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Sample records for active sle patients

  1. Autoantibodies against Modified Histone Peptides in SLE Patients Are Associated with Disease Activity and Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Dieker, Jürgen; Berden, Jo H.; Bakker, Marinka; Briand, Jean-Paul; Muller, Sylviane; Voll, Reinhard; Sjöwall, Christopher; Herrmann, Martin; Hilbrands, Luuk B.; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Persistent exposure of the immune system to death cell debris leads to autoantibodies against chromatin in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Deposition of anti-chromatin/chromatin complexes can instigate inflammation in multiple organs including the kidney. Previously we identified specific cell death-associated histone modifications as targets of autoantibodies in SLE. In this study we addressed, in a large cohort of SLE patients and controls, the question whether plasma reactivities with specific histone peptides associated with serology and clinical features. Plasma from SLE patients with and without lupus nephritis, disease controls, and healthy controls, were tested in ELISA with histone H4 peptide acetylated at lysines 8, 12 and 16 (H4pac), H2B peptide acetylated at lysine 12 (H2Bpac), H3 peptide trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3pme), and their unmodified equivalents. SLE patients displayed a higher reactivity with the modified equivalent of each peptide. Reactivity with H4pac showed both a high sensitivity (89%) and specificity (91%) for SLE, while H2Bpac exhibited a high specificity (96%) but lower sensitivity (69%). Reactivity with H3pme appeared not specific for SLE. Anti-H4pac and anti-H2Bpac reactivity demonstrated a high correlation with disease activity. Moreover, patients reacting with multiple modified histone peptides exhibited higher SLEDAI and lower C3 levels. SLE patients with renal involvement showed higher reactivity with H2B/H2Bpac and a more pronounced reactivity with the modified equivalent of H3pme and H2Bpac. In conclusion, reactivity with H4pac and H2Bpac is specific for SLE patients and correlates with disease activity, whereas reactivity with H2Bpac is in particular associated with lupus nephritis. PMID:27780265

  2. Increased serum levels of soluble l-selectin (CD62L) in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    PubMed Central

    Font, J; Pizcueta, P; Ramos-Casals, M; Cervera, R; García-Carrasco, M; Navarro, M; Ingelmo, M; Engel, P

    2000-01-01

    The adhesion molecule l-selectin (CD62L) mediates lymphocyte recirculation and leucocyte rolling on vascular endothelium at sites of inflammation. Serum levels of soluble l-selectin (sl-selectin) were measured in patients with SLE in order to relate these levels to clinical activity and immunological parameters. An ELISA was used to detect the soluble form of human l-selectin (CD62L) in 42 patients with SLE and in 33 healthy individuals. The mean ± s.e.m. values of sl-selectin were 1285 ± 121 ng/ml for patients with SLE and 986 ± 180 ng/ml for healthy blood donors, but there was no significant difference. When patients with active SLE were analysed, higher levels of circulating sl-selectin were found when compared with patients without activity (1497 ± 167 ng/ml versus 941 ± 150 ng/ml; P = 0.028). We found a significant correlation between the levels of sl-selectin and of dsDNA antibodies (r = 0.36, P = 0.044) and between levels of sl-selectin and SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score (r = 0.42, P = 0.003). Patients with active SLE studied cross-sectionally showed significant elevations of sl-selectin (CD62L) compared with controls. Thus, the levels of this soluble adhesion molecule correlated with active disease and levels of anti-dsDNA antibodies. PMID:10606979

  3. Association of the interferon signature metric with serological disease manifestations but not global activity scores in multiple cohorts of patients with SLE

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, William P; Maciuca, Romeo; Wolslegel, Kristen; Tew, Wei; Abbas, Alexander R; Chaivorapol, Christina; Morimoto, Alyssa; McBride, Jacqueline M; Brunetta, Paul; Richardson, Bruce C; Davis, John C; Behrens, Timothy W; Townsend, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The interferon (IFN) signature (IS) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) includes over 100 genes induced by type I IFN pathway activation. We developed a method to quantify the IS using three genes—the IS metric (ISM)—and characterised the clinical characteristics of patients with SLE with different ISM status from multiple clinical trials. Methods Blood microarray expression data from a training cohort of patients with SLE confirmed the presence of the IS and identified surrogate genes. We assayed these genes in a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay, yielding an ISM from the IS. The association of ISM status with clinical disease characteristics was assessed in patients with extrarenal lupus and lupus nephritis from four clinical trials. Results Three genes, HERC5, EPSTI and CMPK2, correlated well with the IS (p>0.96), and composed the ISM qPCR assay. Using the 95th centile for healthy control data, patients with SLE from different studies were classified into two ISM subsets—ISM-Low and ISM-High—that are longitudinally stable over 36 weeks. Significant associations were identified between ISM-High status and higher titres of anti-dsDNA antibodies, presence of anti extractable nuclear antigen autoantibodies, elevated serum B cell activating factor of the tumour necrosis factor family (BAFF) levels, and hypocomplementaemia. However, measures of overall clinical disease activity were similar for ISM-High and ISM-Low groups. Conclusions The ISM is an IS biomarker that divides patients with SLE into two subpopulations—ISM-High and ISM-Low—with differing serological manifestations. The ISM does not distinguish between high and low disease activity, but may have utility in identifying patients more likely to respond to treatment(s) targeting IFN-α. Clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT00962832. PMID:25861459

  4. The effect of Ramadan fasting on quiescent systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients' disease activity, health quality of life and lipid profile: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Goharifar, Hamid; Faezi, Seyedeh Tahereh; Paragomi, Pedram; Montazeri, Ali; Banihashemi, Arash Tehrani; Akhlaghkhah, Maryam; Abdollahi, Bahar Sadeghi; Kamazani, Zahra; Akbarian, Mahmood

    2015-08-01

    SLE is a common autoimmune disease with considerable morbidity. Ramadan fasting is a religious custom Muslims regularly practice. We aimed to evaluate the effect of Ramadan fasting on SLE patients' disease activity, health quality of life and lipid profile. We conducted this case control study as a pilot study in 40 quiescent SLE patients, 21 cases who decided to fast and 19 controls who decided not to have Ramadan fasting between August and November 2009 in lupus unit of Rheumatology Research Center in Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. They were assessed for SLE Disease Activity Index, lipid profile and quality of life with Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey, 1 day before Ramadan, the day after and 3 months after Ramadan fasting. After 24.1 ± 5.4 (mean ± SD) days of fasting, anti-ds DNA increased for 0.34 ± 0.41 mmol/dL in cases versus 0.07 ± 0.31 in controls (P = 0.026). Likewise C3 increased more dramatically in cases (16.8 ± 17.5 vs. 2.3 ± 13.2 mg/dL, P = 0.006). Three months after fasting, anti-ds DNA was still increased 0.28 ± 0.46 mmol/dL in cases while a 0.02 ± 0.43 mmol/dL drop in controls was detected (P = 0.04). On the contrary, C3 returned to baseline. These changes were not accompanied with significant changes in disease activity and health quality of life. Ramadan fasting had no effect on lipid profile except for delayed total cholesterol decrease in cases in comparison with controls (16.4 ± 29.4 decrease vs. 4.6 ± 23.9 mg/dL decrease, P = 0.018). Ramadan fasting probably has no detrimental effect on SLE patients' disease activity and their quality of life in the quiescent phase of disease.

  5. Measurement of malondialdehyde, glutathione, and glutathione peroxidase in SLE patients.

    PubMed

    Gheita, Tamer A; Kenawy, Sanaa A

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to chronic inflammation of tissues and plays a central role in immunomodulation, which may lead to autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome. Markers of oxidative damage include malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidant scavengers as glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH Px), which all correlate well with SLE disease activity. Amelioration of some clinical manifestations of SLE may be expected by targeting lipid peroxidation with dietary or pharmacological antioxidants. Here, we describe the detection of the key players of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in SLE.

  6. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Ku, Ming; Guo, Shuiming; Shang, Weifeng; Li, Qing; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients' characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome), disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement). We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy. PMID:27442513

  7. Quantitative and qualitative deficiencies of regulatory T cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed

    Bonelli, Michael; Savitskaya, Anastasia; von Dalwigk, Karolina; Steiner, Carl Walter; Aletaha, Daniel; Smolen, Josef S; Scheinecker, Clemens

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the study was that the regulatory T cells (Treg) that specialize in the suppression of immune responses might be critically involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. As for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), however, published data concerning Treg phenotype and function are partly conflicting. We therefore performed quantitative and qualitative analyses of naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg from SLE patients as compared with healthy controls (HC) in order to further elucidate the role of Treg in this systemic autoimmune disease. The phenotype of peripheral blood CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg was determined by flow cytometry (FACS) in SLE patients and HC. Treg were isolated from SLE patients and HC and their functional capacity was analyzed in suppression assays. Phenotypic and functional data were correlated with clinical data. Decreased proportions of CD4(+) Treg with high-level expression of CD25 (CD4(+)CD25(hi)) were observed in active and inactive SLE patients (0.96 +/- 0.08 and 1.17 +/- 0.08%, respectively) as compared with HC (2 +/- 0.1%). In contrast to HC, Treg from SLE patients displayed an activated phenotype as determined by the expression of CD69, CD71 and HLA-DR. The suppressive capacity of isolated Treg from SLE patients, however, was significantly reduced as compared with HC. Proportions of CD4(+)CD25(hi) T cells and the suppressive capacity of Treg were inversely correlated with the clinical disease activity in SLE patients. Our data describe quantitative and qualitative defects of Treg in SLE patients. These deficiencies might contribute to the breakdown of self-tolerance and the development of the autoimmune response in SLE patients.

  8. Pregnancy Outcomes in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Retrospective Study of 109 Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Ming; Guo, Shuiming; Shang, Weifeng; Li, Qing; Zeng, Rui; Han, Min; Ge, Shuwang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that primarily affects women during their reproductive years. The interaction between SLE and pregnancy remains debated. The objective of this study was to analyze the fetal and maternal outcomes of Chinese women with SLE. A total of 109 pregnancies in 83 SLE patients from June 2004 to June 2014 at a tertiary university hospital were reviewed retrospectively. Patients’ characteristics, clinical and laboratory data during pregnancy were obtained from electronic medical records. After exclusion of elective abortions, the live birth rate was 61.5%. Significantly, APS (antiphospholipid syndrome), disease activity, hypertension, hypocomplementemia, thrombocytopenia, and anemia during pregnancy were more commonly observed in fetal loss pregnancies than in live birth pregnancies. Compared to the 64 women with a history of SLE, 19 women with new-onset lupus during pregnancy had worse pregnancy outcome. Furthermore, the 64 patients with a history of SLE were divided into lupus nephritis group and SLE group (non-renal involvement). We found that the lupus nephritis group had worse maternal outcome than the SLE group. We conclude that new-onset lupus during pregnancy predicts both adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, while a history of lupus nephritis predicts adverse maternal outcomes. It is essential to provide SLE women with progestational counseling and regular multispecialty care during pregnancy. PMID:27442513

  9. Microparticles in the blood of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): phenotypic characterization and clinical associations

    PubMed Central

    Mobarrez, Fariborz; Vikerfors, Anna; Gustafsson, Johanna T.; Gunnarsson, Iva; Zickert, Agneta; Larsson, Anders; Pisetsky, David S.; Wallén, Håkan; Svenungsson, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease characterized by circulating autoantibodies and the formation of immune complexes. In these responses, the selecting self-antigens likely derive from the remains of dead and dying cells, as well as from disturbances in clearance. During cell death/activation, microparticles (MPs) can be released to the circulation. Previous MP studies in SLE have been limited in size and differ regarding numbers and phenotypes. Therefore, to characterize MPs more completely, we investigated 280 SLE patients and 280 individually matched controls. MPs were measured with flow cytometry and phenotyped according to phosphatidylserine expression (PS+/PS−), cellular origin and inflammatory markers. MPs, regardless of phenotype, are 2–10 times more abundant in SLE blood compared to controls. PS− MPs predominated in SLE, but not in controls (66% vs. 42%). Selectively in SLE, PS− MPs were more numerous in females and smokers. MP numbers decreased with declining renal function, but no clear association with disease activity was observed. The striking abundance of MPs, especially PS− MPs, suggests a generalized disturbance in SLE. MPs may be regarded as “liquid biopsies” to assess the production and clearance of dead, dying and activated cells, i.e. pivotal events for SLE pathogenesis. PMID:27777414

  10. Two systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) global disease activity indexes--the SLE Disease Activity Index and the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure--demonstrate different correlations with activation of peripheral blood CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Daca, Agnieszka; Czuszyńska, Zenobia; Smoleńska, Zaneta; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew; Witkowski, Jacek M; Bryl, Ewa

    2011-12-01

    Global disease activity measurement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients is important for the clinical estimation and adjustment of therapy. By contrast, immune system activation plays a significant role in disease pathogenesis, with CD4+ lymphocytes acting as central cells in the immune response. We investigated which scale better correlates with immunologic changes in the blood of SLE patients, the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) or the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) scale. Samples of peripheral blood were obtained from 45 SLE patients with different disease activity as assessed by the SLEDAI and the SLAM scales on the same day. We assessed the percentage of CD4+ T cells with activation-associated receptors: CD69, CD25int, CD95, HLA-DR, and CD4+ T cells with killing properties containing perforin and granzyme B. Our results indicated that the percentage of CD4+CD69+ and CD4+CD25(int) cells did not correlate with either the SLEDAI or the SLAM scale. Significant and positive correlations were observed between percentages of CD4+CD95+ and CD4+HLA-DR+ lymphocytes and SLE activity, but only when activity was measured using the SLAM scale, not with the SLEDAI scale. The percentage of CD4+perforin+ and CD4+granzyme B+ cells also strongly correlated with disease activity measured only with the SLAM scale. We conclude that the SLAM scale better reflects changes of immune system activity in SLE patients compared with the SLEDAI scale.

  11. Effect of pregnancy on serum cytokines in SLE patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate an extensive panel of cytokines involved in immune regulation during pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and in healthy women. Methods A total of 47 consecutive successful pregnancies in 46 SLE patients and 56 pregnancies in 56 matched healthy subjects, as controls, were prospectively studied. Serum interleukin (IL)-1-α, IL-1-β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, interferon (INF)-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were detected in sera obtained at the first and third trimester of pregnancy by a highly sensitive, multiplexed sandwich ELISA. Results Medians (pg/ml) of serum levels of most helper T (Th)1-type cytokines were significantly lower in the third trimester compared with those observed in the first trimester of pregnancy in healthy women: INF-γ 2.0 vs 3.4, TNF-α 10.2 vs 11.5, IL-1-α 0.9 vs 1.1, IL-1-β 0.6 vs 1.0, IL-2 3.0 vs 3.5, and IL-12p70 4.9 vs 5.6 (P-values < 0.02 for all). By contrast, only the IL-1-α serum levels were lower in the third trimester compared with the first trimester in SLE patients (P = 0.006). IFN-γ/IL-6 and IFN-γ/IL-10 ratios were higher in controls than in SLE (P = 0.002, and P = 0.001, respectively); moreover, they were significantly reduced in the third compared to the first trimester of pregnancy in healthy women, but not in SLE. Conclusions In SLE patients, Th1/Th2 cytokine serum level ratio does not decrease during pregnancy progression as much as in healthy pregnant women. This could account for the observation of a low frequency of disease flares in the third trimester of gestation. PMID:22417776

  12. Development of quality indicators to evaluate the monitoring of SLE patients in routine clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, M.; Tani, C.; Aringer, M.; Bombardieri, S.; Boumpas, D.; Cervera, R.; Doria, A.; Jayne, D.; Khamashta, M. A.; Kuhn, A.; Gordon, C.; Petri, M.; Schneider, M.; Shoenfeld, Y.; Smolen, J. S.; Talarico, R.; Tincani, A.; Ward, M. M.; Werth, V. P.; Carmona, L.

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in routine clinical practice is mainly based on the experience of the treating physician. This carries the risk of unwanted variability. Variability may have an impact on the quality of care offered to SLE patients, thereby affecting outcomes. Recommendations represent systematically developed statements to help practitioners in reducing variability. However, major difficulties arise in the application of recommendations into clinical practice. In this respect, the use of quality indicators may raise the awareness among rheumatologists regarding potential deficiencies in services and improve the quality of health care. The aim of this study was to develop a set of quality indicators (QI) for SLE by translating into QIs the recently developed EULAR Recommendations for monitoring SLE patients in routine clinical practice and observational studies. Eleven QIs have been developed referring to the use of validated activity and damage indices in routine clinical practice, general evaluation of drug toxicity, evaluation of comorbidities, eye evaluation, laboratory assessment, evaluation of the presence of chronic viral infections, documentation of vaccination and of antibody testing at baseline. A disease specific set of quality assessment tools should help physicians deliver high quality of care across populations. Routine updates will be needed. PMID:21224016

  13. Negative Correlation Between miR-326 and Ets-1 in Regulatory T Cells from new-Onset SLE Patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Ge; Tao, Jin-Hui; Xiang, Nan; Li, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Guo-Sheng; Fang, Xuan; Dai, Chao; Zhang, Min; Chen, Zhu; Li, Xiang-Pei

    2016-04-01

    To analyze the relationship between miR-326 and Ets-1 mRNA levels in Treg cells and clinical manifestations in patients with SLE and explore the role of miR-326 and Ets-1 in the pathogenesis and activity of SLE. Twenty-five new-onset SLE patients without treatment, twenty-eight inactive SLE patients (SLEDA ≤ 4) and twenty-two healthy controls were included in the present study. Clinical data of SLE patients were recorded. Treg cells were purified by MACS from 20 ml peripheral blood, in which the quantity of miR-326 and Ets-1 mRNA were assessed by real-time PCR. Data were analyzed using SPSS Version 17.0. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the groups, The Spearman test was used for correlation analyses. Two-tailed p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. 1.The level of miR-326 was significantly higher in Treg cells from SLE patients [1.98(0.592,6.148)] than that in healthy controls [0.921(0.345, 1.879)] (p = 0.032). The difference between new-onset SLE patients [6.192(0.673, 15.298)] and healthy controls was significant (p = 0.019). Significant difference of the miR-326 expression was found between new-onset SLE patients with serous cavity effusion and new-onset SLE patients without it(P<0.05). Significant positive correlation was found between the expression of miR-326 mRNA in Treg cells with CRP and anti-C1q antibody from new-onset SLE patients. 2. The level of Ets-1 mRNA was decreased in SLE patients [0.382(0.232, 0.572)] compared to healthy controls(p = 0.013). The difference was also found in new-onset SLE patients [0.222(0.125, 0.296)] while compared to healthy controls. Also, the level in new-onset SLE patients was lower than that in inactive SLE patients [0.482(0.398, 0.512)] (p = 0.001). 3. Negative correlation was found between miR-326 and Ets-1 mRNA expression in Treg cells from new-onset SLE patients (r = -0.583 p = 0.01). 4. There was no correlation of miR-326 or Ets-1 m

  14. Suppression of haematopoiesis by IgG autoantibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H; Ozaki, K; Matsuzaki, Y; Abe, M; Kosaka, M; Saito, S

    1995-01-01

    The inhibiting activity of serum on haematopoiesis has been described in patients with SLE. To explore further the features of serum inhibitor, we first examined the suppression of granulocytic and erythroid colony formation in vitro by serum from patients with SLE using methylcellulose culture. The potent inhibiting activity was demonstrated in six of 20 patients. All of these six patients were associated with leukocytopenia and/or anaemia. Five of 10 sera from patients with active SLE suppressed the colony formation of both burst-forming units of erythrocyte (BFU-E) and colony-forming units of granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), and one serum suppressed BFU-E only. IgG fraction isolated from sera with inhibiting activity suppressed colony formation without complement involvement. The elimination of monocytes and lymphocytes from target mononuclear cells did not affect the suppression by the IgG fractions. The suppressive effect was completely eliminated after incubation of the IgG fractions with progenitor-enriched mononuclear cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed these IgG bound to CD34+ haematopoietic progenitor cells, but not to CD33+ cells. These data suggest that (i) the inhibitor of colony formation in serum was observed in IgG fraction; (ii) its suppressive effect on colony formation was mediated by neither monocytes and lymphocytes nor complements; and (iii) IgG fraction could bind to primitive haematopoietic progenitor cells and suppress the growth of these cells. Thus, IgG autoantibodies to primitive haematopoietic progenitor cells are demonstrated to be present in the sera of a significant proportion of active SLE patients with anaemia and leukocytopenia and to suppress the progenitor cell growth. PMID:7539726

  15. Evaluating a particular circulating microRNA species from an SLE patient using stem-loop qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Sui, Weiguo; Liu, Fuhua; Chen, Jiejing; Ou, Minglin; Dai, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease, and correct judgment of SLE activity is very important in guiding precise clinical treatment. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) could serve as potential biomarkers of disease activity or status in SLE, and here we describe a modified qRT-PCR method for detecting them. Stem loop has become one of the most powerful methods for determining miRNA expression because it is highly sensitive and accurate and requires only small amount of sample. In this chapter, we focus on a stem-loop reverse transcription-bound SYBR green qRT-PCR protocol for evaluating a particular circulating miRNA species in SLE patients.

  16. Metabolic control of T-cell activation and death in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, David; Perl, Andras

    2009-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by abnormal T-cell activation and death, processes which are crucially dependent on the controlled production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) and of ATP in mitochondria. The mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm) has conclusively emerged as a critical checkpoint of ATP synthesis and cell death. Lupus T cells exhibit persistent elevation of Δψm or mitochondrial hyperpolarization (MHP) as well as depletion of ATP and glutathione which decrease activation-induced apoptosis and instead predispose T cells for necrosis, thus stimulating inflammation in SLE. NO-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in normal T cells accelerates the rapid phase and reduces the plateau of Ca2+ influx upon CD3/CD28 co-stimulation, thus mimicking the Ca2+ signaling profile of lupus T cells. Treatment of SLE patients with rapamycin improves disease activity, normalizes CD3/CD28-induced Ca2+ fluxing but fails to affect MHP, suggesting that altered Ca2+ fluxing is downstream or independent of mitochondrial dysfunction. Understanding the molecular basis and consequences of MHP is essential for controlling T-cell activation and death signaling in SLE. Lupus T cells exhibit mitochondrial dysfunctionMitochondrial hyperpolarization (MHP) and ATP depletion predispose lupus T cells to death by necrosis which is pro-inflammatoryMHP is caused by depletion of glutathione and exposure to nitric oxide (NO)NO-induced mitochondrial biogenesis regenerates the Ca2+ signaling profile of lupus T cellsRapamycin treatment normalizes Ca2+ fluxing but not MHP, suggesting that the mammalian target of rapamycin, acts as a sensor and effector of MHP in SLE PMID:18722557

  17. High Affinity Antibodies against Influenza Characterize the Plasmablast Response in SLE Patients After Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Kaval; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Smith, Kenneth; Huang, Min; Li, Lie; Pauli, Noel T.; Henry Dunand, Carole J.; Lee, Jane-Hwei; Morrissey, Michael; Wu, Yixuan; Joachims, Michelle L.; Munroe, Melissa E.; Lau, Denise; Qu, Xinyan; Krammer, Florian; Wrammert, Jens; Palese, Peter; Ahmed, Rafi; James, Judith A.; Wilson, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Breakdown of B cell tolerance is a cardinal feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Increased numbers of autoreactive mature naïve B cells have been described in SLE patients and autoantibodies have been shown to arise from autoreactive and non-autoreactive precursors. How these defects, in the regulation of B cell tolerance and selection, influence germinal center (GC) reactions that are directed towards foreign antigens has yet to be investigated. Here, we examined the characteristics of post-GC foreign antigen-specific B cells from SLE patients and healthy controls by analyzing monoclonal antibodies generated from plasmablasts induced specifically by influenza vaccination. We report that many of the SLE patients had anti-influenza antibodies with higher binding affinity and neutralization capacity than those from controls. Although overall frequencies of autoreactivity in the influenza-specific plasmablasts were similar for SLE patients and controls, the variable gene repertoire of influenza-specific plasmablasts from SLE patients was altered, with increased usage of JH6 and long heavy chain CDR3 segments. We found that high affinity anti-influenza antibodies generally characterize the plasmablast responses of SLE patients with low levels of autoreactivity; however, certain exceptions were noted. The high-avidity antibody responses in SLE patients may also be correlated with cytokines that are abnormally expressed in lupus. These findings provide insights into the effects of dysregulated immunity on the quality of antibody responses following influenza vaccination and further our understanding of the underlying abnormalities of lupus. PMID:25951191

  18. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) & IL-4 gene polymorphisms in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) & their association with susceptibility to SLE

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadoo-khorasani, Milad; Salimi, Saeedeh; Tabatabai, Ehsan; Sandoughi, Mahnaz; Zakeri, Zahra; Farajian-Mashhadi, Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is one of the pro-inflammatory cytokines that plays a main role in the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) as an anti-inflammatory cytokine regulates balance between Th1 and Th2 immune responses. This study was undertaken to investigate the IL-1β and IL-4 genes polymorphisms in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and also association between the polymorphisms and susceptibility to SLE. Methods: One hundred and sixty three SLE patients and 180 healthy controls were genotyped for the IL-4 VNTR (variable number tandem repeat), IL-1β C-511T and IL-1β T-31C polymorphisms by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) method. Results: The frequencies of CC genotype and C allele of the IL-1β T-31C polymorphism were significantly (P<0.01) lower in SLE patients than controls. Moreover, the frequencies of RP1/RP2 genotype and RP2 allele of IL-4 VNTR polymorphism were significantly (P<0.05) higher in the SLE patients. No association was observed between IL-1β C-511T polymorphism and increased risk of SLE. We observed increased frequency of CT and TT genotypes of IL-1β C-511T polymorphism in SLE patients with malar rash compared to SLE patients without this manifestation. Interpretation & conclusions: The present findings suggest that IL-1β T-31C and IL-4 VNTR polymorphisms but not IL-1β C-511T polymorphism may contribute in SLE pathogenesis. In addition, CT and TT genotypes of IL-1β C-511T polymorphism were associated with SLE. PMID:27488002

  19. Avascular osteonecrosis in patients with SLE: relation to corticosteroid therapy and anticardiolipin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Migliaresi, S; Picillo, U; Ambrosone, L; Di Palma, G; Mallozzi, M; Tesone, E R; Tirri, G

    1994-02-01

    Sixty-nine unselected SLE patients were studied to evaluate the prevalence of avascular osteonecrosis (AVN) and its relationship with steroid therapy and with anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL). All the patients were under treatment with corticosteroids. AVN occurred in seven occurred in seven of the 69 patients (10.14%) and was not related to corticosteroid intake. Seventeen of the 69 patients were also treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPPT) and cumulated the highest corticosteroid doses but none of them suffered from AVN. Excluding the 17 MPPT-treated SLE patients, corticosteroid intake was significantly higher in the AVN-SLE patients. Abnormal IgG and/or IgM aCL serum levels were found in two of the seven AVN-SLE patients and in 24 of the 62 non-AVN SLE, without a statistically significant difference. None of the seven AVN-SLE patients showed features of antiphospholipid syndrome. We conclude that in SLE patients a continuous high-dose steroid treatment may be considered a risk factor for AVN. On the contrary, MPPT regimen may reduce this risk. Anticardiolipin antibodies might represent an added factor which could play a role in some patients but not in all. PMID:8025584

  20. Racial Disparities for Age at Time of Cardiovascular Events and Cardiovascular Death in SLE Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scalzi, Lisabeth V.; Hollenbeak, Christopher S.; Wang, Li

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine if there are racial disparities in regard to the age at which SLE patients experience CVD and CVD associated death. Methods Using the 2003–2006 National Inpatient Sample, we calculated the age difference between SLE patients and their race and gender-matched controls at the time of hospitalization for a cardiovascular (CVD) event and for CVD-associated death. In addition, we also calculated the age difference for the same outcomes between White SLE patients and gender-matched controls for each minority group. Results The mean age difference at the time of CVD event between women with and without SLE was 10.5 years. All age differences between women with SLE (n=3,625) and women without SLE admitted for CVD were significant (p<0.0001). Black women were the youngest female SLE racial group to be admitted with CVD (53.9 years) and have a CVD associated inhospital mortality (52.8 years; n=218). Black SLE women were 19.8 years younger than race and gender-matched controls at the time of CVD associated death. Admission trends for CVD were reversed for Black women such that the highest proportions of these patients were admitted before age 55 and then steadily decreased across age categories. There were 805 men with SLE admitted with a CVD event, with Black and Hispanic groups being the youngest. Conclusions There are significant racial disparities with regard to age at the time of hospital admission for CVD events and a CVD-related hospitalization resulting in death in patients with SLE. PMID:20506536

  1. Factor V Leiden and Thrombosis in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, R.; Barton, J.L.; Chang, M.; Catanese, JJ.; Li, Y.; Begovich, A.B.; Criswell, LA.

    2009-01-01

    To perform a meta-analysis of the association between the factor V Leiden polymorphism (FVL) and thrombosis among patients with SLE and/or antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) positivity. Included studies recruited patients based on SLE or aPL positive status, confirmed subjects' SLE diagnosis as defined by the American College of Rheumatology, and documented thrombotic events. Excluded studies were non-English or considered only arterial thrombosis. Individual patient data, available from five studies, together with unpublished data from 1210 European-American SLE patients from the UCSF Lupus Genetics Collection genotyped for FVL, were further analyzed. Seventeen studies (n=2090 subjects) were included in the initial meta-analysis. Unadjusted odds ratios (OR) were calculated to assess association of FVL with thrombosis. The OR for association of thrombosis with FVL was 2.88 (95% C.I. 1.98-4.20). In the secondary analysis with our individual patient dataset (n=1447 European-derived individuals), SLE subjects with the FVL polymorphism still had more than two times the odds of thrombosis compared to subjects without this polymorphism, even when adjusting for covariates such as gender, age, and aPL status. SLE and/or aPL positive patients with the FVL variant have more than two times the odds of thrombosis compared to those without this polymorphism. PMID:19421222

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of HSP90AA1 gene influence response of SLE patients to glucocorticoids treatment.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yan-Feng; Xu, Jian-Hua; Gu, Yuan-Yuan; Pan, Fa-Ming; Tao, Jin-Hui; Wang, De-Guang; Xu, Sheng-Qian; Xiao, Hui; Chen, Pei-Ling; Liu, Shuang; Cai, Jing; Lian, Li; Liu, Sheng-Xiu; Liang, Chun-Mei; Tian, Guo; Ye, Qian-Ling; Pan, Hai-Feng; Su, Hong; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is an important glucocorticoid receptor (GR) chaperone protein, and is supposed to be the key factor in regulating glucocorticoids (GCs) effects. The aim of the present study was to explore whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within HSP90AA1 gene affect the response of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients to GCs treatment. Two hundred and forty-five SLE patients were treated with GCs (prednisone) for 12 weeks. SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) was used to assess the response of SLE patients to GCs treatment, and patients were classified into sensitive group and insensitive group. HapMap database and Haploview software were used to select tag SNPs. Tag SNPs were genotyped by using multiplex SNaPshot method. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to discriminate the impact of SNPs of HSP90AA1 gene on the response of SLE patients to GCs treatment. Two hundred and thirty three SLE patients finished the 12-week follow-up. Of these patients, 128 patients were included in sensitive group, and 105 patients were included in insensitive group. Seven tag SNPs were selected within HSP90AA1 gene. We detected significant associations for rs7160651 (dominant model: crude OR 0.514, 95 % CI 0.297-0.890, P = 0.018; adjusted OR 0.518, 95 % CI 0.293-0.916, P = 0.024), rs10873531 (dominant model: crude OR 0.516, 95 % CI 0.305-0.876, P = 0.014; adjusted OR 0.522, 95 % CI 0.304-0.898, P = 0.019) and rs2298877 (dominant model: crude OR 0.543, 95 % CI 0.317-0.928, P = 0.026, adjusted OR 0.558, 95 % CI 0.323-0.967, P = 0.037) polymorphisms, but not for other polymorphisms (P > 0.05). The present study demonstrates that HSP90AA1 gene SNPs may affect the response of SLE patients to GCs treatment.

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of HSP90AA1 gene influence response of SLE patients to glucocorticoids treatment.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yan-Feng; Xu, Jian-Hua; Gu, Yuan-Yuan; Pan, Fa-Ming; Tao, Jin-Hui; Wang, De-Guang; Xu, Sheng-Qian; Xiao, Hui; Chen, Pei-Ling; Liu, Shuang; Cai, Jing; Lian, Li; Liu, Sheng-Xiu; Liang, Chun-Mei; Tian, Guo; Ye, Qian-Ling; Pan, Hai-Feng; Su, Hong; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is an important glucocorticoid receptor (GR) chaperone protein, and is supposed to be the key factor in regulating glucocorticoids (GCs) effects. The aim of the present study was to explore whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within HSP90AA1 gene affect the response of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients to GCs treatment. Two hundred and forty-five SLE patients were treated with GCs (prednisone) for 12 weeks. SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) was used to assess the response of SLE patients to GCs treatment, and patients were classified into sensitive group and insensitive group. HapMap database and Haploview software were used to select tag SNPs. Tag SNPs were genotyped by using multiplex SNaPshot method. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to discriminate the impact of SNPs of HSP90AA1 gene on the response of SLE patients to GCs treatment. Two hundred and thirty three SLE patients finished the 12-week follow-up. Of these patients, 128 patients were included in sensitive group, and 105 patients were included in insensitive group. Seven tag SNPs were selected within HSP90AA1 gene. We detected significant associations for rs7160651 (dominant model: crude OR 0.514, 95 % CI 0.297-0.890, P = 0.018; adjusted OR 0.518, 95 % CI 0.293-0.916, P = 0.024), rs10873531 (dominant model: crude OR 0.516, 95 % CI 0.305-0.876, P = 0.014; adjusted OR 0.522, 95 % CI 0.304-0.898, P = 0.019) and rs2298877 (dominant model: crude OR 0.543, 95 % CI 0.317-0.928, P = 0.026, adjusted OR 0.558, 95 % CI 0.323-0.967, P = 0.037) polymorphisms, but not for other polymorphisms (P > 0.05). The present study demonstrates that HSP90AA1 gene SNPs may affect the response of SLE patients to GCs treatment. PMID:27026916

  4. The Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Responder Index (SRI); a new SLE disease activity assessment.

    PubMed

    Luijten, K M A C; Tekstra, J; Bijlsma, J W J; Bijl, M

    2012-03-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), because of its complex and multisystemic presentation, lacks a reliable and sensitive gold standard for measuring disease activity. In addition, there is no standardized method for defining response to therapy. Several disease activity indices have been developed over the years, each with their own positive and negative aspects. Growing insight in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases like SLE leads to the introduction of specific targeted biologic therapies. To investigate the efficacy of these new biologic agents, disease activity must be monitored regularly by a reliable and validated instrument. Recent studies on new biologics for treatment of SLE use a new composite measurement for disease activity and response in SLE. This new disease activity assessment, called SLE Responder Index (SRI), comprises criteria from three different internationally validated indices, SELENA-SLE Disease Activity Index (SELENA-SLEDAI), Physician Global Assessment (PGA) and the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) 2004. This review gives an overview of current available disease activity indices in relation to the newly developed composite SRI.

  5. Atherosclerosis development in SLE patients is not determined by monocytes ability to bind/endocytose Ox-LDL.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Lina M; Londoño, Julián; Montoya, Guillermo; De Sanctis, Juan B; Rojas, Mauricio; Ramírez, Luis A; García, Luis F; Vásquez, Gloria

    2011-05-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease; however, the mechanisms involved in the early onset of atherosclerosis in these patients are not clear. Scavenger receptors, CD36 and CD163 are expressed by mononuclear phagocytes and participate in the binding and uptake of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (Ox-LDL), contributing to foam-cells formation and atherosclerosis development. The aim of the present study was to evaluate CD36(+) and CD163(+) expression and Ox-LDL removal by monocytes from SLE and atherosclerotic patients, compared to similar age-range healthy controls. Healthy controls, SLE, and atherosclerotic patients were evaluated for carotid intima media thickness (CIMT), lipid profile, and native LDL (N-LDL) and Ox-LDL binding/endocytosis. SLE patients presented decreased high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and increased Triglyceride levels, and half of the SLE patients had increased CIMT, compared to their healthy controls (HC(SLE)). The number of CD14(+)CD163(+) cells was increased in atherosclerosis healthy controls (HC(Atheros)) compared to HC(SLE), but there were no differences between SLE or atherosclerotic patients and their respective healthy controls. Clearance assays revealed a similar capacity to bind/endocytose Ox-LDL by monocytes from SLE patients and HC(SLE), and an increased binding and endocytosis of Ox-LDL by monocytes from atherosclerotic patients, compared to HC(Atheros). The decreased CD36 and CD163 expression observed in atherosclerotic and SLE patients, respectively, suggest that these inflammatory conditions modulate these receptors differentially. The increased CIMT observed in SLE patients cannot be explained by Ox-LDL binding/endocytosis, which was comparable to their controls.

  6. Analysis of expression and function of the co-stimulatory receptor SLAMF1 in immune cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed

    Liñán-Rico, L; Hernández-Castro, B; Doniz-Padilla, L; Portillo-Salazar, H; Baranda, L; Cruz-Muñoz, M E; González-Amaro, R

    2015-10-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule SLAMF1 (CD150) is a co-stimulatory molecule that is expressed by most immune cells, including T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes. Since different abnormalities have been reported regarding the number and function of Foxp3+ Treg cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we decided to analyze the expression and function of CD150 in these regulatory lymphocytes in this condition. We isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 20 patients with SLE, and 20 healthy controls. The expression of SLAMF1 was determined by multi-parametric flow cytometry and the suppressive function of CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes, upon engagement or not of CD150 with an agonistic monoclonal antibody, was analyzed by an assay of inhibition of cell proliferation. We observed a significantly increased expression of SLAMF1 by CD3+CD4+ helper T cells and CD19+ B cells in patients with SLE and active disease. However, similar levels of SLAMF1 expression were detected in Foxp3+ Treg cells from patients and controls. In contrast, a higher proportion of SLE patients increased their suppressive function of Treg cells upon CD150 engagement compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that SLAMF1 is another significant piece in the intricate defective immune-regulatory function of patients with SLE.

  7. Therapeutic blockade of TNF in patients with SLE-promising or crazy?

    PubMed

    Aringer, Martin; Smolen, Josef S

    2012-03-01

    TNF is an important mediator of inflammation, but is also involved in the control of autoimmunity. The latter has been demonstrated in a murine model of SLE (NZB/W) and by the occurrence of autoantibodies to nuclear antigens as well as occasional, transient lupus-like syndromes in patients under TNF blockade. In contrast, data on increased TNF levels in serum, kidney and skin samples of SLE patients as well as results in other mouse models of the disease point to an inflammatory role of TNF in SLE organ disease. Despite all due caution, given these two sides of the cytokine, TNF blockade has by now been employed for several years in single cases and open label studies; data on more than fifty patients have meanwhile been published, for the vast majority of which infliximab was employed. These clinical data have to be very cautiously interpreted, as always with data on single cases or open label trials. However, some consistent pieces of information emerge and may inform controlled clinical trials: (i) While antibodies to double-stranded DNA commonly showed transient increases, lupus flares have not been seen so far and thus apparently are at least not the rule; (ii) in contrast, increases in anti-phospholipid antibodies may be associated with vascular adverse events; (iii) bacterial infections, pneumonia and urinary tract infections in particular, have been observed; (iv) short term induction therapy appears relatively safe, while long-term TNF blockade may confer significant risks in SLE; (v) TNF blocker induction therapy may lead to long-term remission in patients with lupus nephritis, hemophagocytic syndrome, and interstitial lung disease; (vi) patients with lupus arthritis often respond to TNF-blockade but symptoms recur after cessation of therapy, necessitating longer term therapy, which is more risky than short term treatment.

  8. An SLE patient with prolactinoma and recurrent granulomatous mastitis successfully treated with hydroxychloroquine and bromocriptine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L-N; Shi, T-Y; Yang, Y-J; Zhang, F-C

    2014-04-01

    Granulomatous mastitis (GM) is a rare benign mammary lesion in which autoimmunity and hyperprolactinemia are considered possible etiological factors. GM has a high frequency of relapse and may lead to chronic ulceration and fistula if not treated properly. Here we report a case of a 22-year-old systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patient with three years' disease duration, stable on prednisone and hydroxychloroquine, who was found to have prolactinoma and recurrent GM after she discontinued medication on her own accord. The patient subsequently recovered and remained free of GM relapse under treatment of prednisone, hydroxychloroquine and bromocriptine. Though autoimmune disorders and prolactinoma were reported in GM, a coexisting condition of SLE, prolactinoma, and granulomatous mastitis has rarely been observed in one patient. We suggest our case as an illustrative example of the complex interaction between autoimmunity, neuroendocrine dysfunction, and manifestations in the breast: Immunological disturbances in the background of SLE, coupled with elevated prolactin levels secondary to a prolactinoma, may have predisposed the patient to the development of GM. The mammary lesion recovered and maintained free of relapse under immunosuppressive and antiprolactinemic therapy.

  9. Increased expression of TLR2 in CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients enhances immune reactivity and promotes IL-17 expression through histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Liao, Jieyue; Zhao, Ming; Wu, Haijing; Yung, Susan; Chan, Tak Mao; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Lu, Qianjin

    2015-09-01

    The innate immune system has been shown to play an important pathologic role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TLR2, a PRR, recognizes exogenous PAMPs, and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns and has been implicated in the initiation and maintenance of the perpetuated inflammatory reactions in autoimmune diseases. Here, we report increased expression of TLR2 in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, CD19(+) B cells, and CD14(+) monocytes from SLE patients. Conventional treatment, such as hydroxychloroquine and corticosteroids, showed no effect on TLR2 expression in CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients. In vitro stimulation of TLR2 in CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients increased CD40L and CD70 expression, as well as secretion of IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, and TNF-α, while Foxp3 transcription decreased. This effect was reversed by TLR2 siRNA. Moreover, TLR2 activation upregulated H3K4 tri-methylation and H4 acetylation levels while downregulated H3K9 tri-methylation level in the IL-17A promoter region. In addition, it also increased H4 acetylation levels and decreased H3K9 tri-methylation levels in the IL-17F promoter region. In summary, our findings demonstrate that increased expression of TLR2 contributes to immune reactivity and promotes IL-17A and IL-17F expression through histone modifications in SLE.

  10. Clinical and immunological manifestations in 151 SLE patients living in Dubai.

    PubMed

    AlSaleh, J; Jassim, V; ElSayed, M; Saleh, N; Harb, D

    2008-01-01

    To gain better understanding of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Dubai we studied the clinical and immunological manifestations in a cohort of 151 patients attended Rheumatology Clinic in Dubai Hospital between January 2002 and January 2007. We found that the female to male ratio was 20.5:1, with a mean age of 35.5 years (0.9). The mean age at disease onset was 28.9 years (0.8) and mean disease duration 6.7 years (0.4). Five-year survival rate in our cohort was 94%. The commonest clinical manifestations in this cohort were arthritis (88%), haematological abnormalities (61.6%), and malar rash (60.3%). Leucopenia, fever, hair loss and proteinuria were observed in approximately half of the patients. Anaemia was found in 44.3% but only 9.9% had haemolytic anaemia. Photosensitive rash was seen in 43% of patients. Approximately one-third of the patients had serositis and mouth ulcers, 30.5 and 27.2% respectively. Vasculitis was observed in 19.2% of patients. Neuropsychiatric manifestations (15.9%), discoid lupus lesions (12.6%), and brain infarcts (13.2%) were infrequent. Subacute cutaneous lupus (6%) was also uncommon. Anti-nuclear antibodies were detected in 98%, anti-double stranded DNA antibodies in 88.7%, anti-Sm antibodies in 19.7%, anti-RNP in 40.4%, anti-Ro antibodies in 52.3% and anti-La antibodies in 19.8%. Anti-cardiolipin IgM and IgG were detected in 25.3 and 22.4%, respectively. This study suggests that Arabs with SLE residing in Dubai have comparable clinical features to their counterparts in other Arab countries and Western countries. The high prevalence of positive anti-Ro antibodies among our Arab patients probably reflects a character, that is, commonly seen in SLE patients of Middle East origin.

  11. Exploring lifetime occupational exposure and SLE flare: a patient-focussed pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Squance, Marline L; Guest, Maya; Reeves, Glenn; Attia, John; Bridgman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Environmental effectors, such as ultraviolet radiation exposure, infection and stress, have been established as having a role in exacerbating lupus symptoms. However, unpredictable patterns of flare events still remain a mystery. Occupational effectors have also been suggested as having a contributing role; however, they are not widely researched. In this paper we report a pilot study designed to generate focus areas for future research regarding occupational exposures and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods The study explored potential links between exposures and the occurrence of patient-reported flare events in 80 Australian women with SLE (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria classified). Specifically, the study assessed the hypothesis that occupational exposure is associated with significant changes in the likelihood of lupus flares. Lifetime employment history was analysed with the Finnish Job Exposure Matrix (FINJEM), 40 different semiquantified exposure class estimates for a wide number of occupations based on probability of exposure (p≥5%=exposed) were analysed with the construction of negative binomial regression models to test relationships between occupational agents and flare days. A backward stepwise elimination was used to generate a parsimonious model. Results Significant associations were noted for exposure classes of manual handling burden, (p=0.02, incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.01), Iron (p=0.00, IRR 1.37), wood dust (p=0.00, IRR 3.34) and asbestos (p=0.03, IRR 2.48). Conclusion Exposure assessment results indicated that occupations, such as nursing, with a high manual handling burden, posed increased risk to patients with SLE, however, the greatest risk was associated with wood dust and iron exposure with teachers and specialist labourers. PMID:25379190

  12. Autoimmune thyroid disease in a cohort of Malaysian SLE patients: frequency, clinical and immunological associations.

    PubMed

    Ong, S G; Choy, C H

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (ATD) has been associated with other systemic autoimmune diseases. To date, there is limited data on thyroid disorders and autoimmune thyroid disease in Malaysia. The frequency of ATD among 189 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients was 6.3%, with 2.6% in the hyperthyroid group and 3.7% in the hypothyroid group. Hypothyroidism developed at a much younger mean age (24.3 years), suggesting that SLE might be a predisposing factor for the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. There was a higher rate of thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO) positivity compared with anti-thyroglobulin antibody (Tg) in the hyperthyroid subgroup. This study also demonstrated a greater proportion of ATD patients who demonstrated high titres (≥ 1:6400) of TPO compared with high titres of Tg. Although there was an association between ATD and the presence of anti-Ro/SSA and/or anti-La/SSB antibodies, the absence of sicca symptoms and negative Schirmer's tests suggest a lack of association with secondary Sjogren's syndrome. A novel association between ATD and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was detected in our cohort. Hence we propose that patients affected by APS be routinely screened for ATD.

  13. A Chinese version of the Rheumatology Attitudes Index is a valid and reliable measure of learned helplessness in patients with SLE.

    PubMed

    Thumboo, J; Feng, P H; Chan, S P; Boey, M L; Thio, S T; Fong, K Y

    2002-01-01

    Despite the prognostic importance of learned helplessness (LH) in rheumatic diseases, there are no validated measures of LH in Chinese or other Asian languages. We therefore assessed the validity of a Chinese translation of the Rheumatology Attitudes Index (CRAI; a widely used measure of LH) and its Helplessness (CHS) and Internality (CIS) subscales in patients with SLE. Chinese-speaking SLE patients (n = 69) completed identical, self-administered questionnaires containing the CRAI and assessing demographic/socio-economic variables twice within 2 weeks. SLE activity, damage and quality of life were assessed using the BILAG, SLICC/ACR Damage Index and SF-36 respectively. Scale psychometric properties were assessed through Cronbach's alpha, intra-class correlations, quantifying test-retest differences, factor analysis and known-groups construct validity. Internal consistency and reliability were acceptable, with Cronbach's alpha for the CHS, CIS and CRAI being 0.70, 0.69 and 0.74, respectively. Mean differences in test-retest scores spanned 1.6-2.4% of possible scale ranges and intra class correlations ranged from 0.72 to 0.88. Factor analysis identified two major factors corresponding to the CHS and CIS subscales of the CRAI. Eight of 10 a priori hypotheses relating the CRAI and CHS to demographic, disease and quality of life variables were confirmed, supporting the construct validity of these scales. The CRAI and its helplessness subscale are valid and reliable measures of learned helplessness in Chinese-speaking SLE patients. PMID:11958583

  14. Expression and methylation data from SLE patient and healthy control blood samples subdivided with respect to ARID3a levels.

    PubMed

    Ward, Julie M; Ratliff, Michelle L; Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Wiley, Graham; Guthridge, Joel M; Gaffney, Patrick M; James, Judith A; Webb, Carol F

    2016-12-01

    Previously published studies revealed that variation in expression of the DNA-binding protein ARID3a in B lymphocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlated with levels of disease activity ("Disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus correlates with expression of the transcription factor AT-rich-interactive domain 3A" (J.M. Ward, K. Rose, C. Montgomery, I. Adrianto, J.A. James, J.T. Merrill et al., 2014) [1]). The data presented here compare DNA methylation patterns from SLE peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from samples with high numbers of ARID3a expressing B cells (ARID3a(H)) versus SLE samples with normal numbers of ARID3a(+) B cells (ARID3a(N)). The methylation data is available at the gene expression omnibus (GEO) repository, "Gene Expression Omnibus: NCBI gene expression and hybridization array data repository" (R. Edgar, M. Domrachev, A.E. Lash, 2002) [2]. Isolated B cells from SLE ARID3a(H) and ARID3a(N) B samples were also evaluated via qRT-PCR for Type I interferon (IFN) signature and pathway gene expression levels by qRT-PCR. Similarly, healthy control B cells and B cells stimulated to express ARID3a with the TLR agonist, CpG, were also compared via qRT-PCR. Primers designed to detect 6 IFNa subtype mRNAs were tested in 4 IFNa, Epstein-Barr Virus-transformed B cell lines ("Reduced interferon-alpha production by Epstein-Barr virus transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines and lectin-stimulated lymphocytes in congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type I" (S.H. Wickramasinghe, R. Hasan, J. Smythe, 1997) [3]). The data in this article support the publication, "Human effector B lymphocytes express ARID3a and secrete interferon alpha" (J.M. Ward, M.L. Ratliff, M.G. Dozmorov, G. Wiley, J.M. Guthridge, P.M. Gaffney, J.A. James, C.F. Webb, 2016) [4]. PMID:27656675

  15. In a SLE mouse model the production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early developing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Umiker, Benjamin R.; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O.; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG anti-nuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG anti-nucleic acid antibodies. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicdatg), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation (SHM), contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early developing B cells. PMID:25044405

  16. Production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early-developing B cells in a mouse model of SLE.

    PubMed

    Umiker, Benjamin R; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG antinuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG antinucleic acid Abs. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicda(tg) ), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here, we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early-developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early-developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation, contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early-developing B cells.

  17. Tinea infection with scutula-like lesions caused by Microsporum gypseum in a SLE patient: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiao; Liu, Fang; Wu, Fan; De Deng, Quan; Zeng, Hua Mei; Kong, Tao Qing; Chen, Jun; Sang, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Scutula are characteristic lesions of tinea favosa or favus; the most frequently identified causative organism is Trichophyton schoenleinii. Although scutula-like lesions were described in Microsporum gypseum infection, their presence on glabrous skin in a patient with SLE has not been reported previously. We report a case of tinea infection with scutula-like lesions caused by Microsporum gypseum in a SLE patient, who was treated with topical terbinafine cream, and the lesions resolved completely. In addition, we reviewed the reported cases about this rare clinical manifestation caused by Microsporum gypseum in the medical literature.

  18. Cross-recognition between histones and La/SSB may account for anti-DNA reactivity in SLE patients

    PubMed Central

    Touloupi, E; Routsias, JG; Tzioufas, AG

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies to La/SSB are detected in sera of patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome (pSS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The vast majority of anti-La/SSB positive sera contain antibodies directed towards a linear B-cell epitope of La/SSB spanning the sequence 349–364aa (pep349–364). The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluctuation of antibody levels to major B-cell epitopes of La/SSB over time and investigate for their possible crossreactions. Sequential sera from 15 SLE and 15 pSS patients, followed from 3 to 10 years were obtained. All patients with SLE were positive for anti-Ro/SSA, anti-La/SSB and anti-dsDNA antibodies and patients with pSS were positive for anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies. Sera from 30 patients with SLE without anti-La/SSB antibodies and 30 healthy individuals served as disease and negative control respectivelly. All sera tested for the presence of anti-pep349–364 antibodies, using a specific ELISA. Specific anti-pep349–364 IgG was purified from sera of SLE patients and evaluated for cross reactivity against dsDNA and histones. In all SLE sera the levels of anti-pep349–364 antibodies varied in time and fluctuated in parallel with anti dsDNA antibodies. Anti-pep349–364 IgG purified from 7 SLE patients. Five out of 7 were found to react with calf thymus DNA in ELISA. All purified (7/7) anti-pep349–364 IgG preparations reacted with histone H1 and failed to produce a positive immunofluorescence pattern in Crithidia luciliae anti-dsDNA assay which lacks histones. Competative inhibition experiments demonstrated that histone H1 could inhibit completely the binding of anti-pep349–364 IgG to pep349–364 while pep349–364 inhibited by 70% the binding of anti-pep349–364 IgG to histone H1. These findings indicate that a subgroup of SLE patients possess cross-reacting anti-histone H1 antibodies and anti-pep349–364 antibodies, which can be faulty considered as anti-dsDNA reactivity in regular ELISA techniques

  19. The effect of polyamines on the binding of anti-DNA antibodies from patients with SLE and normal human subjects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Stearns, Nancy A; Li, Xingfu; Pisetsky, David S

    2014-07-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To elucidate specificity further, the effect of polyamines on the binding of anti-DNA antibodies from patients with lupus was tested by ELISA to calf thymus (CT) DNA; we also assessed the binding of plasmas of patients and normal human subjects (NHS) to Micrococcus luteus (MC) DNA. As these studies showed, spermine can dose-dependently inhibit SLE anti-DNA binding to CT DNA and can promote dissociation of preformed immune complexes. With MC DNA as antigen, spermine failed to inhibit the NHS anti-DNA binding. Studies using plasmas adsorbed to a CT DNA cellulose affinity indicated that SLE plasmas are mixtures of anti-DNA that differ in inhibition by spermine and binding to conserved and non-conserved determinants. Together, these studies demonstrate that spermine can influence the binding of anti-DNA autoantibodies and may contribute to the antigenicity of DNA.

  20. IL-10 and TNFα Genotypes in SLE

    PubMed Central

    López, Patricia; Gutiérrez, Carmen; Suárez, Ana

    2010-01-01

    The production of two regulators of the inflammatory response, interleukin 10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), has been found to be deeply deregulated in SLE patients, suggesting that these cytokines may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. Genetic polymorphisms at the promoter regions of IL-10 and TNFα genes have been associated with different constitutive and induced cytokine production. Given that individual steady-state levels of these molecules may deviate an initial immune response towards different forms of lymphocyte activation, functional genetic variants in their promoters could influence the development of SLE. The present review summarizes the information previously reported about the involvement of IL-10 and TNFα genetic variants on SLE appearance, clinical phenotype, and outcome. We show that, in spite of the heterogeneity of the populations studied, the existing knowledge points towards a relevant role of IL-10 and TNFα genotypes in SLE. PMID:20625422

  1. Heat shock protein 27 and its regulatory molecules express differentially in SLE patients with distinct autoantibody profiles.

    PubMed

    Rai, Richa; Chauhan, Sudhir Kumar; Singh, Vikas Vikram; Rai, Madhukar; Rai, Geeta

    2015-03-01

    Generation of autoantigens of nuclear origin, like dsDNA and extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) have largely been associated with dysregulated apoptosis and defective clearance of apoptotic debris in SLE. Heat shock protein (HSP) 27 has been reported to have anti-apoptotic properties hence it was of interest to study the expression of HSP27 and its regulatory molecule Brn3a and hsa-miR-939 in SLE patients with distinct autoantibodies specificities. SLE patients were categorized into three subsets based on their distinct sero-positivity for either anti-dsDNA antibody alone (anti-dsDNA(+) group) or anti-ENA antibody alone (anti-ENA(+) group) or both (anti-dsDNA(+) ENA(+) group). We investigated the mRNA and protein expression of HSP27 and Brn3a in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs) by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blotting. Expression of apoptosis markers caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was determined by Western blotting. Hsa-miR-939 expression was determined using TaqMan(®) miRNA assay. In this study, we report significant downregulation of HSP27 in anti-ENA(+) patients and increased expression of caspase 3 and PARP in both anti-ENA(+) and anti-dsDNA(+) SLE subsets. A negative correlation was observed between the expression of HSP27 and apoptosis markers caspase 3 and PARP. Decreased Brn3a expression was observed in anti-ENA(+) SLE patients, which correlated positively with HSP27 expression. Expression of hsa-miR-939, which has a potential target site for Brn3a 3' UTR, was also elevated specifically in anti-ENA(+) patients. The decreased expressions of HSP27, Brn3a along with elevated levels of hsa-miR-939 are selectively associated with anti-ENA(+) patients and HSP27 was observed to be inversely associated with apoptosis. These findings are suggestive of distinct regulatory processes operative in SLE patient subsets with different autoantibody specificities.

  2. Serum antibodies to human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E, HLA-F and HLA-G in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during disease flares: Clinical relevance of HLA-F autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Jucaud, V; Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Morales-Buenrostro, L E; Hiepe, F; Rose, T; Biesen, R

    2016-03-01

    T lymphocyte hyperactivity and progressive inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients results in over-expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Ib on the surface of lymphocytes. These are shed into the circulation upon inflammation, and may augment production of antibodies promoting pathogenicity of the disease. The objective was to evaluate the association of HLA-Ib (HLA-E, HLA-F and HLA-G) antibodies to the disease activity of SLE. The immunoglobulin (Ig)G/IgM reactivity to HLA-Ib and β2m in the sera of 69 German, 29 Mexican female SLE patients and 17 German female controls was measured by multiplex Luminex(®)-based flow cytometry. The values were expressed as mean flourescence intensity (MFI). Only the German SLE cohort was analysed in relation to the clinical disease activity. In the controls, anti-HLA-G IgG predominated over other HLA-Ib antibodies, whereas SLE patients had a preponderance of anti-HLA-F IgG over the other HLA-Ib antibodies. The disease activity index, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI)-2000, was reflected only in the levels of anti-HLA-F IgG. Anti-HLA-F IgG with MFI level of 500-1999 was associated with active SLE, whereas inactive SLE revealed higher MFI (>2000). When anti-HLA-F IgG were cross-reactive with other HLA-Ib alleles, their reactivity was reflected in the levels of anti-HLA-E and -G IgG. The prevalence of HLA-F-monospecific antibodies in SLE patients was also associated with the clinical disease activity. Anti-HLA-F IgG is possibly involved in the clearance of HLA-F shed from lymphocytes and inflamed tissues to lessen the disease's severity, and thus emerges as a beneficial immune biomarker. Therefore, anti-HLA-Ib IgG should be considered as a biomarker in standard SLE diagnostics.

  3. Cytokines as therapeutic targets in SLE.

    PubMed

    Rönnblom, Lars; Elkon, Keith B

    2010-06-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease involving most immune cells. Studies in both experimental animal models of lupus and patients with SLE have revealed a number of cytokine pathways that are important in the disease process. Among these are B-cell activating factor, which promotes B-cell survival and autoantibody production, interferon-alpha, which acts as an immune adjuvant, and tumor necrosis factor, which contributes to organ inflammation. This knowledge, in combination with the successful use of anti-TNF treatment in rheumatoid arthritis, has spurred the development of several biologic agents targeting different cytokines or their receptors in SLE. Consequently, many trials of anticytokine therapies for SLE are underway. Although most of these trials are small or in early phases, the results of some large studies have also been reported. In this Review, we discuss the rationale for anticytokine therapies in SLE and review agents currently in use, and those being developed and tested experimentally. We present the results from published trials and discuss the tentative conclusions that can be drawn regarding the efficacy of the new agents. Finally, we provide suggestions for the future of treatment for SLE, including new therapeutic strategies.

  4. Increased proportion of responders to a murine anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody of the IgG1 class in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed Central

    Blasini, A M; Stekman, I L; Leon-Ponte, M; Caldera, D; Rodriguez, M A

    1993-01-01

    A group of Venezuelan patients with SLE showed an increased proportion of responders to Leu-4, an anti-CD3 MoAb of the IgG1 class, compared with ethnically matched non-SLE patients and healthy controls. The rate of proliferative responses or IL-2 production induced by MoAb Leu-4, and the helper effect of macrophages from Leu-4 responders on T cells from a third-party donor were comparable in patients and controls. No significant differences in the binding of murine IgG1 molecules by macrophages from SLE patients and controls were observed. The proportion of monocytes/macrophages expressing Fc gamma RI was significantly higher in SLE patients. However, the expression of FcRII, the type capable of supporting Leu-4-mediated responses, and of Fc gamma RIII was comparable in monocytes from SLE patients and controls. Our results suggest that Venezuelan patients with SLE may have a genetic predisposition for the expression of the phenotypic variant of Fc gamma RII capable of binding murine IgG1 molecules. PMID:8252802

  5. Glycated-H2A histone is better bound by serum anti-DNA autoantibodies in SLE patients: glycated-histones as likely trigger for SLE?

    PubMed

    Alam, Sana; Arif, Zarina; Alam, Khursheed

    2015-02-01

    Histones are the most abundant proteins associated with genomic DNA. Recent observations show that histones are quite susceptible to non-enzymatic glycation which results in the generation of free radicals causing structural perturbations. In this study, our aim is to define the role of deoxyribose-modified H2A histone in SLE initiation/progression. Glycation reaction was carried out by incubating H2A histone with 10 mM deoxyribose for 21 days at 37 °C. Structural changes in glycated-H2A were studied by various physico-chemical techniques. The antigen-antibody interaction was studied by direct binding, inhibition ELISA and mobility shift assay. Deoxyribose-modified-H2A histone showed increased hyperchromicity and increased fluorescence intensity. CD results demonstrated almost 50% loss in alpha helix conformation as a consequence of glycation. This was supported by an increase in Tm value vis-à-vis thermal stability. Glycated-H2A showed cross linking in SDS-PAGE. SLE sera positive for anti-nDNA autoantibodies showed preference for deoxyribose-modified-H2A histone compared to native H2A histone or native DNA. Inhibition ELISA supported the above findings. Band shift assay further reiterated the preferential recognition of glycated-H2A over native H2A by SLE IgG autoantibodies. Deoxyribose-modified-H2A histone exhibited damage as revealed by various physico-chemical studies. Glycation of H2A has resulted in the generation of neo-epitopes on H2A histone, which are preferably bound by SLE anti-nDNA autoantibodies. It implies that deoxyribose-modified-H2A may trigger immune response resulting in the generation of anti-glycated H2A antibodies with DNA cross reacting properties.

  6. Proteomic analyses and identification of arginine methylated proteins differentially recognized by autosera from anti-Sm positive SLE patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Antibodies against spliceosome Sm proteins (anti-Sm autoantibodies) are specific to the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Anti-Sm autosera have been reported to specifically recognize Sm D1 and D3 with symmetric di-methylarginines (sDMA). We investigated if anti-Sm sera from local SLE patients can differentially recognize Sm proteins or any other proteins due to their methylation states. Results We prepared HeLa cell proteins at normal or hypomethylation states (treated with an indirect methyltransferase inhibitor adenosine dialdehyde, AdOx). A few signals detected by the anti-Sm positive sera from typical SLE patients decreased consistently in the immunoblots of hypomethylated cell extracts. The differentially detected signals by one serum (Sm1) were pinpointed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and identified by mass spectrometry. Three identified proteins: splicing factor, proline- and glutamine-rich (SFPQ), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D-like (hnRNP DL) and cellular nucleic acid binding protein (CNBP) are known to contain methylarginines in their glycine and arginine rich (GAR) sequences. We showed that recombinant hnRNP DL and CNBP expressed in Escherichia coli can be detected by all anti-Sm positive sera we tested. As CNBP appeared to be differentially detected by the SLE sera in the pilot study, differential recognition of arginine methylated CNBP protein by the anti-Sm positive sera were further examined. Hypomethylated FLAG-CNBP protein immunopurified from AdOx-treated HeLa cells was less recognized by Sm1 compared to the CNBP protein expressed in untreated cells. Two of 20 other anti-Sm positive sera specifically differentiated the FLAG-CNBP protein expressed in HeLa cells due to the methylation. We also observed deferential recognition of methylated recombinant CNBP proteins expressed from E. coli by some of the autosera. Conclusion Our study showed that hnRNP DL and CNBP are novel antigens for SLE patients and

  7. Association of γδ T Cell Compartment Size to Disease Activity and Response to Therapy in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongshuang; Yuan, Yi; Zhao, Ling; Ye, Zhuang; Xu, Jiandong; Li, Man; Jiang, Zhenyu; Jiang, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although γδT cells are widely recognized as pivotal elements in immune-mediated diseases, their role in the pathogenesis of SLE and therapeutic outcome remains under explored. The current study aims to characterize the γδT cell compartment in SLE and correlate its status to disease severity and response to therapy. Methods Human peripheral blood-derived γδ T cells were isolated from 14 healthy volunteers and 22 SLE patients (before and after 4 and 12 weeks following the onset of glucocorticoids (GC), mycophenolatemofetil (MMF) orhydroxychloroquine (HCQ) treatment). The γδ T cells were characterized using flow cytometry. In addition, serum concentration of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-17A was determined by cytometric bead array (CBA). Results The SLEDAI scores dropped significantly following therapy in a subset of patients (responders–R) but not in some (non- responders–NR). Peripheral blood γδ T cells in general, and γ9+δ T cells and TNF-α/IL-17-secreting CD4-CD8-γδ T cell subsets in particular, were decreased in SLE compared to healthy controls. The numbers of the γδ T cell subsets reached levels similar to those of healthy controls following therapy in R but not in NR. Serum IL-6, IL-10 and IL-17 but not IFN-γ and TNF-α were significantly increased in SLE compared to the healthy controls and exhibited differential changes following therapy. In addition, inverse correlation was observed between SLEDAI scores and γδ T cell compartments, especially with TNF-α+γδT cells, TNF-α+γ9+δT cells and IL17+CD4-CD8-γδT cells subsets. Differential correlation patterns were also observed between serum cytokine levels and various γδ T cell compartments. Conclusions A strong association exists between γδ T cell compartments and SLE pathogenesis, disease severity and response to therapy. PMID:27333282

  8. Silent Burdens in Disease: Fatigue and Depression in SLE.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, R; Bernardes, M; Terroso, G; de Sousa, M; Figueiredo-Braga, M

    2014-01-01

    At a time when health is being recognized as more than just avoiding death, age and comorbidity are becoming increasingly important aspects of chronic disease. Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE) is probably one of the best paradigms of modern chronic disease, sitting at the crossroads of numerous somatic health problems, immune activation, depression, pain, and fatigue. One hundred forty-eight female participants were enrolled in the present study: 50 diagnosed with SLE, 45 with major depressive disorder (MDD), and 53 age-matched controls. Statistically significant lower scores in quality-of-life dimensions related to physical impairment were found in SLE. Patients with MDD presented significant levels of pain, reduced physical summary component (PSC), and general health scores different from healthy controls. Fatigue was reported in 90% of women with SLE and 77.8% of the MDD patients in contrast with 39.6% in the control group. Significant correlations were seen among fatigue severity, age, and educational level in SLE. From our own previous work and more recent work on the association of immune activation and depression, unexplained fatigue in SLE may signify an early sign of immune activation flare-up. The search for cytokine markers should perhaps be extended to fatigue in SLE.

  9. Silent Burdens in Disease: Fatigue and Depression in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, R.; Bernardes, M.; Terroso, G.; de Sousa, M.; Figueiredo-Braga, M.

    2014-01-01

    At a time when health is being recognized as more than just avoiding death, age and comorbidity are becoming increasingly important aspects of chronic disease. Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE) is probably one of the best paradigms of modern chronic disease, sitting at the crossroads of numerous somatic health problems, immune activation, depression, pain, and fatigue. One hundred forty-eight female participants were enrolled in the present study: 50 diagnosed with SLE, 45 with major depressive disorder (MDD), and 53 age-matched controls. Statistically significant lower scores in quality-of-life dimensions related to physical impairment were found in SLE. Patients with MDD presented significant levels of pain, reduced physical summary component (PSC), and general health scores different from healthy controls. Fatigue was reported in 90% of women with SLE and 77.8% of the MDD patients in contrast with 39.6% in the control group. Significant correlations were seen among fatigue severity, age, and educational level in SLE. From our own previous work and more recent work on the association of immune activation and depression, unexplained fatigue in SLE may signify an early sign of immune activation flare-up. The search for cytokine markers should perhaps be extended to fatigue in SLE. PMID:24592329

  10. Effects of red blood cell lysing solutions on the detection of peripheral basophils of healthy normals and SLE patients by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qingjun; Ye, Ling; Deng, Zhenzhen; Li, Lu; Liu, Huafeng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of four widely used red blood cell lysing solutions on counting and measurement of activation marker of peripheral basophils in normals and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients by flow cytometry. Our results showed that the light scatter properties including FS and SS value of leukocytes in whole blood were preserved when whole blood samples were lysed in RBC Lysis Buffer and FACS Lysing Solution, while were affected when lysed in distilled water or ACK. By counting basophils, RBC Lysis Buffer and FACS Lysing Solution were almost the same level, while were significantly lower when lysed in distilled water or ACK. The expressions of CD203c on peripheral basophils of SLE patients were significantly higher than those of normals. Comparing the data of CD203c expression obtained demonstrated that there were no significant differences among them, while FACS Lysing Solution treatment leads to a slightly lower staining intensity of CD203c. We provide a solid description that the widely used red blood cell lysing reagents may influence the light scatter properties of leukocytes, the accuracy of quantity of absolute number of the existence of basophil subsets and the quantity of staining intensity of cell-activated marker CD203c fluorescence when measured by flow cytometry. PMID:24593031

  11. Effects of red blood cell lysing solutions on the detection of peripheral basophils of healthy normals and SLE patients by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qingjun; Ye, Ling; Deng, Zhenzhen; Li, Lu; Liu, Huafeng

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of four widely used red blood cell lysing solutions on counting and measurement of activation marker of peripheral basophils in normals and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients by flow cytometry. Our results showed that the light scatter properties including FS and SS value of leukocytes in whole blood were preserved when whole blood samples were lysed in RBC Lysis Buffer and FACS Lysing Solution, while were affected when lysed in distilled water or ACK. By counting basophils, RBC Lysis Buffer and FACS Lysing Solution were almost the same level, while were significantly lower when lysed in distilled water or ACK. The expressions of CD203c on peripheral basophils of SLE patients were significantly higher than those of normals. Comparing the data of CD203c expression obtained demonstrated that there were no significant differences among them, while FACS Lysing Solution treatment leads to a slightly lower staining intensity of CD203c. We provide a solid description that the widely used red blood cell lysing reagents may influence the light scatter properties of leukocytes, the accuracy of quantity of absolute number of the existence of basophil subsets and the quantity of staining intensity of cell-activated marker CD203c fluorescence when measured by flow cytometry.

  12. Chinese SLE Treatment and Research Group Registry: III. Association of Autoantibodies with Clinical Manifestations in Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Xiaomei; Li, Zhijun; Ye, Zhizhong; Li, Caifeng; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Zhengang; Zheng, Yi; Li, Xiangpei; Zhang, Miaojia; Tian, Xin-Ping; Li, Mengtao; Zhao, Jiuliang; Zhang, Feng-Chun; Zhao, Yan

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the characteristics of Chinese SLE patients by analyzing the association between specific autoantibodies and clinical manifestations of 2104 SLE patients from registry data of CSTAR cohort. Significant (P < 0.05) associations were found between anti-Sm antibody, anti-rRNP antibody, and malar rash; between anti-RNP antibody, anti-SSA antibody, and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); between anti-SSB antibody and hematologic involvement; and between anti-dsDNA antibody and nephropathy. APL antibody was associated with hematologic involvement, interstitial lung disease, and a lower prevalence of oral ulcerations (P < 0.05). Associations were also found between anti-dsDNA antibody and a lower prevalence of photosensitivity, and between anti-SSA antibody and a lower prevalence of nephropathy (P < 0.05). Most of these findings were consistent with other studies in the literature but this study is the first report on the association between anti-SSA and a lower prevalence of nephropathy. The correlations of specific autoantibodies and clinical manifestations could provide clues for physicians to predict organ damages in SLE patients. We suggest that a thorough screening of autoantibodies should be carried out when the diagnosis of SLE is established, and repeated echocardiography annually in SLE patients with anti-RNP or anti-SSA antibody should be performed. PMID:24864270

  13. Chinese SLE treatment and research group registry: III. association of autoantibodies with clinical manifestations in Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Leng, Xiaomei; Li, Zhijun; Ye, Zhizhong; Li, Caifeng; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Zhengang; Zheng, Yi; Li, Xiangpei; Zhang, Miaojia; Tian, Xin-Ping; Li, Mengtao; Zhao, Jiuliang; Zhang, Feng-Chun; Zhao, Yan; Zeng, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the characteristics of Chinese SLE patients by analyzing the association between specific autoantibodies and clinical manifestations of 2104 SLE patients from registry data of CSTAR cohort. Significant (P<0.05) associations were found between anti-Sm antibody, anti-rRNP antibody, and malar rash; between anti-RNP antibody, anti-SSA antibody, and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); between anti-SSB antibody and hematologic involvement; and between anti-dsDNA antibody and nephropathy. APL antibody was associated with hematologic involvement, interstitial lung disease, and a lower prevalence of oral ulcerations (P<0.05). Associations were also found between anti-dsDNA antibody and a lower prevalence of photosensitivity, and between anti-SSA antibody and a lower prevalence of nephropathy (P<0.05). Most of these findings were consistent with other studies in the literature but this study is the first report on the association between anti-SSA and a lower prevalence of nephropathy. The correlations of specific autoantibodies and clinical manifestations could provide clues for physicians to predict organ damages in SLE patients. We suggest that a thorough screening of autoantibodies should be carried out when the diagnosis of SLE is established, and repeated echocardiography annually in SLE patients with anti-RNP or anti-SSA antibody should be performed.

  14. A Multilocus Genetic Study in a Cohort of Italian SLE Patients Confirms the Association with STAT4 Gene and Describes a New Association with HCP5 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ciccacci, Cinzia; Perricone, Carlo; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Rufini, Sara; Di Fusco, Davide; Alessandri, Cristiano; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Cipriano, Enrica; Novelli, Giuseppe; Valesini, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with complex pathogenesis in which genes and environmental factors are involved. We aimed at analyzing previously identified loci associated with SLE or with other autoimmune and/or inflammatory disorders (STAT4, IL10, IL23R, IRAK1, PSORS1C1, HCP5, MIR146a, PTPN2, ERAP1, ATG16L1, IRGM) in a sample of Italian SLE patients in order to verify or confirm their possible involvement and relative contribution in the disease. Materials and methods Two hundred thirty-nine consecutive SLE patients and 278 matched healthy controls were enrolled. Study protocol included complete physical examination, and clinical and laboratory data collection. Nineteen polymorphisms were genotyped by allelic discrimination assays. A case-control association study and a genotype-phenotype correlation were performed. Results STAT4 was the most associated gene [P = 3×10−7, OR = 2.13 (95% CI: 1.59–2.85)]. IL10 confirmed its association with SLE [rs3024505: P = 0.02, OR = 1.52 (95% CI: 1.07–2.16)]. We describe a novel significant association between HCP5 locus and SLE susceptibility [rs3099844: P = 0.01, OR = 2.06 (95% CI: 1.18–3.6)]. The genotype/phenotype correlation analysis showed several associations including a higher risk to develop pericarditis with STAT4, and an association between HCP5 rs3099844 and anti-Ro/SSA antibodies. Conclusions STAT4 and IL10 confirm their association with SLE. We found that some SNPs in PSORS1C1, ATG16L1, IL23R, PTPN2 and MIR146a genes can determine particular disease phenotypes. HCP5 rs3099844 is associated with SLE and with anti-Ro/SSA. This polymorphism has been previously found associated with cardiac manifestations of SLE, a condition related with anti-Ro/SSA antibodies. Thus, our results may provide new insights into SLE pathogenesis. PMID:25369137

  15. Peripheral catabolism of CR1 (the C3b receptor, CD35) on erythrocytes from healthy individuals and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J H; Lutz, H U; Pennaforte, J L; Bouchard, A; Kazatchkine, M D

    1992-01-01

    The present study investigated the rate of catabolism of CR1 (the C3b receptor, CD35) on erythrocytes (E) in vivo, in relationship with the expressed number of CR1/E, the CR1.1 HindIII quantitative CR1 polymorphism, and cell age. The relationship between the number of CR1/E and cell age was analysed by measuring G6PDH activity in E that had been sorted according to high or low expression of CR1 (CD35), by assessing the expression of CR1 (CD35) on E separated according to cell density, and by comparing the number of CR1 (CD35) antigenic sites on reticulocytes and on E. A physiological catabolism of CR1 (CD35) manifested by a reduction in the number of CR1 (CD35) antigenic sites/E with cell ageing was consistently observed in healthy individuals. The number of CR1/E decreased with ageing of E according to a complex pattern that associated an exponential decay and an offset. Calculated half-lives of CR1 (CD35) ranged between 11 and 32 days in healthy individuals. A more rapid loss of CR1 (CD35) with cell ageing occurred on cells from individuals expressing high numbers of CR1/E. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), half-lives of CR1 (CD35) on E were in the same range as those of healthy individuals with a similar quantitative CR1 genotype; the number of CR1 (CD35) on reticulocytes was reduced and linearly related to the number of CR1/E, independently of the patients' quantitative CR1 genotype. Transfusion experiments with E bearing high or low amounts of CR1/E indicated the lack of preferential removal of E bearing high numbers of CR1 (CD35) in patients with SLE. These results indicate that the rate of loss of CR1 (CD35) from E with cell ageing is directly related to the quantitative CR1 phenotype and suggest that enhanced peripheral catabolism is not the sole mechanism of the acquired loss of CR1 (CD35) on E in patients with SLE. PMID:1531948

  16. Immune cells and type 1 IFN in urine of SLE patients correlate with immunopathology in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Scott, Eric; Dooley, Mary Anne; Vilen, Barbara J; Clarke, Stephen H

    2016-07-01

    The immunopathological events in the kidneys of lupus nephritis (LN) patients are poorly understood due in part to the difficulty in acquiring serial biopsies and the inherent limitations in their analysis. To identify a means to circumvent these limitations, we investigated whether immune cells of kidney origin are present in patient urine and whether they correlate with kidney pathology. Flow cytometry analysis was performed on peripheral blood and urine cells of 69 SLE patients, of whom 41 were LN patients. In addition, type I IFN (IFNα/β) levels were determined in plasma and urine by bioassay. Approximately 60% of non-LN patients had urine lymphocytes. In these patients, T cells were always present and predominantly CD8(+), while B cells were either absent or a mixture of naïve and memory B cells. In contrast, >90% of LN patients had urine lymphocytes. In half, the B and T cells resembled those in non-LN patient urine; however, in the remaining patients, the B cells were exclusively Ig-secreting plasmablasts or plasma cells (PB/PCs) and the T cells were predominantly CD4(+). In addition, pDCs and IFNα/β frequently accompanied PB/PCs. The majority of patients with urine PB/PCs presented with proliferative nephritis and a significant loss of kidney function, which in some cases had progressed to end stage renal disease (ESRD). In conclusion, urine can provide access to cells of kidney resident populations for phenotypic and functional characterization. Analysis of these cells provides insight into the kidney immunopathology and may serve as biomarkers to identify patients at risk for developing LN and progressing to ESRD. PMID:27102764

  17. Long-term organ damage accrual and safety in patients with SLE treated with belimumab plus standard of care

    PubMed Central

    Urowitz, M; van Vollenhoven, R; Aranow, C; Fettiplace, J; Oldham, M; Wilson, B; Molta, C; Roth, D; Gordon, D

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine long-term organ damage and safety following treatment with belimumab plus standard of care (SoC) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Pooled data were examined from two ongoing open-label studies that enrolled patients who completed BLISS-52 or BLISS-76. Patients received belimumab every four weeks plus SoC. SLICC Damage Index (SDI) values were assessed every 48 weeks (study years) following belimumab initiation (baseline). The primary endpoint was change in SDI from baseline at study years 5–6. Incidences of adverse events (AEs) were reported for the entire study period. Results The modified intent-to-treat (MITT) population comprised 998 patients. At baseline, 940 (94.2%) were female, mean (SD) age was 38.7 (11.49) years, and disease duration was 6.7 (6.24) years. The mean (SD) SELENA-SLEDAI and SDI scores were 8.2 (4.18) and 0.7 (1.19), respectively; 411 (41.2%) patients had organ damage (SDI = 1: 235 (23.5%); SDI ≥ 2: 176 (17.6%)) prior to belimumab. A total of 427 (42.8%) patients withdrew overall; the most common reasons were patient request (16.8%) and AEs (8.5%). The mean (SD) change in SDI was +0.2 (0.48) at study years 5–6 (n = 403); 343 (85.1%) patients had no change from baseline in SDI score (SDI +1: 46 (11.4%), SDI +2: 13 (3.2%), SDI +3: 1 (0.2%)). Of patients without organ damage at baseline, 211/241 (87.6%) had no change in SDI and the mean change (SD) in SDI was +0.2 (0.44). Of patients with organ damage at baseline, 132/162 (81.5%) had no change in SDI and the mean (SD) change in SDI was +0.2 (0.53). The probability of not having a worsening in SDI score was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.85, 0.91) and 0.75 (0.67, 0.81) in those without and with baseline damage, respectively (post hoc analysis). Drug-related AEs were reported for 433 (43.4%) patients; infections/infestations (282, 28.3%) and gastrointestinal disorders (139, 13.9%) were the most common. Conclusion Patients with SLE treated with long

  18. FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is inhibited by autoantibodies present in SLE.

    PubMed

    Marsman, Gerben; Stephan, Femke; de Leeuw, Karina; Bulder, Ingrid; Ruinard, Jessica T; de Jong, Jan; Westra, Johanna; Bultink, Irene E M; Voskuyl, Alexandre E; Aarden, Lucien A; Luken, Brenda M; Kallenberg, Cees G M; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2016-03-01

    Inefficient clearance of apoptotic cells and the subsequent exposure of the immune system to nuclear contents are crucially involved in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Factor VII-activating protease (FSAP) is activated in serum upon contact with dead cells, and releases nucleosomes from late apoptotic cells into the extracellular environment. We investigated whether FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is affected in SLE patients. Nucleosome release in sera of 27 SLE patients and 30 healthy controls was investigated by incubating late apoptotic Jurkat cells with serum and analyzing the remaining DNA content by flow cytometry. We found that nucleosome release in sera of SLE patients with high disease activity was significantly decreased when compared with that in SLE sera obtained during low disease activity or from healthy individuals. Upon removal of IgG/IgM antibodies from SLE sera, nucleosome release was restored. Similarly, monoclonal antinuclear antibodies inhibited nucleosome release in healthy donor serum or by plasma-purified FSAP. This inhibition was lost when Fab fragments were used, suggesting that antigen cross-linking is involved. In conclusion, FSAP-mediated nucleosome release from late apoptotic cells is greatly impaired in SLE patient sera, possibly hampering the clearance of these cells and thereby propagating inflammation.

  19. The SLE Transcriptome Exhibits Evidence of Chronic Endotoxin Exposure and Has Widespread Dysregulation of Non-Coding and Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lihua; Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Angela M.; Wang, Wei; Wei, Zhi; Akhter, Ehtisham; Maurer, Kelly; Reis, Patrícia Costa; Song, Li; Petri, Michelle; Sullivan, Kathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gene expression studies of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have demonstrated a type I interferon signature and increased expression of inflammatory cytokine genes. Studies of patients with Aicardi Goutières syndrome, commonly cited as a single gene model for SLE, have suggested that accumulation of non-coding RNAs may drive some of the pathologic gene expression, however, no RNA sequencing studies of SLE patients have been performed. This study was designed to define altered expression of coding and non-coding RNAs and to detect globally altered RNA processing in SLE. Methods Purified monocytes from eight healthy age/gender matched controls and nine SLE patients (with low-moderate disease activity and lack of biologic drug use or immune suppressive treatment) were studied using RNA-seq. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to validate findings. Serum levels of endotoxin were measured by ELISA. Results We found that SLE patients had diminished expression of most endogenous retroviruses and small nucleolar RNAs, but exhibited increased expression of pri-miRNAs. Splicing patterns and polyadenylation were significantly altered. In addition, SLE monocytes expressed novel transcripts, an effect that was replicated by LPS treatment of control monocytes. We further identified increased circulating endotoxin in SLE patients. Conclusions Monocytes from SLE patients exhibit globally dysregulated gene expression. The transcriptome is not simply altered by the transcriptional activation of a set of genes, but is qualitatively different in SLE. The identification of novel loci, inducible by LPS, suggests that chronic microbial translocation could contribute to the immunologic dysregulation in SLE, a new potential disease mechanism. PMID:24796678

  20. SLE - Rituximab in lupus.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Robert

    2003-01-01

    B cells are essential to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The chimeric monoclonal antibody rituximab depletes B cells by targeting the pan-B-cell surface marker CD20. Preliminary experience with this agent in SLE and other autoimmune diseases has been encouraging. Controlled trials in SLE will be necessary to determine whether rituximab is useful therapy in this disease, and will teach us more about the roles of B cells in its pathogenesis.

  1. Glutamate receptor antibodies in neurological diseases: anti-AMPA-GluR3 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies, anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies, anti-mGluR1 antibodies or anti-mGluR5 antibodies are present in subpopulations of patients with either: epilepsy, encephalitis, cerebellar ataxia, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and neuropsychiatric SLE, Sjogren's syndrome, schizophrenia, mania or stroke. These autoimmune anti-glutamate receptor antibodies can bind neurons in few brain regions, activate glutamate receptors, decrease glutamate receptor's expression, impair glutamate-induced signaling and function, activate blood brain barrier endothelial cells, kill neurons, damage the brain, induce behavioral/psychiatric/cognitive abnormalities and ataxia in animal models, and can be removed or silenced in some patients by immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Levite, Mia

    2014-08-01

    pathological effects: they activate glutamate/AMPA receptors, kill neurons by 'Excitotoxicity', and/or by complement activation modulated by complement regulatory proteins, cause multiple brain damage, aggravate chemoconvulsant-induced seizures, and also induce behavioral/motor impairments. Some patients with 'Autoimmune Epilepsy' that have anti-AMPA-GluR3B antibodies respond well (although sometimes transiently) to immunotherapy, and thanks to that have reduced seizures and overall improved neurological functions. (2) Anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies are present in patients with autoimmune 'Anti-NMDA-receptor Encephalitis'. In humans, in animal models and in vitro the anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies can be very pathogenic since they can cause a pronounced decrease of surface NMDA receptors expressed in hippocampal neurons, and also decrease the cluster density and synaptic localization of the NMDA receptors. The anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies induce these effects by crosslinking and internalization of the NMDA receptors. Such changes can impair glutamate signaling via the NMDA receptors and lead to various neuronal/behavior/cognitive/psychiatric abnormalities. Anti-NMDA-NR1 antibodies are frequently present in high levels in the CSF of the patients with 'Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis' due to their intrathecal production. Many patients with 'Anti-NMDA receptor Encephalitis' respond well to several modes of immunotherapy. (3) Anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies are present in a substantial number of patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with or without neuropsychiatric problems. The exact percentage of SLE patients having anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies varies in different studies from 14 to 35%, and in one study such antibodies were found in 81% of patients with diffuse 'Neuropshychiatric SLE', and in 44% of patients with focal 'Neuropshychiatric SLE'. Anti-NMDA-NR2A/B antibodies are also present in subpopulations of patients with Epilepsy of several types, Encephalitis of several types (e

  2. The simultaneous incidence of acute pancreatitis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a rare duo in a patient with SLE.

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    A young female presented with acute abdominal pain of two days duration consistent with acute pancreatitis. During her stay in the hospital she had a sudden drop in hemoglobin to 6 g/dl without any overt blood loss. On evaluation, it was evident that she had acute pancreatitis, in addition to displaying features of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. She had been a known case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and had discontinued her treatment. She was managed with methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Her clinical condition improved, and she has been regularly attending our clinic for the last 2 years. According to a literature search in Medline, it would appear that this is the first report of a case in which SLE with autoimmune hemolytic anemia has been associated with acute pancreatitis in a single case.

  3. T cells as a therapeutic target in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Comte, Denis; Karampetsou, Maria P.; Tsokos, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by a loss of tolerance to multiple endogenous antigens. SLE etiology remains largely unknown, despite recent insight into the immunopathogenesis of the disease. T cells are important in the development of the disease by amplifying the immune response and contributing to organ damage. Aberrant signaling, cytokine secretion and tissue homing displayed by SLE T cells have been extensively studied and the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms are starting to be elucidated. T-cell targeted treatments are being explored in SLE patients. This review is an update on the T-cell abnormalities and related therapeutic options in SLE. PMID:25801878

  4. T lymphocyte expression of complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21): a role in adhesive cell-cell interactions and dysregulation in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed

    Levy, E; Ambrus, J; Kahl, L; Molina, H; Tung, K; Holers, V M

    1992-11-01

    Complement receptor 2 (CR2, CD21), the receptor for both the C3d,g portion of human complement component C3 and the Epstein-Barr virus, has been recently described on peripheral T cells. By using dual stain flow cytometric analysis, we have also observed that a peripheral T lymphocyte subpopulation of normal healthy donors bears CR2 in a range varying from 1.1 to 23.2% (mean 12.6%) of total CD3+ cells. T lymphocytes from nine patients with inactive SLE expressed CR2 in a similar range. Three patients with active SLE were also studied. One of them, having neuropathy and glomerulonephritis, displayed an expansion of the CR2 T cell subpopulation which reached as much as 89% of total CD3+ cells. To examine potential functional roles of T cell CR2, cells from a Jurkat-derived CR2 expressing T cell line were found to bind in vitro to human CR2-, complement-coated K562 cell targets in a CR2- and complement-dependent fashion. Based on these studies, we hypothesize that CR2 might act to increase adherence of T cells to nucleated target cells bearing C3d,g, a function which may be relevant to cytotoxicity or other T cell activities requiring cell-cell interaction. PMID:1424280

  5. Early cerebral volume reductions and their associations with reduced lupus disease activity in patients with newly-diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mak, Anselm; Ho, Roger Chun-Man; Tng, Han-Ying; Koh, Hui Li; Chong, Joanna Su Xian; Zhou, Juan

    2016-03-01

    We examined if cerebral volume reduction occurs very early during the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and observed prospectively whether gray (GMV) and white matter volumes (WMV) of the brain would improve with lowered SLE disease activity. T1-weighted MRI brain images were obtained from 14 healthy controls (HC) and 14 newly-diagnosed SLE patients within 5 months of diagnosis (S1) and after achieving low disease activity (S2). Whole brain voxel-based morphometry was used to detect differences in the GMV and WMV between SLE patients and HC and those between SLE patients at S1 and S2. SLE patients were found to have lower GMV than HC in the middle cingulate cortex, middle frontal gyrus and right supplementary motor area, and lower WMV in the superior longitudinal fasciculus, cingulum cingulate gyrus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus at both S1 and S2. Whole-brain voxel-wise analysis revealed increased GMV chiefly in the prefrontal regions at S2 compared to S1 in SLE patients. The GMV increase in the left superior frontal gyrus was significantly associated with lowered SLE disease activity. In conclusion, GMV and WMV reduced very early in SLE patients. Reduction of SLE disease activity was accompanied by region-specific GMV improvement in the prefrontal regions.

  6. Early cerebral volume reductions and their associations with reduced lupus disease activity in patients with newly-diagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Anselm; Ho, Roger Chun-Man; Tng, Han-Ying; Koh, Hui Li; Chong, Joanna Su Xian; Zhou, Juan

    2016-01-01

    We examined if cerebral volume reduction occurs very early during the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and observed prospectively whether gray (GMV) and white matter volumes (WMV) of the brain would improve with lowered SLE disease activity. T1-weighted MRI brain images were obtained from 14 healthy controls (HC) and 14 newly-diagnosed SLE patients within 5 months of diagnosis (S1) and after achieving low disease activity (S2). Whole brain voxel-based morphometry was used to detect differences in the GMV and WMV between SLE patients and HC and those between SLE patients at S1 and S2. SLE patients were found to have lower GMV than HC in the middle cingulate cortex, middle frontal gyrus and right supplementary motor area, and lower WMV in the superior longitudinal fasciculus, cingulum cingulate gyrus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus at both S1 and S2. Whole-brain voxel-wise analysis revealed increased GMV chiefly in the prefrontal regions at S2 compared to S1 in SLE patients. The GMV increase in the left superior frontal gyrus was significantly associated with lowered SLE disease activity. In conclusion, GMV and WMV reduced very early in SLE patients. Reduction of SLE disease activity was accompanied by region-specific GMV improvement in the prefrontal regions. PMID:26928214

  7. SLE for theoretical physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Cardy, John . E-mail: j.cardy1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2005-07-01

    This article provides an introduction to Schramm (stochastic)-Loewner evolution (SLE) and to its connection with conformal field theory, from the point of view of its application to two-dimensional critical behaviour. The emphasis is on the conceptual ideas rather than rigorous proofs.

  8. The beneficial role of vitamin D in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed

    vinh quốc Luong, Khanh; Nguyễn, Lan Thi Hoàng

    2012-10-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have a high prevalence of abnormal bone metabolism and vitamin D deficiency. Genetic studies have provided the opportunity to determine the specific proteins linking vitamin D to SLE pathology [i.e., major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, the vitamin D receptor (VDR), microRNAs (miRNAs), the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), apolipoprotein E (ApoE), liver X receptor (LXR), and toll-like receptors (TLRs)]. Vitamin D also exerts protective effects against SLE through non-genomic factors, such as ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure, matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the prostaglandins (PGs), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and oxidative stress. Thus, vitamin D may play a beneficial role in SLE. Moreover, the use of calcitriol or 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) is optimal for the treatment of SLE patients because this active form of the vitamin D(3) metabolite can modulate inflammatory cytokine production. However, further investigation into the effects of calcitriol with SLE is warranted.

  9. Predominant role for activation-induced cytidine deaminase in generating IgG anti-nucleosomal antibodies of murine SLE.

    PubMed

    Detanico, Thiago; Guo, Wenzhong; Wysocki, Lawrence J

    2015-04-01

    Serum IgG anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) directed to complexes of DNA and histones are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and reflect a failure in lymphocyte self-tolerance. A prior study utilizing spontaneously autoimmune B6.Nba2 mice deficient in terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) and with heterozygous deficiencies in Jh and Igk loci underscored the importance of somatic hypermutation (SHM) as a major generator of SLE-associated ANA. This interpretation had to be qualified because of severely limited opportunities for receptor editing and restricted VHCDR3 diversity. Therefore, we performed the converse study using mice that carried functional Tdt genes and wild type Jh and Igk loci but that could not undergo SHM. Analyses of ANA and ANA-producing hybridomas from B6.Nba2 Aicda(-/-) mice revealed that few animals produced high titers of the prototypical ANA directed to complexes of histones and DNA, that this response was delayed and that those cells that did produce such antibody exhibited limited clonal expansion, unusual Jk use and only infrequent dual receptor expression. This, together with the additional finding of an intrinsic propensity for SHM to generate Arg codons selectively in CDRs, reinforce the view that most IgG autoimmune clones producing prototypical anti-nucleosome antibodies in wild type mice are created by SHM.

  10. Preferential Binding to Elk-1 by SLE-Associated IL10 Risk Allele Upregulates IL10 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Jennifer A.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Harley, John B.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Alarcόn-Riquelme, Marta E.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Sivils, Kathy Moser; James, Judith A.; Kamen, Diane L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Merrill, Joan T.; Scofield, R. Hal; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Stevens, Anne M.; Boackle, Susan A.; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jiyoung; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Martin, Javier; Yu, C. Yung; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Langefeld, Carl D.; Chen, Weiling; Grossman, Jennifer M.; Cantor, Rita M.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Tsao, Betty P.

    2013-01-01

    Immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) is elevated in sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlating with disease activity. The established association of IL10 with SLE and other autoimmune diseases led us to fine map causal variant(s) and to explore underlying mechanisms. We assessed 19 tag SNPs, covering the IL10 gene cluster including IL19, IL20 and IL24, for association with SLE in 15,533 case and control subjects from four ancestries. The previously reported IL10 variant, rs3024505 located at 1 kb downstream of IL10, exhibited the strongest association signal and was confirmed for association with SLE in European American (EA) (P = 2.7×10−8, OR = 1.30), but not in non-EA ancestries. SNP imputation conducted in EA dataset identified three additional SLE-associated SNPs tagged by rs3024505 (rs3122605, rs3024493 and rs3024495 located at 9.2 kb upstream, intron 3 and 4 of IL10, respectively), and SLE-risk alleles of these SNPs were dose-dependently associated with elevated levels of IL10 mRNA in PBMCs and circulating IL-10 protein in SLE patients and controls. Using nuclear extracts of peripheral blood cells from SLE patients for electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified specific binding of transcription factor Elk-1 to oligodeoxynucleotides containing the risk (G) allele of rs3122605, suggesting rs3122605 as the most likely causal variant regulating IL10 expression. Elk-1 is known to be activated by phosphorylation and nuclear localization to induce transcription. Of interest, phosphorylated Elk-1 (p-Elk-1) detected only in nuclear extracts of SLE PBMCs appeared to increase with disease activity. Co-expression levels of p-Elk-1 and IL-10 were elevated in SLE T, B cells and monocytes, associated with increased disease activity in SLE B cells, and were best downregulated by ERK inhibitor. Taken together, our data suggest that preferential binding of activated Elk-1 to the IL10 rs3122605-G allele upregulates IL

  11. Anti-DNA antibodies--quintessential biomarkers of SLE.

    PubMed

    Pisetsky, David S

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies that recognize and bind to DNA (anti-DNA antibodies) are serological hallmarks of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and key markers for diagnosis and disease activity. In addition to common use in the clinic, anti-DNA antibody testing now also determines eligibility for clinical trials, raising important questions about the nature of the antibody-antigen interaction. At present, no 'gold standard' for serological assessment exists, and anti-DNA antibody binding can be measured with a variety of assay formats, which differ in the nature of the DNA substrates and in the conditions for binding and detection of antibodies. A mechanism called monogamous bivalency--in which high avidity results from simultaneous interaction of IgG Fab sites with a single polynucleotide chain--determines anti-DNA antibody binding; this mechanism might affect antibody detection in different assay formats. Although anti-DNA antibodies can promote pathogenesis by depositing in the kidney or driving cytokine production, they are not all alike, pathologically, and anti-DNA antibody expression does not necessarily correlate with active disease. Levels of anti-DNA antibodies in patients with SLE can vary over time, distinguishing anti-DNA antibodies from other pathogenic antinuclear antibodies. Elucidation of the binding specificities and the pathogenic roles of anti-DNA antibodies in SLE should enable improvements in the design of informative assays for both clinical and research purposes.

  12. Neutrophils in the pathogenesis and manifestations of SLE.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Mariana J

    2011-09-27

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease of unclear etiology that affects mostly women of childbearing age. Profound abnormalities in both innate and adaptive immunity triggered by genetic and environmental factors are well documented to play an important part in the pathogenesis of SLE. Nonetheless, the role of neutrophils--the most abundant immune cell type--in the pathology of this disease has been unclear. Over the past decade, compelling evidence has emerged that implicates neutrophils in the initiation and perpetuation of SLE and also in the resultant organ damage frequently observed in patients with this disease. SLE-derived low-density granulocytes (LDGs) induce vascular damage and synthesize increased amounts of type I interferons and, as such, could play a prominent part in the pathogenesis of SLE. Furthermore, increased cell death and enhanced extracellular trap formation observed in SLE-derived neutrophils might have key roles in the induction of autoimmunity and the development of organ damage in patients with SLE. Together, these events could have significant deleterious effects and promote aberrant immune responses in this disease. This Review highlights the role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of SLE, with a particular focus on the putative deleterious effects of LDGs and neutrophil extracellular trap formation.

  13. Factors associated with anxiety, depression and suicide ideation in female outpatients with SLE in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, R; Morimoto, N; Tanaka, K; Kinukawa, N; Yoshizawa, S; Horiuchi, T; Nakashima, H; Otsuka, T

    2001-01-01

    The subjects consisted of 84 female SLE outpatients who were all over 20 years of age. These patients were able to maintain relatively stable physical conditions and lead normal daily lives, and they were regularly treated at the outpatient clinic. All subjects were Japanese. Psychological features (trait anxiety, state anxiety, depression and suicide ideation) were evaluated using psychological tests, and the relationships between the respective psychological features and background factors were statistically evaluated using stepwise multiple logistic regression analyses. In this study, we found that 'the self-evaluation of not having understood SLE at the time of starting SLE treatment' was the background factor significantly affecting depression or trait anxiety. 'No spouse' had a statistically significant effect on depression, and 'self-awareness as problems of side-effects due to steroids' had a statistically significant effect on state anxiety. We also found 'human relations among family members' and 'high daily steroid dosage' to be significantly correlated with suicide ideation. However, there were no correlations between the psychological features and 'disease activity at the time of investigation' or 'history of neuropsychiatric diseases'. In female SLE outpatients, performing psychological approaches focusing on 'understanding SLE at the beginning of treatment', 'the human relationships among family members', or 'issues related to steroid therapy' may be useful for the early treatment or prevention of various major mental problems.

  14. Soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand/osteoprotegerin ratio is increased in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients have lower bone mineral density and increased fracture risk when compared with healthy individuals, due to distinct factors and mechanisms. Bone remodeling is a tightly orchestrated process dependent on several factors, including the balance between receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). Our aim was to assess serum OPG and soluble RANKL (sRANKL) levels as well as sRANKL/OPG ratio in female SLE patients and compare it with female controls. Methods We have evaluated 103 SLE patients and 114 healthy controls, all Caucasian females. All participants underwent a clinical and laboratory evaluation. sRANKL and OPG were quantified in serum by ELISA based methods. sRANKL, OPG and sRANKL/OPG ratio levels were compared between SLE patients and age, sex and race matched healthy controls. For SLE patients, a multivariate analysis was performed, to find the possible predictors of the changes in sRANKL, OPG and sRANKL/OPG ratio levels. Results Although sRANKL levels did not differ between the two groups, serum OPG was lower in SLE patients (P < 0.001). This led to an increased sRANKL/OPG ratio (P = 0.010) in the patients' group. The multivariate analysis was performed considering age and other clinical and laboratorial potential confounders for these variations in the SLE patients group. We have showed that age (P = 0.001) and levels of anti-Sm antibodies (P = 0.016) were independent predictors of sRANKL/OPG ratio variations in SLE patients. No relationship with therapy or disease activity measured by SLEDAI2K was found. Conclusions These results are suggestive of increased osteoclastic stimuli driven by the SLE disease mechanisms. PMID:22027240

  15. Increased photosensitivity to near-ultraviolet light in murine SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, D.T.; Borel, Y.

    1984-02-01

    The authors investigated whether there is increased susceptibility to near-UVL in murine SLE. Cultured spleen cells from either strain of mice with lupus disease or conventional strains of mice were exposed to different UVL fractions in vitro. The effect of DNA synthesis, release, and repair was examined. DNA synthesis and release was measured as percent of (/sup 3/H)thymidine (dT) uptake into either total acid-precipitable radioactive material of cell sediment plus supernatant, or that of the medium alone, whereas hydroxyurea-resistant dT incorporation represented DNA repair. The data indicate that all SLE strains, in contrast to all non-SLE strains, show increased DNA synthesis and release after UV-A exposure. In addition, all murine SLE strains demonstrate increased susceptibility to induction of DNA damage by UV-A. The significance of these observations in relation to the clinical activity of SLE after sunlight exposure is discussed.

  16. Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis in the context of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): Is histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis in SLE associated with skin lesions?

    PubMed

    Kim, S K; Kang, M S; Yoon, B Y; Kim, D Y; Cho, S K; Bae, S C; Her, M Y

    2011-07-01

    Histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (HNL), or Kikuchi's disease, is a benign and self-limiting lymphadenopathy that typically affects young Asian females. It presents with lymphadenopathy, usually cervical, accompanied by fever, chills and leukopenia. Although the association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and HNL is rare, the number of reports of HNL in SLE patients is increasing. We present nine cases of HNL in patients with SLE. Among the seven patients with diverse skin manifestations, three had skin manifestations that were histologically compatible with SLE. A review of previous reports in the literature showed that cutaneous involvement was commonly found in HNL in association with SLE. In the patients who had simultaneous onset of both diseases, lupus flare-ups were commonly observed. We suggest that HNL in SLE patients is associated with cutaneous manifestations. This report contributes to our understanding of the relationship between these diseases. PMID:21562017

  17. Membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for SLE.

    PubMed

    Das, Nibhriti; Biswas, Bintili; Khera, Rohan

    2013-01-01

    For the last two decades, there had been remarkable advancement in understanding the role of complement regulatory proteins in autoimmune disorders and importance of complement inhibitors as therapeutics. Systemic lupus erythematosus is a prototype of systemic autoimmune disorders. The disease, though rare, is potentially fatal and afflicts women at their reproductive age. It is a complex disease with multiorgan involvement, and each patient presents with a different set of symptoms. The diagnosis is often difficult and is based on the diagnostic criteria set by the American Rheumatology Association. Presence of antinuclear antibodies and more specifically antidouble-stranded DNA indicates SLE. Since the disease is multifactorial and its phenotypes are highly heterogeneous, there is a need to identify multiple noninvasive biomarkers for SLE. Lack of validated biomarkers for SLE disease activity or response to treatment is a barrier to the efficient management of the disease, drug discovery, as well as development of new therapeutics. Recent studies with gene knockout mice have suggested that membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) may critically determine the sensitivity of host tissues to complement injury in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Case-controlled and followup studies carried out in our laboratory suggest an intimate relation between the level of DAF, MCP, CR1, and CD59 transcripts and the disease activity in SLE. Based on comparative evaluation of our data on these four membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins, we envisaged CR1 and MCP transcripts as putative noninvasive disease activity markers and the respective proteins as therapeutic targets for SLE. Following is a brief appraisal on membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins DAF, MCP, CR1, and CD59 as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for SLE. PMID:23402019

  18. Association between the Presence of Autoantibodies Targeting Ficolin-3 and Active Nephritis in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Clavarino, Giovanna; Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Ouili, Saber; Paul, Stéphane; Gout, Evelyne; Sarrot-Reynauld, Françoise; Bardin, Nathalie; Boëlle, Pierre -Yves; Chiche, Laurent; Bouillet, Laurence; Thielens, Nicole M.; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of multiple autoantibodies. Antibodies against Ficolin-3 were previously identified in the sera of some SLE patients, but their prevalence and significance have not been yet investigated. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies among SLE patients and to investigate their potential as diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers in SLE. In this retrospective study, sera from SLE patients (n = 165) were selected from a preexisting declared biological collection. Samples from healthy controls (n = 48) were matched with SLE sera. Disease activity was determined according to the SLEDAI score. Anti-ficolin-3, anti-dsDNA and anti-C1q antibodies levels were measured in sera by ELISA. First, a highly significant difference was found in the anti-ficolin-3 levels between SLE patients and healthy subjects. Anti-ficolin-3 antibodies were detected as positive in 56 of 165 (34%) SLE patients. The titer of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies was correlated with the SLEDAI score (r = 0.38, p<0.0001). The presence of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies was associated with anti-C1q and anti-dsDNA antibodies. Regarding associations with clinical manifestations, the presence of active lupus nephritis was significantly associated with the presence of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies (p≤0.001). This association with renal involvement was higher with anti-ficolin-3 or anti-C1q antibodies than with other auto-antibodies. Interestingly, the combination of anti-ficolin-3 and anti-C1q antibodies demonstrated higher specificity than any other serological biomarker. These results suggest that anti-ficolin-3 antibodies could be useful for the diagnosis of active nephritis in SLE patients. PMID:27631981

  19. Association between the Presence of Autoantibodies Targeting Ficolin-3 and Active Nephritis in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Plawecki, Maëlle; Lheritier, Elise; Clavarino, Giovanna; Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Ouili, Saber; Paul, Stéphane; Gout, Evelyne; Sarrot-Reynauld, Françoise; Bardin, Nathalie; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Chiche, Laurent; Bouillet, Laurence; Thielens, Nicole M; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of multiple autoantibodies. Antibodies against Ficolin-3 were previously identified in the sera of some SLE patients, but their prevalence and significance have not been yet investigated. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies among SLE patients and to investigate their potential as diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers in SLE. In this retrospective study, sera from SLE patients (n = 165) were selected from a preexisting declared biological collection. Samples from healthy controls (n = 48) were matched with SLE sera. Disease activity was determined according to the SLEDAI score. Anti-ficolin-3, anti-dsDNA and anti-C1q antibodies levels were measured in sera by ELISA. First, a highly significant difference was found in the anti-ficolin-3 levels between SLE patients and healthy subjects. Anti-ficolin-3 antibodies were detected as positive in 56 of 165 (34%) SLE patients. The titer of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies was correlated with the SLEDAI score (r = 0.38, p<0.0001). The presence of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies was associated with anti-C1q and anti-dsDNA antibodies. Regarding associations with clinical manifestations, the presence of active lupus nephritis was significantly associated with the presence of anti-ficolin-3 antibodies (p≤0.001). This association with renal involvement was higher with anti-ficolin-3 or anti-C1q antibodies than with other auto-antibodies. Interestingly, the combination of anti-ficolin-3 and anti-C1q antibodies demonstrated higher specificity than any other serological biomarker. These results suggest that anti-ficolin-3 antibodies could be useful for the diagnosis of active nephritis in SLE patients. PMID:27631981

  20. Depletion of autoreactive immunologic memory followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with refractory SLE induces long-term remission through de novo generation of a juvenile and tolerant immune system.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Tobias; Thiel, Andreas; Rosen, Oliver; Massenkeil, Gero; Sattler, Arne; Kohler, Siegfried; Mei, Henrik; Radtke, Hartmut; Gromnica-Ihle, Erika; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Arnold, Renate; Radbruch, Andreas; Hiepe, Falk

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials have indicated that immunoablation followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has the potential to induce clinical remission in patients with refractory systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but the mechanisms have remained unclear. We now report the results of a single-center prospective study of long-term immune reconstitution after ASCT in 7 patients with SLE. The clinical remissions observed in these patients are accompanied by the depletion of autoreactive immunologic memory, reflected by the disappearance of pathogenic anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibodies and protective antibodies in serum and a fundamental resetting of the adaptive immune system. The latter comprises recurrence of CD31(+)CD45RA(+)CD4(+) T cells (recent thymic emigrants) with a doubling in absolute numbers compared with age-matched healthy controls at the 3-year follow-up (P = .016), the regeneration of thymic-derived FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells, and normalization of peripheral T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire usage. Likewise, responders exhibited normalization of the previously disturbed B-cell homeostasis with numeric recovery of the naive B-cell compartment within 1 year after ASCT. These data are the first to demonstrate that both depletion of the autoreactive immunologic memory and a profound resetting of the adaptive immune system are required to reestablish self-tolerance in SLE.

  1. Plasma levels of galectin-3-binding protein reflect type I interferon activity and are increased in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Christoffer T; Lood, Christian; Østergaard, Ole; Iversen, Line V; Voss, Anne; Bengtsson, Anders; Jacobsen, Søren; Heegaard, Niels H H

    2014-01-01

    Objective Simple measures of type I interferon (IFN) activity constitute highly attractive biomarkers in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We explore galectin-3-binding protein (G3BP) as a novel measure of type I IFN activity and serum/plasma biomarker in large independent cohorts of patients with SLE and controls. Methods Serum and plasma G3BP concentrations were quantified using ELISA. Type I IFN activity was assessed by Mx1 reporter gene expression assays and correlated to serum G3BP concentrations (SLE-IFN-α, n=26 and healthy controls (HCs), n=10). Plasma G3BP concentrations in the SLE-Denmark (DK) (n=70) and SLE-Sweden (SE) (n=68) cohorts were compared with the HC-DK (n=47) and HC-SE (n=50) cohorts and patients with systemic sclerosis (n=111). In 15 patients with SLE, serum G3BP in consecutive samples was correlated to disease activity. Correlation analysis between G3BP, clinical parameters including disease activity in the four SLE cohorts was performed. Results G3BP concentrations correlated significantly with the IFN-α reporter gene assay (r=0.56, p=0.0005) and with IFN-α gene expression scores (r=0.54, p=0.0002). Plasma concentrations were significantly increased in the SLE-DK and SLE-SE cohorts compared with HCs and patients with systemic sclerosis (p<0.0001 and p=0.0009). G3BP concentrations correlated with disease activity measures in the SLE-DK- and SLE-IFN-α cohorts (p=0.0004 and p=0.05) but not in the SLE-SE cohort (p=0.98). Markedly temporal variation was observed in G3BP levels in the consecutive SLE-samples and was significantly associated with changes in disease activity (r=0.44, p=0.014). Conclusions G3BP plasma levels reflect type I IFN activity and are increased in SLE. Associations with disease activity or clinical manifestations are uncertain. This study highlights G3BP as a convenient measure of type I IFN-dependent gene activation. PMID:25452879

  2. Cyclic AMP level of lymphocytes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and its relation to disease activity.

    PubMed

    Phi, N C; Takáts, A; Binh, V H; Vien, C V; González-Cabello, R; Gergely, P

    1989-11-01

    The basal and stimulated intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 16 control subjects and 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all fulfilling the ARA criteria, were studied. No significant difference in basal cAMP level was observed between SLE patients and controls. SLE lymphocytes (both active and inactive) elicited a diminished response to aminophylline and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). No correlation was seen between disease activity and either baseline cAMP levels or response to these stimulators. We suggest an intrinsic (not disease activity-related) impairment of the adenylate cyclase-dependent regulatory mechanism in the PBMC of SLE patients, which may result in a defective IL-2 production and IL-2 dependent biological functions. PMID:2558072

  3. Post-steroid neuropsychiatric manifestations are significantly more frequent in SLE compared with other systemic autoimmune diseases and predict better prognosis compared with de novo neuropsychiatric SLE.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yuka; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Kako, Yuki; Nakagawa, Shin; Kanda, Masatoshi; Hisada, Ryo; Ohmura, Kazumasa; Shimamura, Sanae; Shida, Haruki; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Kato, Masaru; Oku, Kenji; Bohgaki, Toshiyuki; Horita, Tetsuya; Kusumi, Ichiro; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2016-08-01

    In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), neuropsychiatric (NP) symptoms sometimes occur after administration of corticosteroids, making differential diagnosis between NPSLE and steroid-induced psychosis challenging for clinicians. The aim of this study was to clarify the characteristics of post-steroid NP disease (PSNP) in patients with SLE. Clinical courses of 146 patients with SLE and 162 with other systemic autoimmune diseases, all in the absence of NP manifestations on admission, were retrospectively analyzed. Forty-three NPSLE patients on admission (de novo NPSLE) were also investigated. All patients were consecutively recruited and treated with 40mg/day or more of prednisolone in Hokkaido University Hospital between April 2002 and March 2015. The prevalence of PSNP was strikingly higher in SLE patients than other systemic autoimmune diseases (24.7% vs. 7.4%, OR 4.09, 95% CI 2.04-8.22). As independent risk factors to develop PSNP in SLE patients, past history of mental disorder and the presence of antiphospholipid syndrome were identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. In patients with PSNP-SLE, mood disorder was significantly more frequent than in de novo NPSLE (47.2% vs. 20.9%, OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.26-9.04). Of PSNP-SLE patients, two-thirds were with one or more abnormal findings in cerebrospinal fluid, electroencephalogram, MRI or SPECT. Majority of our PSNP-SLE patients received intensified immunosuppressive treatments and experienced improvement in most cases. PSNP-SLE had better relapse-free survival than de novo NPSLE (p<0.05, log rank test). In conclusion, PSNP frequently occurred in patients with SLE and treated successfully with immunosuppressive therapy, indicating that NPSLE is likely to harbor patients with PSNP-SLE.

  4. Bone Geometry Profiles in Women with and without SLE*

    PubMed Central

    Alele, Jimmy D; Kamen, Diane L; Hunt, Kelly J; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent studies have reported an increased risk of fracture among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in comparison to the general population. The aim of this study was to examine associations between SLE status and bone geometry in Caucasian and African American women. Methods We compared hip bone mineral density (BMD) and bone geometry parameters among SLE women and controls using hip structure analysis (HSA). 153 DXA scans from the Study of Lupus Vascular and bone Long Term Endpoints (68.7% Caucasian and 31.3% African American) and 4920 scans from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (59.3% Caucasian and 40.7% African American) were analyzed. Linear regression was used to examine BMD and bone geometry differences by SLE status and by race/ethnicity after adjusting for age and body mass index. Results Significant differences were detected between SLE women and control. Among Caucasians, age-adjusted BMD (g/cm2), section modulus (cm3) and cross sectional areas (cm2) were lower among SLE subjects in comparison to control at the narrow neck (0.88 vs. 0.83, 1.31 vs. 1.11 and 2.56 vs. 2.40; p<0.001, <0.01 and <0.0001 respectively), while buckling ratio was increased (10.0 vs. 10.6, p<0.01). Likewise, BMD, section modulus and cross sectional areas were decreased among African American SLE women at all sub regions, while buckling ratios were increased. Conclusions There were significant bone geometry differences between SLE women and control at all hip sub-regions. Bone geometry profiles among SLE subjects were suggestive of increased fragility. PMID:21755534

  5. The efficacy of novel B cell biologics as the future of SLE treatment: a review.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Ameer; Khamashta, Munther

    2014-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease with wide ranging multi-systemic effects. Current understanding centralises B cells in SLE pathogenesis with clinical features resulting from autoantibody formation, immune complex deposition, antigen presentation and cytokine activation. Existing standard of care therapies generates adverse side effects; secondary to corticosteroid use and untargeted immunosuppression. The inability to uphold remission and abolish the disease process, in addition to the increasing numbers of patients seen with refractory disease with these therapies, has provoked the development of novel B cell biologics targeting specific pathogenic pathways fundamental to the SLE disease process. Current evidence highlighting the efficacy of Rituximab, Ocrelizumab and Epratuzumab in inducing B cell depletion and achieving disease amelioration through specific B cell surface receptor antagonism is discussed. We review the efficacy of Atacicept, Briobacept and Belimumab in antagonising B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) and A proliferation inducing ligand (APRIL), two stimulatory cytokines crucial to B cell survival, growth and function. Two large multicentre randomised controlled trials, BLISS-52 and BLISS-76, have led to FDA approval of Belimumab. Following this breakthrough, other anti-BLyS therapies, Blisibimod and Tabalumab, are currently under Phase III evaluation. Similarly, murine models and Phase I/II trials have demonstrated significant efficacy of Rituximab, Epratuzumab, Briobacept and Atacicept as potential future therapies and we now eagerly await results from Phase III trials. Future research must compare the efficacy of different biologics amongst different patient subpopulations and SLE manifestations, in order to develop clinically and cost effective therapies.

  6. Murine lupus susceptibility locus Sle1a requires the expression of two sub-loci to induce inflammatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Cuda, C M; Zeumer, L; Sobel, E S; Croker, B P; Morel, L

    2010-10-01

    The NZM2410-derived Sle1a lupus susceptibility locus induces activated autoreactive CD4(+) T cells and reduces the number and function of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). In this study, we first showed that Sle1a contributes to autoimmunity by increasing antinuclear antibody production when expressed on either NZB or NZW heterozygous genomes, and by enhancing the chronic graft versus host disease response indicating an expansion of the autoreactive B-cell pool. Screening two non-overlapping recombinants, the Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 intervals that cover the entire Sle1a locus, revealed that both Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 were necessary for the full Sle1a phenotype. Sle1a.1, and to a lesser extent Sle1a.2, significantly affected CD4(+) T-cell activation as well as Treg differentiation and function. Sle1a.2 also increased the production of autoreactive B cells. As the Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 intervals contain only 1 and 15 known genes, respectively, this study considerably reduces the number of candidate genes responsible for the production of autoreactive T cells. These results also show that the Sle1 locus is an excellent model for the genetic architecture of lupus, in which a major obligate phenotype results from the coexpression of multiple genetic variants with individual weak effects.

  7. Simultaneous presentation of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) after enteroviral infection: can ADEM present as the first manifestation of SLE?

    PubMed

    Kim, J-M; Son, C-N; Chang, H W; Kim, S-H

    2015-05-01

    Central Nervous System (CNS) involvement of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) includes a broad range of neuropsychiatric syndromes. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a demyelinating CNS disorder characterized by encephalopathy and multifocal lesions predominantly involving the white matter on brain magnetic resonance imaging. ADEM associated with SLE has been only rarely reported. We report an unusual case of a 17-year-old girl who developed ADEM after enteroviral infection as the first manifestation of SLE. The authors emphasize that the patient's illness was preceded by enteroviral infection and that ADEM occurred before any other symptoms of SLE, which makes this case unique.

  8. The use of laboratory tests in the diagnosis of SLE.

    PubMed

    Egner, W

    2000-06-01

    ANA IIF is an effective screening assay in patients with clinical features of SLE and will detect most anti-ssDNA, anti-dsDNA, ENAs, and other autoantibodies. False positives are common. The clinical importance cannot be extrapolated from the ANA titre or pattern, although higher titres (> 1/160) are more likely to be important. HEp-2 cells are the most sensitive substrate for ANA detection, but this must be balanced against an increased incidence of insignificant positivity. ANA positive samples should be subjected to more specific assays for the diagnosis of SLE. A combination of ENA (Ro/La/Sm/RNP) and dsDNA assays will detect most patients with SLE as long as the characteristics of the assays used are well understood. ESR and CRP measurements provide useful additional information. Sjogren's syndrome and MCTD will produce overlapping serology with SLE, and anti-dsDNA titres are sometimes seen in autoimmune hepatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. All results should be reported in the light of the clinical details, by an experienced immunologist. A suggested diagnostic protocol is outlined in fig 1. The type of assay used crucially influences the predictive value of the tests. ELISA technology dominates routine laboratory practice, but tends to produce more false positive and true weak positive results, which may reduce the PPV of the test. This can be minimised by using IgG specific conjugates and careful assay validation. The NPV for SLE [figure: see text] is high for most assays but the PPV varies. Where necessary, laboratories should use crithidia or Farr dsDNA assays to confirm dubious ELISA dsDNA results, and ID/IB to confirm dubious ENA results. For monitoring, a precise, quantitative assay is required. It is unclear whether the detection of IgM or low affinity antibodies has a role here. A combination of anti-dsDNA, C3, C4, CRP, and ESR assays provides the most useful clinical information. Anti-ssDNA assays are likely to be useful, and are potentially more

  9. Reduced serum concentrations of 25-hydroxy vitamin D in Egyptian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Relation to disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Rasha T.; Awwad, Khaled S.; Ali, Mohamed K.; Hamed, Amira I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Recently, vitamin D deficiency has been implicated as a potential environmental factor triggering some autoimmune disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)). In addition, patients with SLE, especially those with increased disease activity, were suggested to have decreased vitamin D level, suggesting that vitamin D might play a role in regulating autoantibody production. Material/Methods To assess 25 hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] status in Egyptian patients with SLE and its relation to disease activity. Clinical evaluation and assay of serum 25(OH)D, total calcium, phosphorous, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were done on 60 SLE patients in comparison to 60 matched-healthy subjects. Serum 25(OH)D levels <30 and 10 ng/ml were defined as vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency, respectively. Results Serum 25(OH)D was significantly lower in patients than in controls (26.33±12.05 vs. 42.66±9.20 respectively, p<0.0001), with 13.30% and 60% being deficient and insufficient, respectively. Serum 25(OH)D levels were lower with increased disease activity (p=0.03) and frequency of photosensitivity(p=0.02) and photoprotection (p=0.002). Systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI) score (OR: 2.72, 95% CI: 1.42–5.18, P=0.002), photosensitivity (OR: 3.6, 95% CI: 1.9–6.8, P<0.01) and photoprotection (OR: 6.7, 95% CI: 2.9–8.8, P<0.001) were significant predictors of 25(OH)D level among SLE cases. Conclusions Low vitamin D status is prevalent in Egyptian SLE patients despite plentiful exposure to sunlight throughout the year, and its level is negatively correlated to disease activity. Future studies looking at a potential role of vitamin D in the pathophysiology and treatment of SLE are warranted. PMID:22129903

  10. Perceptions and measurements of physical activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, C A; Perna, M; Sargent, A B; Salmon, J E

    2011-03-01

    Promoting physical activity should be a priority for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) because a sedentary lifestyle compounds patients' already disproportionately high risk for cardiovascular events and other adverse health outcomes. The objectives of this pilot study were to assess physical activity in 50 patients with SLE and to compare activity levels with clinical and psychosocial variables, such as fatigue, depressive symptoms, and social support and stress. Patients were asked open-ended questions about physical activity, and responses were coded according to Grounded Theory. Patients then completed the Paffenbarger Physical Activity and Exercise Index, a survey of lifestyle energy expenditure reported in kilocalories/week, performed a 2-minute walk test according to a standard protocol, and completed questionnaires measuring fatigue, depressive symptoms and social support and stress. Most patients (92%) were women, had a mean age of 45 years, and did not have extensive SLE. In response to open-ended questions, patients reported they avoided physical activity because they did not want to exacerbate SLE in the short term. However, if they could overcome initial hurdles, 46 patients (92%) thought physical activity ultimately would improve SLE symptoms. Walking was the preferred activity and 45 (90%) thought they could walk more. According to the Paffenbarger Index, mean energy expenditure was 1466 ± 1366 kilocalories/week and mean time spent in moderate-intensity activity was 132 ± 222 min/week. In total, 18 patients (36%) and 14 patients (28%) met physical activity goals for these values, respectively. Mean distance walked during the 2-minute test was 149 ± 28 m, equivalent to two blocks, which is similar to reports for stable patients with other chronic diseases. Patients with more social stress and more fatigue reported less physical activity. We conclude that the proportion of patients meeting physical activity goals was

  11. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) for cancer after renal transplant in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and non-SLE recipients

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Brar, Amarpali; Richardson, Carrie; Salifu, Moro O; Clarke, Ann; Bernatsky, Sasha; Stefanov, Dimitre G; Jindal, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigated malignancy risk after renal transplantation in patients with and without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Using the United States Renal Data System from 2001 to 2009, 143 652 renal transplant recipients with and without SLE contributed 585 420 patient-years of follow-up to determine incident cancers using Medicare claims codes. We calculated standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) of cancer by group using age, sex, race/ethnicity-specific and calendar year-specific cancer rates compared with the US population. Results 10 160 cancers occurred at least 3 months after renal transplant. Overall cancer risk was increased in both SLE and non-SLE groups compared with the US general population, SIR 3.5 (95% CI 2.1 to 5.7) and SIR 3.7 (95% CI 2.4 to 5.7), respectively. Lip/oropharyngeal, Kaposi, neuroendocrine, thyroid, renal, cervical, lymphoma, liver, colorectal and breast cancers were increased in both groups, whereas only melanoma was increased in SLE and lung cancer was increased in non-SLE. In Cox regression analysis, SLE status (HR 1.1, 95% CI 0.9 to 1.3) was not associated with increased risk of developing cancer, adjusted for other independent risk factors for developing cancer in renal transplant recipients. We found that smoking (HR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.0), cytomegalovirus positivity at time of transplant (HR 1.3, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.4), white race (HR 1.2, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.3) and older recipient age at time of transplantation (HR 1.0 95% CI 1.0 to 1.2) were associated with an increased risk for development of cancer, whereas shorter time on dialysis, Epstein-Barr virus or HIV were associated with a lower risk for development of cancer. Conclusions Cancer risk in renal transplant recipients appeared similar in SLE and non-SLE subjects, aside from melanoma. Renal transplant recipients may need targeted counselling regarding surveillance and modifiable risk factors. PMID:27335659

  12. SLE-associated risk factors affect DC function.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungsun; Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Numerous risk alleles for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have now been identified. Analysis of the expression of genes with risk alleles in cells of hematopoietic origin demonstrates them to be most abundantly expressed in B cells and dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that these cell types may be the drivers of the inflammatory changes seen in SLE. DCs are of particular interest as they act to connect the innate and the adaptive immune response. Thus, DCs can transform inflammation into autoimmunity, and autoantibodies are the hallmark of SLE. In this review, we focus on mechanisms of tolerance that maintain DCs in a non-activated, non-immunogenic state. We demonstrate, using examples from our own studies, how alterations in DC function stemming from either DC-intrinsic abnormalities or DC-extrinsic regulators of function can predispose to autoimmunity.

  13. SLE-associated risk factors affect DC function.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungsun; Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Numerous risk alleles for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have now been identified. Analysis of the expression of genes with risk alleles in cells of hematopoietic origin demonstrates them to be most abundantly expressed in B cells and dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that these cell types may be the drivers of the inflammatory changes seen in SLE. DCs are of particular interest as they act to connect the innate and the adaptive immune response. Thus, DCs can transform inflammation into autoimmunity, and autoantibodies are the hallmark of SLE. In this review, we focus on mechanisms of tolerance that maintain DCs in a non-activated, non-immunogenic state. We demonstrate, using examples from our own studies, how alterations in DC function stemming from either DC-intrinsic abnormalities or DC-extrinsic regulators of function can predispose to autoimmunity. PMID:26683148

  14. SLE-associated risk factors affect DC function

    PubMed Central

    Son, Myoungsun; Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Numerous risk alleles for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have now been identified. Analysis of the expression of genes with risk alleles in cells of hematopoietic origin demonstrates them to be most abundantly expressed in B cells and dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that these cell types may be the drivers of the inflammatory changes seen in SLE. DCs are of particular interest as they act to connect the innate and the adaptive immune response. Thus, DCs can transform inflammation into autoimmunity, and autoantibodies are the hallmark of SLE. In this review, we focus on mechanisms of tolerance that maintain DCs in a non-activated, non-immunogenic state. We demonstrate, using examples from our own studies, how alterations in DC function stemming from either DC-intrinsic abnormalities or DC-extrinsic regulators of function can predispose to autoimmunity. PMID:26683148

  15. The hypothalamic-pituitary response in SLE. Regulation of prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol release.

    PubMed

    Rovenský, J; Blazícková, S; Rauová, L; Jezová, D; Koska, J; Lukác, J; Vigas, M

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that neuroendocrine regulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and activation of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the hypothalamic-pituitary response to a well-defined stimulus under standardised conditions in patients with SLE. Plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol were determined in venous blood drawn through an indwelling cannula during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (0.1 U/kg b.w., i.v.) in ten patients and in 12 age-, gender- and weight-matched healthy subjects. Basal PRL concentrations were higher in patients vs healthy controls (12 vs 6 ng/ml, P < 0.01), though still within the physiological range. Insulin-induced plasma PRL and GH were significantly increased both in patients and healthy subjects; however, the increments or areas under the curves were not different in the two groups. Plasma cortisol response showed moderate attenuation in patients. Sensitivity of pituitary lactotrothrops to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) administration (200 microg, i.v.) was the same in patients and control subjects. In SLE patients with low activity of the disease the sensitivity of pituitary PRL release to TRH administration remained unchanged. The hypothalamic response to stress stimulus (hypoglycaemia) was comparable in patients and healthy subjects. PMID:9736325

  16. Blood-Borne RNA Correlates with Disease Activity and IFN-Stimulated Gene Expression in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Doedens, John R; Jones, Wendell D; Hill, Kay; Mason, Michael J; Gersuk, Vivian H; Mease, Philip J; Dall'Era, Maria; Aranow, Cynthia; Martin, Richard W; Cohen, Stanley B; Fleischmann, Roy M; Kivitz, Alan J; Burge, Daniel J; Chaussabel, Damien; Elkon, Keith B; Posada, James A

    2016-10-01

    The loss of tolerance and the presence of circulating autoantibodies directed against nuclear Ags is the hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Many of these Ags are complexed with short, noncoding RNAs, such as U1 and Y1. The amount of U1 and Y1 RNA complexed with SLE patient Abs and immune complexes was measured in a cross-section of 228 SLE patients to evaluate the role of these RNA molecules within the known biochemical framework of SLE. The study revealed that SLE patients had significantly elevated levels of circulating U1 and/or Y1 RNA compared with healthy volunteers. In addition, the blood-borne RNA molecules were correlated with SLE disease activity and increased expression of IFN-inducible genes. To our knowledge, this study provides the first systematic examination of the role of circulating RNA in a large group of SLE patients and provides an important link with IFN dysregulation.

  17. Blood-Borne RNA Correlates with Disease Activity and IFN-Stimulated Gene Expression in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Doedens, John R; Jones, Wendell D; Hill, Kay; Mason, Michael J; Gersuk, Vivian H; Mease, Philip J; Dall'Era, Maria; Aranow, Cynthia; Martin, Richard W; Cohen, Stanley B; Fleischmann, Roy M; Kivitz, Alan J; Burge, Daniel J; Chaussabel, Damien; Elkon, Keith B; Posada, James A

    2016-10-01

    The loss of tolerance and the presence of circulating autoantibodies directed against nuclear Ags is the hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Many of these Ags are complexed with short, noncoding RNAs, such as U1 and Y1. The amount of U1 and Y1 RNA complexed with SLE patient Abs and immune complexes was measured in a cross-section of 228 SLE patients to evaluate the role of these RNA molecules within the known biochemical framework of SLE. The study revealed that SLE patients had significantly elevated levels of circulating U1 and/or Y1 RNA compared with healthy volunteers. In addition, the blood-borne RNA molecules were correlated with SLE disease activity and increased expression of IFN-inducible genes. To our knowledge, this study provides the first systematic examination of the role of circulating RNA in a large group of SLE patients and provides an important link with IFN dysregulation. PMID:27534558

  18. Detection of antinuclear antibodies in SLE.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yashwant; Bhatia, Alka

    2014-01-01

    The antinuclear antibodies (ANA) also known as antinuclear factors (ANF) are unwanted molecules which bind and destroy certain structures within the nucleus. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), they are produced in excess; hence their detection in the blood of patients is important for diagnosis and monitoring of the disease. Several methods are available which can be used to detect ANA; nevertheless, indirect immunofluorescence antinuclear antibody test (IF-ANA) is considered a "reference method" for their detection. Though IF-ANA is relatively easier to perform, its interpretation requires considerable skill and experience. The chapter therefore is aimed to provide comprehensive details to readers, not only about its methodology but also the result interpretation and reporting aspects of IF-ANA.

  19. Circulating interferon-α2 levels are increased in the majority of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and are associated with disease activity and multiple cytokine activation.

    PubMed

    Becker-Merok, A; Østli-Eilersten, G; Lester, S; Nossent, Jc

    2013-02-01

    Mutations in interferon (IFN) regulatory factor genes and the biological activity of type I IFN on expression of specific genes that are induced by IFN have been associated with various aspects of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Circulating levels of IFN-α in SLE has not been extensively studied because of limited sensitivity of available ELISA assays. We performed a cross-sectional case-control study where circulating levels of IFN-α2 were measured by a highly sensitive, solution phase multiplex magnetized bead assay and investigated the relation of IFN-α2 with autoantibody profiles, clinical disease activity and levels of inflammatory cytokines in SLE patients (n = 87). Cytokine levels were determined on stored sera aliquots with cut-off levels determined by the geometric mean + 2SD in healthy controls (n = 27). IFN-α2 levels were increased in 64% of SLE patients, who displayed more renal disease and higher disease activity (p = 0.06) and had a significantly higher sum of activated cytokines (median 4.5, range 7) compared to patients with normal IFN-α2 (median one, range 3; p < 0.001). Solution phase micro-bead assay thus identified increased IFN-α2 levels in two-thirds of SLE patients with longstanding disease. The association with clinical disease and activation of multiple inflammatory cytokines supports a role for IFN-α2 in disease perpetuation in a large subset of SLE patients.

  20. Vitamin D Deficiency in Egyptian Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients: How Prevalent and Does It Impact Disease Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Abaza, Nouran M.; El-Mallah, Reem M.; Shaaban, Asmaa; Mobasher, Sameh A.; Al-hassanein, Khaled F.; Abdel Zaher, Amr A.; El-kabarity, Rania H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The emerging role of vitamin D in immunology and autoimmune disorders has been a worldwide interest in the last decade. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are particularly at a delicate position predisposing them to suffer from vitamin D deficiency due to the multiple risk factors accompanying the disease. Whether vitamin D deficiency is also involved as a risk factor for developing SLE and affecting its course is a considerable concern. OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in SLE patients and its relation to disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS In our observational cross-sectional study, serum levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D] in 60 SLE patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were assessed and estimated for deficiency and insufficiency at 10 and 30 ng/mL, respectively. Disease activity was evaluated by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), irreversible organ damage by Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SLICC/ACR DI), and severity by Severity of Disease Index. Fatigue was measured by visual analog scale. RESULTS Significantly lower levels of 25(OH)D were found in SLE patients (17.6 ± 6.9 ng/mL) in comparison to controls (79.0 ± 28.7 ng/mL), with a statistically high significant difference (t = −11.2, P < 0.001). High prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency was detected as 73.3% and 23.3%, respectively. Vitamin D had a highly significant negative correlation with SLEDAI (r = −0.495, P < 0.001), SLICC (r = −0.431, P < 0.05), and fatigue (r = −0.436, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were found to be prevalent in SLE patients in our study and related to disease activity and fatigue. If needed, routine screening and consequent repletion of vitamin D are recommended in SLE patients. Restoring adequate vitamin D levels in SLE patients should be more explored as a potential yet

  1. Vitamin D Deficiency in Egyptian Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients: How Prevalent and Does It Impact Disease Activity?

    PubMed Central

    Abaza, Nouran M.; El-Mallah, Reem M.; Shaaban, Asmaa; Mobasher, Sameh A.; Al-hassanein, Khaled F.; Abdel Zaher, Amr A.; El-kabarity, Rania H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The emerging role of vitamin D in immunology and autoimmune disorders has been a worldwide interest in the last decade. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are particularly at a delicate position predisposing them to suffer from vitamin D deficiency due to the multiple risk factors accompanying the disease. Whether vitamin D deficiency is also involved as a risk factor for developing SLE and affecting its course is a considerable concern. OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in SLE patients and its relation to disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS In our observational cross-sectional study, serum levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D] in 60 SLE patients and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were assessed and estimated for deficiency and insufficiency at 10 and 30 ng/mL, respectively. Disease activity was evaluated by SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), irreversible organ damage by Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology Damage Index (SLICC/ACR DI), and severity by Severity of Disease Index. Fatigue was measured by visual analog scale. RESULTS Significantly lower levels of 25(OH)D were found in SLE patients (17.6 ± 6.9 ng/mL) in comparison to controls (79.0 ± 28.7 ng/mL), with a statistically high significant difference (t = −11.2, P < 0.001). High prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency was detected as 73.3% and 23.3%, respectively. Vitamin D had a highly significant negative correlation with SLEDAI (r = −0.495, P < 0.001), SLICC (r = −0.431, P < 0.05), and fatigue (r = −0.436, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were found to be prevalent in SLE patients in our study and related to disease activity and fatigue. If needed, routine screening and consequent repletion of vitamin D are recommended in SLE patients. Restoring adequate vitamin D levels in SLE patients should be more explored as a potential yet

  2. Circulating anti-double-stranded DNA antibody-secreting cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a novel biomarker for disease activity.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, H; Okazaki, Y; Satoh, T; Kaneko, Y; Yasuoka, H; Seta, N; Kuwana, M

    2012-10-01

    Antibodies against double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) are widely used to diagnose systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and evaluate its activity in patients. This study was undertaken to examine the clinical utility of circulating anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells for evaluating SLE patients. Anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells quantified using an enzyme-linked immunospot assay were detected in the spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood from MRL/lpr but not in control BALB/c mice. Circulating anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells were detected in 29 (22%) of 130 patients with SLE, but in none of 49 with non-SLE connective-tissue disease or 18 healthy controls. The presence of circulating anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells was associated with persistent proteinuria, high SLE disease activity index and systemic lupus activity measures, and a high serum anti-dsDNA antibody titre measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The positive predictive value for active disease was 48% for circulating anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells versus 17% for serum anti-dsDNA antibodies. A prospective cohort of patients with circulating anti-dsDNA antibodies and inactive SLE showed that the cumulative disease flare-free rate was significantly lower in patients with than without circulating anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells (p < 0.001). Circulating anti-dsDNA antibody-secreting cells are a useful biomarker for assessing disease activity in SLE patients.

  3. New treatments for SLE: cell-depleting and anti-cytokine therapies.

    PubMed

    Anolik, Jennifer H; Aringer, Martin

    2005-10-01

    Although systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is indeed a complex autoimmune disease, recent advances in our understanding of lupus pathogenesis have suggested new, targeted approaches to therapy. The purpose of this review is to discuss the underlying scientific rationale and results of first clinical studies of new treatment approaches to SLE, with a focus on cell-depleting therapies and cytokine blockade. It has become clear that the B lymphocyte plays a key role in disease pathogenesis by both autoantibody-dependent and autoantibody-independent mechanisms. Additionally, aberrant interactions between B and T cells are critical to disease emergence and progression. New agents that directly target immune cells abnormal in SLE include the B-cell depleting or modulating antibodies, rituximab (anti-CD20) and epratuzumab (anti-CD22) and the anti-dsDNA tolerogen LJP394. Another promising approach has been to block co-stimulatory interactions between T and B cells, for example by inhibiting the CD40-CD40 ligand pathway with anti-CD40 ligand monoclonal antibody or the B7 pathway with CTLA-4Ig. Immune cells can also be manipulated indirectly through cytokine effects. For B cells, anti-BAFF (B-cell activation factor of the tumor necrosis family) provides an example of this approach. Other, more pleiotropic cytokines can likewise be blocked in SLE. In addition to the blockade of interleukin-10 (IL-10), the first anti-cytokine approach examined, it is mainly anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy that has come into focus, holding promise for some patients with lupus nephritis. The majority of the available data on these new treatment approaches stems from open-label trials, but controlled trials are under way. Moreover, many additional cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6, IL-18, and the type I interferons, represent interesting future targets.

  4. Depressive and Anxiety Disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients without Major Neuropsychiatric Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yueyin; Cheng, Yuqi; Li, Shu; Lai, Aiyun; Xie, Zhongqi; Xu, Xinyu; Lu, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    Depressive and anxiety disorders are frequently observed in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). However, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. We conducted this survey to understand the prevalence of depression and anxiety in SLE patients without major neuropsychiatric manifestations (non-NPSLE) and to explore the relationship between emotional disorders, symptoms, autoantibodies, disease activity, and treatments in SLE. 176 SLE patients were included, and SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD), and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA) were recorded to evaluate their disease activity and emotional status. We found that depressive and anxiety disorders were common among SLE patients: 121 (68.8%) patients were in depression status while 14 (8.0%) patients could be diagnosed with depression. Accordingly, 101 (57.4%) were in anxiety status and 21 (11.9%) could be diagnosed with anxiety. Depression was associated with disease activity, and anxiety was associated with anti-P0 antibody, while both of them were associated with proteinuria. HAMA and HAMD scores were in strong positive correlation and they were independent risk factors of each other. We concluded that the high prevalence of depression and anxiety and the association between depression and SLE disease activity might reveal the covert damage of central nervous system in SLE. The role of anti-P0 antibody in SLE patients with emotional disorders warrants more researches. PMID:27747246

  5. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 and its natural inhibitor TIMP-1 expressed or secreted by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Matache, Cristiana; Stefanescu, Maria; Dragomir, Cristina; Tanaseanu, Stefanita; Onu, Adrian; Ofiteru, Augustin; Szegli, Geza

    2003-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) was involved in inflammation and immune system dysfunctions. Besides immunologic abnormalities, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) also presents chronic inflammatory components. Therefore, a role of MMP-9 in SLE pathology might be supposed. To verify this hypothesis, SLE patients and healthy donors were compared for the MMP-9 and MMP-9 mRNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), the spontaneous secretion of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 and the MMP-9 activity. Thus, we found that fresh PBMCs from SLE patients expressed a significantly higher activity of MMP-9 and spontaneously released higher levels of MMP-9, as compared to healthy donors, while the secreted TIMP-1 level was the same for both groups. When the patients were sub-grouped based on disease status, the most increased pro-MMP-9 activity inside the PBMCs was identified for relapse SLE sub-group. A similar observation for SLE patients with positive serum fibrinogen was found. Following culture, the PBMCs from remission SLE patients secreted significantly higher MMP-9 level, than the PBMCs from relapse SLE patients. PBMCs from relapse SLE patients secreted the highest levels of TIMP-1, although this difference was not statistically significant. Taken together, these observations suggested the multiple roles of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in progress of inflammation and tissue damage and/or in repair, depending on clinical stages of SLE.

  6. Association of MIF, but not type I interferon-induced chemokines, with increased disease activity in Asian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, K. L.; Kandane-Rathnayake, R.; Hoi, A.; Nikpour, Mandana; Morand, E. F.

    2016-01-01

    Ethnicity is a key factor impacting on disease severity in SLE, but molecular mechanisms of these associations are unknown. Type I IFN and MIF have each been associated with SLE pathogenesis. We investigated whether increased SLE severity in Asian patients is associated with either MIF or Type I IFN. SLE patients (n = 151) had prospective recording of disease variables. Serum MIF, and a validated composite score of three Type I IFN-inducible chemokines (IFNCK:CCL2, CXCL10, CCL19) were measured. Associations of MIF and IFNCK score with disease activity were assessed, with persistent active disease (PAD) used as a marker of high disease activity over a median 2.6 years follow up. In univariable analysis, MIF, IFNCK score and Asian ethnicity were significantly associated with PAD. Asian ethnicity was associated with higher MIF but not IFNCK score. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, MIF (OR3.62 (95% CI 1.14,11.5), p = 0.03) and Asian ethnicity (OR3.00 (95% CI 1.39,6.46), p < 0.01) but not IFNCK were significantly associated with PAD. These results potentially support an effect of MIF, but not Type I IFN, in heightened SLE disease severity in Asian SLE. The associations of MIF and Asian ethnicity with PAD are at least partly independent. PMID:27453287

  7. Dual effects of statins therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus and SLE-related atherosclerosis: the potential role for regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Haiyan; Li, Qi; Xiang, Shilong; Jiang, Hong; Mao, Youying; Shou, Zhangfei; Chen, Jianghua

    2012-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease associated with accelerated atherosclerosis independent of traditional risk factors. Statins, the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been widely prescribed for hyperlipidemia, which could slow the atherosclerosis progression, and reduce cardiovascular disease events. Nonetheless, accumulated evidences suggested that statins exert immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory functions independent of their lipid-lowering effects. By the virtue of pleiotropic immunomodulatory property, statins may be applied for the treatment of both autoimmunity and atherosclerosis in patients with SLE. Interestingly, it has been well documented that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the pathogenesis of SLE as well as atherosclerosis. Meanwhile, studies have shown that statins could induce augmented number of Tregs with increased functional inhibitory properties. Thus, we hypothesized that the effect of statins ameliorating lupus disease manifestations and lupus-mediated atherogenesis might be mediated, at least partly, via the activation of Tregs. To our knowledge, this is the first hypothesis focused on that Tregs might be involved in the immunomodulatory effect of statins on SLE and SLE-related atherosclerosis.

  8. B cells from African American lupus patients exhibit an activated phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Laurence C.; Habte, Sium; Gonsiorek, Waldemar; Lee, Deborah; Banas, Dana; Holloway, Deborah A.; Cunningham, Mark; Stetsko, Dawn; Casano, Francesca; Kansal, Selena; Davis, Patricia M.; Carman, Julie; Zhang, Clarence K.; Abidi, Ferva; Furie, Richard; Nadler, Steven G.; Suchard, Suzanne J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex systemic autoimmune disease driven by both innate and adaptive immune cells. African Americans tend to present with more severe disease at an earlier age compared with patients of European ancestry. In order to better understand the immunological differences between African American and European American patients, we analyzed the frequencies of B cell subsets and the expression of B cell activation markers from a total of 68 SLE patients and 69 normal healthy volunteers. We found that B cells expressing the activation markers CD86, CD80, PD1, and CD40L, as well as CD19+CD27–IgD– double-negative B cells, were enriched in African American patients vs. patients of European ancestry. In addition to increased expression of CD40L, surface levels of CD40 on B cells were lower, suggesting the engagement of the CD40 pathway. In vitro experiments confirmed that CD40L expressed by B cells could lead to CD40 activation and internalization on adjacent B cells. To conclude, these results indicate that, compared with European American patients, African American SLE patients present with a particularly active B cell component, possibly via the activation of the CD40/CD40L pathway. These data may help guide the development of novel therapies.

  9. B cells from African American lupus patients exhibit an activated phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Laurence C.; Habte, Sium; Gonsiorek, Waldemar; Lee, Deborah; Banas, Dana; Holloway, Deborah A.; Cunningham, Mark; Stetsko, Dawn; Casano, Francesca; Kansal, Selena; Davis, Patricia M.; Carman, Julie; Zhang, Clarence K.; Abidi, Ferva; Furie, Richard; Nadler, Steven G.; Suchard, Suzanne J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex systemic autoimmune disease driven by both innate and adaptive immune cells. African Americans tend to present with more severe disease at an earlier age compared with patients of European ancestry. In order to better understand the immunological differences between African American and European American patients, we analyzed the frequencies of B cell subsets and the expression of B cell activation markers from a total of 68 SLE patients and 69 normal healthy volunteers. We found that B cells expressing the activation markers CD86, CD80, PD1, and CD40L, as well as CD19+CD27–IgD– double-negative B cells, were enriched in African American patients vs. patients of European ancestry. In addition to increased expression of CD40L, surface levels of CD40 on B cells were lower, suggesting the engagement of the CD40 pathway. In vitro experiments confirmed that CD40L expressed by B cells could lead to CD40 activation and internalization on adjacent B cells. To conclude, these results indicate that, compared with European American patients, African American SLE patients present with a particularly active B cell component, possibly via the activation of the CD40/CD40L pathway. These data may help guide the development of novel therapies. PMID:27699274

  10. Serum and Urinary Interleukin-6 in Assessment of Renal Activity in Egyptian Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    EL-Shereef, Rawhya R.; Lotfi, Ahmed; Abdel-Naeam, Emad A.; Tawfik, Heba

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF THE WORK This study investigates whether serum and urinary interleukin-6 (IL-6) represent an early marker of kidney involvement and assesses the difference between them and renal biopsy in lupus nephritis (LN). PATIENTS AND METHODS A total of 60 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients were compared to 20 healthy controls. Urinary and serum IL-6 were measured in both patients and controls. In addition, renal biopsy was done prior or shortly after urine and blood sampling; the results were classified according to the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society classification of LN by recording the activity score and chronicity score for each sample. RESULTS There was a significant higher level of urinary IL-6 in the SLE patients with biopsy-proven LN than in those without LN and those of the control group. However, no significant difference was reported between the three groups as regards serum IL-6. A strong positive correlation was found between urinary IL-6 and renal disease activity based on the renal SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score with no significant correlation regarding the extra renal SLEDAI. Urinary IL-6 was positively correlated with renal biopsy results and with its activity scores but weakly correlated with the chronicity scores. CONCLUSION Urinary IL-6 may provide a simple noninvasive potential marker of disease activity of renal involvement in adult patients with SLE. PMID:26966395

  11. PTPN22 Association in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) with Respect to Individual Ancestry and Clinical Sub-Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Adam; Chung, Sharon A.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Glenn, Stuart B.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Scofield, Robert H.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jiyoung; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Petri, Michelle A.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.; Boackle, Susan A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Tsao, Betty P.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Pons-Estel, Bernardo; Niewold, Timothy B.; Moser Sivils, Kathy L.; Merrill, Joan T.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Harley, John B.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; James, Judith A.; Nath, Swapan K.

    2013-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is a negative regulator of T-cell activation associated with several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Missense rs2476601 is associated with SLE in individuals with European ancestry. Since the rs2476601 risk allele frequency differs dramatically across ethnicities, we assessed robustness of PTPN22 association with SLE and its clinical sub-phenotypes across four ethnically diverse populations. Ten SNPs were genotyped in 8220 SLE cases and 7369 controls from in European-Americans (EA), African-Americans (AA), Asians (AS), and Hispanics (HS). We performed imputation-based association followed by conditional analysis to identify independent associations. Significantly associated SNPs were tested for association with SLE clinical sub-phenotypes, including autoantibody profiles. Multiple testing was accounted for by using false discovery rate. We successfully imputed and tested allelic association for 107 SNPs within the PTPN22 region and detected evidence of ethnic-specific associations from EA and HS. In EA, the strongest association was at rs2476601 (P = 4.7×10−9, OR = 1.40 (95% CI = 1.25–1.56)). Independent association with rs1217414 was also observed in EA, and both SNPs are correlated with increased European ancestry. For HS imputed intronic SNP, rs3765598, predicted to be a cis-eQTL, was associated (P = 0.007, OR = 0.79 and 95% CI = 0.67–0.94). No significant associations were observed in AA or AS. Case-only analysis using lupus-related clinical criteria revealed differences between EA SLE patients positive for moderate to high titers of IgG anti-cardiolipin (aCL IgG >20) versus negative aCL IgG at rs2476601 (P = 0.012, OR = 1.65). Association was reinforced when these cases were compared to controls (P = 2.7×10−5, OR = 2.11). Our results validate that rs2476601 is the most significantly associated SNP in individuals with

  12. The Level of IgA Antibodies to Endothelial Cells Correlates with Histological Evidence of Disease Activity in Patients with Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Ayako; Mizuno, Tomohiro; Kato, Akihiro; Hirano, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Naoki; Hayashi, Hiroki; Koide, Shigehisa; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Midori; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Shunji; Miura, Keiji; Yuzawa, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    Anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) are frequently detected in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but their pathological role remains unclear. We recently developed a solubilized cell surface protein capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CSP-ELISA) to detect antibodies against membrane proteins involved in autoimmune reactions. In this study, sera from 51 patients with biopsy-proven lupus nephritis (LN), 25 with SLE without renal involvement (non-LN SLE), 42 disease control (DC) subjects, and 80 healthy control (HC) subjects were tested for IgG- and IgA-AECA for human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human glomerular EC (HGEC) by using CSP-ELISA. IgG- and IgA-AECA titers were significantly higher in LN and non-LN SLE patients than in the DC or HC (P < 0.001) groups. IgG- and IgA-AECA titers for HUVEC corresponded well with those for HGEC. The IgA-AECA level correlated with the SLE disease activity index and with histological evidence of active lesions (cellular proliferations, hyaline thrombi and wire loops, leukocytic infiltration, and fibrinoid necrosis) in LN patients (P < 0.001). The sensitivity of IgA-AECA as a diagnostic test for histological evidence of active lesions in LN patients was 0.92, with a specificity of 0.70. The significant correlation of IgA-AECA with glomerular hypercellularity indicates that IgA-AECA are associated with endothelial damage in LN. PMID:27788140

  13. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with medicine, and an exercise program can improve energy levels. (See 'Exercise' below.) Weight changes — SLE can ... ill can cause you to lose muscle and energy quickly. A separate article discusses how to incorporate ...

  14. Association of elevated transcript levels of interferon-inducible chemokines with disease activity and organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiong; Chen, Xiaoqing; Cui, Huijuan; Guo, Yanzhi; Chen, Jing; Shen, Nan; Bao, Chunde

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system autoimmune disease with a heterogeneous course and varying degrees of severity and organ damage; thus, there is increasing interest in identifying biomarkers for SLE. In this study we correlated the combined expression level of multiple interferon-inducible chemokines with disease activity, degree of organ damage and clinical features in SLE, and we investigated their roles as biomarkers. Methods Peripheral blood cells obtained from 67 patients with SLE patients, 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 23 healthy donors were subjected to real-time PCR in order to measure the transcriptional levels of seven interferon-inducible chemokines (RANTES, MCP-1, CCL19, MIG, IP-10, CXCL11, and IL-8). The data were used to calculate a chemokine score for each participant, after which comparisons were performed between various groups of SLE patients and control individuals. Results Chemokine scores were significantly elevated in SLE patients versus RA patients and healthy donors (P = 0.012 and P = 0.002, respectively). Chemokine scores were correlated positively with SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 scores (P = 0.005) and negatively with C3 levels (P < 0.001). Compared with patients without lupus nephritis and those with inactive lupus nephritis, chemokine scores were elevated in patients with active lupus nephritis, especially when their daily prednisone dosage was under 30 mg (P = 0.002 and P = 0.014, respectively). Elevated chemokine scores were also associated with the presence of cumulative organ damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American Society of Rheumatology Damage Index ≥ 1; P = 0.010) and the occurrence of anti-Sm or anti-RNP autoantibodies (both P = 0.021). Conclusions The combined transcription level of interferon-inducible chemokines in peripheral blood leucocytes is closely associated with disease activity, degree of organ damage, and specific autoantibody patterns

  15. Association of PPP2CA polymorphisms with SLE susceptibility in multiple ethnic groups

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wenfeng; Sunahori, Katsue; Zhao, Jian; Deng, Yun; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Williams, Adrienne H.; Comeau, Mary E.; Ziegler, Julie T.; Marion, Miranda C.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Lee, Joo Hyun; Lee, Ji-Seon; Chang, Deh-Ming; Song, Yeong Wook; Yu, Chack-Yung; Kimberly, Robert P.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Petri, Michelle A.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Vilá, Luis M.; Reveille, John D.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Harley, John B.; Boackle, Susan A.; Stevens, Anne M.; Scofield, R. Hal; Merrill, Joan T.; Freedman, Barry I.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Moser, Kathy L.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Kamen, Diane L.; James, Judith A.; Grossman, Jennifer M.; Hahn, Bevra H.; Tsokos, George C.; Tsao, Betty P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective T cells from patients with SLE express increased amounts of PP2Ac which contribute to decreased production of IL-2. Because IL-2 is important in the regulation of several aspects of the immune response, it has been proposed that PP2Ac contributes to the expression of SLE. This study was designed to determine whether genetic variants of PPP2AC are linked to the expression of SLE and specific clinical manifestations and account for the increased expression of PP2Ac. Methods We conducted a trans-ethnic study consisting of 8,695 SLE cases and 7,308 controls from four different ancestries. Eighteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the PPP2CA were genotyped using an Illumina custom array. PPP2CA expression in SLE and control T cells was analyzed by real-time PCR. Results A 32-kb haplotype comprised of multiple SNPs of PPP2CA showed significant association with SLE in Hispanic Americans (HA), European Americans (EA) and Asians but not in African-Americans (AA). Conditional analyses revealed that SNP rs7704116 in intron 1 showed consistently strong association with SLE across Asian, EA and HA populations (pmeta=3.8×10−7, OR=1.3[1.14–1.31]). In EA, the largest ethnic dataset, the risk A allele of rs7704116 was associated with the presence of renal disease, anti-dsDNA and anti-RNP antibodies. PPP2CA expression was approximately 2-fold higher in SLE patients carrying the rs7704116 AG genotype than those carrying GG genotype (p = 0.008). Conclusion Our data provide the first evidence for an association between PPP2CA polymorphisms and elevated PP2Ac transcript levels in T cells, which implicates a new molecular pathway for SLE susceptibility in EA, HA and Asians. PMID:21590681

  16. Vitamin D status in Egyptian patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Garf, Kamal El; Marzouk, Huda; Farag, Yomna; Rasheed, Laila; Garf, Ayman El

    2015-09-01

    There are scanty data on the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its relation to disease activity among patients with juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (JoSLE) in the Middle East and North Africa, an area known to be endemic for vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency. The aim of this study was, therefore, to study vitamin D status and its relation to disease activity and parameters in Egyptian patients with JoSLE. Serum levels of 25(OH) D3 in 70 JoSLE patients were compared to 40 age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls. The 25(OH) D3 was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Information regarding the medical history, clinical symptoms, and signs was registered at the time of serum sampling. Disease activity of SLE was evaluated according to the SLEDAI score. The mean level of serum 25(OH) D3 was 12 ± 3.7 in JoSLE patients compared to 21 ± 3.5 ng/mL in normal controls (p < 0.001). Forty percent (28/70) of the JoSLE patients has severe 25(OH) D3 deficiency (≤10 ng/mL), and 60 % of the JoSLE patients has 25(OH) D3 insufficiency (≤30 ng/mL). None of the JoSLE patients has 25(OH) D3 level >30 ng/mL. There was no significant correlation between serum levels of 25(OH) D3 and the demographic data, medication used, and some laboratory data of patients with JoSLE. Disease activity score in our patients was insignificantly correlated with serum levels of 25(OH) D3. In spite of vitamin D supplementation in Egyptian JoSLE patients and the presence of vitamin D insufficiency in the control group, there are still significantly lower levels of vitamin D in JoSLE compared to normal controls.

  17. The value of decreased plasma gelsolin levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis in diagnosis and disease activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yl; Li, H; Li, W H; Meng, H X; Fan, Y Z; Li, W J; Ji, Y T; Zhao, H; Zhang, L; Jin, X M; Zhang, F M

    2013-12-01

    Plasma gelsolin, the extracellular gelsolin isoform, circulates in the blood of healthy individuals at a concentration of 200 ± 50 mg/l and plays important roles in the extracellular actin-scavenging system during tissue damage. Decreased plasma gelsolin levels have been observed in many inflammatory diseases. In the present study, the variation and potential clinical application of plasma gelsolin levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were analysed. Plasma samples and clinical data were collected from informed and consenting participants: 47 SLE patients, 60 RA patients and 50 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals. Semiquantitative western blotting was used for measuring plasma gelsolin levels. The plasma gelsolin levels in patients with SLE and RA were significantly decreased compared with healthy controls (145.3 ± 40.4 versus 182.7 ± 38.3 mg/l and 100.8 ± 36 versus 182.7 ± 38.3 mg/l, p < 0.001), and plasma gelsolin levels were especially lower in RA than in SLE patients (100.8 ± 36 versus 145.3 ± 40.4 mg/L, p < 0.001). An analysis of the clinical data showed a significant negative correlation between plasma gelsolin levels and SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) scores (r = 0.659, p < 0.001) but no correlation between plasma gelsolin levels and RA disease activity score 28 (DAS28) (r = 0.076, p = 0.569). Different clinical characteristics were also observed in SLE and RA patients with normal and decreased plasma gelsolin levels.This study found significantly lower plasma gelsolin levels in patients with SLE and RA compared with healthy controls and documented a significant negative correlation between plasma gelsolin levels and SLEDAI, which suggested the potential clinical application of plasma gelsolin in SLE diagnosis and disease activity evaluation. The different clinical characteristics in SLE and RA patients with normal and decreased plasma gelsolin levels indicate differences in the basis of

  18. Molecular Characterization of Circulating Plasma Cells in Patients with Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lugar, Patricia L.; Love, Cassandra; Grammer, Amrie C.; Dave, Sandeep S.; Lipsky, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a generalized autoimmune disease characterized by abnormal B cell activation and the occurrence of increased frequencies of circulating plasma cells (PC). The molecular characteristics and nature of circulating PC and B cells in SLE have not been completely characterized. Microarray analysis of gene expression was used to characterize circulating PC in subjects with active SLE. Flow cytometry was used to sort PC and comparator B cell populations from active SLE blood, normal blood and normal tonsil. The gene expression profiles of the sorted B cell populations were then compared. SLE PC exhibited a similar gene expression signature as tonsil PC. The differences in gene expression between SLE PC and normal tonsil PC and tonsil plasmablasts (PB) suggest a mature Ig secreting cell phenotype in the former population. Despite this, SLE PC differed in expression of about half the genes from previously published gene expression profiles of normal bone marrow PC, indicating that these cells had not achieved a fully mature status. Abnormal expression of several genes, including CXCR4 and S1P1, suggests a mechanism for the persistence of SLE PC in the circulation. All SLE B cell populations revealed an interferon (IFN) gene signature previously only reported in unseparated SLE peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that SLE PC are a unique population of Ig secreting cells with a gene expression profile indicative of a mature, but not fully differentiated phenotype. PMID:23028528

  19. Molecular characterization of circulating plasma cells in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lugar, Patricia L; Love, Cassandra; Grammer, Amrie C; Dave, Sandeep S; Lipsky, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a generalized autoimmune disease characterized by abnormal B cell activation and the occurrence of increased frequencies of circulating plasma cells (PC). The molecular characteristics and nature of circulating PC and B cells in SLE have not been completely characterized. Microarray analysis of gene expression was used to characterize circulating PC in subjects with active SLE. Flow cytometry was used to sort PC and comparator B cell populations from active SLE blood, normal blood and normal tonsil. The gene expression profiles of the sorted B cell populations were then compared. SLE PC exhibited a similar gene expression signature as tonsil PC. The differences in gene expression between SLE PC and normal tonsil PC and tonsil plasmablasts (PB) suggest a mature Ig secreting cell phenotype in the former population. Despite this, SLE PC differed in expression of about half the genes from previously published gene expression profiles of normal bone marrow PC, indicating that these cells had not achieved a fully mature status. Abnormal expression of several genes, including CXCR4 and S1P(1), suggests a mechanism for the persistence of SLE PC in the circulation. All SLE B cell populations revealed an interferon (IFN) gene signature previously only reported in unseparated SLE peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These data indicate that SLE PC are a unique population of Ig secreting cells with a gene expression profile indicative of a mature, but not fully differentiated phenotype.

  20. Carotid subclinical atherosclerosis is associated with disease activity but not vitamin D in Korean systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jung, J-Y; Koh, B-R; Bae, C-B; Kim, H-A; Suh, C-H

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerosis develops early in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and is an important cause of mortality. Vitamin D deficiency is found to be associated with cardiovascular disease and autoimmunity. We evaluated the extent of carotid subclinical atherosclerosis and analyzed its correlation with vitamin D in SLE. One hundred and two female patients with SLE and 52 normal controls (NCs) were recruited. The mean carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) of SLE patients was 0.41 ± 0.08 mm, which was higher than that of NCs (0.32 ± 0.08 mm, p = 0.012). In addition, carotid plaques were more frequent and the plaque index was higher in SLE patients than in NCs (0.68 ± 1.39 vs. 0.26 ± 0.87, p = 0.026). Carotid IMT was correlated with age, body mass index, SLE disease activity index, and aspirin use in SLE patients. The plaque index was correlated with renal involvement. Vitamin 25(OH)D3 level was not correlated with carotid IMT, plaque index or disease activity markers. In SLE, the risk of cardiovascular disease is higher than that in NCs, which may be derived from systemic inflammation. It may be not suitable to assess vitamin D as a marker of disease activity or subclinical atherosclerosis in SLE patients.

  1. Anti-malarials exert a protective effect while Mestizo patients are at increased risk of developing SLE renal disease: data from a Latin-American cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pons-Estel, Guillermo J.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Hachuel, Leticia; Boggio, Gabriela; Wojdyla, Daniel; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Soriano, Enrique R.; Saurit, Verónica; Cavalcanti, Fernando S.; Guzman, Renato A.; Guibert-Toledano, Marlene; Sauza del Pozo, Maria J.; Amigo, Mary-Carmen; Alva, Magaly; Esteva-Spinetti, Maria H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine the role of ethnicity and the use of anti-malarials (protective) on lupus renal disease. Methods. A nested case–control study (1:2 proportion, n = 265 and 530) within GLADEL's (Grupo Latino Americano De Estudio de Lupus) longitudinal inception cohort was carried out. The end-point was ACR renal criterion development after diagnosis. Cases and controls were matched for follow-up time (end-point or a comparable time, respectively). Renal disease predictors were examined by univariable and multivariable analyses. Additional analyses were done to determine if the protective effect of anti-malarials persisted after adjusting for intake-associated confounders. Results. Of the cases, 233 (87.9%) were women; their mean (s.d.) age at diagnosis was 28.0 (11.9) years and their median (Q3–Q1 interquartile range) follow-up time for cases and controls was 8.3 months (Q3–Q1: 23.5); 56.6% of the cases and 74.3% of the controls were anti-malarial users. Mestizo ethnicity [odds ratio (OR) 1.72, 95% CI 1.19, 2.48] and hypertension (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.38, 3.70) were independently associated with a higher risk of renal disease, whereas anti-malarial use (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.26, 0.58), older age at disease onset (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96, 0.99) and female gender (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.32, 0.99) were negatively associated with such occurrence. After adjusting for variables associated with their intake, the protective effect of anti-malarials on renal disease occurrence persisted (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.25, 0.58). Conclusion. Mestizo patients are at increased risk of developing renal disease, whereas anti-malarial use protects patients from such an occurrence. PMID:22389125

  2. ATAC-seq on biobanked specimens defines a unique chromatin accessibility structure in naïve SLE B cells.

    PubMed

    Scharer, Christopher D; Blalock, Emily L; Barwick, Benjamin G; Haines, Robert R; Wei, Chungwen; Sanz, Ignacio; Boss, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    Biobanking is a widespread practice for storing biological samples for future studies ranging from genotyping to RNA analysis. However, methods that probe the status of the epigenome are lacking. Here, the framework for applying the Assay for Transposase Accessible Sequencing (ATAC-seq) to biobanked specimens is described and was used to examine the accessibility landscape of naïve B cells from Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) patients undergoing disease flares. An SLE specific chromatin accessibility signature was identified. Changes in accessibility occurred at loci surrounding genes involved in B cell activation and contained motifs for transcription factors that regulate B cell activation and differentiation. These data provide evidence for an altered epigenetic programming in SLE B cells and identify loci and transcription factor networks that potentially impact disease. The ability to determine the chromatin accessibility landscape and identify cis-regulatory elements has broad application to studies using biorepositories and offers significant advantages to improve the molecular information obtained from biobanked samples. PMID:27249108

  3. Management considerations for childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients and implications on therapy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Clovis Artur; Aikawa, Nadia Emi; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Campos, Lucia Maria Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease that may involve various organs and systems. This narrative review focuses on the recent evidence relating to cSLE management. The general management considerations of cSLE patients require the use of validated classification criteria, disease and health-related quality of life tools evaluation, as well as assessments of lupus nephritis biomarkers and cSLE quality indicators. The drug treatment for cSLE patients includes general supportive care and immunosuppressive therapy. Important implications on cSLE therapy are also updated such as infection, vaccination, infertility, pregnancy, contraception, dyslipidemia, physical activity, cancer, bone health, drug pharmacokinetics, adherence, academic outcomes, transition to adult care and cumulative organ damage.

  4. Clearance Deficiency and Cell Death Pathways: A Model for the Pathogenesis of SLE

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Aparna; Herrmann, Martin; Muñoz, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of cell death pathways, including apoptosis and the neutrophil specific kind of death called NETosis, can represent a potential source of autoantigens. Defects in the clearance of apoptotic cells may be responsible for the initiation of systemic autoimmunity in several chronic inflammatory diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Autoantigens are released mainly from secondary necrotic cells because of a defective clearance of apoptotic cells or an inefficient degradation of DNA-containing neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These modified autoantigens are presented by follicular dendritic cells to autoreactive B cells in germinal centers of secondary lymphoid organs. This results in the loss of self-tolerance and production of autoantibodies, a unifying feature of SLE. Immune complexes (IC) are formed from autoantibodies bound to uncleared cellular debris in blood or tissues. Clearance of IC by blood phagocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells leads to proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In particular, plasmacytoid dendritic cells produce high amounts of interferon-α upon IC uptake, thereby contributing to the interferon signature of patients with SLE. The clearance of antinuclear IC via Fc-gamma receptors is considered a central event in amplifying inflammatory immune responses in SLE. Along with this, the accumulation of cell remnants represents an initiating event of the etiology, while the subsequent generation of autoantibodies against nuclear antigens (including NETs) results in the perpetuation of inflammation and tissue damage in patients with SLE. Here, we discuss the implications of defective clearance of apoptotic cells and NETs in the development of clinical manifestations in SLE. PMID:26904025

  5. Comparison of the scanning linear estimator (SLE) and ROI methods for quantitative SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könik, Arda; Kupinski, Meredith; Hendrik Pretorius, P.; King, Michael A.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2015-08-01

    In quantitative emission tomography, tumor activity is typically estimated from calculations on a region of interest (ROI) identified in the reconstructed slices. In these calculations, unpredictable bias arising from the null functions of the imaging system affects ROI estimates. The magnitude of this bias depends upon the tumor size and location. In prior work it has been shown that the scanning linear estimator (SLE), which operates on the raw projection data, is an unbiased estimator of activity when the size and location of the tumor are known. In this work, we performed analytic simulation of SPECT imaging with a parallel-hole medium-energy collimator. Distance-dependent system spatial resolution and non-uniform attenuation were included in the imaging simulation. We compared the task of activity estimation by the ROI and SLE methods for a range of tumor sizes (diameter: 1-3 cm) and activities (contrast ratio: 1-10) added to uniform and non-uniform liver backgrounds. Using the correct value for the tumor shape and location is an idealized approximation to how task estimation would occur clinically. Thus we determined how perturbing this idealized prior knowledge impacted the performance of both techniques. To implement the SLE for the non-uniform background, we used a novel iterative algorithm for pre-whitening stationary noise within a compact region. Estimation task performance was compared using the ensemble mean-squared error (EMSE) as the criterion. The SLE method performed substantially better than the ROI method (i.e. EMSE(SLE) was 23-174 times lower) when the background is uniform and tumor location and size are known accurately. The variance of the SLE increased when a non-uniform liver texture was introduced but the EMSE(SLE) continued to be 5-20 times lower than the ROI method. In summary, SLE outperformed ROI under almost all conditions that we tested.

  6. Investigations of a rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), BAFF and its receptors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiahui; Pospisil, Richard; Ray, Satyajit; Milton, Jacqueline; Mage, Rose G

    2009-12-30

    B-cell activation factor belonging to the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF) is a major contributor to survival of B lymphocytes during development and maturation. A relationship between circulating BAFF levels and disease activity has been reported in patients with the autoimmune disease Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Clinical trials targeting BAFF or its receptors are currently in progress. In order to further characterize a rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) model of SLE, we investigated the expression of BAFF and its receptors in non-inbred, pedigreed rabbits derived from breeding and selection based on autoantibody responses. We immunized rabbits related to previous groups that developed autoantibodies and inflammatory responses after immunizations with peptides synthesized on multiple antigen-branched polylysine backbones. Blood and sera collected before immunization and after boosts were used for health monitoring, analyses of serum autoantibody responses by ELISA and immunofluorescence. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were studied by flow cytometry and were the source of mRNA for quantitative PCR analyses. We hypothesized that BAFF mRNA expression and serum BAFF levels measured indirectly through BAFF receptor binding might increase in autoantibody-producing rabbits. Immunized rabbits developed elevated levels of leucocyte populations, anti-nuclear, anti-dsDNA and other autoantibodies. BR3 mRNA levels in total PBMC decreased and BAFF levels remained low and unchanged in most immunized rabbits. By flow cytometry, percentages of BAFF positive cells decreased. Percentages of transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) decreased in most rabbits from all the immunized groups. The rabbit is an important model for human autoimmune and infectious diseases, and a high quality draft rabbit genome assembly was recently completed. Human disease models developed in non-inbred pedigreed animals are better able to reflect the complexities of diseases

  7. Immunization with hepatitis B vaccine accelerates SLE-like disease in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Arango, María-Teresa; Kivity, Shaye; Katzav, Aviva; Gilburd, Boris; Blank, Miri; Tomer, Nir; Volkov, Alex; Barshack, Iris; Chapman, Joab; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis-B vaccine (HBVv) can prevent HBV-infection and associated liver diseases. However, concerns regarding its safety, particularly among patients with autoimmune diseases (i.e. SLE) were raised. Moreover, the aluminum adjuvant in HBVv was related to immune mediated adverse events. Therefore, we examined the effects of immunization with HBVv or alum on SLE-like disease in a murine model. NZBWF1 mice were immunized with HBVv (Engerix), or aluminum hydroxide (alum) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 8 and 12 weeks of age. Mice were followed for weight, autoantibodies titers, blood counts, proteinuria, kidney histology, neurocognitive functions (novel object recognition, staircase, Y-maze and the forced swimming tests) and brain histology. Immunization with HBVv induced acceleration of kidney disease manifested by high anti-dsDNA antibodies (p < 0.01), early onset of proteinuria (p < 0.05), histological damage and deposition of HBs antigen in the kidney. Mice immunized with HBVv and/or alum had decreased cells counts mainly of the red cell lineage (p < 0.001), memory deficits (p < 0.01), and increased activated microglia in different areas of the brain compare with mice immunized with PBS. Anxiety-like behavior was more pronounced among mice immunized with alum. In conclusion, herein we report that immunization with the HBVv aggravated kidney disease in an animal model of SLE. Immunization with either HBVv or alum affected blood counts, neurocognitive functions and brain gliosis. Our data support the concept that different component of vaccines may be linked with immune and autoimmune mediated adverse events.

  8. Decreased frequency and activated phenotype of blood CD27 IgD IgM B lymphocytes is a permanent abnormality in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by B cell hyper-activation and auto-reactivity resulting in pathogenic auto-antibody generation. The phenotypic analysis of blood B cell subsets can be used to understand these alterations. Methods The combined detection of CD19, CD27 and IgD (or IgM) by flow cytometry (FC) analysis delineates five well-defined blood B cell-subsets: naive, switched (S) memory, double negative (DN) memory and CD27 IgD IgM (non-switched memory) B lymphocytes, and plasma cells (PCs). This phenotypic study was performed in 69 consecutive SLE patients and 31 healthy controls. Results SLE patients exhibited several abnormalities in the distribution of these B cell subsets, including elevated levels of DN memory B cells and PCs, and decreased CD27 IgD IgM B cells. Active SLE patients also showed decreased presence of S memory B cells and increased proportions of naive B lymphocytes. Nevertheless, when the patients in remission who did not require treatment were studied separately, the only remaining abnormality was a reduction of the CD27 IgD IgM B cell-subset detectable in most of these patients. The level of reduction of CD27 IgD IgM B cells was associated with elevated values of serum SLE auto-antibodies. Further analysis of this latter B cell-subset specifically showed increased expression of CD80, CD86, CD95, 9G4 idiotype and functional CXCR3 and CXCR4. Conclusions The presence of a reduced blood CD27 IgD IgM B cell-subset, exhibiting an activated state and enriched for auto-reactivity, is a consistent B cell abnormality in SLE. These findings suggest that CD27 IgD IgM B lymphocytes play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:20525218

  9. Loss of Immune Tolerance Is Controlled by ICOS in Sle1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Mittereder, Nanette; Kuta, Ellen; Bhat, Geetha; Dacosta, Karma; Cheng, Lily I; Herbst, Ronald; Carlesso, Gianluca

    2016-07-15

    ICOS, a member of the CD28 family, represents a key molecule that regulates adaptive responses to foreign Ags. ICOS is prominently expressed on T follicular helper (TFH) cells, a specialized CD4(+) T cell subset that orchestrates B cell differentiation within the germinal centers and humoral response. However, the contribution of ICOS and TFH cells to autoantibody profiles under pathological conditions has not been thoroughly investigated. We used the Sle1 lupus-prone mouse model to examine the role of ICOS in the expansion and function of pathogenic TFH cells. Genetic deletion of ICOS impacted the expansion of TFH cells in B6.Sle1 mice and inhibited the differentiation of B lymphocytes into plasma cells. The phenotypic changes observed in B6.Sle1-ICOS-knockout mice were also associated with a significant reduction in class-switched IgG, and anti-nucleosomal IgG-secreting B cells compared with B6.Sle1 animals. The level of vascular cell adhesion protein 1, a molecule that was shown to be elevated in patients with SLE and in lupus models, was also increased in an ICOS-dependent manner in Sle1 mice and correlated with autoantibody levels. The elimination of ICOS-expressing CD4(+) T cells in B6.Sle1 mice, using a glyco-engineered anti-ICOS-depleting Ab, resulted in a significant reduction in anti-nucleosomal autoantibodies. Our results indicate that ICOS regulates the ontogeny and homeostasis of B6.Sle1 TFH cells and influences the function of TFH cells during aberrant germinal center B cell responses. Therapies targeting the ICOS signaling pathway may offer new opportunities for the treatment of lupus and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27296665

  10. Loss of Immune Tolerance Is Controlled by ICOS in Sle1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mittereder, Nanette; Kuta, Ellen; Bhat, Geetha; Dacosta, Karma; Cheng, Lily I.; Herbst, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    ICOS, a member of the CD28 family, represents a key molecule that regulates adaptive responses to foreign Ags. ICOS is prominently expressed on T follicular helper (TFH) cells, a specialized CD4+ T cell subset that orchestrates B cell differentiation within the germinal centers and humoral response. However, the contribution of ICOS and TFH cells to autoantibody profiles under pathological conditions has not been thoroughly investigated. We used the Sle1 lupus-prone mouse model to examine the role of ICOS in the expansion and function of pathogenic TFH cells. Genetic deletion of ICOS impacted the expansion of TFH cells in B6.Sle1 mice and inhibited the differentiation of B lymphocytes into plasma cells. The phenotypic changes observed in B6.Sle1-ICOS–knockout mice were also associated with a significant reduction in class-switched IgG, and anti-nucleosomal IgG-secreting B cells compared with B6.Sle1 animals. The level of vascular cell adhesion protein 1, a molecule that was shown to be elevated in patients with SLE and in lupus models, was also increased in an ICOS-dependent manner in Sle1 mice and correlated with autoantibody levels. The elimination of ICOS-expressing CD4+ T cells in B6.Sle1 mice, using a glyco-engineered anti-ICOS–depleting Ab, resulted in a significant reduction in anti-nucleosomal autoantibodies. Our results indicate that ICOS regulates the ontogeny and homeostasis of B6.Sle1 TFH cells and influences the function of TFH cells during aberrant germinal center B cell responses. Therapies targeting the ICOS signaling pathway may offer new opportunities for the treatment of lupus and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:27296665

  11. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  12. Evaluation of ENA-6 Profile by ELISA Immunoassay in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematodes.

    PubMed

    Aganovic-Musinovic, Izeta; Karamehic, Jasenko; Zecevic, Lamija; Gavrankapetanovic, Faris; Avdagic, Nesina; Zaciragic, Asija; Jukic, Tomislav; Grcic, Nerima; Svrakic, Suvada

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur in 3-5% of the population. Study included 30 patients with clinically diagnosed SLE and 30 healthy controls (American college of Rheumatology, 1997). SLE was diagnosed according to criteria issued in 1997 by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). The aim of this study was to evaluate concentration values of each antigen of ENA-6 profile in SLE, to investigate possible correlation between the concentration of Sm antibodies and CIC, and to test their use as possible immunobiological markers in SLE. Furthermore, the aim of our study was to determine whether there is a correlation between Sm antibodies and CIC and SLE activity. The results revealed that all of these ENA-6 and Sm antibodies as biomarkers complement diagnoses of active SLE but their use as solo markers does not allow classifying patients with SLE. Our study has shown that based on calculations from ROC curves, Sm/RNP was clearly a very important marker for diagnosis of SLE (cut off ≥ 9.56 EU, AUC 0,942). The high incidence of Scl-70 (10%) reactivity suggests that ELISA monitoring of this antibody produces more false positive results than other multiplex assay. An important conclusion that can be drawn from the results of our study is that laboratory tests are no more effective than clinical examination for detecting disease relapse, but are helpful in the confirmation of SLE activity.

  13. Evaluation of ENA-6 Profile by ELISA Immunoassay in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematodes

    PubMed Central

    Aganovic-Musinovic, Izeta; Karamehic, Jasenko; Zecevic, Lamija; Gavrankapetanovic, Faris; Avdagic, Nesina; Zaciragic, Asija; Jukic, Tomislav; Grcic, Nerima; Svrakic, Suvada

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur in 3−5% of the population. Study included 30 patients with clinically diagnosed SLE and 30 healthy controls (American college of Rheumatology, 1997). SLE was diagnosed according to criteria issued in 1997 by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR). The aim of this study was to evaluate concentration values of each antigen of ENA-6 profile in SLE, to investigate possible correlation between the concentration of Sm antibodies and CIC, and to test their use as possible immunobiological markers in SLE. Furthermore, the aim of our study was to determine whether there is a correlation between Sm antibodies and CIC and SLE activity. The results revealed that all of these ENA-6 and Sm antibodies as biomarkers complement diagnoses of active SLE but their use as solo markers does not allow classifying patients with SLE. Our study has shown that based on calculations from ROC curves, Sm/RNP was clearly a very important marker for diagnosis of SLE (cut off ≥ 9.56 EU, AUC 0,942). The high incidence of Scl-70 (10%) reactivity suggests that ELISA monitoring of this antibody produces more false positive results than other multiplex assay. An important conclusion that can be drawn from the results of our study is that laboratory tests are no more effective than clinical examination for detecting disease relapse, but are helpful in the confirmation of SLE activity. PMID:23097694

  14. Vitamin K-dependent proteins GAS6 and Protein S and TAM receptors in patients of systemic lupus erythematosus: correlation with common genetic variants and disease activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Growth arrest-specific gene 6 protein (GAS6) and protein S (ProS) are vitamin K-dependent proteins present in plasma with important regulatory functions in systems of response and repair to damage. They interact with receptor tyrosine kinases of the Tyro3, Axl and MerTK receptor tyrosine kinase (TAM) family, involved in apoptotic cell clearance (efferocytosis) and regulation of the innate immunity. TAM-deficient mice show spontaneous lupus-like symptoms. Here we tested the genetic profile and plasma levels of components of the system in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and compare them with a control healthy population. Methods Fifty SLE patients and 50 healthy controls with matched age, gender and from the same geographic area were compared. Genetic analysis was performed in GAS6 and the TAM receptor genes on SNPs previously identified. The concentrations of GAS6, total and free ProS, and the soluble forms of the three TAM receptors (sAxl, sMerTK and sTyro3) were measured in plasma from these samples. Results Plasma concentrations of GAS6 were higher and, total and free ProS were lower in the SLE patients compared to controls, even when patients on oral anticoagulant treatment were discarded. Those parameters correlated with SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score, GAS6 being higher in the most severe cases, while free and total ProS were lower. All 3 soluble receptors increased its concentration in plasma of lupus patients. Conclusions The present study highlights that the GAS6/ProS-TAM system correlates in several ways with disease activity in SLE. We show here that this correlation is affected by common polymorphisms in the genes of the system. These findings underscore the importance of mechanism of regulatory control of innate immunity in the pathology of SLE. PMID:23497733

  15. Serum Thiols as a Biomarker of Disease Activity in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Lalwani, Pritesh; de Souza, Giselle Katiane Bonfim Bacelar; de Lima, Domingos Savio Nunes; Passos, Luiz Fernando Souza; Boechat, Antonio Luiz; Lima, Emerson Silva

    2015-01-01

    Lupus Nephritis (LN) develops in more than half of the Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE) patients. However, lack of reliable, specific biomarkers for LN hampers clinical management of patients and impedes development of new therapeutics. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oxidative stress biomarkers in patients with SLE is predictive of renal pathology. Serum biochemical and oxidative stress markers were measured in patients with inactive lupus, active lupus with and without nephritis and compared to healthy control group. To assess the predictive performance of biomarkers, Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed and cut-offs were used to identify SLE patients with nephritis. We observed an increased oxidative stress response in all SLE patients compared to healthy controls. Among the several biomarkers tested, serum thiols had a significant inverse association with SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Interestingly, thiols were able too aptly differentiate between SLE patients with and without renal pathology, and serum thiol levels were not affected by immunosuppressive drug therapy. The decreased thiols in SLE correlated significantly with serum creatinine and serum C3 levels. Further retrospective evaluation using serum creatinine or C3 levels in combination with thiol’s cutoff values from ROC analysis, we could positively predict chronicity of renal pathology in SLE patients. In summary, serum thiols emerge as an inexpensive and reliable indicator of LN, which may not only help in early identification of renal pathology but also aid in the therapeutic management of the disease, in developing countries with resource poor settings. PMID:25799079

  16. Inflammatory expression profiles in monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and relationship with atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our objectives were to examine mononuclear cell gene expression profiles in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and healthy controls and to compare subsets with and without atherosclerosis to determine which genes’ expression is related to atherosclerosis in SLE. Methods Monocytes were obtained from 20 patients with SLE and 16 healthy controls and were in vitro-differentiated into macrophages. Subjects also underwent laboratory and imaging studies to evaluate for subclinical atherosclerosis. Whole-genome RNA expression microarray was performed, and gene expression was examined. Results Gene expression profiling was used to identify gene signatures that differentiated patients from controls and individuals with and without atherosclerosis. In monocytes, 9 out of 20 patients with SLE had an interferon-inducible signature compared with 2 out of 16 controls. By looking at gene expression during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation, we identified pathways which were differentially regulated between SLE and controls and identified signatures based on relevant intracellular signaling molecules which could differentiate SLE patients with atherosclerosis from controls. Among patients with SLE, we used a previously defined 344-gene atherosclerosis signature in monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation to identify patient subgroups with and without atherosclerosis. Interestingly, this signature further classified patients on the basis of the presence of SLE disease activity and cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusions Many genes were differentially regulated during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation in SLE patients compared with controls. The expression of these genes in mononuclear cells is important in the pathogenesis of SLE, and molecular profiling using gene expression can help stratify SLE patients who may be at risk for development of atherosclerosis. PMID:25011540

  17. SLE-key(®) rule-out serologic test for excluding the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus: Developing the ImmunArray iCHIP(®).

    PubMed

    Putterman, Chaim; Wu, Alan; Reiner-Benaim, Anat; Batty, D Scott; Sanz, Ignacio; Oates, Jim; Jakobi, Keren; Petri, Michelle; Safer, Pennina; Gerwien, Robert; Sorek, Rachel; Blumenstein, Yakov; Cohen, Irun R

    2016-02-01

    We describe here the development, verification and validation of the SLE-key(®) rule-out test for a definitive rule-out of a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The test uses the proprietary iCHIP(®) micro-array technology platform (Fattal et al., 2010) to identify discriminating patterns of circulating autoantibodies among SLE patients compared with self-declared healthy individuals. Given the challenges associated with the diagnosis of SLE and the healthcare costs of delayed diagnosis and misdiagnosis, a definitive rule-out test can provide significant clinical benefits to patients and potentially major cost savings to healthcare systems.

  18. Endocan Levels and Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Icli, Abdullah; Cure, Erkan; Cure, Medine Cumhur; Uslu, Ali Ugur; Balta, Sevket; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Ozturk, Cengiz; Arslan, Sevket; Sakız, Davut; Sahin, Muhammed; Kucuk, Adem

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology. A major cause of morbidity and mortality in SLE is accelerated atherosclerosis. Endothelial-specific molecule 1 (endocan) is a potential predictor of vascular events and is expressed in response to inflammatory cytokines in endothelial cells. We investigated the relationship between endocan and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) as a marker of early atherosclerosis. We included 44 women with SLE and 44 healthy women as controls. Disease severity of SLE was evaluated using the SLE Disease Activity Index. Endocan, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and lipid panel were measured. The cIMT was 0.70 (range: 0.45-1.20) mm in patients with SLE and 0.40 (0.25-0.60) mm in controls (P < .001). Endocan value was 1.6 ± 0.9 ng/mL in controls and 2.2 ± 1.0 ng/mL in patients with SLE (P = .014). Endocan levels were positively correlated with cIMT (r = .469, P < .001), body mass index (r = .373, P = .013), and ESR (r = .393, P = .008). Endocan level may be associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in SLE. Consequently, endocan levels may be a promising clinical tool for patients with SLE as a guide for preventive strategy. PMID:26614790

  19. Defective production of interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha by stimulated monocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mũzes, G; Vien, C V; González-Cabello, R; Fehér, J; Gergely, P

    1989-01-01

    Interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha activity by E. coli lipopolysaccharide-triggered monocytes was studied in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in various stages of activity. Monocytes from both groups of SLE patients produced significantly less tumour necrosis factor-alpha activity than those of age and sex matched healthy controls. However, interleukin-1 activity was only significantly reduced in patients with active stage of the disease. These findings indicate further immunoregulatory disturbances in monocyte function concerning SLE. PMID:2636360

  20. Structural integration-based fascial release efficacy in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): two case studies.

    PubMed

    Ball, Tanya M

    2011-04-01

    Auto-immune conditions such as Scleroderma and SLE induce fascial sclerosis and fibrosis, with related vascular, lymphatic, neural, joint, and visceral compression. Ensuing ischaemic pain, necrosis, autonomic and immune dysfunction in turn account for much of patients' pain, functional impairment, and psychological distress. Fascial Release Therapy (FRT) is a hands-on therapeutic model focused on restoring postural and functional integrity by addressing fascial imbalance, with hypothesized efficacy for SLE patients in: Two SLE patients who received FRT treatment along KMI® SI methodology, reported improvements to seven symptoms, namely: While 'spontaneous recovery' cannot be ruled out without controls, these anecdotal results support further, broader-based clinical research with stringent evaluation tools to enhance outcome validity. Therapeutic mechanisms may includefascial relaxation as key to decreasing myofascial pain; myofibroblast response to 'stress'; inter- and trans-fascial plane transfer of enhanced 'ease' and 'glide'. Psycho-neuro-immunological factors reversing adverse auto-immune response.

  1. CXCL13 Promotes Proliferation of Mesangial Cells by Combination with CXCR5 in SLE

    PubMed Central

    You, Bo; Shan, Ying; Shi, Si

    2016-01-01

    As a CXC subtype member of the chemokine superfamily, CXCL13 is considered to be involved in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), especially in lupus nephritis (LN). To determine the effect of CXCL13 on SLE and explore the potential mechanisms, we tested serum concentrations of CXCL13 in patients and healthy individuals and found that CXCL13 expression was high in SLE patients especially in LN patients. When we treated human renal mesangial cells (HRMCs) in vitro with recombinant human CXCL13, the cell proliferation was accelerated, which was tested by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry. Western blot and immunofluorescence assay revealed that CXCL13 would lead to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). However, the effect was weakened after the silence of CXCR5. The results of our study elaborated that high expression of CXCL13 could be involved in the pathogenesis of LN. PMID:27672667

  2. Structural integration-based fascial release efficacy in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): two case studies.

    PubMed

    Ball, Tanya M

    2011-04-01

    Auto-immune conditions such as Scleroderma and SLE induce fascial sclerosis and fibrosis, with related vascular, lymphatic, neural, joint, and visceral compression. Ensuing ischaemic pain, necrosis, autonomic and immune dysfunction in turn account for much of patients' pain, functional impairment, and psychological distress. Fascial Release Therapy (FRT) is a hands-on therapeutic model focused on restoring postural and functional integrity by addressing fascial imbalance, with hypothesized efficacy for SLE patients in: Two SLE patients who received FRT treatment along KMI® SI methodology, reported improvements to seven symptoms, namely: While 'spontaneous recovery' cannot be ruled out without controls, these anecdotal results support further, broader-based clinical research with stringent evaluation tools to enhance outcome validity. Therapeutic mechanisms may includefascial relaxation as key to decreasing myofascial pain; myofibroblast response to 'stress'; inter- and trans-fascial plane transfer of enhanced 'ease' and 'glide'. Psycho-neuro-immunological factors reversing adverse auto-immune response. PMID:21419363

  3. CXCL13 Promotes Proliferation of Mesangial Cells by Combination with CXCR5 in SLE

    PubMed Central

    You, Bo; Shan, Ying; Shi, Si

    2016-01-01

    As a CXC subtype member of the chemokine superfamily, CXCL13 is considered to be involved in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), especially in lupus nephritis (LN). To determine the effect of CXCL13 on SLE and explore the potential mechanisms, we tested serum concentrations of CXCL13 in patients and healthy individuals and found that CXCL13 expression was high in SLE patients especially in LN patients. When we treated human renal mesangial cells (HRMCs) in vitro with recombinant human CXCL13, the cell proliferation was accelerated, which was tested by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry. Western blot and immunofluorescence assay revealed that CXCL13 would lead to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). However, the effect was weakened after the silence of CXCR5. The results of our study elaborated that high expression of CXCL13 could be involved in the pathogenesis of LN.

  4. Mannose binding lectin gene polymorphism and preclinical carotid atherosclerosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Wafaa T; Herdan, Omar M; Osman, Mustafa H; Alkady, Eman A M

    2010-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have increased risk of atherosclerosis and CVD that cannot be explained by traditional risk factors. Previous studies indicated that mannose binding lectin (MBL) may modify the development of atherosclerosis. This study was designed to investigate association of MBL gene polymorphism with occurrence of preclinical atherosclerosis in SLE. The study included 46 patients with SLE and 17 age and sex matched controls. MBL2 genotypes were assessed in patients and controls by the PCR-RFLP method and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery (cclMT) was determined by means of ultrasonography. Also, serological markers were measured and the disease activity index (SLEDAI) was estimated. SLE patients had higher frequency of MBL A/B + B/B genotypes (47.8%) than controls (29.4%). ccIMT was higher in patients having A/B, B/B, A/B+B/B genotypes when compared with wild genotype (A/A). Patients with A/B+B/B genotypes showed high serum level of LDL, TG, ESRI, CRP and SLEDAI score, but low level of HDL, C3, and C4 compared to wild genotype. ccIMT of mutant SLE subgroup correlated well with SLE risk factors for atherosclerosis. In conclusion, mutant genotypes of MBL may be atherogenic as SLE patients had a higher IMT, which correlated significantly with SLE risk factors for atherosclerosis. PMID:23082493

  5. Prolactin rescues and primes autoreactive B cells directly and indirectly through dendritic cells in B6.Sle3 mice

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J; Saha, S; Peeva, E

    2013-01-01

    The lupus susceptibility interval Sle3/5 confers responsiveness to prolactin in C57BL/6 (B6) mice and hyperprolactinaemia induces a lupus-like phenotype in B6.Sel3/5 mice. In this study, the immunostimulatory effects of prolactin in B6 mice containing the Sle3 portion of the Sel3/5 interval (B6.Sle3 mice) were dissected. Because of the Sle3 interval's involvement in activation of myeloid cells, the effect of dendritic cells (DCs) from prolactin-treated B6.Sle3 mice on the phenotype of B6 mice was also evaluated. B cells from prolactin-treated B6 and B6.Sle3 mice and from B6 recipients of prolactin-modulated DCs from B6.Sle3 mice were tested for DNA-reactivity and resistance to B cell receptor (BCR)-mediated apoptosis. The expression of co-stimulatory molecules on lymphocytes and myeloid cells was also evaluated. In prolactin-treated B6.Sle3 mice, transitional type 2 B cells increased while type 1 B cells decreased as a consequence of prolactin-induced resistance to BCR-mediated apoptosis leading to the survival of DNA-reactive B cells. Follicular B cells from prolactin-treated mice expressed increased levels of CD40, B7·2 and IAb, and DCs and monocytes had higher levels of CD44 and B7·2 than placebo-treated mice. Adoptive transfer of DCs from prolactin-treated B6.Sle3 mice to B6 recipients demonstrated the intrinsic ability of prolactin-modulated DCs to induce a development of lupus-like characteristics in B6 mice. Based on these results, prolactin accelerates the breakdown of immune tolerance in B6.Sle3 mice by promoting the survival, maturation and activation of autoreactive B cells, DCs and macrophages. PMID:23574327

  6. Anti-interferon alpha treatment in SLE.

    PubMed

    Kirou, Kyriakos A; Gkrouzman, Elena

    2013-09-01

    Several studies in the last decade have highlighted the role of the type I interferon (IFN-I) pathway, and particularly interferon alpha (IFNα) in SLE pathogenesis. As a result, a multitude of potential treatments targeting IFNα have emerged in the last few years, a few of which have already completed phase II clinical trials. Some of the treatment strategies have focused on blocking IFNα or its receptor and others the plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC), which is the principal IFNα producing cell. In this review, we will discuss the evidence supporting a pathogenic role of IFNα and pDC in SLE, provide an update on the current status of these therapeutic strategies, and discuss the potential advantages and disadvantages of each therapeutic approach.

  7. Pathways: Strategies for Susceptibility Genes in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, James M.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Kimberly, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disorder marked by an inappropriate immune response to nuclear antigens. Recent whole genome association and more focused studies have revealed numerous genes implicated in this disease process, including ITGAM, Fc gamma receptors, complement components, C-reactive protein, and others. One common feature of these molecules is their involvement in the immune opsonins pathway and phagocytic clearing of nuclear antigens and apoptotic debris which provide excessive exposure of lupus-related antigens to immune cells. Analysis of gene-gene interactions in the opsonin pathway and its relationship to SLE may provide a systems-based approach to identify additional candidate genes associated with disease able to account for a larger part of lupus susceptibility. PMID:20144911

  8. Key issues in the management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: latest developments and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is a chronic multisystem disease with significant associated morbidity and mortality. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of SLE has led to the development of biologic agents, primarily targeting B cells and others inhibiting costimulatory molecules, type I interferons and cytokines such as interleukin-6. Several of these agents have been studied in clinical trials; some have shown promise while others have yielded disappointing results. Economic and regulatory issues continue to hamper the availability of such therapies for SLE patients. With increasing recognition that recurrent flares of disease activity lead to long-term damage accrual, one of the most important recent developments in patient management has been the concept of treat-to-target in SLE while minimizing patient exposure to excessive corticosteroid and other immunosuppressive therapy. This article reviews these key issues in SLE management, outlining recent developments and clinical implications for patients. PMID:26622325

  9. Role of vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level in Egyptian female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Emerah, Ahmed A; El-Shal, Amal S

    2013-11-01

    Recently, several studies have demonstrated the role of vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms in the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to evaluate VDR (ApaI, BsmI, and FokI) gene polymorphisms and haplotypes as a risk factors and/or activity markers for SLE, and whether they influence 25-hydroxyvitamin (25(OH) D) level. One hundred and seven SLE patients and 129 controls were enrolled in this study. Disease activity in SLE patients was assessed using Disease Activity Index. Polymorphisms of VDR gene were detected using polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism. Serum 25(OH) D levels were measured using ELISA. We found that ApaI AA genotype, BsmI B allele, Bb, BB genotypes, FokI F allele and FF genotype frequencies of VDR were increased in SLE group. There were significant associations of VDR ApaI AA, BsmI BB, and FokI FF genotypes with lupus nephritis and higher SLE activity scores. Moreover, serum 25(OH) D levels were increased in SLE patients carrying FokI ff genotype compared with patients carrying FF genotype. VDR haplotypes aBF and ABF were associated with SLE risk. The ABF haplotype was associated with higher SLE activity scores and lower serum 25(OH) D concentrations. We observed that the presence of leuko/lymphopenia, renal disorders, higher SLE activity scores and higher anti-dsDNA levels were accompanied by a significant decrease of serum 25(OH)D concentrations. We concluded that The VDR genes polymorphisms, haplotypes, and decreased 25(OH) D levels were associated with risk and more activity scores of SLE.

  10. Activation-induced necroptosis contributes to B-cell lymphopenia in active systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fan, H; Liu, F; Dong, G; Ren, D; Xu, Y; Dou, J; Wang, T; Sun, L; Hou, Y

    2014-01-01

    B-cell abnormality including excessive activation and lymphopenia is a central feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although activation threshold, auto-reaction and death of B cells can be affected by intrinsical and/or external signaling, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Herein, we demonstrate that co-activation of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and B-cell receptor (BCR) pathways is a core event for the survival/dead states of B cells in SLE. We found that the mortalities of CD19+CD27- and CD19+IgM+ B-cell subsets were increased in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of SLE patients. The gene microarray analysis of CD19+ B cells from active SLE patients showed that the differentially expressed genes were closely correlated to TLR7, BCR, apoptosis, necroptosis and immune pathways. We also found that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR could trigger normal B cells to take on SLE-like B-cell characters including the elevated viability, activation and proliferation in the first 3 days and necroptosis in the later days. Moreover, the necroptotic B cells exhibited mitochondrial dysfunction and hypoxia, along with the elevated expression of necroptosis-related genes, consistent with that in both SLE B-cell microarray and real-time PCR verification. Expectedly, pretreatment with the receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) inhibitor Necrostatin-1, and not the apoptosis inhibitor zVAD, suppressed B-cell death. Importantly, B cells from additional SLE patients also significantly displayed high expression levels of necroptosis-related genes compared with those from healthy donors. These data indicate that co-activation of TLR7 and BCR pathways can promote B cells to hyperactivation and ultimately necroptosis. Our finding provides a new explanation on B-cell lymphopenia in active SLE patients. These data suggest that extrinsic factors may increase the intrinsical abnormality of B cells in SLE patients. PMID:25210799

  11. Incidental retinal vascular occlusions on hydroxychloroquine screening in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Asima; Khurana, Gitanjali; Kimpel, Donald; Reddy, Ashvini K

    2015-01-01

    Objective The proportion of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who manifest retinal involvement increases many fold in patients with active systemic disease. The objective of this report is to stress upon the significance of comprehensive ophthalmic assessment of all SLE patients to prevent and manage blinding ocular manifestations of the disease. Methods Retrospective case review. Results Incidental retinal vascular complications seen in patients undergoing baseline hydroxychloroquine screening. Conclusion The purpose of comprehensive ophthalmic screening in SLE patients is twofold. It will aid in the diagnosis and treatment of blinding ocular complications of the disease and monitor hydroxychloroquine macular toxicity. PMID:26064074

  12. Anti-C1q autoantibodies from systemic lupus erythematosus patients activate the complement system via both the classical and lectin pathways.

    PubMed

    Thanei, Sophia; Vanhecke, Dominique; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2015-10-01

    Autoantibodies against complement C1q (anti-C1q) strongly correlate with the occurrence of lupus nephritis and hypocomplementemia in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although a direct pathogenic role of anti-C1q has been suggested, the assumed complement-activating capacity remains to be elucidated. Using an ELISA-based assay, we found that anti-C1q activate the classical (CP) and lectin pathways (LP) depending on the anti-C1q immunoglobulin-class repertoire present in the patient's serum. IgG anti-C1q resulted in the activation of the CP as reflected by C4b deposition in the presence of purified C1 and C4 in a dose-dependent manner. The extent of C4b deposition correlated with anti-C1q levels in SLE patients but not in healthy controls. Our data indicate that SLE patient-derived anti-C1q can activate the CP and the LP but not the alternative pathway of complement. These findings are of importance for the understanding of the role of anti-C1q in SLE suggesting a direct link to hypocomplementemia.

  13. Reduced opsonisation of protein A containing Staphylococcus aureus in sera with cryoglobulins from patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Nived, O; Linder, C; Odeberg, H; Svensson, B

    1985-01-01

    Among a total of 41 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) 11 of 14 patients with active disease had reduced capacity (p less than 0.05) to opsonify Staphylococcus aureus in undiluted sera, as compared with nine of 27 patients with inactive disease (p less than 0.02). The opsonic reduction in the active patients increased with the number of active organ systems (p less than 0.002). No correlation was found between reduced opsonisation and corticosteroid treatment, or serum concentrations of complement components (C) of the classical pathway, or bacteria-associated activated C3. When the cryoglobulin fraction of immune complexes (IC) was removed, normal opsonic capacity was restored, and the opsonic reduction could be transferred with the cryoglobulins to pooled serum. Increased IC values, as measured by C1q binding assay, were found in conjunction with reduced opsonic capacity (p less than 0.04). Since opsonisation in SLE sera of a protein A deficient strain of S. aureus was normal, reduced S. aureus phagocytosis in SLE sera may be explained by IC binding to staphylococcal protein A. PMID:3872638

  14. Relationship between Serum Level of Interleukin-2 in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Disease Activity in Comparison with Control Group

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei, Mehrdad; Musavi, Sara; Nomali, Mahin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite the large number of surveys, there are not any validated biomarkers for SLE disease activity till now. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between serum level of IL-2 in patients with SLE and disease activity in comparison with control group. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 73 patients with lupus and 73 healthy subjects referred to the rheumatology clinic of 5 Azar Hospital in Gorgan (North of Iran).They were studied via convenience sampling during 2011-2012. Blood samples were taken from both groups and serum levels of interleukin -2 measured by Avi Bion Human IL-2 ELISA kit. Serum Level of IL-2 greater than 15 pg/ml defined positive and lesser than this amount defined negative. Disease activity evaluated with SLE disease activity index. Score greater than or equal to three or four defined as active disease. Data analysis conducted by SPSS software (version 16) and by using descriptive statistics and statistical tests. Results: Serum level of IL-2 was positive in 45.2% of sample studied and negative in 54.8% in case group, while in control group, serum level of IL-2 only in 11% of sample studied was positive and in 89% was negative. Statistical analysis indicated a significant relationship between serum level of IL-2 and the SLE disease activity index (p=0.025). Conclusion: This study showed the relationship between serum levels of IL-2 and disease activity, so this biomarker can be used as a clinical indicator for assessing disease activity in patients with SLE. PMID:25177590

  15. Anti-erythropoietin receptor antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with anemia.

    PubMed

    Luo, X-Y; Yang, M-H; Peng, Ping; Wu, L-J; Liu, Q-S; Chen, L; Tang, Z; Liu, N-T; Zeng, X-F; Liu, Y; Yuan, G-H

    2013-02-01

    Anemia is a common hematologic abnormality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An inadequate erythropoietin (EPO) response in SLE patients with anemia has been described that may be due to the presence of antibodies to EPO in SLE patients. However, whether anemia in patients with SLE is related to antibodies to EPO receptor (EPOR) has not yet been investigated. We enlisted 169 consecutive patients with SLE and 45 normal individuals to investigate the existence and importance of circulating autoantibodies to EPOR in sera from patients with SLE. In all patients with SLE, the disease activity was evaluated by using the SLE disease activity index SLEDAI. Anti-EPOR antibodies were detected by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A higher frequency of anti-EPOR antibodies was observed in SLE patients than in healthy controls (18.3% vs 2.2%, p = 0.007). Moreover, anti-EPOR antibodies were detected in 22 of 69 (31.9%) SLE patients with anemia and in only nine of 100 (9.0%, p < 0.001) in those without. Furthermore, the patients with anti-EPOR antibodies exhibited more severe anemia and often presented as microcytic anemia (p = 0.001). Finally, anti-EPOR antibodies seemed more likely to occur in patients with rash (p = 0.008), lower levels of C(3) component (p = 0.01), higher titer of anti-dsDNA antibodies (p < 0.001) and higher disease activity scores (p = 0.024). The results of this study suggest that anti-EPOR antibodies might play a vital role in SLE patients developing anemia because of the higher incidence of antibodies to EPOR found in SLE patients with anemia. Thus, there might be clinical value in detecting anti-EPOR antibodies in SLE patients with anemia. Therefore, the pathologic role of the antibodies in inducing anemia needs to be established in future studies.

  16. CR1 on erythrocytes of Brazilian systemic lupus erythematosus patients: the influence of disease activity on expression and ability of this receptor to bind immune complexes opsonized with complement from normal human serum.

    PubMed

    Marzocchi-Machado, C M; Alves, C M O S; Azzolini, A E C S; Polizello, A C M; Carvalho, I F; Lucisano-Valim, Y M

    2005-12-01

    Hypocomplementaemia and low expression of CR1 on erythrocytes (E) of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are associated with defective clearance of circulating immune complexes (IC) and so they may have pathogenic significance. Here, we investigated whether the reduced CR1/E in SLE patients per se might affect the binding of IC to CR1/E. First, we analysed the expression of CR1 on E of active (n=30) and inactive (n=34) SLE patients using a FITC-conjugated mouse anti-CR1 monoclonal antibody E11 and flow cytometry. Both groups of patients had a significantly reduced CR1/E expression compared with healthy controls (n=40). It was also observed that the number of E bearing CR1 was reduced in both groups of SLE patients studied. Second, we determined the functional activity of CR1/E by measuring the binding to E of FITC-bovine serum albumin (BSA)/rabbit anti-BSA complexes, formed at equivalence, which were opsonized with complement from normal human serum (NHS). On the other hand, we did not find differences between the patient and control groups in the ability of E to bind IC/NHS. There was also a positive correlation between the CR1/E expression and the number of E bearing CR1 in control and inactive SLE groups, which was not observed in the group of active SLE patients. Considering the involvement of low levels of complement and CR1/E expression on complex processing, in this in vitro model the results show that an effective coating of the complexes with complement is sufficient to bind them preferentially to CR1 over normal levels of receptor expression.

  17. Increased CD28 serum levels are not associated with specific clinical activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Brambila-Tapia, Aniel J L; Gámez-Nava, Jorge I; Salazar-Páramo, Mario; Munoz-Valle, José F; González-López, Laura; Llamas-Covarrubias, Mara A; Gutiérrez-Urena, Sergio R; Vázquez-Del Mercado, Mónica; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Ingrid P

    2011-10-01

    CD28 is one of the main activator receptors involved in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) pathogenesis, and its expression and serum levels are significantly higher in patients with SLE and other autoimmune diseases than in healthy controls (HC). However, it is unknown whether this increase is associated with specific organ damage. Therefore, our objective was to measure the CD28 levels in serum from SLE and HC groups to confirm the CD28 serum levels increase, as reported previously, and to determine whether this increase was associated with specific organ activity and the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Forty SLE patients and 40 matched HC were included, and the age, disease duration, SLEDAI and Mexican SLEDAI were recorded for the SLE group. CD28 serum levels were measured by ELISA. There was a statistically significant increase in the CD28 serum levels of SLE patients compared to controls (p = 0.039); however, we did not find any significant correlation with disease activity indices or organ involvement, although we found a significant but low correlation with C3. Our results and a review of the literature suggest that the increase in CD28 serum levels may be the result of CD28 gene overexpression, which could be related to the decrease in CD28+ T cells, T-cell hyporesponsiveness and immune impairment that occurs in SLE.

  18. Systemic lupus erythematosus and thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura: a refractory case without lupus activity.

    PubMed

    Garcia Boyero, Raimundo; Mas Esteve, Eva; Mas Esteve, Maria; Millá Perseguer, M Magdalena; Marco Buades, Josefa; Beltran Fabregat, Juan; Cañigral Ferrando, Guillermo; Belmonte Serrano, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    The association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has been infrequently reported. Usually, patients with TTP have more SLE activity and frequent renal involvement. Here we present a case of TTP associated to low-activity SLE. The absence of renal and major organ involvement increased the difficulty in making the initial diagnosis. ADAMTS13 activity in plasma in this patient was very low, as seen in other similar cases. The evolution of the patient was poor, needing plasma exchanges and immunosuppressive therapy, including the use of rituximab.

  19. Psychotic Symptoms in a Child with Long Standing SLE Nephritis: Neuropsychiatric Manifestation or Sequelae to Lupus?

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Ananya; Sharma, Pawan; Sagar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease of unknown etiology, which affects multiple organ systems including the central nervous system (CNS). Though not common, childhood onset SLE is a known and established entity. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in childhood onset SLE. Of these, psychosis and behavioural symptoms are relatively rare, and there is no consensus on the proper treatment of such cases. We report a case of 13-year-old boy, diagnosed with lupus nephritis, and presented with psychosis and behavioural symptoms. The highlight of this case is that the psychiatric symptoms were present despite the primary illness being quiescent. Thus, the patient was treated with Olanzapine and lorazepam, while continuing immunosuppressive therapy as previously. Also, MRI brain revealed vasculitic changes in the right hemisphere, which might be one of the etiological factors playing role in the development of these neuropsychiatric symptoms. PMID:27274749

  20. Differential Expression of O-Glycans in CD4(+) T Lymphocytes from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Martínez, Edgar; Lascurain, Ricardo; Tenorio, Eda Patricia; Sánchez-González, Antonio; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Jara-Quezada, Luis J; Chávez-Sánchez, Raúl; Zenteno, Edgar; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show a decreased activation threshold and increased apoptosis. These processes seem to be regulated by glycosylated molecules on the T cell surface. Here, we determined through flow cytometry the expression of mucin-type O-glycans on T helper cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 23 SLE patients and its relation with disease activity. We used lectins specific for the disaccharide Gal-GalNAc, such as Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin (ALL), Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) and Arachis hypogaea lectin (peanut agglutinin, PNA), as well as lectins for sialic acid such as Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) and Maakia amurensis agglutinin (MAA). The results showed that ALL, but not jacalin or PNA, identified significant differences in O-glycan expression on T helper cells from active SLE patients (n = 10). Moreover, an inverse correlation was found between the frequency of T helper cells recognized by ALL and SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score in SLE patients. In contrast, SNA and MAA lectins did not identify any differences between CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients. There was no difference in the recognition by ALL on activated T helper cells and T regulatory (Treg) cells. Our findings point out that activation of SLE disease diminishes the expression of O-glycans in T helper cells; ALL could be considered as a marker to determine activity of the disease. PMID:27600584

  1. Differential Expression of O-Glycans in CD4(+) T Lymphocytes from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Martínez, Edgar; Lascurain, Ricardo; Tenorio, Eda Patricia; Sánchez-González, Antonio; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Jara-Quezada, Luis J; Chávez-Sánchez, Raúl; Zenteno, Edgar; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) show a decreased activation threshold and increased apoptosis. These processes seem to be regulated by glycosylated molecules on the T cell surface. Here, we determined through flow cytometry the expression of mucin-type O-glycans on T helper cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 23 SLE patients and its relation with disease activity. We used lectins specific for the disaccharide Gal-GalNAc, such as Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin (ALL), Artocarpus integrifolia lectin (jacalin) and Arachis hypogaea lectin (peanut agglutinin, PNA), as well as lectins for sialic acid such as Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) and Maakia amurensis agglutinin (MAA). The results showed that ALL, but not jacalin or PNA, identified significant differences in O-glycan expression on T helper cells from active SLE patients (n = 10). Moreover, an inverse correlation was found between the frequency of T helper cells recognized by ALL and SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score in SLE patients. In contrast, SNA and MAA lectins did not identify any differences between CD4(+) T cells from SLE patients. There was no difference in the recognition by ALL on activated T helper cells and T regulatory (Treg) cells. Our findings point out that activation of SLE disease diminishes the expression of O-glycans in T helper cells; ALL could be considered as a marker to determine activity of the disease.

  2. The Blood Nucleome in the Pathogenesis of SLE

    PubMed Central

    Pisetsky, David S.; Ullal, Anirudh J.

    2010-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is prototypic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to DNA among other nuclear molecules. These antibodies can form immune complexes that promote pathogenesis by stimulating cytokine production and depositing in the kidney to instigate nephritis. The antigens that form these complexes arise from the blood nucleome, a pool of circulating macromolecules comprised of DNA, RNA and nuclear proteins released from cells. Cell death is a major source of these molecules, releasing DNA in a process that can be modeled in mice by the administration of cells killed ex vivo. In the mouse model, the appearance of blood DNA requires macrophages and differs between males and females. This finding raises the possibility that augmented levels of extracellular DNA and other nuclear antigens can contribute to the increased frequency of SLE in females. Extracellular DNA can occur in both a soluble and particulate form, with microparticles generated in vitro displaying antigenically active DNA. Together, these findings suggest that cell death is an important event in lupus pathogenesis and can provide a supply of blood DNA essential for immune complex formation. PMID:20659590

  3. Immunogenicity and Safety of Influenza Vaccination in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients Compared with Healthy Controls: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhengfa; Tang, Hao; Xu, Xiaojia; Liang, Yaping; Xiong, Yongzhen; Ni, Jindong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the immunogenicity and safety of influenza vaccine in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Relevant articles were retrieved from electronic databases. Seroprotection rate, seroconversion rate and factors that increase antibody geometric mean titer (GMT) were used as indices to measure the immunogenicity. The safety of vaccine was assessed through monitoring adverse events, which included side effects and SLE exacerbations. We performed a meta-analysis of influenza vaccine seroprotection, seroconversion and adverse effects. SLE exacerbation after vaccination was comprehensively described. We used the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP) guidelines to determine whether influenza can induce adequate immunogenicity in patients with SLE. Results Eighteen studies with 1966 subjects met the inclusion criteria. At least 565 of the subjects were patients with low-to-moderate SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score or stable SLE disease. Compared with the general population, seroprotection rate in SLE patients was significantly decreased in patients with H1N1 [odds ratio (OR) = 0.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.27–0.50] and H3N2 vaccination (OR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.24–0.93), but not influenza B vaccination (OR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.24–1.25). Seroconversion rate also significantly decreased in patients with H1N1 (OR = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.27–0.57) and influenza B (OR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.29–0.76) vaccination, but not H3N2 vaccination (OR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.21–1.79). However, the immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in SLE patients almost reached that of the CPMP guidelines. The OR for side effects (patients versus healthy controls) was 3.24 (95% CI: 0.62–16.76). Among 1966 patients with SLE, 32 experienced mild exacerbation of SLE and five had serious side effects for other reasons. Conclusion Influenza vaccine has moderate effect on protecting patients with SLE. The side effects of influenza vaccine are not serious

  4. CCSDS SLE Service Management: Real-World Use Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkley, Erik; Pechkam, Paul; Pietras, John; Quintela, Paula

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how the standard SLE-SM services can be applied to the operations of current TT&C providers. It begins with a brief overview of the scope and operating environment of the SLE-SM services, then describes several use cases in which SLE-SM services can be applied to existing operational situations. The paper also addresses how SLE-SM services can be adopted in an evolutionary fashion. The paper concludes with a brief identification of additions to SLE-SM that are under consideration to make SLE-SM applicable to an even broader range of network operations concepts, policies, and procedures.

  5. C/EBP β mRNA expression is upregulated and positively correlated with the expression of TNIP1/TNFAIP3 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Tian; Chen, Yan; Shi, Xiaowei; Li, Jian; Hao, Fei; Zhang, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBP β) has important roles in numerous signaling pathways. The expression of the majority of regulators and target gene products of C/EBP β, including tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3) and TNFAIP3-interacting protein 1 (TNIP1), are upregulated in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether C/EBP β expression is associated with SLE pathogenesis and correlates with TNIP1 and TNFAIP3 expression. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to assess the expression of C/EBP β, TNIP1, and TNFAIP3 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 20 patients with SLE and 20 healthy controls. Spearman's rank test was used to determine the correlation between C/EBP β expression and SLE disease activity, and that between C/EBP β expression and TNIP1/TNFAIP3 expression in PBMCs from patients with SLE. C/EBP β mRNA expression was markedly increased in patients with SLE compared with healthy controls. The expression of C/EBP β was positively correlated with the SLE disease activity index and negatively correlated with the serum level of complement components C3 and C4. In addition, C/EBP β mRNA expression was increased in PBMCs from SLE patients that were positive for antinuclear, anti-Smith and anti-nRNP antibodies, compared with the antibody negative SLE patients. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of C/EBP β in patients with SLE was positively correlated with TNIP1 and TNFAIP3 expression. The results of the current study suggest that the increased expression of C/EBP β in PBMCs and the interaction between C/EBP β and TNIP1/TNFAIP3 may be involved in the pathogenesis of SLE.

  6. C/EBP β mRNA expression is upregulated and positively correlated with the expression of TNIP1/TNFAIP3 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Tian; Chen, Yan; Shi, Xiaowei; Li, Jian; Hao, Fei; Zhang, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBP β) has important roles in numerous signaling pathways. The expression of the majority of regulators and target gene products of C/EBP β, including tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3) and TNFAIP3-interacting protein 1 (TNIP1), are upregulated in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether C/EBP β expression is associated with SLE pathogenesis and correlates with TNIP1 and TNFAIP3 expression. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to assess the expression of C/EBP β, TNIP1, and TNFAIP3 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 20 patients with SLE and 20 healthy controls. Spearman's rank test was used to determine the correlation between C/EBP β expression and SLE disease activity, and that between C/EBP β expression and TNIP1/TNFAIP3 expression in PBMCs from patients with SLE. C/EBP β mRNA expression was markedly increased in patients with SLE compared with healthy controls. The expression of C/EBP β was positively correlated with the SLE disease activity index and negatively correlated with the serum level of complement components C3 and C4. In addition, C/EBP β mRNA expression was increased in PBMCs from SLE patients that were positive for antinuclear, anti-Smith and anti-nRNP antibodies, compared with the antibody negative SLE patients. Furthermore, the mRNA expression levels of C/EBP β in patients with SLE was positively correlated with TNIP1 and TNFAIP3 expression. The results of the current study suggest that the increased expression of C/EBP β in PBMCs and the interaction between C/EBP β and TNIP1/TNFAIP3 may be involved in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:27698734

  7. Autoimmune hepatitis or hepatic involvement in SLE?--A case report.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Y; Maebo, A; Yamade, W; Yamamoto, T; Amuro, Y; Hada, T; Higashino, K

    1987-04-01

    We report a patient with autoimmune hepatitis, who simultaneously satisfied the 1982 revised ARA criteria for systemic lupus erythematous and emphasize the difficulty in differentiating these two diseases. In addition, current concepts of a possible immunological distinction between autoimmune hepatitis and hepatic involvement in SLE are reviewed. PMID:3596158

  8. Genes Associated with SLE Are Targets of Recent Positive Selection

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Paula S.; Shaftman, Stephanie R.; Ward, Ralph C.; Langefeld, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    The reasons for the ethnic disparities in the prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the relative high frequency of SLE risk alleles in the population are not fully understood. Population genetic factors such as natural selection alter allele frequencies over generations and may help explain the persistence of such common risk variants in the population and the differential risk of SLE. In order to better understand the genetic basis of SLE that might be due to natural selection, a total of 74 genomic regions with compelling evidence for association with SLE were tested for evidence of recent positive selection in the HapMap and HGDP populations, using population differentiation, allele frequency, and haplotype-based tests. Consistent signs of positive selection across different studies and statistical methods were observed at several SLE-associated loci, including PTPN22, TNFSF4, TET3-DGUOK, TNIP1, UHRF1BP1, BLK, and ITGAM genes. This study is the first to evaluate and report that several SLE-associated regions show signs of positive natural selection. These results provide corroborating evidence in support of recent positive selection as one mechanism underlying the elevated population frequency of SLE risk loci and supports future research that integrates signals of natural selection to help identify functional SLE risk alleles. PMID:24587899

  9. Evaluation of Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecules and Anti-C1q Antibody in Discriminating between Active and Non-Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mahayidin, Hasni; Yahya, Nurul Khaiza; Wan Ghazali, Wan Syamimee; Mohd Ismail, Asmahan; Wan Ab Hamid, Wan Zuraida

    2016-01-01

    Background Detecting the active state of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is important but challenging. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of serum endothelial cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) and anti-C1q antibody in discriminating between active and non-active SLE. Methods Using SELENA-SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), 95 SLE patients (45 active and 50 non-active) were assessed. A score above five was considered indicative of active SLE. The blood samples were tested for serum ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and anti-C1q antibody using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The levels of serum VCAM-1 and anti-C1q antibody were significantly higher in active SLE patients. Both VCAM-1 and anti-C1q were able to discriminate between active and non-active SLE (p-value < 0.001 and 0.005, respectively). From the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROCs) constructed, the optimal cut-off values for VCAM-1 and anti-C1q antibody in discriminating between active and non-active SLE were 30.5 ng/mL (69.0% sensitivity, 60.0% specificity, PPV 58.5%, NPV 66.7%) and 7.86 U/mL (75.6% sensitivity, 80% specificity, PPV 77.3%, NPV 78.4%), respectively. However, serum ICAM-1 level was unable to discriminate between the two groups (p-value = 0.193). Conclusion Anti-C1q antibody demonstrated the best diagnostic accuracy in discriminating between active and non-active SLE patients. PMID:27418866

  10. Increased serum β2-microglobulin is associated with clinical and immunological markers of disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Hermansen, M-L F; Hummelshøj, L; Lundsgaard, D; Hornum, L; Keller, P; Fleckner, J; Fox, B; Poulsen, L K; Jacobsen, S

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between serum levels of β2-microglobulin (β2MG), which some studies suggest reflect disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and various clinical and immunological markers of disease activity in SLE. Twenty-six SLE patients and 10 healthy controls were included. Disease activity was assessed by: SLEDAI, 24 hr-proteinuria, circulating levels of complement C3, anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA), β2MG and various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-18) measured with a multiplex assay, IFN-α assessed with a reporter gene assay, and a combined expression score of 12 IFN-α inducible genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Median serum levels of β2MG were significantly higher in SLE patients vs controls (2.8 mg/L, range: 1.1-21.6 and 1.2 mg/L, range: 0.9-1.7, respectively, p < 0.001). β2MG was correlated with SLEDAI score (R = 0.68, p < 0.001), 24 hr-proteinuria (R = 0.64, p < 0.001), and complement C3 (R = -0.52, p = 0.007). The cytokines were significantly correlated with β2MG: IL-6 (R = 0.45, p = 0.02), IL-8 (R = 0.75, p < 0.001), IL-10 (R = 0.67, p < 0.001) and IL-18 (R = 0.71, p < 0.001) as were serum IFN-α (R = 0.45, p = 0.02) and the IFN-α inducible gene-score (R = 0.51, p = 0.01). The results support that β2MG may serve as a marker of disease activity in SLE. The correlations with the measured cytokines indicate that increased β2MG in SLE reflects immunological activity.

  11. Cerebral hypoperfusion detected by SPECT in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is related to clinical activity and cumulative tissue damage.

    PubMed

    López-Longo, F J; Carol, N; Almoguera, M I; Olazarán, J; Alonso-Farto, J C; Ortega, A; Monteagudo, I; González, C Manuel; Carreño, L

    2003-01-01

    Cerebral single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a sensitive technique for the detection of central nervous system (CNS) involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective was to determine whether a relationship exists between cerebral hypoperfusion as detected by cerebral SPECT, cumulative tissue damage and the clinical activity of SLE. Cerebral technetium-99m-L,L-ethyl cysteinate dimer (99mTc-ECD) SPECT was performed in two groups of patients: 10 women with SLE (Group A) who had no previous history of major neuropsychiatric (NPS) manifestations and no minor NPS symptoms in the last six months, and 57 unselected women with SLE (Group B). In the same week that SPECT was performed, the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), SLICC/ACR damage index, native anti-DNA antibodies (ELISA) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were determined. In Group A, cerebral SPECT showed moderate or severe hypoperfusion (abnormal SPECT) in five patients without NPS symptoms, unrelated to age (mean 24.8 versus 27.8 years) or disease duration (mean 6.8 versus 9 years). Patients with significant cerebral hypoperfusion had greater clinical disease activity (mean SLEDAI 13.6 versus 7.6) (SLEDAI > 7 in 5/5 versus 1/5; Fisher: 0.023; OR: 33; 95% CI: 2.3-469.8) and ESR (mean 43.6 versus 9.8; P < 0.05). In Group B, the mean age of the 57 unselected women with SLE was 37 years (SD 6.3) and the mean duration of the disease was 9.7 years (SD 6.3). Cerebral SPECT revealed normal perfusion or mild hypoperfusion (normal SPECT) in 30 patients (52.6%), and moderate or severe hypoperfusion in 27 (47.4%). Hypoperfusion was unrelated to age, duration of SLE or concentrations of anti-DNA antibodies and C3 and C4 fractions. Patients with significant cerebral hypoperfusion had more active clinical disease (mean SLEDAI 13.92; SD 8.44 versus 4.56; SD 4.15) (Mann-Whitney, P < 0.005), more cumulative tissue damage (mean SLICC 2.66; SD 2.84 versus 1.03; SD 1.51) (Mann-Whitney, P = 0

  12. Increased von Willebrand factor levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus reflect inflammation rather than increased propensity for platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Warren D; Eilertsen, Gro Østli

    2016-01-01

    Background von Willebrand factor (VWF) is involved in platelet plug formation and protein transport. Increased VWF levels in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are considered risk factors for vascular events. VWF protein levels, however, do not accurately reflect its platelet-aggregating function, which has not been examined in SLE. Methods Cross-sectional study with clinical and laboratory data obtained in patients with SLE (n=92) from a regional lupus registry. VWF function was determined by ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (VWF ristocetin cofactor, VWF:RCo) and VWF levels by turbidimetric assay (VWF antigen, VWF:Ag). The platelet-aggregating activity per VWF unit was estimated by the VWF RCo/Ag ratio. Healthy controls served as comparators and associations were evaluated by non-parametric methods. Results VWF:Ag (142% vs 107%, p=0.001) and VWF:RCo levels (123% vs 78%, p<0.041) were increased in patients with SLE, but VWF RCo/Ag ratio was similar as in controls (0.83 vs 0.82, p=0.8). VWF:Ag levels were higher in patients experiencing serositis but unrelated to other manifestations, thrombotic disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematous Disease Activity Index 2000 or Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics-Damage Index. VWF:Ag levels correlated significantly with VWF:RCo levels (Rs 0.8, p<0.001), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (Rs 0.32, p<0.01), anti-dsDNA Ab (Rs 0.27, p<0.01), total IgG (Rs 0.33 p<0.01), fibrinogen (Rs 0.28, p<0.01) and ceruloplasmin (Rs 0.367, p<0.01) levels. VWF:RCo levels were not related to clinical findings but were correlated with ESR, anti-dsDNA and transferrin levels. No serological associations existed for VWF RCo/Ag ratio (all p>0.2). Conclusions In this SLE cohort, VWF:Ag behaved similarly to acute-phase reactants, but VWF:Ag increases were not matched by increases in functional activity per unit of VWF. Thus, more VWF did not increase the propensity for platelet aggregation in SLE.

  13. Increased von Willebrand factor levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus reflect inflammation rather than increased propensity for platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Warren D; Eilertsen, Gro Østli

    2016-01-01

    Background von Willebrand factor (VWF) is involved in platelet plug formation and protein transport. Increased VWF levels in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are considered risk factors for vascular events. VWF protein levels, however, do not accurately reflect its platelet-aggregating function, which has not been examined in SLE. Methods Cross-sectional study with clinical and laboratory data obtained in patients with SLE (n=92) from a regional lupus registry. VWF function was determined by ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (VWF ristocetin cofactor, VWF:RCo) and VWF levels by turbidimetric assay (VWF antigen, VWF:Ag). The platelet-aggregating activity per VWF unit was estimated by the VWF RCo/Ag ratio. Healthy controls served as comparators and associations were evaluated by non-parametric methods. Results VWF:Ag (142% vs 107%, p=0.001) and VWF:RCo levels (123% vs 78%, p<0.041) were increased in patients with SLE, but VWF RCo/Ag ratio was similar as in controls (0.83 vs 0.82, p=0.8). VWF:Ag levels were higher in patients experiencing serositis but unrelated to other manifestations, thrombotic disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematous Disease Activity Index 2000 or Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics-Damage Index. VWF:Ag levels correlated significantly with VWF:RCo levels (Rs 0.8, p<0.001), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (Rs 0.32, p<0.01), anti-dsDNA Ab (Rs 0.27, p<0.01), total IgG (Rs 0.33 p<0.01), fibrinogen (Rs 0.28, p<0.01) and ceruloplasmin (Rs 0.367, p<0.01) levels. VWF:RCo levels were not related to clinical findings but were correlated with ESR, anti-dsDNA and transferrin levels. No serological associations existed for VWF RCo/Ag ratio (all p>0.2). Conclusions In this SLE cohort, VWF:Ag behaved similarly to acute-phase reactants, but VWF:Ag increases were not matched by increases in functional activity per unit of VWF. Thus, more VWF did not increase the propensity for platelet aggregation in SLE. PMID:27651919

  14. MHC associations with clinical and autoantibody manifestations in European SLE.

    PubMed

    Morris, D L; Fernando, M M A; Taylor, K E; Chung, S A; Nititham, J; Alarcón-Riquelme, M E; Barcellos, L F; Behrens, T W; Cotsapas, C; Gaffney, P M; Graham, R R; Pons-Estel, B A; Gregersen, P K; Harley, J B; Hauser, S L; Hom, G; Langefeld, C D; Noble, J A; Rioux, J D; Seldin, M F; Vyse, T J; Criswell, L A

    2014-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous disease affecting multiple organ systems and characterized by autoantibody formation to nuclear components. Although genetic variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is associated with SLE, its role in the development of clinical manifestations and autoantibody production is not well defined. We conducted a meta-analysis of four independent European SLE case collections for associations between SLE sub-phenotypes and MHC single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and variant HLA amino acids. Of the 11 American College of Rheumatology criteria and 7 autoantibody sub-phenotypes examined, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibody subsets exhibited the highest number and most statistically significant associations. HLA-DRB1*03:01 was significantly associated with both sub-phenotypes. We found evidence of associations independent of MHC class II variants in the anti-Ro subset alone. Conditional analyses showed that anti-Ro and anti-La subsets are independently associated with HLA-DRB1*0301, and that the HLA-DRB1*03:01 association with SLE is largely but not completely driven by the association of this allele with these sub-phenotypes. Our results provide strong evidence for a multilevel risk model for HLA-DRB1*03:01 in SLE, where the association with anti-Ro and anti-La antibody-positive SLE is much stronger than SLE without these autoantibodies.

  15. Vitamin D Levels Are Associated with Expression of SLE, but Not Flare Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Squance, Marline L.; Reeves, Glenn E. M.; Tran, Huy A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores links between vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D = 50 nmol/L) and serological autoimmunity (ANA > 1 : 80) and frequency of self-reported flares (SRF) in participants with clinical autoimmunity (SLE). 25(OH)D levels of 121 females were quantified and compared. The cohort consisted of 80 ACR defined SLE patients and 41 age and sex matched controls. Association analysis of log2 (25(OH)D) levels and ANA 80 positivity was undertaken via two-sample t-tests and regression models. Significant differences were found for 25(OH)D levels (mean: control 74 nmol/L (29.5 ng/ml); SLE 58 nmol/L (23.1 ng/ml), P = 0.04), 25(OH)D deficiency (P = 0.02). Regression models indicate that, for a twofold rise in 25(OH)D level, the odds ratio (OR) for ANA-positivity drops to 36% of the baseline OR. No link was found between SRF-days and 25(OH)D levels. Our results support links between vitamin D deficiency and expression of serological autoimmunity and clinical autoimmunity (SLE). However, no demonstrable association between 25(OH)D and SRF was confirmed, suggesting independent influences of other flare-inducing factors. Results indicate that SLE patients have high risk of 25(OH)D deficiency and therefore supplementation with regular monitoring should be considered as part of patient management. PMID:25506363

  16. Clinical and financial burden of active lupus in Greece: a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Bertsias, G; Karampli, E; Sidiropoulos, P; Gergianaki, I; Drosos, A; Sakkas, L; Garyfallos, A; Tzioufas, A; Vassilopoulos, D; Tsalapaki, C; Sfikakis, P; Panopoulos, S; Athanasakis, K; Perna, A; Psomali, D; Kyriopoulos, J; Boumpas, D

    2016-10-01

    Analyses of the medical and economic burden of chronic disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are valuable for clinical and health policy decisions. We performed a chart-based review of 215 adult SLE patients with active autoantibody-positive disease at the predefined ratio of 30% severe (involvement of major organs requiring treatment) and 70% non-severe, followed at seven hospital centres in Greece. We reviewed 318 patients consecutively registered over three months (sub-study). Disease activity, organ damage, flares and healthcare resource utilization were recorded. Costs were assessed from the third-party payer perspective. Severe SLE patients had chronic active disease more frequently (22.4% vs 4.7%), higher average SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) (10.5 vs 6.1) and systemic lupus international collaborating clinics (SLICC) damage index (1.1 vs 0.6) than non-severe patients. The mean annual direct medical cost was €3741 for severe vs €1225 for non-severe patients. Severe flares, active renal disease and organ damage were independent cost predictors. In the sub-study, 19% of unselected patients were classified as severe SLE, and 30% of them had chronic active disease. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate the significant clinical and financial burden of Greek SLE patients with active major organ disease. Among them, 30% display chronic activity, in spite of standard care, which represents a significant unmet medical need.

  17. Anti-CII antibody as a novel indicator to assess disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    He, C; Mao, T; Feng, Y; Song, T; Qin, C; Yan, R; Feng, P

    2015-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disorder that affects a variety of organ systems. Anti-dsDNA Abs and complement factors have been used as indicators of lupus activity for more than 50 years. A novel indicator of activation in SLE is reported in this paper. Anti-collagen type II (CII) Ab was obviously elevated in patients with SLE compared to those patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and healthy controls (HCs). Anti-CII-Ab-positive patients with SLE showed significantly higher levels of serum IgG and higher titers of ANA but lower levels of C3 and C4 than controls. A positive correlation was demonstrated between anti-CII Ab and serum IgG in SLE patients (r = 0.50, p < 0.0001). The negative correlations of anti-CII Ab with C3 and C4 were observed in SLE patients (r = -0.36, p = 0.0013; r = -0.37, p = 0.0006, respectively). The reduced anti-CII Ab level was accompanied by decreased level of serum IgG and increased levels of C3 and C4 after regular treatment. Therefore, anti-CII Ab could be a novel indicator for monitoring activity of SLE.

  18. Predictors of the rate of change in disease activity over time in LUMINA, a multiethnic US cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: LUMINA LXX.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; González, L A; Roseman, J M; Vilá, L M; Reveille, J D; Alárcon, G S

    2010-05-01

    The objectives of the present study were (1) to clarify and quantify the relationship between age and disease duration with the rate of change in disease activity over time in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and (2) to explore other possible factors associated with this rate of change. To this end, SLE patients from LUMINA were studied if they had at least three visits in which disease activity (Systemic Lupus Activity Measure-Revised [SLAM-R]) had been ascertained. Variables associated with the rate (slope) of change in disease activity (obtained by regressing the SLAM-R score against the length of time from diagnosis to visit date) were examined by univariable and multivariable analyses. Five hundred and forty two of the 632 patients had at least three SLAM-R score. In multivariable analyses, Whites exhibited the fastest decline in disease activity, Texan Hispanics exhibited the slowest, trailed by the African Americans. Longer disease duration and HLA-DRB1*1503 positivity were associated with a slower decline whereas a greater number of American College of Rheumatology criteria and abnormal laboratory parameters (white blood cell counts, hematocrit and serum creatinine) were associated with a faster decline. These findings complement existing knowledge on SLE disease activity and are potentially useful to clinicians managing these patients.

  19. The lupus susceptibility locus Sle1 facilitates the peripheral development and selection of anti-DNA B cells through impaired receptor editing.

    PubMed

    Chang, Soog-Hee; Kim, Tae-Joo; Kim, Young-Joo; Liu, Yang; Min, So-Youn; Park, Min-Jung; Park, Hyun-Sil; Lee, Sun-Kyung; Nam, Ki-Hoan; Kim, Ho-Youn; Mohan, Chandra; Kim, Hang-Rae

    2014-06-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is characterized by the spontaneous production of IgG autoantibodies in patients and lupus-prone mice. In this study, we investigated the effect of the Sle1 lupus susceptibility locus on the peripheral development of 56R(+) anti-DNA transgenic B cells by tracking 56R(+) B cells in mice without (B6.56R) or with (B6.Sle1.56R) the Sle1 locus. Compared with B6.56R mice, B6.Sle1.56R mice exhibited increased class-switched IgG2a anti-DNA Abs in their serum, encoded by the transgene. Interestingly, within the spleen, Sle1 facilitated the development of these cells into clusters of IgG2a class-switched B cells juxtaposed to CD4(+) T cells within extrafollicular sites. Through sequence analysis of B cell hybridomas, we also found that B cells from B6.Sle1.56R mice are inefficient at Ig H and L chain editing. Thus, the Ig H chains in Sle1.56R(+) B cells are partnered more often with cationic L chains that facilitate DNA binding. Taken together, these findings indicate that the Sle1 lupus-susceptibility locus may facilitate the emergence of anti-DNA B cells by subduing BCR revision and possibly by shaping the extrafollicular development of effector B cells, although the precise molecular mechanisms await further study.

  20. Autoantibodies to the functionally active RING-domain of Ro52/SSA are associated with disease activity in patients with lupus.

    PubMed

    Kvarnström, M; Dzikaite-Ottosson, V; Ottosson, L; Gustafsson, J T; Gunnarsson, I; Svenungsson, E; Wahren-Herlenius, M

    2013-04-01

    The Ro52 protein of the Ro/SSA antigen was recently defined as an E3 ligase controlling cytokine production. Autoantibodies from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients targeting the Ro52-RING domain, containing the E3 ligase activity, have been shown to inhibit the E3 ligase activity of Ro52. The objective of the present study was to investigate correlations between clinical parameters in patients with SLE and levels of Ro/SSA (Ro52 and Ro60) and La/SSB autoantibodies, including autoantibodies directed towards the functional RING and B-box domains of the Ro52 protein. SLE patients (n=232) were clinically examined and disease activity indices collected concurrently to blood sampling. The samples were analyzed for immunological parameters including autoantibodies. Ro52 autoantibody levels were associated with more variables than the other analyzed antibodies and were significantly associated with several individual items related to sSS and the diagnosis of sSS itself (p=0.004). Other associated variables were high sedimentation rate (p=0.0003), levels of immunoglobulins (p=0.0003), and an inverse correlation with levels of lymphocytes (p=0.003) and leukocytes (p=0.01). Antibodies to the RING domain of Ro52, which is the functionally active domain with E3 ligase activity, were significantly correlated with disease activity as measured by the SLAM score. We conclude that autoantibodies against Ro52 and in particular its functional RING domain are important in lupus patients and associated with several clinical and laboratory features of the disease. The impact on disease activity of Ro52-RING specific antibodies was especially noted, and could imply a functional role for these autoantibodies in inhibiting Ro52 activity, which is important for the control of proinflammatory cytokine production, including type 1 interferons.

  1. The substantial burden of systemic lupus erythematosus on the productivity and careers of patients: a European patient-driven online survey

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg, David; Lerstrøm, Kirsten; Norton, Yvonne; Nikaï, Enkeleida; Pushparajah, Daphnee S.; Schneider, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to explore the burden of SLE and its effect on patients’ lives. Methods. The Lupus European Online (LEO) survey included patient-designed questions on demographics, SLE diagnosis, and the impact of SLE on careers. Three SLE-specific patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires were also completed: the Lupus Quality of Life (LupusQoL), the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI)-Lupus v2.0. The survey was available online in five languages from May through August 2010. All self-identified SLE participants were eligible to respond. Survey results were analysed using descriptive statistics. Multivariate linear regression explored factors contributing to impaired productivity. Results. Of the 2070 European SLE patients completing the survey, 93.1% were women, 86.7% were aged <50 years and 71.8% had a college or university education. More than two-thirds of respondents (69.5%) reported that SLE affected their careers; 27.7% changed careers within a year of diagnosis. All LupusQoL domains (score range 0–100) were impaired, with fatigue (median domain score 43.8) being the most affected and intimate relationships (median domain score 75.0) the least. Most patients (82.5%) reported fatigue (FSS score ≥4). Productivity was impaired across all WPAI domains, both at work and in general activities. Fatigue, an inability to plan and reduced physical health were significantly associated with impaired productivity. Patients whose careers were affected by SLE had worse health-related quality of life, more fatigue and worse productivity than patients whose careers were not affected. Conclusion. LEO survey respondents reported that SLE negatively affects their daily lives, productivity and career choices. PMID:24049101

  2. The global burden of SLE: prevalence, health disparities and socioeconomic impact.

    PubMed

    Carter, Erin E; Barr, Susan G; Clarke, Ann E

    2016-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that can potentially lead to serious organ complications and even death. Its global burden - in terms of incidence and prevalence, differential impact on populations, economic costs and capacity to compromise health-related quality of life - remains incompletely understood. The reported worldwide incidence and prevalence of SLE vary considerably; this variation is probably attributable to a variety of factors, including ethnic and geographic differences in the populations being studied, the definition of SLE applied, and the methods of case identification. Despite the heterogeneous nature of the disease, distinct patterns of disease presentation, severity and course can often be related to differences in ethnicity, income level, education, health insurance status, level of social support and medication compliance, as well as environmental and occupational factors. Given the potential for the disease to cause such severe and widespread organ damage, not only are the attendant direct costs high, but these costs are sometimes exceeded by indirect costs owing to loss of economic productivity. As an intangible cost, patients with SLE are, not surprisingly, likely to endure considerably reduced health-related quality of life.

  3. The global burden of SLE: prevalence, health disparities and socioeconomic impact.

    PubMed

    Carter, Erin E; Barr, Susan G; Clarke, Ann E

    2016-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease that can potentially lead to serious organ complications and even death. Its global burden - in terms of incidence and prevalence, differential impact on populations, economic costs and capacity to compromise health-related quality of life - remains incompletely understood. The reported worldwide incidence and prevalence of SLE vary considerably; this variation is probably attributable to a variety of factors, including ethnic and geographic differences in the populations being studied, the definition of SLE applied, and the methods of case identification. Despite the heterogeneous nature of the disease, distinct patterns of disease presentation, severity and course can often be related to differences in ethnicity, income level, education, health insurance status, level of social support and medication compliance, as well as environmental and occupational factors. Given the potential for the disease to cause such severe and widespread organ damage, not only are the attendant direct costs high, but these costs are sometimes exceeded by indirect costs owing to loss of economic productivity. As an intangible cost, patients with SLE are, not surprisingly, likely to endure considerably reduced health-related quality of life. PMID:27558659

  4. Expression of Ets-1 and FOXP3 mRNA in CD4(+)CD25 (+) T regulatory cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Nan; Li, Xiang-Pei; Li, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Guo-Sheng; Tao, Jin-Hui; Pan, Hai-Feng; Fang, Xuan; Ma, Qian; Yu, Ning

    2014-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease with complex genetic predisposing factors involved. Ets-1 transcription factor plays an important role in the suppressive activity of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and stable expression of FOXP3. To find its potential role in the pathogenesis of SLE, we investigate the mRNA expression of Ets-1 and FOXP3 mRNA in CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells from patients with SLE. Real-time transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to determine the expression of Ets-1 and FOXP3 mRNA in CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells from 36 patients with SLE and 18 sex-and-age-matched healthy controls. The Ets-1 mRNA expression level was decreased in patients with SLE [0.225 (0.135, 0.337)] than healthy controls [0.528 (0.303, 0.681)] (P < 0.001). The expression levels of FOXP3 mRNA were lower in SLE patients [0.608 (0.272, 1.164)] than healthy controls [0.919 (0.690, 1.223)], but the difference was not significant (P = 0.106). Significant reduction in Ets-1 and FOXP3 expression was also found in new-onset SLE subgroup when compared with healthy controls (P < 0.001). The level of Ets-1 and FOXP3 mRNA was not significantly different in hyperactive and lower active SLE group when compared with inactive SLE group, respectively (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences between SLE with lupus nephritis (LN) and SLE without LN either (P > 0.05). Associations of Ets-1 and FOXP3 mRNA expression levels with major clinical and laboratory parameters of SLE patients were also analyzed. However, no significant association was found. Significant positive correlation was found between Ets-1 and FOXP3 mRNA expression in CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells from SLE patients (r = 0.698, P < 0.001). Our results found that the expression levels of Ets-1 mRNA were decreased in SLE patients and Ets-1 expression was positively correlated with the expression of FOXP3. It indicated that Ets-1 may play an important role in the stable expression of FOXP3 in

  5. Increased expression of low density granulocytes in juvenile-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients correlates with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Midgley, A; Beresford, M W

    2016-04-01

    Neutrophils are implicated in a wide range of non-infectious inflammatory conditions. A subset of neutrophils in the peripheral circulation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients has been described and termed low density granulocytes (LDGs). This study investigates the expression of LDG in juvenile-onset SLE (JSLE) patients compared to controls, and any correlations with disease activity.Neutrophils and LDGs were isolated from JSLE (n = 13) and paediatric non-inflammatory control patients (n = 12). Cell populations were assessed and compared using flow cytometry and morphological analysis. Standard clinical data, which included disease activity markers/scores, were collected for each patient.Significantly increased LDG expression (%mean ± SEM, range) was observed in JSLE patients (10.4 ± 3.26, 3.41-36.3) compared to controls (2.4 ± 0.44, 0.36-5.27; p = 0.005). A statistically significant positive correlation was observed between LDG expression and the British Isles Lupus Activity Group (correlation coefficient 0.685; p = 0.010) and SLE Disease Activity Index (correlation coefficient 0.567; p = 0.043) and the biomarker of dsDNA-antibodies (correlation coefficient 0.590; p = 0.043).Here we observe increased expression in LDGs in JSLE patients, which correlate with dsDNA antibody concentration and scores of disease activity. These correlations indicate that the increased LDG expression observed in this study may have a potential role in the pathogenesis of JSLE, and may be a useful biomarker.

  6. Neutrophil extracellular traps that are not degraded in systemic lupus erythematosus activate complement exacerbating the disease.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Jonatan; Martin, Myriam; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Tydén, Helena; Lood, Christian; Truedsson, Lennart; Bengtsson, Anders A; Blom, Anna M

    2012-04-01

    Ongoing inflammation including activation of the complement system is a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Antimicrobial neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are composed of secreted chromatin that may act as a source of autoantigens typical for SLE. In this study, we investigated how complement interacts with NETs and how NET degradation is affected by complement in SLE patients. We found that sera from a subset of patients with active SLE had a reduced ability to degrade in vitro-generated NETs, which was mostly restored when these patients were in remission. Patients that failed to degrade NETs had a more active disease and they also displayed lower levels of complement proteins C4 and C3 in blood. We discovered that NETs activated complement in vitro and that deposited C1q inhibited NET degradation including a direct inhibition of DNase-I by C1q. Complement deposition on NETs may facilitate autoantibody production, and indeed, Abs against NETs and NET epitopes were more pronounced in patients with impaired ability to degrade NETs. NET-bound autoantibodies inhibited degradation but also further increased C1q deposition, potentially exacerbating the disease. Thus, NETs are a potent complement activator, and this interaction may play an important role in SLE. Targeting complement with inhibitors or by removing complement activators such as NETs could be beneficial for patients with SLE.

  7. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in Colombian patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Carlos; Tobón, Gabriel J; Granados, Marcela; Fernández, Liliana

    2007-11-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a rare life-threatening complication seen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This paper describes the clinical features and outcome of seven SLE patients with DAH admitted to a medical intensive care unit (ICU) in a referral center. Of a total of 122 SLE patients, seven patients presented this complication (5.7%). Five patients were women (71.4%). Mean age was 24.3 (range 4-51 years). Mean duration of SLE before clinical DAH was 15.7 months (range 0-48 months). DAH was the initial manifestation of SLE in two patients (29%). DAH recurrence was seen in two patients (29%). Active lupus was present in all seven patients. Fever, glomerulonephritis, arthritis, myositis, and peripheral neuropathy were observed in six, four, four, three, and two patients, respectively. Five patients who underwent to bronchoscopy had positive findings of DAH (71.4%; i.e., bloody return on bronchoalveolar lavage--with hemosiderin-laden macrophages). Treatment options included intravenous methylprednisolone (10 mg kg(-1) day(-1)--3 days) following by prednisolone 1 mg kg(-1) day(-1) and pulse cyclophosphamide (750 mg/m(2)). Plasmapheresis was added in four patients (57.1%) because of the persistence of DAH. All patients were treated in an ICU, six of them requiring mechanical respiratory support (85.1%). Mortality rate during ICU stay was 12% (one patient). Our results show that DAH is an uncommon complication in SLE patients, requiring a prompt and aggressive recognition and treatment with high-dose steroid, intravenous cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis. With all of these treatments, there is a trend to a low mortality rate in patients with SLE presenting DAH.

  8. Elevated levels of soluble CD14 in serum of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Nockher, W A; Wigand, R; Schoeppe, W; Scherberich, J E

    1994-01-01

    A soluble form of CD14 (sCD14) was assessed with an ELISA assay in the serum of the following three clinical groups: 35 patients with an inactive phase of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 17 patients with SLE relapses, and 65 normal healthy volunteers. Increased levels of sCD14 were observed in all patients suffering from SLE compared with normal controls. In addition, patients with active SLE revealed higher serum concentrations of sCD14 (median 6.9 mg/l) than patients under remission (4.1 mg/l; P < 0.0001). Serum values of sCD14 correlated neither with the number of peripheral blood monocytes bearing the CD14 membrane antigen, nor with serum concentrations of IL-1 beta. Serum sCD14 was compared with other clinical parameters used to monitor the clinical course of patients with SLE, among them complement C3, anti-dsDNA antibodies and soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R). A good correlation emerged between sCD14 and C3 as well as sIL-2R concentrations, but sCD14 and anti-dsDNA titres disclosed no significant correlation in both groups of patients with SLE. Serial studies in patients with severe SLE showed that serum sCD14 closely parallels the clinical course as defined by an activity score. Our data suggest that serum sCD14 represents a promising parameter to monitor disease activity in patients with SLE. PMID:7512005

  9. Impact analysis of autoantibody level and NR2 antibody level in neuropsychiatric SLE treated by methylprednisolone combined with MTX and DXM intrathecal injection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyuan; Zhao, Yinhuan; Zhang, Jihui; Lei, Hongwei; Zhu, Guiqi; Fu, Bingbing

    2014-11-01

    The objective is to explore the clinical curative effects of methylprednisolone combined with MTX and DXM intrathecal injection in treating neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE) and its effects on autoantibody level and anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subtype NR2a/2b antibody (anti-NR2 antibody) level. Thirty six admitted NPSLE patients were treated by methylprednisolone combined with MTX and DXM intrathecal injection. Thirty six SLE patients without neuropsychiatric symptoms were selected as non-NPSLE group. Clinical indexes including SLE activity index, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), cerebrospinal fluid protein were observed before and after treatment. Autoantibodies including anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), anti-double stranded DNA antibody (anti-dsDNA antibody), anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibody (ENA-Ab) were detected before and after treatment. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect NR2 antibody level before and after treatment in two groups. Upon treatment of methylprednisolone combined with MTX and DXM intrathecal injection, SLE activity index, ESR, CSFP, cerebrospinal fluid protein of 36 NPSLE patients were significantly decreased. Before treatment, positive rates of ANA, anti-dsDNA antibody, and anti-ENA antibody in both NPSLE group and non-NPSLE group had no significant difference. However, positive rate of anti-NR2 antibody in NPSLE group was significantly higher than that of non-NPSLE group. After treatment, positive rates of autoantibodies and anti-NR2 antibody in both NPSLE and non-NPSLE group were significantly decreased. Anti-NR2 antibody can be a screening index of NPSLE, and methylprednisolone combined with MTX and DXM intrathecal injection has significant curative effects and can effectively decrease autoantibody level and anti-NR2 antibody level.

  10. Admixture in Hispanic Americans: its impact on ITGAM association and implications for admixture mapping in SLE.

    PubMed

    Molineros, J E; Kim-Howard, X; Deshmukh, H; Jacob, C O; Harley, J B; Nath, S K

    2009-07-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) disproportionately affects minorities, such as Hispanic Americans (HA). Prevalence of SLE is 3-5 times higher in HA than in European-derived populations and have more active disease at the time of diagnosis, with more serious organ system involvement. HA is an admixed population, it is possible that there is an effect of admixture on the relative risk of the disease. This admixture can create substantial increase of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in both magnitude and range, which can provide a unique opportunity for admixture mapping. The main objectives of this study are to (a) estimate hidden population structure in HA individuals; (b) estimate individual ancestry proportions and its impact on SLE risk; (c) assess impact of admixture on ITGAM association, a recently identified SLE susceptibility gene; and (d) estimate power of admixture mapping in HA. Our dataset contained 1125 individuals, of whom 884 (657 SLE cases and 227 controls) were self-classified as HA. Using 107 unlinked ancestry informative markers (AIMs), we estimated hidden population structure and individual ancestry in HA. Out of 5671 possible pairwise LD, 54% were statistically significant, indicating recent population admixture. The best-fitted model for HA was a four-population model with average ancestry of European (48%), American-Indian (AI) (40%), African (8%) and a fourth population (4%) with unknown ancestry. We also identified significant higher risk associated with AI ancestry (odds ratio (OR)=4.84, P=0.0001, 95% CI (confidence interval)=2.14-10.95) on overall SLE. We showed that ITGAM is associated as a risk factor for SLE (OR=2.06, P=8.74 x 10(-5), 95% CI=1.44-2.97). This association is not affected by population substructure or admixture. We have shown that HA have great potential and are an appropriate population for admixture mapping. As expected, the case-only design is more powerful than case-control design, for any given admixture proportion or

  11. Indices to assess patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in clinical trials, long-term observational studies, and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Castrejón, I; Tani, C; Jolly, M; Huang, A; Mosca, M

    2014-01-01

    This review summarises most currently used indices to assess and monitor patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in clinical trials, long-term observational studies, and clinical care. Six SLE disease activity indices include the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group Index (BILAG), European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurement (ECLAM), Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), Lupus Activity Index (LAI), and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ). Three SLE responder indices include Responder Index for Lupus Erythematosus (RIFLE), SLE Responder Index (SRI), and BILAG Based Combined Lupus Assessment (BICLA). Three SLE damage indices include the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology-Damage Index (SLICC/ACE-DI), Lupus Damage Index Questionnaire (LDIQ), and Brief Index of Lupus Damage (BILD). The SLAQ, LDIQ and the BILD are patient self-report questionnaires, which appear to give similar information to physician-completed indices, but are pragmatically more easily completed as patients do almost all the work. Additional self-report indices which have been used to assess and monitor patients with in SLE include a generic general health short form 36 (SF36), a SLE-specific Lupus Patient Reported Outcome (LupusPRO), and a generic rheumatology index, Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3). These activity, response, damage and patient self-report indices have been validated at different levels with no consensus about what it is the most appropriate for every setting. Sensitive and feasible assessment of SLE in clinical trials, observational studies, and busy clinical settings remains a challenge to the rheumatology community.

  12. Heightened cleavage of Axl receptor tyrosine kinase by ADAM metalloproteases may contribute to disease pathogenesis in SLE.

    PubMed

    Orme, Jacob J; Du, Yong; Vanarsa, Kamala; Mayeux, Jessica; Li, Li; Mutwally, Azza; Arriens, Cristina; Min, Soyoun; Hutcheson, Jack; Davis, Laurie S; Chong, Benjamin F; Satterthwaite, Anne B; Wu, Tianfu; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by antibody-mediated chronic inflammation in the kidney, lung, skin, and other organs to cause inflammation and damage. Several inflammatory pathways are dysregulated in SLE, and understanding these pathways may improve diagnosis and treatment. In one such pathway, Axl tyrosine kinase receptor responds to Gas6 ligand to block inflammation in leukocytes. A soluble form of the Axl receptor ectodomain (sAxl) is elevated in serum from patients with SLE and lupus-prone mice. We hypothesized that sAxl in SLE serum originates from the surface of leukocytes and that the loss of leukocyte Axl contributes to the disease. We determined that macrophages and B cells are a source of sAxl in SLE and in lupus-prone mice. Shedding of the Axl ectodomain from the leukocytes of lupus-prone mice is mediated by the matrix metalloproteases ADAM10 and TACE (ADAM17). Loss of Axl from lupus-prone macrophages renders them unresponsive to Gas6-induced anti-inflammatory signaling in vitro. This phenotype is rescued by combined ADAM10/TACE inhibition. Mice with Axl-deficient macrophages develop worse disease than controls when challenged with anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) sera in an induced model of nephritis. ADAM10 and TACE also mediate human SLE PBMC Axl cleavage. Collectively, these studies indicate that increased metalloprotease-mediated cleavage of leukocyte Axl may contribute to end organ disease in lupus. They further suggest dual ADAM10/TACE inhibition as a potential therapeutic modality in SLE.

  13. Soluble TRAIL concentrations are raised in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lub-de, H; de Vries, E G E; de Jong, S; Bijl, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Increased apoptosis may induce autoimmune conditions. Apoptosis is induced by binding of death receptor ligands, members of the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, to their cognate receptors. The Fas–Fas ligand pathway has been studied extensively in relation to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, other death pathways are also considered important. TNF related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), another ligand of the TNF superfamily, induces apoptosis in sensitive cells. Objective: To assess soluble (s) TRAIL concentrations in sera of SLE patients. Methods: 40 SLE patients were studied (20 with active and 20 with inactive disease). Serum sTRAIL concentrations were measured by a solid phase sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Levels in SLE patients were compared with those in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 20), Wegener's granulomatosis (n = 20), and healthy controls (n = 20). Results: Mean (SEM) serum sTRAIL concentration in SLE patients (936.0 (108.2) pg/ml) was higher than in healthy controls (509.4 (33.8) pg/ml; p<0.01) or in disease control patients with rheumatoid arthritis (443.8 (36.1) pg/ml, p<0.001) or Wegener's granulomatosis (357.1 (32.2) pg/ml; p<0.001). The mean serum sTRAIL concentration was 1010.2 (168.0) pg/ml for patients with inactive disease and 861.8 (138.7) pg/ml for those with active disease. sTRAIL values were not correlated with specific manifestations of the disease, such as leucopenia or lymphopenia, or with SLE disease activity index. Conclusions: Serum sTRAIL concentrations are increased SLE patients. This seems to be disease specific and could indicate a role for TRAIL in SLE pathophysiology. PMID:15564310

  14. SLE: Another Autoimmune Disorder Influenced by Microbes and Diet?

    PubMed

    Mu, Qinghui; Zhang, Husen; Luo, Xin M

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system autoimmune disease. Despite years of study, the etiology of SLE is still unclear. Both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the disease mechanisms. In the past decade, a growing body of evidence has indicated an important role of gut microbes in the development of autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. However, such knowledge on SLE is little, though we have already known that environmental factors can trigger the development of lupus. Several recent studies have suggested that alterations of the gut microbial composition may be correlated with SLE disease manifestations, while the exact roles of either symbiotic or pathogenic microbes in this disease remain to be explored. Elucidation of the roles of gut microbes - as well as the roles of diet that can modulate the composition of gut microbes - in SLE will shed light on how this autoimmune disorder develops, and provide opportunities for improved biomarkers of the disease and the potential to probe new therapies. In this review, we aim to compile the available evidence on the contributions of diet and gut microbes to SLE occurrence and pathogenesis. PMID:26648937

  15. SLE: Another Autoimmune Disorder Influenced by Microbes and Diet?

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Qinghui; Zhang, Husen; Luo, Xin M.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system autoimmune disease. Despite years of study, the etiology of SLE is still unclear. Both genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the disease mechanisms. In the past decade, a growing body of evidence has indicated an important role of gut microbes in the development of autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. However, such knowledge on SLE is little, though we have already known that environmental factors can trigger the development of lupus. Several recent studies have suggested that alterations of the gut microbial composition may be correlated with SLE disease manifestations, while the exact roles of either symbiotic or pathogenic microbes in this disease remain to be explored. Elucidation of the roles of gut microbes – as well as the roles of diet that can modulate the composition of gut microbes – in SLE will shed light on how this autoimmune disorder develops, and provide opportunities for improved biomarkers of the disease and the potential to probe new therapies. In this review, we aim to compile the available evidence on the contributions of diet and gut microbes to SLE occurrence and pathogenesis. PMID:26648937

  16. Anti-nucleosome and anti-chromatin antibodies are present in active systemic lupus erythematosus but not in the cutaneous form of the disease.

    PubMed

    Souza, A; da Silva, L M; Oliveira, F R; Roselino, A M F; Louzada-Junior, P

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the presence of anti-nucleosome (anti-NCS) and anti-chromatin (anti-CRT) antibodies in patients with cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) compared with active and inactive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A total of 154 subjects were evaluated: 54 patients presenting CLE, 66 patients with active SLE and 34 with inactive SLE. Lupus activity was assessed using the disease activity index (SLEDAI). Anti-NCS and anti-CRT antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Only one of 54 patients with CLE tested positive for both anti-NCS and anti-CRT antibodies. The prevalence of anti-CRT antibodies was significantly higher in active SLE (84.8%) when compared with inactive SLE (26.4%) and CLE (1.8%) (P < 0.001). Anti-NCS antibodies were also more prevalent in active SLE patients (74.2%) than inactive SLE (11.7%) and CLE patients (1.8%) (P < 0.001). The presence of anti-CRT and anti-NCS antibodies was correlated to disease activity in patients with SLE (r = 0.4937, r = 0.5621, respectively). Furthermore, the detection of both antibodies was correlated with disease activity in patients with SLE who tested negative for anti-dsDNA antibodies (r = 0.4754 for anti-NCS and r = 0.4281 for anti-CRT). The presence of these two auto-antibodies was strongly associated with renal damage in patients with SLE (OR = 13.1, for anti-CRT antibodies and OR = 25.83, for anti-NCS antibodies). The anti-NCS and anti-CRT antibodies were not found in CLE. In patients with SLE, there is a correlation of these antibodies with disease activity and active nephritis. When compared with anti-dsDNA antibodies, anti-NCS and anti-CRT antibodies were more sensitive in detecting disease activity and kidney damage in lupus patients.

  17. T Cell Transcriptomes Describe Patient Subtypes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Sean J.; Suarez-Fueyo, Abel; Moss, David R.; Kyttaris, Vasileios C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2015-01-01

    Background T cells regulate the adaptive immune response and have altered function in autoimmunity. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) has great diversity of presentation and treatment response. Peripheral blood component gene expression affords an efficient platform to investigate SLE immune dysfunction and help guide diagnostic biomarker development for patient stratification. Methods Gene expression in peripheral blood T cell samples for 14 SLE patients and 4 controls was analyzed by high depth sequencing. Unbiased clustering of genes and samples revealed novel patterns related to disease etiology. Functional annotation of these genes highlights pathways and protein domains involved in SLE manifestation. Results We found transcripts for hundreds of genes consistently altered in SLE T cell samples, for which DAVID analysis highlights induction of pathways related to mitochondria, nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication. Fewer genes had reduced mRNA expression, and these were linked to signaling, splicing and transcriptional activity. Gene signatures associated with the presence of dsDNA antibodies, low complement levels and nephritis were detected. T cell gene expression also indicates the presence of several patient subtypes, such as having only a minimal expression phenotype, male type, or severe with or without induction of genes related to membrane protein production. Conclusions Unbiased transcriptome analysis of a peripheral blood component provides insight on autoimmune pathophysiology and patient variability. We present an open source workflow and richly annotated dataset to support investigation of T cell biology, develop biomarkers for patient stratification and perhaps help indicate a source of SLE immune dysfunction. PMID:26544975

  18. Multi-User Space Link Extension (SLE) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Toby

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-User Space (MUS) Link Extension system, a software and data system, provides Space Link Extension (SLE) users with three space data transfer services in timely, complete, and offline modes as applicable according to standards defined by the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS). MUS radically reduces the schedule, cost, and risk of implementing a new SLE user system, minimizes operating costs with a lights-out approach to SLE, and is designed to require no sustaining engineering expense during its lifetime unless changes in the CCSDS SLE standards, combined with new provider implementations, force changes. No software modification to MUS needs to be made to support a new mission. Any systems engineer with Linux experience can begin testing SLE user service instances with MUS starting from a personal computer (PC) within five days. For flight operators, MUS provides a familiar-looking Web page for entering SLE configuration data received from SLE. Operators can also use the Web page to back up a space mission's entire set of up to approximately 500 SLE service instances in less than five seconds, or to restore or transfer from another system the same amount of data from a MUS backup file in about the same amount of time. Missions operate each MUS SLE service instance independently by sending it MUS directives, which are legible, plain ASCII strings. MUS directives are usually (but not necessarily) sent through a TCP-IP (Transmission Control Protocol Internet Protocol) socket from a MOC (Mission Operations Center) or POCC (Payload Operations Control Center) system, under scripted control, during "lights-out" spacecraft operation. MUS permits the flight operations team to configure independently each of its data interfaces; not only commands and telemetry, but also MUS status messages to the MOC. Interfaces can use single- or multiple-client TCP/IP server sockets, TCP/IP client sockets, temporary disk files, the system log, or standard in

  19. Survival rates and risk factors for mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus patients in a Chinese center.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ge; Jia, Xiaoyuan; Gao, Dan; Zhao, Zhanzheng

    2014-07-01

    This paper aims to study the survival and risk factors affecting the long-term prognosis of Chinese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We collected clinical data of 1,072 SLE patients at the time of diagnosis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the survival rate, and the Cox proportional hazard regression model for the risk factors affecting prognosis. Of the original 1,072 recruited SLE patients, 665 (570 females and 95 males) were successfully followed up. Mean follow-up was 5.47 ± 4.62 years. Mean age of onset was 29.4 ± 13.4 years. Eighty-one patients did not survive during follow-up; infection, followed by cardiovascular disease, renal failure and SLE disease activity were the leading causes of death. The 5- and 10-year survival rates were 91.2 and 79.6 %, respectively. Moreover, the 5-year survival rates of female and male patients were 92.6 and 81.6 % respectively, and the 10-year survival rates were 80.8 and 62.3 %, respectively. Univariate analyses indicated that male gender, older age of onset, hypertension, increased blood creatinine levels, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol at the time of diagnosis of SLE were risk factors for all-cause mortality. After adjusting for potential confounders by multivariate analysis, male gender, older age of onset, and high SLEDAI scores at the time of diagnosis were independent risk factors for all-cause mortality in SLE patients. The long-term survival of Chinese SLE patients is comparable to that of other countries. Older age of onset, high disease activity, and decline in renal function are independent risk factors for mortality in patients with SLE.

  20. p53/p21 Pathway involved in mediating cellular senescence of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells from systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhifeng; Jiang, Jinxia; Tan, Wei; Xia, Yunfei; Cao, Haixia; Meng, Yan; Da, Zhanyun; Liu, Hong; Cheng, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Our and other groups have found that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients exhibited senescent behavior and are involved in the pathogenesis of SLE. Numerous studies have shown that activation of the p53/p21 pathway inhibits the proliferation of BM-MSCs. The aim of this study was to determine whether p53/p21 pathway is involved in regulating the aging of BM-MSCs from SLE patients and the underlying mechanisms. We further confirmed that BM-MSCs from SLE patients showed characteristics of senescence. The expressions of p53 and p21 were significantly increased, whereas levels of Cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase-2, and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein were decreased in the BM-MSCs from SLE patients and knockdown of p21 expression reversed the senescent features of BM-MSCs from SLE patients. Our results demonstrated that p53/p21 pathway played an important role in the senescence process of BM-MSCs from SLE.

  1. Incidence and Risk of Infection in Egyptian Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Dalia F; Habeeb, Reem A; Hosny, Sherin M; Ebrahim, Shafika E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Infection in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is common and is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. OBJECTIVE To study the risk and occurrence of infection in Egyptian SLE patients and to determine its characteristics. METHODS A total of 200 SLE patients were followed up for 1 year at monthly intervals, undergoing clinical and laboratory evaluation. Disease activity was assessed by SLE disease activity measurement (SLAM) score. Infections were diagnosed on basis of clinical findings, medical opinion, positive blood and urine cultures, Gram stain results, and specific serological assays as measurement of CMV and EBV antibodies. RESULTS A total of 55% of patients developed infection, 45% had one infection, and the rest had multiple infection episodes. Total number of infections was 233 infections/year, 47.2% were major and 52.8% were minor infections. Urinary tract was the most commonly involved site with bacterial infection being the commonest isolated organism (46.4%), and E. coli the commonest isolated bacteria (14.2%). There were 51 episodes caused by systemic viral infection (CMV in 25, EBV in 22, HCV in 3, and 1 in HBV). CONCLUSION There is a high rate of infection among SLE patients. Disease activity, leukopenia, high CRP level, positive anti-dsDNA, consumed C3, and cyclophosphamide therapy are independent risk factors for infection in SLE. PMID:25125988

  2. Outcome of a cohort of 300 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus attending a dedicated clinic for over two decades

    PubMed Central

    Moss, K; Ioannou, Y; Sultan, S; Haq, I; Isenberg, D

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To examine the mortality rate and causes of death in a cohort of 300 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on all patients attending the SLE clinic between 1978 and 2000. Information was obtained on those patients lost to follow up. Cause of death was analysed and categorised as early (<5 years after diagnosis of SLE) and late (>5 years after diagnosis of SLE). Standardised mortality rates were obtained. Results: The patients were followed up for a median of 8.3 years. Seventy three (24%) patients were no longer followed up at the end of the study period, of whom 41 (14%) had died. Of the 32 patients lost to follow up, 14 were being actively followed up within the UK, 16 were followed up outside the UK, and two patients were untraceable. The most common cause of death was malignancy, which accounted for eight (20%) deaths, followed by infection and vascular disease, which accounted for seven (17%) deaths each. Conclusions: Malignancy was the most common cause of death. Cause of death varied depending on disease duration. Forty per cent of early deaths were due to SLE related renal disease, whereas 23% of late deaths were due to vascular causes. Death due to infection occurred throughout the follow up period. There was a fourfold increased risk of death in our cohort of patients with SLE compared with the general population. PMID:11959764

  3. Prevalence of depression and depressive symptoms in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Iranian experience.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Zahra; Shakiba, Mansoor; Narouie, Behzad; Mladkova, Nikol; Ghasemi-Rad, Mohammad; Khosravi, Alireza

    2012-05-01

    Psychiatric disorders including depression represent clinical manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Recognition of depression in SLE patients is of utmost importance since it is treatable and can be of fatal consequences if unrecognized. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of depression and depressive symptoms in SLE patients in terms of age, gender, disease duration and severity, and duration of steroid treatment in SLE patients. Eighty-five SLE patients (77 women, 8 men) with verified SLE diagnosis completed Beck's depression inventory, a self-reported measure of depression. Clinical data on disease and treatment were obtained from patient files. In total, 60% of patients achieved scores indicating depression. The most common depressive symptoms in participants were fatigue and weakness (88.2%), irritability (82.3%), sadness (77.6%), and somatic preoccupation (76.4%), while the least common symptoms were weight loss (34.1%), low level of energy (28.2%), and suicide ideation (10.5%). There was a significant difference between the disease activity and the severity of depression (P = 0.0001). Our findings show higher prevalence of depression in our sample in comparison with previous studies, suggesting that the prevalence of depression varies across different populations. Severity of depression increases with more severe disease course.

  4. Laboratory markers of cardiovascular risk in pediatric SLE: the APPLE baseline cohort.

    PubMed

    Ardoin, S P; Schanberg, L E; Sandborg, C; Yow, E; Barnhart, H X; Mieszkalski, K l; Ilowite, N T; von Scheven, E; Eberhard, A; Levy, D M; Kimura, Y; Silverman, E; Bowyer, S L; Punaro, L; Singer, N G; Sherry, D D; McCurdy, D; Klein-Gitelman, M; Wallace, C; Silver, R; Wagner-Weiner, L; Higgins, G C; Brunner, H I; Jung, L K; Imundo, L; Soep, J B; Reed, A M

    2010-10-01

    As part of the Atherosclerosis Prevention in Pediatric Lupus Erythematosus (APPLE) Trial, a prospective multicenter cohort of 221 children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (mean age 15.7 years, 83% female) underwent baseline measurement of markers of cardiovascular risk, including fasting levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglycerides (TG), lipoprotein A (Lpa), homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). A cross-sectional analysis of the baseline laboratory values and clinical characteristics of this cohort was performed. Univariable relationships between the cardiovascular markers of interest and clinical variables were assessed, followed by multivariable linear regression modeling. Mean levels of LDL, HDL, Lpa, TG, hs-CRP and homocysteine were in the normal or borderline ranges. In multivariable analysis, increased Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), prednisone dose, and hypertension (HTN) were independently associated with higher LDL levels. Higher hs-CRP and creatinine clearance were independently related to lower HDL levels. Higher body mass index (BMI), prednisone dose, and homocysteine levels were independently associated with higher TG levels. Only Hispanic or non-White status predicted higher Lpa levels. Proteinuria, higher TG and lower creatinine clearance were independently associated with higher homocysteine levels, while use of multivitamin with folate predicted lower homocysteine levels. Higher BMI, lower HDL, and longer SLE disease duration, but not SLEDAI, were independently associated with higher hs-CRP levels. The R(2) for these models ranged from 7% to 23%. SLE disease activity as measured by the SLEDAI was associated only with higher LDL levels and not with hs-CRP. Markers of renal injury (HTN, proteinuria, and creatinine clearance) were independently associated with levels of LDL, HDL, and homocysteine, highlighting the importance of

  5. Mitochondrial DNA damage is associated with damage accrual and disease duration in patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    López-López, Linnette; Nieves-Plaza, Mariely; Castro, María del R.; Font, Yvonne M.; Torres-Ramos, Carlos; Vilá, Luis M.; Ayala-Peña, Sylvette

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared to healthy subjects and to determine the factors associated with mtDNA damage among SLE patients. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in 86 SLE patients (per American College of Rheumatology classification criteria) and 86 healthy individuals matched for age and gender. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected from subjects to assess the relative amounts of mtDNA damage. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay was used to measure the frequency of mtDNA lesions and mtDNA abundance. Socioeconomic-demographic features, clinical manifestations, pharmacologic treatment, disease activity, and damage accrual were determined. Statistical analyses were performed using t test, pairwise correlation, and Pearson’s chi-square test (or Fisher’s exact test) as appropriate. Results Among SLE patients, 93.0% were women. The mean (SD) age was 38.0 (10.4) years and the mean (SD) disease duration was 8.7 (7.5) years. SLE patients exhibited increased levels of mtDNA damage as shown by higher levels of mtDNA lesions and decreased mtDNA abundance as compared to healthy individuals. There was a negative correlation between disease damage and mtDNA abundance and a positive correlation between mtDNA lesions and disease duration. No association was found between disease activity and mtDNA damage. Conclusion PBMCs from SLE patients exhibited more mtDNA damage compared to healthy subjects. Higher levels of mtDNA damage were observed among SLE patients with major organ involvement and damage accrual. These results suggest that mtDNA damage have a potential role in the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:24899636

  6. Localization of radiolabeled anti-DNA monoclonal antibodies in murine systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.; Hahn, B.; Ebling, F.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis of SLE can be extremely difficult. This multi-system disease is characterized by the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA antibody (Ab) complexes in many tissues, producing glomerulonephritis and systemic vasculitis. This study evaluates an IGG monoclonal (Mo) Ab directe3d against DNA (MrSSl) for potential radioimmunodiagnosis of SLE. Six 15 wk. old F-1 female hybrids of NZB+NZW mice (an animal SLE model that develops vasculitis and nephritis) were injected with 50 ..mu..Cl of I-131 MrSSl and 15 ..mu..Cl of I-125 isotype-matched control mouse myeloma (LPC-1) (non-reactive with DNA). Imaging and tissue distribution were studied. Two animals were also imaged using I-131 LPC Ab. Images at 2 and 9 days showed no clear differences in scan patterns using MrSSl or LPC-1 Ab. Tissue distribution studies at six days, however, showed a significantly higher accumulation of MrSSl in the kidneys vs. control Ab (2.7% vs. 1.8% of injected dose) (p < .04). Similarly, higher levels of MrSS were also seen in the spleen, liver and lungs (p < .03). Blood levels tended to be higher with the specific antibody as well. These differences were not apparent at 3 days post injection. The increased concentration of MrSSl present at 9 days in several organs may be secondary to MrSSl binding to DNA containing immune complexes present in diseased tissues. Blocked clearance by immune complexes or DNA, or differences in electrical charges of the antibodies could be contributing to the higher MrSSl levels seen. Images did not suggest deiodination as responsible. Further studies are necessary to determine if the amount of MrSSl retained by diseased animals is indicative of SLE disease activity.

  7. Decreased SAP Expression in T Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Contributes to Early Signaling Abnormalities and Reduced IL-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2016-06-15

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of abnormalities, including increased early signaling events following engagement of the TCR. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating the immune response. We present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and three men with SLE, independent of disease activity. In SLE T cells, SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells normalized IL-2 production, calcium (Ca(2+)) responses, and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR Abs, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP, probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype.

  8. Decreased SAP Expression in T Cells from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Contributes to Early Signaling Abnormalities and Reduced IL-2 Production.

    PubMed

    Karampetsou, Maria P; Comte, Denis; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Terhorst, Cox; Kyttaris, Vasileios C; Tsokos, George C

    2016-06-15

    T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) display a number of abnormalities, including increased early signaling events following engagement of the TCR. Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family cell surface receptors and the X-chromosome-defined signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein (SAP) adaptor are important in the development of several immunocyte lineages and modulating the immune response. We present evidence that SAP protein levels are decreased in T cells and in their main subsets isolated from 32 women and three men with SLE, independent of disease activity. In SLE T cells, SAP protein is also subject to increased degradation by caspase-3. Forced expression of SAP in SLE T cells normalized IL-2 production, calcium (Ca(2+)) responses, and tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of proteins. Exposure of normal T cells to SLE serum IgG, known to contain anti-CD3/TCR Abs, resulted in SAP downregulation. We conclude that SLE T cells display reduced levels of the adaptor protein SAP, probably as a result of continuous T cell activation and degradation by caspase-3. Restoration of SAP levels in SLE T cells corrects the overexcitable lupus T cell phenotype. PMID:27183584

  9. Th17 responses and natural IgM antibodies are related to gut microbiota composition in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    López, Patricia; de Paz, Banesa; Rodríguez-Carrio, Javier; Hevia, Arancha; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo; Suárez, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis, characterized by a reduced Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, has been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. In this study, in vitro cultures revealed that microbiota isolated from SLE patient stool samples (SLE-M) promoted lymphocyte activation and Th17 differentiation from naïve CD4+ lymphocytes to a greater extent than healthy control-microbiota. Enrichment of SLE-M with Treg-inducing bacteria showed that a mixture of two Clostridia strains significantly reduced the Th17/Th1 balance, whereas Bifidobacterium bifidum supplementation prevented CD4+ lymphocyte over-activation, thus supporting a possible therapeutic benefit of probiotics containing Treg-inducer strains in order to restore the Treg/Th17/Th1 imbalance present in SLE. In fact, ex vivo analyses of patient samples showed enlarged Th17 and Foxp3+ IL-17+ populations, suggesting a possible Treg-Th17 trans-differentiation. Moreover, analyses of fecal microbiota revealed a negative correlation between IL-17+ populations and Firmicutes in healthy controls, whereas in SLE this phylum correlated directly with serum levels of IFNγ, a Th1 cytokine slightly reduced in patients. Finally, the frequency of Synergistetes, positively correlated with the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio in healthy controls, tended to be reduced in patients when anti-dsDNA titers were increased and showed a strong negative correlation with IL-6 serum levels and correlated positively with protective natural IgM antibodies against phosphorylcholine. PMID:27044888

  10. Th17 responses and natural IgM antibodies are related to gut microbiota composition in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    López, Patricia; de Paz, Banesa; Rodríguez-Carrio, Javier; Hevia, Arancha; Sánchez, Borja; Margolles, Abelardo; Suárez, Ana

    2016-04-05

    Intestinal dysbiosis, characterized by a reduced Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio, has been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. In this study, in vitro cultures revealed that microbiota isolated from SLE patient stool samples (SLE-M) promoted lymphocyte activation and Th17 differentiation from naïve CD4(+) lymphocytes to a greater extent than healthy control-microbiota. Enrichment of SLE-M with Treg-inducing bacteria showed that a mixture of two Clostridia strains significantly reduced the Th17/Th1 balance, whereas Bifidobacterium bifidum supplementation prevented CD4(+) lymphocyte over-activation, thus supporting a possible therapeutic benefit of probiotics containing Treg-inducer strains in order to restore the Treg/Th17/Th1 imbalance present in SLE. In fact, ex vivo analyses of patient samples showed enlarged Th17 and Foxp3(+) IL-17(+) populations, suggesting a possible Treg-Th17 trans-differentiation. Moreover, analyses of fecal microbiota revealed a negative correlation between IL-17(+) populations and Firmicutes in healthy controls, whereas in SLE this phylum correlated directly with serum levels of IFNγ, a Th1 cytokine slightly reduced in patients. Finally, the frequency of Synergistetes, positively correlated with the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio in healthy controls, tended to be reduced in patients when anti-dsDNA titers were increased and showed a strong negative correlation with IL-6 serum levels and correlated positively with protective natural IgM antibodies against phosphorylcholine.

  11. IgA nephropathy in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Leonardo Sales; Almeida, Bruna Laiza Fontes; de Melo, Ana Karla Guedes; de Brito, Danielle Christine Soares Egypto; Braz, Alessandra Sousa; Freire, Eutília Andrade Medeiros

    2016-01-01

    Systemic erythematosus lupus (SLE) is a multisystemic autoimmune disease which has nephritis as one of the most striking manifestations. Although it can coexist with other autoimmune diseases, and determine the predisposition to various infectious complications, SLE is rarely described in association with non-lupus nephropathies etiologies. We report the rare association of SLE and primary IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the most frequent primary glomerulopathy in the world population. The patient was diagnosed with SLE due to the occurrence of malar rash, alopecia, pleural effusion, proteinuria, ANA 1: 1280, nuclear fine speckled pattern, and anticardiolipin IgM and 280U/mL. Renal biopsy revealed mesangial hypercellularity with isolated IgA deposits, consistent with primary IgAN. It was treated with antimalarial drug, prednisone and inhibitor of angiotensin converting enzyme, showing good progress. Since they are relatively common diseases, the coexistence of SLE and IgAN may in fact be an uncommon finding for unknown reasons or an underdiagnosed condition. This report focus on the importance of the distinction between the activity of renal disease in SLE and non-SLE nephropathy, especially IgAN, a definition that has important implications on renal prognosis and therapeutic regimens to be adopted in both the short and long terms.

  12. Drug repositioning in SLE: crowd-sourcing, literature-mining and Big Data analysis.

    PubMed

    Grammer, A C; Ryals, M M; Heuer, S E; Robl, R D; Madamanchi, S; Davis, L S; Lauwerys, B; Catalina, M D; Lipsky, P E

    2016-09-01

    Lupus patients are in need of modern drugs to treat specific manifestations of their disease effectively and safely. In the past half century, only one new treatment has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In 2014-2015, the FDA approved 71 new drugs, only one of which targeted a rheumatic disease and none of which was approved for use in SLE. Repositioning/repurposing drugs approved for other diseases using multiple approaches is one possible means to find new treatment options for lupus patients. "Big Data" analysis approaches this challenge from an unbiased standpoint whereas literature mining and crowd sourcing for candidates assessed by the CoLTs (Combined Lupus Treatment Scoring) system provide a hypothesis-based approach to rank potential therapeutic candidates for possible clinical application. Both approaches mitigate risk since the candidates assessed have largely been extensively tested in clinical trials for other indications. The usefulness of a multi-pronged approach to drug repositioning in lupus is highlighted by orthogonal confirmation of hypothesis-based drug repositioning predictions by "Big Data" analysis of differentially expressed genes from lupus patient samples. The goal is to identify novel therapies that have the potential to affect disease processes specifically. Involvement of SLE patients and the scientists that study this disease in thinking about new drugs that may be effective in lupus though crowd-sourcing sites such as LRxL-STAT (www.linkedin.com/in/lrxlstat) is important in stimulating the momentum needed to test these novel drug targets for efficacy in lupus rapidly in small, proof-of-concept trials conducted by LuCIN, the Lupus Clinical Investigators Network (www.linkedin.com/in/lucinstat). PMID:27497259

  13. Drug repositioning in SLE: crowd-sourcing, literature-mining and Big Data analysis.

    PubMed

    Grammer, A C; Ryals, M M; Heuer, S E; Robl, R D; Madamanchi, S; Davis, L S; Lauwerys, B; Catalina, M D; Lipsky, P E

    2016-09-01

    Lupus patients are in need of modern drugs to treat specific manifestations of their disease effectively and safely. In the past half century, only one new treatment has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In 2014-2015, the FDA approved 71 new drugs, only one of which targeted a rheumatic disease and none of which was approved for use in SLE. Repositioning/repurposing drugs approved for other diseases using multiple approaches is one possible means to find new treatment options for lupus patients. "Big Data" analysis approaches this challenge from an unbiased standpoint whereas literature mining and crowd sourcing for candidates assessed by the CoLTs (Combined Lupus Treatment Scoring) system provide a hypothesis-based approach to rank potential therapeutic candidates for possible clinical application. Both approaches mitigate risk since the candidates assessed have largely been extensively tested in clinical trials for other indications. The usefulness of a multi-pronged approach to drug repositioning in lupus is highlighted by orthogonal confirmation of hypothesis-based drug repositioning predictions by "Big Data" analysis of differentially expressed genes from lupus patient samples. The goal is to identify novel therapies that have the potential to affect disease processes specifically. Involvement of SLE patients and the scientists that study this disease in thinking about new drugs that may be effective in lupus though crowd-sourcing sites such as LRxL-STAT (www.linkedin.com/in/lrxlstat) is important in stimulating the momentum needed to test these novel drug targets for efficacy in lupus rapidly in small, proof-of-concept trials conducted by LuCIN, the Lupus Clinical Investigators Network (www.linkedin.com/in/lucinstat).

  14. Correlation of disease activity with circulating immune complexes (C1qbA) and complement breakdown products (C3D) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Swaak, A J; Groenwold, J; Hannema, A; Hack, C E

    1985-01-01

    Most biologic effects of immune complexes are mediated through the activation of the complement system. The relationship between lupus disease activity and the presence of C3 breakdown products (C3d) and circulating immune complexes (CIC) as demonstrated with the C1q binding assay (C1qbA), was evaluated. Nearly all 13 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients had a stable disease course in this prospective study, nevertheless, in each patient the profiles of the serologic parameters were quite different. Despite the small number of investigated patients (13), it is concluded that irrespective of the disease activity, the serologic parameters could be either positive or negative. No relationship could be obtained between disease activity and the presence of C3d and/or CIC. Nor was there any evidence that the presence of CIC would indicate increased levels of C3 breakdown products (C3d). This observation argues against a pathogenetic significance of CIC detected by the C1qbA in SLE. In conclusion, the supposed link between the presence of CIC, consumption and activation of the complement system, and the activity of SLE needs further study.

  15. Analysis of CD80 and CD86 expression on peripheral blood B lymphocytes reveals increased expression of CD86 in lupus patients.

    PubMed

    Folzenlogen, D; Hofer, M F; Leung, D Y; Freed, J H; Newell, M K

    1997-06-01

    We screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 13 SLE patients, all having quiescent disease at the time of analysis, 12 allergy patients, and 21 normal subjects for the expression of CD80 (B7-1) and CD86 (B7-2, B70) on small (resting) and large (activated) subsets of CD19+ B cells. The percentage of CD86+ cells was significantly higher in all B cell subsets in the SLE patients compared to either normal controls or allergy patients. No differences in the mean percentage CD86+ stained B cells (CD19+) were found when comparing the allergy patients and the normal controls. The percentage of CD80+ cells in the large activated B cell (CD19+) subset of the SLE patient population was significantly higher than in the comparable subset from the normal controls and the allergy patients. Comparison of the small resting B cell subset did not reveal a significant difference in CD80 expression between the normal controls, the allergy patients, and the SLE patients. Our findings suggest that the B7 family of molecules, and CD86 in particular, may reflect immunologic dysregulation in patients with autoimmune disease and may reflect a state facilitating heightened B cell activity and hypergammaglobulinemia that occur in active SLE.

  16. The lupus susceptibility locus Sle3 is not sufficient to accelerate atherosclerosis in lupus-susceptible low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wade, N S; Stevenson, B G; Dunlap, D S; Major, A S

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk is increased in individuals suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus. Understanding the mechanism(s) of systemic lupus erythematosus-accelerated atherosclerosis is critical for the development of effective therapies. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that radiation chimeras of systemic lupus erythematosus-susceptible B6.Sle1.2.3 and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr)(-/-) mice have augmented atherosclerosis, which is associated with increased T-cell burden and activation in the lesion. The goals of this study were to further define specific immune mechanisms that mediate accelerated atherosclerosis and to determine whether the gene interval Sle3, which is linked to lupus-associated T-cell dysregulation, was sufficient to modulate atherogenesis. We transferred B6.Sle3 or C57Bl/6-derived bone marrow cells into lethally irradiated LDLr( -/-) mice (hereafter referred to as LDLr.Sle3 and LDLr.B6, respectively). Sixteen weeks after transplantation, the mice were placed on a western-type diet for 8 weeks. Our analyses revealed that LDLr.Sle3 mice had increased auto-antibody production against double-stranded DNA and cardiolipin compared with LDLr.B6 controls. We also found an increase in atherosclerosis-associated oxLDL antibodies. Antibody isotypes and serum cytokine analysis suggested that the humoral immune response in LDLr.Sle3 mice was skewed toward a Th2 phenotype. This finding is consistent with lupus-associated immune dysregulation. Additionally, LDLr.Sle3 mice had decreased serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels. However, there was no difference in lesion area or cellular composition of lesions between the two groups. These data demonstrate that, despite no change in lesion area, transfer of Sle3-associated T-cell dysregulation alone to LDLr-deficient mice is sufficient to decrease serum cholesterol and to exacerbate humoral immune responses that are frequently associated with atherosclerosis.

  17. Serum cystatin C, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase in juvenile and adult patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: Correlation with clinical manifestations, disease activity and damage.

    PubMed

    Gheita, Tamer A; Abd El Baky, Abeer M Nour El Din; Assal, Heba S; Farid, Tarek M; Rasheed, Inas A; Thabet, Eman H

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a potentially devastating outcome of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It is important to identify reliable, non-invasive methods to assess the kidneys in patients with SLE. The aim of the study was to measure the level of novel markers of renal involvement in these patients and assess their correlation with disease activity and damage. Sixtyone patients with SLE (33 adults and 28 juvenile) were included in the study. Fifty-two ageand sex-matched healthy individuals served as controls. Full history taking, thorough clinical examination and laboratory investigations were performed and disease activity and damage were assessed for all patients. Renal bio-markers including serum cystatin C, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (UNGAL) and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (UNAG) were assessed in patients and controls. There was a significant increase in serum cystatin C, UNGAL and UNAG levels in the adult SLE patients compared with controls (P = 0.000, P = 0.013 and P = 0.018, respectively); serum cystatin C and UNGAL levels were higher in the juvenile patients compared with controls (P = 0.038 and P = 0.000, respectively). Serum cystatin C significantly correlated with the damage index, renal biopsy class and negatively with the serum albumin; UNGAL correlated with albuminuria and the level of nephritis and UNAG negatively correlated with serum albumin level. Our study suggests that serum cystatin C, UNGAL and UNAG are important markers of LN and both cystatin C and UNAG would help in predicting the renal biopsy class.

  18. TLR9-induced miR-155 and Ets-1 decrease expression of CD1d on B cells in SLE.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Fan, Hongye; Ren, Deshan; Dong, Guanjun; Hu, Erling; Ji, Jianjian; Hou, Yayi

    2015-07-01

    B cells present lipid antigens to CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells to maintain autoimmune tolerance, and this process is disrupted in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Inflammation may inhibit CD1d expression to exacerbate the pathology of lupus. However, how inflammation regulates CD1d expression on B cells is unclear in SLE. In the present study, we showed that the surface expression of CD1d on B cells from SLE mice was decreased and that stimulation of inflammatory responses through TLR9 decreased the membrane and total CD1d levels of CD1d on B cells. Moreover, inflammation-related microRNA-155 (miR-155) negatively correlated with the expression of CD1d in B cells. miR-155 directly targeted the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of CD1d upon TLR9 activation in both humans and mice. The inhibitory effects of miR-155 on CD1d expression in B cells impaired their antigen-presenting capacity to iNKT cells. In addition, Ets-1, a susceptibility gene of SLE, also directly regulated the expression of the CD1d gene at the transcriptional level. These findings provide new insight into the mechanism underlying decreased CD1d expression on B cells in SLE, suggesting that inhibition of inflammation may increase CD1d expression in B cells to ameliorate SLE via modulating iNKT cells.

  19. Expression of human T cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin-3 (TIM-3) and TIM-3 ligands in peripheral blood from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qingqing; Qian, Qihong; Zhao, Zuotao; Fang, Fumin; Hu, Xiaohan; An, Jingnan; Wu, Jian; Liu, Cuiping

    2016-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic systemic autoimmune disease. The T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) family is associated with autoimmune diseases, but its level of expression in the immune cells of patients with SLE is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine whether TIM-3 and Galectin-9 (Gal-9) contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE. In total, 30 patients with SLE and 30 healthy controls were recruited, and their levels of TIM-3 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were examined via flow cytometry. Meanwhile, the levels of Gal-9 expression in serum and in PBMCs were measured via an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The relation between the level of TIM-3 or Gal-9 expression and the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) was also studied. Finally, the function of the TIM-3 and Gal-9 pathway in the pathogenesis of SLE was explored. Our results showed that the levels of expression of TIM-3 and Gal-9 on CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, CD56(+) T cells and in serum in patients with SLE were significantly higher than those of healthy controls. We found that the level of Gal-9 expression was significantly higher in both serum and PMBCs of patients with SLE than in healthy controls. The up-regulation of TIM-3 and Gal-9 expression in patients with SLE was closely related to the SLEDAI scores. In addition, Gal-9 blocking antibody significantly inhibited CD3-stimulated PBMC proliferation and Th1-derived cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α), Th2-derived cytokines (IL-4, IL-10), a Th17-derived cytokine (IL-17A), and release of a pro-inflammatory factor (IL-6) in patients with SLE. The results suggest that increased expression of TIM-3 and Gal-9 may be a biomarker for SLE diagnosis and that the TIM-3 pathway may be a target for SLE treatment.

  20. Functional significance of renal prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 production in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Patrono, C; Ciabattoni, G; Remuzzi, G; Gotti, E; Bombardieri, S; Di Munno, O; Tartarelli, G; Cinotti, G A; Simonetti, B M; Pierucci, A

    1985-01-01

    We have examined the urinary excretion of stable immunoreactive eicosanoids in 23 female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 16 patients with chronic glomerular disease (CGD), and 20 healthy women. SLE patients had significantly higher urinary thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and prostaglandin (PG) E2 excretion and significantly lower 6-keto-PGF1 alpha than did healthy women. In contrast, CGD patients only differed from controls for having reduced 6-keto-PGF1 alpha excretion. The group of SLE patients with active renal lesions differed significantly from the group with inactive lesions for having a lower creatinine clearance and urinary 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and higher urinary TXB2. Higher urinary TXB2 excretion was associated with comparable platelet TXB2 production in whole blood, undetectable TXB2 in peripheral venous blood, and unchanged urinary excretion of 2,3-dinor-TXB2. A significant inverse correlation was found between urinary TXB2 and creatinine clearance rate (CCr). In contrast, the urinary excretion of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha showed a significant linear correlation with both CCr and para-aminohippurate clearance rate (CPAH). In four SLE and seven CGD patients, inhibition of renal cyclooxygenase activity by ibuprofen was associated with a significant reduction in urinary 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and TXB2 and in both CCr and CPAH. However, the average decrease in both clearances was 50% lower in SLE patients than in CGD patients, when fractionated by the reduction in urinary 6-keto-PGF1 alpha or PGE2 excretion. We conclude that the intrarenal synthesis of PGI2 and TXA2 is specifically altered in SLE. Such biochemical alterations are associated with changes in glomerular hemodynamics and may play a role in the progression of SLE nephropathy. PMID:3900132

  1. Association between serum trace element concentrations and the disease activity of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sahebari, M; Abrishami-Moghaddam, M; Moezzi, A; Ghayour-Mobarhan, M; Mirfeizi, Z; Esmaily, H; Ferns, G

    2014-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with a complex, incompletely understood, etiology. Several genetic and environmental factors are suspected to be involved in its aetiology. Oxidative stress may be implicated in the pathogenesis of SLE and may be affected by trace element status. Zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) are essential components of several anti-oxidative enzymes and are also involved in several immune functions. The current study aimed to assess the relationship between serum concentrations of these trace elements and the clinical disease activity of SLE assessed using the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI). Serum concentrations of albumin (Alb) (p = 0.001), Se (p = 0.001), Zn (p = 0.001) and the Zn to Cu ratio (Zn/Cu R) (p = 0.001) were lower in patients with SLE than the age- and sex-matched healthy controls. However, only Alb (p = 0.001) and Cu (p = 0.03) were negatively correlated with disease activity, which was supported by regression analysis. In summary, lower serum values of Alb, Zn, Se and Zn/Cu R were found in SLE patients compared with healthy controls; however, in addition to serum Alb concentrations, serum Cu concentrations were also negatively correlated with lupus disease activity.

  2. Semaphorin 3A - a marker for disease activity and a potential putative disease-modifying treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Vadasz, Z; Toubi, E

    2012-10-01

    Semaphorin 3A (sema3A) and neuropilin-1 (NP-1) play a regulatory role in immune responses and have a demonstrated effect on the course of collagen-induced arthritis. Sema3A was also found to be involved in other immune-mediated diseases, e.g. psoriasis and allergic rhinitis. In this review we concentrated on the involvement of sema3A and NP-1 in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and on the specific effect of sema3A on the auto-reactive properties of B cells in SLE patients. We demonstrated the expression of sema3A in renal biopsies from lupus glomerulonephritis patients. This expression was found to be inversely correlated with proteinuria and kidney function tests. Sema3A serum levels in SLE patients were found to be significantly lower than in RA patients (disease control) and lower yet than in normal individuals. Altered serum sema3A levels were found to be in inverse correlation with SLE disease activity, mainly with renal damage and the presence of anti-cardiolipin antibodies. The expression of both sema3A and NP-1 on B cells from SLE patients was significantly different in comparison with normal healthy individuals. Finally, we demonstrated that when sema3A was co-cultured with CpG-ODN-stimulated memory B cells of SLE patients, their TLR-9 expression was significantly reduced by almost 50% (p = 0.001). These findings, along with the observation of sema3A being reduced in SLE patients in correlation with disease severity and autoimmunity, and memory B cells being beneficially responsive to sema3A, suggest this regulatory molecule may be considered as a potential therapy for SLE. Such focused therapies will help in achieving the maintenance of self-tolerance and alter pro-inflammatory status in lupus.

  3. The Effect of Prolonged Treatment with Belimumab on B cells in Human SLE

    PubMed Central

    Jacobi, Annett M; Huang, Weiqing; Wang, Tao; Freimuth, William; Sanz, Inaki; Furie, Richard; Mackay, Meggan; Aranow, Cynthia; Diamond, Betty; Davidson, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To understand the effects of prolonged BLyS inhibition in human SLE. Methods 17 SLE patients enrolled in a clinical trial of belimumab, a BLyS-specific inhibitor, plus standard of care therapy were studied. Phenotypic analysis of lymphocytes was performed using flow cytometry. Circulating antibody-secreting cells were enumerated using ELISpot assay. Serum was analyzed by ELISA using an antibody that recognizes products of the VH4-34 gene. Lymphocyte counts, Ig levels and anti-dsDNA antibody levels were available as part of the clinical trial analyses. Results Samples were collected at days 0, 84, 168, 365, 532 and >730. The total B cell number decreased from baseline starting between days 84–168. This was due to a decrease in naïve and transitional B cells. CD27+/IgD+memory B cells and plasmablasts decreased only after 532 days, whereas CD27+/IgD− memory B cells were not affected, and there were no changes in T cells. Serum IgM levels began to decline between days 84–168, but there were no changes in serum levels of IgG, IgG anti-DNA antibodies or VH4-34 antibodies during the study. SLE patients had more IgM-, IgG-, and autoantibody-producing B cells than normal controls at Day 0. There was only a modest decrease in the frequency of total IgM-producing but not IgG-producing cells at Days 365 and 532, consistent with the phenotypic and serologic data. Conclusions Our data confirm the dependence of newly formed B cells on BLyS for survival in humans. In contrast, memory B cells and plasma cells are less susceptible to selective BLyS inhibition. PMID:20039404

  4. Sialyltransferase and Neuraminidase Levels/Ratios and Sialic Acid Levels in Peripheral Blood B Cells Correlate with Measures of Disease Activity in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Lieh-bang; Huang, Che-ching

    2016-01-01

    Objective We attempted to determine whether the level of enzymes sialyltransferase (ST) and neuraminidase (Neu) and sialic acid (SIA) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlates with the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) correlates with the Disease Activity Score28 (DAS28). Methods We examined cell-surface levels of ST6Gal-1, Neu1, ST3Gal-1, Neu3, α-2,6-SIA, and α-2,3-SIA by using fluorescent anti-enzyme antibodies, fluorescent-conjugated Sambucus nigra lectin, and fluorescent-conjugated Maackia amurensis lectin on blood cells in SLE and RA patients and assessed correlations of these levels with SLEDAI and with DAS28. Areas under the curve (AUC) were calculated for different variables against SLEDAI. Results The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio positively correlated with SLEDAI scores (ρ = 0.409 and P = 0.002, statistically significant after Bonferroni’ correction for multiple analyses.). It was supported by the inverse correlation of B-cell Neu3 levels with SLEDAI scores (ρ = −0.264, P = 0.048). The B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratio against SLEDAI yielded an AUC of 0.689, which was comparable to that of anti-dsDNA levels at 0.635. In contrast, both ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels of RA B cells (r = 0.376, P = 0.013; r = 0.425, P = 0.005, respectively) correlated positively with high disease-activity DAS28 scores. Conclusion B-cell ST3Gal-1/Neu3 ratios in SLE and B-cell ST3Gal-1 and Neu3 levels in RA with high disease-activity DAS28 scores correlated with disease activity measures and may be useful in monitoring disease activities. PMID:26981635

  5. The Crystal-T algorithm: a new approach to calculate the SLE of lipidic mixtures presenting solid solutions.

    PubMed

    Maximo, Guilherme J; Costa, Mariana C; Meirelles, Antonio J A

    2014-08-21

    Lipidic mixtures present a particular phase change profile highly affected by their unique crystalline structure. However, classical solid-liquid equilibrium (SLE) thermodynamic modeling approaches, which assume the solid phase to be a pure component, sometimes fail in the correct description of the phase behavior. In addition, their inability increases with the complexity of the system. To overcome some of these problems, this study describes a new procedure to depict the SLE of fatty binary mixtures presenting solid solutions, namely the "Crystal-T algorithm". Considering the non-ideality of both liquid and solid phases, this algorithm is aimed at the determination of the temperature in which the first and last crystal of the mixture melts. The evaluation is focused on experimental data measured and reported in this work for systems composed of triacylglycerols and fatty alcohols. The liquidus and solidus lines of the SLE phase diagrams were described by using excess Gibbs energy based equations, and the group contribution UNIFAC model for the calculation of the activity coefficients of both liquid and solid phases. Very low deviations of theoretical and experimental data evidenced the strength of the algorithm, contributing to the enlargement of the scope of the SLE modeling.

  6. Inhibition of adenovirus DNA synthesis in vitro by sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.S.; Friefeld, B.R.; Keiser, H.D.

    1982-12-01

    Sera containing antinuclear antibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and related disorders were tested for their effect on the synthesis of adenovirus (Ad) DNA in an in vitro replication system. After being heated at 60/sup 0/C for 1 h, some sera from patients with SLE inhibited Ad DNA synthesis by 60 to 100%. Antibodies to double-stranded DNA were present in 15 of the 16 inhibitory sera, and inhibitory activity copurified with anti-double-stranded DNA in the immunoglobulin G fraction. These SLE sera did not inhibit the DNA polymerases ..cap alpha.., BETA, ..gamma.. and had no antibody to the 72,000-dalton DNA-binding protein necessary for Ad DNA synthesis. The presence of antibodies to single-stranded DNA and a variety of saline-extractable antigens (Sm, Ha, nRNP, and rRNP) did not correlate with SLE serum inhibitory activity. Methods previously developed for studying the individual steps in Ad DNA replication were used to determine the site of inhibition by the SLE sera that contained antibody to double-stranded DNA. Concentrations of the SLE inhibitor that decreased the elongation of Ad DNA by greater than 85% had no effect on either the initiation of Ad DNA synthesis or the polymerization of the first 26 deoxyribonucleotides.

  7. Development and validation of a simple lupus severity index using ACR criteria for classification of SLE

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Ghalib A; Brown, Michael A; Kelly, Jennifer A; Thanou, Aikaterini; James, Judith A; Montgomery, Courtney G

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop a simple systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) severity index that requires knowledge of only American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria and subcriteria. Methods This study used demographic, mortality and medical records data of 1915 patients with lupus from the Lupus Family Registry and Repository. The data were randomly split (2:1 ratio) into independent training and validation sets. A logistic regression with ridge penalty was used to model the probability of being prescribed major immunosuppressive drugs—a surrogate indicator of lupus severity. ACR criteria and subcriteria were used as predictor variables in this model, and the resulting regression coefficient estimates obtained from the training data were used as item weightings to construct the severity index. Results The resulting index was tested on the independent validation dataset and was found to have high predictive accuracy for immunosuppressive use and early mortality. The index was also found to be strongly correlated with a previously existing severity score for lupus. In addition, demographic factors known to influence lupus severity (eg, age of onset, gender and ethnicity) all showed robust associations with our severity index that were consistent with observed clinical trends. Conclusions This new index can be easily computed using ACR criteria, which may be among the most readily available data elements from patient medical records. This tool may be useful in lupus research, especially large dataset analyses to stratify patients by disease severity, an important prognostic indicator in SLE. PMID:27026812

  8. Why can't we find a new treatment for SLE?

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Robert

    2009-01-01

    No new therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus has been approved. In the last decade, the development of several novel compounds has been pursued for lupus, but so far nothing has been proven to be effective. This review discusses some of the reasons why it may be so difficult to demonstrate that a novel therapy is effective for this disease. These include the complexity of the disease itself; the lack of reliable outcome measures; our limited understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease; the propensity of lupus patients to have bad outcomes and to react to medicines in unusual ways; the heterogeneity of the patient population; the unpredictable course of disease in individual patients; and the lack of reliable biomarkers. Although some of the tested targeted compounds that are apparently based on strong preclinical and mechanistic data may indeed not be effective therapies for SLE, it is hard not to believe that among the various specific agents now being tested that at least some of them should downregulate the abnormal immunoregulation characteristic of SLE, and thus be clinically effective. We need to be persistent and imaginative in identifying these effective agents and proving their efficacy so that they may be widely used in our lupus populations.

  9. Antinucleosome antibodies as a potential biomarker for the evaluation of renal pathological activity in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Hung, W T; Chen, Y M; Lan, J L; Chen, H H; Chen, Y H; Chen, D Y; Hsieh, C W; Wen, M C

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the correlation between antinucleosome antibodies and renal pathological activity in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis (LN). We evaluated 36 patients with proliferative LN, 14 non-renal lupus patients and 10 healthy volunteers. Lupus activity was assessed using the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group 2004 (BILAG 2004) index, serum anti-double stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) levels, serum complement levels and daily urinary protein levels. All 36 lupus nephritis patients received renal biopsy. Antinucleosome antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that levels of serum antinucleosome antibodies were significantly higher in LN patients (median 90.35 units/ml, interquartile range [IQR] 37.38-135.23) than in non-renal SLE patients (median 5.45 units/ml, IQR 2.6-28.93, p <0.05) and in healthy volunteers (median 3.35 units/ml, IQR 2.95-5.23, p <0.001). Serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies were positively correlated with BILAG index (Spearman's r = 0.645, p <0.001) and serum anti-dsDNA antibody levels (r(s) = 0.644, p <0.01), while serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies were negatively correlated with serum levels of C3 (r(s) = -0.400, p <0.01) and C4 (r(s) = -0.300, p <0.05). Serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies were positively correlated with the histological activity index of LN (r(s) = 0.368, p <0.05). However, there was no significant correlation between serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies and the histological chronicity index. In conclusion, the serum level of antinucleosome antibodies is a potential biomarker for early recognition of renal involvement and evaluation of disease activity in SLE. Our preliminary results suggested that serum levels of antinucleosome antibodies might be a potential biomarker in evaluating pathological activity of LN.

  10. Proportions of several types of plasma and urine microparticles are increased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with active disease.

    PubMed

    Viñuela-Berni, V; Doníz-Padilla, L; Figueroa-Vega, N; Portillo-Salazar, H; Abud-Mendoza, C; Baranda, L; González-Amaro, R

    2015-06-01

    We analysed the proportions of different microparticles (MPs) in plasma from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and assessed their relationship with disease activity/therapy and their in-vitro effect on proinflammatory cytokine release. Blood and urine samples were obtained from 55 patients with RA (24 untreated and 31 under conventional therapy) and 20 healthy subjects. Fourteen patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were also studied. The proportions of CD3(+) , CD14(+) , CD19(+) , CD41(+) and CD62E(+) MPs were determined by flow cytometry analysis. The in-vitro effect of plasma MPs on the release of interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, IL-17 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α was also analysed. We detected that the proportions of different types of annexin-V(+) MPs were enhanced in plasma (CD3(+) , CD14(+) , CD19(+) , CD41(+) and CD62E(+) MPs) and urine (CD14(+) , CD3(+) and CD19(+) MPs) from RA patients with high disease activity (DAS28 index > 5·1). Accordingly, a significant positive correlation was observed between the levels of MPs and DAS28 score, and these levels diminished significantly at week 4 of immunosuppressive therapy. Finally, MPs isolated from patients with high disease activity induced, in vitro, an enhanced release of IL-1, IL-17 and TNF-α. In SLE, enhanced levels of different types of plasma MPs were also detected, with a tight correlation with disease activity. Our data further support that MPs have a relevant role in the pathogenesis of RA and suggest that the analysis of the proportions of these microvesicles in plasma could be useful to monitor disease activity and therapy response in patients with RA.

  11. Genetic and Physical Interaction of the B-Cell SLE-Associated Genes BANK1 and BLK

    PubMed Central

    Castillejo-López, Casimiro; Delgado-Vega, Angélica M.; Wojcik, Jerome; Kozyrev, Sergey V.; Thavathiru, Elangovan; Wu, Ying-Yu; Sánchez, Elena; Pöllmann, David; López-Egido, Juan R.; Fineschi, Serena; Domínguez, Nicolás; Lu, Rufei; James, Judith A.; Merrill, Joan T.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Moser, Kathy; Gilkeson, Gary; Frostegård, Johan; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Witte, Torsten; Callejas, José Luis; Harley, John B.; Gaffney, Patrick; Martin, Javier; Guthridge, Joel M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Altered signaling in B-cells is a predominant feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The genes BANK1 and BLK were recently described as associated with SLE. BANK1 codes for a B-cell-specific cytoplasmic protein involved in B-cell receptor signaling and BLK codes for an Src tyrosine kinase with important roles in B-cell development. To characterize the role of BANK1 and BLK in SLE, we performed a genetic interaction analysis hypothesizing that genetic interactions could reveal functional pathways relevant to disease pathogenesis. Methods We Used the method GPAT16 to analyze the gene-gene interactions of BANK1 and BLK. Confocal microscopy was used to investigate co-localization, and immunoprecipitation was used to verify the physical interaction of BANK1 and BLK. Results Epistatic interactions between BANK1 and BLK polymorphisms associated with SLE were observed in a discovery set of 279 patients and 515 controls from Northern Europe. A meta-analysis with 4399 European individuals confirmed the genetic interactions between BANK1 and BLK. As BANK1 was identified as a binding partner of the Src tyrosine kinase LYN, we tested the possibility that BANK1 and BLK could also show a protein-protein interaction. We demonstrated co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization of BLK and BANK1. In a Daudi cell line and primary naïve B-cells the endogenous binding was enhanced upon B-cell receptor stimulation using anti-IgM antibodies. Conclusions Here, we show a genetic interaction between BANK1 and BLK, and demonstrate that these molecules interact physically. Our results have important consequences for the understanding of SLE and other autoimmune diseases and identify a potential new signaling pathway. PMID:21978998

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in the eastern region of Saudi Arabia. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Abid, N; Khan, A Sattar; Al Otaibi, F Huzam

    2013-12-01

    This retrospective study aimed to collect data related to the clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients in the eastern part of Saudi Arabia, in one of the tertiary-care centers, King Fahd Hospital Al-Hasa, and to compare it with other regions of Saudi Arabia. Forty-six patients fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology 1997 criteria (ACR) were collected over a period from January 2004 to December 2008. The results showed an average age of onset of 26.17 (±9.17). The most common clinical features were nonspecific constitutional symptoms (fever, fatigue and malaise) seen in 44 patients (95.7%). Musculoskeletal features seen were mostly arthralgias (91.3%) and arthritis (76.1%). Nephritis was seen in 58.7% and hypertension in 52.2%. Mucocutaneous involvement included oral ulcers (71.7%), hair loss (65.2%), butterfly rashes (67.4%), photosensitivity (47.8%) and discoid lupus (13%). Neurologic manifestations showed psychosis in 17.4%, depression in 15.2% and headache in 28.3%. The most common hematologic presentation was leukopenia (58.7%) followed by hemolytic anemia and anemia of chronic disease (47.8%). Antinuclear antibodies were positive in 44 (95.7%), anti-dsDNA in 38 (42.6%), anti-Ro SSA and La SSB in 38 (82.6%). Anticardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant were positive in eight (17.4%). Low complement levels (C3 and C4) were seen in 41 (89.1%) of the patients with active disease. The drugs used in treatment were NSAIDs (100%), antimalarials (97.8%), steroids (100%), intermittent cyclophosphamide and other immunosuppressive drugs (71.7%). We found that the age of onset and sex distributions were different from other areas of Saudi Arabia, while clinical manifestations were the same as in other areas. The prognosis of lupus was good overall despite the multi-organ involvement. However, further studies based on larger number of patients are needed.

  13. Common mental disorders and psychological distress in systemic lupus erythematosus are not associated with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Jarpa, E; Babul, M; Calderón, J; González, M; Martínez, M E; Bravo-Zehnder, M; Henríquez, C; Jacobelli, S; González, A; Massardo, L

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric diagnosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is controversial: variations have been reported in frequency, diagnostic assays, associations with disease activity, autoantibodies, and contributing social factors. Eighty-three consecutive non-selected Chilean patients with SLE were evaluated for: (i) 26 common mental disorders according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI-plus); (ii) psychological suffering measured by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); (iii) ACR 1999 neuropsychiatric (NP)SLE criteria; (iv) SLE disease activity (SLEDAI-2K); (v) cumulative damage (SLICC/ACR); and (vi) anti-ribosomal P antibodies by enzyme-linked immunoassay and immunoblot. Psychiatric diagnoses occurred in 44.6% of patients; the most frequent (21.7%) was major depressive episode (MDE). No association with lupus activity was observed in patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis or MDE or psychological suffering. ACR 1999 NPSLE criteria were present in 42.2% of patients, the majority corresponding to mood (28.9%) or anxiety disorders (15.6%). Suicidal risk was present in 9.6% of patients. Anti-ribosomal P antibodies (13.3%) were not associated with DSM-IV diagnosis. Severe psychiatric disorders in SLE are common and not associated with disease activity.

  14. Abnormalities in the cellular phase of blood fibrinolytic activity in systemic lupus erythematosus and in venous thromboembolism

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, L.A.; MacLean, L.D.; Langleben, D.

    1986-09-15

    Fibrinolytic activities of whole blood and plasma were determined by /sup 125/I-fibrin radiometric assay in 16 normal subjects, and in 11 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 14 with progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), 23 with venous thromboembolic disease, and 20 patients awaiting elective surgery. Mean whole blood and plasma activities for patients with PSS, and for those awaiting elective surgery, were similar to normal values, as was the mean plasma activity in patients with SLE. However, mean whole blood activity in SLE was significantly decreased compared with normals (p less than 0.05), with mean plasma activity accounting for 44% of mean whole blood activity (compared with 17% in normal subjects), representing a 67% decrease in mean calculated cellular phase activity in SLE, when compared with normals. Since the numbers of cells (neutrophils, monocytes) possibly involved in cellular activity were not decreased, the findings suggest a functional defect in fibrinolytic activity of one or more blood cell types in SLE. An additional finding was the participation of the cellular phase as well as the well-known plasma phase of blood in the fibrinolytic response to thromboembolism.

  15. Understanding remission in real-world lupus patients across five European countries.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M; Mosca, M; Pego-Reigosa, J M; Hachulla, E; Teh, L-S; Perna, A; Koscielny, V; Pike, J; Lobosco, S; Apolone, G

    2016-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease associated with increased mortality and significant personal, psychological and socioeconomic consequences. An agreed definition of remission is needed and lacking. We sought to visualize 'remission in SLE' in European patients considered by their physicians to be 'in remission' by comparing the reported symptom burden as reported by treating physicians for patients considered to be 'in remission' and those not considered to be 'in remission'. Data for 1227 patients drawn from a multinational, real-world survey of patients with SLE consulting practising rheumatologists and nephrologists in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK show that physicians classed their patients as 'in remission' despite a considerable ongoing symptom burden and intensive immunosuppressive medication. Patients considered to be 'in remission' still had a mean of 2.68 current symptoms vs 5.48 for those considered to be not 'in remission' (p < 0.0001). The most common symptoms among those seen to be 'in remission' were joint symptoms, fatigue, pain, mucocutaneous involvement, haematological manifestations and kidney abnormalities. The current analysis highlights important ongoing disease activity, symptom burden and immunosuppressive medication in European patients with SLE considered by their treating physician to be 'in remission'. For a further improvement of outcome, there is an urgent need for an international consensus on the definitions for remission among patients with SLE.

  16. Establishing an active patient partnership.

    PubMed

    Herrier, R N; Boyce, R W

    1995-04-01

    Pharmacists face many changes in the coming decade, some of which threaten their professional survival. Although uncertainty may currently prevail, one of these changes, the shift in the patient-health care professional relationship from the patient taking a passive role to an active partnering role, provides pharmacists with many opportunities to realize the vision of patient-centered care that has been advocated by pharmacy innovators and leaders for almost three decades. To take advantage of these changes, pharmacists must modify their practice paradigms and use their existing strengths, such as easy patient access and high levels of patient trust, to help develop a new model of pharmaceutical care. The concern that the magnitude of these changes will prevent successful practice transformations may be exaggerated. In reality, these proposed "new" roles have been in existence for much of this century. Most pharmacists can expand and enhance their traditional roles as self-care advisors and patient educators simply by incremental improvements in interpersonal and clinical skills. Rather than a Star Trek approach to "go where no man has gone before," the profession needs only a pharmaceutical sequel to Back to the Future.

  17. The prevalence and associations of sleep disturbances in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhara, Pradeep Kumar Shenoy; Jayachandran, Nambiar Veettil; Rajasekhar, Liza; Thomas, Joe; Narsimulu, Gumdal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze sleep complaints in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to determine its prevalence and associations. Fifty outpatients with SLE and an equal number of age- and sex-matched controls were included in the study. Sleep quality was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) in both cases and controls. Depressed mood, functional disability and pain severity were assessed in patients using standardized questionnaires. Disease severity, cumulative damage and presence of fibromyalgia were determined by clinical examination. Bivariate associations between sleep quality and disease-related variables as well as demographic variables were calculated. A series of hierarchical regression analyses were computed to determine the independent determinant of sleep quality. PSQI scores were significantly higher in patients with SLE. Prevalence of sleep disturbance was 62%. Functional disability, disease activity and depressed mood correlated positively with sleep disturbances. 36% of the patients satisfied ACR criteria for fibromyalgia. In multiple regression analyses disease activity was found to be an independent determinant of sleep quality. The prevalence of poor sleep quality in patients with SLE was higher than it is generally perceived to be. Functional disability, disease activity and depressed mood contributed significantly to sleep disturbances in SLE.

  18. Antinuclear antibodies in patients on anticonvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Reyes, P. A.; Díes, H.; Shwadsky, S.

    1972-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies to calf thymus nuclei, NP, DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen were investigated in sera from 170 patients on various programmes of prolonged anticonvulsant treatment. Findings were compared to those on 214 tuberculous patients on isoniazid, 109 SLE patients and 66 healthy subjects. Patients on anticonvulsants had a significantly higher incidence of ANA to DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen than the controls but had a lower incidence of ANA to all antigens, except sNP, than the SLE patients. Patients on isoniazid did not have DNA antibodies, but had antibodies to whole nuclei and to NP which were practically absent in the anticonvulsant group. Of all patients on anticonvulsants only those receiving hydantoins had ANA to Sm antigen, while those receiving only primidone had antibodies to sNP but no antibodies to DNA. Alteration of sNP with isoniazid did not result in an increased incidence of ANA in the anticonvulsant group as it does in isoniazid treated subjects. It is concluded that the SLE-activating properties of diverse anticonvulsants probably resides in their potential to induce ANA. Although all anticonvulsants elicit ANA directed primarily to sNP, each may do so by different mechanisms or by altering different sites in the sNP molecule. The mechanisms by which anticonvulsant and isoniazid intake results in ANA probably differ. Presence of DNA antibodies in some patients on anticonvulsants may indicate that their convulsions were due to SLE. PMID:4117275

  19. Genetic dissection of lupus pathogenesis: Sle3/5 impacts IgH CDR3 sequences, somatic mutations, and receptor editing.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Masatoshi; Kim, Jinho; Butfiloski, Edward J; Morel, Laurence; Sobel, Eric S

    2004-12-15

    Sle3/5 is a lupus susceptibility locus identified on mouse chromosome 7 of the New Zealand Black/New Zealand White (NZB/NZW)-derived NZM2410 strain. Based on previous observations, this locus appears to contribute to lupus pathogenesis through its impact on diversification of immune responses. To understand how Sle3/5 affects somatic diversification of humoral responses, we analyzed IgH rearrangements preferentially encoding hapten-reactive IgG1 repertoires after immunization and assessed peripheral IgH VDJ recombination activities in C57BL/6 (B6) mice congenic for Sle3/5 (B6.Sle3/5). In addition to altered somatic V(H) mutation profiles, sequences from B6.Sle3/5 mice exhibited atypical IgH CDR3 structures characteristic of autoreactive B cells and consistent with peripheral B cells bearing putatively edited receptors. Significant expression of Rag genes and circular V(H)D gene excision products were detected in splenic mature B cells of B6.Sle3/5 but not B6 mice, showing that peripheral IgH rearrangements occurred beyond allelic exclusion. Taken together, on the nonautoimmune background, Sle3/5 affected V(H)DJ(H) junctional diversity and V(H) mutational diversity and led to recombinational activation of allelically excluded IgH genes in the periphery. Such impact on somatic IgH diversification may contribute to the development of autoreactive B cell repertoires. This is the first report to present evidence for significant association of a lupus susceptibility locus, which has been mapped to a chromosomal region in which no Ig genes have been identified, with somatic IgH sequence diversity and peripheral H chain receptor editing or revision without relying upon Ig transgene strategies.

  20. Relationship between QT Interval Length and Arterial Stiffness in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE): A Cross-Sectional Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-López, Ricardo; Jiménez-Jáimez, Juan; Sabio, José Mario; Zamora-Pasadas, Mónica; Vargas-Hitos, José Antonio; Martínez-Bordonado, Josefina; Navarrete-Navarrete, Nuria; Fernández, Ricardo Rivera; Sanchez-Cantalejo, E.; Jiménez-Alonso, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Objectives The QT interval on the electrocardiogram has been shown to be longer in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared to that of the general population. The clinical significance of this finding is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between QT interval and subclinical atherosclerosis, measured by carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity. Material and Methods 93 patients with SLE and 109 healthy women with similar basal characteristics were studied. All patients underwent a 12- lead electrocardiogram, and corrected QT interval (QTc) was measured using the Bazett’s formula. The presence of atherosclerosis was evaluated by carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity. Results Clinical basal characteristics were similar in both groups. QTc interval was 415±21.4 milliseconds in all patients, and 407±19.1 milliseconds in the control group (p = 0.007). There was a positive correlation between QTc interval and carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity (r = 0.235; p = 0.02) in patients with SLE. This association was independent of hypertension and age in a multivariate analysis. Conclusion QTc interval measured by electrocardiogram is prolonged in SLE patients; it is related to subclinical atherosclerosis, measured by carotid-femoral pulse-wave velocity. This measure may help stratify risk in routine clinical practice and select the patients that might benefit from a more aggressive therapy in the prevention of cardiovascular events. PMID:27064990

  1. Enhanced membrane binding of autoantibodies to cultured keratinocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus patients after ultraviolet B/ultraviolet A irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Golan, T D; Elkon, K B; Gharavi, A E; Krueger, J G

    1992-01-01

    Although sunlight is known to induce skin lesions in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to exacerbate systemic manifestations, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. We report experiments that show enhanced binding of IgG autoantibodies to the cell surface membrane of ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiated (200-1,600 J/m2) cultured SLE keratinocytes in 10 out of 12 such cell strains. The autoantibody probes showing increased binding were directed against the soluble intracellular antigens, Sm, RNP, SSA/Ro, SSB/La, whereas serum with anti-dsDNA activity did not demonstrate such binding. Control keratinocytes from several sources shared low level binding of autoantibodies after ultraviolet light exposure. In addition, 4/6 UVB-sensitive SLE strains showed increased autoantibody binding to the surface of SLE keratinocytes after UVA exposure (50-150 kJ/m2), but of lower magnitude. When UVB-sensitive nonirradiated SLE strains were exposed to autologous serum, 3/8 sera demonstrated a striking increase in IgG binding, which increased further after UVB exposure. Enhanced expression of saline-soluble intracellular antigens on the cell surface membrane of patient, but not control, keratinocytes may, in part, explain the photosensitivity of patients with SLE. Images PMID:1522215

  2. Suppression of experimental systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with specific anti-idiotypic antibody-saporin conjugate.

    PubMed Central

    Blank, M; Manosroi, J; Tomer, Y; Manosroi, A; Kopolovic, J; Charcon-Polak, S; Shoenfeld, Y

    1994-01-01

    The importance of the idiotypic network is represented in experimental SLE induced by active immunization of naive mice with an anti-DNA idiotype (Ab1) emulsified in adjuvant. The mice after 4 months of incubation generate Ab3 having anti-DNA activity. In addition, the mice develop other serological markers for SLE associated with clinical and histopathological manifestations characteristic of the disease. To confirm further the etiological role of the idiotype in this experimental model, the mice were treated with specific anti-idiotypic antibodies (anti-Id) which were also conjugated to a toxin-saporin (Immunotoxin (IT)). Pretreatment of hybridoma cell line producing the anti-anti-Id (anti-DNA = (Ab3)) for 48 h with the anti-Id MoAb (Ab2) reduced the production of anti-DNA by 58%, while pretreatment with the IT resulted in 86% decrease in anti-DNA secretion (saporin alone had only 12% effect). The anti-Id MoAb had no effect on the production of immunoglobulin by an unrelated cell line. In vivo treatment of mice with experimental SLE led to a significant decrease in titres of serum autoantibodies, with diminished clinical manifestations. The results were more remarkable when the IT was employed. These suppressive effects were specific, since an anti-Id treatment of experimental anti-phospholipid syndrome was of no avail. The anti-Id effect was mediated via a reduction in specific anti-DNA antibody-forming cells, and lasted only while anti-Id injections were given. Discontinuation of the anti-Id injection was followed by a rise in titres of anti-DNA antibodies. No immunological escape of new anti-DNA Ids was noted. Our results point to the importance of pathogenic idiotypes in SLE and to the specific potential of implementing anti-idiotypic therapy, enhanced by the conjugation of the anti-Id to an immunotoxin, in particular one with low spontaneous toxicity. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 PMID:7994908

  3. Decreased serum levels of T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-1 and T-cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Yao, Y S; Chen, G M; Sheng, J; Xu, L; Pan, H F

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the serum T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM)-1 and TIM-3 levels in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and analyze their correlations with clinical features. Sixtyone SLE patients and 69 healthy controls were enrolled, serum TIM-1 and TIM-3 levels were detected by ELISA. Results demonstrated that both serum TIM-1 and TIM-3 levels were significantly decreased in SLE patients compared with controls (both P less than 0.05). Lower serum TIM-3 levels in SLE patients with nephritis were observed when compared to those without nephritis, with a marginal statistical significance (P=0.059). However, both serum TIM-1 and TIM-3 levels had no significant correlation with SLE disease activity (both >0.05). In summary, decreased serum TIM-1 and TIM-3 levels and association of TIM-3 with nephritis suggest their possible role in the development and pathogenesis of SLE. However, further studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results. PMID:27049082

  4. Direct medical costs and their predictors in South Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Yeon; Joo, Young Bin; Shim, Jeeseon; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to estimate the annual direct medical costs of South Korean systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, and their predictors. The 2010 annual direct medical costs of SLE patients in the Hanyang BAE Lupus cohort in South Korea were assessed. The information was taken directly from the hospital database and medical records, and included clinical characteristics, disease activity, organ damage, and healthcare utilization. Cost predictors were estimated with a multivariate linear regression model. A total of 749 SLE patients (92.7 % female, mean age 35.7 ± 11.3 years, mean disease duration 9.6 ± 4.9 years) were studied. Their mean annual direct medical costs amounted to USD 3305. The largest component of these costs was the cost of medication (USD 1269, 38.4 %), followed by those of diagnostic procedures and tests (USD 1177, 35.6 %). Regression analysis showed that adjusted mean SLE disease activity index score (p < 0.0001), systemic damage index (p < 0.0001), and renal (p = 0.0039) and hematologic (p = 0.0353) involvement were associated with increased direct medical costs, whereas longer disease duration was associated with lower direct medical costs. Greater disease activity and greater organ damage predict higher costs for South Korean SLE patients. Major organ involvement such as renal disorder and hematologic involvement also predicts higher costs, whereas longer duration of disease predicts lower costs.

  5. Types of DNA methylation status of the interspersed repetitive sequences for LINE-1, Alu, HERV-E and HERV-K in the neutrophils from systemic lupus erythematosus patients and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Sukapan, Patadon; Promnarate, Paramate; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Hirankarn, Nattiya

    2014-04-01

    Changes of the DNA methylation at the interspersed repetitive sequences can occur in various conditions including cancer as well as autoimmune diseases. We previously reported the hypomethylation of LINE-1 and HERV-E in the lymphocytes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. As neutrophils are another important cell type contributing to SLE pathogenesis, in this study, we evaluated the methylation levels and patterns for LINE-1, ALU, HERV-E and HERV-K in the neutrophils from SLE patients compared with the healthy controls. We observed that the methylation levels, especially for LINE-1, in the neutrophils from SLE patients were significantly lower than the healthy controls (P-value < 0.0001). Interestingly, this hypomethylation was not correlated with the activity of the disease. Furthermore, the methylation levels and patterns for Alu, HERV-E and HERV-K in the neutrophils from the SLE patients were not significantly different from the healthy controls. In addition, we further investigated whether there were any correlations between the intragenic LINE-1 and differential expressions of the neutrophils from the SLE patients using public arrays data. The upregulated genes in the neutrophils from the SLE patients were significantly associated with the genes containing LINE-1s compared with the healthy controls (P-value GSE27427 = 7.74 × 10(-3); odds ratio (OR) = 1.28). Interestingly, this association was mainly found among genes with antisense LINE-1s (P-value GSE27427 = 6.22 × 10(-3); OR = 1.38). Bioinformatics data suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation may affect expression of the genes that may contribute to the pathogenesis of SLE. However, additional functional studies of these proposed genes are warranted to prove this hypothesis.

  6. Body Image Disturbances Have Impact on the Sexual Problems in Chinese Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Biyu; He, Yan; Chen, Haoyang; Zhao, Chunmei; Zhu, Li; Gao, Yingying; Ren, Yunli; Wang, Xueqing; Liu, Jingwei

    2015-01-01

    SLE might affect all aspects of life including sexual functioning; previous study found that body image disturbance (BID) was the most powerful predictors of impaired partner relationships and sexual function. The current study investigated the relationship among disease parameters, quality of life, the psychological status, BID, and sexual problems in Chinese patients with SLE. A self-report survey design was administered to 168 SLE patients and 210 healthy individuals. Our results showed that 86 (55.1%) SLE patients reported impaired relationships with a sexual partner or partners, and 100 (64.1%) patients reported impaired sexual function which were significantly higher than the control group (31.6%, 35.7%, rep.). Age, marital status, depression, and BIDQ were the most powerful predictors of impaired partner relationships, while BIDQ3 and education, disease activity, and depression were the most significant causes of impaired sexual function. The study for first time reported Chinese SLE patients had sexual problems and BID was associated with sexual problems. So, early detection and interventions might not only rehabilitate the patients and their loved ones, but also improve overall health outcomes and reduce the direct and indirect costs of their medical care. PMID:26090484

  7. Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, Safety, and Clinical Activity of Multiple Doses of RCT-18 in Chinese Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian; Chen, Xia; Hou, Yong; Jiang, Ji; Zhong, Wen; Yao, Xuejing; Wang, Wenxiang; Li, Lin; Fang, Jianmin; Zhang, Fengchun; Hu, Pei

    2016-08-01

    RCT-18 is a novel recombinant fusion protein that blocks the activity of a B-lymphocyte stimulator and a proliferation-inducing ligand. This was a randomized, single-blind, and placebo-controlled phase 1 study in 12 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Eligible patients were randomized 3:1 to receive multiple subcutaneous doses of RCT-18 for 4 weeks (180 mg, once weekly) or placebo and monitored over an 84-day observation period for pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, immunogenicity, safety, and clinical activity. After multiple-dose RCT-18, the maximal serum concentration (Cmax ) of total and free RCT-18 was reached within 1 to 2 days. Mean elimination half-life for total RCT-18 and free RCT-18 was 11.4 to 26.4 days and 2.4 to 26.5 days, respectively. Slight accumulation was found after multiple subcutaneous administrations. The average accumulation ratios of AUC and Cmax after the fourth administration of RCT-18 were 2.0 and 1.7 for total RCT-18, and 1.8 and 1.6 for free RCT-18. The formation and elimination of BLyS-RCT-18 complex were much slower, with a time to Cmax of 14 to 46 days. Pharmacokinetic characteristics of RCT-18 in SLE patients were similar to those in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. No positive reaction was detected in the immunogenicity assessments. RCT-18 was biologically active, according to serum immunoglobulin and B-cell levels. Treatment-related IgM and IgA reduction was found during this study. CD19(+) , IgD(+) , and CD27(+) B-cell counts were increased after administration and decreased subsequently. SLE patients treated with RCT-18 were more prone to infections, including moderate and severe infections. Lower dosages of RCT-18 should be considered in further clinical development.

  8. Circulating endothelial cells and angiogenic proteins in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Robak, E; Kierstan, M; Cebula, B; Krawczynska, A; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, A; Wierzbowska, A; Smolewski, P; Robak, T

    2009-04-01

    The aim of our study was to assess absolute counts of different subpopulations of circulating endothelial cells (CEC) in patients with active and inactive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We have also investigated a potential correlation of CEC numbers with serum levels of angiogenic proteins as well as with clinical and laboratory symptoms of the disease. For the first time in SLE, CEC were enumerated directly, by the 'single platform' method. Resting (rCEC), activated (aCEC) and progenitor (pCEC) endothelial cells were identified in patients with SLE and healthy volunteers using four-colour flow cytometry. Serum concentrations of angiogenic proteins (vascular endothelial growth factor, placental growth factor (PIGF), soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule and endoglin) were evaluated by ELISA. The SLE activity was scored according to the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure system. We found that total CEC number in patients with SLE was significantly higher (median 14.2/microL) than in the control group (median 3.3/microL) (P < 0.0001). Absolute counts of aCEC, rCEC and pCEC (medians 4.9/microL, 6.8/microL and 2.3/microL, respectively) were also higher in patients with SLE than in healthy persons (medians 0.9/microL, 1.6/microL and 0.1/microL, respectively), with P < 0.0001 for all comparisons. There was no correlation between CEC or their subpopulations and SLE activity. Strong positive correlations were found between CEC, rCEC and pCEC numbers and serum levels of PIGF. Moreover, aCEC, rCEC and pCEC counts were significantly higher in SLE patients with leukopenia. In conclusion, our results show that absolute CEC counts and angiogenic proteins levels are elevated in patients with SLE as compared with healthy controls. These data may suggest that angiogenic process is involved in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  9. Elevated Salivary Alpha-Amylase Level, Association Between Depression and Disease Activity, and Stress as a Predictor of Disease Flare in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ju-Yang; Nam, Jin-Young; Kim, Hyoun-Ah; Suh, Chang-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Psychological stress has been shown to trigger systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, objective evidence of symptom aggravation due to mental stress is difficult to identify. We aimed to investigate the relationship between SLE disease activity and mental stress, and the usefulness of saliva as an assessment index for stress in patients with SLE. We prospectively assessed the salivary stress hormone and disease-related biomarkers, and questionnaire data regarding stress and depression in 100 patients with SLE and 49 sex- and age-matched normal controls (NCs). Patients with SLE had higher mean salivary α-amylase levels (5.7 ± 4.6 U/mL vs 2.7 ± 2.5 U/mL, P < 0.001), anti-chromatin antibody levels (25.3 ± 22.9 U/mL vs 15.9 ± 10.9 U/mL, P < 0.001), and Beck Depression Index (BDI) scores (11.1 ± 9.2 vs 5.3 ± 5.1, P < 0.001) than NCs. However, salivary cortisol levels and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) scores did not differ between the groups. The BDI scores correlated with the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) scores (r = 0.253, P = 0.011) and erythrocyte sedimentation rates (r = 0.234, P = 0.019). SLE patients with the highest-quartile PSS scores had significantly increased SLEDAI scores compared to those with the lowest-quartile PSS scores after 4 to 5 months’ follow-up. Moreover, SLE patients with elevated SLEDAI scores had higher baseline PSS scores. Patients with SLE showed uncoupling of the sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis; higher salivary α-amylase and no different cortisol levels compared with NCs. Also, patients with SLE were more depressed, which correlated with disease activity. Furthermore, perceived stress was not correlated with disease activity; however, disease activity worsened several months later with elevated perceived stress levels. PMID:26222848

  10. Vitamin D levels in Jamaican patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    McGhie, T K; DeCeulaer, K; Walters, C A; Soyibo, A; Lee, M G

    2014-09-01

    Vitamin D has important effects on the immune system as it has been shown to exert antiproliferative and relative immunosuppressant effects. Low levels of this hormone may contribute to the immune activation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases. Serum levels of 25-OH vitamin D were measured in 75 patients with SLE in Jamaica, using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Correlations with clinical data and disease activity as determined by the BILAG index were determined. Of a total of 75 patients, 33 (44%) had vitamin D sufficiency with mean vitamin D level of 39.45 ng/ml (range, 30.35-58.16). Forty-two (56%) patients had either vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency, 30 (40%) had vitamin D insufficiency, mean 26.36 ng/ml (range, 20.26-29.88), and 12 (16%) had vitamin D deficiency, mean 16.07 ng/ml (range, 7.78-19.90). There was an overall negative relationship between the total disease activity score using the BILAG index and vitamin D levels, and this was influenced primarily by the relationship seen among the vitamin D-deficient subgroup. This was also impacted on by a patient population that was significantly skewed toward low disease activity. The negative association trended toward statistical significance. Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent among patients with SLE in Jamaica. A relationship between low serum levels of vitamin D and SLE activity may occur.

  11. The Clinical Value of Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) Levels in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Toldi, Gergely; Balog, Attila

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of the general inflammatory condition of patients with autoimmune connective tissue disorders (ACTD) is a major challenge. The use of traditional inflammatory markers including CRP-levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is limited by several preanalytical factors and their low specificities. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is one of the novel candidate markers that is increasingly used in immune mediated disorders. In our studies we compared suPAR levels of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and ankylosing spondylitis with those of healthy controls. suPAR provided valuable clinical information on disease activity in RA, SLE and SSc. We identified a subgroup of remitted RA patients, who presented still clinical symptoms of inflammatory activity which correlated to high plasma suPAR (while ESR and CRP were normal). In SLE we established specific suPAR cut-off values that support the discrimination between patients with high and those with moderate SLE activity. In patients with SSc suPAR correlated with objective measures of lung and other complications. In the majority of ACTDs including SLE, SSc or RA, suPAR is seemingly a good biomarker that would provide valuable clinical information. However, before the introduction of this novel parameter in laboratory repertoire important issues should be elucidated. These include the establishment of appropriate and disease specific cutoff values, clarification of interfering preanalytical values and underlying conditions and declaration of age- and gender-specific reference ranges. PMID:27683525

  12. The Clinical Value of Soluble Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) Levels in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Disorders.

    PubMed

    Vasarhelyi, Barna; Toldi, Gergely; Balog, Attila

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of the general inflammatory condition of patients with autoimmune connective tissue disorders (ACTD) is a major challenge. The use of traditional inflammatory markers including CRP-levels and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is limited by several preanalytical factors and their low specificities. Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is one of the novel candidate markers that is increasingly used in immune mediated disorders. In our studies we compared suPAR levels of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and ankylosing spondylitis with those of healthy controls. suPAR provided valuable clinical information on disease activity in RA, SLE and SSc. We identified a subgroup of remitted RA patients, who presented still clinical symptoms of inflammatory activity which correlated to high plasma suPAR (while ESR and CRP were normal). In SLE we established specific suPAR cut-off values that support the discrimination between patients with high and those with moderate SLE activity. In patients with SSc suPAR correlated with objective measures of lung and other complications. In the majority of ACTDs including SLE, SSc or RA, suPAR is seemingly a good biomarker that would provide valuable clinical information. However, before the introduction of this novel parameter in laboratory repertoire important issues should be elucidated. These include the establishment of appropriate and disease specific cutoff values, clarification of interfering preanalytical values and underlying conditions and declaration of age- and gender-specific reference ranges. PMID:27683525

  13. Prevalence of hyposalivation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in a brazilian subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Leite, Cristhiane Almeida; Galera, Marcial Francis; Espinosa, Mariano Martínez; de Lima, Paulo Ricardo Teles; Fernandes, Vander; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Dias, Eliane Pedra

    2015-01-01

    Background. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic inflammatory, multisystem, and autoimmune disease. Objective. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of hyposalivation in SLE patients and evaluate factors associated. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study developed at the Cuiaba University General Hospital (UNIC-HGU), Mato Grosso, Brazil. The study population consisted of female SLE patients treated at this hospital from 06/2010 to 12/2012. Unstimulated salivary flow rates (SFRs) were measured. Descriptive and inferential analyses were performed in all cases using a significance level P < 0.05. Results. The results showed that 79% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus suffered from hyposalivation and that the disease activity and age in years were the factors that resulted in statistically significant differences. Conclusion. The activity of the disease, age >27 years, and the drugs used were factors associated with hyposalivation, resulting in a statistically significant decrease in saliva production.

  14. Prevalence of Hyposalivation in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in a Brazilian Subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Cristhiane Almeida; Galera, Marcial Francis; Espinosa, Mariano Martínez; de Lima, Paulo Ricardo Teles; Fernandes, Vander; Borges, Álvaro Henrique; Dias, Eliane Pedra

    2015-01-01

    Background. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic inflammatory, multisystem, and autoimmune disease. Objective. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of hyposalivation in SLE patients and evaluate factors associated. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study developed at the Cuiaba University General Hospital (UNIC-HGU), Mato Grosso, Brazil. The study population consisted of female SLE patients treated at this hospital from 06/2010 to 12/2012. Unstimulated salivary flow rates (SFRs) were measured. Descriptive and inferential analyses were performed in all cases using a significance level P < 0.05. Results. The results showed that 79% of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus suffered from hyposalivation and that the disease activity and age in years were the factors that resulted in statistically significant differences. Conclusion. The activity of the disease, age >27 years, and the drugs used were factors associated with hyposalivation, resulting in a statistically significant decrease in saliva production. PMID:25649631

  15. New insights into B cell biology in SLE and Sjogren’s Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Anna K.; Meednu, Nida; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Our understanding of the physiological and pathogenic functions of B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjogren’s syndrome (pSS) continues to expand. In this review, we discuss novel insights published in the last 18 months into the roles of B cells in systemic autoimmunity. Recent findings Data has continued to expand the diverse mechanisms by which innate immune signals including toll like receptors (TLR) may regulate the B cell compartment. Localized B cells and long-lived plasma cells have been identified as playing an important role in target tissue including the development of ectopic lymphoid structures in kidney and salivary gland. In addition to pathogenic roles for B cells, there is mounting evidence for regulatory B cell subsets that play a protective role and new insights into the signals that regulate their development. Summary The past few years have provided insights into the multiple paths by which innate immune signals can lead to B cell activation in SLE and pSS and the increasingly diverse ways in which B cells contribute to disease expression. Further understanding the imbalance between protective and pathogenic functions for B cells in disease including in understudied target tissue should yield new treatment approaches. PMID:26164595

  16. Diffuse Lymphadenopathy as the Presenting Manifestation of SLE

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lanaya Williams; Petri, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 27 year old African-American man who presented with 6 months of generalized lymphadenopathy and nothing in his history or examination to suggest systemic lupus erythematosus. He was thought to have lymphoma, syphilis or tuberculosis and an extensive work up was done. Laboratory investigation finally revealed leukopenia (4.0), proteinuria (1.87grams), ANA (640 speckled), anti-dsDNA (640) , anticardiolipin IgG and IgM, anti-Smith, Coombs, anti-Ro, anti-La, CK (531U/L), aldolase (8.5 U/L), high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (130) and low complement (C3 15mg/dl and C4 3mg/dl). A kidney biopsy showed diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis, ISN class IV. Generalized lymphadenopathy as the first and only manifestation for 6 months made the diagnosis of SLE challenging. Generalized diffuse lymphadenopathy has been associated with SLE, but is much less frequent now than in the past. The differential diagnosis of lymphadenopathy relevant to rheumatologists, includes Kikuchi histiocytic necrotizing lympadenitis, Castleman disease, syphilis, tuberculosis, sarcoidosis and lymphoma. PMID:24048114

  17. Impaired Clearance of Early Apoptotic Cells Mediated by Inhibitory IgG Antibodies in Patients with Primary Sjögren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Manoussakis, Menelaos N.; Fragoulis, George E.; Vakrakou, Aigli G.; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Deficient efferocytosis (i.e. phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells) has been frequently reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Todate, patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) have not been assessed for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells (ApoCell-phagocytosis) and of particulate targets (microbeads, MB-phagocytosis). Design ApoCell-phagocytosis and MB-phagocytosis were comparatively assessed by flow cytometry in peripheral blood specimens and monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) preparations from healthy blood donors (HBD) and consecutive SS, SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Cross-admixture ApoCell-phagocytosis experiments were also performed using phagocytes from HBD or patients, and apoptotic cells pretreated with whole sera or purified serum IgG derived from patients or HBD. Results Compared to HBD, approximately half of SS and SLE patients studied (but not RA) manifested significantly reduced ApoCell-phagocytosis (p<0.001) and MB-phagocytosis (p<0.003) by blood-borne phagocytes that correlated inversely with disease activity (p≤0.004). In cross-admixture assays, healthy monocytes showed significantly reduced ApoCell-phagocytosis when fed with apoptotic cells that were pretreated with sera or purified serum IgG preparations from SS and SLE patients (p<0.0001, compared to those from HBD or RA). Such aberrant effect of the SS and SLE sera and IgG preparations correlated linearly with their content of IgG antibodies against apoptotic cells (p≤0.0001). Phagocytic dysfunction maybe also present in certain SS and SLE patients, as supported by deficient capacity of MDM for ApoCell-phagocytosis and MB-phagocytosis under patients' serum-free conditions. Conclusion Similarly to SLE, efferocytosis is frequently impaired in SS and is primarily due to the presence of inhibitory IgG anti-ApoCell antibodies and secondarily to phagocytes' dysfunction. PMID:25396412

  18. Understanding and Managing Pregnancy in Patients with Lupus

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Guilherme Ramires; Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; de Jesus, Nilson Ramires; dos Santos, Flávia Cunha; Klumb, Evandro Mendes; Carrasco, Mario García; Levy, Roger Abramino

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic, multisystemic autoimmune disease that occurs predominantly in women of fertile age. The association of SLE and pregnancy, mainly with active disease and especially with nephritis, has poorer pregnancy outcomes, with increased frequency of preeclampsia, fetal loss, prematurity, growth restriction, and newborns small for gestational age. Therefore, SLE pregnancies are considered high risk condition, should be monitored frequently during pregnancy and delivery should occur in a controlled setting. Pregnancy induces dramatic immune and neuroendocrine changes in the maternal body in order to protect the fetus from immunologic attack and these modifications can be affected by SLE. The risk of flares depends on the level of maternal disease activity in the 6–12 months before conception and is higher in women with repeated flares before conception, in those who discontinue useful medications and in women with active glomerulonephritis at conception. It is a challenge to differentiate lupus nephritis from preeclampsia and, in this context, the angiogenic and antiangiogenic cytokines are promising. Prenatal care of pregnant patients with SLE requires close collaboration between rheumatologist and obstetrician. Planning pregnancy is essential to increase the probability of successful pregnancies. PMID:26246905

  19. Wnt/β-catenin signaling mediates the senescence of bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells from systemic lupus erythematosus patients through the p53/p21 pathway.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhifeng; Tan, Wei; Feng, Guijuan; Meng, Yan; Shen, Biyu; Liu, Hong; Cheng, Chun

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that allogeneic bone marrow (BM)-mesenchymal stem cell transplantation (MSCT) appears to be effective in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and lupus-prone mice, contrary to studies in syngeneic BM-MSCT. These studies indicated that the abnormalities of BM-MSCs may be involved in the pathogenesis of SLE. Our studies and other previous studies have revealed that BM-MSCs from SLE patients exhibited early signs of senescence, such as flattened morphology, slow proliferation, increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity, and so on. However, the mechanisms by which these cells senescences were still unclear. Previous studies have demonstrated that Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays an important role in stem cell senescence. In the current study, we investigated whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling mediates the senescence of BM-MSCs from SLE patients. We have found that Wnt/β-catenin signaling and the p53/p21 pathway were significantly hyperactivated in senescent SLE BM-MSCs. Treatment with 100 ng/mL Dickkopf-1 (DKK1), a Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibitor or β-catenin siRNA for 48 h could reverse the senescent features of SLE BM-MSCs. Additionally, the expression levels of p53 and p21 were reduced in treated-SLE BM-MSCs compared with the untreated group. In summary, our study indicated that Wnt/β-catenin signaling may play a critical role in the senescence of SLE BM-MSCs through the p53/p21 pathway.

  20. The implication of tissue Doppler echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise in early detection of cardiac dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    Elnady, Basant M.; Abdelghafar, Ayman Saeed Mohamed; Khalik, El Shazly Abdul; Algethami, Mohammed Mesfer; Basiony, A.S.; Al-otaibi, Mona Dhaif Allah; Al-otaibi, Maram Eidhah

    2016-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can present limitations to exercise capacity and quality of life (QoL) because of various clinical conditions, such as pulmonary disease or heart disease. Tissue Doppler echocardiography (TDE) offers the promise of an objective measurement to quantify regional and global ventricular function through the assessment of myocardial velocity data. This study aimed to assess the intensity of left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) systolic and diastolic dysfunction in SLE patients by means of TDE and cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing to determine their impact on QoL. Material and Methods Overall, 56 SLE patients within two tertiary healthcare centers as well as 50 healthy controls were examined with TDE after the exclusion of cardiovascular risk factors. TDE was performed for maximal systolic (S), early diastolic (E′), and late diastolic (A′) velocities of the mitral and tricuspid annulus. Pulsed wave (PW) Doppler of mitral and tricuspid valve inflow was performed in addition to the estimation of the left ventricle ejection fraction and assessment of right ventricle systolic function by tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE). Disease activity was assessed by the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM), and the damage index was assessed by the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Damage Index (SDI). CPX tests according to the modified Bruce protocol were performed. Results SLE patients in both subgroups had more or less similar laboratory data and statistically higher values of ESR, CRP, and anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies compared to the control group. LV function showed statistically insignificant EF compared to the control group, being lower in the patient group. Tissue Doppler image revealed that E′ and A′ of the mitral annulus were lower in the patient group than in the control group. Concerning RV, TAPSE in the patient group was

  1. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 is implicated in disease activity in adult and juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Meshaal, Safa; El Refai, Rasha; El Saie, Ahmed; El Hawary, Rabab

    2016-06-01

    The Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway is one of a handful of pleiotropic cascades used to transduce a multitude of signals for development and homeostasis in humans. It is the principal signaling mechanism for a wide array of cytokines and growth factors. Dysregulated cytokine action on immune cells plays an important role in the initiation and progress of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we tried to assess the role of STAT5 in systemic lupus erythematosus and correlate its phosphorylation level with the disease activity. The activation of the STAT5 was assessed by measuring the level of expression of phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5) using flow cytometry on the peripheral blood T and B cells in 58 SLE patients (40 adult and 18 juvenile onset) and on 23 healthy age- and sex-matched controls for both groups. Serum prolactin level was also assessed in the patients and control by ELISA. The study revealed that the level of pSTAT5 was higher in adult SLE patients than in healthy control (p = 0.001) and in juvenile-onset SLE patients versus age-matched control (p = 0.031). A positive correlation existed between the pSTAT5 levels and Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) score and also with multiple clinical manifestations indicating a potential role of STAT5 signaling in pathogenesis SLE. The pSTAT5 signaling is implicated in the disease activity of SLE and may be a useful target of therapy by correcting the dysregulation of cytokines involved in the disease pathogenesis.

  2. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 is implicated in disease activity in adult and juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Meshaal, Safa; El Refai, Rasha; El Saie, Ahmed; El Hawary, Rabab

    2016-06-01

    The Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway is one of a handful of pleiotropic cascades used to transduce a multitude of signals for development and homeostasis in humans. It is the principal signaling mechanism for a wide array of cytokines and growth factors. Dysregulated cytokine action on immune cells plays an important role in the initiation and progress of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this study, we tried to assess the role of STAT5 in systemic lupus erythematosus and correlate its phosphorylation level with the disease activity. The activation of the STAT5 was assessed by measuring the level of expression of phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5) using flow cytometry on the peripheral blood T and B cells in 58 SLE patients (40 adult and 18 juvenile onset) and on 23 healthy age- and sex-matched controls for both groups. Serum prolactin level was also assessed in the patients and control by ELISA. The study revealed that the level of pSTAT5 was higher in adult SLE patients than in healthy control (p = 0.001) and in juvenile-onset SLE patients versus age-matched control (p = 0.031). A positive correlation existed between the pSTAT5 levels and Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM) score and also with multiple clinical manifestations indicating a potential role of STAT5 signaling in pathogenesis SLE. The pSTAT5 signaling is implicated in the disease activity of SLE and may be a useful target of therapy by correcting the dysregulation of cytokines involved in the disease pathogenesis. PMID:27041383

  3. Leukocyte Activation in Obese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Minervino, Daniele; Gumiero, Daniela; Nicolazzi, Maria Anna; Carnicelli, Annamaria; Fuorlo, Mariella; Guidone, Caterina; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Fattorossi, Andrea; Mingrone, Geltrude; Landolfi, Raffaele

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The rising prevalence of obesity is a major global health problem. In severe obesity, bariatric surgery (BS) allows to obtain a significant weight loss and comorbidities improvement, among them one of the factors is the thrombotic risk. In this observational study, we measured indices of leukocyte activation in severely obese patients as markers of increased thrombotic risk in relation with serum markers of inflammation before and after BS. Frequency of polymorphonuclear neutrophil-platelet (PLT) and monocyte (MONO)-PLT aggregates as well as of tissue factor (TF) expressing MONOs was measured in the peripheral blood of 58 consecutive obese patients and 30 healthy controls. In 31 of the 58 obese patients, data obtained at the enrollment were compared with those obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months after BS. Compared with healthy controls, obese patients showed a higher frequency of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL)-PLT aggregates (7.47 ± 2.45 [6.82–8.11]% vs 5.85 ± 1.89 [5.14–6.55]%, P = 0.001), MONO-PLT aggregates (12.31 ± 7.33 [10.38–14.24]% vs 8.14 ± 2.22 [7.31–8.97]%, P < 0.001), and TF expressing MONOs (4.01 ± 2.11 [3.45–4.56]% vs 2.64 ± 1.65 [2.02–3.25]%, P = 0.002). PMNL-PLT and MONO-PLT aggregate frequency was positively correlated with TF expressing MONOs (R2 = 0.260, P = 0.049 and R2 = 0.318, P = 0.015, respectively). BS was performed in 31 patients and induced a significant reduction of the body mass index, and waist and hip circumferences. These effects were associated with a significant decrease of PMNL-PLT aggregates at 12 months (7.58 ± 2.27 [6.75–8.42]% vs 4.47 ± 1.11 [3.93–5.01]%, P < 0.001), and a reduction of TF expressing MONOs at 6 (3.82 ± 2.04 [3.07–4.57]% vs 1.60 ± 1.69 [0.30–2.90]%, P = 0.008) and 12 months (3.82 ± 2.04 [3.07–4.57]% vs 1.71 ± 0.54 [1.45–1.97]%, P = 0.001) after BS. These data suggest that leukocyte

  4. Lack of cardiovascular risk assessment in inflammatory arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus patients at a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Stephanie O; Teo, Michelle; Fung, Daisy

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate cardiovascular risk assessment at a Canadian rheumatology center and describe the cardiovascular risk of inflammatory arthritis (IA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients using the Framingham risk score. A retrospective chart review of 504 patients attending nine rheumatology practices at the University of Alberta Hospital was performed. A pre-specified case report form detailed patient demographics, cardiac risk factors, variables for the Framingham 2008 score, disease activity, and medication use. In this group of 504 patients, 64 (12.7%) had SLE (male (M) to female (F) ratio = 60:4) and 440 (87.3%) had an IA (M to F ratio = 117:323). Of the SLE patients, 31 (48.4%) met four or more American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, 33 (51.6%) had less than four ACR criteria. Of the IA patients, 156 (35.5%) were CCP positive and 257 (58.4%) were RF positive. Utilizing the chart data, retrospective Framingham risk scores were calculable for one (1.6%) SLE patient and three (0.68%) IA patients. The most common cardiac risk factors not documented in the medical records of both the SLE and IA patients included: (1) positive family history of MI, (2) diabetes, and (3) lipid status. The blood pressure was more frequently documented in the SLE patients (93.8%) compared to the IA patients (56.1%). While traditional cardiac risk factors only partially contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in these patients, cardiovascular risk assessment was suboptimally performed amongst a large group of rheumatologists. A dedicated cardiovascular risk reduction clinic for inflammatory rheumatic diseases has been established at this site to fulfill this need and evaluate treatment strategies. PMID:21503617

  5. A pilot randomized, controlled trial of vitamin D repletion to determine if endothelial function improves in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kamen, Diane L; Oates, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The endothelium is important not only in regulating vascular tone but also in modulating inflammation. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have deficits in these endothelial functions. Vitamin D is a nuclear hormone that regulates vascular endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity and expression. Many SLE patients have insufficient levels of vitamin D. The effect of this hormone on vascular endothelial function in SLE patients is not known. This study was designed to determine the effect size of repleting vitamin D levels on endothelial function in patients with SLE and vitamin D deficiency. SLE patients with 25(OH) vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels < 20 ng/ml were randomized to oral vitamin D3 (D3) doses that did or did not raise 25(OH)D levels to ≥ 32 ng/ml. Endothelial function was measured with flow-mediated dilation (FMD) before and after 16 weeks of vitamin D3 supplementation. Half of those who achieved 25(OH)D levels of ≥32 ng/ml experienced increases in FMD, while none of those with continued low 25(OH)D levels did. Those with increases in FMD had significantly higher final 25(OH)D levels. Using the effect size from this study, future studies designed to test the effect of repleting 25(OH)D on FMD in vitamin D deficient SLE patients will require 35 patients in each group. These results suggest a potential role for vitamin D in SLE-related endothelial dysfunction and that an adaptive multi-arm treat-to-target serum level trial design may increase the efficiency and likelihood of success of such a study. PMID:26351776

  6. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Lütfi; Önem, Soner; Özgen, Metin; Sayarlıoğlu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by several immunological abnormalities. We wish to communicate the case of a patient with SLE and lupus nephritis (LN) who developed pseudothrombocytopenia. Pseudothrombocytopenia can occur in patients with SLE and LN and should be considered when diagnosing patients with thrombocytopenia without bleeding.

  7. Resilience and Treatment Adhesion in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Daniella Antunes Pousa; Revoredo, Luciana Silva; Vilar, Maria José; Eulália Maria Chaves, Maia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune, rheumatic inflammatory disease that can cause significant morbidity with evident psychological impacts and obvious harm to quality-of-life that require the patient to adapt treatment. Objective: Assessment of resilience and the self-reported treatment adhesion behaviors of patients with SLE, investigating which of these factors are associated to resilience. Method: Cross-sectional study of 40 women with SLE. A questionnaire with social demographic data, health history and the Wagnild Young Resilience Scale were used. Results: 62.5% followed the medical treatment properly but 55% found it difficult. 27.5% of the patients presented low resilience, 57.5% medium and 15% high resilience. Resilience was associated in the chi-square test (p-value < 0.05) with the variables work, understanding SLE, trying to find out about SLE, following the treatment correctly, difficulty in following the treatment and stopping some activity because of the disease. In the correlation analysis, resilience was associated with age (-0.3960), number of working hours (0.5533), specialized treatment duration (-0.8103) and disease duration from diagnosis (-0.8014). Conclusion: Patients with high resilience tended to follow treatment correctly, tried to understand the disease and adhered more to the treatment to avoid risks and promote protection factors. Therefore knowledge of resilience in patients with SLE is necessary. It is important that the state takes necessary actions to facilitate access to treatment, to educational programs and to medical support. Awareness and counselling sessions must be initiated to develop and promote individual capacities to learn how to tackle with the disease for which psychological support of family and doctors can play a significant role. PMID:24665352

  8. Incidence of and Risk Factors for Adverse Cardiovascular Events Among Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Magder, Laurence S.; Petri, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are at excess risk of cardiovascular events (CVEs). There is uncertainty regarding the relative importance of SLE disease activity, medications, or traditional risk factors in this increased risk. To gain insight into this, the authors analyzed data from a cohort of 1,874 patients with SLE who were seen quarterly at a single clinical center (April 1987–June 2010) using pooled logistic regression analysis. In 9,485 person-years of follow-up, the authors observed 134 CVEs (rate = 14.1/1,000 person-years). This was 2.66 times what would be expected in the general population based on Framingham risk scores (95% confidence interval: 2.16, 3.16). After adjustment for age, CVE rates were not associated with duration of SLE. However, they were associated with average past levels of SLE disease activity and recent levels of circulating anti-double-stranded DNA. Past use of corticosteroids (in the absence of current use) was not associated with CVE rates. However, persons currently using 20 mg/day or more of corticosteroids had a substantial increase in risk even after adjustment for disease activity. Thus, consistent with findings in several recent publications among cohorts with other diseases, current use of corticosteroids was associated with an increased risk of CVEs. These results suggest a short-term impact of corticosteroids on CVE risk. PMID:23024137

  9. Lupus anticoagulant and history of thrombosis are not associated with persistent endothelial cell activation in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Frijns, C J M; Derksen, R H W M; De Groot, PH G; Algra, A; Fijnheer, R

    2001-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), especially lupus anticoagulant (LAC), characterize systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients at increased risk for arterial and venous thromboembolic complications. It has been reported that purified human anti-phospholipid antibodies cause endothelial cell activation in in vitro experiments. In order to investigate whether increased endothelial cell activation is associated with thromboembolic events in SLE patients with LAC, we measured plasma levels of thrombomodulin (TM), von Willebrand factor (vWf), sP-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) and ED1-fibronectin in a study of 76 patients with SLE. Patients were subdivided on the basis of: no history of thrombosis and LAC-negative (n = 22) or LAC-positive (n = 17); positive history of thrombosis and LAC-negative (n = 16) or LAC-positive (n = 21). The median SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) was 4. Although concentrations of sTM, vWf, sP-selectin and sVCAM-1 were significantly elevated in SLE compared with values in healthy controls, they did not differ between the four groups, between patients with or without history of thrombosis, and between patients with or without LAC. Presence of anticardiolipin antibodies could not explain these negative findings. Adjustment of the concentrations for significantly associated variables, such as age, hypertension, smoking, immunosuppressive treatment and concentrations of creatinine, cholesterol and homocysteine, did not change the main results of the study. Only sTM was significantly lower in patients with both LAC and thrombosis than in patients without both these features after adjustment for serum creatinine concentrations. In conclusion, we did not find an association between endothelial cell activation and presence of LAC or history of thrombosis in SLE. PMID:11472438

  10. Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus in Singapore: clinical phenotypes, disease activity, damage, and autoantibody profiles.

    PubMed

    Tan, J H T; Hoh, S F; Win, M T M; Chan, Y H; Das, L; Arkachaisri, T

    2015-08-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by immune dysregulation affecting patients less than 18 years old. One-fifth of SLE cases are diagnosed during childhood. cSLE presents differently from adults and has a more severe and aggressive course. We describe the clinical and antibody profiles in our cSLE Singapore cohort. All cSLE patients who satisfied the 1997 American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria were captured in our lupus registry from January 2009 to January 2014. Data including demographic, cumulative clinical, serologic data, and damage indices were collected. Adjusted mean SLEDAI-2K (AMS) was used to summarize disease activity over multiple visits. Cluster analysis using non-hierarchical K-means procedure was performed on eight selected antibodies. The 64 patients (female:male ratio 5:1; Chinese 45.3%, Malay 28.1%, Indian 9.4%, and other races 17.2%) had a mean onset age of 11.5 years (range 2.1-16.7) and mean age at diagnosis was 11.9 years (range 2.6-18.0). Our study demonstrated differences in clinical manifestations for which hematologic involvement was the most common manifestation with less renal disease and uncommon neurologic manifestation as compared to other cSLE cohorts reported in our region. Antibody clusters were identified in our cohort but their clinical association/discrimination and outcome prediction required further validation study. Outcomes of our cohort in regard to disease activity after therapy and organ damages were comparable if not better to other cSLE cohorts elsewhere. Steroid-related damage, including symptomatic multifocal avascular necrosis and cataract, were not uncommon locally. Infection remains the major cause of death for the continent. Nevertheless, the five year survival rate of our cohort (98.4%) was high.

  11. The predictive factors of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and vitamin D deficiency in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Sumethkul, Kittiwan; Boonyaratavej, Smonporn; Kitumnuaypong, Tasanee; Angthararuk, Sungchai; Cheewasat, Patcharin; Manadee, Naruimon; Sumethkul, Vasant

    2013-06-01

    Vitamin D is a steroid hormone with pleiotropic effects. The association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level [25(OH) D] and lupus nephritis are not clearly known. We aim to determine serum 25(OH) D levels in patients with inactive SLE, active SLE without lupus nephritis (LN) and active SLE with LN and to identify clinical predictor of vitamin D deficiency. One hundred and eight SLE patients were included. Patients were classified as Group (Gr) 1, 2 and 3 if they had SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) <3, ≥ 3 but no LN and ≥ 3 with LN. Important baseline characteristics were collected. 25(OH) D was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SLEDAI in Gr1, Gr2 and Gr3 was 0.7 (0.9), 5.6 (2.3) and 9.2 (5.2), respectively. 43.5 % had vitamin D insufficiency and 29.6 % had vitamin D deficiency. Mean 25(OH) D in each groups was 28.3 (8.0), 26.7 (9.5) and 19.9 (7.6) ng/ml (p < 0.001 comparing Gr1 and 3) (p = 0.003 comparing Gr2 and 3). Vitamin D deficiency was found in 11.1, 22.2 and 55.6 % of Gr1, 2 and 3. Linear regression analysis found that 25(OH) D was significantly correlated with serum albumin (r = 0.28, p = 0.004), inversely correlated with SLEDAI (r = -0.22, p = 0.03) and urinary protein creatinine index (UPCI) (r = -0.28, p = 0.005), but not with sun exposure score, body mass index and estimated GFR. Only UPCI was significantly inversely correlated with 25(OH) D (p = 0.02) from multiple linear regression. LN was a significant predictor of vitamin D deficiency from multivariate logistic regression (OR 5.97; p = 0.006). Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was found in 93 and 86 % of LN with proteinuria ≥ and <500 mg/day. We conclude that SLE patients with LN have significantly lower vitamin D level than inactive SLE and active SLE without LN. Hence, nephritis is a significant predictor of vitamin D deficiency in SLE patients.

  12. The effects of antiphospholipid antibodies obtained from women with SLE/APS and associated pregnancy loss on rat embryos and placental explants in culture.

    PubMed

    Ornoy, A; Yacobi, S; Matalon, S Tartakover; Blank, M; Blumenfeld, Z; Miller, R K; Shoenfeld, Y

    2003-01-01

    Recurrent fetal loss occurs in approximately 1% of women. Autoimmune causes have been suggested as a factor in some of these cases. High rates of intrauterine fetal growth retardation and increased incidence of prematurity is associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). We found in previous studies that sera from SLE/APS patients when used as a culture medium for rat embryos were found to reduce embryonic growth and development, induce a high rate of embryonic anomalies and death and damage the yolk sac morphologically and functionally. In order to investigate the direct effect of IgG purified from women with SLE/APS on the growth and viability of embryos, we cultured 11.5-day-old rat embryos in their yolk sacs in the presence of IgG purified from SLE/APS patients with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL). The IgG affected directly the embryo and yolk sac, reducing their growth. The purified IgG positive for anticardiolipin/anti-DNA antibodies reduced yolk sac and embryonic growth more than sera negative for these antibodies but positive for antiphosphatydilserine and for antilaminin. Monoclonal antiphosphatydilserine reduced yolk sac growth but the embryos remained intact. Following the observed damage to the yolk sac we cultured human placental explants at 5.5-8 weeks of pregnancy in sera from SLE/APS patients for 96 hours and found that these sera reduced placental trophoblastic cell growth, reduced their proliferation rate and increased their rate of apoptosis. Successful treatment of the women resulted in a correction of the damage induced in the cultured rat embryos and in the cultured placental explants.

  13. Chinese Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Treatment and Research Group Registry VI: Effect of Cigarette Smoking on the Clinical Phenotype of Chinese Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qingyu; Xu, Jianhua; Jiang, Lindi; Gong, Lu; Wu, Fengqi; Gu, Jieruo; Tao, Yi; Chen, Jinwei; Zhao, Jiuliang; Li, Mengtao; Zhao, Yan; Zeng, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Our study aimed to investigate the effect of cigarette smoking on the clinical phenotype of patients registered in the Chinese Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) Treatment and Research (CSTAR) group registry database, the first online registry of Chinese patients with SLE. Methods A prospective cross-sectional study of Chinese SLE patients was conducted using the CSTAR. Our case-control analysis was performed on age- and gender-matched subjects to explore the potential effect of cigarette smoking on the clinical manifestation of SLE. Results Smokers comprised 8.9% (65/730) of patients, and the ratio of females/males was 19/46. Thirty-nine patients were current smokers, and 26 were ex-smokers. Data showed significant differences between smokers and nonsmokers in the following areas: nephropathy (58.5% vs. 39.2%; p = 0.003), microscopic hematuria (30.8% vs. 19.1%; p = 0.025), proteinuria (53.8% vs. 34.4%; p = 0.002), and SLE Disease Activity Index(DAI) scores (12.38±8.95 vs. 9.83±6.81; p = 0.028). After adjusting for age and gender, significant differences between smokers and nonsmokers were found with photosensitivity (35.9% vs. 18%; p = 0.006), nephropathy (59.4% vs. 39.8%; p = 0.011), and proteinuria (54.7% vs. 35.2%). Although smokers tended to have greater disease severity compared with nonsmokers (SLEDAI scores: 12.58±8.89 vs.10.5±7.09), the difference was not significant (p = 0.081). Conclusions Cigarette smoking triggers the development and exacerbation of SLE, especially with respect to renal involvement. Chinese smokers with SLE should be advised to discontinue cigarette use. PMID:26280671

  14. Alternatively activated dendritic cells derived from systemic lupus erythematosus patients have tolerogenic phenotype and function.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Jing; Lo, Yi; Luk, Daniel; Lau, Chak Sing; Lu, Liwei; Mok, Mo Yin

    2015-01-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) are potential cell-based therapy in autoimmune diseases. In this study, we generated alternatively activated DCs (aaDCs) by treating monocyte-derived DCs from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and healthy subjects with combination of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (vitD3) and dexamethasone followed by lipopolysaccharide-induced maturation. Lupus aaDCs were found to acquire semi-mature phenotype that remained maturation-resistant to immunostimulants. They produced low level of IL-12 but high level of IL-10. They had attenuated allostimulatory effects on T cell activation and proliferation comparable to normal aaDCs and demonstrated differential immunomodulatory effects on naïve and memory T cells. These aaDCs were capable of inducing IL-10 producing regulatory T effectors from naïve T cells whereas they modulated cytokine profile with suppressed production of IFN-γ and IL-17 by co-cultured memory T cells with attenuated proliferation. These aaDCs were shown to be superior to those generated using vitD3 alone in lupus patients.

  15. Perceptions of racism in healthcare among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Vina, Ernest R; Hausmann, Leslie R M; Utset, Tammy O; Masi, Christopher M; Liang, Kimberly P; Kwoh, C Kent

    2015-01-01

    Background Racial disparities in the clinical outcomes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) exist. Perceived racial discrimination may contribute to disparities in health. Objectives To determine if perceived racism in healthcare differs by race among patients with SLE and to evaluate its contribution to racial disparities in SLE-related outcomes. Methods 163 African–American (AA) and 180 white (WH) patients with SLE were enrolled. Structured interviews and chart reviews were done to determine perceptions of racism, SLE-related outcomes (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) Damage Index, SLE Disease Activity, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D)), and other variables that may affect perceptions of racism. Serial hierarchical multivariable logistic regression models were conducted. Race-stratified analyses were also performed. Results 56.0% of AA patients compared with 32.8% of WH patients had high perceptions of discrimination in healthcare (p<0.001). This difference remained (OR 4.75 (95% CI 2.41 to 8.68)) after adjustment for background, identity and healthcare experiences. Female gender (p=0.012) and lower trust in physicians (p<0.001) were also associated with high perceived racism. The odds of having greater disease damage (SLICC damage index ≥2) were higher in AA patients than in WH patients (crude OR 1.55 (95% CI 1.01 to 2.38)). The odds of having moderate to severe depression (CES-D ≥17) were also higher in AA patients than in WH patients (crude OR 1.94 (95% CI 1.26 to 2.98)). When adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, racial disparities in disease damage and depression were no longer significant. Among AA patients, higher perceived racism was associated with having moderate to severe depression (adjusted OR 1.23 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.43)) even after adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical variables. Conclusions Perceptions of racism in healthcare were more common in AA patients than in WH

  16. Connective tissue diseases: SLE classification: plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Matthias; Liang, Matthew H

    2015-05-01

    The sensitivity of the long-awaited SLICC classification criteria for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has now been examined in a cross-sectional observational study. Will the new criteria enable advances in the management of SLE? PMID:25687176

  17. Effect of IL6 and IL23 on double negative T cells and anti ds-DNA in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Shaltout, Asmaa S; Sayed, Douaa; Badary, Mohamed S; Nafee, Amany M; El Zohri, Mona H; Bakry, Rania; Ahmed, Shabaan H

    2016-10-01

    Several evidences suggest that DN T cells, IL23 and IL6 play a role in the pathogenesis of SLE. This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of DN T cells in SLE patients and the relation to their activity also to assess the possible role of IL6 and IL23 on DN T cells. Thirty patients with SLE and sixteen healthy blood donor females were enrolled. There was a significant increase in DN T cells in patients than controls (P=0.001). These cells had a significant positive correlation with SLEDAI (r=0.486, P=0.006). DN T cells from SLE patient samples were expanded when stimulated in vitro with RhIL6 or RhIL23 in patients than controls. Furthermore, anti ds-DNA level was found to be increased in supernatant of PBMCs when stimulated by these cytokines in different concentrations. Our findings suggest that IL6 and IL23 may play role in SLE pathogenesis through their effect on DN T cells and anti ds-DNA. PMID:27343994

  18. Osteonecrosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus develops very early after starting high dose corticosteroid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Oinuma, K; Harada, Y; Nawata, Y; Takabayashi, K; Abe, I; Kamikawa, K; Moriya, H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the actual time of onset of osteonecrosis (ON) after high dose corticosteroid treatment in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).
METHODS—72 patients with active SLE, who received high dose corticosteroid for the first time, for the development of ON at hips and knees were monitored by magnetic resonance imaging for at least 12 months.
RESULTS—ON lesions were detected in 32/72 patients (44%) between one and five months (3.1 months on average) after starting high dose corticosteroid treatment. No osteonecrotic lesion was newly detected from the sixth month of treatment until the end of the follow up period.
CONCLUSION—The findings suggested that the actual time of onset of ON in SLE is within the first month of high dose corticosteroid treatment.

 PMID:11709458

  19. [Evaluation of systemic lupus erythematosus activity during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Olesińska, Marzena; Wiesik-Szewczyk, Ewa; Chwalińska-Sadowska, Hanna

    2007-07-01

    Pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is considered a high-risk pregnancy. It is complicated by preeclampsia, premature labour and miscarriage more frequently than in the general population. Improved prognosis depends on low disease activity during conception and on appropriate medical care (SLE activity monitoring, selection of therapy safe for the mother and the developing foetus, advances in neonatology). Because symptoms of physiological pregnancy and SLE exacerbation are similar, their correct interpretation is essential for skin lesions, arthralgias, arterial hypertension or results of laboratory tests: proteinuria, thrombocytopenia or leucopenia observed in the patient. In order to standardise the assessment of SLE activity during pregnancy, scores of this activity are used. In the past, scores validated on non-pregnant populations (including male patients) were used: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM), European Consensus Lupus Activity Measurment (ECLAM). Only recently have SLE activity scores been introduced that are specific for pregnant women: Lupus Activity Index In Pregnancy (LAI-P), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Pregnancy Disease Activity Index (SLEPDAI), modified--Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (m-SLAM) and a visual three-grade score modified--Physician Global Assessment (m-PGA). So far, only scores LAI-P and m-PGA have been validated. According to the LAI-P score, clinical data are divided into 4 groups. Group 1 includes mild clinical symptoms, group 2--symptoms of involvement of internal organs, group 3 pertains to modifications of treatment and group 4 to laboratory parameters. Point values are ascribed to individual parameters depending on their intensity.

  20. Patient Activation: Public Libraries and Health Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malachowski, Margot

    2011-01-01

    Patient activation is a new term for a perennial problem. People know what they need to do for their health: exercise, eat right, and get enough rest--but how are they motivated to actually do these things? This is what patient activation is. From this author's vantage point as a medical librarian, public libraries are well-placed to be part of…

  1. Assessment of disease activity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Lights and shadows.

    PubMed

    Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Perricone, Carlo; Massaro, Laura; Cipriano, Enrica; Alessandri, Cristiano; Spinelli, Francesca Romana; Valesini, Guido; Conti, Fabrizio

    2015-07-01

    The assessment of disease activity in patients affected by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) represents an important issue, as recommended by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). Two main types of disease activity measure have been proposed: the global score systems, providing an overall measure of activity, and the individual organ/system assessment scales, assessing disease activity in different organs. All the activity indices included both clinical and laboratory items, related to the disease manifestations. However, there is no gold standard to measure disease activity in patients affected by SLE. In this review, we will analyze the lights and shadows of the disease activity indices, by means of a critical approach. In particular, we will focus on SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG), the most frequently used in randomized controlled trials and observational studies. The evaluation of data from the literature underlined some limitations of these indices, making their application in clinical practice difficult and suggesting the possible use of specific tools in the different subset of SLE patients, in order to capture all the disease features.

  2. STS-1 promotes IFN-α induced autophagy by activating the JAK1-STAT1 signaling pathway in B cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guanjun; You, Ming; Fan, Hongye; Ding, Liang; Sun, Lingyun; Hou, Yayi

    2015-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the overexpression of IFN-α. IFN-α induces autophagy via the JAK1-STAT1 signaling pathway, contributing to the pathogenesis of SLE. Recent studies reported that B cells from patients with SLE and NZB/W F1 mice had enhanced autophagy activity; however, the mechanism still remains unknown. Here, we show that the protein tyrosine phosphatase STS-1 (suppressor of T-cell receptor signaling 1) was significantly overexpressed in B cells from patients with SLE and MRL/lpr mice. Notably, STS-1 promoted IFN-α-induced autophagy in B cells by enhancing the JAK1-STAT1 signaling activation. STS-1 inhibited the phosphorylation of the E3 ubiquitin protein ligase c-cbl, and subsequently promoted IFN-α-induced phosphorylation of tyrosine kinase 2, leading to JAK1-STAT1 signaling activation. Furthermore, STAT1 and JAK1 inhibitors blocked the IFN-α-induced autophagy promoted by STS-1, indicating that STS-1 promotes IFN-α-induced autophagy via the JAK1-STAT1 signaling. Our results demonstrate the importance of STS-1 in regulating IFN-α-induced autophagy in B cells, and this could be used as a therapeutic approach to treat SLE.

  3. Use of biologics in SLE: a review of the evidence from a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Aytan, Jayoti; Bukhari, Marwan A S

    2016-05-01

    With the explosion in biologics use in rheumatology, newer and smarter ways of using these drugs in different diseases have been advocated. SLE has to date been at the back of the biologics algorithms. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Evaluation Agency licensed belimumab for use in SLE, the first drug in >30 years. A clinical review of the evidence that underlies the use of belimumab and other biologics in SLE reveals possible reasons why the results are not as spectacular as they are in other diseases.

  4. Comparative Transcriptional Profiling of 3 Murine Models of SLE Nephritis Reveals Both Unique and Shared Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weijia; Kretzler, Matthias; Davidson, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Objective To define shared and unique features of SLE nephritis in mouse models of proliferative and glomerulosclerotic renal disease. Methods Perfused kidneys from NZB/W F1, NZW/BXSB and NZM2410 mice were harvested before and after nephritis onset. Affymetrix based gene expression profiles of kidney RNA were analyzed using Genomatix Pathway Systems and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Gene expression patterns were confirmed using real-time PCR. Results 955, 1168 and 755 genes were regulated in the kidneys of nephritic NZB/W F1, NZM2410 and NZW/BXSB mice respectively. 263 genes were regulated concordantly in all three strains reflecting immune cell infiltration, endothelial cell activation, complement activation, cytokine signaling, tissue remodeling and hypoxia. STAT3 was the top associated transcription factor, having a binding site in the gene promoter of 60/263 regulated genes. The two strains with proliferative nephritis shared a macrophage/DC infiltration and activation signature. NZB/W and NZM2410 mice shared a mitochondrial dysfunction signature. Dominant T cell and plasma cell signatures in NZB/W mice reflected lymphoid aggregates; this was the only strain with regulatory T cell infiltrates. NZW/BXSB mice manifested tubular regeneration and NZM2410 mice had the most metabolic stress and manifested loss of nephrin, indicating podocyte loss. Conclusions These findings identify shared inflammatory mechanisms of SLE nephritis that can be therapeutically targeted. Nevertheless, the heterogeneity of effector mechanisms suggests that individualized therapy might need to be based on biopsy findings. Some common mechanisms are shared with non-immune–mediated renal diseases, suggesting that strategies to prevent tissue hypoxia and remodeling may be useful in SLE nephritis. PMID:24167575

  5. Vitamin D deficiency and its association with disease activity in new cases of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Bonakdar, Z S; Jahanshahifar, L; Jahanshahifar, F; Gholamrezaei, A

    2011-10-01

    Evidence has shown a relationship between vitamin D deficiency and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We evaluated the frequency of vitamin D deficiency and its association with disease activity in new cases of SLE. Women with newly diagnosed SLE, based on the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, were enrolled consecutively. Those receiving vitamin D supplements and postmenopausal women were not included. Disease activity was measured by the BILAG index (2004) and serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) was measured by radioimmunoassay method. Forty SLE patients with mean age of 25.3 ± 4.2 years were studied. Severe, moderate, and mild vitamin D deficiency, corresponding to serum 25[OH]D concentrations of <12.5, 12.5-24.9, and 25-39.9  nmol/l, were found in 12.5%, 62.5%, and 17.5% of the patients, respectively. Serum 25[OH]D concentration was inversely correlated with the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) index score (r = -0.486, p = 0.001). Those with a more severe vitamin D deficiency had also higher concentrations of liver enzymes (p < 0.05), lower serum albumin and hemoglobin concentrations (p < 0.05), and higher titers of antibodies to double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) (p < 0.001). This study showed that most of the SLE patients in our society have vitamin D deficiency at the time of diagnosis that is associated with a higher disease activity. Routine screening for vitamin D deficiency and its prompt treatment in patients with newly diagnosed SLE is recommended.

  6. Risk of Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Ya-Wen; Yu, Mei-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Yu, Tung-Min; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with atherosclerosis, but the relationship between SLE and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) remains unclear. We sought to investigate this relationship by comparing cardiovascular complications in patients with and without SLE.Data on patients from 2000 to 2011 were collected from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. The SLE cohort was frequency-matched according to age, sex, and history of diabetes mellitus (DM) with patients without SLE (control cohort). We evaluated the risk of cardiovascular complications, including hypertension, DM, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, coronary artery disease, and hyperlipidemia.The study included 10,144 patients with SLE and 10,144 control patients. The incidence of PAOD was 9.39-fold higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.70-11.15) in the SLE cohort than in the non-SLE cohort. Moreover, SLE was an independent risk factor for PAOD. The adjusted risk of PAOD was highest in patients with SLE who were aged ≤34 years (hazard ratio = 47.6, 95% CI = 26.8-84.4). The risk of PAOD was highest during the first year of follow-up and decreased over time.Patients with SLE exhibit a higher incidence and an independently higher risk of PAOD compared with the general population. The PAOD risk is markedly elevated in patients with SLE who are young and in whom the disease is at an early stage. PMID:26579830

  7. [Two cases with SLE and MCTD developed after a long period of chronic arthritis that was initially diagnosed as JRA].

    PubMed

    Takei, S; Maeno, N; Shigemori, M; Nakae, Y; Mori, H; Nerome, Y; Imanaka, H; Hokonohara, M; Miyata, K

    1997-10-01

    In order to discuss the diversity of clinical features and the difficulty in diagnosis of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), we present two cases who have documented the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) after a long period of disease characterized only by arthritis that was initially diagnosed as JRA. The first case was a girl diagnosed for her arthritic joints as polyarticular JRA at 15 years of age. At onset, she had Raynaud phenomenon but autoantibodies such as anti-nuclear antibody (ANA), anti-DNA antibody, and rheumatoid factor were negative. Five years after onset, she became ANA positive and 3 years later she became pregnant. During her pregnancy, she became positive for anti-DNA antibody without any signs of nephritis. One month after the delivery, however, she developed butterfly rash, carditis, nephritis, and was diagnosed as SLE. No destructive changes were observed in her joints though arthritis continued for 8 years form onset to pregnancy. The second case was a 3 years old girl who was diagnosed as polyarticular JRA. Treatment by aspirin induced complate remission after one year from the onset. However, 10 years after that remission, she developed Raynaud phenomenon and arthralgia in her knees and hip joints. Her laboratory findings showed hypergammaglobulinemia, positive ANA, positive anti-DNA antibody, positive anti-RNP antibody. She was eventually diagnosed as MCTD when she was found to have polymyositis by EMG and serum CK. In the present paper, two cases imply the difficulty in diagnosing JRA and diversity of rheumatic diseases such as JRA, SLE and MCTD. Closer and longer period of observation is essential for the JRA patients with nondestructive arthritis.

  8. [Cytokine production in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Müzes, G; González-Cabello, R; Van Vien, C; Fehér, J; Gergely, P

    1991-09-01

    The production of different cytokines, namely interleukin-2, interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha produced by peripheral immunocompetent cells was evaluated in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in active and inactive stage of the disease. The results obtained were compared to healthy controls. It has been found that lymphocytes from both groups of SLE patients produced similarly less interleukin-2 activity. Interleukin-1 activity of monocytes was significantly reduced only in patients with active stage of the disease, whereas tumor necrosis factor-alpha production was diminished even in cases of inactive SLE. The simultaneous detection of the above mentioned cytokines may indicate further details concerning immunoregulatory disturbances of systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:1923468

  9. Space Link Extension (SLE) Emulation for High-Throughput Network Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murawski, Robert; Tchorowski, Nicole; Golden, Bert

    2014-01-01

    As the data rate requirements for space communications increases, signicant stressis placed not only on the wireless satellite communication links, but also on the groundnetworks which forward data from end-users to remote ground stations. These wide areanetwork (WAN) connections add delay and jitter to the end-to-end satellite communicationlink, eects which can have signicant impacts on the wireless communication link. It isimperative that any ground communication protocol can react to these eects such that theground network does not become a bottleneck in the communication path to the satellite.In this paper, we present our SCENIC Emulation Lab testbed which was developed to testthe CCSDS SLE protocol implementations proposed for use on future NASA communica-tion networks. Our results show that in the presence of realistic levels of network delay,high-throughput SLE communication links can experience signicant data rate throttling.Based on our observations, we present some insight into why this data throttling happens,and trace the probable issue back to non-optimal blocking communication which is sup-ported by the CCSDS SLE API recommended practices. These issues were presented aswell to the SLE implementation developers which, based on our reports, developed a newrelease for SLE which we show xes the SLE blocking issue and greatly improves the pro-tocol throughput. In this paper, we also discuss future developments for our end-to-endemulation lab and how these improvements can be used to develop and test future spacecommunication technologies.

  10. Space Link Extension (SLE) Emulation for High-Throughput Network Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murawski, Robert W.; Tchorowski, Nicole; Golden, Bert

    2014-01-01

    As the data rate requirements for space communications increases, significant stress is placed not only on the wireless satellite communication links, but also on the ground networks which forward data from end-users to remote ground stations. These wide area network (WAN) connections add delay and jitter to the end-to-end satellite communication link, effects which can have significant impacts on the wireless communication link. It is imperative that any ground communication protocol can react to these effects such that the ground network does not become a bottleneck in the communication path to the satellite. In this paper, we present our SCENIC Emulation Lab testbed which was developed to test the CCSDS SLE protocol implementations proposed for use on future NASA communication networks. Our results show that in the presence of realistic levels of network delay, high-throughput SLE communication links can experience significant data rate throttling. Based on our observations, we present some insight into why this data throttling happens, and trace the probable issue back to non-optimal blocking communication which is sup-ported by the CCSDS SLE API recommended practices. These issues were presented as well to the SLE implementation developers which, based on our reports, developed a new release for SLE which we show fixes the SLE blocking issue and greatly improves the protocol throughput. In this paper, we also discuss future developments for our end-to-end emulation lab and how these improvements can be used to develop and test future space communication technologies.

  11. Personalized Immunomonitoring Uncovers Molecular Networks that Stratify Lupus Patients.

    PubMed

    Banchereau, Romain; Hong, Seunghee; Cantarel, Brandi; Baldwin, Nicole; Baisch, Jeanine; Edens, Michelle; Cepika, Alma-Martina; Acs, Peter; Turner, Jacob; Anguiano, Esperanza; Vinod, Parvathi; Kahn, Shaheen; Obermoser, Gerlinde; Blankenship, Derek; Wakeland, Edward; Nassi, Lorien; Gotte, Alisa; Punaro, Marilynn; Liu, Yong-Jun; Banchereau, Jacques; Rossello-Urgell, Jose; Wright, Tracey; Pascual, Virginia

    2016-04-21

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by loss of tolerance to nucleic acids and highly diverse clinical manifestations. To assess its molecular heterogeneity, we longitudinally profiled the blood transcriptome of 158 pediatric patients. Using mixed models accounting for repeated measurements, demographics, treatment, disease activity (DA), and nephritis class, we confirmed a prevalent IFN signature and identified a plasmablast signature as the most robust biomarker of DA. We detected gradual enrichment of neutrophil transcripts during progression to active nephritis and distinct signatures in response to treatment in different nephritis subclasses. Importantly, personalized immunomonitoring uncovered individual correlates of disease activity that enabled patient stratification into seven groups, supported by patient genotypes. Our study uncovers the molecular heterogeneity of SLE and provides an explanation for the failure of clinical trials. This approach may improve trial design and implementation of tailored therapies in genetically and clinically complex autoimmune diseases. PAPERCLIP. PMID:27040498

  12. Chronic arthritis in systemic lupus erythematosus: distinct features in 336 paediatric and 1830 adult patients.

    PubMed

    Gormezano, Natali W S; Silva, Clovis A; Aikawa, Nadia E; Barros, Diego L; da Silva, Mariana A; Otsuzi, Carini I; Kozu, Katia; Seguro, Luciana Parente; Pereira, Rosa M R; Bonfá, Eloisa

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess the frequency of chronic arthritis and compare the clinical and laboratory features in a large population of childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) and adult-onset (aSLE) patients. This historical study evaluated 336 cSLE and 1830 aSLE patients. Chronic arthritis was defined as synovitis of at least 6 weeks of duration. Rhupus was characterised as the association of SLE and chronic inflammatory arthritis with erosion and positive rheumatoid factor. Jaccoud's arthropathy is a non-erosive subluxation leading to severe deformity of the hands and feet. Data were compared using Student's t test or the Mann-Whitney test for continuous variables. For categorical variables, differences were assessed by Fisher's exact test and Pearson chi-square. Frequencies of chronic arthritis were similar in cSLE and aSLE (2.4 vs. 3.8%, p = 0.261). The median time from disease onset to appearance of chronic arthritis was shorter in cSLE (0 vs. 10 years, p < 0.001), and the median of age at chronic arthritis diagnosis was [10.8 (4.2-14.6) vs. 40 (21-67), p < 0.001]. The children presented with more chronic polyarthritis than the adults (75 vs. 32%, p = 0.024), a higher median number of joints with arthritis [8.5 (1-18) vs. 3 (1-9), p = 0.017] and a higher number of joints with limitation [1.5(0-24) vs. 0(0-4), p = 0.004]. The chronic arthritis diagnosis frequencies of hepatomegaly (25 vs. 0%, p = 0.009), splenomegaly (25 vs. 0%, p = 0.009), pericarditis (25 vs. 0%, p = 0.009), nephritis (37 vs. 3% , p = 0.006), haematuria (37 vs. 1.4%, p = 0.002), lupus anticoagulant (40 vs. 1.6%, p = 0.012), anticardiolipin IgM (40 vs. 1.5%, p = 0.012) and median Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) [10.5(1-20) vs. 6(4-16), p = 0.029] were higher in cSLE. Frequency of rhupus, (12 vs. 17%, p = 1.0), Jaccoud's arthropathy (0 vs. 17%, p = 0.343) and

  13. Serotonin content of platelets in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Correlation with clinical activity.

    PubMed

    Zeller, J; Weissbarth, E; Baruth, B; Mielke, H; Deicher, H

    1983-04-01

    Significantly decreased platelet serotonin contents were measured in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), progressive systemic sclerosis, and mixed connective tissue disease. An inverse relationship between platelet serotonin levels and clinical disease activity was observed in both rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. SLE patients with multiple organ involvement showed the lowest platelet serotonin values. No correlation was observed between platelet serotonin contents and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug treatment, presence of circulating platelet reactive IgG, or the amount of circulating immune complexes. The results are interpreted as indicating platelet release occurring in vivo during inflammatory episodes of the rheumatic disorders investigated. PMID:6838676

  14. Function of Treg Cells Decreased in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Due To the Effect of Prolactin

    PubMed Central

    Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Cervera-Castillo, Hernando; Zenteno-Galindo, Edgar; Barile-Fabris, Leonor; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Álvarez-Hernández, Everardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prolactin has different functions, including cytokine secretion and inhibition of the suppressor effect of regulatory T (Treg) cells in healthy individuals. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by defects in the functions of B, T, and Treg cells. Prolactin plays an important role in the physiopathology of SLE. Our objective was to establish the participation of prolactin in the regulation of the immune response mediated by Treg cells from patients with SLE. CD4+CD25hiCD127−/low cells were purified using magnetic beads and the relative expression of prolactin receptor was measured. The functional activity was evaluated by proliferation assay and cytokine secretion in activated cells, in the presence and absence of prolactin. We found that both percentage and function of Treg cells decrease in SLE patients compared to healthy individuals with statistical significance. The prolactin receptor is constitutively expressed on Treg and effector T (Teff) cells in SLE patients, and this expression is higher than in healthy individuals. The expression of this receptor differs in inactive and active patients: in the former, the expression is higher in Treg cells than in Teff cells, similar to healthy individuals, whereas there is no difference in the expression between Treg and Teff cells from active patients. In Treg:Teff cell cocultures, addition of prolactin decreases the suppressor effect exerted by Treg cells and increases IFNγ secretion. Our results suggest that prolactin plays an important role in the activation of the disease in inactive patients by decreasing the suppressor function exerted by Treg cells over Teff cells, thereby favoring an inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:26844452

  15. Function of Treg Cells Decreased in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Due To the Effect of Prolactin.

    PubMed

    Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Cervera-Castillo, Hernando; Zenteno-Galindo, Edgar; Barile-Fabris, Leonor; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Álvarez-Hernández, Everardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Prolactin has different functions, including cytokine secretion and inhibition of the suppressor effect of regulatory T (Treg) cells in healthy individuals. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by defects in the functions of B, T, and Treg cells. Prolactin plays an important role in the physiopathology of SLE. Our objective was to establish the participation of prolactin in the regulation of the immune response mediated by Treg cells from patients with SLE. CD4CD25CD127 cells were purified using magnetic beads and the relative expression of prolactin receptor was measured. The functional activity was evaluated by proliferation assay and cytokine secretion in activated cells, in the presence and absence of prolactin. We found that both percentage and function of Treg cells decrease in SLE patients compared to healthy individuals with statistical significance. The prolactin receptor is constitutively expressed on Treg and effector T (Teff) cells in SLE patients, and this expression is higher than in healthy individuals. The expression of this receptor differs in inactive and active patients: in the former, the expression is higher in Treg cells than in Teff cells, similar to healthy individuals, whereas there is no difference in the expression between Treg and Teff cells from active patients. In Treg:Teff cell cocultures, addition of prolactin decreases the suppressor effect exerted by Treg cells and increases IFNγ secretion. Our results suggest that prolactin plays an important role in the activation of the disease in inactive patients by decreasing the suppressor function exerted by Treg cells over Teff cells, thereby favoring an inflammatory microenvironment.

  16. Function of Treg Cells Decreased in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Due To the Effect of Prolactin.

    PubMed

    Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Cervera-Castillo, Hernando; Zenteno-Galindo, Edgar; Barile-Fabris, Leonor; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Álvarez-Hernández, Everardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Prolactin has different functions, including cytokine secretion and inhibition of the suppressor effect of regulatory T (Treg) cells in healthy individuals. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by defects in the functions of B, T, and Treg cells. Prolactin plays an important role in the physiopathology of SLE. Our objective was to establish the participation of prolactin in the regulation of the immune response mediated by Treg cells from patients with SLE. CD4CD25CD127 cells were purified using magnetic beads and the relative expression of prolactin receptor was measured. The functional activity was evaluated by proliferation assay and cytokine secretion in activated cells, in the presence and absence of prolactin. We found that both percentage and function of Treg cells decrease in SLE patients compared to healthy individuals with statistical significance. The prolactin receptor is constitutively expressed on Treg and effector T (Teff) cells in SLE patients, and this expression is higher than in healthy individuals. The expression of this receptor differs in inactive and active patients: in the former, the expression is higher in Treg cells than in Teff cells, similar to healthy individuals, whereas there is no difference in the expression between Treg and Teff cells from active patients. In Treg:Teff cell cocultures, addition of prolactin decreases the suppressor effect exerted by Treg cells and increases IFNγ secretion. Our results suggest that prolactin plays an important role in the activation of the disease in inactive patients by decreasing the suppressor function exerted by Treg cells over Teff cells, thereby favoring an inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:26844452

  17. Validation of the Japanese version of the Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire that includes physician-based assessments in a large observational cohort.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Y; Katsumata, Y; Baba, S; Kawaguchi, Y; Gono, T; Hanaoka, M; Kawasumi, H; Yamanaka, H

    2016-04-01

    The Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ) is a patient-reported outcome for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed to translate it into Japanese and further investigate its validity and reliability. The English version of the SLAQ was translated into Japanese and administered to Japanese SLE patients at our university clinic. Physicians assessed disease activity using the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K). The patients were prospectively followed for repeat assessment a year later. Ultimately, 255 patients participated. The patients' 10-point ratings of disease activity and SLAQ scores were significantly correlated (Spearman's ρ = 0.53). The SLAQ score was weakly correlated with the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K)-nolab (omitting laboratory items; ρ = 0.18) but not with the SLEDAI-2K (ρ = 0.02). These results suggested its convergent and discriminant validity. The SLAQ demonstrated acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.80), and good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.85). The effect sizes and the standardized response means of the SLAQ were as follows: clinical worsening, 0.26 and 0.31, and improvement, -0.39 and -0.41, respectively, which indicated a small but significant responsiveness. The Japanese version of the SLAQ demonstrated acceptable reliability and validity; its performance was comparable to that of the original version.

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Rituximab in Moderately-to-Severely Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Joan T.; Neuwelt, C. Michael; Wallace, Daniel J.; Shanahan, Joseph C.; Latinis, Kevin M.; Oates, James C.; Utset, Tammy O.; Gordon, Caroline; Isenberg, David A.; Hsieh, Hsin-Ju; Zhang, David; Brunetta, Paul G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective B cells are likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and rituximab induces depletion of B cells. The Exploratory Phase II/III SLE Evaluation of Rituximab (EXPLORER) trial tested the efficacy and safety of rituximab versus placebo in patients with moderately-to-severely active extrarenal SLE. Methods Patients entered with ≥1 British Isles Lupus Assessment Group (BILAG) A score or ≥2 BILAG B scores despite background immunosuppressant therapy, which was continued during the trial. Prednisone was added and subsequently tapered. Patients were randomized at a ratio of 2:1 to receive rituximab (1,000 mg) or placebo on days 1, 15, 168, and 182. Results In the intent-to-treat analysis of 257 patients, background treatment was evenly distributed among azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, and methotrexate. Fifty-three percent of the patients had ≥1 BILAG A score at entry, and 57% of the patients were categorized as being steroid dependent. No differences were observed between placebo and rituximab in the primary and secondary efficacy end points, including the BILAG-defined response, in terms of both area under the curve and landmark analyses. A beneficial effect of rituximab on the primary end point was observed in the African American and Hispanic subgroups. Safety and tolerability were similar in patients receiving placebo and those receiving rituximab. Conclusion The EXPLORER trial enrolled patients with moderately-to-severely active SLE and used aggressive background treatment and sensitive cutoffs for nonresponse. No differences were noted between placebo and rituximab in the primary and secondary end points. Further evaluation of patient subsets, biomarkers, and exploratory outcome models may improve the design of future SLE clinical trials. PMID:20039413

  19. Lymphopaenia, anti-Ro/anti-RNP autoantibodies, renal involvement and cyclophosphamide use correlate with increased risk of herpes zoster in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Hu, Stephen Chu-Sung; Lin, Chi-Ling; Lu, Yi-Wei; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Yu, Hsin-Su; Wu, Ching-Shuang; Lan, Cheng-Che E

    2013-05-01

    Herpes zoster occurs with increased frequency in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The aim of this study was to identify and evaluate clinical and laboratory risk factors associated with development of herpes zoster in patients with SLE. A retrospective case-control study was performed in a population of patients with SLE. Patients were identified as cases if their first episode of herpes zoster occurred after diagnosis of SLE. Patients with SLE who never developed herpes zoster were enrolled as controls. Medical charts and laboratory data for both cases and control patients were comprehensively reviewed. A total of 65 cases and 105 controls were included. Risk factors associated with the development of herpes zoster in patients with SLE were found to be lymphopaenia, anti-Ro antibodies, anti-RNP antibodies, neuropsychiatric manifestations, renal involvement and cyclophosphamide use. Therefore, the presence of certain disease manifestations in patients with SLE represents risk factors for the development of herpes zoster.

  20. Anti-SSB/La is one of the antineutrophil autoantibodies responsible for neutropenia and functional impairment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, S-C; Yu, H-S; Lin, W-W; Sun, K-H; Tsai, C-Y; Huang, D-F; Tsai, Y-Y; Yu, C-L

    2003-01-01

    Decreased number and impaired functions of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) due to the presence of anti-PMN autoantibodies in the serum render patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptible to bacterial infections. However, the cognate antigens and pathological mechanisms of anti-PMN autoantibodies in SLE are rarely reported in the literature. In this study, we found approximately 20% of SLE sera contained anti-PMN autoantibodies detected by human PMN-coated cellular ELISA. A membrane protein with molecular weight of 50 kDa was identified as the cognate antigen of anti-PMN in Western blot after membrane-biotinylation and streptavidin column elution. The 50 kDa molecule was proved to be SSB/La after immunoscreening, molecular cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the gene from the human leucocyte cDNA library. Human anti-SSB/La autoantibodies purified from active SLE sera passing through the recombinant SSB/La conjugated Sepharose 4B affinity column could bind and penetrate into normal human PMN. Functional analysis revealed that the anti-SSB/La autoantibodies exerted a number of potent effects on human PMN, including suppressed phagocytosis, accelerated apoptosis and enhanced IL-8 production. These in vitro results suggest that anti-SSB/La is one of the anti-PMN autoantibodies capable of penetrating into PMN and responsible for neutropenia and functional impairment of PMN in patients with SLE. PMID:12605705

  1. Design for learning: deconstructing virtual patient activities.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Davies, David

    2011-01-01

    Digital technologies are used in almost every aspect of contemporary health professional education (HPE) but our understanding of their true potential as instructional tools rather than administrative tools has not significantly advanced in the last decade. One notable exception to this has been the rise of the 'virtual patient' as an educational intervention in HPE. This article attempts to deconstruct the virtual patient concept by developing a model of virtual patients as artifacts with intrinsic encoded properties and emergent constructed properties that build on the core concept of 'activity'.

  2. Systemic lupus erythematosus and primary fibromyalgia can be distinguished by testing for cell-bound complement activation products

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Daniel J; Silverman, Stuart L; Conklin, John; Barken, Derren; Dervieux, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Objective We sought to establish the performance of cell-bound complement activation products (CB-CAPs) as a diagnostic tool to distinguish primary fibromyalgia (FM) from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods A total of 75 SLE and 75 primary FM adult subjects who fulfilled appropriate classification criteria were enrolled prospectively. CB-CAPs (erythrocyte-C4d (EC4d) and B-lymphocyte-C4d (BC4d)) were determined by flow cytometry. Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) were determined using indirect immunofluorescence while other autoantibodies were determined by solid-phase assays. The CB-CAPs in a multi-analyte assay with algorithm (MAAA) relied on two consecutive tiers of analysis that was reported as an overall positive or negative assessment. Test performance was assessed using sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR). Results ANAs yielded 80% positives for SLE and 33% positives for FM. High CB-CAP expression (EC4d >14 units or BC4d >60 units) was 43% sensitive and 96% specific for SLE. The CB-CAPs in MAAA assessment was evaluable in 138 of the 150 subjects enrolled (92%) and yielded 60% sensitivity (CI 95% 48% to 72%) for SLE with no FM patient testing positive (100% specificity). A positive test result was associated with a strong positive LR for SLE (>24, CI 95%; 6 to 102), while a negative test result was associated with a moderate negative LR (0.40; CI 95% 0.30 to 0.54). Conclusion Our data indicate that CB-CAPs in MAAA can distinguish FM from SLE. PMID:26870391

  3. Targeted therapeutics in SLE: emerging strategies to modulate the interferon pathway

    PubMed Central

    Oon, Shereen; Wilson, Nicholas J; Wicks, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypic autoimmune disease characterized by impaired immune tolerance, resulting in the generation of pathogenic autoantibodies and immune complexes. Although autoreactive B lymphocytes have been the first targets for biologic therapies in SLE, the importance of the innate immune system, and in particular, pathways involved in interferon (IFN) signaling, has emerged. There are now data supporting a central role for a plasmacytoid dendritic cell-derived type I IFN pathway in SLE, with a number of biologic therapeutics and small-molecule inhibitors undergoing clinical trials. Monoclonal antibodies targeting IFN-α have completed phase II clinical trials, and an antibody against the type I IFN receptor is entering a phase III trial. However, other IFNs, such as IFN gamma, and the more recently discovered type III IFNs, are also emerging as targets in SLE; and blockade of upstream components of the IFN signaling pathway may enable inhibition of more than one IFN subtype. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of IFNs in SLE, focusing on emerging therapies. PMID:27350879

  4. Disease Activity and Damage are not Associated with Increased Levels of Fatigue in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients from LUMINA LXVII, a Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, Paula I.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; McGwin, Gerald; Crews, Kendra Q.; Reveille, John D.; Vilá, Luis M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the factors associated with increased levels of fatigue over the course of the disease in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients from LUMINA (Lupus in Minorities: Nature versus Nurture), a longitudinal multiethnic cohort. Methods Patients with SLE (American College of Rheumatology revised and updated criteria), age ≥16 years, disease duration ≤ 5 years at entry into the cohort (T0), of Hispanic (Texan or Puerto Rican), African America or Caucasian ethnicity, were studied. The association between socioeconomic-demographic, health behaviors, behavioral and psychological, functional and clinical characteristics and fatigue was examined using generalized estimating equations to account for the longitudinal nature of the data. Results Five-hundred and fifteen patients (~91% female) contributed 2,609 visits to these analyses; there were: 93 (18.1%) Texan Hispanics, 101 (19.6%) Puerto Rican Hispanics, 169 (32.8%) African Americans, and 152 (29.5%) Caucasians; the patients mean (SD) age and follow up time were 37.2 (12.0) and 4.7 (3.2) years, respectively. Variables associated with increased levels of fatigue in the multivariable analyses were Caucasian ethnicity, the presence of constitutional symptoms(fever, weight loss), higher levels of pain, of abnormal illness-related behaviors and of helplessness (p’s between 0.0018 and <0.0001). Conclusions The presence of pain, abnormal illness-related behaviors, helplessness and constitutional manifestations were associated with increased levels of fatigue; however, lupus specific measures, such as disease activity and damage were not. Interventions aimed at decreasing fatigue need to take into account these findings. PMID:19714612

  5. Prevalence of symptoms of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and of fluorescent antinuclear antibodies associated with chronic exposure to trichloroethylene and other chemicals in well water

    SciTech Connect

    Kilburn, K.H.; Warshaw, R.H. )

    1992-02-01

    Criteria for the recognition of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were applied to 362 subjects exposed to trichloroethylene, trichloroethane, inorganic chromium, and other chemicals in water obtained from wells in an industrially contaminated aquifer in Tucson, Arizona. Their antinuclear autoantibodies were measured by fluorescence (FANA) in serum. Ten patients with clinical SLE and/or other collagen-vascular diseases were considered separately. Results were compared to an Arizona control group, to published series, and to laboratory controls. Frequencies of each of 10 ARA symptoms were higher in exposed subjects than in any comparison group except those with clinical SLE. The number of subjects with 4 or more symptoms was 2.3 times higher compared to referent women and men. FANA titers > 1:80 was approximately 2.3 times higher in women but equally frequent in men as in laboratory controls. ARA score and FANA rank were correlated with a coefficient (cc) of .1251, r{sup 2} = .0205 in women and this correlation was almost statistically significant in men cc = .1282, r{sup 2} = .0253. In control men and women neither correlation was significant. Long-term low-dose exposure to TCE and other chemicals in contaminated well water significantly increased symptoms of lupus erthematosus as perceived by the ARA score and the increased FANA titers.

  6. Similarities and differences between selective and nonselective BAFF blockade in murine SLE

    PubMed Central

    Ramanujam, Meera; Wang, Xiaobo; Huang, Weiqing; Liu, Zheng; Schiffer, Lena; Tao, Haiou; Frank, Daniel; Rice, Jeffrey; Diamond, Betty; Yu, Karl O.A.; Porcelli, Steven; Davidson, Anne

    2006-01-01

    B cells have multiple roles in immune activation and inflammation separate from their capacity to produce antibodies. B cell depletion is currently under intense investigation as a therapeutic strategy for autoimmune diseases. The TNF family members B cell–activating factor of the TNF family (BAFF) and its homolog A proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) are B cell survival and differentiation factors and are therefore rational therapeutic targets. We compared the effects of BAFF receptor–Ig, which blocks only BAFF, with those of transmembrane activator and calcium modulator ligand interactor–Ig, which blocks both BAFF and APRIL, in a murine SLE model. Both reagents prolonged the life of NZB/W F1 mice when given either before or after disease onset. Many immunologic effects of the 2 reagents were similar, including B cell and B cell subset depletion and prevention of the progressive T cell activation and dendritic cell accumulation that occurs with age in NZB/W mice without substantial effects on the emergence of the IgG anti–double-stranded DNA response. Furthermore, both reagents inhibited the T cell–independent marginal zone B cell response to particulate antigen delivered i.v., but not the B1 B cell response to the same antigen delivered i.p. In contrast, blockade of both BAFF and APRIL, but not blockade of BAFF alone, reduced the serum levels of IgM antibodies, decreased the frequency of plasma cells in the spleen, and inhibited the IgM response to a T cell–dependent antigen. The differences between selective and nonselective BAFF blockade are relevant to the choice of a BAFF blocking agent for the treatment of autoimmune and malignant diseases. PMID:16485042

  7. Sicca symptoms in Thai patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma: a comparison with age-matched controls and correlation with disease variables.

    PubMed

    Wangkaew, Suparaporn; Kasitanon, Nuntana; Sivasomboon, Chate; Wichainun, Ramjai; Sukitawut, Waraporn; Louthrenoo, Worawit

    2006-12-01

    This study was performed to determine the prevalence of ocular and oral sicca symptoms in Thai patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and scleroderma (Scl). The ocular symptoms and sign (the Schirmer's 1 test) and the oral sicca symptoms and sign (the Saxon's test) in each of 50 RA, SLE and Scl patients were compared with their age-matched controls. The correlation between the presence of sicca symptoms and signs with their clinical activity was also determined. Ocular sicca symptoms were found more common in patients with RA (38% vs 18%, p < 0.05), SLE (36% vs 14%, p < 0.05) and Scl (54% vs 16%, p < 0.01), and oral sicca symptoms were found more common in SLE (22% vs 0%, p < 0.01), and Scl (16% vs 4%, p < 0.05) than their controls. However, only RA patients had a significantly higher proportion of positive Schimer-1 test compared with their controls (p < 0.01). There was no strong correlation between sicca symptoms or signs and other clinical or laboratory variables (age, disease duration, disease activity, disease severity, and antibody to Ro and La antigens) in these three groups. In conclusion, sicca symptoms were seen significantly more common in Thai patients with connective tissue diseases, but the symptoms did not show a good correlation with the clinical and laboratory variables.

  8. Induction of mucosal tolerance in SLE: A sniff or a sip away from ameliorating lupus?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Henry Yim

    2009-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by aberrant immune responses against intracellularly derived self antigens. Treatment for SLE relies on the use of aggressive immunosuppressants and steroids that are nonspecific and can cause serious adverse effects. The observation that a systemic immune tolerance to self antigens or generation of regulatory T cells may follow mucosal (nasal or oral) exposure to self proteins or monoclonal antibody against CD3 respectively suggests that induction of mucosal tolerance offers the basis of a side effect free therapy that could re-establish the ability to distinguish self from non-self and restore peripheral tolerance in individuals susceptible to developing autoimmune diseases. Here I review studies on mucosal tolerance in autoimmune diseases and discuss the therapeutic potential of inducing tolerance for the treatment of SLE. PMID:18938110

  9. Evaluation of the P Wave Axis in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Rezzan Deniz; Bulut, Mustafa; Acar, Şencan; Izci, Servet; Fidan, Serdar; Yesin, Mahmut; Efe, Suleyman Cagan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: P wave axis is one of the most practical clinical tool for evaluation of cardiovascular disease. The aim of our study was to evaluate the P wave axis in electrocardiogram (ECG), left atrial function and association between the disease activity score in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods: Standard 12-lead surface ECGs were recorded by at a paper speed of 25 m/s and an amplifier gain of 10 mm/mV. The heart rate (HR), the duration of PR, QRS, QTd (dispersion), the axis of P wave were measured by ECG machine automatically. Results: The P wave axis was significantly increased in patients with SLE (49 ± 20 vs. 40 ± 18, P = 0.037) and the disease activity score was found positively correlated with P wave axis (r: 0.382, P = 0.011). The LA volume and the peak systolic strain of the left atrium (LA) were statistically different between the groups (P = 0.024 and P = 0.000). The parameters of the diastolic function; E/A and E/e’ were better in the control group than the patients with SLE (1.1 ± 0.3 vs. 1.3 ± 0.3, P = 0.041 and 6.6 ± 2.8 vs. 5.4 ± 1.4, P = 0.036, respectively). Conclusion: P wave axis was found significantly increased in patients with SLE and positively correlated with SELENA-SLEDAI score. As the risk score increases in patients with SLE, P wave axis changes which may predict the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. PMID:26702344

  10. Is lipstick associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)?

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Kay, Ashley B; Fletcher, Jeremiah; Formica, Margaret K; McAlindon, Timothy E

    2008-09-01

    Lipstick use has been hypothesized to be a risk factor of developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective of this study was to investigate the association between lipstick use and risk of SLE. We performed an Internet-based case-control study of SLE with Google users searching on medical key terms as the source population. Cases were diagnosed within 5 years and met > or =4 ACR criteria for SLE by medical record review. Controls were matched to cases on age, gender, race, ethnicity, region of residence, reference year, education, and income using propensity score. Demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors were collected using an online questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression models were used for the analyses with smoking, alcohol consumption, permanent hair dye use, and chemical hair straightener use adjusted. The analysis included 124 cases and 248 matched controls of whom 96% were females and 81% were whites. The median of disease duration was 2 years (range 0-4 years). Using lipstick at least 3 days/week was significantly associated with increased risk of SLE (adjusted OR = 1.71, 95%CI = 1.04-2.82). There was a trend of greater risk with earlier age of initiation of lipstick use (<16 years vs. never use; OR = 1.95, 95%CI = 1.01-3.76, p trend = 0.02) and with increased frequency of use (7 days/week vs. never use; OR = 1.75, 95%CI = 0.89-3.44, p trend = 0.07). Biologic effects of chemicals present in lipsticks absorbed across the buccal mucosa and confounding from unmeasured lifestyle factors could be the explanation of this association. Epidemiologic studies of SLE should include this exposure in exploring its environmental triggers.

  11. Is lipstick associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)?

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Kay, Ashley B; Fletcher, Jeremiah; Formica, Margaret K; McAlindon, Timothy E

    2008-09-01

    Lipstick use has been hypothesized to be a risk factor of developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective of this study was to investigate the association between lipstick use and risk of SLE. We performed an Internet-based case-control study of SLE with Google users searching on medical key terms as the source population. Cases were diagnosed within 5 years and met > or =4 ACR criteria for SLE by medical record review. Controls were matched to cases on age, gender, race, ethnicity, region of residence, reference year, education, and income using propensity score. Demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors were collected using an online questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression models were used for the analyses with smoking, alcohol consumption, permanent hair dye use, and chemical hair straightener use adjusted. The analysis included 124 cases and 248 matched controls of whom 96% were females and 81% were whites. The median of disease duration was 2 years (range 0-4 years). Using lipstick at least 3 days/week was significantly associated with increased risk of SLE (adjusted OR = 1.71, 95%CI = 1.04-2.82). There was a trend of greater risk with earlier age of initiation of lipstick use (<16 years vs. never use; OR = 1.95, 95%CI = 1.01-3.76, p trend = 0.02) and with increased frequency of use (7 days/week vs. never use; OR = 1.75, 95%CI = 0.89-3.44, p trend = 0.07). Biologic effects of chemicals present in lipsticks absorbed across the buccal mucosa and confounding from unmeasured lifestyle factors could be the explanation of this association. Epidemiologic studies of SLE should include this exposure in exploring its environmental triggers. PMID:18523821

  12. Is lipstick associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)?

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Ashley B.; Fletcher, Jeremiah; Formica, Margaret K.; McAlindon, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Lipstick use has been hypothesized to be a risk factor of developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective of this study was to investigate the association between lipstick use and risk of SLE. We performed an Internet-based case–control study of SLE with Google™ users searching on medical key terms as the source population. Cases were diagnosed within 5 years and met ≥4 ACR criteria for SLE by medical record review. Controls were matched to cases on age, gender, race, ethnicity, region of residence, reference year, education, and income using propensity score. Demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors were collected using an online questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression models were used for the analyses with smoking, alcohol consumption, permanent hair dye use, and chemical hair straightener use adjusted. The analysis included 124 cases and 248 matched controls of whom 96% were females and 81% were whites. The median of disease duration was 2 years (range 0–4 years). Using lipstick at least 3 days/week was significantly associated with increased risk of SLE (adjusted OR = 1.71, 95%CI = 1.04–2.82). There was a trend of greater risk with earlier age of initiation of lipstick use (<16 years vs. never use; OR = 1.95, 95%CI = 1.01–3.76, p trend = 0.02) and with increased frequency of use (7 days/week vs. never use; OR = 1.75, 95%CI = 0.89–3.44, p trend = 0.07). Biologic effects of chemicals present in lipsticks absorbed across the buccal mucosa and confounding from unmeasured lifestyle factors could be the explanation of this association. Epidemiologic studies of SLE should include this exposure in exploring its environmental triggers. PMID:18523821

  13. Satisfaction with control of systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis: physician and patient perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mozaffarian, Neelufar; Lobosco, Steve; Lu, Peng; Roughley, Adam; Alperovich, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patient satisfaction with disease control of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an important component of medical management. This analysis evaluated patient and physician satisfaction with disease control of SLE, factors associated with satisfaction/dissatisfaction, and the degree of physician–patient concordance of these parameters. Patients and methods Data were extracted from the US Adelphi Real World Lupus Disease Specific Programme®, a cross-sectional survey of 50 rheumatologists, 25 nephrologists, and their patients with non-nephritis SLE (NNSLE) or lupus nephritis (LN). Results Physicians reported moderate or severe disease activity in 25.0% of patients with NNSLE and in 50.5% of patients with LN, and were satisfied with disease control in 78.6% (132/168) and 73.8% (152/206) of patients, respectively. For patients, 75.8% (75/99) with NNSLE were satisfied with their current treatment, compared with 65.5% (74/113) with LN. Physician–patient agreement (70.7%) on the level of satisfaction was “slight” (kappa =0.1445) for NNSLE; patients were more frequently dissatisfied than physicians with regard to joint tenderness, fatigue, anxiety, pain on movement, malar rash, and photosensitivity. Physician–patient agreement (71.4%) on the level of satisfaction was “fair” (kappa =0.3695) for LN; patients expressed greater dissatisfaction than physicians for headache, photosensitivity, and anxiety, whereas physicians were more dissatisfied with regard to joint swelling, kidney function, and blood pressure control. In general, patients with NNSLE or LN who were dissatisfied (or whose physicians were dissatisfied) were more likely to have joint swelling, joint stiffness, malar rash, hair loss, depression, and fatigue, have moderate or severe disease, or to be currently experiencing disease flare. Conclusion These data highlight the patient and physician dissatisfaction with real-world disease control of SLE. PMID:27784995

  14. Link-Polymorphism of 5-HTT Promoter Region Is Associated with Autoantibodies in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Chen, Fan; Cheng, Yuqi; Lai, Aiyun; Lu, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) was reported to associate with depression in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients by our team. To explore whether 5-HTTLPR plays a role in the pathogenesis of SLE, we tested 138 SLE patients and 138 age and sex matched health controls (HCs) for 5-HTTLPR by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and agarose gel electrophoresis. Interestingly, the results suggest that the frequencies of SS genotype and S allele in SLE patients with positive anti-Sm antibody and anti-U1RNP antibody were both significantly higher than the other genotypes and alleles. However, the frequencies of 5-HTTLPR genotypes and alleles were of no significant difference between SLE patients and HCs. This suggested that 5-HTTLPR was not a high-risk susceptible gene in SLE but might relate to SLE by affecting production of some autoantibodies, especially anti-Sm and anti-U1RNP antibody.

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists in the prevention and treatment of murine systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Aprahamian, Tamar R; Bonegio, Ramon G; Weitzner, Zachary; Gharakhanian, Raffi; Rifkin, Ian R

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists are known to have many immunomodulatory effects. We have previously shown that the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone is beneficial when used early in prevention of disease in murine models of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and SLE-related atherosclerosis. In this report, we demonstrate that another PPARγ agonist, pioglitazone is also beneficial as a treatment for early murine lupus, indicating that this is a class effect and not agent-specific. We further attempt to define the ability of PPARγ agonists to ameliorate established or severe autoimmune disease using two mouse models: the MRL.lpr SLE model and the gld.apoE−/− model of accelerated atherosclerosis and SLE. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the marked amelioration of disease seen when PPARγ agonist treatment was started before disease onset, treatment with rosiglitazone after disease onset in MRL.lpr or gld.apoE−/− mice had minimal beneficial effect on the development of the autoimmune phenotype; however, rosiglitazone treatment remained highly effective at reducing lupus-associated atherosclerosis in gld.apoE−/− mice after disease onset or when mice were maintained on a high cholesterol Western diet. These results suggest that beneficial effects of PPARγ agonists on the development of autoimmunity might be limited to the early stages of disease, but that atherosclerosis, a major cause of death in SLE patients, may be ameliorated even in established or severe disease. PMID:24456224

  16. CTLA-4 polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE): a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jin-Xia; Zou, Li-Wei; Zhang, Zhao-Xiang; Fan, Wen-Jing; Wang, Han-Yong; Liu, Ting; Ren, Zheng; Dai, Rui-Xue; Ye, Dongqing

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to summarize results on the association of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) promoter exon-1 +49 and 1722T/C polymorphism with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility by using the meta-analysis. We searched all the publications about the association between CTLA-4) promoter exon-1 +49 and 1722T/C polymorphism and SLE from PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Wanfang (Chinese). Previous CTLA-4 association studies with SLE, however, have produced inconsistent results. We have performed a meta-analysis to better assess the purported associations. A total of 17 independent studies (to June 2012) testing association between one or more CTLA-4 polymorphisms and SLE were used in this analysis. We have compared allele and genotype frequencies at two polymorphic sites found in exon-1 (at +49) and the promoter region (at -1722). The data demonstrate that the exon-1 +49 polymorphism is associated with SLE susceptibility in Asian population. The overall risk, measured by odds ratio (OR), stratification by ethnicity indicates the exon-1 +49 GG+GA genotype is associated with SLE, at least in Asians (OR = 0.85, 95 % CI = 0.73-0.99, P = 0.04 for GG+GA vs. AA; OR = 0.85, 95 % CI = 0.72-1.00, P = 0.05 for AG vs. AA). Similar trends are found in allele-specific risk estimates and disease association. Overall, there was significant association between the 1722T/C polymorphism and overall SLE risks (OR = 0.78, 95 % CI = 0.63-0.97, P = 0.04 for GG+GA vs. AA, OR = 0.87, 95 % CI = 0.76-0.99, P = 0.04 for G vs. A) in Asian population.In summary, this meta-analysis demonstrates that the CTLA-4 promoter +49A/G and promoter -1722C/T polymorphism may confer susceptibility to SLE, especially in Asian-derived population.

  17. Gamma-N activation of cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Meek, A.G.; Moskowitz, M.; Cohn, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    High energy gamma radiation (8 to 30 MeV) is gaining acceptance for radiation therapy of patients with deep cancers. This radiation is of sufficient energy to induce photonuclear activation of the elements in the human body. Our results of measurements of nitrogen and phosphorus in an anthropomorphic phantom, a cadaver, and a cancer patient with bremsstrahlung radiation from 15 MeV electrons demonstrate the feasibility of a method to monitor these two elements in the human body in vivo by measuring the radioactivity induced in these targets by photonuclear reactions. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Psychometric validation of the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in the United States.

    PubMed

    Naegeli, A N; Tomaszewski, E L; Al Sawah, S

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) in patients with moderate-to-severe systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients ≥18 years old who self-reported a physician diagnosis of SLE (confirmed by medical record review) and active SLE (Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ) score of ≥11) were included. The BPI-SF and Short Form Health Survey version 2 (SF-36v2) were administered electronically at baseline, week 2 and week 12. Psychometric properties of the BPI-SF were evaluated. Cronbach alphas were >0.9 for all BPI-SF items, domains and total score. Test-retest reliability correlations for responses between baseline and week 2 of the BPI-SF had intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) ≥0.5. The BPI-SF domains and total score were moderately positively correlated to the SLAQ score (r ≥ 0.4), but negatively correlated to the SF-36v2 bodily pain domain (r ≤ -0.6). The BPI-SF domains and total score were moderately negatively correlated to the SF-36v2 physical functioning domain and physical component summary (r ≤ -0.4), with low correlations between the BPI-SF severity domain and SF-36v2 mental component summary (r = -0.16). Assessment of pain, as measured by the BPI-SF, demonstrated validity and reliability in a sample of patients with moderate-to-severe SLE.

  19. Stress as a trigger of disease flares in SLE.

    PubMed

    Roussou, E; Iacovou, C; Weerakoon, A; Ahmed, K

    2013-05-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were asked to report their perceptions as to whether stress can trigger disease flares. A total of 54 patients treated at two District General Hospitals in Essex were included in the analysis. They were 4 males and 50 females and were 20 Caucasians, 22 Asians, and 12 Africans/Afro-Caribbean. Thirty-three of 54 patients (61.1%) reported stress to be a trigger for disease flares. Although most (85%) of the Caucasian patients reported that stress triggered their disease flares, only 50% of the African/Afro-Caribbean patients and 45.4% of the Asian patients reported stress as a trigger for disease flares. No correlation was found between reported number of flares per year and characteristics such as age (P = 0.4), age at diagnosis (P = 0.8), age at disease onset (P = 0.6), or disease duration (P = 0.2). A trend towards a significant correlation was observed between the number of reported flares per year and the number of children a patient has (P = 0.07).

  20. Inflammasome activation of IL-18 results in endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kahlenberg, J Michelle; Thacker, Seth G; Berthier, Celine C; Cohen, Clemens D; Kretzler, Matthias; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2011-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with heterogeneous manifestations including severe organ damage and vascular dysfunction leading to premature atherosclerosis. IFN-α has been proposed to have an important role in the development of lupus and lupus-related cardiovascular disease, partly by repression of IL-1 pathways leading to impairments in vascular repair induced by endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating angiogenic cells (CACs). Counterintuitively, SLE patients also display transcriptional upregulation of the IL-1β/IL-18 processing machinery, the inflammasome. To understand this dichotomy and its impact on SLE-related cardiovascular disease, we examined cultures of human and murine control or lupus EPC/CACs to determine the role of the inflammasome in endothelial differentiation. We show that caspase-1 inhibition improves dysfunctional SLE EPC/CAC differentiation into mature endothelial cells and blocks IFN-α-mediated repression of this differentiation, implicating inflammasome activation as a crucial downstream pathway leading to aberrant vasculogenesis. Furthermore, serum IL-18 levels are elevated in SLE and correlate with EPC/CAC dysfunction. Exogenous IL-18 inhibits endothelial differentiation in control EPC/CACs and neutralization of IL-18 in SLE EPC/CAC cultures restores their capacity to differentiate into mature endothelial cells, supporting a deleterious effect of IL-18 on vascular repair in vivo. Upregulation of the inflammasome machinery was operational in vivo, as evidenced by gene array analysis of lupus nephritis biopsies. Thus, the effects of IFN-α are complex and contribute to an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease by suppression of IL-1β pathways and by upregulation of the inflammasome machinery and potentiation of IL-18 activation.

  1. Functional neuronal network activity differs with cognitive dysfunction in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Neuropsychiatric manifestations are common in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE) and often include neurocognitive dysfunction (NCD). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can measure brain activation during tasks that invoke domains of cognitive function impaired by cSLE. This study investigates specific changes in brain function attributable to NCD in cSLE that have potential to serve as imaging biomarkers. Methods Formal neuropsychological testing was done to measure cognitive ability and to identify NCD. Participants performed fMRI tasks probing three cognitive domains impacted by cSLE: visuoconstructional ability (VCA), working memory, and attention. Imaging data, collected on 3-Tesla scanners, included a high-resolution T1-weighted anatomic reference image followed by a T2*-weighted whole-brain echo planar image series for each fMRI task. Brain activation using blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast was compared between cSLE patients with NCD (NCD-group, n = 7) vs. without NCD (noNCD-group, n = 14) using voxel-wise and region of interest-based analyses. The relationship of brain activation during fMRI tasks and performance in formal neuropsychological testing was assessed. Results Greater brain activation was observed in the noNCD-group vs. NCD-group during VCA and working memory fMRI tasks. Conversely, compared to the noNCD-group, the NCD-group showed more brain activation during the attention fMRI task. In region of interest analysis, brain activity during VCA and working memory fMRI tasks was positively associated with the participants' neuropsychological test performance. In contrast, brain activation during the attention fMRI task was negatively correlated with neuropsychological test performance. While the NCD group performed worse than the noNCD group during VCA and working memory tasks, the attention task was performed equally well by both groups. Conclusions NCD in patients with cSLE is characterized by

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, KMC CONTROLS, INC. SLE-1001 SIGHT GLASS MONITOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the KMC SLE-1001 Sight Glass Monitor manufactured by KMC Controls, Inc. The sight glass monitor (SGM) fits over the sight glass that may be installed in a refrigeration system for the pur...

  3. Mycophenolate mofetil prevents a clinical relapse in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus at risk

    PubMed Central

    Bijl, M; Horst, G; Bootsma, H; Limburg, P; Kallenberg, C

    2003-01-01

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterised by the presence of antibodies to double stranded DNA (dsDNA), which are involved in the pathogenesis of SLE. Previous studies showed that at least two thirds of patients develop a clinical relapse within six months after a significant rise in the anti-dsDNA level, and most relapses were prevented by the administration of corticosteroids at the time of the rise. Objective: To determine whether mofetil mycophenolate (MMF) can prevent a clinical relapse without the side effects associated with corticosteroids. Methods: 36 patients with SLE were examined monthly to determine whether a rise in anti-dsDNA level had occurred. A rise was defined as an increase of 25% of the level of the previous sample of at least 15 IU/ml within a four month period. After a rise patients were treated with MMF 2000 mg daily for six months. Patients were monitored monthly for the occurrence of a clinical relapse and to assess the serological activity and state of activation of CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ lymphocyte subsets. Results: Anti-dsDNA rose in 10 patients. Treatment with MMF was started in all these patients, and after six months no clinical relapse had occurred. Side effects were minimal. Antibodies to dsDNA decreased during the treatment (p<0.001), associated with a decrease in the state of activation of CD19+ lymphocytes. No changes were found in the state of activation of CD4+ or CD8+ lymphocyte subsets. Conclusion: Administration of MMF after a rise in antibodies to dsDNA is well tolerated, decreases anti-dsDNA and B cell activation, and seems to prevent the occurrence of a clinical relapse in patients with SLE. PMID:12759290

  4. Impaired catecholaminergic signalling of B lymphocytes in patients with chronic rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wahle, M; Kolker, S; Krause, A; Burmester, G; Baerwald, C

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate further the influence of the autonomic nervous system on chronic rheumatic diseases.
METHODS—The density and affinity of β2 adrenergic receptors (β2R) on CD19+ lymphocytes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and systemic sclerosis (SSc), as well as intracellular cAMP levels in patients with RA and SLE, were determined. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were separated from venous blood of patients and healthy controls by Ficoll-Hypaque density centrifugation. CD19+ lymphocytes were purified by magnetic cell sorting, and β2R were determined by a radioligand binding assay with [125I]iodocyanopindolol. Intracellular cAMP levels and β2R agonist induced cell death were measured by a radioimmunoassay and flow cytometry using annexin-V binding, respectively. Systemic disease activity of the patients was evaluated using multifactorial scoring systems.
RESULTS—The density of β2R on peripheral CD19+ lymphocytes was significantly decreased in patients with RA, SLE, and SSc compared with healthy controls. In patients with RA and SSc β2R density was negatively correlated with systemic disease activity. Furthermore, although basal intracellular cAMP levels were raised in patients with RA and SLE, the increase of cAMP upon stimulation of β2R was significantly reduced in these patients compared with control subjects. Preliminary data suggest that β2R agonist induced cell death is diminished in patients with RA exhibiting decreased β2R densities.
CONCLUSIONS—The results of this study show a reduction of β2R densities on B lymphocytes mirrored by an impaired intracellular cAMP generation in patients with chronic rheumatic diseases, indicating a decreased influence of the autonomic nervous system on B cells in these conditions.

 PMID:11302874

  5. Identification of MAMDC1 as a Candidate Susceptibility Gene for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

    PubMed Central

    Hellquist, Anna; Zucchelli, Marco; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Saarialho-Kere, Ulpu; Järvinen, Tiina M.; Koskenmies, Sari; Julkunen, Heikki; Onkamo, Päivi; Skoog, Tiina; Panelius, Jaana; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Hasan, Taina; Widen, Elisabeth; Gunnarson, Iva; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Padyukov, Leonid; Assadi, Ghazaleh; Berglind, Linda; Mäkelä, Ville-Veikko; Kivinen, Katja; Wong, Andrew; Cunningham Graham, Deborah S.; Vyse, Timothy J.; D'Amato, Mauro; Kere, Juha

    2009-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disorder with multiple susceptibility genes. We have previously reported suggestive linkage to the chromosomal region 14q21-q23 in Finnish SLE families. Principal Findings Genetic fine mapping of this region in the same family material, together with a large collection of parent affected trios from UK and two independent case-control cohorts from Finland and Sweden, indicated that a novel uncharacterized gene, MAMDC1 (MAM domain containing glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor 2, also known as MDGA2, MIM 611128), represents a putative susceptibility gene for SLE. In a combined analysis of the whole dataset, significant evidence of association was detected for the MAMDC1 intronic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) rs961616 (P –value = 0.001, Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.292, 95% CI 1.103–1.513) and rs2297926 (P –value = 0.003, OR = 1.349, 95% CI 1.109–1.640). By Northern blot, real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses, we show that MAMDC1 is expressed in several tissues and cell types, and that the corresponding mRNA is up-regulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) in THP-1 monocytes. Based on its homology to known proteins with similar structure, MAMDC1 appears to be a novel member of the adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgCAM), which is involved in cell adhesion, migration, and recruitment to inflammatory sites. Remarkably, some IgCAMs have been shown to interact with ITGAM, the product of another SLE susceptibility gene recently discovered in two independent genome wide association (GWA) scans. Significance Further studies focused on MAMDC1 and other molecules involved in these pathways might thus provide new insight into the pathogenesis of SLE. PMID:19997561

  6. Autoantibodies Affect Brain Density Reduction in Nonneuropsychiatric Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Cheng, Yuqi; Lai, Aiyun; Lv, Zhaoping; Yu, Hongjun; Luo, Chunrong; Shan, Baoci; Xu, Lin; Xu, Xiufeng

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between autoantibodies and brain density reduction in SLE patients without major neuropsychiatric manifestation (NPSLE). Ninety-five NPSLE patients without obvious cerebral deficits, as determined by conventional MRI, as well as 89 control subjects, underwent high-resolution structural MRI. Whole-brain density of grey matter (GMD) and white matter (WMD) were calculated for each individual, and correlations between the brain density, symptom severity, immunosuppressive agent (ISA), and autoantibody levels were assessed. The GMD and WMD of the SLE group decreased compared to controls. GMD was negatively associated with SLE activity. The WMD of patients who received ISA treatment were higher than that in the patients who did not. The WMD of patients with anticardiolipin (ACL) or anti-SSB/La antibodies was lower than in patients without these antibodies, while the GMD was lower in patients with anti-SM or anti-U1RNP antibodies. Thus, obvious brain atrophy can occur very early even before the development of significant symptoms and specific autoantibodies might contribute to the reduction of GMD or WMD in NPSLE patients. However, ISAs showed protective effects in minimizing GMD and WMD reduction. The presence of these specific autoantibodies might help identify early brain damage in NPSLE patients. PMID:26090505

  7. Risk factors for osteoporosis in female patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Di Munno, O; Mazzantini, M; Delle Sedie, A; Mosca, M; Bombardieri, S

    2004-01-01

    In the last years it has been recognized that patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are at high risk of osteoporosis (OP) and fractures, both occurring through disease-specific (chronic arthritis, reduced physical activity, induction of cytokines promoting bone resorption, renal impairment, endocrine factors) and nondisease-specific mechanisms (sunshine avoidance with consequent vitamin D deficiency, glucocorticoids, immunosuppressants and chronic anticoagulants). Regarding anticoagulants, subcutaneous heparin is crucial against the risk of recurrent thromboembolism or pregnancy loss, specifically in patients with SLE and anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS). Thus heparin-induced OP represents one of the hazards of this treatment, first because heparin must be used long-term and secondly because pregnancy and lactation themselves may predispose to OP and fractures. Current data suggest the use of prophylaxis with calcium and vitamin D in all patients treated with heparin during pregnancy. Nevertheless glucocorticoid-induced OP (GIOP) is considered the most serious risk factor for OP and fractures in SLE patients. All guidelines recommend general measures and supplementation with calcium and vitamin D in all patients. However when considering premenopausal patients, there is no generally recommended treatment. Bisphosphonates, which are considered the first choice therapy for the prevention and treatment of GIOP, should be used 'cautiously' in these patients. Therefore the potential risks and lack of efficacy data on fracture risk reduction in premenopausal patients must be weighed against their proven efficacy in postmenopausal patients.

  8. Lupus vulgaris in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and persistent IgG deficiency.

    PubMed

    Düzgün, N; Duman, M; Sonel, B; Peksari, Y; Erdem, C; Tokgöz, G

    1997-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with juvenile onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who developed a persistent, acquired hypogammaglobulinaemia with IgG deficiency. The hypogammaglobulinaemia was probably a complication of high dose corticosteroid treatment. The serum IgG level remained subnormal despite intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Lupus vulgaris, which developed on the nasal cartilage in this patient with SLE, is not an expected finding. This patient is probably the first reported case of SLE associated with lupus vulgaris.

  9. Genetic risk and longitudinal disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus using targeted maximum likelihood estimation.

    PubMed

    Gianfrancesco, M A; Balzer, L; Taylor, K E; Trupin, L; Nititham, J; Seldin, M F; Singer, A W; Criswell, L A; Barcellos, L F

    2016-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease associated with genetic and environmental risk factors. However, the extent to which genetic risk is causally associated with disease activity is unknown. We utilized longitudinal-targeted maximum likelihood estimation to estimate the causal association between a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising 41 established SLE variants and clinically important disease activity as measured by the validated Systemic Lupus Activity Questionnaire (SLAQ) in a multiethnic cohort of 942 individuals with SLE. We did not find evidence of a clinically important SLAQ score difference (>4.0) for individuals with a high GRS compared with those with a low GRS across nine time points after controlling for sex, ancestry, renal status, dialysis, disease duration, treatment, depression, smoking and education, as well as time-dependent confounding of missing visits. Individual single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses revealed that 12 of the 41 variants were significantly associated with clinically relevant changes in SLAQ scores across time points eight and nine after controlling for multiple testing. Results based on sophisticated causal modeling of longitudinal data in a large patient cohort suggest that individual SLE risk variants may influence disease activity over time. Our findings also emphasize a role for other biological or environmental factors. PMID:27467283

  10. Vitamin D and polymorphisms of VDR gene in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Monticielo, Odirlei André; Teixeira, Thaisa de Mattos; Chies, José Artur Bogo; Brenol, João Carlos Tavares; Xavier, Ricardo Machado

    2012-10-01

    The susceptibility for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is related to environmental, hormonal, genetic, and immunological factors. Numerous genes have been linked to the emergence of SLE, including vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene that synthesizes the receptor of vitamin D. Several polymorphisms have been described since the discovery of this gene, and their effects on VDR activity are still poorly understood. Vitamin D's biological functions are mediated by VDR. Vitamin D exerts many actions on the immune system, and several studies have suggested its role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. SLE patients have low blood levels of vitamin D, which raises the possibility of association between the deficiency of this vitamin and the onset of the disease. BsmI and FokI polymorphic variants seem to be related to the onset of the disease in Asian patients. In this article, we review the aspects related to the metabolism and immunoregulatory effects of vitamin D, VDR, and main polymorphisms involving the VDR gene and the relationship between vitamin D levels and its receptor with SLE.

  11. Hyponatremia in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Il Shin, Jae; Park, Se Jin; Suh, Chang-Hee; Lee, Geum Hwa; Hur, Min Woo; Han, Song Yi; Kim, Dong Soo; Kim, Ji Hong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether decreased serum sodium concentration could be associated with the disease activity in SLE. We retrospectively analyzed the data of the two independent cohorts of children and adults with SLE in two centers. Hyponatremia was associated with serum chloride (p = 0.004), albumin (p = 0.002) and SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) (p = 0.026) in children with SLE. Serum sodium levels were correlated negatively with ESR (p =0.001) and positively with serum albumin levels (p < 0.0001) and C3 (p = 0.008) in children with SLE and those levels were correlated negatively with serum interleukin-6 levels (p = 0.003) in adults with SLE. Independent risk factors for the development of hyponatremia were the decreased serum C3 levels (OR 1.069, p = 0.031), the decreased serum chloride levels (OR 2.054, p = 0.006) and increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (OR 1.066, p = 0.03) in children with SLE and increased C-reactive protein (CRP) (OR 1.480, p = 0.023) in combined cohorts with SLE by multiple logistic regression analyses. Our study firstly showed that hyponatremia could reflect a disease activity and severe inflammation of SLE. PMID:27193532

  12. Incidence and Prevalence of Major Central Nervous System Involvement in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: A 3-Year Prospective Study of 370 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kampylafka, Eleni I.; Alexopoulos, Haralampos; Kosmidis, Michalis L.; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.; Vlachoyiannopoulos, Panayiotis G.; Dalakas, Marinos C.; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M.; Tzioufas, Athanasios G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence and prevalence of CNS involvement in SLE remains unclear owing to conflicting results in the published studies. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence and prevalence of major definite CNS events in SLE patients. Methods 370 SLE patients with no previous history of CNS involvement were prospectively evaluated in a tertiary hospital referral center for 3 years. Major CNS manifestations were codified according to ACR definitions, including chorea, aseptic meningitis, psychosis, seizures, myelopathy, demyelinating syndrome, acute confusional state and strokes. Minor CNS events were excluded. ECLAM and SLEDAI-SELENA Modification scores were used to evaluate disease activity and SLICC/ACR Damage Index was used to assess accumulated damage. Results 16/370 (4.3%) patients presented with a total of 23 major CNS events. These included seizures (35%), strokes (26%), myelopathy (22%), optic neuritis (8.7%), aseptic meningitis (4.3%) and acute psychosis (4.3%). Incidence was 7.8/100 person years. Among hospitalizations for SLE, 13% were due to CNS manifestations. Epileptic seizures were associated with high disease activity, while myelopathy correlated with lower disease activity and NMO-IgG antibodies (P≤0.05). Stroke incidence correlated with APS coexistence (P = 0.06). Overall, CNS involvement correlated with high ECLAM and SLEDAI scores (P<0.001). Conclusions Clinically severe CNS involvement is rare in SLE patients, accounting for 7.8/100 person years. CNS involvement correlates with high disease activity and coexistence of specific features that define the respective CNS syndromes. PMID:23424638

  13. IgG and IgM autoantibody differences in discoid and systemic lupus patients

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Benjamin F.; Tseng, Lin-chiang; Lee, Thomas; Vasquez, Rebecca; Li, Quan Z.; Zhang, Song; Karp, David R.; Olsen, Nancy J.; Mohan, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Systemic lupus (SLE) patients with discoid lupus (DLE) were reported to have milder disease. To test this observation, we employed sandwich arrays containing 98 autoantigens to compare autoantibody profiles of SLE subjects without DLE (DLE−SLE+) (N=9), SLE subjects with DLE (DLE+SLE+) (N=10), DLE subjects without SLE (DLE+SLE−) (N=11), and healthy controls (N=11). We validated differentially expressed autoantibodies using immunoassays in DLE−SLE+ (N=18), DLE+SLE+ (N=17), DLE+SLE− (N=23), and healthy subjects (N=22). Arrays showed 15 IgG autoantibodies (ten against nuclear antigens) and four IgM autoantibodies that were differentially expressed (q-value<0.05). DLE−SLE+ subjects had higher IgG autoantibodies against dsDNA, ssDNA, dsRNA, histone H2A and H2B, and SS-A (52 kDa) than all other groups including DLE+SLE+ subjects (p<0.05). Immunoassays measuring anti-dsDNA, -ssDNA, and -SS-A (52 kDa) IgG autoantibodies showed similar trends (p<0.05). Healthy and DLE+SLE−subjects expressed higher IgM autoantibodies against alpha beta crystallin, lipopolysaccharide, heat shock cognate 70, and desmoglein-3 than DLE+SLE+ and DLE−SLE+ subjects. IgG:IgM ratios of autoantibodies against nuclear antigens progressively rose from healthy to DLE−SLE+ subjects. In conclusion, lower IgG autoantibodies against nuclear antigens in DLE+SLE+ versus DLE−SLE+ subjects suggest that DLE indicates lower disease severity. Higher IgM autoantibodies against selected antigens in healthy and DLE+SLE−subjects may be non-pathogenic. PMID:22763789

  14. Adrenocorticotropic hormone gel in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: A retrospective study of patients.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Golubovsky, Josh; Hui-Yuen, Joyce; Shah, Ummara; Olech, Ewa; Lomeo, Rosalia; Singh, Vijay; Busch, Howard; Strandberg, Mary Jane; Strandberg, Kayla; Horowitz, Leslie; Askanase, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Acthar Gel is a long-acting formulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) with anti-inflammatory effects thought to be mediated in part through melanocortin receptor activation. This study was initiated to understand the role of Acthar Gel in SLE treatment in rheumatology practices. Methods: This is a retrospective case series of nine adult female patients treated with Acthar Gel for at least six months at five academic centers. Treating physicians completed a one-page questionnaire on lupus medications, disease activity, and outcomes. Clinical response was defined using SLEDAI 2K and improvement in the clinical manifestation(s) being treated. Results: The most common clinical SLE manifestations/indications requiring therapy with Acthar Gel were arthritis, rash, and inability to taper corticosteroids. The mean SLEDAI 2K score at baseline was 5.8 ± 5.0 (range 0-16). Six patients were concomitantly treated with corticosteroids (mean dose 18.3mg/day). All patients were on background SLE medications including immunosuppressives. Seven of nine patients had an overall improvement, with a decrease in SLEDAI 2K from 5.8 ± 5.0 at baseline to 3.5 ± 2.7 (range 0-8); four of five patients had improvement or resolution in arthritis, and one of two patients had resolution of inflammatory rash. Four patients discontinued corticosteroids and one patient tapered below 50% of the initial dose by 3 months of treatment with Acthar Gel. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions: This study suggests a role for Acthar Gel as an alternative to corticosteroids in the treatment of SLE. Acthar Gel appears to be safe and well-tolerated after 6 months of treatment, with a significant reduction in disease activity. PMID:27158444

  15. Trans-Ancestral Studies Fine Map the SLE-Susceptibility Locus TNFSF4

    PubMed Central

    Manku, Harinder; Langefeld, Carl D.; Guerra, Sandra G.; Malik, Talat H.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Boackle, Susan A.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Freedman, Barry I.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Gregersen, Peter A.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Han, Sang-Hoon; Harley, John B.; Jacob, Chaim O.; James, Judith A.; Kamen, Diane L.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Martin, Javier; Merrill, Joan T.; Moser, Kathy L.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Park, So-Yeon; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Sawalha, Amr H.; Scofield, R. Hal; Shen, Nan; Stevens, Anne M.; Sun, Celi; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Edberg, Jeff C.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Nath, Swapan K.; Tsao, Betty P.; Vyse, Tim J.

    2013-01-01

    We previously established an 80 kb haplotype upstream of TNFSF4 as a susceptibility locus in the autoimmune disease SLE. SLE-associated alleles at this locus are associated with inflammatory disorders, including atherosclerosis and ischaemic stroke. In Europeans, the TNFSF4 causal variants have remained elusive due to strong linkage disequilibrium exhibited by alleles spanning the region. Using a trans-ancestral approach to fine-map the locus, utilising 17,900 SLE and control subjects including Amerindian/Hispanics (1348 cases, 717 controls), African-Americans (AA) (1529, 2048) and better powered cohorts of Europeans and East Asians, we find strong association of risk alleles in all ethnicities; the AA association replicates in African-American Gullah (152,122). The best evidence of association comes from two adjacent markers: rs2205960-T (P = 1.71×10−34, OR = 1.43[1.26–1.60]) and rs1234317-T (P = 1.16×10−28, OR = 1.38[1.24–1.54]). Inference of fine-scale recombination rates for all populations tested finds the 80 kb risk and non-risk haplotypes in all except African-Americans. In this population the decay of recombination equates to an 11 kb risk haplotype, anchored in the 5′ region proximal to TNFSF4 and tagged by rs2205960-T after 1000 Genomes phase 1 (v3) imputation. Conditional regression analyses delineate the 5′ risk signal to rs2205960-T and the independent non-risk signal to rs1234314-C. Our case-only and SLE-control cohorts demonstrate robust association of rs2205960-T with autoantibody production. The rs2205960-T is predicted to form part of a decameric motif which binds NF-κBp65 with increased affinity compared to rs2205960-G. ChIP-seq data also indicate NF-κB interaction with the DNA sequence at this position in LCL cells. Our research suggests association of rs2205960-T with SLE across multiple groups and an independent non-risk signal at rs1234314-C. rs2205960-T is associated with autoantibody production and

  16. Adalimumab in Patients with Active Noninfectious Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Glenn J; Dick, Andrew D; Brézin, Antoine P; Nguyen, Quan Dong; Thorne, Jennifer E; Kestelyn, Philippe; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin; Franco, Pablo; Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Scales, David; Chu, David S; Camez, Anne; Kwatra, Nisha V; Song, Alexandra P; Kron, Martina; Tari, Samir; Suhler, Eric B

    2016-09-01

    Background Patients with noninfectious uveitis are at risk for long-term complications of uncontrolled inflammation, as well as for the adverse effects of long-term glucocorticoid therapy. We conducted a trial to assess the efficacy and safety of adalimumab as a glucocorticoid-sparing agent for the treatment of noninfectious uveitis. Methods This multinational phase 3 trial involved adults who had active noninfectious intermediate uveitis, posterior uveitis, or panuveitis despite having received prednisone treatment for 2 or more weeks. Investigators and patients were unaware of the study-group assignments. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive adalimumab (a loading dose of 80 mg followed by a dose of 40 mg every 2 weeks) or matched placebo. All patients received a mandatory prednisone burst followed by tapering of prednisone over the course of 15 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was the time to treatment failure occurring at or after week 6. Treatment failure was a multicomponent outcome that was based on assessment of new inflammatory lesions, best corrected visual acuity, anterior chamber cell grade, and vitreous haze grade. Nine ranked secondary efficacy end points were assessed, and adverse events were reported. Results The median time to treatment failure was 24 weeks in the adalimumab group and 13 weeks in the placebo group. Among the 217 patients in the intention-to-treat population, those receiving adalimumab were less likely than those in the placebo group to have treatment failure (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.36 to 0.70; P<0.001). Outcomes with regard to three secondary end points (change in anterior chamber cell grade, change in vitreous haze grade, and change in best corrected visual acuity) were significantly better in the adalimumab group than in the placebo group. Adverse events and serious adverse events were reported more frequently among patients who received adalimumab (1052.4 vs. 971.7 adverse events

  17. Clinical manifestations and clinical syndromes of Filipino patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Villamin, Charles A C; Navarra, Sandra V

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the presenting clinical manifestations and syndromes of Filipino patients on diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We performed a retrospective review of medical records of Filipino SLE patients included in the lupus database of the University of Santo Tomas (UST) in Manila, Philippines. All patients fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for SLE. The following data were recorded: (1) demographic profile, (2) clinical manifestations on SLE diagnosis, and (3) clinical syndromes prior to and during fulfillment of diagnostic criteria for SLE and disease interval from diagnosis of a clinical syndrome to SLE diagnosis. Clinical data of 1,070 patients entered into the UST lupus database as of October 2005 were analyzed. The average age at SLE diagnosis was 28.5 +/- 11.5 (range 5-71) years, with 1,025 female and 45 male subjects. The most common presenting manifestation was arthritis (68%), followed by malar rash (49%), renal involvement (47%), photosensitivity (33%), and oral ulcers (33%). The following clinical syndromes were recorded prior to or during SLE diagnosis: nephrotic syndrome (30%), undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) (22%), autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) (6%), and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) (6%). Among these, AIHA preceded the diagnosis of SLE at the longest interval (20.3 +/- 30.6, range 1-194 months). In this large database of Filipino patients with SLE, the most common presenting manifestation was arthritis, with renal involvement occurring in almost 50%. Among the clinical syndromes, nephrotic syndrome was the most common, whereas AIHA recorded the longest interval preceding SLE diagnosis, at an average of 20.3 months. Our findings are similar to data from other countries and emphasize the broad range of manifestations of SLE. The findings also reinforce the need to establish and maintain SLE databases to enhance awareness, early diagnosis, and more

  18. Association of age with health-related quality of life in a cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: the Georgians Organized Against Lupus study

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Laura; Lim, S Sam; Bowling, C Barrett; Drenkard, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine whether older age was associated with lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and whether differential disease-related damage and activity explained these associations. Methods We used cross-sectional data on 684 patients with SLE aged ≥20 years from the Georgians Organized Against Lupus cohort to estimate the associations between age (categorised as 20–39, 40–59 and ≥60 years) and HRQOL (Short Form-12 norm-based domain and physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores), using multivariable linear regression. We then examined the effect of disease-related damage and activity on these associations. Results The mean age of the cohort was 48.2±13.1 years (range, 20–88 years), with 28.0%, 52.9% and 19.1% of participants being aged 20–39, 40–59 and ≥60 years, respectively; 79.0% were African-American and 93.7% were female. The mean PCS score was 39.3 (41.8, 38.7 and 37.4 among those aged 20–39, 40–59 and ≥60 years, respectively), while the mean MCS score was 44.3 (44.2, 43.8 and 46.1, respectively). In general, lower physical but not mental HRQOL scores were associated with older age. With adjustment, older ages (40–59 and ≥60, respectively, vs 20–39) remained associated (β (95% CI)) with lower PCS (−2.53 (−4.58 to −0.67) and −3.57 (−6.19 to −0.96)) but not MCS (0.47 (−1.46 to 2.41) and 1.20 (−1.52 to 3.92)) scores. Associations of age with HRQOL domain and summary scores were not substantially changed by further adjustment for disease-related damage and/or activity. Conclusions Nearly one in five participants in this large, predominantly African-American cohort of patients with SLE was at least 60 years old. The associations of older age with lower physical, but not mental, HRQOL were independent of accumulated SLE damage and current SLE activity. The results suggest that studies of important geriatric

  19. Schramm-Loewner (SLE) analysis of quasi two-dimensional turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalabard, Simon

    2012-02-01

    Quasi two-dimensional turbulence can be observed in several cases: for example, in the laboratory using liquid soap films, or as the result of a strong imposed rotation as obtained in three-dimensional large direct numerical simulations. We study and contrast SLE properties of such flows, in the former case in the inverse cascade of energy to large scale, and in the latter in the direct cascade of energy to small scales in the presence of a fully-helical forcing. We thus examine the geometric properties of these quasi 2D regimes in the context of stochastic geometry, as was done for the 2D inverse cascade by Bernard et al. (2006). We show that in both cases the data is compatible with self-similarity and with SLE behaviors, whose different diffusivities can be heuristically determined.

  20. A rare case of prototheca algaemia in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and recent belimumab infusion.

    PubMed

    Mejia-Otero, Carolina; Singh, Shelley; Arias Urdaneta, Luis; Sesin, Carlos; Chakrabarti, Anindita; Miller, Nanci Mae; Tuda, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Novel agents for the treatment of immune-mediated diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been increasingly used as an alternative to or in combination with conventional therapies. Belimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that inhibits B-cell activating factor (BAFF), has demonstrated efficacy in moderate-to-severe SLE with similar adverse effects when compared to other biologic agents and conventional SLE therapies. Here, we describe a woman with SLE and diabetes mellitus (DM) on immunosuppressive therapy for five years who was admitted to the hospital for pneumonia but had a complicated hospital course with multiple infections and, most notably, a nosocomial algaemia due to Prototheca wickerhamii, which was treated successfully with amphotericin B. She had recently received three belimumab infusions as an outpatient prior to admission to the hospital. To the best of our knowledge no cases of human protothecosis in patients receiving belimumab have been described in the English literature; however, unusual infections have to be considered in all patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapies who persist with fever despite conventional antimicrobials. PMID:25374733

  1. A Rare Case of Prototheca Algaemia in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Recent Belimumab Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Mejia-Otero, Carolina; Singh, Shelley; Arias Urdaneta, Luis; Sesin, Carlos; Chakrabarti, Anindita; Miller, Nanci Mae; Tuda, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Novel agents for the treatment of immune-mediated diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have been increasingly used as an alternative to or in combination with conventional therapies. Belimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that inhibits B-cell activating factor (BAFF), has demonstrated efficacy in moderate-to-severe SLE with similar adverse effects when compared to other biologic agents and conventional SLE therapies. Here, we describe a woman with SLE and diabetes mellitus (DM) on immunosuppressive therapy for five years who was admitted to the hospital for pneumonia but had a complicated hospital course with multiple infections and, most notably, a nosocomial algaemia due to Prototheca wickerhamii, which was treated successfully with amphotericin B. She had recently received three belimumab infusions as an outpatient prior to admission to the hospital. To the best of our knowledge no cases of human protothecosis in patients receiving belimumab have been described in the English literature; however, unusual infections have to be considered in all patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapies who persist with fever despite conventional antimicrobials. PMID:25374733

  2. Encore: Genetic Association Interaction Network Centrality Pipeline and Application to SLE Exome Data

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Nicholas A.; Lareau, Caleb A.; White, Bill C.; Pandey, Ahwan; Wiley, Graham; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; McKinney, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Open source tools are needed to facilitate the construction, analysis, and visualization of gene-gene interaction networks for sequencing data. To address this need, we present Encore, an open source network analysis pipeline for GWAS and rare variant data. Encore constructs Genetic Association Interaction Networks or Epistasis Networks using two optional approaches: our previous information-theory method or a generalized linear model approach. Additionally, Encore includes multiple data filtering options, including Random Forest/Random Jungle for main effect enrichment and Evaporative Cooling and Relief-F filters for enrichment of interaction effects. Encore implements SNPrank network centrality for identifying susceptibility hubs (nodes containing a large amount of disease susceptibility information through the combination of multivariate main effects and multiple gene-gene interactions in the network), and it provides appropriate files for interactive visualization of a network using tools from our online Galaxy instance. We implemented these algorithms in C++ using OpenMP for shared-memory parallel analysis on a server or desktop. To demonstrate Encore’s utility in analysis of genetic sequencing data, we present an analysis of exome resequencing data from healthy individuals and those with Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE). Our results verify the importance of the previously associated SLE genes HLA-DRB and NCF2, and these two genes had the highest gene-gene interaction degrees among the susceptibility hubs. An additional 14 genes previously associated with SLE emerged in our epistasis network model of the exome data, and three novel candidate genes, ST8SIA4, CMTM4, and C2CD4B, were implicated in the model. In summary, we present a comprehensive tool for epistasis network analysis and the first such analysis of exome data from a genetic study of SLE. Software Availability: http://insilico.utulsa.edu/encore.php. PMID:23740754

  3. Encore: Genetic Association Interaction Network centrality pipeline and application to SLE exome data.

    PubMed

    Davis, Nicholas A; Lareau, Caleb A; White, Bill C; Pandey, Ahwan; Wiley, Graham; Montgomery, Courtney G; Gaffney, Patrick M; McKinney, B A

    2013-09-01

    Open source tools are needed to facilitate the construction, analysis, and visualization of gene-gene interaction networks for sequencing data. To address this need, we present Encore, an open source network analysis pipeline for genome-wide association studies and rare variant data. Encore constructs Genetic Association Interaction Networks or epistasis networks using two optional approaches: our previous information-theory method or a generalized linear model approach. Additionally, Encore includes multiple data filtering options, including Random Forest/Random Jungle for main effect enrichment and Evaporative Cooling and Relief-F filters for enrichment of interaction effects. Encore implements SNPrank network centrality for identifying susceptibility hubs (nodes containing a large amount of disease susceptibility information through the combination of multivariate main effects and multiple gene-gene interactions in the network), and it provides appropriate files for interactive visualization of a network using tools from our online Galaxy instance. We implemented these algorithms in C++ using OpenMP for shared-memory parallel analysis on a server or desktop. To demonstrate Encore's utility in analysis of genetic sequencing data, we present an analysis of exome resequencing data from healthy individuals and those with Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE). Our results verify the importance of the previously associated SLE genes HLA-DRB and NCF2, and these two genes had the highest gene-gene interaction degrees among the susceptibility hubs. An additional 14 genes previously associated with SLE emerged in our epistasis network model of the exome data, and three novel candidate genes, ST8SIA4, CMTM4, and C2CD4B, were implicated in the model. In summary, we present a comprehensive tool for epistasis network analysis and the first such analysis of exome data from a genetic study of SLE. PMID:23740754

  4. Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Use of Space Link Extension (SLE) Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Cordier, G. R.; Johnson, L. M.; Tillery, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA & NASA are acquiring the next-generation civilian operational weather satellite -- Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). Contributing the afternoon orbit & ground system (GS) to replace current NOAA POES Satellites, its sensors will collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological & solar-geophysical data. The JPSS Common Ground System (CGS), consisting of Command, Control & Communications (C3) and Interface Data Processing (IDP) segments, is developed by Raytheon. CGS now flies the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, transferring data between ground facilities, processing them into Environmental Data Records for NOAA & DoD weather centers, and expanding to support JPSS-1 in 2017. CGS Block 2.0 (B2.0) is the recent CDR-approved design to support both the current S-NPP and upcoming JPSS-1 missions. In B2.0, many important improvements were made to evolve CGS C3. One of those improvements is the addition of SLE services. The CCSDS SLE Protocol standard facilitates and significantly improves GS-to-Data Center communications. The CGS SLE architecture provides data reliability and resource scheduling and is scalable to support added missions. The JPSS CGS is a mature, tested solution for supporting operational weather forecasting for civil, military, and international partners as well as climate research. It features a flexible design that handles order-of-magnitude increases in data over legacy satellite ground systems and meets demanding science accuracy needs. The JPSS CGS is expandable to support additional ground station service providers with or without the deployment of additional JPSS ground hardware by using standard SLE Transfer Service protocol and offers opportunities to reduce costs and improve information Integration across missions. The Raytheon-built JPSS CGS provides the full common ground capability, from design and development through operations & sustainment. These features lay the foundation for the CGS future

  5. Classical complement activation as a footprint for murine and human antiphospholipid antibody-induced fetal loss.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Danielle; Buurma, Aletta; Goemaere, Natascha N; Girardi, Guillermina; le Cessie, Saskia; Scherjon, Sicco; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W M; de Heer, Emile; Bruijn, Jan A; Bajema, Ingeborg M

    2011-12-01

    Recurrent miscarriage, fetal growth restriction and intrauterine fetal death are frequently occurring complications of pregnancy in patients with systemic lupus erythaematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Murine models show that complement activation plays a pivotal role in antiphospholipid antibody-mediated pregnancy morbidity, but the exact pathways of complement activation and their potential role in human pregnancy are insufficiently understood. We hypothesized that the classical pathway would play a major role in inducing fetal loss. Pregnant C57BL/6 mice and mice deficient in C1q and factor D were injected with antiphospholipid antibodies or normal human IgG. Mouse placentas were subsequently stained with an anti-C4 antibody and anti-normal human IgG to determine the presence of classical complement activation and IgG binding. Findings in mice were validated in 88 human placentae from 83 women (SLE and APS cases versus controls), which were immunohistochemically stained for C4d, C1q, properdin and MBL. Staining patterns were compared to pregnancy outcome. In murine placentae of mice pretreated with antiphospholipid antibodies, increased C4 deposition was observed, which was associated with adverse fetal outcome but not with IgG binding. In humans, diffuse C4d staining at the feto-maternal interface was present almost exclusively in patients with SLE and/or APS (p < 0.001) and was related to intrauterine fetal death (p = 0.03). Our data show that presence of C4d in murine and human placentae is strongly related to adverse fetal outcome in the setting of SLE and APS. The excessive deposition of C4d supports the concept of severe autoantibody-mediated injury at the fetal-maternal interface. We suggest C4d as a potential biomarker of autoantibody-mediated fetal loss in SLE and APS.

  6. Risk of Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ya-Wen; Yu, Mei-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Li; Yu, Tung-Min; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with atherosclerosis, but the relationship between SLE and peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) remains unclear. We sought to investigate this relationship by comparing cardiovascular complications in patients with and without SLE. Data on patients from 2000 to 2011 were collected from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan. The SLE cohort was frequency-matched according to age, sex, and history of diabetes mellitus (DM) with patients without SLE (control cohort). We evaluated the risk of cardiovascular complications, including hypertension, DM, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, coronary artery disease, and hyperlipidemia. The study included 10,144 patients with SLE and 10,144 control patients. The incidence of PAOD was 9.39-fold higher (95% confidence interval [CI] = 7.70–11.15) in the SLE cohort than in the non-SLE cohort. Moreover, SLE was an independent risk factor for PAOD. The adjusted risk of PAOD was highest in patients with SLE who were aged ≤34 years (hazard ratio = 47.6, 95% CI = 26.8–84.4). The risk of PAOD was highest during the first year of follow-up and decreased over time. Patients with SLE exhibit a higher incidence and an independently higher risk of PAOD compared with the general population. The PAOD risk is markedly elevated in patients with SLE who are young and in whom the disease is at an early stage. PMID:26579830

  7. CD3+CD8+CD28− T Lymphocytes in Patients with Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Krajewska, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The results of studies on the CD3+CD8+CD28− cells in SLE are inconsistent since several analyses describe CD3+CD8+CD28− as either immunosuppressive or cytotoxic. The aim of this study is to inquire whether the quantitative changes of CD3+CD8+CD28− T lymphocytes subpopulation are related to the clinical status of patients with lupus nephritis. Evaluation of Foxp3 expression on CD3+CD8+CD28− cells may shed some light on functional properties of these cells. 54 adult SLE patients and 19 sex and age matched healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. There were 15 patients in inactive (SLEDAI ≤ 5) and 39 in active (SLEDAI > 5) phase of disease. We determined absolute count of CD3+CD8+CD28− and CD3+CD8+CD28−Foxp3+ subpopulations by flow cytometry. We observed a statistically significant increase in absolute count and percentage of CD3+CD8+CD28− in SLE patients compared to HC (p < 0.001). Moreover there was significant positive correlation between increasing absolute count of CD3+CD8+CD28− cells and disease activity measured by SLEDAI (rs = 0.281, p = 0.038). Active LN patients had increased absolute count of CD3+CD8+CD28− cells compared to HC. Positive correlation of CD3+CD8+CD28− number with disease activity, and lack of Foxp3 expression on these cells, suggests that CD3+CD8+CD28− lymphocytes might be responsible for an increased proinflammatory response in the exacerbation of SLE. PMID:27446964

  8. Association of the polymorphisms of TRAF1 (rs10818488) and TNFAIP3 (rs2230926) with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus and their relationship to disease activity among Egyptian patients

    PubMed Central

    Mohannad, Nevine

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Recent studies demonstrated the association of tumor necrosis factor α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3) (rs2230926) and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 1 (TRAF1) (rs10818488) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in different populations. We aimed at determining whether they confer susceptibility to SLE and RA in Egyptian population and if there is any relation to disease activity and auto-antibodies profile. Material and methods A case-control study involving 105 individuals with RA, 90 with SLE and 75 healthy controls was performed using TaqMan genotyping assay for two SNPs that showed the best evidence of association in the previous Caucasian studies. Results We detected significant differences in G allele frequency of TNFAIP3 (rs2230926) with SLE (p = 0.017*) and RA (OR = 2.333; 95% CI: 1.103-4.935, p = 0.023*) and association with RA disease activity (< 0.001). The A allele of TRAF1 was significantly increased in RA compared to controls(p = 0.049) and with RA activity (p = 0.001), while TRAF1 polymorphism did not exhibit any significant difference in the frequencies of genotypes or alleles in SLE and control (p = 0.280). Conclusions TNFAIP3 is a susceptibility gene to SLE and RA in the Egyptian population and is correlated to disease activity and the presence of autoantibodies while TRAF1 polymorphisms increase the risk of RA but not to SLE in Egyptian populations. PMID:27536202

  9. Predictors of the first cardiovascular event in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus - a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of premature mortality among Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Many studies have measured and evaluated risk factors for premature subclinical atherosclerosis, but few studies are prospective and few have evaluated risk factors for hard endpoints, i.e. clinically important cardiovascular events (CVE). We investigated the impact of traditional and lupus associated risk factors for the first ever CVE in a longitudinal cohort of SLE patients. Methods A total of 182 SLE patients (mean age 43.9 years) selected to be free of CVE were included. Cardiovascular and autoimmune biomarkers were measured on samples collected after overnight fasting at baseline. Clinical information was collected at baseline and at follow up. End point was the first ever CVE (ischemic heart, cerebrovascular or peripheral vascular disease or death due to CVD). Impact of baseline characteristics/biomarkers on the risk of having a first CVE was evaluated with Cox regression. Results Follow up was 99.5% after a mean time of 8.3 years. Twenty-four patients (13%) had a first CVE. In age-adjusted Cox regression, any positive antiphospholipid antibody (aPL), elevated markers of endothelial activation (von Willebrand factor (vWf), soluble vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1)) and fibrinogen predicted CVEs. Of SLE manifestations, arthritis, pleuritis and previous venous occlusion were positively associated with future CVEs while thrombocytopenia was negatively associated. Among traditional risk factors only age and smoking were significant predictors. In a multivariable Cox regression model age, any positive aPL, vWf and absence of thrombocytopenia were all predictors of the first CVE. Conclusions In addition to age, positive aPL, biomarkers indicating increased endothelial cell activity/damage, and absence of thrombocytopenia were independent predictors of CVEs in this prospective study. Our results indicate that activation

  10. Metabolic syndrome in lupus patients in northeast of Iran, and their lifestyle habits.

    PubMed Central

    Hatef-Fard, Mohammad Reza; Khodabandeh, Mina; Sahebari, Maryam; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Rezaieyazdi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Systemic lupus erythematous is an autoimmune disease associated with atherosclerotic manifestations or metabolic disturbance due to inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine frequency of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in SLE compared to healthy controls. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 150 SLE patients and 220 healthy volunteers were enrolled. MetS was diagnosed according to ATPIII criteria. Patients and controls were compared according to prevalence of MetS. In addition, SLE patients with and without MetS were compared according to laboratory parameters. Each patient also fulfilled a checklist about routine daily activities and diet program. Data were analyzed by SPSS-11 software. Results: MetS was significantly lower in SLE than healthy controls (18% vs 29.1%, P=0.015). Disease manifestations, major organ involvement, serum values of complements and anti-DNA antibody and pharmacological therapy did not correlate with MetS occurrence in patients. The mean TG, FBS, systolic and diastolic BP were statistically higher in lupus patients compared to healthy volunteers in contrast to waist circumference. HDL-cholesterol serum values did not show any significant difference between two groups. Conclusion: It seems that despite higher values of blood pressure, serum lipids and glucose in lupus patients, the cumulative metabolic components were in a manner to make MetS more prevalent in healthy volunteers. As far as life habits are concerned, lupus patients in general did not exercise enough and did not go on a healthy diet despite of glucocorticoid therapy and hypertension. PMID:27757205

  11. Analysis of T cells bearing different isotypic forms of the gamma/delta T cell receptor in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Agea, E; Bertotto, A; Tognellini, R; Flenghi, L; Spinozzi, F; Velardi, A; Grignani, F

    1991-10-01

    The expression of gamma/delta T cell receptor (TCR) on peripheral blood CD3+ cells circulating in 74 patients with different systemic autoimmune diseases was evaluated. There was a significant increase in the gamma/delta T cell number only in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) and in untreated patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Unlike healthy subjects, a subgroup of patients with SLE and SS displayed a marked increase in gamma/delta T cells. Immunosuppressive treatment of patients with active SLE led to a normalization of the gamma/delta T cell number. Analysis of surface phenotype showed that when patient gamma/delta T cells were expanded in the peripheral blood, they were not activated but bore "memory" markers. In addition, they preferentially expressed the disulfide linked form of the TCR, except in progressive systemic sclerosis where the nondisulfide form was displayed. Serial determinations in single patients demonstrated that the gamma/delta T cell increase is a persistent immunological feature in these patient subgroups. PMID:1837314

  12. Sex-specific effects of LiCl treatment on preservation of renal function and extended life-span in murine models of SLE: perspective on insights into the potential basis for survivorship in NZB/W female mice.

    PubMed

    Hart, David A

    2016-01-01

    Considerable research effort has been invested in attempting to understand immune dysregulation leading to autoimmunity and target organ damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), patients can develop a systemic disease with a number of organs involved. One of the major target organs is the kidney, but patients vary in the progression of the end-organ targeting of this organ. Some patients develop glomerulonephritis only, while others develop rapidly progressive end organ failure. In murine models of SLE, renal involvement can also occur. Studies performed over the past several years have indicated that treatment with LiCl of females, but not males of the NZB/W model, at an early age during the onset of disease, can prevent development of end-stage renal disease in a significant percentage of the animals. While on Li treatment, up to 80 % of the females can exhibit long-term survival with evidence of mild glomerulonephritis which does not progress to renal failure in spite of on-going autoimmunity. Stopping the treatment led to a reactivation of the disease and renal failure. Li treatment of other murine models of SLE was less effective and decreased survivorship in male BxSB mice, exhibited little effect on male MRL-lpr mice, and only modestly improved survivorship in female MRL-lpr mice. This perspective piece discusses the findings of several related studies which support the concept that protecting target organs such as the kidney, even in the face of continued immune insults and some inflammation, can lead to prolonged survival with retention of organ function. Some possible mechanisms for the effectiveness of Li treatment in this context are also discussed. However, the detailed mechanistic basis for the sex-specific effects of LiCl treatment particularly in the NZB/W model remains to be elucidated. Elucidating such details may provide important clues for development of effective treatment for patients with SLE, ~90 % of which are females. PMID:27354902

  13. Exploring Contextual Factors and Patient Activation: Evidence from a Nationally Representative Sample of Patients with Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jie; Mortensen, Karoline; Bloodworth, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Patient activation has been considered as a "blockbuster drug of the century." Patients with mental disorders are less activated compared to patients with other chronic diseases. Low activation due to mental disorders can affect the efficiency of treatment of other comorbidities. Contextual factors are significantly associated with…

  14. Belimumab Reduces Autoantibodies, Normalizes Low Complement, and Reduces Select B-Cell Populations in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    STOHL, WILLIAM; HIEPE, FALK; LATINIS, KEVIN M.; THOMAS, MATHEW; SCHEINBERG, MORTON A.; CLARKE, ANN; ARANOW, CYNTHIA; WELLBORNE, FRANK R.; ABUD-MENDOZA, CARLOS; HOUGH, DOUGLAS R.; PINEDA, LILIA; MIGONE, THI-SAU; ZHONG, Z. JOHN; FREIMUTH, WILLIAM W.; CHATHAM, W. WINN

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of the B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS)-specific inhibitor belimumab on immunologic biomarkers, including B- and T-cell populations, and maintenance of antibody titers to prior vaccines in autoantibody-positive systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Methods Pooled data from two phase 3 trials—BLISS-52 and -76—comparing belimumab 1 or 10 mg/kg vs placebo (each plus standard SLE therapy) were analyzed for changes in autoantibodies, immunoglobulin (Ig), and complement (C); BLISS-76 patients were analyzed for changes in B- and T-cell populations, and effects on prior vaccine-induced antibody levels. Results Belimumab-treated patients experienced significant sustained reductions in IgG and autoantibodies, and improvement in C3/C4, resulting in greater positive-to-negative conversion rates for IgG anti–double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA), anti-Smith, anticardiolipin, and antiribosomal P autoantibodies, and normalization of hypergammaglobulinemia and low C3/C4. Belimumab-treated patients experienced significant decreases in naïve and activated B cells, as well as plasma cells, whereas memory B cells and T-cell populations did not decrease. Belimumab did not substantially affect pre-existing antipneumococcal or antitetanus antibody levels. Post-hoc analysis showed greater reductions in SLE disease activity and the risk of severe flares in patients treated with belimumab 10 mg/kg (P ≤ 0.01) who were anti-dsDNA positive with low C3/C4 at baseline. Normalization of C3 or anti-dsDNA by 8 weeks, irrespective of therapy, was predictive of a reduced risk of severe flare over 52 weeks. Conclusion Belimumab appears to promote normalization of serologic activity and reduce BLyS-dependent B-cell subsets in serologically and clinically active SLE. Greater serologic activity may predict a better treatment response to belimumab. PMID:22275291

  15. Complement and membrane-bound complement regulatory proteins as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for autoimmune inflammatory disorders, RA and SLE.

    PubMed

    Das, Nibhriti

    2015-11-01

    Complement system is a major effecter system of the innate immunity that bridges with adaptive immunity. The system consists of about 40 humoral and cell surface proteins that include zymogens, receptors and regulators. The zymogens get activated in a cascade fashion by antigen-antibody complex, antigen alone or by polymannans, respectively, by the classical, alternative and mannose binding lectin (MBL) pathways. The ongoing research on complement regulators and complement receptors suggest key role of these proteins in the initiation, regulation and effecter mechanisms of the innate and adaptive immunity. Although, the complement system provides the first line of defence against the invading pathogens, its aberrant uncontrolled activation causes extensive self tissue injury. A large number of humoral and cell surface complement regulatory protein keep the system well-regulated in healthy individuals. Complement profiling had brought important information on the pathophysiology of several infectious and chronic inflammatory disorders. In view of the diversity of the clinical disorders involving abnormal complement activity or regulation, which include both acute and chronic diseases that affect a wide range of organs, diverse yet specifically tailored therapeutic approaches may be needed to shift complement back into balance. This brief review discusses on the complement system, its functions and its importance as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for autoimmune diseases with focus on SLE and RA.

  16. Patient Activation and Mental Health Care Experiences Among Women Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Pavao, Joanne; Wong, Ava

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a nationally representative survey of women veteran primary care users to examine associations between patient activation and mental health care experiences. A dose–response relationship was observed, with odds of high quality ratings significantly greater at each successive level of patient activation. Higher activation levels were also significantly associated with preference concordant care for gender-related preferences (use of female providers, women-only settings, and women-only groups as often as desired). Results add to the growing literature documenting better health care experiences among more activated patients, and suggest that patient activation may play an important role in promoting engagement with mental health care. PMID:25917224

  17. Analysis of RAG expression by peripheral blood CD5+ and CD5− B cells of patients with childhood systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Morbach, H; Singh, S K; Faber, C; Lipsky, P E; Girschick, H J

    2006-01-01

    Background The assembly of immunoglobulin genes during B cell development in the bone marrow is dependent on the expression of recombination activating genes (RAG) 1 and 2. Recently, RAG expression in peripheral blood IgD+ B cells outside the bone marrow has been demonstrated and is associated with the development of autoimmune diseases. Objective To investigate RAG expression in the CD5+ or CD5− IgD+ B cell compartment in childhood systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Using a combination of flow cytometric cell sorting and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis of cDNA libraries generated from individual cells, the expression of RAG, VpreB, and CD154 mRNA by individual peripheral blood B cells of three paediatric SLE patients was examined in detail. Results While only one patient had a significantly increased frequency of RAG+ B cells in the CD5− B cell population, all patients showed higher frequencies of RAG+ B cells in the CD5+IgD+ B cell population. The frequency of RAG+ IgD+CD5+/− B cells was reduced during intravenous cyclophosphamide treatment. In healthy age matched children, RAG expressing IgD+ B cells were hardly detectable. Coexpression of RAG and VpreB or CD154 mRNA could only be found in SLE B cells. Conclusions RAG expression in peripheral blood B cells of SLE patients is particularly increased in the IgD+CD5+ B cell population. CD5+ and CD5− B cells in SLE have the potential to undergo receptor revision leading to the generation of high affinity pathogenic autoantibodies. PMID:16126793

  18. Comparing demographics, clinical presentation, treatments and outcome between systemic lupus erythematosus patients treated in a public and private health system in Santa Fe, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Schmid, María Marcela; Roverano, Susana Graciela; Paira, Sergio Oscar

    2014-01-01

    The study includes 159 SLE patients seen between 1987 and 2011, of whom 116 were treated in the public health system and 43 in private practice. In the comparison between both groups, it was shown that patients in the public health system were younger at first consultation and at the onset of SLE, and that the mean duration of their disease prior to nephropathy was statistically significantly shorter. They also presented with more SLE activity (measured by Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Activity Index) such as fever, lower levels of C4, and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Although cyclophosphamide was administered more frequently to patients in the public health system group, there were no statistically significant differences in renal histological findings. A second renal biopsy was performed on 20 patients due to the presence of persistent proteinuria, peripheral edema, urinary casts, or because of previous defective renal specimens. The overall 10-year survival of the patients in the public health system was 78% compared to a survival rate of 91% for the patients in private practices. When survival was evaluated at 15 years, however, no differences were found (log rank test: 0.65). Patients from both public and private groups attended medical specialist practices and received early diagnoses and close follow-ups.

  19. Salmonella septic arthritis of the knees in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kim, S S; Perino, G; Boettner, F; Miller, A; Goodman, S

    2013-06-01

    Hematogenous Salmonella osteomyelitis is uncommon in immunocompetent hosts, but occurs with some regularity in immunosuppressed patients affected by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Surgical debridement with resection of compromised tissue is central to the surgical management of osteomyelitis. Persistence of septic arthropathy may result from inadequate debridement, areas of osteonecrosis (ON), and an abnormal cellular and humoral dysregulation characteristic of SLE. We describe a 53-year-old Hispanic female with SLE on immunosuppressive therapy, who developed acute salmonella-induced septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of both knees associated with ON and recurrent SLE synovitis. She received prolonged antibiotic therapy and an extensive surgical debridement as part of a successful two-stage bilateral total knee replacement. This report illustrates the significance of Salmonella enterica infection in SLE patients, and the role of underlying bone and joint pathology such as bone infarcts, sub-acute osteomyelitis, and SLE synovitis.

  20. A comprehensive analysis of shared loci between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and sixteen autoimmune diseases reveals limited genetic overlap.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Paula S; Criswell, Lindsey A; Moser, Kathy L; Comeau, Mary E; Williams, Adrienne H; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Chung, Sharon A; Graham, Robert R; Zidovetzki, Raphael; Kelly, Jennifer A; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Jacob, Chaim O; Vyse, Timothy J; Tsao, Betty P; Kimberly, Robert P; Gaffney, Patrick M; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Harley, John B; Langefeld, Carl D

    2011-12-01

    In spite of the well-known clustering of multiple autoimmune disorders in families, analyses of specific shared genes and polymorphisms between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases (ADs) have been limited. Therefore, we comprehensively tested autoimmune variants for association with SLE, aiming to identify pleiotropic genetic associations between these diseases. We compiled a list of 446 non-Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) variants identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of populations of European ancestry across 17 ADs. We then tested these variants in our combined Caucasian SLE cohorts of 1,500 cases and 5,706 controls. We tested a subset of these polymorphisms in an independent Caucasian replication cohort of 2,085 SLE cases and 2,854 controls, allowing the computation of a meta-analysis between all cohorts. We have uncovered novel shared SLE loci that passed multiple comparisons adjustment, including the VTCN1 (rs12046117, P = 2.02×10(-06)) region. We observed that the loci shared among the most ADs include IL23R, OLIG3/TNFAIP3, and IL2RA. Given the lack of a universal autoimmune risk locus outside of the MHC and variable specificities for different diseases, our data suggests partial pleiotropy among ADs. Hierarchical clustering of ADs suggested that the most genetically related ADs appear to be type 1 diabetes with rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease with ulcerative colitis. These findings support a relatively distinct genetic susceptibility for SLE. For many of the shared GWAS autoimmune loci, we found no evidence for association with SLE, including IL23R. Also, several established SLE loci are apparently not associated with other ADs, including the ITGAM-ITGAX and TNFSF4 regions. This study represents the most comprehensive evaluation of shared autoimmune loci to date, supports a relatively distinct non-MHC genetic susceptibility for SLE, provides further evidence for previously and newly identified

  1. Beneficial effect of the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitor mycophenolate mofetil on survival and severity of glomerulonephritis in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-prone MRLlpr/lpr mice.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, C A; Svensson, L; Carlsten, H

    1999-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on the course of disease in SLE-prone MRLlpr/lpr mice. Three-months-old mice displaying clinical symptoms of glomerulonephritis were given MMF (100 mg/kg per day) orally via the drinking water. Control mice received i.p. injections of cyclophosphamide (CYC) (1.8 mg/mouse per week) or saline. Survival, albuminuria and haematuria, immunoglobulin levels and anti-dsDNA antibodies in serum, frequencies of immunoglobulin-producing B lymphocytes and glomerular deposits of immunoglobulin and C3 were analysed. The results showed that MMF treatment significantly prolonged survival and reduced the occurrence of albuminuria and haematuria in MRLlpr/lpr mice. In addition, the number of immunoglobulin-producing B cells and serum levels of IgG and IgG anti-dsDNA antibodies were reduced after MMF and CYC treatment. MMF treatment significantly reduced the extent of deposition of C3 in glomeruli. We conclude that the reduced severity of glomerulonephritis following treatment of lupus-prone mice with MMF was as efficacious as that of CYC. These results warrant clinical trials of MMF in SLE patients with glomerulonephritis.

  2. Acquired hemophilia A in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T; Tsukamoto, N; Suto, M; Uchiumi, H; Mitsuhashi, H; Yokohama, A; Maesawa, A; Nojima, Y; Naruse, T

    2001-06-01

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) developed acquired hemophilia A. The patient, a 24-year-old Japanese woman, was referred to our hospital because of uncontrollable bleeding following a tooth extraction. Laboratory examination revealed prolonged APTT (116 seconds), reduced factor VIII activity (2.8 %) and the presence of factor VIII inhibitor at a titer of 46.5 Bethesda units/ml. Transfusion of prothrombin complex concentrate and activated prothrombin complex concentrate followed by administration of prednisolone and cyclophosphamide successfully arrested bleeding and reduced the factor VIII inhibitor level. Acquired hemophilia A is a rare but lethal condition. Rapid diagnosis and introduction of adequate therapies are critical. PMID:11446683

  3. Lupus cystitis in Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: risk factors and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koh, J H; Lee, J; Jung, S M; Ju, J H; Park, S-H; Kim, H-Y; Kwok, S-K

    2015-10-01

    This study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics of lupus cystitis and determine the risk factors and clinical outcomes of lupus cystitis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We retrospectively reviewed 1064 patients at Seoul St. Mary's Hospital in Seoul, Korea, from 1998 to 2013. Twenty-four patients had lupus cystitis. Lupus cystitis was defined as unexplained ureteritis and/or cystitis as detected by imaging studies, cystoscopy, or bladder histopathology without urinary microorganisms or stones. Three-fourths of patients with lupus cystitis had concurrent lupus mesenteric vasculitis (LMV). The initial symptoms were gastrointestinal in nature for most patients (79.2%). High-dose methylprednisolone was initially administered to most patients (91.7%) with lupus cystitis. Two patients (8.3%) died of urinary tract infections. Sixty-five age- and sex-matched patients with SLE who were admitted with other manifestations were included as the control group. Patients with lupus cystitis showed a lower C3 level (p = 0.031), higher SLE Disease Activity Index score (p = 0.006), and higher ESR (p = 0.05) upon admission; more frequently had a history of LMV prior to admission (p < 0.001); and less frequently had a history of neuropsychiatric lupus (p = 0.031) than did patients with SLE but without lupus cystitis. The occurrence of lupus cystitis was associated with a history of LMV (OR, 21.794; 95% CI, 4.061-116.963). The median follow-up period was 3.4 years, and the cumulative one-year mortality rate was 20%. Complications developed in 33.3% of patients with lupus cystitis and were related to survival (log-rank p = 0.021). Our results suggest that the possibility of lupus cystitis should be considered when a patient with SLE and history of LMV presents with gastrointestinal symptoms or lower urinary tract symptoms. Development of complications in patients with lupus cystitis can be fatal. Thus, intensive treatment

  4. Myth and reality: practical test system for the measurement of anti-DNA antibodies in the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Laura J; Christner, Paul; Jacobs-Kosmin, Dana; Jaskowski, Troy D; Hill, Harry R; Lakos, Gabriella; Teodorescu, Marius

    2010-01-01

    The myth persists that only the labor intensive Farr radioimmunoassay and Crithidia luciliae immunofluorescence (CL-IFA) are systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-specific tests. We compared them to ELISA with bacteriophage lambda DNA (EL-dsDNA) and denatured calf thymus DNA (EL-ssDNA). By percentile ranking, the specificity cut-off level was set both out of clinical context (SOCC) on 100 blood bank donors, and in clinical context (SICC) on 100 patients with either rheumatoid arthritis or scleroderma (50/50). Clinical sensitivity was calculated on 100 random SLE patients. At 95% SICC, the sensitivity of Farr, CL-IFA, EL-dsDNA, and EL-ssDNA was similar (95%CI): 76% (66-84), 76% (66-84), 63% (53-72), and 75% (65-83), respectively; 87% of the patients were positive by at least one method and 55%by all methods. At 99% SICC, the sensitivity was also similar (95% CI): 57% (47-67), 47% (37-57), 58% (47-67), and 43% (33-53), respectively. The areas under ROC curve were similar (95% CI) when patients were used as controls for specificity. At 99% SOCC, EL-ssDNA identified 89% positive, 2 negative but positive by another method at 95% SICC, and 9 negative (i.e. 89/2/9), followed by CL-IFA (80/6/14), Farr (76/12/12), and EL-dsDNA (64/23/13). Thus, at relatively low cost and easy automation, under the same conditions of specificity, the two ELISA tests combined were at least as good, if not superior, to CL-IFA or Farr: they showed similar clinical sensitivity and also identified more patients with anti-DNA antibodies.

  5. OxLDL/beta2GPI complexes and autoantibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and antiphospholipid syndrome: pathogenic implications for vascular involvement.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Luis R; Simpson, Daniel F; Hurley, Beth L; Matsuura, Eiji

    2005-06-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) interacts with beta2GPI, forming oxLDL/beta2GPI complexes. Autoimmune vascular inflammation (and oxidative stress) may promote the formation of these complexes. The coexistence of oxLDL/beta2GPI complexes with autoantibodies to these complexes suggests an active pro-atherogenic role in vascular thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-oxLDL/beta2GPI antibodies have been regarded as pro-atherogenic, whereas IgM antibodies are thought to be anti-atherogenic. For this study, oxLDL/beta2GPI complexes, IgG, and IgM anti-oxLDL/beta2GPI antibodies were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Measurements were taken in two patient groups: (1) those with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA); and (2) those with primary and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). For oxLDL/beta2GPI complexes, SLE and SSc patients had the highest mean optical densities (ODs) (P <.001), followed by RA (P = .139) and healthy controls. IgG anti-oxLDL/beta2GPI antibody distribution followed the same pattern observed with oxLDL/beta2GPI complexes, SLE and SSc (P <.001), RA (P = .08), and controls. IgM antibodies showed a reverse pattern, with the highest mean OD in RA (P <.001), followed by SSc (P = .007) and SLE (P = 143). Both IgG and IgM anti-oxLDL/beta2GPI antibodies were significantly higher in secondary APS patients compared with SLE controls without APS. In addition, the highest mean OD and prevalence of IgG anti-oxLDL/beta2GPI antibodies were observed in APS patients with a history of arterial thrombosis. These results may reflect the widespread vascular involvement seen in SLE and SSc, in contrast to the relatively low vascular involvement in RA. In SLE and SSc, high serum levels and prevalence of circulating oxLDL/beta2GPI complexes and IgG anti-oxLDL/beta2GPI antibodies indicate significant vascular oxidative stress as well as a possible pathogenic role

  6. Decreased B cell activating factor receptor expression on peripheral lymphocytes associated with increased disease activity in primary Sjögren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sellam, Jérémie; Miceli‐Richard, Corinne; Gottenberg, Jacques‐Eric; Ittah, Marc; Lavie, Frédéric; Lacabaratz, Christine; Gestermann, Nicolas; Proust, Alexis; Lambotte, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    Objective To analyse B cell activating factor (BAFF) receptor (BAFF‐R) expression on peripheral lymphocytes from patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Patients and methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 20 patients with pSS, 19 patients with SLE and 15 controls were examined by flow cytometry to investigate BAFF‐R mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) on lymphocytes. BAFF‐R mRNA level from isolated blood B cells of nine patients with pSS and eight controls was assessed by real‐time quantitative reverse transcription‐PCR. BAFF serum level was determined by ELISA. Results In all subjects, BAFF‐R was expressed on all naïve CD27− and memory CD27+ B‐cells and was present on <0.5% of T cells. The expression of BAFF‐R on B cells was significantly decreased in patients with pSS as compared with controls (MFI = 7.8 vs 10.6, p = 0.001), and was intermediate in patients with SLE (MFI = 9.5). Serum BAFF level was inversely correlated with BAFF‐R MFI (p = 0.007), but not because of competition between endogenous BAFF (at observed concentrations in patients) and the monoclonal antibody (11C1) detecting BAFF‐R. BAFF‐R mRNA levels did not differ between patients with pSS and controls (p = 0.48). BAFF‐R MFI decreased after overnight culture with recombinant human BAFF (from 32.5 to 25.4, p = 0.03). Contrary to the serum BAFF level, BAFF‐R expression was correlated with extraglandular involvement in pSS and SLE Disease Activity Index. Conclusions BAFF‐R expression is reduced on peripheral B cells of patients with pSS and SLE. This down‐regulation occurs through a post‐transcriptional mechanism and could be the consequence of chronic increase in BAFF. BAFF‐R levels on B cells could be a novel activity biomarker in autoimmune diseases. PMID:17185325

  7. Paraoxonase-1 and arylesterase activities in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Afsar, Cigdem Usul; Gunaldı, Meral; Okuturlar, Yıldız; Gedikbası, Asuman; Tiken, Elif Eda; Kahraman, Sibel; Karaca, Feryal; Ercolak, Vehbi; Karabulut, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate paraoxonase-1 (PON1) and arylesterase (ARE) activities and oxidative stress status in patients with colorectal carcinomas (CRC). Materials and methods: Thirty-three patients (20 male, 13 female) with CRC and 30 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were obtained from the CRC patients before adjuvant therapy. Serum samples from CRC patients and healthy controls were analyzed for PON1 and ARE activities. Results: The PON1 and ARE activities of the patients with CRC were significantly higher compared to those of the control group (PON1 activity is 125.35±20.07 U/L for CRC patients and 1.22±0.48 U/L for control group, P<0.001; ARE activity is 160.76±10.79 U/L for CRC patients). ARE levels showed a positive correlation with smoking status (P=0.04). PON1 activity was higher in colon carcinoma patients (135.95±19.3 U/L) rather than rectal carcinoma patients (97.08±5.24 U/L) but it was not statistically significant (P=0.72). Conclusion: Serum PON1 activity is increased in patients with CRC, and serum ARE levels showed a positive correlation with smoking status. PON1 activity was higher in colon carcinoma patients. There is no other study in literature investigating these activities for CRC patients. It should be reevaluated by larger clinical trials. PMID:26885111

  8. Exploring Patient Activation in the Clinic: Measurement from Three Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ledford, Christy J. W.; Ledford, Christopher C.; Childress, Marc A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To further conceptualize and operationalize patient activation (PA), using measures from patient, physician, and researcher perspectives. Data Source/Study Setting. Multimethod observation in 2010 within a family medicine clinic. Study Design. Part of an intervention with 130 patients with type 2 diabetes, this observational study…

  9. Heart disease and physical activity: looking beyond patient characteristics.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Chris M

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) adherence is a problem that has plagued cardiovascular disease patients for years. Because of this, researchers have advocated for the identification of key theoretical correlates that can be used to guide PA intervention development. The present review will identify key PA correlates for these patients and provide subsequent recommendations to look beyond patient-level correlates.

  10. Lower vitamin D levels are associated with higher systemic lupus erythematosus activity, but not predictive of disease flare-up

    PubMed Central

    Schoindre, Yoland; Jallouli, Moez; Tanguy, Marie-Laure; Ghillani, Pascale; Galicier, Lionel; Aumaître, Olivier; Francès, Camille; Le Guern, Véronique; Lioté, Frédéric; Smail, Amar; Limal, Nicolas; Perard, Laurent; Desmurs-Clavel, Hélène; Thi Huong, Du Le; Asli, Bouchra; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Sailler, Laurent; Ackermann, Félix; Papo, Thomas; Sacré, Karim; Fain, Olivier; Stirnemann, Jérôme; Cacoub, Patrice; Leroux, Gaëlle; Cohen-Bittan, Judith; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Lechat, Philippe; Musset, Lucile; Piette, Jean-Charles; Amoura, Zahir; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Growing evidence suggests that vitamin D plays a key role in the pathogenesis and progression of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Recent studies have found an association between lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels and higher SLE activity. We studied the relationship between 25(OH)D levels and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) score, and we assessed for the first time the role of vitamin D in predicting SLE flare-ups. Methods Serum 25(OH)D levels were measured in 170 patients with SLE who were prospectively followed up for 6 months (Plaquenil LUpus Systemic study, ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00413361). Results The mean SLEDAI score was 2.03±2.43 and 12.3% patients had active disease (SLEDAI ≥6). The mean 25(OH)D level was 20.6±9.8 ng/mL. Deficiency (25(OH)D <10 ng/mL) was observed in 27 (15.9%), insufficiency (10≤25(OH)D<30) in 112 (65.9%) and optimal vitamin D status (25(OH)D≥30) in 31 (18.2%) patients. In multivariate analysis, female gender (p=0.018), absence of defined antiphospholipid syndrome (p=0.002) and higher creatinine clearance (p=0.004) were predictive of lower 25(OH)D levels. In multivariate analysis, lower 25(OH)D levels were associated with high SLE activity (p=0.02). Relapse-free survival rate was not statistically different according to the vitamin D status during the 6-month follow-up (p=0.22). Conclusions We found a low vitamin D status in the majority of patients with SLE, and a modest association between lower 25(OH)D levels and high disease activity. There was no association between baseline 25(OH)D levels and relapse-free survival rate. PMID:25379192

  11. Commercial filming of patient care activities in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Geiderman, Joel M; Larkin, Gregory L

    2002-07-17

    Commercial filming of patient care activities is common in hospital settings. This article reviews common circumstances in which patients are commercially filmed, explores the potential positive and negative aspects of filming, and considers the ethical and legal issues associated with commercial filming of patients in hospital settings. We examine the competing goals of commercial filming and the duties of journalists vs the rights of patients to privacy. Current standards and recommendations for commercial filming of patient care activities are reviewed and additional recommendations are offered.

  12. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E.; Looger, Loren L.; Zhou, Xu-jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Harley, John B.; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,492 SLE cases and 12,675 controls from six East-Asian cohorts, to identify novel and better localize known SLE susceptibility loci. We identified 10 novel loci as well as 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the novel loci, the most significant was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta=3.75×10−117, OR=2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We localized the most likely functional variants for each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene regulation data. Ten putative variants are known to alter cis- or trans-gene expression. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B- and T-cell biology. Together with previously known loci, the explained heritability of SLE increases to 24%. Novel loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci, and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics. PMID:26808113

  13. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E; Looger, Loren L; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Wren, Jonathan D; Harley, John B; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K

    2016-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,478 SLE cases and 12,656 controls from six East Asian cohorts to identify new SLE susceptibility loci and better localize known loci. We identified ten new loci and confirmed 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the new loci, the most significant locus was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta = 3.75 × 10(-117), odds ratio (OR) = 2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We identified the most likely functional variants at each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene expression data. Ten candidate variants are known to alter gene expression in cis or in trans. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B cell and T cell biology. The new loci, together with previously known loci, increase the explained heritability of SLE to 24%. The new loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics.

  14. Subclinical cerebrovascular cognitive function, and mood changes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Abdel-Kareem, Mohamed I; Yassin, Abd ellah N; El Adl, Abdel Hamid R

    2010-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders, cerebral atherosclerosis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and explore the relation between transcranial duplex findings of different intracranial vessels with neuropsychiatric affect, and Systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index (SLEDAI). Methods Twenty-six consecutive SLE patients were evaluated for neurological and psychiatric disorders. Another 26 subjects matched with respect to age, sex, education, and socioeconomic status formed the control group. SLE disease activity was assessed by the SLEDAI. For each participant, a complete medical history was obtained and clinical, laboratory, and neurophysiological examinations, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, transcranial duplex for intracranial vessels, and psychometric evaluations were performed. For the psychometric evaluation, we used the Modified Mini-mental State Examination and Cognitive Assessment Scale Inventory to assess cognitive function, and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Hamilton Anxiety Scale to assess symptoms of depression and anxiety. Results Anxiety in 65.4% is the most prevalent manifestation followed by depression in 57.7%, headache in 38.5%, peripheral neuropathy in 26.9%, seizures in 23.1%, psychosis in 19.2%, radiculopathy and dementia in 15.4% for each, myositis in 11.5%, and stroke in 7.7%. There was a significant increased mean velocity and decreased pulsatility index of most studied intracranial vessels in both patient groups than in the control group. There was significant negative correlation between SLEDAI and transcranial Doppler findings in the pulsatility index of medial circumflex artery and procoagulant activity. Conclusion Neurological disorders, cognitive impairment, depression, anxiety, psychosis and cerebrovascular changes detected by transcranial Doppler ultrasound are common in SLE.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus antibodies mark systemic lupus erythematosus and scleroderma patients negative for anti-DNA.

    PubMed

    Fattal, Ittai; Shental, Noam; Molad, Yair; Gabrielli, Armando; Pokroy-Shapira, Elisheva; Oren, Shirly; Livneh, Avi; Langevitz, Pnina; Pauzner, Rachel; Sarig, Ofer; Gafter, Uzi; Domany, Eytan; Cohen, Irun R

    2014-02-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that can attack many different body organs; the triggering event is unknown. SLE has been associated with more than 100 different autoantibody reactivities - anti-dsDNA is prominent. Nevertheless, autoantibodies to dsDNA occur in only two-thirds of SLE patients. We previously reported the use of an antigen microarray to characterize SLE serology. We now report the results of an expanded study of serology in SLE patients and scleroderma (SSc) patients compared with healthy controls. The analysis validated and extended previous findings: two-thirds of SLE patients reacted to a large spectrum of self-molecules that overlapped with their reactivity to dsDNA; moreover, some SLE patients manifested a deficiency of natural IgM autoantibodies. Most significant was the finding that many SLE patients who were negative for autoantibodies to dsDNA manifested abnormal antibody responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV): these subjects made IgG antibodies to EBV antigens to which healthy subjects did not respond or they failed to make antibodies to EBV antigens to which healthy subjects did respond. This observation suggests that SLE may be associated with a defective immune response to EBV. The SSc patients shared many of these serological abnormalities with SLE patients, but differed from them in increased IgG autoantibodies to topoisomerase and centromere B; 84% of SLE patients and 58% of SSc patients could be detected by their abnormal antibodies to EBV. Hence an aberrant immune response to a ubiquitous viral infection such as EBV might set the stage for an autoimmune disease.

  16. Specific HDAC6 inhibition by ACY-738 reduces SLE pathogenesis in NZB/W mice.

    PubMed

    Regna, Nicole L; Vieson, Miranda D; Luo, Xin M; Chafin, Cristen B; Puthiyaveetil, Abdul Gafoor; Hammond, Sarah E; Caudell, David L; Jarpe, Matthew B; Reilly, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    We sought to determine if a selective HDAC6 inhibitor (ACY-738) decreases disease in NZB/W mice. From 22 to 38weeks-of-age, mice were injected intraperitoneally with 5 or 20mg/kg of ACY-738, or vehicle control. Body weight and proteinuria were measured every 2weeks, while sera anti-dsDNA, Ig isotypes, and cytokine levels were measured every 4weeks. Kidney disease was determined by evaluation of sera, urine, immune complex deposition, and renal pathology. Flow cytometric analysis assessed thymic, splenic, bone marrow, and peripheral lymphocyte differentiation patterns. Our results showed HDAC6 inhibition decreased SLE disease by inhibiting immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis, sera anti-dsDNA levels, and inflammatory cytokine production and increasing splenic Treg cells. Inhibition of HDAC6 increased the percentage of cells in the early-stage developmental fractions of both pro- and pre-B cells. These results suggest that specific HDAC6 inhibition may be able to decrease SLE disease by altering aberrant T and B cell differentiation. PMID:26604012

  17. Changes in referral, treatment and outcomes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in Germany in the 1990s and the 2000s

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Katinka; Huscher, Dörte; Richter, Jutta; Backhaus, Marina; Bischoff, Sascha; Kötter, Ina; Thiele, Katja; Zink, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate trends in the referral, treatment and outcome of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in Germany over two decades. Methods From 1993 to 2012, ∼1200 patients with SLE were recorded annually in the national database of the German Collaborative Arthritis Centres. Treatment patterns, healthcare use and outcomes, such as disease activity, function and work participation, were evaluated over time. Furthermore, two distinct cohorts of patients (enrolment 1994–1998, n=467; and 2004–2008, n=376) observed over 5 years were assessed for changes in outcomes. Results The mean disease duration at the first visit to a rheumatologist decreased from 2.6 (1994) to 1.5 (2012) years. Glucocorticoids (69%), antimalarials (56%), azathioprine (22%), non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (23%) and mycophenolate mofetil (15%) were the most frequently used treatments in 2012. A significant increase was observed in the use of antimalarials and mycophenolate mofetil. The use of glucocorticoids at >7.5 mg/day decreased from 27% (1994) to 10% (2012). The average length of sick leave taken due to SLE declined from 9 weeks (1997) to 6 weeks (2012). When comparing the two longitudinal cohorts, in the cohort from the 2000s, the intraindividual decline of disease activity was significantly stronger (p<0.001), and fewer patients retired early (36% vs 46%). Conclusions The disease activity and resource use declined considerably over the observation period, and more patients remained in the labour force. Earlier treatment onset, faster modification of the treatment regimen and more intensive use of anti-inflammatory therapy may account for the improved outcomes in patients with SLE across the years. PMID:25553251

  18. IgG, IgM, and IgA antinuclear antibodies in discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    Jost, Sheridan A; Tseng, Lin-Chiang; Matthews, Loderick A; Vasquez, Rebecca; Zhang, Song; Yancey, Kim B; Chong, Benjamin F

    2014-01-01

    IgG antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) are elevated in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) compared with patients with discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE). To provide an expanded immunologic view of circulating ANAs in lupus patients, we compared the expressions of IgG, IgM, and IgA ANAs in DLE and SLE patients. In this cross-sectional study, sera from age-, gender-, and ethnic-matched SLE (N = 35), DLE (N = 23), and normal patients (N = 22) were tested for IgG, IgM, and IgA ANAs using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) with monkey esophagus as substrate. ELISAs showed elevated levels of IgG ANA, IgM ANA, and IgG/IgM ANA ratios in SLE patients compared with DLE and normal patients. IgA ANA expression was higher in SLE and DLE patients versus normal patients. IIF studies showed higher percentages of patients positive for IgG, IgM, and IgA ANAs in the SLE group. Higher IgG/IgM ANA ratios in SLE than DLE show enhanced class-switching and a more sustained humoral response in SLE. They also suggest a potential connection of IgM ANAs with disease containment.

  19. Risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Charlene; Lin, Shih-Wei; Weng, Shih-Feng; Lin, Yung-Song

    2013-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) may be a manifestation of systemic vascular involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and may have an important impact on the health of patients with SLE. To investigate the risk of developing SSHL in patients with SLE, we conducted a population-based, retrospective cohort study from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A total of 7168 patients diagnosed with SLE and 35840 control subjects without SLE were selected from claims made from 2001 to 2006. The incidence of SSHL was assessed and determined at the end of 2010. The incidence of SSHL was 2.22-fold higher in the SLE group than in the non-SLE group (6.52 vs. 2.93 per 10000 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 2.253 (95% confidence interval, CI=1.407-3.608) calculated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. Age was an independent risk factor for SSHL, with adjusted HRs of 2.103 for individuals aged≥35 years compared with those 0-34 years. In the 0-34 age range, the incidence of developing SSHL was 4.27-fold (95% CI=2.11-8.67) higher in the SLE group compared with the non-SLE group. In female patients, the incidence of developing SSHL was 2.19-fold (95% CI=1.73-3.50) higher in the SLE group than in the non-SLE group. Systemic lupus erythematosus was significantly associated with an increased risk of developing SSHL. Scheduled auditory examinations for patients with SLE to assess the presence of chronic hearing impairment are advised to enable the early detection of SSHL.

  20. Increasing Patient Activation Could Improve Outcomes for Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Shah, Shawn L; Siegel, Corey A

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex disease process that often requires the integration of skills from various health care providers to adequately meet the needs of patients with IBD. The medical and surgical treatment options for IBD have become more complicated and are frequently a source of angst for both the patient and provider. However, it has become more important than ever to engage patients in navigating the treatment algorithm. Although novel in the IBD world, the concept of patients' becoming more active and effective managers of their care has been well studied in other disease processes such as diabetes mellitus and mental illness. This idea of patient activation refers to a patient understanding his or her role in the care process and having the skill sets and self-reliance necessary to manage his or her own health care. Over the past decade, evidence supporting the role of patient activation in chronic illness has grown, revealing improved health outcomes, enhanced patient experiences, and lower overall costs. Patient activation can be measured, and interventions have been shown to improve levels of activation over time and influence outcomes. A focus on patient activation is very appropriate for patients with IBD because this may potentially serve as a tool for IBD providers to not only improve patient outcomes and experience but also reduce health care costs.

  1. Sports, Physical Activity and Patient-Reported Outcomes After Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty in Young Patients.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tilman; Streit, Julia; Gotterbarm, Tobias; Bruckner, Thomas; Merle, Christian; Streit, Marcus R

    2015-11-01

    One hundred-and-one patients age 60 or younger following medial mobile bearing UKA were reviewed retrospectively with a minimum follow-up of 2 years using the Schulthess activity score, Tegner, UCLA and SF-36 score to assess their level of physical activity and quality of life. Patients showed a rapid recovery and resumption of their activities with a return-to-activity rate of 93%. Most common activities were low impact, whereas high-impact activities showed a significant decrease. Precaution was found to be the main reason for a decrease in the level of activity. The results of this study demonstrate that patients age 60 or younger following medial UKA were able to return to regular physical activities with almost two-thirds of the patients reaching a high activity level (UCLA≥7).

  2. Human Complement Receptor 2 (CR2/CD21) as a Receptor for DNA: Implications for its Roles in the Immune Response and the Pathogenesis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

    PubMed Central

    Asokan, Rengasamy; Banda, Nirmal K.; Szakonyi, Gerda; Chen, Xiaojiang S.; Holers, V. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Human CR2 is a B cell membrane glycoprotein that plays a central role in autoimmunity. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients show reduced CR2 levels, and complete deficiency of CR2 and CR1 promotes the development of anti-DNA antibodies in mouse models of SLE. Here we show that multiple forms of DNA, including bacterial, viral and mammalian DNA, bind to human CR2 with moderately high affinity. Surface plasmon resonance studies showed that methylated DNA bound with high affinity with CR2 at a maximal KD of 6 nM. DNA was bound to the first two domains of CR2 and this binding was blocked by using a specific inhibitory anti-CR2 mAb. DNA immunization in Cr2−/− mice revealed a specific defect in immune responses to bacterial DNA. CR2 can act as a receptor for DNA in the absence of complement C3 fixation to this ligand. These results suggest that CR2 plays a role in the recognition of foreign DNA during host-immune responses. This recognition function of CR2 may be a mechanism that influences the development of autoimmunity to DNA in SLE. PMID:22885687

  3. Flow-Induced Dispersion Analysis for Probing Anti-dsDNA Antibody Binding Heterogeneity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients: Toward a New Approach for Diagnosis and Patient Stratification.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Nicklas N; Pedersen, Morten E; Østergaard, Jesper; Petersen, Nickolaj J; Nielsen, Christoffer T; Heegaard, Niels H H; Jensen, Henrik

    2016-09-20

    Detection of immune responses is important in the diagnosis of many diseases. For example, the detection of circulating autoantibodies against double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) is used in the diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). It is, however, difficult to reach satisfactory sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy with established assays. Also, existing methodologies for quantification of autoantibodies are challenging to transfer to a point-of-care setting. Here we present the use of flow-induced dispersion analysis (FIDA) for rapid (minutes) measurement of autoantibodies against dsDNA. The assay is based on Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) and is fully automated with the use of standard capillary electrophoresis (CE) based equipment employing fluorescence detection. It is robust toward matrix effects as demonstrated by the direct analysis of samples composed of up to 85% plasma derived from human blood samples, and it allows for flexible exchange of the DNA sequences used to probe for the autoantibodies. Plasma samples from SLE positive patients were analyzed using the new FIDA methodology as well as by standard indirect immunofluorescence and solid-phase immunoassays. Interestingly, the patient antibodies bound DNA sequences with different affinities, suggesting pronounced heterogeneity among autoantibodies produced in SLE. The FIDA based methodology is a new approach for autoantibody detection and holds promise for being used for patient stratification and monitoring of disease activity. PMID:27571264

  4. Morvan Syndrome Secondary to Thymic Carcinoma in a Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Koussa, Salam

    2016-01-01

    Morvan syndrome (MoS) is a rare paraneoplastic autoimmune disorder characterized by peripheral nerve hyperexcitability, autonomic dysfunction, and sleep disorders. Systemic lupus erythmatosus (SLE) cooccurs in 6–10% of patients with thymoma. It may occur before, concurrently with, or after thymoma diagnosis. This paper reports the first case of cooccurrence of SLE, thymic carcinoma, and MoS. The cooccurrence of SLE, thymoma, and MoS delineates the generalized autoimmunity process. Symptoms of both MoS and SLE abated upon tumor resection. PMID:27247812

  5. CR1 stump peptide and terminal complement complexes are found in the glomeruli of lupus nephritis patients.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, J E; Costa, R S; Lachmann, P J; Würzner, R; Barbosa, J E

    1996-09-01

    The number of CR1 on podocytes is reduced in nephropathies with severe glomerular damage, especially in the diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis (DPGN) of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Reduction of CR1 number on erythrocytes is due to proteolysis of CR1 by macrophage proteases activated by the reaction of their complement receptors, which leaves a 'CR1 stump peptide' on the erythrocyte. In the present study, we demonstrated the presence of the terminal complement complex (TCC) and the CR1 stump in histological sections of biopsies from patients with SLE by the indirect immunoperoxidase technique. Less severe glomerular lesions presented TCC deposits mainly in the mesangium (mesangial pattern). In lupus nephritis, with more severe glomerular damage, TCC deposits were detected both in the mesangium and in the capillary loops with podocyte involvement (mixed pattern). Patients with highly active DPGN presented a marked reduction of intact podocyte CR1 receptors in association with increased reactivity to the anti-CR1 stump antibody and with glomerular TCC deposits of mixed histological pattern. These results suggest that the decrease in the number of podocyte CR1 receptors in severe glomerular lesions of SLE may be due to a local proteolytic activity associated with activation and deposition of TCC. PMID:8809140

  6. Early Components of the Complement Classical Activation Pathway in Human Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Katherine E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Yang, Yan; Spencer, Charles H.; Hauptmann, Georges; Hebert, Lee A.; Atkinson, John P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2016-01-01

    The complement system consists of effector proteins, regulators, and receptors that participate in host defense against pathogens. Activation of the complement system, via the classical pathway (CP), has long been recognized in immune complex-mediated tissue injury, most notably systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Paradoxically, a complete deficiency of an early component of the CP, as evidenced by homozygous genetic deficiencies reported in human, are strongly associated with the risk of developing SLE or a lupus-like disease. Similarly, isotype deficiency attributable to a gene copy-number (GCN) variation and/or the presence of autoantibodies directed against a CP component or a regulatory protein that result in an acquired deficiency are relatively common in SLE patients. Applying accurate assay methodologies with rigorous data validations, low GCNs of total C4, and heterozygous and homozygous deficiencies of C4A have been shown as medium to large effect size risk factors, while high copy numbers of total C4 or C4A as prevalent protective factors, of European and East-Asian SLE. Here, we summarize the current knowledge related to genetic deficiency and insufficiency, and acquired protein deficiencies for C1q, C1r, C1s, C4A/C4B, and C2 in disease pathogenesis and prognosis of SLE, and, briefly, for other systemic autoimmune diseases. As the complement system is increasingly found to be associated with autoimmune diseases and immune-mediated diseases, it has become an attractive therapeutic target. We highlight the recent developments and offer a balanced perspective concerning future investigations and therapeutic applications with a focus on early components of the CP in human systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:26913032

  7. Associations of clinical features and prognosis with age at disease onset in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Feng, X; Zou, Y; Pan, W; Wang, X; Wu, M; Zhang, M; Tao, J; Zhang, Y; Tan, K; Li, J; Chen, Z; Ding, X; Qian, X; Da, Z; Wang, M; Sun, L

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of clinical features and prognosis with age at disease onset in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in a large, multicenter Chinese cohort. Medical records of 1898 SLE inpatients from 15 hospitals were reviewed and classified into three groups according to their ages at disease presentation. Categorical data were analyzed by chi-square test and potentially associated factors were tested by multinomial logistic regression. Among the patients studied, 259 (13.6%) were juvenile onset (≤18 years), 1444 (76.1%) were early onset (>18 and ≤45 years) and 195 (10.3%) were late onset (>45 years). Whenever manifestations occurred, most patients (>80%) were diagnosed within two years. Juvenile-onset patients were more likely to be untreated before admission (p < 0.001) and have mucocutaneous manifestations (p < 0.001), but musculoskeletal symptoms (p < 0.05) and leukopenia (p < 0.05) were less frequent, while comorbidities were much higher in patients with late-onset SLE (p < 0.001). Neuropsychiatric, cardiopulmonary, renal and gastrointestinal involvement, disease activity index and damage scores were similar among three groups. Anti-Sm antibodies were less prevalent in late-onset patients (p < 0.05) and antimalarial drugs were more often applied to juvenile-onset patients (p < 0.001). As expected, mortality was elevated in the late-onset SLE group (p < 0.05), in which nearly half died of infections, which was much higher than those in the other two groups (p < 0.001). Logistic regression confirmed that patients with juvenile- and early-onset disease were associated with high incidence of being untreated prior to admission, and with low incidence of comorbidities as well as deaths caused by infection compared to patients with late-onset lupus. Interestingly, our data showed that more patients with late-onset disease had a SLEDAI score change of >7 at discharge. In

  8. Effects of an Individualized Activity Program on Elderly Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Carlota de Lerma; Salter, Charles A.

    1975-01-01

    A combined program of Reality Orientation, Activities of Daily Living, and Recreational Activities, together with environmental stimulation, was applied on an individualized basis to 21 elderly patients suffering from both psychological disorders and long-term physical illness. The motivation to participate in the available activities increased…

  9. Recommendations for physical activity in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Petajan, J H; White, A T

    1999-03-01

    For many years, patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, have been advised to avoid exercise. MS is believed to be autoimmune in origin, mediated by activated T cells which penetrate the blood-brain barrier and attack myelin. The pathophysiology, with respect to function is an impairment of saltatory conduction, specifically, slowing of conduction speed and/or conduction block. Symptoms can temporarily worsen on exposure to heat or during physical exercise. Exercise programmes must be designed to activate working muscles but avoid overload that results in conduction block. Fatigue, often severe, affects about 85% of MS patients and, along with motor and sensory symptoms, results in decreased mobility and reduced quality of life. Physical activity and recreation are reduced in patients with MS. Before developing recommendations, physical activity patterns and the physical effects of MS should be assessed in individual patients. Patients may then be functionally classified. Physical activity can also be classified in a pyramid structure, with the most basic functions forming the base and the most integrated functions on top. The muscular fitness pyramid progresses through passive range of motion, active resistive, specific strengthening and integrated strength exercises Overall physical activity may be increased according to functional level by performing activities of daily living, incorporating inefficiencies into daily living, pursuing more active recreation and eventually developing a structured exercise programme. The importance of the proper exercise environment, balance and coordination issues and factors related to adherence are discussed. PMID:10222541

  10. Complete remission of human parvovirus b19 associated symptoms by loxoprofen in patients with atopic predispositions.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Itsuro; Sasagawa, Naoko; Nakajima, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Two cases of women in their thirties with past histories of atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis developed a low grade fever, followed by a butterfly-shaped erythema, swelling of their fingers, and polyarthralgia. Despite such symptoms that overlap with those of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the diagnostic criteria for SLE were not fulfilled. Due to positive results for human parvovirus B19 (HPV-B19) IgM antibodies in the serum, diagnoses of HPV-B19 infection were made in both cases. Although acetaminophen failed to improve their deteriorating symptoms, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), loxoprofen, completely removed the symptoms immediately after the administration. In those cases, since the patients were predisposed to atopic disorders, an increased immunological response based on the lymphocyte hypersensitivity was likely to be involved in the pathogenesis. The immunomodulatory property of NSAID was thought to repress such lymphocyte activity and thus provided a rapid and sustained remission of the disease. PMID:22611409

  11. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: A real diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    García López, Carlos Alberto; Laredo-Sánchez, Fernando; Malagón-Rangel, José; Flores-Padilla, Miguel G; Nellen-Hummel, Haiko

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare syndrome described in recent decades. There are slightly over 30 published cases in the English language literature, primarily associated with renal and hematological disease activity. Its presentation and evolution are a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. We present four cases of intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to lupus in young Mexican females. One patient had a previous diagnosis of SLE and all presented with a urinary tract infection of varying degrees of severity during their evolution. We consider that recognition of the disease is of vital importance because it allows for establishing appropriate management, leading to a better prognosis and avoiding unnecessary surgery and complications. PMID:25170234

  12. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a real diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    García López, Carlos Alberto; Laredo-Sánchez, Fernando; Malagón-Rangel, José; Flores-Padilla, Miguel G; Nellen-Hummel, Haiko

    2014-08-28

    Intestinal pseudo-obstruction secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a rare syndrome described in recent decades. There are slightly over 30 published cases in the English language literature, primarily associated with renal and hematological disease activity. Its presentation and evolution are a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. We present four cases of intestinal pseudo-obstruction due to lupus in young Mexican females. One patient had a previous diagnosis of SLE and all presented with a urinary tract infection of varying degrees of severity during their evolution. We consider that recognition of the disease is of vital importance because it allows for establishing appropriate management, leading to a better prognosis and avoiding unnecessary surgery and complications.

  13. Elevated C-reactive protein and self-reported disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Eudy, A M; Vines, A I; Dooley, M A; Cooper, G S; Parks, C G

    2014-12-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a biomarker of inflammation, has been associated with increased disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. However, the association in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) remains unclear. We examined the association of CRP with self-reported disease activity in the Carolina Lupus Study and described differences by sociodemographic characteristics. The study included baseline and three-year follow-up data on 107 African-American and 69 Caucasian SLE patients enrolled at a median 13 months since diagnosis. Models estimated prevalence differences in the association of baseline CRP with self-reported flares, adjusting for age, sex, race and education. Active disease or flare was reported by 59% at baseline and 58% at follow-up. Higher CRP (>10 µg/ml vs. <3 µg/ml) was associated with a 17% (95% confidence interval (CI): -20, 53%) higher prevalence of flare at baseline and a 26% (95% CI: -9, 62%) higher prevalence of flare at follow-up. These CRP-flare associations were notably stronger in patients with lower education at baseline and in African-Americans at follow-up. These findings suggest that CRP may be a useful marker in studies of SLE health disparities.

  14. Disease activity and damage accrual during the early disease course in a multinational inception cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Nossent, J; Kiss, E; Rozman, B; Pokorny, G; Vlachoyiannopoulos, P; Olesinska, M; Marchesoni, A; Mosca, M; Påi, S; Manger, K; Schneider, M; Nielsen, H; van Vollenhoven, R; Swaak, T

    2010-07-01

    An inception cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus from 14 European centres was followed for up to 5 years in order to describe the current early disease course. At inclusion patients (n = 200, 89% female, mean age 35 years, 97% Caucasian, mean SLEDAI 12.2) fulfilled a mean of 6.5 ACR classification criteria. The most prevalent criteria were antinuclear Ab presence (97%) followed by anti-dsDNA Ab (74%), arthritis (69%), leukocytopenia (54%) and malar rash (53%), antiphospholipid Ab (48%) and anti-synovial membrane Ab (21.6%). Clinical signs of lupus nephritis (LN) were present in 39% with biopsy-confirmed LN seen in 25%. Frequent additional findings were hypocomplementaemia (54%), anti-SSA Ab (49%), alopecia (26%) and Raynaud's phenomenon (31%). There were few regional differences in disease presentation and management. One and 5-year survival rates were 99% and 97% respectively. During the mean follow-up of 4.1 years 25% entered a state of early disease quiescence by global physician assessment, but the overall risk of subsequent flare was 60%. Maximum SLEDAI scores decreased over time, but 45% of patients accrued damage (SDI >or=1) for which baseline presence of proteinuria and persistent disease activity were independent predictors. The results indicate minor differences in SLE presentation and treatment within various regions of Europe and a high diagnostic reliance on anti-dsDNA Ab. Despite early reductions in disease activity and improved mortality, the risk for disease flare and damage development is, however, still substantial, especially in patients not entering an early remission.

  15. CR1/CR2 deficiency alters IgG3 autoantibody production and IgA glomerular deposition in the MRL/lpr model of SLE.

    PubMed

    Boackle, Susan A; Culhane, Kristin K; Brown, Jared M; Haas, Mark; Bao, Lihua; Quigg, Richard J; Holers, V Michael

    2004-03-01

    CR1 and CR2 expression is decreased by approximately 50% on B cells of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Expression is also decreased in the MRL/lpr murine model of SLE prior to the development of clinical disease, suggesting that this alteration may play a role in pathogenesis. To determine whether the decrease in receptor levels affects the development of SLE, we analyzed MRL/lpr mice in which CR1/CR2 expression was altered by gene targeting. Mice from each cohort (Cr2+/+, Cr2+/-, and Cr2-/-) were analyzed biweekly for the development of proteinuria and autoantibodies. Kidneys were examined at 12 and 16 weeks for evidence of immune complex deposition and renal disease. Deficiency of CR1/CR2 did not affect survival or development of renal disease as measured by proteinuria. Mice deficient in CR1/CR2 had significantly lower levels of IgG3 rheumatoid factor (RF) and total serum IgG3, suggesting a specific defect in production of IgG3 in response to endogenous autoantigens. Since IgG3 RF has been associated with the development of vasculitis in this model, we examined the mice for alterations in development of this clinical manifestation. Although there was no difference in the development of ear necrosis among the three groups, renal arteritis was not identified in any of the Cr2+/- mice, whereas it was present in 20% of the Cr2+/- and 40% of the Cr2+/+ mice. Finally, significantly higher levels of IgA were seen in the glomeruli of Cr2+/- mice compared to Cr2+/- or Cr2+/+ mice, suggesting that CR1/CR2 are involved in either the regulation of IgA production or the clearance of IgA immune complexes. Together these data support the concept that alterations in CR1/CR2 expression or function affect the regulation of autoantibody production and/or clearance and may have clinical consequences.

  16. CR1/CR2 deficiency alters IgG3 autoantibody production and IgA glomerular deposition in the MRL/lpr model of SLE.

    PubMed

    Boackle, Susan A; Culhane, Kristin K; Brown, Jared M; Haas, Mark; Bao, Lihua; Quigg, Richard J; Holers, V Michael

    2004-03-01

    CR1 and CR2 expression is decreased by approximately 50% on B cells of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Expression is also decreased in the MRL/lpr murine model of SLE prior to the development of clinical disease, suggesting that this alteration may play a role in pathogenesis. To determine whether the decrease in receptor levels affects the development of SLE, we analyzed MRL/lpr mice in which CR1/CR2 expression was altered by gene targeting. Mice from each cohort (Cr2+/+, Cr2+/-, and Cr2-/-) were analyzed biweekly for the development of proteinuria and autoantibodies. Kidneys were examined at 12 and 16 weeks for evidence of immune complex deposition and renal disease. Deficiency of CR1/CR2 did not affect survival or development of renal disease as measured by proteinuria. Mice deficient in CR1/CR2 had significantly lower levels of IgG3 rheumatoid factor (RF) and total serum IgG3, suggesting a specific defect in production of IgG3 in response to endogenous autoantigens. Since IgG3 RF has been associated with the development of vasculitis in this model, we examined the mice for alterations in development of this clinical manifestation. Although there was no difference in the development of ear necrosis among the three groups, renal arteritis was not identified in any of the Cr2+/- mice, whereas it was present in 20% of the Cr2+/- and 40% of the Cr2+/+ mice. Finally, significantly higher levels of IgA were seen in the glomeruli of Cr2+/- mice compared to Cr2+/- or Cr2+/+ mice, suggesting that CR1/CR2 are involved in either the regulation of IgA production or the clearance of IgA immune complexes. Together these data support the concept that alterations in CR1/CR2 expression or function affect the regulation of autoantibody production and/or clearance and may have clinical consequences. PMID:15293881

  17. Variables associated with patient activation in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goodworth, Marie-Christine R; Stepleman, Lara; Hibbard, Judith; Johns, Lisa; Wright, Dustin; Hughes, Mary D; Williams, Mitzi J

    2016-01-01

    Identifying variables associated with patient activation in the multiple sclerosis population could serve to facilitate better multiple sclerosis self-management behaviors. Using a cross-sectional survey design, 199 participants were recruited from a multiple sclerosis center in the Southeastern United States. Depression, multiple sclerosis quality of life, and multiple Sclerosis self-efficacy were all significantly correlated with patient activation. Results of a hierarchical regression indicated that patient activation was significantly related to educational attainment, depression, and self-efficacy but not to quality of life. The results suggest several possible targets for intervention to increase patient activation, including health literacy, depression symptoms, and self-efficacy for multiple sclerosis disease management.

  18. Copy Number Variation of TLR-7 Gene and its Association with the Development of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Female Patients from Yucatan Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Guillermo Valencia; Cruz, Darig Cámara; González Herrera, Lizbeth J; Pérez Mendoza, Gerardo J; Adrián Amaro, Guadalupe I; Nakazawa Ueji, Yumi E; Angulo Ramírez, Angélica V

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies against self-antigens, which occurs most often in women between 15 and 40 years of age. The innate immunity is involved in the pathogenesis of SLE through TLR- 7. Genetic factors such as copy number variation (CNV) of target genes may contribute to disease development, but this possible risk has not yet been studied in SLE patients from Yucatan, Mexico. The CNV of TLR-7 gene was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay using TaqMan probes in 80 SLE women and 150 control subjects. The results showed that 10% of SLE patients exhibited more than two copies of TLR-7 gene, whereas no mRNA overexpression was detected. These data suggested that increased CNV of the TLR-7 gene in Yucatan SLE women can be a risk factor for this disease. PMID:25512712

  19. Hair dye treatment use and clinical course in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and cutaneous lupus.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Alonso, J; Sabio, J M; Pérez-Alvarez, F; Reche, I; Hidalgo, C; Jáimez, L

    2002-01-01

    The etiological role of hair dye treatment (HDT), some of them such as permanent hair dyes containing aromatic amines, in the development of SLE has been previously ruled out. However, the possible influence of HDT use on the course and prognosis of lupus patients has been assessed only in one short-term study. Since HDT is very extensive among the population, the knowledge of this possible negative effect may be very important. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the long-term influence of several HDTs on the course and clinical severity of patients with both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and cutaneous lupus (CL). In this longitudinal case series study, 91 SLE patients and 22 CL patients were prospectively studied from October 1988 to May 2000. They were divided into three groups: (a) non-HDT users--patients who have never used HDT (n = 65); (b) P-HDT users--HDT permanent type users, alone or in combination with other types of HDT (n = 28); (c) non P-HDT--users of other treatments different from permanent tinting (bleach, lowlights, etc; n = 20). In each patient we determined: (1) number of flares/year in SLE patients and worsening of cutaneous lesions for CL; (2) Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) damage index; (3) predominant damaged organs/systems according to the HDT use and type of HDT; and (4) subjective impression about the disease evolution in relation to HDT use. No significant differences were found with respect to flares/year and SLICC/ACR damage index between the study groups. Non-HDT group presented more renal involvement and serositis than both HDT-user groups. No patient related the HDT use to the worsening of his disease. Therefore, in this study no evidence of an association between the long-term use of several types of HDT and the clinical activity and course of SLE and CL was found.

  20. Hair dye treatment use and clinical course in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and cutaneous lupus.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Alonso, J; Sabio, J M; Pérez-Alvarez, F; Reche, I; Hidalgo, C; Jáimez, L

    2002-01-01

    The etiological role of hair dye treatment (HDT), some of them such as permanent hair dyes containing aromatic amines, in the development of SLE has been previously ruled out. However, the possible influence of HDT use on the course and prognosis of lupus patients has been assessed only in one short-term study. Since HDT is very extensive among the population, the knowledge of this possible negative effect may be very important. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the long-term influence of several HDTs on the course and clinical severity of patients with both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and cutaneous lupus (CL). In this longitudinal case series study, 91 SLE patients and 22 CL patients were prospectively studied from October 1988 to May 2000. They were divided into three groups: (a) non-HDT users--patients who have never used HDT (n = 65); (b) P-HDT users--HDT permanent type users, alone or in combination with other types of HDT (n = 28); (c) non P-HDT--users of other treatments different from permanent tinting (bleach, lowlights, etc; n = 20). In each patient we determined: (1) number of flares/year in SLE patients and worsening of cutaneous lesions for CL; (2) Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) damage index; (3) predominant damaged organs/systems according to the HDT use and type of HDT; and (4) subjective impression about the disease evolution in relation to HDT use. No significant differences were found with respect to flares/year and SLICC/ACR damage index between the study groups. Non-HDT group presented more renal involvement and serositis than both HDT-user groups. No patient related the HDT use to the worsening of his disease. Therefore, in this study no evidence of an association between the long-term use of several types of HDT and the clinical activity and course of SLE and CL was found. PMID:12195784

  1. Management of Hypertension: Adapting New Guidelines for Active Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.; Batt, Mark E.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses recent guidelines on hypertension from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and details the latest management protocols for patients with high blood pressure. The article helps physicians interpret the guidelines for treating active patients, highlighting diagnosis, step care revision, pharmacology, and sports participation…

  2. Salivary Ceruloplasmin Ferroxidase & Oxidase Activities in Celiac Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Hathama R.; Ghadhban, Jasim M.; Abudal Kadhum, Zahraa I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate salivary ferroxidase ceruloplasmin activities in celiac patients with different histopathological severity. This study included 75 celiac patients with different mean age (18.68 ± 11.13) year, who had positive screen for celiac antibodies, and who had gastrointestinal symptoms. In order to simplify the comparison with the healthy control group, celiac patients were divided into two groups according to their histopathological severity: severe (marsh IIIa, b, c) & less severe (marsh 0, I). All these patients have been evaluating for salivary ceruloplasmin (Cp) concentration and Cp ferroxidase activities. To confirm the presence of the enzymatic activity of this protein, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was carried out and then stained for Cp ferroxidase, as well as for Cp oxidase activity. Furthermore, the concentrations of salivary total protein, albumin, and globulin were measured in the studied groups. A significant increase (p<0.05) in salivary concentration of ceruloplasmin was found in all above mentioned patients groups in comparison to that of the control group, except for total villous atrophy (marsh IIIc) patients subgroup. Salivary Cp ferroxidase activity revealed statistically significant decrease among the patient groups as well as between them and the control group. The result of salivary total protein and globulin showed presence a significant increase (p<0.05) in comparison to that of the control group. Meanwhile albumin levels was found to increase non-significantly (p=0.186). PMID:23675269

  3. Decreased Prolidase Activity in Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Mahmut; Atli, Abdullah; Kaplan, İbrahim; Kaya, Mehmet Cemal; Bez, Yasin; Özdemir, Pınar Güzel; Sır, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many neurochemical systems have been implicated in the development of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The prolidase enzyme is a cytosolic exopeptidase that detaches proline or hydroxyproline from the carboxyl terminal position of dipeptides. Prolidase has important biological effects, and to date, its role in the etiology of PTSD has not been studied. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate prolidase activity in patients with PTSD. Methods The study group consisted of patients who were diagnosed with PTSD after the earthquake that occurred in the province of Van in Turkey in 2011 (n=25); the first control group consisted of patients who experienced the earthquake but did not show PTSD symptoms (n=26) and the second control group consisted of patients who have never been exposed to a traumatic event (n=25). Prolidase activities in the patients and the control groups were determined by the ELISA method using commercial kits. Results Prolidase activity in the patient group was significantly lower when compared to the control groups. Prolidase activity was also significantly lower in the traumatized healthy subjects compared to the other healthy group (p<0.01). Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that the decrease in prolidase activity may have neuroprotective effects in patients with PTSD. PMID:27482243

  4. Concurrent validation of activity monitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis☆

    PubMed Central

    Backhouse, Michael R.; Hensor, Elizabeth M.A.; White, Derrick; Keenan, Anne-Maree; Helliwell, Philip S.; Redmond, Anthony C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Physical activity is frequently reported in rheumatology but it is difficult to measure objectively outside the gait laboratory. A new generation of activity monitors offers this potential but it has not yet been evaluated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This study aimed to evaluate three types of activity monitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods The Step-N-Tune, Activ4Life Pro V3.8, and the Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity activity monitors were tested concurrently in 12 patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as in a healthy control group of 12 volunteers. Participants walked at a self selected speed for two minutes and were filmed for later review. Temporal and spatial gait parameters were also validated against the GAITRite walkway and the total number of steps recorded by each activity monitor was compared to a gold standard derived from half speed video replays. Findings Activity monitor performance varied between devices but all showed poorer performance when used in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. Bland–Altman plots demonstrated wider 95% limits of agreement in the group with rheumatoid arthritis and a systematic decrease in agreement between activity monitors and the gold standard with decreasing functional ability. Interpretation Despite some variation between devices, all the activity monitors tested performed reasonably well in healthy young volunteers. All except the Activ4Life showed a marked decrease in performance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting Activ4Life could be the most suitable for use in this patient group. The marked between group difference in functional ability, and systematic decrease in device performance with deteriorating gait, indicate that activity monitors require specific validation in target clinical populations. PMID:23522723

  5. Spontaneous retroperitoneal bleeding from renal microaneurysms and pancreatic pseudocyst in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Melamed, N; Molad, Y

    2006-01-01

    Visceral vasculitis and pancreatic pseudocyst are rare manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We describe a patient with SLE who presented with spontaneous bilateral perinephric and retroperitoneal haematoma secondary to polyarteritis nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis of the renal arteries, which subsequently evolved into systemic vasculitis with pancreatic pseudocyst formation.

  6. Complement Activation in Patients with Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Wong, Maria; Renner, Brandon; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Giclas, Patricia C.; Joy, Melanie S.; Jalal, Diana; Radeva, Milena K.; Gassman, Jennifer; Gipson, Debbie S.; Kaskel, Frederick; Friedman, Aaron; Trachtman, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent pre-clinical studies have shown that complement activation contributes to glomerular and tubular injury in experimental FSGS. Although complement proteins are detected in the glomeruli of some patients with FSGS, it is not known whether this is due to complement activation or whether the proteins are simply trapped in sclerotic glomeruli. We measured complement activation fragments in the plasma and urine of patients with primary FSGS to determine whether complement activation is part of the disease process. Study Design Plasma and urine samples from patients with biopsy-proven FSGS who participated in the FSGS Clinical Trial were analyzed. Setting and Participants We identified 19 patients for whom samples were available from weeks 0, 26, 52 and 78. The results for these FSGS patients were compared to results in samples from 10 healthy controls, 10 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), 20 patients with vasculitis, and 23 patients with lupus nephritis. Outcomes Longitudinal control of proteinuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Measurements Levels of the complement fragments Ba, Bb, C4a, and sC5b-9 in plasma and urine. Results Plasma and urine Ba, C4a, sC5b-9 were significantly higher in FSGS patients at the time of diagnosis than in the control groups. Plasma Ba levels inversely correlated with the eGFR at the time of diagnosis and at the end of the study. Plasma and urine Ba levels at the end of the study positively correlated with the level of proteinuria, the primary outcome of the study. Limitations Limited number of patients with samples from all time-points. Conclusions The complement system is activated in patients with primary FSGS, and elevated levels of plasma Ba correlate with more severe disease. Measurement of complement fragments may identify a subset of patients in whom the complement system is activated. Further investigations are needed to confirm our findings and to determine the prognostic significance of

  7. Synchronization of EEG activity in patients with bipolar disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panischev, O. Yu; Demin, S. A.; Muhametshin, I. G.; Demina, N. Yu

    2015-12-01

    In paper we apply the method based on the Flicker-Noise Spectroscopy (FNS) to determine the differences in frequency-phase synchronization of the cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) activities in patients with bipolar disorder (BD). We found that for healthy subjects the frequency-phase synchronization of EEGs from long-range electrodes was significantly better for BD patients. In BD patients a high synchronization of EEGs was observed only for short-range electrodes. Thus, the FNS is a simple graphical method for qualitative analysis can be applied to identify the synchronization effects in EEG activity and, probably, may be used for the diagnosis of this syndrome.

  8. Virtual patients as activities: exploring the research implications of an activity theoretical stance.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H

    2014-09-01

    Virtual patients are computer-based simulators of patient encounters for the purposes of instruction, practice, and assessment. Although virtual patients have been around for some time they have yet to become part of mainstream medical education. A major reason for this would seem to be a lack of clarity as to what educational value virtual patients actually have. This paper argues that virtual patients should be seen as activities rather than artifacts and that activity theory can be used to generate different ways to frame scholarship in and around virtual patients. Drawing on the work of Leont'ev and Engeström this paper describes a range of perspectives based on the operations, actions, and objectives in and around virtual patients; the use of virtual patients to mediate activities; and the sociocultural context and the participants in virtual patient activities. This approach allows us to move beyond the 'does or does not work' discourse of much of the existing scholarship around virtual patients and, to an extent, around educational technologies as a whole. Activity perspectives, and activity theory in particular, offer new horizons for research and evaluation that address many of the limitations of intervention-based paradigms of inquiry.

  9. Response to belimumab among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in clinical practice settings: 24-month results from the OBSErve study in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Collins, C E; Dall'Era, M; Kan, H; Macahilig, C; Molta, C; Koscielny, V; Chang, D J

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine disease activity and clinical outcomes, and describe overall patterns of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) care in patients who received belimumab in a real-world clinical setting. Methods This observational cohort study was conducted in US clinical practices. Rheumatologists (n=92) identified adults with SLE who had received ≥8 infusions of belimumab plus standard of care (SoC). Physicians assessed disease outcomes at 6-month intervals using patient medical charts, for up to 24 months. The primary outcome was physician-assessed change in SLE disease. Other outcomes included change in steroid use, laboratory tests and healthcare resource utilisation (HCRU). Results Of 501 patients (intent-to-treat population (ITT)), 446 were female, mean age was 43.3 years and 98% had moderate/severe disease activity at baseline (first dose of belimumab). Data for 277 patients who completed 24 months of belimumab treatment were available. Among the ITT, a ≥50% improvement in overall clinical response between baseline and month 6 was reported for 48.7% of patients; continued improvement was seen at all subsequent 6-month intervals relative to the previous timepoint. The percentage of patients with moderate/severe disease also decreased at each timepoint. At baseline, 77.0% of patients received steroids at a mean (SD) prednisone equivalent dose of 19.9 (14.39) mg/day, which decreased to 8.4 (7.35) mg/day at month 6 and 6.1 (9.31) mg/day at month 24. Abnormal laboratory values typically associated with SLE also demonstrated improvements at month 6, which continued through 24 months. HCRU decreased over the duration of the study. Conclusions Patients with SLE who received belimumab plus SoC for up to 24 months demonstrated improvements in disease severity and laboratory values and a reduction in steroid use and HCRU as early as month 6. Improvements continued through 24 months, providing evidence of reduced disease activity among patients taking

  10. [Substantiation of active surgical tactics for patients with puerperal endometritis].

    PubMed

    Nikonov, A P; Ankirskaia, A S

    1991-01-01

    An active surgical tactics for managing patients (uterine wash and its cavity content vacuum aspiration) was applied in 34 patients with postnatal endometritis. Echography and hysteroscopy demonstrated that in 28 of 34 patients, the endometritis developed in the presence of pathological involvements into the uterine cavity, which made the use of surgical endometrial treatment justifiable. In addition, the surgical treatment substantially decreased the bacterial dissemination of the content in the uterine cavity. The proposed procedure enabled uterine extirpation to be avoided in 5 of 6 patients with partial suture inadequacy. PMID:2042714

  11. [Creative arts activity in manually handicapped patients].

    PubMed

    Wolf, N

    1986-02-01

    Congenital or acquired conditions directly or indirectly causal in total or partial impairment of manual function are set out. The possibilities for creative-expressive activity, using various techniques, nothwithstanding manual disabilities are pointed out. In Cefischer, who until his war-related loss of both upper limbs had been a renowned cartoonist, a comparison of his works, drawn initially by hand and later with the mouth, reveals his characteristic style of expression having remained the same. Further examples are given of creative expression in the presence of manual disability even under extreme circumstances (such as 11 years of confinement to the Iron Lung). Arts and crafts work of persons with leprosy-related manual handicaps are mentioned; typewriter graphics as a method inaugurated by Basset is presented as used in young people with total manual disability. Partial disability of manual function due to arthritis was present in Renoir, Jawlensky, and Grandma Moses, the course of their conditions is described over time. Contents and form of their pictures, after long years of being manually disabled, do not reveal any essential changes in comparison to their earlier ones. PMID:2938233

  12. Prognostic value of serum angiogenic activity in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Francisco-Jesus; Quesada, Ana-Rodriguez; Sevilla, Isabel; Baca, Juan-Javier; Medina, Miguel-Angel; Amores, Jose; Diaz, Juan Miguel; Rius-Diaz, Francisca; Marques, Eduardo; Alba, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Angiogenesis, resulting from an imbalance between angiogenic activator factors and inhibitors, is required for tumour growth and metastasis. The determination of the circulating concentration of all angiogenic factors (activators and inhibitors) is not feasible at present. We have evaluated diagnostic and prognostic values of the measurement of serum angiogenic activity in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients. Serum proliferative activity (PA) on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in vitro, and serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels were determined by ELISA in 53 patients with primary CRC, 16 subjects with non-neoplastic gastrointestinal disease (SC) and 34 healthy individuals. Data were compared with clinical outcome of the patients. Although serum from CRC patients significantly increased the PA of HUVEC, compared to culture control (HUVEC in medium + 10% foetal bovine serum (FBS); P < 0.001); our results indicate that serum PA in CRC patients was similar to that of SC or healthy individuals. There was no correlation between serum PA and circulating VEGF concentrations. Surgery produced a decrease of PA at 8 hrs after tumour resection in CRC patients compared to pre-surgery values (186 ± 47 versus 213 ± 41, P < 0.001). However, an increase in serum VEGF values was observed after surgery (280 [176–450] versus 251 [160–357] pg/ml, P = 0.004). Patients with lower PA values after surgery showed a worse outcome that those with higher PA values. Therefore, this study does not support a diagnostic value for serum angiogenic activity measured by proliferative activity on HUVEC but suggests it could have a prognostic value in CRC patients. PMID:17367506

  13. Tuberculosis among Filipino patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Victorio-Navarra, S T; Dy, E E; Arroyo, C G; Torralba, T P

    1996-12-01

    A retrospective review of the clinical records of 54 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and documented tuberculosis (TB) infection seen at the University of Santo Tomas Hospital was accomplished. There were 53 women and one man, with a mean age of 32.2 +/- 10 years and a total of 57 TB occurrences. Pulmonary involvement was recorded in 42 (74%): upper lungfield in 25, mid to lower lungfield in 7, and miliary pattern or diffuse infiltrates in 10. TB arthritis was noted in 8, osteomyelitis in 4, and soft tissue abscesses in 4. Central nervous system involvement consisted of brain abscesses (tuberculomas) in two and meningitis in one. Two patients each had TB lymphadenitis, genitourinary TB, ileocecal TB, and TB peritonitis. Hepatobiliary and cutaneous TB occurred in one patient each. Eight of 10 patients with disseminated or miliary TB died primarily of respiratory failure; six of these eight patients also had some form of extrapulmonary involvement. Using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test, there were significant differences in the mean SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and Severity of Disease Index (SDI) scores between those with limited TB (SLEDAI 24 +/- 7 SD; SDI 19 +/- 18 SD) versus those with extensive TB (SLEDAI 41 +/- 16 SD; SDI 36 +/- 21 SD), P < .05. There was no significant difference in the average daily prednisone dose (mg) between those with limited TB (25 +/- 17 SD) versus those with extensive TB (31 +/- 16 SD). The contributory role of tuberculous infection in the morbidity and mortality of patients with SLE must be emphasized, especially in areas endemic for TB.

  14. Differential clearance mechanisms, neutrophil extracellular trap degradation and phagocytosis, are operative in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with distinct autoantibody specificities.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sudhir Kumar; Rai, Richa; Singh, Vikas Vikram; Rai, Madhukar; Rai, Geeta

    2015-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients are generally presented with autoantibodies against either dsDNA or RNA-associated antigens (also known as extractable nuclear antigens, ENA) or both. However, the mechanisms and processes that lead to this distinctive autoantibody profile are not well understood. Defects in clearance mechanism i.e. phagocytosis may lead to enhanced microbial and cellular debris of immunogenic potential. In addition to defective phagocytosis, impaired neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) degradation has been recently reported in SLE patients. However, the extent to which both these clearance processes (NET-degradation and phagocytosis) are operative in serologically distinguished subsets of SLE patients is not established. Therefore, in this report, we evaluated NET-degradation and phagocytosis efficiency among SLE patients with different autoantibody specificities. SLE patients were classified into three subsets based on their autoantibody profile (anti-dsDNA, anti-ENA or both) as determined by ELISA. NET-degradation by SLE and control sera was assessed by sytox orange-based fluorescence assay. Neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis in the presence of SLE and control sera was determined by flowcytometry. The segregation of SLE patients revealed significant differences in NET-degradation and phagocytosis in SLE patients with autoantibodies against dsDNA and ENA. We report that NET-degradation efficiency was significantly impaired in SLE patients with anti-dsDNA autoantibodies and not in those with anti-ENA autoantibodies. In contrast to NET-degradation, neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis was impaired in all three subsets independent of autoantibody specificity. These observations suggest that varying clearance mechanisms are operative in SLE subsets with anti-dsDNA or anti-ENA autoantibodies. The results outlined in this manuscript also suggest that sub-grouping of SLE patients could be useful in delineating the molecular and pathological

  15. The spectrum of nasal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus and its association with the disease activity.

    PubMed

    Kusyairi, K A; Gendeh, B S; Sakthiswary, R; Shaharir, S S; Haizlene, A H; Yusof, K H

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of nasal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its association with the disease activity of SLE based on the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). This was a cross-sectional and observational study involving 73 stable SLE patients. All subjects were evaluated for the SLEDAI scores and had nasal endoscopic examination. The most commonly reported symptom was nasal congestion (31.5%) followed by nasal itchiness (26.0%), runny nose (20.5%) and nasal dryness (19.2%). Almost half (42.9%) of the subjects had nasal mucosal abnormalities, which included mucositis, crusting, ulceration, bifid middle turbinate, septal spur, Jacobson's organ, deviated nasal septum, bilateral inferior turbinate hypertrophy, everted uncinate process, nasopharynx cleft and torus palatinus. The median SLEDAI score for subjects with nasal symptoms was significantly higher than subjects without nasal symptoms (p < 0.05). Similarly, subjects with moderate to high activity (SL