activity at 16 h was significantly higher than expected activity levels (0.078 ± 0.072 vs. 0.001 ± 0.001 IU/ng/ml, P < 0.001). While the exact mechanism of increased stability of PAI-1 activity in vitiligo is not known, it is likely due to post-translational modifications or increased binding affinity for a stabilizing cofactor. In conclusion, enhanced stability of PAI-1 may contribute to the pathophysiology of vascular disease and associated melanocyte degeneration. Systemic or local treatment with PAI-1 inhibitors may offer a potential treatment alternative to the near orphan status for vitiligo drug development. PMID:24197654

  19. Identification and characterization of triamcinolone acetonide, a microglial-activation inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jinpyo; Kim, Bo-Kyong; Lim, Hyoungsub; Lee, Soojin; Lee, Sung Joong

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies show that necrotic neuronal cells (NNC) activate microglia, thereby leading to neuronal cell death. This suggests that chemicals that inhibit microglia activation may be used as neuroprotective drugs. In this context, we screened a chemical library for inhibitors of microglia activation. Using a screening system based on a nitrite assay, we isolated two chemicals that inhibit nitric oxide (NO) release from activated microglia: triamcinolone acetonide (TA) and amcinonide. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of TA and amcinonide for NO release inhibition were 1.78 nM and 3.38 nM, respectively. These chemicals also inhibited NNC-induced expression of the proinflammatory genes iNOS, TNF-α, and IL-1β in glial cells. A study based on a luciferase assay revealed that TA attenuated NNC-induced microglia activation by blocking the NF-κB signaling pathway. In addition, TA protected cortical neurons in coculture with microglia from LPS/IFN-γ-induced neuronal cell death. In conclusion, TA may inhibit microglia activation and may protect neuronal cells from death induced by microglial activation. PMID:22551518

  20. Synthesis and activity of benzimidazole-1,3-dioxide inhibitors of separase.

    PubMed

    Do, Ha T; Zhang, Nenggang; Pati, Debananda; Gilbertson, Scott R

    2016-09-15

    Due to the oncogenic activity of cohesin protease, separase in human cancer cells, modulation of separase enzymatic activity could constitute a new therapeutic strategy for targeting resistant, separase-overexpressing aneuploid tumors. Herein, we report the synthesis, structural information, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of separase inhibitors based on modification of the lead molecule 2,2-dimethyl-5-nitro-2H-benzimidazole-1,3-dioxide, named Sepin-1, (1) identified from a high-throughput-screen. Replacement of -NO2 at C5 with other functional groups reduce the inhibitory activity in separase enzymatic assay. Substitution of the two methyl groups with other alkyl chains at the C2 moderately improves the effects on the inhibitory activity of those compounds. Modifications on 2H-benzimidazole-1,3-dioxide or the skeleton have variable effect on inhibition of separase enzymatic activity. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest there may be a correlation between the charges on the oxide moieties on these compounds and their activity in inhibiting separase enzyme. PMID:27530289

  1. Antitumor activity of pimasertib, a selective MEK 1/2 inhibitor, in combination with PI3K/mTOR inhibitors or with multi-targeted kinase inhibitors in pimasertib-resistant human lung and colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Erika; Troiani, Teresa; D'Aiuto, Elena; Morgillo, Floriana; Vitagliano, Donata; Capasso, Anna; Costantino, Sarah; Ciuffreda, Loreta Pia; Merolla, Francesco; Vecchione, Loredana; De Vriendt, Veerle; Tejpar, Sabine; Nappi, Anna; Sforza, Vincenzo; Martini, Giulia; Berrino, Liberato; De Palma, Raffaele; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2013-11-01

    The RAS/RAF/MEK/MAPK and the PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways are key regulators of proliferation and survival in human cancer cells. Selective inhibitors of different transducer molecules in these pathways have been developed as molecular targeted anti-cancer therapies. The in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity of pimasertib, a selective MEK 1/2 inhibitor, alone or in combination with a PI3K inhibitor (PI3Ki), a mTOR inhibitor (everolimus), or with multi-targeted kinase inhibitors (sorafenib and regorafenib), that block also BRAF and CRAF, were tested in a panel of eight human lung and colon cancer cell lines. Following pimasertib treatment, cancer cell lines were classified as pimasertib-sensitive (IC50 for cell growth inhibition of 0.001 µM) or pimasertib-resistant. Evaluation of basal gene expression profiles by microarrays identified several genes that were up-regulated in pimasertib-resistant cancer cells and that were involved in both RAS/RAF/MEK/MAPK and PTEN/PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways. Therefore, a series of combination experiments with pimasertib and either PI3Ki, everolimus, sorafenib or regorafenib were conducted, demonstrating a synergistic effect in cell growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis with sustained blockade in MAPK- and AKT-dependent signaling pathways in pimasertib-resistant human colon carcinoma (HCT15) and lung adenocarcinoma (H1975) cells. Finally, in nude mice bearing established HCT15 and H1975 subcutaneous tumor xenografts, the combined treatment with pimasertib and BEZ235 (a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor) or with sorafenib caused significant tumor growth delays and increase in mice survival as compared to single agent treatment. These results suggest that dual blockade of MAPK and PI3K pathways could overcome intrinsic resistance to MEK inhibition.

  2. A phosphorylation switch regulates the transcriptional activation of cell cycle regulator p21 by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Simboeck, Elisabeth; Sawicka, Anna; Zupkovitz, Gordin; Senese, Silvia; Winter, Stefan; Dequiedt, Franck; Ogris, Egon; Di Croce, Luciano; Chiocca, Susanna; Seiser, Christian

    2010-12-24

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells and are, therefore, promising anti-cancer drugs. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 is activated in histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor-treated tumor cells, and its growth-inhibitory function contributes to the anti-tumorigenic effect of HDAC inhibitors. We show here that induction of p21 by trichostatin A involves MAP kinase signaling. Activation of the MAP kinase signaling pathway by growth factors or stress signals results in histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation at the p21 promoter and is crucial for acetylation of the neighboring lysine 14 and recruitment of activated RNA polymerase II in response to trichostatin A treatment. In non-induced cells, the protein phosphatase PP2A is associated with the p21 gene and counteracts its activation. Induction of p21 is linked to simultaneous acetylation and phosphorylation of histone H3. The dual modification mark H3S10phK14ac at the activated p21 promoter is recognized by the phospho-binding protein 14-3-3ζ, which protects the phosphoacetylation mark from being processed by PP2A. Taken together we have revealed a cross-talk of reversible phosphorylation and acetylation signals that controls the activation of p21 by HDAC inhibitors and identify the phosphatase PP2A as chromatin-associated transcriptional repressor in mammalian cells.

  3. Angiotensin II induces secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and a tissue metalloprotease inhibitor-related protein from rat brain astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.A. Jr.; Shiverick, K.T.; Ogilvie, S.; Buhi, W.C.; Raizada, M.K. )

    1991-03-01

    The present study investigates angiotensin (Ang) II effects on secretory protein synthesis in brain astrocytes cultured from neonatal and 21-day-old rats. Ang II-induced changes in the de novo synthesis of (35S)methionine-labeled secretory proteins were visualized using two-dimensional NaDodSO4/PAGE. Astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brain possess specific high-affinity receptors for Ang II. These cells express two Ang II-induced secretory proteins with Mr 55,000 (AISP-55K) and Mr 30,000 (AISP-30K), which were time- and dose-dependent (EC50, 1 nM). (Sar1, Ile8)Ang II (where Sar is sarcosine) inhibited Ang II-induced secretion of AISP-55K but not AISP-30K. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicates that AISP-55K is identical to rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, whereas AISP-30K exhibits 72-81% identity to three closely related proteins: human tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases, a rat phorbol ester-induced protein, and the murine growth-responsive protein 16C8. Immunofluorescent staining with rat plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 antibody was induced in the majority of cells in culture after Ang II treatment of astrocytes from 21-day-old rat brains. Absence of this response to Ang II in astrocytes from neonatal rat brain provides evidence that this action of Ang II on astrocytes is developmentally regulated.

  4. Construction of a dimeric form of glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium symbiosum by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Pasquo, A; Britton, K L; Stillman, T J; Rice, D W; Cölfen, H; Harding, S E; Scandurra, R; Engel, P C

    1996-10-17

    By using site-directed mutagenesis, Phe-187, one of the amino-acid residues involved in hydrophobic interaction between the three identical dimers comprising the hexamer of Clostridium symbiosum glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), has been replaced by an aspartic acid residue. Over-expression in Escherichia coli led to production of large amounts of a soluble protein which, though devoid of GDH activity, showed the expected subunit M(r) on SDS-PAGE, and cross-reacted with an anti-GDH antibody preparation in Western blots. The antibody was used to monitor purification of the inactive protein. F187D GDH showed altered mobility on non-denaturing electrophoresis, consistent with changed size and/or surface charge. Gel filtration on a calibrated column indicated an M(r) of 87000 +/- 3000. The mutant enzyme did not bind to the dye column routinely used in preparing wild-type GDH. Nevertheless suspicions of major misfolding were allayed by the results of chemical modification studies: as with wild-type GDH, NAD+ completely protected one-SH group against modification by DTNB, implying normal coenzyme binding. A significant difference, however, is that in the mutant enzyme both cysteine groups were modified by DTNB, rather than C320 only. The CD spectrum in the far-UV region indicated no major change in secondary structure in the mutant protein. The near-UV CD spectrum, however, was less intense and showed a pronounced Phe contribution, possibly reflecting the changed environment of Phe-199, which would be buried in the hexamer. Sedimentation velocity experiments gave corrected coefficients S20,W of 11.08 S and 5.29 S for the wild-type and mutant proteins. Sedimentation equilibrium gave weight average molar masses M(r,app) of 280000 +/- 5000 g/mol. consistent with the hexameric structure for the wild-type protein and 135000 +/- 3000 g/mol for F187D. The value for the mutant is intermediate between the values expected for a dimer (98000) and a trimer (147000). To investigate the

  5. Chitinase inhibitors: extraction of the active framework from natural argifin and use of in situ click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Tomoyasu; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Sugawara, Akihiro; Endo, Ayako; Iguchi, Kanami; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Ui, Hideaki; Shiomi, Kazuro; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sharpless, K Barry; Omura, Satoshi

    2009-05-01

    In situ click chemistry is a target-guided synthesis technique for discovering potent protein ligands by assembling azides and alkynes into triazoles inside the affinity site of a target protein. We report the rapid discovery of a new and potent inhibitor of bacterial chitinases by the use of in situ click chemistry. We observed a target-templated formation of a potent triazole inhibitor of the chitinase-catalyzed chitin hydrolysis, through in situ click chemistry between a biologically active azide-containing scaffold and structurally unrelated alkyne fragments. Chitinase inhibitors have chemotherapeutic potential as fungicides, pesticides and antiasthmatics. Argifin, which has been isolated and characterized as a cyclopentapeptide natural product by our research group, shows strong inhibitory activity against chitinases. As a result of our efforts at developing a chitinase inhibitor from an azide-bearing argifin fragment and the application of the chitinase template and a library of alkynes, we rapidly obtained a very potent and new 1,5-disubstituted triazole inhibitor against Serratia marcescens chitinase (SmChi) B. The new inhibitor expressed 300-fold increase in the inhibitory activity against SmChiB compared with that of argifin. To the best of our knowledge, our finding of an enzyme-made 1,5-disubstituted triazole, using in situ click chemistry is the second example reported in the literature.

  6. Menin-MLL inhibitors reverse oncogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Grembecka, Jolanta; He, Shihan; Shi, Aibin; Purohit, Trupta; Muntean, Andrew G; Sorenson, Roderick J; Showalter, Hollis D; Murai, Marcelo J; Belcher, Amalia M; Hartley, Thomas; Hess, Jay L; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2012-03-01

    Translocations involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene result in human acute leukemias with very poor prognosis. The leukemogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins is critically dependent on their direct interaction with menin, a product of the multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN1) gene. Here we present what are to our knowledge the first small-molecule inhibitors of the menin-MLL fusion protein interaction that specifically bind menin with nanomolar affinities. These compounds effectively reverse MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemic transformation by downregulating the expression of target genes required for MLL fusion protein oncogenic activity. They also selectively block proliferation and induce both apoptosis and differentiation of leukemia cells harboring MLL translocations. Identification of these compounds provides a new tool for better understanding MLL-mediated leukemogenesis and represents a new approach for studying the role of menin as an oncogenic cofactor of MLL fusion proteins. Our findings also highlight a new therapeutic strategy for aggressive leukemias with MLL rearrangements.

  7. Oximes: inhibitors of human recombinant acetylcholinesterase. A structure-activity relationship (SAR) study.

    PubMed

    Sepsova, Vendula; Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Korabecny, Jan; Dolezal, Rafael; Zemek, Filip; Bennion, Brian J; Kuca, Kamil

    2013-08-16

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reactivators were developed for the treatment of organophosphate intoxication. Standard care involves the use of anticonvulsants (e.g., diazepam), parasympatolytics (e.g., atropine) and oximes that restore AChE activity. However, oximes also bind to the active site of AChE, simultaneously acting as reversible inhibitors. The goal of the present study is to determine how oxime structure influences the inhibition of human recombinant AChE (hrAChE). Therefore, 24 structurally different oximes were tested and the results compared to the previous eel AChE (EeAChE) experiments. Structural factors that were tested included the number of pyridinium rings, the length and structural features of the linker, and the number and position of the oxime group on the pyridinium ring.

  8. Arabidopsis PME17 Activity can be Controlled by Pectin Methylesterase Inhibitor4

    PubMed Central

    Sénéchal, Fabien; Mareck, Alain; Marcelo, Paulo; Lerouge, Patrice; Pelloux, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    The degree of methylesterification (DM) of homogalacturonans (HGs), the main constituent of pectins in Arabidopsis thaliana, can be modified by pectin methylesterases (PMEs). Regulation of PME activity occurs through interaction with PME inhibitors (PMEIs) and subtilases (SBTs). Considering the size of the gene families encoding PMEs, PMEIs and SBTs, it is highly likely that specific pairs mediate localized changes in pectin structure with consequences on cell wall rheology and plant development. We previously reported that PME17, a group 2 PME expressed in root, could be processed by SBT3.5, a co-expressed subtilisin-like serine protease, to mediate changes in pectin properties and root growth. Here, we further report that a PMEI, PMEI4, is co-expressed with PME17 and is likely to regulate its activity. This sheds new light on the possible interplay of specific PMEs, PMEIs and SBTs in the fine-tuning of pectin structure. PMID:25826258

  9. New immunocapture enzyme (ICE) assay for quantification of cancer procoagulant activity: studies of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Mielicki, W P; Tagawa, M; Gordon, S G

    1994-04-01

    A new, sensitive and specific immunocapture enzyme (ICE) assay for quantitation of the enzymatic activity of cancer procoagulant (CP) has been developed. The assay had good reproducibility (inter- and intra-assay CV were 6.4% and 5.7% respectively) and was linear for concentrations of CP from 0.5 microgram/ml to 10 micrograms/ml (r2 = 0.995). Using this assay the inhibition of CP by iodoacetamide, mercuric chloride, E-64, leupeptin and antipain was demonstrated. There was no significant effect of cystatin and natural plasma proteinase inhibitors alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, alpha 2-macroglobulin and antithrombin-III/heparin, on the activity of the CP.

  10. Cardiovascular-renal complications and the possible role of plasminogen activator inhibitor: a review.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, John A; Bayliss, George; Gleason, Ray E; Weinrauch, Larry A

    2016-10-01

    Since angiotensin increases the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), mechanisms associated with an actively functioning renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system can be expected to be associated with increased PAI-1 expression. These mechanisms are present not only in common conditions resulting in glomerulosclerosis associated with aging, diabetes or genetic mutations, but also in autoimmune disease (like scleroderma and lupus), radiation injury, cyclosporine toxicity, allograft nephropathy and ureteral obstruction. While the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), are almost always part of the process, there are rare experimental observations of PAI-1 expression without their interaction. Here we review the literature on PAI-1 and its role in vascular, fibrotic and oxidative injury as well as work suggesting potential areas of intervention in the pathogenesis of multiple disorders. PMID:27679717

  11. Cardiovascular-renal complications and the possible role of plasminogen activator inhibitor: a review

    PubMed Central

    D'Elia, John A.; Bayliss, George; Gleason, Ray E.; Weinrauch, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    Since angiotensin increases the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), mechanisms associated with an actively functioning renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system can be expected to be associated with increased PAI-1 expression. These mechanisms are present not only in common conditions resulting in glomerulosclerosis associated with aging, diabetes or genetic mutations, but also in autoimmune disease (like scleroderma and lupus), radiation injury, cyclosporine toxicity, allograft nephropathy and ureteral obstruction. While the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), are almost always part of the process, there are rare experimental observations of PAI-1 expression without their interaction. Here we review the literature on PAI-1 and its role in vascular, fibrotic and oxidative injury as well as work suggesting potential areas of intervention in the pathogenesis of multiple disorders. PMID:27679717

  12. Modulation of Activity Profiles for Largazole-Based HDAC Inhibitors through Alteration of Prodrug Properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Largazole is a potent and class I-selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor purified from marine cyanobacteria and was demonstrated to possess antitumor activity. Largazole employs a unique prodrug strategy, via a thioester moiety, to liberate the bioactive species largazole thiol. Here we report alternate prodrug strategies to modulate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles of new largazole-based compounds. The in vitro effects of largazole analogues on cancer cell proliferation and enzymatic activities of purified HDACs were comparable to the natural product. However, in vitro and in vivo histone hyperacetylation in HCT116 cells and implanted tumors, respectively, showed differences, particularly in the onset of action and oral bioavailability. These results indicate that, by employing a different approach to disguise the “warhead” moiety, the functional consequence of these prodrugs can be significantly modulated. Our data corroborate the role of the pharmacokinetic properties of this class of compounds to elicit the desired and timely functional response. PMID:25147612

  13. Benzoxazolone Carboxamides: Potent and Systemically Active Inhibitors of Intracellular Acid Ceramidase**

    PubMed Central

    Pizzirani, Daniela; Bach, Anders; Realini, Natalia; Armirotti, Andrea; Mengatto, Luisa; Bauer, Inga; Girotto, Stefania; Pagliuca, Chiara; De Vivo, Marco; Summa, Maria; Ribeiro, Alison; Piomelli, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    The ceramides are a family of bioactive lipid-derived messengers involved in the control of cellular senescence, inflammation, and apoptosis. Ceramide hydrolysis by acid ceramidase (AC) stops the biological activity of these substances and influences survival and function of normal and neoplastic cells. Because of its central role in the ceramide metabolism, AC may offer a novel molecular target in disorders with dysfunctional ceramide-mediated signaling. Here, a class of benzoxazolone carboxamides is identified as the first potent and systemically active inhibitors of AC. Prototype members of this class inhibit AC with low nanomolar potency by covalent binding to the catalytic cysteine. Their metabolic stability and high in vivo efficacy suggest that these compounds may be used as probes to investigate the roles of ceramide in health and disease, and that this scaffold may represent a promising starting point for the development of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:25395373

  14. The regulatory region of the human plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, A; Lund, L R; Sartorio, R; Lania, A; Andreasen, P A; Danø, K; Blasi, F

    1988-01-01

    The human gene for plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) has been isolated and its promoter region characterized. PAI-1 regulation by glucocorticoids, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) and the phorbol ester PMA is shown to be exerted at the promoter level. A fragment spanning 805 nucleotides of the 5' flanking and 72 of the 5' untranslated region contain information enough to promote transcription and to respond to glucocorticoids when fused to a reporter gene and transfected into human fibrosarcoma cells. A moderately repetitive DNA sequence, containing a TATA box, a GRE consensus, a Z-DNA forming sequence and two imperfect direct repeats at the extremities, is present a few nucleotides 5' of the human PAI-1 gene transcription start site, raising the possibility that this gene could have been activated by DNA insertion during evolution. Images PMID:3130610

  15. Cardiovascular-renal complications and the possible role of plasminogen activator inhibitor: a review

    PubMed Central

    D'Elia, John A.; Bayliss, George; Gleason, Ray E.; Weinrauch, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    Since angiotensin increases the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI), mechanisms associated with an actively functioning renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system can be expected to be associated with increased PAI-1 expression. These mechanisms are present not only in common conditions resulting in glomerulosclerosis associated with aging, diabetes or genetic mutations, but also in autoimmune disease (like scleroderma and lupus), radiation injury, cyclosporine toxicity, allograft nephropathy and ureteral obstruction. While the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and growth factors, such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), are almost always part of the process, there are rare experimental observations of PAI-1 expression without their interaction. Here we review the literature on PAI-1 and its role in vascular, fibrotic and oxidative injury as well as work suggesting potential areas of intervention in the pathogenesis of multiple disorders.

  16. Cholesterol synthesis inhibitors protect against platelet-activating factor-induced neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Rumbold, Louis; Williams, Alun

    2007-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is implicated in the neuronal damage that accompanies ischemia, prion disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since some epidemiological studies demonstrate that statins, drugs that reduce cholesterol synthesis, have a beneficial effect on mild AD, we examined the effects of two cholesterol synthesis inhibitors on neuronal responses to PAF. Methods Primary cortical neurons were treated with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors (simvastatin or squalestatin) prior to incubation with different neurotoxins. The effects of these drugs on neuronal cholesterol levels and neuronal survival were measured. Immunoblots were used to determine the effects of simvastatin or squalestatin on the distribution of the PAF receptor and an enzyme linked immunoassay was used to quantify the amounts of PAF receptor. Results PAF killed primary neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with simvastatin or squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol and increased the survival of PAF-treated neurons. Neuronal survival was increased 50% by 100 nM simvastatin, or 20 nM squalestatin. The addition of mevalonate restored cholesterol levels, and reversed the protective effect of simvastatin. Simvastatin or squalestatin did not affect the amounts of the PAF receptor but did cause it to disperse from within lipid rafts. Conclusion Treatment of neurons with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors including simvastatin and squalestatin protected neurons against PAF. Treatment caused a percentage of the PAF receptors to disperse from cholesterol-sensitive domains. These results raise the possibility that the effects of statins on neurodegenerative disease are, at least in part, due to desensitisation of neurons to PAF. PMID:17233902

  17. Intra-alveolar tissue factor pathway inhibitor is not sufficient to block tissue factor procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Bastarache, Julie A; Wang, Ling; Wang, Zhengming; Albertine, Kurt H; Matthay, Michael A; Ware, Lorraine B

    2008-05-01

    The alveolar compartment in acute lung injury contains high levels of tissue factor (TF) procoagulant activity favoring fibrin deposition. We previously reported that the alveolar epithelium can release TF procoagulant activity in response to a proinflammatory stimulus. To test the hypothesis that the alveolar epithelium further modulates intra-alveolar fibrin deposition through secretion of an endogenous inhibitor to TF, tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), we measured TFPI levels in edema fluid (EF) from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. To determine whether the alveolar epithelium can release TFPI, both full-length TFPI and truncated TFPI were measured (ELISA) in pulmonary edema fluid from patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and a control group of patients with hydrostatic pulmonary edema (HYDRO). TFPI protein was also measured in conditioned media (CM) and cell lysates (CL) from human alveolar epithelial cells (A549) after exposure to cytomix (TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IFN-gamma). TFPI protein levels were higher in pulmonary edema fluid from patients with ARDS vs. HYDRO. TFPI protein was increased in CM and did not change in CL after cytomix treatment; TFPI mRNA levels (RT-PCR) did not change. Despite the high levels of TFPI, both the EF and CM retained significant TF procoagulant activity as measured by plasma recalcification time. The majority of intra-alveolar TFPI was in a truncated, inactive form, whereas the majority of TFPI released from cells was full length, suggesting different mechanisms of inactivation. In summary, the alveolar epithelium releases TFPI in response to an inflammatory stimulus but does not increase TFPI gene transcription or protein production. Levels of intra-alveolar TFPI in ARDS are not sufficient to block intra-alveolar TF procoagulant activity due to truncation and inactivation of intra-alveolar TFPI. PMID:18310227

  18. Pulsed EPR Distance Measurements in Soluble Proteins by