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Sample records for active slip plane

  1. Plane constrained shear of single crystal strip with two active slip systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, K. C.; Sembiring, P.

    Within continuum dislocation theory the plane constrained shear of a single crystal strip with two active slip systems is considered. An analytical solution is found for symmetric double slip which exhibits the energetic and dissipative thresholds for dislocation nucleation, the Bauschinger translational work hardening, and the size effects. Comparison with discrete dislocation simulations shows good agreement between the discrete and continuum approaches. Numerical procedures in the general case of non-symmetric double slip are proposed.

  2. Dislocation microstructures and strain-gradient plasticity with one active slip plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Sergio; Garroni, Adriana; Müller, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    We study dislocation networks in the plane using the vectorial phase-field model introduced by Ortiz and coworkers, in the limit of small lattice spacing. We show that, in a scaling regime where the total length of the dislocations is large, the phase field model reduces to a simpler model of the strain-gradient type. The limiting model contains a term describing the three-dimensional elastic energy and a strain-gradient term describing the energy of the geometrically necessary dislocations, characterized by the tangential gradient of the slip. The energy density appearing in the strain-gradient term is determined by the solution of a cell problem, which depends on the line tension energy of dislocations. In the case of cubic crystals with isotropic elasticity our model shows that complex microstructures may form in which dislocations with different Burgers vector and orientation react with each other to reduce the total self-energy.

  3. Slipping and Rolling on an Inclined Plane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Aghamohammadi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    In the first part of the paper, using a direct calculation two-dimensional motion of a particle sliding on an inclined plane is investigated for general values of friction coefficient ([mu]). A parametric equation for the trajectory of the particle is also obtained. In the second part of the paper, the motion of a sphere on the inclined plane is…

  4. Shearing flows of frictionless spheres over bumpy planes: slip velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzi, Diego; Vescovi, Dalila

    2016-05-01

    Boundary conditions for the slip velocity of inelastic, frictionless spheres interacting with bumpy walls are derived via discrete element method simulations of Couette granular flows. The bumpiness is created by gluing spheres identical to those flowing in a regular hexagonal array to a flat plane. Depending on the particle inelasticity and bumpiness, the characteristics of the flow range from simple shearing to plug flow. At low bumpiness—small distance between the wall-particles—the ratio of particle shear stress to pressure is a non-linear function of the slip velocity and presents a maximum. At high bumpiness, the bumpy plane behaves as a flat, frictional surface and the stress ratio saturates to a constant value for large slip velocity.

  5. The 1994 Sefidabeh earthquakes in eastern Iran: blind thrusting and bedding-plane slip on a growing anticline, and active tectonics of the Sistan suture zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberian, M.; Jackson, J. A.; Qorashi, M.; Talebian, M.; Khatib, M.; Priestley, K.

    2000-08-01

    In 1994 a sequence of five earthquakes with Mw 5.5-6.2 occurred in the Sistan belt of eastern Iran, all of them involving motion on blind thrusts with centroid depths of 5-10km. Coseismic ruptures at the surface involved bedding-plane slip on a growing hanging-wall anticline displaying geomorphological evidence of uplift and lateral propagation. The 1994 earthquakes were associated with a NW-trending thrust system that splays off the northern termination of a major N-S right-lateral strike-slip fault. Elevation changes along the anticline ridge suggest that displacement on the underlying thrust dies out to the NW, away from its intersection with the strike-slip fault. This is a common fault configuration in eastern Iran and accommodates oblique NE-SW shortening across the N-S deforming zone, probably by anticlockwise rotations about a vertical axis. This style of fault kinematics may be transitional to a more evolved state that involves partitioning of the strike-slip and convergent motion onto separate subparallel faults.

  6. Slip of polydisperse polymers: Molecular weight distribution above and below the plane of slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzevari, Seyed Mostafa; Strandman, Satu; Wood-Adams, Paula Marie

    2015-04-01

    When strong slip occurs during the drag flow of highly entangled polybutadienes (PBD) in a sliding plate rheometer equipped with stainless steel parallel plates, a thin film of polymer debris remains on the substrate after the slip. This debris is assumed to be formed by the disentanglement process that occurs in strong slip at a distance of about one molecular size from the plate. In order to evaluate the composition of the debris we collected it with tetrahydrofuran and subjected it to gel permeation chromatography. It was found that the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of the debris is significantly different from that of the bulk. Moreover, in mixtures prepared from long and short PBDs with distinctly different molecular weight distributions, the MWD of the debris was found to be richer in low molecular weight components and leaner in the high molecular weight components compared to the bulk. This information is important since it reveals the compositional difference between the bulk and interfacial layer above and below the plane of slip. The difference in MWD is likely a consequence of the strong slip in which some of long chains are pulled away from the surface-adsorbed chains by the flow leaving a debris lean in the high molecular weight component.

  7. Stokes drag on a disc with a Navier slip condition near a plane wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, J. D.

    2013-10-01

    The Stokes drag and couple acting on a disc moving through incompressible Newtonian fluid are investigated for the case when the fluid obeys a Navier slip condition, with slip length b, on the surface of the disc. The fluid is bounded by an infinite plane wall on which there is no slip. The disc, of zero thickness and radius a, is parallel to the wall and distance h from it. Analyses are presented for the limits h ≫ a and h ≪ a results for intermediate values of the separation h are obtained numerically by means of Tranter's method. The resistance coefficients for translation normal to the disc surface, and for rotation about a diameter, are unaffected by slip when the disc lies in unbounded fluid, but all resistance coefficients depend upon the slip length b when the disc is close to the wall. Their dependence on h becomes weak when b ≫ a.

  8. Effects of Slip Planes on Stresses in MICE Coupling Solenoid Coil Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Cheng, Y.; Green, Michael A

    2010-06-28

    The MICE superconducting coupling solenoid magnet is made from copper matrix Nb-Ti conductors with inner radius of 750 mm, length of 285 mm and thickness of 110.4 mm at room temperature. The coil is to be wound on a mandrel made of aluminum. The peak magnetic field on the conductor is about 7.3 T when fully charged at 210 A. High magnetic field and large size make the stress inside the coupling coil assembly relatively high during cool down and full energizing. The shear stress between coil winding and aluminum casing may cause premature quench. To avoid quench potential induced by stress, slip planes were designed for the coil assembly. In this paper, FE models with and without slip planes for it have been developed to simulate the stresses during the process including winding, cooling down and charging. The stress distribution in the coil assembly with and without slip planes was investigated. The results show that slip planes with low friction coefficients can improve the stress condition in the coil, especially reduce the shear stress largely so that improve the stability.

  9. Dislocation boundaries and active slip systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J.A.; Hansen, N.

    1995-11-01

    Part of the dislocations which have participated in the plastic deformation of a polycrystalline metal are stored in dislocation boundaries in a two- or three-dimensional arrangement. The dislocation in such boundaries can be analyzed by determining the misorientation between neighboring crystallites and the boundary orientation. Information about the dislocations in the boundaries can also be obtained by an analysis of active slip systems based on the crystallite orientation and the imposed stress or strain state in combination with appropriate constraint conditions. In the present paper an analysis of the boundary dislocation structure and of the slip systems has been conducted for pure aluminium cold-rolled to a von Mises strain of 0.41. The results show that a substantial majority of dislocations in different types of dislocation boundaries are from the primary and conjugate slip system in the adjoining crystallites. A basis is therefore provided for integrating deformation structure observations with plastic deformation behavior.

  10. Slip at the surface of a sphere translating perpendicular to a plane wall in micropolar fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherif, H. H.; Faltas, M. S.; Saad, E. I.

    2008-03-01

    The Stokes axisymmetrical flow caused by a sphere translating in a micropolar fluid perpendicular to a plane wall at an arbitrary position from the wall is presented using a combined analytical-numerical method. A linear slip, Basset type, boundary condition on the surface of the sphere has been used. To solve the Stokes equations for the fluid velocity field and the microrotation vector, a general solution is constructed from fundamental solutions in both cylindrical, and spherical coordinate systems. Boundary conditions are satisfied first at the plane wall by the Fourier transforms and then on the sphere surface by the collocation method. The drag acting on the sphere is evaluated with good convergence. Numerical results for the hydrodynamic drag force and wall effect with respect to the micropolarity, slip parameters and the separation distance parameter between the sphere and the wall are presented both in tabular and graphical forms. Comparisons are made between the classical fluid and micropolar fluid.

  11. DYNAMIC PLANE-STRAIN SHEAR RUPTURE WITH A SLIP-WEAKENING FRICTION LAW CALCULATED BY A BOUNDARY INTEGRAL METHOD.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical boundary integral method, relating slip and traction on a plane in an elastic medium by convolution with a discretized Green function, can be linked to a slip-dependent friction law on the fault plane. Such a method is developed here in two-dimensional plane-strain geometry. Spontaneous plane-strain shear ruptures can make a transition from sub-Rayleigh to near-P propagation velocity. Results from the boundary integral method agree with earlier results from a finite difference method on the location of this transition in parameter space. The methods differ in their prediction of rupture velocity following the transition. The trailing edge of the cohesive zone propagates at the P-wave velocity after the transition in the boundary integral calculations. Refs.

  12. Thermally activated phase slips in superfluid spin transport in magnetic wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Kwon; Takei, So; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study thermally activated phase slips in superfluid spin transport in easy-plane magnetic wires within the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert phenomenology, which runs parallel to the Langer-Ambegaokar-McCumber-Halperin theory for thermal resistances in superconducting wires. To that end, we start by obtaining the exact solutions for free-energy minima and saddle points. We provide an analytical expression for the phase-slip rate in the zero spin-current limit, which involves a detailed analysis of spin fluctuations at the extrema of the free energy. An experimental setup for a magnetoelectric circuit is proposed, in which thermal phase slips can be inferred by measuring nonlocal magnetoresistance.

  13. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.M.J.; Kezirian, M.T.; Brenner, H.

    1992-12-31

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere `rolling` under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  14. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.M.J.; Kezirian, M.T.; Brenner, H.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere rolling' under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  15. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. M. J.; Kezirian, M. T.; Brenner, H.

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, while allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces arises from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere 'rolling' under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane--at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case. This suggests a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  16. Direct dating of folding events by 40Ar/39Ar analysis of synkinematic muscovite from flexural-slip planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Zwingmann, Horst; Zhou, Liyun; Lo, Ching-hua; Viola, Giulio; Hao, Jinhua

    2016-02-01

    Timing of folding is usually dated indirectly, with limited isotopic dating studies reported in the literature. The present study investigated the timing of intracontinental, multi-stage folding in Upper Proterozoic sandstone, limestone, and marble near Beijing, North China, and adjacent regions. Detailed field investigations with microstructural, backscattered electron (BSE) images and electron microprobe analyses indicate that authigenic muscovite and sericite crystallized parallel to stretching lineations/striations or along thin flexural-slip surfaces, both developed during the complex deformation history of the study area, involving repeated compressional, extensional and strike-slip episodes. Muscovite/sericite separates from interlayer-slip surfaces along the limbs and from dilatant sites in the hinges of folded sandstones yield muscovite 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages of ∼158-159 Ma, whereas those from folded marble and limestone samples yield ages of 156 ± 1 Ma. Muscovite from thin flexural-slip planes on fold limbs and hinges yields ages within analytical error of ∼155-165 Ma. Further muscovite samples collected from extensionally folded limestone and strike-slip drag folds yield younger ages of 128-125 Ma with well-defined plateaus. To assess the potential influence of the detrital mica component of the host rock on the age data, two additional muscovite samples were investigated, one from a folded upper Proterozoic-Cambrian sandstone outside the Western Hills of Beijing and one from a folded sandstone sampled 20 cm from folding-related slip planes. Muscovite separates from these samples yield significantly older ages of 575 ± 2 Ma and 587 ± 2 Ma, suggesting that the timing of folding can be directly determined using the 40Ar/39Ar method. This approach enables the identification and dating of distinct deformation events that occur during multi-stage regional folding. 40Ar/39Ar dating can be used to constrain the timing of muscovite and sericite growth at

  17. Rolling and slipping down Galileo{close_quote}s inclined plane: Rhythms of the spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, F.S.

    1996-05-01

    In ``Two New Sciences`` (TNS) Galileo presents a number of theorems and propositions for smooth solid spheres released from rest and rolling a distance {ital d} in time {ital t} down an incline of height {ital H} and length {ital L}. We collect and summarize his results in a single grand proportionality {ital P}: {ital d}{sub 1}/{ital d}{sub 2}=({ital t}{sup 2}{sub 1}/{ital t}{sup 2}{sub 2})({ital H}/{ital L}){sub 1}/({ital H}/{ital L}){sub 2}. ({ital P}) From TNS it is clear that what we call {ital P} is assumed by Galileo to hold for all inclinations including vertical free fall with {ital H}/{ital L}=1. But in TNS he describes only experiments with gentle inclinations {ital H}/{ital L}{lt}1/2. Indeed he cannot have performed the vertical free fall ({ital H}={ital L}) experiment, because we (moderns) know that as we increase {ital H}/{ital L}, {ital P} starts to break down when {ital H}/{ital L} exceeds about 0.5, because the sphere, which rolls without slipping for small {ital H}/{ital L}, starts to slip, whence {ital d} starts to exceed the predictions of {ital P}, becoming too large by a factor of 7/5 for vertical free fall at {ital H}/{ital L}=1. In 1973 Drake and in 1975 Drake and MacLachlan published their analysis of a previously unpublished experiment that Galileo performed that (without his realizing it) directly compared rolling without slipping to free fall. In the experiment, a sphere that has gained speed {ital v}{sub 1} while rolling down a gentle incline is deflected so as to be launched horizontally with speed {ital v}{sub 1} into a free fall orbit discovered by Galileo to be a parabola. The measured horizontal distance {ital X}{sub 2} traveled in this parabolic orbit (for a given vertical distance fallen to the floor) was smaller than he expected, by a factor 0.84. But that is exactly what we (moderns) expect, since we know that Galileo did not appreciate the difference between rolling without slipping, and slipping on a frictionless surface.

  18. Broadside mobility of a disk in a viscous fluid near a plane wall with no-slip boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderhof, B. U.

    2012-08-01

    The broadside motion of a disk in a viscous fluid towards a planar wall with no-slip boundary condition is studied on the basis of the steady-state Stokes equations. It is shown that flow velocity and pressure of the fluid can be found conveniently from a superposition of elementary complex stream functions. The two amplitude functions characterizing the superposition are found from the numerical solution of a pair of integral equations for the axial and radial velocity components at the disk. The numerical procedure converges fast, provided the distance to the plane is not much smaller than the radius of the disk. For small distance the flow is well approximated by lubrication theory.

  19. Euler-Lagrange equations governing the flow of solids by extended slip with applications to plane torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bish, Robert Leonard

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a variational principle based on a new physical law governing the rotationally continuous flow of a solid that flows by means of the recently identified mechanism of extended slip. The Euler-Lagrange equations derived from this principle are applied to the plane torsion problem. Theoretical results so obtained are compared to experimental measurements made using discs of cold-worked aluminium, and excellent agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. Interesting properties of plane torsion are revealed by this investigation. It is shown, for instance, that within the shear annulus in the disc, at each stage of its expansion, the rotation rate is independent of position. Moreover, if we consider the disc centre to be rotating relative to its edge, the rotation rate in the shear annulus is opposite to that in the rigid centre of the disc. At each stage, not only are the senses of rotation of the disc centre and the shear annulus opposite but the products of rotation rate and area for the two domains remain equal.

  20. Analytical expressions of incompatibility stresses at Σ3⟨111⟩ twin boundaries and consequences on single-slip promotion parallel to twin plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richeton, T.; Tiba, I.; Berbenni, S.; Bouaziz, O.

    2015-01-01

    Strong incompatibility stresses may develop at grain or twin boundaries because of elastic and plastic anisotropies. Their knowledge at ? twin boundaries may be of interest for a better understanding of the mechanical behaviour of fcc materials that can display lamellar twin structures, such as twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steels or general nanotwinned materials. In this paper, incompatibility stresses arising at general twin boundaries are explicitly derived for a given twin volume fraction. They are deduced from the solutions of the general infinite bicrystal, which is equivalent to a periodic layered structure. In the case of pure elasticity and ? twin boundaries, the result is of remarkable simplicity. The incompatibility stress field reduces to a shear stress acting upon a plane orthogonal to twin plane. Simple analytical expressions of the resolved shear stresses are also determined according to the twin-boundary orientation, the twin volume fraction and the elastic anisotropy factor. Such expressions allow performing a comprehensive study of slip initiation. In particular, there exists a large physical domain, depending on the three above parameters, where simultaneous slip parallel to twin plane in the parent and in the twin is greatly promoted. There is also a restricted domain where simultaneous single slip parallel to twin plane is promoted. The conditions for these promotions are realistic considering the literature data on TWIP steels. The present results, hence, support the high ductility and strong contribution of kinematic hardening observed in TWIP steels and agree with composite hardening models with single- and multi-slip-deforming grains.

  1. Slip sense inversion on active strike-slip faults in southwest Japan and its implications for Cenozoic tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Lin, Aiming

    2004-05-01

    Analyses of deflected river channels, offset of basement rocks, and fault rock structures reveal that slip sense inversion occurred on major active strike-slip faults in southwest Japan such as the Yamasaki and Mitoke fault zones and the Median Tectonic Line (MTL). Along the Yamasaki and Mitoke fault zones, small-size rivers cutting shallowly mountain slopes and Quaternary terraces have been deflected sinistrally, whereas large-size rivers which deeply incised into the Mio-Pliocene elevated peneplains show no systematically sinistral offset or complicated hairpin-shaped deflection. When the sinistral offsets accumulated on the small-size rivers are restored, the large-size rivers show residual dextral deflections. This dextral offset sense is consistent with that recorded in the pre-Cenozoic basement rocks. S-C fabrics of fault gouge and breccia zone developed in the active fault zones show sinistral shear sense compatible with earthquake focal mechanisms, whereas those of the foliated cataclasite indicate a dextral shear sense. These observations show that the sinistral strike-slip shear fabrics were overprinted on dextral ones which formed during a previous deformation phase. Similar topographic and geologic features are observed along the MTL in the central-eastern part of the Kii Peninsula. Based on these geomorphological and geological data, we infer that the slip sense inversion occurred in the period between the late Tertiary and mid-Quaternary period. This strike-slip inversion might result from the plate rearrangement consequent to the mid-Miocene Japan Sea opening event. This multidisciplinary study gives insight into how active strike-slip fault might evolves with time.

  2. Hydrodynamic analysis of flagellated bacteria swimming near one and between two no-slip plane boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Henry; Gaffney, Eamonn A.

    2015-03-01

    The motility of swimming bacteria near solid surfaces has implications in a wide range of scenarios, including water treatment facilities, microfluidics, and biomedical implants. Using the boundary element method to numerically solve the equations of low Reynolds number fluid flow, we investigate the dynamics of a model swimmer propelled by rotating a single helical flagellum. Building on previous simulation results for swimmers near a single plane boundary, we introduce a second, parallel boundary and show that the bacterial trajectories change as the two plates are brought closer together. Analysis of this dynamical system shows that the configuration in the center of the channel and parallel to the walls is an unstable equilibrium state for large plate separations, but it becomes the only stable position for swimmers when the plate separation is reduced to three to four times the cell width. Our model also predicts that transient trajectories, i.e., those not at steady states, can exhibit curvature in the opposite sense to that expected from the well-known explanation for circular bacterial paths near a single wall.

  3. Crustal stress state inferred from earthquake focal mechanisms: Recognition of a non-uniform stress state, slip plane selection criteria, and implications for the mechanics of faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Marian Eileen

    Populations of earthquake focal mechanisms that are characterized by diverse styles of faulting require some degree of heterogeneity in the causative stress field or variable fault strength. Methods for finding a stress tensor compatible with a set of focal mechanisms are based on methods which determine paleostress tensors from fault slip data. Although slip on any specific fault plane places a different constraint on the causative stress tensor, this is only directly measured for fault slip data. The actual slip plane and direction are rarely known for most earthquakes. The capability of published methods to determine the degree of heterogeneity required by inversion of diverse earthquake focal mechanisms is examined through a comparison of several fault plane selection criteria on synthetic focal mechanisms where the fault planes are constrained to be in agreement with specific stress tensors. My approach is to use a modified published stress inversion method to quantify the range of allowable model stress tensors, then the likelihood and degree of stress heterogeneity. To examine the fault strength variability requires that the earthquakes have occurred in a region characterized by a uniform stress field and that fault planes be identified. A new stress inversion method is developed which uses the P-wave first motion polarity readings that constrain focal mechanisms to select probable fault planes and constrain the stress tensor for a population of earthquakes. This method is applied to two problematic data sets: small earthquakes in the New Madrid seismic zone and aftershocks to the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. A uniform reverse faulting stress state can be constrained using the observed polarities for most of the New Madrid area, but not for the entire seismic zone due to errors in velocity structure. A uniform reverse faulting tensor with an SsbHmax direction that acts approximately normal to the mainshock plane is well constrained by the P-wave polarity

  4. Application of slip-line analysis to the mechanical model of active accretionary wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, I.; Lee, H.; Kim, J.

    2012-04-01

    An active accretionary wedge is formed from sediments accreted continuously at a continental margin by a subducting plate and mechanically characterized by a plane-strain compressive frictional flow throughout its entire volume. Continuous deformation induced by incoming sediments raises the distortional stress eventually leading to an ultimate condition known as a critical state. According to the critical taper theory (Davis et al., JGR, 1983), the angle of wedge increases as the incoming materials are accreted into the wedge until it reaches a critical value where the shear force on the basal detachment is in equilibrium with the basal friction. Under this concept, we applied the plastic slip-line theory for the computation of stress and velocity fields throughout the continuously deforming area of the wedge. For the simplicity, we assumed that the tapered wedge overlying a basal décollement fault is described by a perfectly plastic rheology complying with the Coulomb failure criterion and the associated flow rule. A complete description of soil rheology at the critical state requires the determination of stress tensors and velocity vectors at given points within the deforming region. For the boundary condition of stress, the effective normal and shear tractions on the upper surface of wedge are equal to zero, and thus the maximum principal stress acts parallel to the surface. Considering the two-dimensional plane strain deformation, we numerically obtained the slip-line solution for the mean effective stress with respect to the orientation of the maximum principal stress at each intersection point of the potential (conjugate) slip lines given by the Coulomb criterion. Then the maximum shear stress was calculated using the failure criterion. After the stress solution was yielded, the velocity field was determined by the same procedure using the boundary condition of the velocity of incoming sediments obtained from the velocity of subducting plate. Our result

  5. Sulfamerazine: Understanding the Influence of Slip Planes in the Polymorphic Phase Transformation through X-Ray Crystallographic Studies and ab Initio Lattice Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pallipurath, Anuradha R; Skelton, Jonathan M; Warren, Mark R; Kamali, Naghmeh; McArdle, Patrick; Erxleben, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the polymorphism exhibited by organic active-pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), in particular the relationships between crystal structure and the thermodynamics of polymorph stability, is vital for the production of more stable drugs and better therapeutics, and for the economics of the pharmaceutical industry in general. In this article, we report a detailed study of the structure-property relationships among the polymorphs of the model API, Sulfamerazine. Detailed experimental characterization using synchrotron radiation is complemented by computational modeling of the lattice dynamics and mechanical properties, in order to study the origin of differences in millability and to investigate the thermodynamics of the phase equilibria. Good agreement is observed between the simulated phonon spectra and mid-infrared and Raman spectra. The presence of slip planes, which are found to give rise to low-frequency lattice vibrations, explains the higher millability of Form I compared to Form II. Energy/volume curves for the three polymorphs, together with the temperature dependence of the thermodynamic free energy computed from the phonon frequencies, explains why Form II converts to Form I at high temperature, whereas Form III is a rare polymorph that is difficult to isolate. The combined experimental and theoretical approach employed here should be generally applicable to the study of other systems that exhibit polymorphism. PMID:26317333

  6. Experimental Deformation of Olivine Single Crystal at Mantle P and T: Pressure Effect on Olivine Dislocation Slip-System Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, R.; Girard, J.; Chen, J.; Amiguet, E.

    2008-12-01

    Seismic velocity anisotropies observed in the upper mantle are interpreted from lattice preferred orientations (LPO) produced experimentally in olivine, which depends on the dominant dislocation slip systems. At low pressure P<3 GPa, mantle temperature (T) and in dry conditions, olivine [100] dislocation slip dominates the less active [001] slip. This tends to align crystal fast velocity [100] axis with the principal shear direction. Yet recent high-pressure deformation experiments (Couvy et al., 2004, EJM, 16, 877; Raterron et al., 2007, Am. Min., 92, 1436; Raterron et al., 2008, Phys. Earth Planet. Int., doi:10.1016/j.pepi.2008.07.026) show that [001](010) slip system dominates [100](010) system in the (P,T) range of the deep upper mantle. This may promote a shear-parallel slow-velocity [001] axis and may explain the seismic-velocity attenuation observed at depth >200 km (Mainprice et al., 2005, Nature, 433, 731). In order to further constrain the effect of P on olivine slip system activities, which is classically quantified by the activation volume V* in power creep laws, deformation experiments were carried out in poor water condition, at P>5 GPa and T=1400°C, on pure forsterite (Fo100) and San Carlos olivine crystals, using the Deformation-DIA apparatus at the X17B2 beamline of the NSLS (Upton, NY). Ten crystals were oriented in order to active either [100] slip alone or [001] slip alone in (010) plane, or both [100](001) and [001](100) systems together. Constant applied stress σ <300 MPa and specimen strain rates were monitored in situ using time-resolved x-ray diffraction and radiography, respectively, for a total of 27 investigated steady state conditions. The obtained rheological data were compared with data previously obtained in comparable T and σ conditions, but at room P, by Darot and Gueguen (1981, JGR, 86, 6219) for Fo100 and by Bai et al. (1991, JGR, 96, 2441) for San Carlos olivine. This new set of data confirms previous deformation data

  7. Investigation of active slip systems in high purity single crystal niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, Derek

    The superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) community uses high purity niobium to manufacture SRF cavities for a variety of accelerator applications. Cavities are either made from large-grain sheets cut directly from the ingot and formed, or the ingot microstructure is broken down to form polycrystalline sheets or tubes. Reducing the number of costly electron beam welds to assemble the cavities is also desired. A greater understanding of the active slip systems and their relation to subsequent dislocation substructure would be of use in all these areas, to better understand how large grain niobium deforms and to develop more accurate computational models that will aid in the design and use of more cost-effective forming methods. Studies of slip in high-purity niobium suggest that temperature, material purity, and crystal orientation affect which slip systems are active during deformation, though have not examined the somewhat lesser purity niobium used for SRF cavities. As a step toward these goals, two sets of SRF-purity single crystal niobium samples were deformed to 40% strain in tension at room temperature. The first set was cut and welded back together. The second set consisted of deliberately orientated samples that resolved shear stress onto desired slip systems to evaluate different combinations of slip. Determining likely active slip systems was complex, though the evidence suggests that {112} slip may be dominant at yield at room temperature as suggested by theory, though {110} slip could not be ruled out.

  8. Students as Researchers: An Inclined-Plane Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Thomas G.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an inquiry activity in which students explore the variables that influence the amount of time it takes a ball to roll down an inclined plane. Relates features of the activity to recommendations in the NCTM Standards. (MKR)

  9. Core structure, dislocation energy and Peierls stress for 1/3?11 0? edge dislocations with (0001) and {1 00} slip planes in α-Zr.

    SciTech Connect

    Voskoboinikov, Roman E; Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2005-01-01

    Atomic-scale simulations of edge dislocations of the 1/3<11{bar 2}0> (0001) and 1/3<11{bar 2}0> {l_brace}1{bar 1}00{r_brace} slip systems have been carried out using a Finnis-Sinclair-type interatomic potential for {alpha}-zirconium. The distribution of atomic displacements in the dislocation core shows that in this model the edge dislocation in the basal plane dissociates into two Shockley partials whereas the dislocation in the prism plane remains undissociated. The effective core radius and core energy are estimated, and dislocation response to increasing applied shear strain is investigated. The core properties and the critical stress for dislocation glide (Peierls stress) depend sensitively on whether the core extends or not.

  10. Insights on activation enthalpy for non-Schmid slip in body-centered cubic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Lucas M.; Lim, Hojun; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Battaile, Corbett C.; Weinberger, Christopher R.

    2014-12-18

    We use insights gained from atomistic simulation to develop an activation enthalpy model for dislocation slip in body-centered cubic iron. Furthermore, using a classical potential that predicts dislocation core stabilities consistent with ab initio predictions, we quantify the non-Schmid stress-dependent effects of slip. The kink-pair activation enthalpy is evaluated and a model is identified as a function of the general stress state. Thus, our model enlarges the applicability of the classic Kocks activation enthalpy model to materials with non-Schmid behavior.

  11. Interaction between slip events, erosion and sedimentation along an active strike-slip fault: Insights from analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatton, M.; Malavieille, J.; Dominguez, S.; Manighetti, I.; Romano, C.; Beauprêtre, S.; Garembois, S.; Larroque, C.

    2012-04-01

    Recovering information on past (i.e., last 102-104 yrs) large earthquakes on faults is a challenge. The classical approach -especially used on strike-slip faults- consists in searching morphological markers such as river channels, streams, alluvial fans, ridges or terrace risers, etc, that would be offset by the fault, and measure these offsets by reconstructing the original position and shape of the markers. Combined with the dating of the offset markers, this morphotectonic paleoseismological approach may provide information on the slips and ages of the most recent earthquakes on the fault under study. Yet, the approach is complex as it depends on the recognition of unambiguous paired markers on either side of the fault. And our capability to recognize similar markers on either side of a fault in turn greatly depends on the 'evolution' that these markers may have sustained subsequently to their very first slip disruption. Did the repeating earthquake slip events modify their surface appearance? Did their morphology and position (ex: burying, destruction, modification, etc) evolve with the sedimentation and erosion that might have occurred during the fault history? Etc. These questions have rarely been approached for they are difficult to address in natural settings. And as we are unable to answer them in the natural cases that we study, the slip reconstructions that we provide are generally uncertain as they are likely based on an incomplete or biased record of the past fault slips. Therefore, the objective of our work is to contribute to better understand and document the nature and 'evolution' of the morphological markers that are commonly used in morphotectonic and paleoseismological analyses, especially along strike-slip faults. We approach these questions experimentally. We have developed an original experimental set-up made to simulate repeated slip events on a strike-slip fault placed in a wet environment sustaining sedimentation and erosion. The fault

  12. Investigating Fault Slip Budget in the Cocos Subducting Plate from Characteristically Repeating Earthquake Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, L. A.; Taira, T.

    2013-12-01

    High-quality seismic and geodetic data from dense networks have revealed that the Cocos subducting plate in the Mesoamerican region has been experienced a rich variety of transient slip including earthquakes, slow slip events, and tectonic tremors. Detecting these transient deformation fields with estimations in the locations of responsible deformation areas is a fundamental first step in addressing the slip budget in the Mesoamerican region. We search for characteristically repenting earthquakes (CREs) in the Cocos subducting plate in the Mesoamerican region, by analyzing over 30 years of historical seismic data collected by the National Seismological Service (SSN). Spatiotemporal properties in the CRE activity would allow us to infer aseismic slip surrounding the CRE sequences. The seismic signatures in our target area show a remarkable resemblance to zones where repeating earthquakes have been previously identified. Namely, the flat segment of subducting slab shows a strongly couple zone followed wide creeping zone that extends up to ~250km inland. Our preliminary search for CREs was limited to analyze broadband seismic data (with a 1-8 Hz bandpass filter) recorded at two stations, we however identify a few candidate CRE sequences with a cross-correlation threshold of 0.90. We will extend our analysis to data collected from other stations and to examine smaller earthquakes to detect additional CREs and will evaluate aseismic slip rates from the identified CRE sequences.

  13. Quaternary slip-rates of the Kazerun and the Main Recent Faults: active strike-slip partitioning in the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Authemayou, Christine; Bellier, Olivier; Chardon, Dominique; Benedetti, Lucilla; Malekzade, Zaman; Claude, Christelle; Angeletti, Bernard; Shabanian, Esmaeil; Abbassi, Mohammad Reza

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to constrain the Late Quaternary activity of two major dextral strike-slip faults of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt of Southern Iran, within the framework of right-oblique convergence between Arabia and Eurasia. The NW-trending Main Recent fault marks the rear of the belt along two thirds of its length. Its southeastern tip connects to the northern termination of the N-trending Kazerun Fault, which affects the entire width of the belt. Horizontal slip rates have been estimated on these two faults over the last 140 ka from lateral offsets of streams and fans and in situ cosmogenic 36Cl exposure dating of cobbles sampled on the surface of these geomorphic features. Compared to GPS data, the obtained minimum slip rate of 3.5-12.5 mm yr-1 on the Main Recent Fault implies strike-slip partitioning of the convergence along this fault. Minimum slip rate of the Kazerun Fault is 2.5-4 mm yr-1 for its northern strand, 1.5-3.5 mm yr-1 for its central segment and is negligible for its southern segment. These results are consistent with southward distribution of the slip from along the Main Recent Fault to the longitudinal thrusts and folds of the fold-and-thrust belt through the Kazerun Fault, with a decrease of slip from the southeastern tip of the Main Recent Fault towards the southern termination of the Kazerun Fault. The Kazerun and associated faults form the horsetail termination of the Main Recent fault and may be seen as the propagating southeastern front of the fault system that accommodates indentation of Eurasia by Arabia.

  14. Vehicle yaw stability control using active limited-slip differential via model predictive control methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Daniel; Arogeti, Shai A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the problem of vehicle yaw control using an active limited-slip differential (ALSD) applied on the rear axle is addressed. The controller objective is to minimise yaw-rate and body slip-angle errors, with respect to target values. A novel model predictive controller is designed, using a linear parameter-varying (LPV) vehicle model, which takes into account the ALSD dynamics and its constraints. The controller is simulated using a 10DOF Matlab/Simulink simulation model and a CarSim model. These simulations exemplify the controller yaw-rate and slip-angle tracking performances, under challenging manoeuvres and road conditions. The model predictive controller performances surpass those of a reference sliding mode controller, and can narrow the loss of performances due to the ALSD's inability to transfer torque regardless of driving conditions.

  15. Modelling the heat pulses generated on a fault plane during coseismic slip: Inferences from the pseudotachylites of the Copanello cliffs (Calabria, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caggianelli, A.; de Lorenzo, S.; Prosser, G.

    2005-08-01

    A pseudotachylite vein network crosscutting late Hercynian foliated tonalites can be observed along the Copanello cliffs (Calabria, Southern Italy). Pseudotachylites formed during the Oligocene-Miocene at intermediate crustal levels (ca. 10 km). They show variable thickness ranging from few mm up to 10 cm, as observed in injection veins branching from the fault plane. Microscopic observations indicate that pseudotachylite matrix mainly consists of plagioclase (An 46-An 58) and biotite microlites. Rounded clasts of quartz, plagioclase or of plagioclase-quartz lithic fragments are disseminated in the matrix. Intergranular, flow and spherulitic textures are commonly observed. Microstructural features are consistent with rapid crystallisation from melt. EDS analyses of rare and tiny glass veins indicated a trachyandesite or An 50 plagioclase melt composition. The conditions for pseudotachylite formation were reproduced by an analytical model taking into account the heat released by friction along a horizontal fault plane during a seismic event. The model is based on a three-stage rupture history that includes nucleation, propagation and stopping. In addition, by means of a numerical approach, the model reproduces cooling that follows the stopping stage. According to previous studies, the thermal perturbation induced by fault displacement is very intense. In fact, temperatures exceeding the tonalite and even An 50 plagioclase liquidus (1470 °C) are reproduced by small amount of slip (≤ 6 cm) in suprahydrostatic regime. On the other hand, the thermal perturbation is strongly localised and of short duration. Peak temperatures abruptly decrease at a short distance from the fault plane (typically in few millimetres). In these conditions a thin film of melt can be produced. Therefore, the presence of cm-scale pseudotachylite veins can be only explained assuming an efficient and fast melt migration towards dilatant sites, such as pull-apart structures and injections veins

  16. Slip rate variability over the Holocene period in the middle Aterno fault system (Italy), retrieved from in situ 36Cl cosmogenic nuclide dating of exhumed fault-plane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesson, Jim; Benedetti, Lucilla; Pucci, Stefano; Villani, Fabio; Bourles, Didier; Keddadouche, Karim; Aumaitre, Georges

    2016-04-01

    with the ages of seismic events retrieved from trenching paleoseismological studies performed on fault segments also belonging to the Middle Aterno fault system. Those results thus suggest that the 50 km long fault-system (from the Paganica fault to the Sulmona fault) entirely ruptured in a sequence of events between 4.5 and 5.5 ka. During these periods of intense seismic activity, the associated slip-rate increases up to 3 mm/yr on those faults. Those results shed new light about the seismogenic potential of this fault-system and bring crucial data for the seismic hazard assessment of this area.

  17. Bond slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using shear wave based active sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lei; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-12-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure exhibits improved strength, ductility and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete, by incorporating the advantages of both steel and concrete materials. A major drawback of this type of structure is the bond slip introduced between steel and concrete, which directly reduces the load capacity of the structure. In this paper, an active sensing approach using shear waves to provide monitoring and early warning of the development of bond slip in the concrete-encased composite structure is proposed. A specimen of concrete-encased composite structure was investigated. In this active sensing approach, shear mode smart aggregates (SAs) embedded in the concrete act as actuators and generate desired shear stress waves. Distributed piezoceramic transducers installed in the cavities of steel plates act as sensors and detect the wave response from shear mode SAs. Bond slip acts as a form of stress relief and attenuates the wave propagation energy. Experimental results from the time domain analysis clearly indicate that the amplitudes of received signal by lead zirconate titanate sensors decreased when bond slip occurred. In addition, a wavelet packet-based analysis was developed to compute the received signal energy values, which can be used to determine the initiation and development of bond slip in concrete-encased composite structure. In order to establish the validity of the proposed method, a 3D finite element analysis of the concrete-steel bond model is further performed with the aid of the commercial finite element package, Abaqus, and the numerical results are compared with the results obtained in experimental study.

  18. Slip Rates of Main Active Fault Zones Through Turkey Inferred From GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozener, H.; Aktug, B.; Dogru, A.; Tasci, L.; Acar, M.; Emre, O.; Yilmaz, O.; Turgut, B.; Halicioglu, K.; Sabuncu, A.; Bal, O.; Eraslan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Active Fault Map of Turkey was revised and published by General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration in 2012. This map reveals that there are about 500 faults can generate earthquakes.In order to understand the earthquake potential of these faults, it is needed to determine the slip rates. Although many regional and local studies were performed in the past, the slip rates of the active faults in Turkey have not been determined. In this study, the block modelling, which is the most common method to produce slip rates, will be done. GPS velocities required for block modeling is being compiled from the published studies and the raw data provided then velocity field is combined. To form a homogeneous velocity field, different stochastic models will be used and the optimal velocity field will be achieved. In literature, GPS site velocities, which are computed for different purposes and published, are combined globally and this combined velocity field are used in the analysis of strain accumulation. It is also aimed to develop optimal stochastic models to combine the velocity data. Real time, survey mode and published GPS observations is being combined in this study. We also perform new GPS observations. Furthermore, micro blocks and main fault zones from Active Fault Map Turkey will be determined and homogeneous velocity field will be used to infer slip rates of these active faults. Here, we present the result of first year of the study. This study is being supported by THE SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF TURKEY (TUBITAK)-CAYDAG with grant no. 113Y430.

  19. Preventing Slips and Falls through Leisure-Time Physical Activity: Findings from a Study of Limited-Service Restaurants

    PubMed Central

    Caban-Martinez, Alberto J.; Courtney, Theodore K.; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Lombardi, David A.; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Brennan, Melanye J.; Perry, Melissa J.; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Verma, Santosh K.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective Physical activity has been shown to be beneficial at improving health in some medical conditions and in preventing injury. Epidemiologic studies suggest that physical activity is one factor associated with a decreased risk for slips and falls in the older (≥65 years) adult population. While the risk of slips and falls is generally lower in younger than in older adults; little is known of the relative contribution of physical activity in preventing slips and falls in younger adults. We examined whether engagement in leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) was protective of slips and falls among a younger/middle-aged (≤50 years old) working population. Methods 475 workers from 36 limited-service restaurants in six states in the U.S. were recruited to participate in a prospective cohort study of workplace slipping. Information on LTPA was collected at the time of enrollment. Participants reported their slip experience and work hours weekly for up to 12 weeks. We investigated the association between the rate of slipping and the rate of major slipping (i.e., slips that resulted in a fall and/or injury) and LTPA for workers 50 years of age and younger (n = 433, range 18–50 years old) using a multivariable negative binomial generalized estimating equation model. Results The rate of major slips among workers who engaged in moderate (Adjusted Rate Ratio (RR)  = 0.65; 95% Confidence Interval (CI)  =  [0.18–2.44]) and vigorous (RR = 0.64; 95%CI  =  [0.18–2.26]) LTPA, while non-significant, were approximately one-third lower than the rate of major slips among less active workers. Conclusion While not statistically significant, the results suggest a potential association between engagement in moderate and vigorous LTPA and the rate of major slips in younger adults. Additional studies that examine the role of occupational and non-occupational physical activity on the risk of slips, trips and falls among younger and middle aged

  20. GPS-derived slip rates of active faults in eastern Venezuela, along the southeastern Caribbean PBZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard, F. A.; Beck, C.; Jouanne, F.; Reinoza, C. E.; Fegag

    2013-05-01

    For over 20 years, GPS campaign measurements have been performed in eastern Venezuela, as well as in other areas of the country, by different scientific groups and in the frame of different either national or international efforts and/or projects, essentially aiming at the estimation of the rate of motion along the major Quaternary faults (i.e., Boconó, San Sebastián and El Pilar faults) composing the plate boundary zone (PBZ) between the Caribbean and South America, along onshore northern and western Venezuela. The slip rates and sense of slip of those major faults derived from the comparison of several GPS campaigns carried out through the years have confirmed the slip data (fault kinematics) previously derived from geologic data, through comprehensive neotectonic and paleoseismic studies mainly made by the FUNVISIS' Earth Sciences Dpt. staff. In a rough way, we could conclude that those faults are dextrally moving at a rate in the order of 10-12 mm/a. More recently, it has been shown that the El Pilar fault has a locking depth close to 10 km deep and that about half of the PBZ dextral motion is accommodated as creep, reducing the seismic hazard for northeastern Venezuela almost by half. On the contrary, in the near past, very little attention has been paid to the secondary active faulting in eastern Venezuela. In that sense, FUNVISIS, in collaboration with the Université de Savoie, started the monitoring of these secondary features by installing 36 brass benchmarks on bedrock in that region in 2003, which have been occupied 3 times, in late 2003 and 2005 and in early 2013. The comparison between the 2003 and 2005 occupations shows promising results, such as: a) The Charagato fault on Cubagua island is left-lateral with a slip rate of about 2 mm/a; b) slip vectors across the El Pilar fault tend to head to the ESE, suggesting that the tectonic regime is compressive transcurrent to transcurrent compressional (transpressional); c) The NW-SE-trending San Francisco

  1. Active point out-of-plane ultrasound calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Alexis; Guo, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Haichong K.; Kang, Hyunjae; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Image-guided surgery systems are often used to provide surgeons with informational support. Due to several unique advantages such as ease of use, real-time image acquisition, and no ionizing radiation, ultrasound is a common intraoperative medical imaging modality used in image-guided surgery systems. To perform advanced forms of guidance with ultrasound, such as virtual image overlays or automated robotic actuation, an ultrasound calibration process must be performed. This process recovers the rigid body transformation between a tracked marker attached to the transducer and the ultrasound image. Point-based phantoms are considered to be accurate, but their calibration framework assumes that the point is in the image plane. In this work, we present the use of an active point phantom and a calibration framework that accounts for the elevational uncertainty of the point. Given the lateral and axial position of the point in the ultrasound image, we approximate a circle in the axial-elevational plane with a radius equal to the axial position. The standard approach transforms all of the imaged points to be a single physical point. In our approach, we minimize the distances between the circular subsets of each image, with them ideally intersecting at a single point. We simulated in noiseless and noisy cases, presenting results on out-of-plane estimation errors, calibration estimation errors, and point reconstruction precision. We also performed an experiment using a robot arm as the tracker, resulting in a point reconstruction precision of 0.64mm.

  2. The physical fundamental plane of black hole activity: revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang; Han, Zhenhua; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the jet power and accretion disk luminosity is investigated for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and black hole X-ray binaries (BHXBs) from the literature. The power-law correlation index is steep (μ˜1.0 -1.4) for radio loud quasars and the `outliers' of BHXBs, and it is flatter (μ˜ 0.3 -0.6) for radio loud galaxies and the standard BHXBs. The steep-index groups are mostly at higher accretion rates (peaked at Eddington ratio > 0.01) and the flatter-index groups are at relatively low accretion rates (peaked at Eddington ratio < 0.01), implying that the former groups could be dominated by the inner disk accretion of black hole, while the jet in latter groups would be a hybrid production of the accretion and black hole spin. We could still have a fundamental plane of black hole activity for the BHXBs and AGNs with diverse (maybe two kinds of) correlation indices. It is noted that the fundamental plane of black hole activity should be referred to the correlation between the jet power and disk luminosity or equivalently to the correlation between jet power, Eddington ratio and black hole mass, rather than the jet power, disk luminosity and black hole mass.

  3. Relative tectonic activity assessment along the East Anatolian strike-slip fault, Eastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Abdelrahman

    2016-04-01

    The East Anatolian transform fault is a morphologically distinct and seismically active left-lateral strike-slip fault that extends for ~ 500 km from Karlıova to the Maraş defining the boundary between the Anatolian Block and Syrian Foreland. Deformed landforms along the East Anatolian fault provide important insights into the nature of landscape development within an intra-continental strike-slip fault system. Geomorphic analysis of the East Anatolian fault using geomorphic indices including mountain front sinuosity, stream length-gradient index, drainage density, hypsometric integral, and the valley-width to valley height ratio helped differentiate the faulting into segments of differing degrees of the tectonic and geomorphic activity. Watershed maps for the East Anatolian fault showing the relative relief, incision, and maturity of basins along the fault zone help define segments of the higher seismic risk and help evaluate the regional seismic hazard. The results of the geomorphic indices show a high degree of activity, reveal each segment along the fault is active and represent a higher seismic hazard along the entire fault.

  4. Strike-slip fault geometry in Turkey and its influence on earthquake activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barka, A. A.; Kadinsky-Cade, K.

    1988-01-01

    The geometry of Turkish strike-slip faults is reviewed, showing that fault geometry plays an important role in controlling the location of large earthquake rupture segments along the fault zones. It is found that large earthquake ruptures generally do not propagate past individual stepovers that are wider than 5 km or bends that have angles greater than about 30 degrees. It is suggested that certain geometric patterns are responsible for strain accumulation along portions of the fault zone. It is shown that fault geometry plays a role in the characteristics of earthquake behavior and that aftershocks and swarm activity are often associated with releasing areas.

  5. Deformation textures in Fe{sub 3}Al alloys: An assessment of dominant slip system activity in the 900--1325 K temperature range of hot working

    SciTech Connect

    Kad, B.K.; Schoenfeld, S.E.; Asaro, R.J.; McKamey, C.G.; Sikka, V.K.

    1997-04-01

    A combination of numerical and experimental methodologies have been employed to study deformation textures in Fe{sub 3}Al alloys produced entirely by crystallographic shears on the <111>{l_brace}110{r_brace} + <111>{l_brace}112{r_brace}, <100>{l_brace}011{r_brace} and <100>{l_brace}001{r_brace} slip systems, respectively. Numerical simulations indicate that both <111>{l_brace}110{r_brace} + <111>{l_brace}112{r_brace} and <100>{l_brace}011{r_brace} slip systems produce a reasonably strong texture, while <100>{l_brace}001{r_brace} induces no texture over the initial random configuration. Experimental texture measurements on samples deformed at deformation rates of 10{sup {minus}3}--10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} by forging, rolling and extrusion in the 925--1325 K temperature range, of the B2 structure regime, agree well with the predicted textures for the <111>{l_brace}110{r_brace} + <111>{l_brace}112{r_brace} slip system activation. These results appear to be in disagreement with prior transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations that support the activation of <100>{l_brace}011{r_brace} and <100>{l_brace}001{r_brace} slip systems. Possible sources of discrepancies are elucidated. Finally, the loss of ductility in fully recrystallized microstructures is explained by textural reorganizations that are likely to impose larger normal stresses on the dominant {l_brace}100{r_brace} fracture planes.

  6. Architectural evolution of the Nojima fault and identification of the activated slip layer by Kobe earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hidemi; Omura, Kentaro; Matsuda, Tatsuo; Ikeda, Ryuji; Kobayashi, Kenta; Murakami, Masaki; Shimada, Koji

    2007-07-01

    Evolutionary history of Nojima Fault zone is clarified by comprehensive examinations of petrological, geophysical, and geochemical characterizations on a fault zone in deep-drilled core penetrating the Nojima Fault. On the basis of the results, we reconstruct a whole depth profile of the architecture of the Nojima Fault and identify the primal slip layer activated by 1995 Kobe earthquake. The deepest part (8- to 12-km depth) of the fault zone is composed of thin slip layers of pseudotachylite (5 to 10 mm thick each, 10 cm in total). Middle depth (4- to 8-km depth) of the fault zone is composed of fault core (6 to 10 m thick), surrounded by thick (100 m thick) damage zone, characterized by zeolite precipitation. The shallow part of the fault zone (1- to 4-km depth) is composed of distributed narrow shear zones, which are characterized by combination of thin (0.5 cm thick each, 10 cm in total) ultracataclasite layers at the core of shear zones, surrounded by thicker (1 to 3 m thick) damage zones associated with carbonate precipitation. An extremely thin ultracataclasite layer (7 mm thick), activated by the 1995 Kobe earthquake, is clearly identified from numerous past slip layers, overprinting one of the shear zones, as evidenced by conspicuous geological and geophysical anomalies. The Nojima Fault zone was 10 to 100 times thicker at middle depth than that of shallower and deeper depths. The thickening would be explained as a combination of physical and chemical effects as follows. (1) Thickening of "fault core" at middle depth would be attributed to normal stress dependence on thickness of the shear zone and (2) an extreme thickening of "damage zone" in middle depth of the crust would result from the weakening of the fault zone due to super hydrostatic fluid pressure at middle depths. The high fluid pressure would result from faster sealing with low-temperature carbonate at the shallower fault zone.

  7. Precursory Seismic Activity Surrounding the High-Slip Patches of the 2011 Mw9.0 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Hiratsuka, S.; Mori, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    The 11 March 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw9.0) occurred on the megathrust along the western margin of the Pacific Ocean where the Pacific plate is being subducted beneath the island of Honshu, Japan. The slip near the Japan Trench was estimated to be enormous; it averaged about 40 m over the upper 100 km of the megathrust and peaked at 60-80 m close to the trench (Lay et al., 2011; Ozawa et al., 2012; Iinuma et al., 2012). Nearly a thousand years are required to accumulate such a large slip for the convergence rate of 8-9 cm/yr along this plate boundary zone. Two days before the Tohoku-Oki earthquake, foreshock activity (largest event M7.3) occurred north of the main-shock epicenter. The epicentral area of the foreshock activity is similar to a M7.0 earthquake in 1981 (Shao et al., 2011). The question arises, why did the 1981 event not trigger a great earthquake? A time difference of 30 years is negligible in comparison with the long time required for the slip deficit of more than 40 m. In order to address this question, we investigated the seismic activity prior to the Tohoku-Oki earthquake using the earthquake catalogue compiled by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) since 1923. For the purpose of the present study, we independently determined the slip distribution of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake, using the coseismic displacements derived from the GEONET GPS stations on land (Ozawa et al., 2011) and those from the offshore GPS stations and ocean-bottom water pressure gauges (Sato et al., 2011; Iinuma et al., 2012). The slip distribution is characterized by two high-slip ( 20m) patches separated by a zone of relatively low slip. The peak of the northern high-slip patch is located near the trench while the peak of the southern high-slip patches are situated about 40 km southeast of the main-shock epicenter, about 70 km away from the trench. Combined with the analyses of main-shock rupture process by Ide et al. (2011) and Shao et al. (2011), it is estimated that the

  8. Earthquake cycle associated with active strike slip faults in central Panamá

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rick, Bennett; Spinler, Joshua C.; Compton, Kathleen; Rockwell, Thomas K.; Gath, Eldon

    2013-04-01

    The rigidity of the Panamá Isthmus is currently under debate, with important implications for seismic hazards to the Panamá Canal and Panamá City. Whereas Panamá has traditionally been described as a non-deforming microplate caught between a number of larger tectonic plates, new paleoseismic data collected at a limited number of trench sites in association with the ongoing expansion of the Panamá Canal may challenge the validity of the rigid microplate hypothesis. Crustal velocities from a new, ~100 km aperture, 5-station continuous GPS network constructed across the Rio Gatún, Limón, and Pedro Miguel fault zones confirm that these fault zones are active, forming a system of faults that traverse central Panamá in close proximity to the Panamá Canal and Panamá City. However, the slip rates inferred from these new geodetic data are lower than the geologic rates when using an elastic halfspace model. Differences among previous geodetic investigations, which concluded that Panamá is rigid, and the geological slip rate estimates are explained by earthquake cycle effects associated with long recurrence intervals relative to lower crust and upper mantle Maxwell relaxation times. Late in the earthquake cycle the geodetic strain field is broadly distributed, giving the false appearance of low seismic hazards.

  9. Reducing employee slips, trips, and falls during employee-assisted patient activities.

    PubMed

    Staal, Collette; White, Barbra; Brasser, Bruce; LeForge, Larry; Dlouhy, Amie; Gabier, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    Following a remodeling of patient care rooms at Mary Free Bed Rehabilitation Hospital, the nursing staff reported frequent slipping in patient care areas. Data were analyzed and revealed that most slips were occurring during transfer of patients from shower chairs. An extensive literature review was done, and solutions to slipping were sought from areas outside of the healthcare industry. Specifically, ideas were borrowed from the commercial fishing industry and the restaurant industry. Both industries rely heavily on footwear to reduce slipping in the workplace. A trial was initiated with nursing staff members wearing positive-grip shoe covers that can be worn over regular footwear. No slips occurred during the trial. The purpose of this article is to motivate nurses who are involved in transferring patients from shower chairs (often used in rehabilitation settings) to consider the role their footwear has in reducing slips and potential injury. PMID:15598000

  10. Taylor simulation and experimental investigation of rolling textures of polycrystalline iron aluminides with special regard to slip on {l_brace}112{r_brace} planes

    SciTech Connect

    Raabe, D.

    1996-03-01

    The evolution of the crystallographic rolling textures of B2- and DO{sub 3}-ordered polycrystalline iron aluminides is described in terms of taylor-type simulations. The contribution of crystallographic slip on the various types of glide systems, particularly the influence of {l_brace}112{r_brace}<111> slip is examined. The evolution of the aspect ratio of the grains during rolling is considered by gradually relaxing the externally imposed strain constraints with increasing deformation. For simulating low reductions, full constraints Taylor-type conditions are assumed. For describing intermediate reductions the lath model and for large reductions the pancake model is employed. The ratio of the critical resolved shear stress of the {l_brace}110{r_brace}<111> and {l_brace}112{r_brace}<111> slip systems is varied. The predictions yielded by impeding {l_brace}110{r_brace}<111> systems and promoting {l_brace}112{r_brace}<111> systems ({tau}{sub {l_brace}110{r_brace}<111>} = 10 {times} {tau}{sub {l_brace}112{r_brace}<111>}) are in good accord with experiment. The results are discussed in terms of the energy of the antiphase boundaries and of dislocation core effects.

  11. Mechanism of slip and twinning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastani, Mansur

    1992-01-01

    The objectives are to: (1) demonstrate the mechanisms of deformation in body centered cubic (BCC), face centered cubic (FCC), and hexagonal close-packed (HCP)-structure metals and alloys and in some ceramics as well; (2) examine the deformed microstructures (slip lines and twin boundaries) in different grains of metallic and ceramic specimens; and (3) study visually the deformed macrostructure (slip and twin bands) of metals and alloys. Some of the topics covered include: deformation behavior of materials, mechanisms of plastic deformation, slip bands, twin bands, ductile failure, intergranular fracture, shear failure, slip planes, crystal deformation, and dislocations in ceramics.

  12. Cycle Slips Detection in Quad-Frequency Mode: Galileo's Contribution to an Efficient Approach under High Ionospheric Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Vyvere, Laura; Warnant, René

    2016-04-01

    Cycle slips detection has always been a key issue in phase measurements accuracy, thus impacting positioning precision. Since Galileo is the first constellation to offer four carrier frequencies available in Open Service, we were able to develop an innovative detection algorithm, especially promising in harsh environment like high ionospheric activity. This improves previous dual and triple-frequency methods, whose efficiency was somehow limited in tricky situations, like ionospheric events or particular configurations. In our algorithm, two types of testing quantities were used: triple-frequency Simsky combination and dual-frequency Geometry-Free combination, each one being associated to a suitable detection algorithm. Simsky combination allows to detect almost every configuration, except for cycle slips of the same magnitude, appearing simultaneously on all carriers. Geometry-Free combination is only used to detect this particular case, since it suffers from quick variation of ionospheric delay. Together - through the choice of the most efficient combination alternatives - they enable the detection of any cycle slips configuration. This is now made possible thanks to the availability of data from Galileo's four carriers. The quad-frequency algorithm has been tested on Galileo observations from both GMSD (Japan) and NKLG (Gabon) stations. On the first ones, cycle slips were artificially inserted in order to simulate particular cases and test algorithm robustness. NKLG raw data were used to assess algorithm behaviour for cases met in the equatorial area. Enhanced with a suitable cycle slip correction method and a real-time feature, our algorithm could directly be integrated into the software receiver, enabling the supply of continuous and corrected data to the user. In conclusion, this first quad-frequency cycle slips detection algorithm is obviously a step forward and every Galileo user will indeed be able to benefit from a highly better-quality positioning. With

  13. Anthropogenically-Induced Superficial Seismic Activity Modulated By Slow-Slip Events in Guerrero, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, W.; Shapiro, N.; Husker, A. L.; Kostoglodov, V.; Campillo, M.

    2014-12-01

    We use the data of the MASE seismic experiment operated during 2.5 years in Guerrero, Mexico to create a large catalog of seismic multiplets. This catalog is dominated by families of Low-Frequency Earthquakes (LFE) occurring in vicinity of the main subduction interface. In addition to more than one thousand LFE families, we detected nine repeating seismic event families that are located in the upper crust and are anthropogenically induced (AI) by mining blasts. Analysis of the recurrence of these AI events in time shows that their activity significantly increases during the strong Slow-Slip Event (SSE) in 2006. Modeled static stress perturbations induced by the SSE at the surface are ~5 kPa that is on the same order of magnitude as dynamic stress perturbations observed to trigger other low stress drop phenomena, such as tectonic tremor. We propose therefore that strong SSEs in Guerrero impose an extensional regime throughout the continental crust, modifying the stress field near the surface and increasing AI activity. This modulation of the recurrence of the crustal seismic events by the SSE-induced stress might be related to another recent observation: the SSE-induced reduction of seismic velocities linked to nonlinear elastic effects caused by opening of cracks (Rivet et al., 2011, 2014).

  14. Novel Cross-Slip Mechanism of Pyramidal Screw Dislocations in Magnesium.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Kaburaki, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Tsuru, Tomohito

    2016-06-01

    Compared to cubic metals, whose primary slip mode includes twelve equivalent systems, the lower crystalline symmetry of hexagonal close-packed metals results in a reduced number of equivalent primary slips and anisotropy in plasticity, leading to brittleness at the ambient temperature. At higher temperatures, the ductility of hexagonal close-packed metals improves owing to the activation of secondary ⟨c+a⟩ pyramidal slip systems. Thus, understanding the fundamental properties of corresponding dislocations is essential for the improvement of ductility at the ambient temperature. Here, we present the results of large-scale ab initio calculations for ⟨c+a⟩ pyramidal screw dislocations in magnesium and show that their slip behavior is a stark counterexample to the conventional wisdom that a slip plane is determined by the stacking fault plane of dislocations. A stacking fault between dissociated partial dislocations can assume a nonplanar shape with a negligible energy cost and can migrate normal to its plane by a local shuffling of atoms. Partial dislocations dissociated on a {21[over ¯]1[over ¯]2} plane "slither" in the {011[over ¯]1} plane, dragging the stacking fault with them in response to an applied shear stress. This finding resolves the apparent discrepancy that both {21[over ¯]1[over ¯]2} and {011[over ¯]1} slip traces are observed in experiments while ab initio calculations indicate that dislocations preferably dissociate in the {21[over ¯]1[over ¯]2} planes. PMID:27314728

  15. Novel Cross-Slip Mechanism of Pyramidal Screw Dislocations in Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Kaburaki, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Tsuru, Tomohito

    2016-06-01

    Compared to cubic metals, whose primary slip mode includes twelve equivalent systems, the lower crystalline symmetry of hexagonal close-packed metals results in a reduced number of equivalent primary slips and anisotropy in plasticity, leading to brittleness at the ambient temperature. At higher temperatures, the ductility of hexagonal close-packed metals improves owing to the activation of secondary ⟨c +a ⟩ pyramidal slip systems. Thus, understanding the fundamental properties of corresponding dislocations is essential for the improvement of ductility at the ambient temperature. Here, we present the results of large-scale ab initio calculations for ⟨c +a ⟩ pyramidal screw dislocations in magnesium and show that their slip behavior is a stark counterexample to the conventional wisdom that a slip plane is determined by the stacking fault plane of dislocations. A stacking fault between dissociated partial dislocations can assume a nonplanar shape with a negligible energy cost and can migrate normal to its plane by a local shuffling of atoms. Partial dislocations dissociated on a {2 1 ¯ 1 ¯ 2 } plane "slither" in the {01 1 ¯1 } plane, dragging the stacking fault with them in response to an applied shear stress. This finding resolves the apparent discrepancy that both {2 1 ¯1 ¯2 } and {01 1 ¯1 } slip traces are observed in experiments while ab initio calculations indicate that dislocations preferably dissociate in the {2 1 ¯1 ¯2 } planes.

  16. Active faulting induced by the slip partitioning in the Lesser Antilles arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Frédérique; Feuillet, Nathalie

    2010-05-01

    AGUADOMAR marine cruise data acquired 11 years ago allowed us to identified and map two main sets of active faults within the Lesser Antilles arc (Feuillet et al., 2002; 2004). The faults belonging to the first set, such as Morne-Piton in Guadeloupe, bound up to 100km-long and 50km-wide arc-perpendicular graben or half graben that disrupt the fore-arc reef platforms. The faults of the second set form right-stepping en echelon arrays, accommodating left-lateral slip along the inner, volcanic islands. The two fault systems form a sinistral horsetail east of the tip of the left-lateral Puerto Rico fault zone that takes up the trench-parallel component of convergence between the North-American and Caribbean plates west of the Anegada passage. In other words, they together accommodate large-scale slip partitioning along the northeastern arc, consistent with recent GPS measurements (Lopez et al., 2006). These intraplate faults are responsible for a part of the shallow seismicity in the arc and have produce damaging historical earthquakes. Two magnitude 6.3 events occurred in the last 25 years along the inner en echelon faults, the last one on November 21 2004 in Les Saintes in the Guadeloupe archipelago. To better constrain the seismic hazard related to the inner arc faults and image the ruptures and effects on the seafloor of Les Saintes 2004 earthquake, we acquired new marine data between 23 February and 25 March 2009 aboard the French R/V le Suroît during the GWADASEIS cruise. We present here the data (high-resolution 72 channel and very high-resolution chirp 3.5 khz seismic reflection profiles, EM300 multibeam bathymetry, Küllenberg coring and SAR imagery) and the first results. We identified, mapped and characterized in detail several normal to oblique fault systems between Martinique and Saba. They offset the seafloor by several hundred meters and crosscut all active volcanoes, among them Nevis Peak, Soufriere Hills, Soufriere de Guadeloupe and Montagne Pel

  17. Active flexural-slip faulting: A study from the Pamir-Tian Shan convergent zone, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Chen, Jie; Thompson, Jessica A.; Burbank, Douglas W.; Yang, Xiaodong

    2015-06-01

    The flexural-slip fault (FSF), a type of secondary fault generated by bed-parallel slip, occurs commonly and plays an important role in accommodating fold growth. Although the kinematics and mechanics of FSFs are well studied, relatively few field observations or geometric models explore its geomorphic expression. In the Pamir-Tian Shan convergent zone, NW China, suites of well-preserved FSF scarps displace fluvial terraces in the Mingyaole and Wulagen folds. Integrating interpretations of Google Earth images, detailed geologic and geomorphic mapping, and differential GPS measurements of terrace surfaces, we summarize geomorphic features that typify these faults and create kinematic models of active flexural-slip faulting. Our study indicates the following: (i) FSF scarps commonly occur near synclinal hinges, irrespective of whether (a) the dip direction of beds on either side of the hinge is unidirectional or in opposite directions, (b) the hinge is migrating or fixed, or (c) the hinge shape is narrow and angular or wide and curved. (ii) Active FSFs are likely to produce higher scarps on steeper beds, whereas lower or no topographic scarps typify gentler beds. (iii) Tilt angles of the terrace surface displaced above FSFs progressively decrease farther away from the hinge, with abrupt changes in slope coinciding with FSF scarps; the changes in tilt angle and scarp height have a predictable geometric relationship. (iv) Active FSFs can accommodate a significant fraction of total slip and play a significant role in folding deformation. (v) Active FSFs may be used to assess seismic hazards associated with active folds and associated blind thrusts.

  18. Fabrication of Activated Rice Husk Charcoal by Slip Casting as a Hybrid Material for Water Filter Aid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuaprakone, T.; Wongphaet, N.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.

    2011-04-01

    Activated charcoal has been widely used as an odor absorbent in household and water purification industry. Filtration equipment for drinking water generally consists of four parts, which are microporous membrane (porous alumina ceramic or diatomite, or porous polymer), odor absorbent (activated carbon), hard water treatment (ion exchange resin), and UV irradiation. Ceramic filter aid is usually prepared by slip casting of alumina or diatomite. The membrane offers high flux, high porosity and maximum pore size does not exceed 0.3 μm. This study investigated the fabrication of hybrid activated charcoal tube for water filtration and odor absorption by slip casting. The suitable rice husk charcoal and water ratio was 48 to 52 wt% by weight with 1.5wt% (by dry basis) of CMC binder. The green rice husk charcoal bodies were dried and fired between 700-900 °C in reduction atmosphere. The resulting prepared slip in high speed porcelain pot for 60 min and sintered at 700 °C for 1 h showed the highest specific surface area as 174.95 m2/g. The characterizations of microstructure and pore size distribution as a function of particle size were investigated.

  19. Slip Kits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombes, S. D.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the process of developing the Science Lessons from Industrial Processes (SLIP) kits by 16 British science teachers. The content, applicability, and components of these kits (based upon local industries) are also included. (HM)

  20. Preceding seismic activity and slow slip events in the source area of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Yoshida, Keisuke

    2015-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake ruptured a large area of the megathrust east of NE Japan. The earthquake's magnitude was 9.0, substantially larger than predicted. It is important to know what occurred in the source area prior to this great megathrust earthquake to improve understanding of the nucleation processes of large earthquakes and risk assessments in subduction zones. Seafloor observation data revealed the existence of two extremely large slip patches: one just updip of the mainshock hypocenter and the other 80-100 km to the north near the trench axis. For 70-90 years before 2003, M > 6 events and slips of M > c. 7 events on the megathrust occurred in the areas surrounding these two large slip patches. Seismic activity had increased since at least 2003 in the downdip portion of the source area of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. In addition, long-term accelerated slow slip occurred in this downdip portion of the source area in the decades before the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. About 1 month before the earthquake, a slow slip event (SSE) took place at relatively shallow depths between the two large slip patches, accompanied by foreshock activity. Both the slow slip and foreshocks propagated from north to south toward the southern large slip patch. Two days before the earthquake, an M 7.3 foreshock and an associated postseismic slip began at relatively deep depths in the megathrust between the two large slip patches. In addition, a slow slip type event seems to have occurred approximately half a day after the M 7.3 foreshock near the mainshock hypocenter. This slow slip event and the foreshock activity again propagated from north to south toward the mainshock hypocenter. These long- and short-term preceding seismic and aseismic slip gradually reduced the interplate coupling, increased shear stresses at the two large slip patches (i.e., two strong asperity patches), and finally led to the rupture of the great Tohoku-Oki earthquake.

  1. Copper metal-organic framework nanocrystal for plane effect nonenzymatic electro-catalytic activity of glucose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanying; Zhang, Youjuan; Chen, Jing; Pang, Huan

    2014-10-01

    This work describes the first demonstration of nanocrystal plane dependent nonenzymatic electro-catalytic glucose activity of [Cu3(btc)2] nanocrystals with different shapes (nanocube, truncated cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron). From electrochemical results, the obtained [Cu3(btc)2] nanocube modified electrode shows the best nonenzymatic electro-catalytic glucose activity. Interestingly, decreasing the {100} crystal planes from cubes to octahedra, changes the nonenzymatic electro-catalytic activity from highly sensitive to general. PMID:25123202

  2. Analysis of slip activity and heterogeneous deformation in tension and tension-creep of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn (wt %) using in-situ SEM experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Boehlert, C. J.; Bieler, T. R.; Crimp, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    The deformation behavior of a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn (wt %) near-α alloy was investigated during in-situ deformation inside a scanning electron microscope. Tensile experiments were performed at 296 K and 728 K (≈0.4 T m), while tensile-creep experiments were performed at 728 K and 763 K. Active deformation systems were identified using electron backscattered diffraction-based slip trace analysis. Both basal and prismatic slip systems were active during the tensile experiments. Basal slip was observed for grains clustered around high Schmid factor orientations, while prismatic slip exhibited less dependence on the crystallographic orientation. The tension-creep experiments revealed less slip but more development of grain boundary ledges than in the higher strain rate tensile experiments. Some of the grain boundary ledges evolved into grain boundary cracks, and grain boundaries oriented nearly perpendicular to the tensile axis formed ledges earlier in the deformation process. Grain boundaries with high misorientations also tended to form ledges earlier than those with lower misorientations. Most of the grain boundary cracks formed in association with grains displaying hard orientations, where the c-axis was nearly perpendicular to the tensile direction. For the tension-creep experiments, pronounced basal slip was observed in the lower-stress creep regime and the activity of prismatic slip increased with increasing creep stress and temperature.

  3. Seismic evidence of active strike-slip faulting in the external Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberian Margin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolome, R.; Gràcia, E.; Stich, D.; Martinez-Loriente, S.; Klaeschen, D.; Masana, E.; Diez, S.; Lo Iacono, C.; Moreno, X.; Zitellini, N.; Manuel, A.; Dañobeitia, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Gulf of Cadiz (GC) hosts the present-day NW-SE plate convergence between Eurasia and Africa Plates west of the Straits of Gibraltar at a rate about 4 mm/yr. The convergence is accommodated over a wide and diffuse deformation zone with moderate magnitude seismic activity. Nevertheless, some of the largest events in Western Europe occurred in the GC, such as the 1755 Lisbon (Mw 8.5) and 1969 Horseshoe (Mw 7.0) earthquakes. Recently published swath-bathymetric compilation in the GC area allowed the identification of several WNW-ESE trending SWIM lineaments (SL), extending over a total length of 600 km. Analogue modelling of topographic features along the SL indicates that the structures are compatible with a dextral strike-slip movement. The concentration of these dextral strike-slip faults along a wide band, the SWIM Fault Zone (SFZ), has been proposed as the present-day EUR-AFR plate boundary. This contribution seeks to: 1) characterizing the active SL seismically; 2) establishing the dextral movement of the SL; 3) identifying new WNW-ESE active dextral strike-slip faults off the SFZ; and 4) providing additional constraints on the tectonics and dynamics of the GC. Two different datasets have been used in this work: 1) 5 multichannel (3 of them pre-stack depth migrated) and ultra-high resolution (parametric sounder TOPAS) seismic profiles, acquired in 2006 within the framework of the SWIM project, and 2) moment tensor inversion of 4 earthquakes (Mw 3.8 to 6.0), ranging from 8 to 50 km depth, from the Spanish IGN catalogue. We present 4 transects of MCS and TOPAS data crossing the SL showing detailed images of the shallow and deep crustal structure. TOPAS images provide evidence of recent activity in a “flower structure” morphology associated with strike-slip faults in the SL. MCS data suggest that the Neogene and Quaternary convergence between African and Eurasian plates has also been absorbed by lateral strike-slip faults going at least up to 10 km depth

  4. Sag-ponding and its Significance in determining Paleo-seismic events along the active strike- slip fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Zhang, P.; Yuan, D.

    2007-12-01

    During the development of one active fault, we really want to know how it behaves and what it will do next. This mostly depends on the record and preservation of the information showing the action of the fault. Sparse young sediments or sediments with coarse grain along most of big strike-slip faults make it hard record and preserve the vestige of the paleo-seismic events. This extremely restricts the development of the Paleo-seismic research. Sag-ponding as well as the deposits in ponds, which are formed by the movement of the fault, can help settling the difficulty. Periodic sag-ponding is a feature to which should be paid more attention along the strike-slip fault, it can develop a pond to capture plenty fine sediments which well record the action of the faults. Sag-ponding can easily be found on the main active strike-slip faults in northern and eastern Tibet. By disclosing the sag-ponding depositions with 3-D excavations, sediment distribution and characters of relevant sag-ponds, and the relation between the sag-ponding and faulting were discussed. 1. Mechanism of the formation of the sag-pond When the valleys and ridges intersecting with the fault are displaced, the fault scarps will block the flow of the streams cut by the fault, or make the gullies develop ancon-like bend. This would form a space for water-storage, and thus a sag-pond comes into being. If the fault behaves like this many times, multi-sag-ponding will occur. 2. Rhythmic sag-ponding deposition features and stratigraphic sequence (1) Vertical characteristics. Observed from the stratigraphic profiles disclosed by the excavation, stratigraphic sequence shows good rhythms. There are several rhythms in each pond, and one rhythm is composed of the lower coarse layers and the upper fine layers. That is, the grains are coarser below and finer upward. (2) Transverse variation. In the direction parallel to the fault, the deposition center of each sag-pond appears regular movement, or migration

  5. Slip rates along active faults estimated with cosmic-ray exposure dates: Application to the Bogd fault, Gobi-Altaï, Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritz, J. F.; Brown, E. T.; Bourlès, D. L.; Philip, H.; Schlupp, A.; Raisbeck, G. M.; Yiou, F.; Enkhtuvshin, B.

    1995-11-01

    Dating morphological features displaced along active faults presents a major difficulty in evaluation of slip rates. We used in-situ produced 10 Be to calculate minimum ages for alluvial surfaces misaligned by movement along a major active fault in the Gobi-Altaï (western Mongolia). The maximum slip rate of ≈1.2 mm/yr suggested by this method contrasts strongly with rates of ≈20 mm/yr that we estimated by correlation of alluvial deposition with warm humid periods associated with the last glacial termination estimated to have occurred about 12 ka in western Tibet. The 10Be-based slip rate indicates that strong earthquakes can occur along faults with low slip rates and demonstrates the contribution of cosmic-ray exposure dating in Quaternary tectonic analyses.

  6. Pressure-Induced Slip-System Transition in Forsterite: Single-Crystal Rheological Properties at Mantle Pressure and Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Raterron,P.; Chen, J.; Li, L.; Weidner, D.; Cordier, P.

    2007-01-01

    Deformation experiments were carried out in a Deformation-DIA high-pressure apparatus (D-DIA) on oriented Mg2SiO4 olivine (Fo100) single crystals, at pressure (P) ranging from 2.1 to 7.5 GPa, in the temperature (T) range 1373-1677 K, and in dry conditions. These experiments were designed to investigate the effect of pressure on olivine dislocation slip-system activities, responsible for the lattice-preferred orientations observed in the upper mantle. Two compression directions were tested, promoting either [100] slip alone or [001] slip alone in (010) crystallographic plane. Constant applied stress ({sigma}) and specimen strain rates (Formula) were monitored in situ using time-resolved X-ray synchrotron diffraction and radiography, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation of the run products reveals that dislocation creep assisted by dislocation climb and cross slip was responsible for sample deformation. A slip transition with increasing pressure, from a dominant [100]-slip to a dominant [001]-slip, is documented. Extrapolation of the obtained rheological laws to upper-mantle P, T, and {sigma} conditions, suggests that [001]-slip activity becomes comparable to [100]-slip activity in the deep upper mantle, while [001] slip is mostly dominant in subduction zones. These results provide alternative explanations for the seismic anisotropy attenuation observed in the upper mantle, and for the 'puzzling' seismic-anisotropy anomalies commonly observed in subduction zones.

  7. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  8. Block-like motion of Tibetan Plateau: Evidences from active faults , GPS velocities and recent earthquake slips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Cheng, J.

    2012-12-01

    continuous models have been proposed to explain GPS observations in many active regions. Here we first describe a division of active blocks in the Tibetan plateau and its adjacent regions in detail from recently published and unpublished maps showing distribution of active faults, discuss basic features of boundary faults around the blocks, block-like motions and their interior deformation patterns in the Quaternary. Then we examine present-day vectors and mechanical parameters of the active blocks both from the GPS observations and recent earthquake slips. All these analyses demonstrate that the block-like motion prevail in the Tibetan Plateau.

  9. Localized, Non-Harmonic Active Flap Motions for Low Frequency In-Plane Rotor Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Potsdam, Mark; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; LeMasurier, Philip; Lorber, Peter; Andrews, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    A first-of-its-kind demonstration of the use of localized, non-harmonic active flap motions, for suppressing low frequency, in-plane rotor noise, is reported in this paper. Operational feasibility is verified via testing of the full-scale AATD/Sikorsky/UTRC active flap demonstration rotor in the NFAC's 40- by 80-Foot anechoic wind tunnel. Effectiveness of using localized, non-harmonic active flap motions are compared to conventional four-per-rev harmonic flap motions, and also active flap motions derived from closed-loop acoustics implementations. All three approaches resulted in approximately the same noise reductions over an in-plane three-by-three microphone array installed forward and near in-plane of the rotor in the nearfield. It is also reported that using an active flap in this localized, non-harmonic manner, resulted in no more that 2% rotor performance penalty, but had the tendency to incur higher hub vibration levels.

  10. An analysis of the slip of screw dislocations in L1{sub 2} alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Veyssiere, P.

    1997-12-31

    The annihilation of dislocations by cross-slip is studied by numerical simulation of infinitely long dissociated screw dislocations, allowed to move in an elastically anisotropic crystal. The external load is along [{bar 1}23] and cross-slip is permitted both on the octahedral and on the cube plane. The latter, together with cube slip, is thermally activated. Anisotropic elasticity modifies the properties of cross-slip significantly. Under the conditions of the simulations, the processes of APB jumps (APBJs) and repeated APB jumps (RAPBJs) can be largely promoted by interactions with other dislocations, while it is much less likely to occur at an isolated dislocation submitted to the same applied stress. The encounter of dislocations of opposite signs produces dipoles which may or may not tend to annihilate by cross-slip. APB tubes may form upon annihilation under certain circumstances again largely controlled by elastic anisotropy.

  11. A slow-slipping active fold and thrust system at the SE corner of the Atacama basin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Shyu, J. H.; González, G.

    2009-12-01

    The western South American offshore is one of the major active convergent plate boundaries in the world, where the Nazca plate is subducting northeastward beneath the South American plate at a rate of about 84 mm/yr. Despite of this rapid plate convergence, the forearc region of western Andes does not seem to undergo large deformation at present. In order to understand the characteristics and mechanisms of active forearc deformation related to the plate convergence, we investigated tectono-geomorphic features in the area of Tilocalar, near the SE margin of the Atacama Basin in northern Chile, where active structures have been previously identified. To map topographic features produced by active structures, we used a combination of several remote-sensing data sets, including digital elevation models (DEM) made from Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM), as well as higher resolution ASTER and QuickBird satellite images. Detailed geomorphic surveys using real time kinematic (RTK) GPS are carried out in the field to obtain high-resolution topographic profiles across these features. We also performed 40Ar/39Ar dating of deformed volcanic rocks in order to determine the long-term slip rates of the active structures. The hyper-aridity of the Atacama Basin results in extremely low erosion and sedimentation rates in the area. As a result, the present relief of land surface is mostly produced by neotectonic activity, and can be used as deformation marker. In the Tilocalar area, several N-S trending ridges are present. These ridges, generally several tens of meters high, are likely formed by asymmetric anticlines or monoclines with steep forelimbs facing east, and these folds are likely fault-propagation folds produced by underlying thrust faults. We suggest that these faults merge at depth to become a major active thrust system. From 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages, we found that the surface ignimbrites mostly deposited in latest Pliocene (2.3~4.3 Ma). If the structures have been

  12. Tectonic Geomorphology in the Laboratory: Evolution of landscape along an active thrust, normal and strike-slip fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graveleau, Fabien; Strak, Vincent; Dominguez, Stéphane; Malavieille, Jacques; Chatton, Marina; Manighetti, Isabelle; Petit, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Tectonically controlled landforms develop morphologic features that provide useful markers to investigate crustal deformation and relief growth dynamics. We present here results of morphotectonic experiments obtained with an innovative approach combining tectonic and surface processes (erosion, transport and sedimentation), coupled with accurate model monitoring techniques. This approach allows for a qualitative and quantitative analysis of landscape evolution in response to active deformation in the three end-member geological settings: compression, extension and strike-slip. Experimental results outline first that experimental morphologies evolve significantly at a short timescale. Numerous morphologic markers form continuously, but their lifetime is generally short because erosion and sedimentation processes tend to destroy or bury them. For the compressional setting, the formation of terraces above an active thrust appears mainly controlled by narrowing and incision of the main channel through the uplifting hanging-wall and by avulsion of deposits on fan-like bodies. Terrace formation is irregular even under steady tectonic rates and erosional conditions. Terrace deformation analysis allows retrieving the growth history of the structure and the fault slip rate evolution. For the extensional setting, the dynamics of hanging-wall sedimentary filling appears to control the position of the base level, which in turn controls footwall erosion. Two phases of relief evolution can be evidenced: the first is a phase of relief growth and the second is a phase of upstream propagation of topographic equilibrium that is reached first in the sedimentary basin. During the phase of relief growth, the formation of triangular facets occurs by degradation of the fault scarp and their geometry (height) becomes stationary during the phase of upstream propagation of the topographic equilibrium. For the strike-slip setting, the complex morphology of the wrench zone, composed of

  13. Seismic sequence near Zakynthos Island, Greece, April 2006: Identification of the activated fault plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpetsidaki, A.; Sokos, E.; Tselentis, G.-A.; Zahradnik, J.

    2010-01-01

    The April 2006 earthquake sequence near Zakynthos (Western Greece) is analysed to identify the fault plane(-s). The sequence (33 events) was relocated to assess physical insight into the hypocenter uncertainty. Moment tensor solution of three major events was performed, simultaneously with the determination of the centroid position. Joint analysis of the hypocenter position, centroid position and nodal planes indicated sub-horizontal fault planes. Moment tensor solutions of 15 smaller events were performed under assumption that the source positions are those of the hypocenters (without seeking centroids). Their focal mechanisms are highly similar and agree with the analysis of the three major events. The preferable seismotectonic interpretation is that the whole sequence activated a single sub-horizontal fault zone at a depth of about 13 km, corresponding to the interplate subduction boundary. Considering that the Ionian Sea is a high-seismicity area, the identification of the seismic fault is significant for the seismic hazard investigation of the region.

  14. Active interplay between strike-slip and extensional structures in a Back-Arc environment, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, P. M.; Lamarche, G.; Bull, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    Active continental back-arc tectonics associated with the oblique Hikurangi subduction zone, North Island, New Zealand, is characterized by (1) extensional deformation distributed across a 40-50 km-wide zone, but presently concentrated in the east within the 20 km-wide, NE-striking Taupo Fault Belt (TFB) and Whakatane Graben (WG); (2) c. 12mm/yr extension rate at the Bay of Plenty coast; (3) 1-3 mm/yr subsidence in the WG; and (4) a seismogenic zone estimated to be 6-9 km thick. A component of the oblique convergence within the plate boundary is partitioned to the east onto the adjacent North Island Dextral Fault Belt (NIDFB), a large NNE-trending strike-slip fault system traversing the entire North Island. At the Bay of Plenty coast, the NIDFB strikes north, with an estimated strike-slip rate of at least 1 mm/yr. Both normal and strike-slip fault systems extend beneath the continental shelf in the Bay of Plenty, and because of differences in their strike, they converge and interact. Detailed mapping of faults using marine seismic reflection profiles and multibeam bathymetric data reveals the structure of the WG. Tilted basement blocks are associated with large west-dipping faults, numerous antithetic secondary faults, and domino-style fault arrays. Eastward migration of the principal extension zone during the last c. 1 Myrs has resulted in the encroachment and oblique overprinting of the NIDFB by the WG. The structure and geometry of the White Island Fault (WIF), currently the principal fault along the eastern margin of the graben, results from interaction and linkage of the two fault systems. The displacement profile of this fault reveals relatively young NE-striking sections that obliquely link more northerly-striking, inherited components of the NIDFB. Understanding of the fault structure and evolution may have implications for the interpretation of earthquake potential close to urban centres.

  15. Copper metal-organic framework nanocrystal for plane effect nonenzymatic electro-catalytic activity of glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanying; Zhang, Youjuan; Chen, Jing; Pang, Huan

    2014-09-01

    This work describes the first demonstration of nanocrystal plane dependent nonenzymatic electro-catalytic glucose activity of [Cu3(btc)2] nanocrystals with different shapes (nanocube, truncated cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron). From electrochemical results, the obtained [Cu3(btc)2] nanocube modified electrode shows the best nonenzymatic electro-catalytic glucose activity. Interestingly, decreasing the {100} crystal planes from cubes to octahedra, changes the nonenzymatic electro-catalytic activity from highly sensitive to general.This work describes the first demonstration of nanocrystal plane dependent nonenzymatic electro-catalytic glucose activity of [Cu3(btc)2] nanocrystals with different shapes (nanocube, truncated cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron). From electrochemical results, the obtained [Cu3(btc)2] nanocube modified electrode shows the best nonenzymatic electro-catalytic glucose activity. Interestingly, decreasing the {100} crystal planes from cubes to octahedra, changes the nonenzymatic electro-catalytic activity from highly sensitive to general. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03396e

  16. Multicycle slip distribution along a laboratory fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chi-Yu, King

    1991-01-01

    Slip distribution along a laboratory fault, which consists of eight spring-connected blocks that are elastically driven to slide on a frictional surface, has been examined for a "long' sequence of slip events to test the applicability of some conceptual models. The distributions of large slip events are found to be quite variable and do not fit the uniform slip or characteristic earthquake models. The rupture initiation points are usually not near the corresponding maximum slip points, in contrast to observations by Thatcher (1990) and by Fukao and Kikuchi (1987) that earthquake hypocenters are commonly near corresponding regions of maximum slip in the fault planes. The results suggest that earthquake prediction monitoring efforts should not be limited to a small region near an asperity but should be spread out to cover the entire fault segment in a seismic gap in order to detect the condition of simultaneous strain buildup. -from Author

  17. Slip distributions on active normal faults measured from Terrestrial Laser Scan (TLS) data and field mapping of geomorphic offsets: An example from L'Aquila, Italy, and implications for modeling seismic moment release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, M. W.; Roberts, G.; McCaffrey, K. J.; Cowie, P. A.; Faure Walker, J.; Papanikolaou, I.; Phillips, R. J.; Michetti, A.; Vittori, E.

    2012-12-01

    Surface slip distributions for an active normal fault in Italy have been measured using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), concentrating on offsets developed since 15 ±3 ka and for 2 palaeoearthquake ruptures, in order to assess the impact of spatial changes in fault orientation and kinematics on sub-surface slip distributions that control seismic moment release. The southeastern half of the surface trace of the Campo Felice active normal fault near the city of L'Aquila, central Italy, was scanned with TLS to define the vertical and horizontal offsets of geomorphic slopes that formed during the last glacial maximum (15 ±3 ka) from the center of the fault to its southeastern tip. Field measurements were made to define the strike and dip of the fault plane and plunge and plunge direction of the slip vector from striations on slickensides. Throw measurements from 250 TLS-derived scarp profiles were analyzed using the crossint cross section interpretation program developed by the authors specifically for this study. Field data of fault kinematics from 43 sites were combined with the TLS-derived throw measurements using a modification of the Kostrov equations to calculate the magnitude and directions of the horizontal principle strain-rates. The studied 5 km long portion of the fault has an overall strike of 140°, but has a prominent bend where the strike is 100-140°, where the fault has linked across a former left-stepping relay-zone which had an along strike length of ~600 m and across strike width of ~300 m. Throw-rates defined by TLS-derived profiles across a 15 ±3 ka bedrock fault scarp decrease linearly from 0.95 ±0.025 mm/yr at the fault center through 0.5 ±0.025 mm/yr to zero at the fault tip, except in the position of the prominent bend where throws rates increase by 0.15 ±0.025 mm/yr over a distance of ~1 km. The vertical co-seismic offsets averaged between two palaeoearthquake ruptures that manifest themselves as fresh stripes of rock at the base of

  18. Olivine Slip-system Activity at High Pressure: Implications for Upper-Mantle Rheology and Seismic Anisotropy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raterron, P.; Castelnau, O.; Geenen, T.; Merkel, S.

    2013-12-01

    The past decade abounded in technical developments allowing the investigation of materials rheology at high pressure (P > 3 GPa) [1]. This had a significant impact on our understanding of olivine rheology in the Earth asthenosphere, where P is in the range 3 - 13 GPa. A dislocation slip-system transition induced by pressure has been documented in dry Fe-bearing olivine [2]; it induces changes in olivine aggregate lattice preferred orientation (LPO) [3,4], which may explain the seismic velocity anisotropy attenuation observed at depths > 200 km in the upper mantle [5]. Deformation experiments carried out on olivine single crystals at high pressure allowed quantifying the effect of P on individual slip system activities [6]. Integration of these data, together with data on lattice friction arising from computational models (e.g., [7]), into analytical or mean-field numerical models for aggregate plasticity gave insight on the viscosity and LPO of olivine aggregates deformed at geological conditions in the dislocation creep regime [8,9]. We will review these recent findings and their implications for upper mantle rheology and seismic anisotropy. [1] Raterron & Merkel, 2009, J. Sync. Rad., 16, 748 ; [2] Raterron et al., 2009, PEPI, 172, 74 ; [3] Jung et al., 2009, Nature Geoscience, 2, 73 ; [4] Ohuchi et al., 2011, EPSL, 304, 55 ; [5] Mainprice et al., 2005, Nature, 433, 731 ; [6] Raterron et al., 2012, PEPI, 200-201, 105 ; [7] Durinck et al., 2007, EJM, 19, 631 ; [8] Castelnau et al., 2010, C.R. Physique, 11, 304 ; [9] Raterron et al., 2011, PEPI, 188, 26

  19. Molecular scale simulation of homopolymer wall slip.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, John R; Rorrer, Nicholas A

    2013-04-26

    The first molecular scale simulation of highly entangled polydisperse homopolymers that is capable of capturing all three regions--no slip, weak slip, and strong slip--of the hydrodynamic boundary condition is presented. An on-lattice dynamic Monte Carlo technique capable of correctly capturing both unentangled and entangled polymer dynamics is used to study the molecular details of wall slip phenomena for homopolymers and energetically neutral walls. For unentangled chains (those exhibiting Rouse dynamics) weak slip is not present but evidence of strong slip is manifest at very high shear rates. For entangled chains (of sufficient length to exhibit reptation dynamics), both weak and strong slip are observed. Consistent with numerous experimental studies, disentanglement and cohesive failure occur at high shear rates. Disentanglement is clearly evidenced in a nonlinear velocity profile that exhibits shear banding, in an excess of chain ends at the slip plane, and perhaps most importantly in a nonmonotonic stress versus shear rate response. The chain end density exhibits a pretransitional periodicity prior to disentanglement. Unentangled Rouse chains do not show this pretransitional response or a bifurcation in their stress versus shear rate response. Finally, it is shown that when polydispersity is introduced, slip phenomena are severely reduced and the inherent constitutive bifurcation is limited to a small region. Predictions are in post facto agreement with many experiments, are distinct from existing results obtained using molecular dynamics simulation techniques, and shed light on fundamental mechanisms of polymer wall slip. PMID:23679746

  20. Slip reversals on active normal faults related to the inflation and deflation of magma chambers: Numerical modeling with application to the Yellowstone-Teton region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Andrea; Hetzel, Ralf

    2008-04-01

    Earthquakes and coseismic slip on faults are the common response of Earth's crust to plate-tectonic forces. Here we demonstrate, using three-dimensional numerical experiments, that pulses of magmatic activity may alter the slip behavior of nearby tectonic faults by causing unusual aseismic creep and even reversals in the sense of slip. We apply our results to the Teton normal fault, Wyoming, which experienced hitherto unexplained episodes of reverse and normal creep between 1988 and 2001, to show that its anomalous behavior can be explained by inflation and deflation of two magma chambers beneath the Yellowstone caldera. Our findings imply a strong coupling between magmatism and tectonic faulting, which requires coordinated monitoring of both processes to improve our understanding of the resulting spatial and temporal strain pattern.

  1. Analysis of Slip Activity and Deformation Modes in Tension and Tension-Creep Tests of Cast Mg-10Gd-3Y-0.5Zr (Wt Pct) at Elevated Temperatures Using In Situ SEM Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan; Boehlert, Carl J.; Wang, Qudong; Yin, Dongdi; Ding, Wenjiang

    2016-05-01

    The tension and tension-creep deformation behavior at elevated temperatures of a cast Mg-10Gd-3Y-0.5Zr (wt pct, GW103) alloy was investigated using in situ scanning electron microscopy. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from 473 K to 598 K (200 °C to 325 °C). The active slip systems were identified using an EBSD-based slip trace analysis methodology. The results showed that for all of the tests, basal slip was the most likely system to be activated, and non-basal slip was activated to some extent depending on the temperature. No twinning was observed. For the tension tests, non-basal slip consisted of ~35 pct of the deformation modes at low temperatures (473 K and 523 K (200 °C and 250 °C)), while non-basal slip accounted for 12 and 7 pct of the deformation modes at high temperatures (573 K and 598 K (300 °C and 325 °C)), respectively. For the tension-creep tests, non-basal slip accounted for 31 pct of the total slip systems at low temperatures, while this value decreased to 10 to 16 pct at high temperatures. For a given temperature, the relative activity for prismatic slip in the tension-creep tests was slightly greater than that for the tension tests, while the activity for pyramidal slip was lower. Slip-transfer in neighboring grains was observed for the low-temperature tests. Intergranular cracking was the main cracking mode, while some intragranular cracks were observed for the tension-creep tests at high temperature and low stress. Grain boundary ledges were prevalently observed for both the tension and tension-creep tests at high temperatures, which suggests that besides dislocation slip, grain boundary sliding also contributed to the deformation.

  2. Lorentz factor distribution of blazars from the optical Fundamental Plane of black hole activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Payaswini; Körding, Elmar; Falcke, Heino

    2016-09-01

    Blazar radiation is dominated by a relativistic jet which can be modelled at first approximation using just two intrinsic parameters - the Lorentz factor Γ and the viewing angle θ. Blazar jet observations are often beamed due to relativistic effects, complicating the understanding of these intrinsic properties. The most common way to estimate blazar Lorentz factors needs the estimation of apparent jet speeds and Doppler beaming factors. We present a new and independent method of constructing the blazar Lorentz factor distribution, using the optical Fundamental Plane of black hole activity. The optical Fundamental Plane is a plane stretched out by both the supermassive black holes and the X-ray binaries, in the 3D space provided by their [O III] line luminosity, radio luminosity and black hole mass. We use the intrinsic radio luminosity obtained from the optical Fundamental Plane to constrain the boosting parameters of the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey blazar sample. We find a blazar bulk Lorentz factor distribution in the form of a power law as N(Γ) ∝ Γ-2.1 ± 0.4 for the Γ range of 1-40. We also discuss the viewing angle distribution of the blazars and the dependence of our results on the input parameters.

  3. Lorentz factor distribution of blazars from the optical Fundamental plane of black hole activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Payaswini; Körding, Elmar; Falcke, Heino

    2016-06-01

    Blazar radiation is dominated by a relativistic jet which can be modeled at first approximation using just two intrinsic parameters - the Lorentz factor Γ and the viewing angle θ. Blazar jet observations are often beamed due to relativistic effects, complicating the understanding of these intrinsic properties. The most common way to estimate blazar Lorentz factors needs the estimation of apparent jet speeds and Doppler beaming factors. We present a new and independent method of constructing the blazar Lorentz factor distribution, using the optical fundamental plane of black hole activity. The optical fundamental plane is a plane stretched out by both the supermassive black holes and the X-ray binaries, in the 3D space provided by their [OIII] line luminosity, radio luminosity and black hole mass. We use the intrinsic radio luminosity obtained from the optical fundamental plane to constrain the boosting parameters of the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey (VIPS) blazar sample. We find a blazar bulk Lorentz factor distribution in the form of a power law as N(Γ)∝Γ-2.1 ± 0.4 for the Γ range of 1 to 40. We also discuss the viewing angle distribution of the blazars and the dependence of our results on the input parameters.

  4. Episodic slow slip events and seaward flank motion at Mt. Etna volcano (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palano, Mimmo

    2016-09-01

    Episodic aseismic slip events have recently been detected at a variety of tectonic and volcanic environments, sparking the curiosity of seismic and geodetic communities. Here, a sequence of 7 slow slip events occurring at Mt. Etna since mid-2009 has been analyzed. Observed displacement fields evidence that the sequence involves two contiguous sectors of the unstable eastern flank, delimited by the Timpe faults. The tectonic control played by these faults can also be recognized on the long-term (2003-2015) velocity field. Elastic modelling of the long-term velocity field infers a sub-horizontal plane slightly dipping eastward and located within the sedimentary basement at shallow depth. Slip distribution models for each slow-slip event highlight how the largest slip values were centred on the SE edge of the sub-horizontal plane during 4 events and on the NE edge during the remaining 3 ones. The recognized events do not appear correlated with volcanic activity, although there is a possible correlation between slow-slip events and inflating episodes of the volcano.

  5. Reduced In-Plane, Low Frequency Helicopter Noise of an Active Flap Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Ben W.; Janakiram, Ram D.; Barbely, Natasha L.; Solis, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Results from a recent joint DARPA/Boeing/NASA/Army wind tunnel test demonstrated the ability to reduce in-plane, low frequency noise of the full-scale Boeing-SMART rotor using active flaps. Test data reported in this paper illustrated that acoustic energy in the first six blade-passing harmonics could be reduced by up to 6 decibels at a moderate airspeed, level flight condition corresponding to advance ratio of 0.30. Reduced noise levels were attributed to selective active flap schedules that modified in-plane blade airloads on the advancing side of the rotor, in a manner, which generated counteracting acoustic pulses that partially offset the negative pressure peaks associated with in-plane, steady thickness noise. These favorable reduced-noise operating states are a strong function of the active flap actuation amplitude, frequency and phase. The associated noise reductions resulted in reduced aural detection distance by up to 18%, but incurred significant vibratory load penalties due to increased hub shear forces. Small reductions in rotor lift-to-drag ratios, of no more than 3%, were also measured

  6. The role of latent and active failures in workplace slips, trips and falls: an information processing approach.

    PubMed

    Bentley, Tim

    2009-03-01

    The vast majority of the published workplace slips, trips and falls (STF) literature is exceedingly narrow in its focus and often ignores wider systems issues in workplace STF aetiology. There is little recognition within the published literature of the importance of latent failures or the upstream organisational and cultural contexts within which workplace STF occur. This is unfortunate, as a systems approach to workplace STF analysis, that is inclusive of latent design and work organisation factors that often shape worker behaviour patterns related to STF risk (e.g. rushing, risk taking), is fundamental to the development of effective prevention measures. The aims of this paper are to provide an understanding of workplace STF causation that is cognisant of the potential role of both active and latent failures in STF causation. The paper presents an ergonomics model for workplace STF analysis that highlights information processing in STF aetiology, the STF incident process and the interaction between latent and active failures in STF causation. The paper draws upon ergonomics research conducted in a range of occupational contexts to illustrate the key features of the model as it applies to workplace STF. Implications of the model for analysis and prevention of STF are discussed. PMID:18501330

  7. A Mid-infrared Census of Star Formation Activity in Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, Miranda K.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Evans, Neal J., II; Schlingman, Wayne M.; Cyganowski, Claudia J.; Urquhart, James

    2011-04-01

    We present the results of a search for mid-infrared signs of star formation activity in the 1.1 mm sources in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS). We have correlated the BGPS catalog with available mid-IR Galactic plane catalogs based on the Spitzer Space Telescope GLIMPSE legacy survey and the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Galactic plane survey. We find that 44% (3712 of 8358) of the BGPS sources contain at least one mid-IR source, including 2457 of 5067 (49%) within the area where all surveys overlap (10° < ell < 65°). Accounting for chance alignments between the BGPS and mid-IR sources, we conservatively estimate that 20% of the BPGS sources within the area where all surveys overlap show signs of active star formation. We separate the BGPS sources into four groups based on their probability of star formation activity. Extended Green Objects and Red MSX Sources make up the highest probability group, while the lowest probability group is comprised of "starless" BGPS sources which were not matched to any mid-IR sources. The mean 1.1 mm flux of each group increases with increasing probability of active star formation. We also find that the "starless" BGPS sources are the most compact, while the sources with the highest probability of star formation activity are on average more extended with large skirts of emission. A subsample of 280 BGPS sources with known distances demonstrates that mass and mean H2 column density also increase with probability of star formation activity.

  8. Fault Slip Embedded in Creep: Insight into Tectonic Tremors and Slow Slip Events from Acoustic and Optical Monitoring of Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Lengline, O.; Ampuero, J. P.; Schmittbuhl, J.

    2010-12-01

    Observations of temporal and spatial correlations between slow slip earthquakes and tectonic tremor activity suggest a physical relation between them. Early descriptions of mechanisms relating these phenomena simply attributed the relation between seismic and aseismic events to fluid mediated processes. More recent hypotheses suggest that tectonic tremors are bursts of seismic energy due to the rupturing of small asperities within slow slipping regions. Here we present laboratory results of a unique experimental setting aimed at understanding the response to transient loads of a system of small asperities embedded in creep as a model of tectonic tremor activity triggered by slow slip and modulated by tides. We performed mode I crack propagation experiments on glass bead blasted and annealed 2D interfaces of transparent material (Polymethylmethacrylate) where fracture fronts were confined to the 2D weakness plane of the heterogeneous interface. We monitored acoustic emissions (AE) with piezo-electric sensors surrounding the crack front line. We also optically monitored the rupture front line with up to 1000 frames per second. The experimental loading conditions produce quasi-static front propagation at slow average speeds. Image processing reveals de-pinning along the front that we characterize as intermittent opening during slow front propagation. AE locations strongly correlate to the spatiotemporal clustering of the de-penning events along the front. Moreover, this correlation is preserved at the time of imposed transient fluctuations in loading during front propagation. Using the analogy between mode I and modes II and III fractures, our results translate into intermittent slip on faults linked to clustering of seismic activity produced by the breakage of asperities embedded in creeping regions with no need of invoking fluid mediated processes. Thus our experiments help reveal the interplay between aseismic and seismic slip on faults. We also observe qualitative

  9. Investigation of Three-Dimensional Stress Fields and Slip Systems for FCC Single Crystal Superalloy Notched Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arakere, Nagaraj K.; Magnan, Shannon; Ebrahimi, Fereshteh; Ferroro, Luis

    2004-01-01

    Metals and their alloys, except for a few intermetallics, are inherently ductile, i.e. plastic deformation precedes fracture in these materials. Therefore, resistance to fracture is directly related to the development of the plastic zone at the crack tip. Recent studies indicate that the fracture toughness of single crystals depends on the crystallographic orientation of the notch as well as the loading direction. In general, the dependence of crack propagation resistance on crystallographic orientation arises from the anisotropy of (i) elastic constants, (ii) plastic deformation (or slip), and (iii) the weakest fracture planes (e.g. cleavage planes). Because of the triaxial stress state at the notch tips, many slip systems that otherwise would not be activated during uniaxial testing, become operational. The plastic zone formation in single crystals has been tackled theoretically by Rice and his co-workers and only limited experimental work has been conducted in this area. The study of the stresses and strains in the vicinity of a FCC single crystal notch tip is of relatively recent origin. We present experimental and numerical investigation of 3D stress fields and evolution of slip sector boundaries near notches in FCC single crystal tension test specimens, and demonstrate that a 3D linear elastic finite element model that includes the effect of material anisotropy is shown to predict active slip planes and sectors accurately. The slip sector boundaries are shown to have complex curved shapes with several slip systems active simultaneously near the notch. Results are presented for surface and mid-plane of the specimens. The results demonstrate that accounting for 3D elastic anisotropy is very important for accurate prediction of slip activation near FCC single crystal notches loaded in tension. Results from the study will help establish guidelines for fatigue damage near single crystal notches.

  10. The Friction Evolution of Siliceous Rocks during High-Velocity Slip By Thermal Activated Transition from Powder Lubrication and Rolling to Gouge Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Madden, A. S.; Reches, Z.

    2014-12-01

    thermally activated stage (high velocity, high normal stress, long slip-distance) that leads to weakening by viscous flow. Further, the energy dissipation associated with partial-melting explains the unexpected strengthening for granite faults slipping at velocities of 0.05-0.2 m/s (Fig. 1b).

  11. Molecular Scale Simulation of Homopolymer Wall Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, John R.; Rorrer, Nicholas A.

    2013-04-01

    The first molecular scale simulation of highly entangled polydisperse homopolymers that is capable of capturing all three regions—no slip, weak slip, and strong slip—of the hydrodynamic boundary condition is presented. An on-lattice dynamic Monte Carlo technique capable of correctly capturing both unentangled and entangled polymer dynamics is used to study the molecular details of wall slip phenomena for homopolymers and energetically neutral walls. For unentangled chains (those exhibiting Rouse dynamics) weak slip is not present but evidence of strong slip is manifest at very high shear rates. For entangled chains (of sufficient length to exhibit reptation dynamics), both weak and strong slip are observed. Consistent with numerous experimental studies, disentanglement and cohesive failure occur at high shear rates. Disentanglement is clearly evidenced in a nonlinear velocity profile that exhibits shear banding, in an excess of chain ends at the slip plane, and perhaps most importantly in a nonmonotonic stress versus shear rate response. The chain end density exhibits a pretransitional periodicity prior to disentanglement. Unentangled Rouse chains do not show this pretransitional response or a bifurcation in their stress versus shear rate response. Finally, it is shown that when polydispersity is introduced, slip phenomena are severely reduced and the inherent constitutive bifurcation is limited to a small region. Predictions are in post facto agreement with many experiments, are distinct from existing results obtained using molecular dynamics simulation techniques, and shed light on fundamental mechanisms of polymer wall slip.

  12. Nanocrystalline mirror-slip surfaces in calcite gouge sheared at sub-seismic slip rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verberne, B. A.; Plümper, O.; de Winter, D.; Niemeijer, A. R.; Spiers, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    If seismic-aseismic transitions in fault rocks are to be recognized from microstructures preserved in natural fault rocks, an understanding of the microphysical mechanisms that produce such microstructures is needed. We report on microstructures recovered from dry direct shear experiments on (simulated) dry calcite gouge, performed at 50 MPa normal stress, 18-150°C and low sliding velocities (0.1-10 μm/s). The mechanical data show a transition from velocity strengthening below ~80°C to velocity weakening slip at higher temperatures. We investigated both loose gouge fragments and thin sections, characterizing the microstructures at the mm- to nm-scales. All deformed samples split along a shear band fabric defined by mainly R1- and boundary shears. Viewed normal to the shear plane, these bands commonly showed shiny, elongate patches aligned, and striated, parallel to the shear direction. These patches were especially common in samples tested below 80°C, though shear band splitting was less well-developed above 80°C so that even if the shiny patches formed at higher temperature they were less frequently exposed. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) applied to shiny patches formed in samples sheared at room temperature showed the presence of elongate, streaked out sub-micron-sized particles oriented parallel to the shear direction. Transmitted light optical microscopy of thin sections cut normal to the shear plane and parallel to the shear direction, combined with Focused Ion Beam (FIB) - SEM on loose gouge fragments, showed that the shiny surfaces correspond with shear bands characterized by extreme grain size reduction and sintered sub-micron-particles. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) further revealed that the cores of the shear bands consist of nanocrystallites some 20 nm in size, with a Crystallographic Preferred Orientation (CPO). Our results demonstrate that mirror-like nanocrystalline slip zones can form in calcite gouge sheared at shallow crustal

  13. Seismic Activity Related to the 2002-2003 Mt. Etna Volcano Eruption (Italy): Fault Plane Solutions and Stress Tensor Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barberi, G.; Cammarata, L.; Cocina, O.; Maiolino, V.; Musumeci, C.; Privitera, E.

    2003-04-01

    Late on the night of October 26, 2002, a bi-lateral eruption started on both the eastern and the southeastern flanks of Mt. Etna. The opening of the eruptive fracture system on the NE sector and the reactivation of the 2001 fracture system, on the S sector, were accompanied by a strong seismic swarm recorded between October 26 and 28 and by sharp increase of volcanic tremor amplitude. After this initial phase, on October 29 another seismogenetic zone became active in the SE sector of the volcano. At present (January 2003) the eruption is still in evolution. During the whole period a total of 862 earthquakes (Md≫1) was recorded by the local permanent seismic network run by INGV - Sezione di Catania. The maximum magnitude observed was Md=4.4. We focus our attention on 55 earthquakes with magnitude Md≫ 3.0. The dataset consists of accurate digital pickings of P- and S-phases including first-motion polarities. Firstly earthquakes were located using a 1D velocity model (Hirn et alii, 1991), then events were relocated by using two different 3D velocity models (Aloisi et alii, 2002; Patane et alii, 2002). Results indicate that most of earthquakes are located to the east of the Summit Craters and to northeast of them. Fault plane solutions (FPS) obtained show prevalent strike-slip rupture mechanisms. The suitable FPSs were considered for the application of Gephart and Forsyth`s algorithm in order to evaluate seismic stress field characteristics. Taking into account the preliminary results we propose a kinematic model of the eastern flank eastward movement in response of the intrusion processes in the central part of the volcano. References Aloisi M., Cocina O., Neri G., Orecchio B., Privitera E. (2002). Seismic tomography of the crust underneath the Etna volcano, Sicily. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 4154, pp. 1-17 Hirn A., Nercessian A., Sapin M., Ferrucci F., Wittlinger G. (1991). Seismic heterogeneity of Mt. Etna: structure and activity. Geophys. J

  14. The 1998 March 14 Fandoqa earthquake (Mw 6.6) in Kerman province, southeast Iran: re-rupture of the 1981 Sirch earthquake fault, triggering of slip on adjacent thrusts and the active tectonics of the Gowk fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberian, M.; Jackson, J. A.; Fielding, E.; Parsons, B. E.; Priestley, K.; Qorashi, M.; Talebian, M.; Walker, R.; Wright, T. J.; Baker, C.

    2001-08-01

    The 1998 March 14 Fandoqa earthquake (Ms6.6) was the penultimate in a series of five substantial earthquakes on the Gowk fault system of southeast Iran since 1981, all of which were associated with co-seismic surface ruptures. We use observations of surface faulting, analysis of P and SH body waves, SAR interferometry and geomorphology to investigate the ruptures in these earthquakes and how they are related both to each other and to the regional active tectonics. The 1998 Fandoqa earthquake produced 23km of surface faulting with up to 3m right-lateral strike-slip and 1m vertical offsets. SAR interferometry and seismic waveforms show that the main rupture plane dipped west at ~50° and had a normal component, although the surface ruptures were more complicated, being downthrown to both the east and the west on steep faults in near-surface sediments. In addition, SAR interferometry shows that a nearby thrust with a similar strike but dipping at ~6°W moved about 8cm in a time interval and in a position that makes it likely that its slip was triggered by the Fandoqa earthquake. The 1998 surface ruptures in the Gowk valley followed part of a much longer (~80km) set of co-seismic ruptures with smaller offsets that were observed after larger earthquakes in 1981 (Mw6.6 and 7.1). The main ruptures in these 1981 earthquakes probably occurred on different, deeper parts of the same fault system, producing only minor reactivation of the shallower faults at the surface. Although the 1981-1998 earthquake sequence apparently ruptured parts of the same fault system repeatedly, these earthquakes had very different rupture characteristics: an important lesson for the interpretation of both palaeoseismological trenching investigations and historical accounts of earthquakes. The regional kinematics, which involve oblique right-lateral and convergent motion, are evidently achieved by a complex configuration of faults with normal, reverse and strike-slip components. Some of the

  15. Atomistic study on the cross-slip process of a screw    dislocation in magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, M.; Kaburaki, H.; Yamaguchi, M.; Tsuru, T.

    2015-09-01

    The cross-slip process of a screw    dislocation from the basal to the prismatic plane in magnesium was studied using the density functional theory and the molecular dynamics calculations. An atomistic method for calculating the total Peierls energy map has been devised to track the transition path of a dissociated and/or constricted screw    dislocation in the cross-slip process. The barrier of a screw    dislocation from the basal to the prismatic plane is estimated by the density functional theory for the first time to be 61.4+/- 2.0 meV per Burgers vector length. The activation enthalpy for the cross slip is calculated using a line tension model based on the density functional theory to be 1.4-1.7 eV, which is in reasonable agreement with experiments. On the basis of the results, the effect of temperature on the cross-slip process of the dissociated screw    dislocation on the basal plane is studied in detail using the molecular dynamics method with the embedded-atom-method (EAM) interatomic potential, in which the critical resolved shear stress for the cross slip is evaluated. It is confirmed that the bowed-out dislocation line on the prismatic plane consists of slightly dissociated rectilinear segments with connecting jogs at low temperatures and, as the temperature rises, the curved dislocation line becomes smooth with many segments. The motion of an    dislocation on the prismatic plane is jerky in the low temperature region, while it is retarded by the formation of the largely dissociated plateau segment above the room temperature. A large reduction of the critical shear stress for the cross slip is obtained when the    screw dislocation interacts with a hard-sphere particle placed on the basal plane in the low temperature region.

  16. Phase-field slip-line theory of plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freddi, Francesco; Royer-Carfagni, Gianni

    2016-09-01

    A variational approach to determine the deformation of an ideally plastic substance is proposed by solving a sequence of energy minimization problems under proper conditions to account for the irreversible character of plasticity. The flow is driven by the local transformation of elastic strain energy into plastic work on slip surfaces, once that a certain energetic barrier for slip activation has been overcome. The distinction of the elastic strain energy into spherical and deviatoric parts is used to incorporate in the model the idea of von Mises plasticity and isochoric plastic strain. This is a "phase field model" because the matching condition at the slip interfaces is substituted by the evolution of an auxiliary phase field that, similar to a damage field, is unitary on the elastic phase and null on the yielded phase. The slip lines diffuse in bands, whose width depends upon a material length-scale parameter. Numerical experiments on representative problems in plane strain give solutions with noteworthy similarities with the results from classical slip-line field theory, but the proposed model is much richer because, accounting for elastic deformations, it can describe the formation of slip bands at the local level, which can nucleate, propagate, widen and diffuse by varying the boundary conditions. In particular, the solution for a long pipe under internal pressure is very different from the one obtainable from the classical macroscopic theory of plasticity. For this case, the location of the plastic bands may be an insight to explain the premature failures that are sometimes encountered during the manufacturing process. This practical example enhances the importance of this new theory based on the mathematical sciences.

  17. Episodic tremor and slip on the Cascadia subduction zone: the chatter of silent slip.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Garry; Dragert, Herb

    2003-06-20

    We found that repeated slow slip events observed on the deeper interface of the northern Cascadia subduction zone, which were at first thought to be silent, have unique nonearthquake seismic signatures. Tremorlike seismic signals were found to correlate temporally and spatially with slip events identified from crustal motion data spanning the past 6 years. During the period between slips, tremor activity is minor or nonexistent. We call this associated tremor and slip phenomenon episodic tremor and slip (ETS) and propose that ETS activity can be used as a real-time indicator of stress loading of the Cascadia megathrust earthquake zone. PMID:12738870

  18. Walker Lake, Nevada: sedimentation in an active, strike-slip related basin

    SciTech Connect

    Link, M.H.; Roberts, M.T.

    1984-04-01

    Walker Lake, Nevada, is in an active fault-controlled basin related to the right-lateral, northwest-trending Walker Lane Shear Zone on the western side of the Basin and Range province. The lake occurs in a half graben bounded on its west side by a high-angle normal fault zone along the Wassuk Range front. This fault zone may merge to the north into the Walker Lane fault system, which forms the northeast boundary of the basin. To the south of Walker Lake, the Wassuk front fault merges with an east-northeast trending left-lateral fault. The Walker Lake basin is interpreted to be a pull-apart basin formed within the triangular zone bounded by the Wassuk front, the Walker Lane, and left-lateral faults. The Walker River drainage basin occupies about 10,000 km/sup 2/ (3800 mi/sup 2/) in western Nevada and parts of California and is essentially a closed hydrologic system that drains from the crest of the Sierra Nevada in California and terminates in Walker Lake. Walker Lake trends north-northwest and is 27.4 km (17 mi) long and 8 km (5 mi) wide with water depths exceeding 30 m (100 ft). Lake Lahontan (Wisconsinian) shorelines ring Walker Lake and suggest water depths of 150 m (500 ft) above the present lake level. The lake is situated in an asymmetric basin with steep alluvial fans flanking the western shoreline (Wassuk Range) and gentle, areally more extensive fans flanking the eastern shoreline (Gillis Range). The Walker River delta enters the lake from the north and is a major sediment point source for the basin. Older dissected shoreline, alluvial fan, Gilbert delta, and beach ridge deposits were built largely of coarse-grained, locally derived materials. Stromatolites, oncolites, and tufas formed along the shorelines, whereas mud and organic sediments accumulated in the lake on the west side of the basin. Extensive submerged sand flats and local sand dunes occur on the east side of the basin.

  19. Spatial-temporal three-dimensional ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound in free field and pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ting; Hu, Hong; Bai, Chen; Guo, Shifang; Yang, Miao; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation plays important roles in almost all high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications. However, current two-dimensional (2D) cavitation mapping could only provide cavitation activity in one plane. This study proposed a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping (3D-UPACM) for HIFU in free field and pulsatile flow. The acquisition of channel-domain raw radio-frequency (RF) data in 3D space was performed by sequential plane-by-plane 2D ultrafast active cavitation mapping. Between two adjacent unit locations, there was a waiting time to make cavitation nuclei distribution of the liquid back to the original state. The 3D cavitation map equivalent to the one detected at one time and over the entire volume could be reconstructed by Marching Cube algorithm. Minimum variance (MV) adaptive beamforming was combined with coherence factor (CF) weighting (MVCF) or compressive sensing (CS) method (MVCS) to process the raw RF data for improved beamforming or more rapid data processing. The feasibility of 3D-UPACM was demonstrated in tap-water and a phantom vessel with pulsatile flow. The time interval between temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud could be several microseconds. MVCF beamformer had a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 14.17dB higher, lateral and axial resolution at 2.88times and 1.88times, respectively, which were compared with those of B-mode active cavitation mapping. MVCS beamformer had only 14.94% time penalty of that of MVCF beamformer. This 3D-UPACM technique employs the linear array of a current ultrasound diagnosis system rather than a 2D array transducer to decrease the cost of the instrument. Moreover, although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid medium or a constant supply of new cavitation nuclei that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, this technique may exhibit a useful tool in 3D cavitation mapping for HIFU with high speed, precision and resolution

  20. The Scaling of the Slip Weakening Distance (Dc) With Final Slip During Dynamic Earthquake Rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, E.; Fukuyama, E.; Cocco, M.; Piatanesi, A.

    2005-12-01

    Several numerical approaches have been recently proposed to retrieve the evolution of dynamic traction during the earthquake propagation on extended faults. Although many studies have shown that the shear traction evolution as a function of time and/or slip may be complex, they all reveal an evident dynamic weakening behavior during faulting. The main dynamic parameters describing traction evolution are: the yield stress, the residual kinetic stress level and the characteristic slip weakening distance Dc. Recent investigations on real data yield the estimate of large Dc values on the fault plane and a correlation between Dc and the final slip. In this study, we focus our attention on the characteristic slip weakening distance Dc and on its variability on the fault plane. Different physical mechanisms have been proposed to explain the origin of Dc, some of them consider this parameter as a scale dependent quantity. We have computed the rupture history from several spontaneous dynamic models imposing a slip weakening law with prescribed Dc distributions on the fault plane. These synthetic models provide the slip velocity evolution during the earthquake rupture. We have therefore generated a set of slip velocity models by fitting the "true" slip velocity time histories with an analytical source time function. To this goal we use the Yoffe function [Tinti et al. 2005], which is dynamically consistent and allows a flexible parameterization. We use these slip velocity histories as a boundary condition on the fault plane to compute the traction evolution. We estimate the Dc values from the traction versus slip curves. We therefore compare the inferred Dc values with those of the original dynamic models and we found that the Dc estimates are very sensitive to the adopted slip velocity function. Despite the problem of resolution that limits the estimate of Dc from kinematic earthquake models and the tradeoff that exists between Dc and strength excess, we show that to

  1. Slip compensation at fault damage zones along earthquake surface ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Kim, Y.

    2013-12-01

    to those of the main traces. In contrast, when the L/W < 2, the vertical slip is either increased or decreased as the horizontal slip is decreased, depending on the maturity of the linking zone. Thus, we argue that slip patterns at linking damage zones may be controlled by the LW-ratio of linking damage zones and hence structural maturities of the segmented fault systems. In conclusion, slip patterns at fault damage zones along earthquake surface ruptures are various depending on the maturity of linkage zones and/or the rupture propagation direction. Therefore, the consideration of slip compensation as well as damage structures along surface ruptures must be very useful to understand fault evolution and, hence, to assess seismic hazards around active fault systems.

  2. Active strike-slip faulting history inferred from offsets of topographic features and basement rocks: a case study of the Arima Takatsuki Tectonic Line, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Lin, Aiming

    2002-01-01

    Geological, geomorphological and geophysical data have been used to determine the total displacement, slip rates and age of formation of the Arima-Takatsuki Tectonic Line (ATTL) in southwest Japan. The ATTL is an ENE-WSW-trending dextral strike-slip fault zone that extends for about 60 km from northwest of the Rokko Mountains to southwest of the Kyoto Basin. The ATTL marks a distinct topographic boundary between mountainous regions and basin regions. Tectonic landforms typically associated with active strike-slip faults, such as systematically-deflected stream channels, offset ridges and fault scarps, are recognized along the ATTL. The Quaternary drainage system shows progressive displacement along the fault traces: the greater the magnitude of stream channel, the larger the amount of offset. The maximum dextral deflection of stream channels is 600-700 m. The field data and detailed topographic analyses, however, show that pre-Neogene basement rocks on both sides of the ATTL are displaced by about 16-18 km dextrally and pre-Mio-Pliocene elevated peneplains are also offset 16-17 km in dextral along the ATTL. This suggests that the ATTL formed in the period between the development of the pre-Mio-Pliocene peneplains and deflection of the Quaternary stream channels. The geological, geomorphological and geophysical evidence presented in this study indicates that (1) the ATTL formed after the mid-Miocene, (2) the ATTL has moved as a dextral strike-slip fault with minor vertical component since its formation to late Holocene and (3) the ATTL is presently active with dextral slip rates of 1-3 mm/year and a vertical component of >0.3 mm/year. The formation of the ATTL was probably related to the opening of the Japan Sea, which is the dominant tectonic event around Japan since mid-Miocene. The case study of the ATTL provides insight into understanding the tectonic history and relationship between tectonic landforms and structures in active strike-slip faults.

  3. Slipped and lost extraocular muscles.

    PubMed

    Lenart, T D; Lambert, S R

    2001-09-01

    A slipped or lost muscle should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with a marked limitation of duction and inability to rotate the eye beyond the midline. Loss of a rectus muscle can occur after strabismus surgery, trauma, paranasal sinus surgery, orbital surgery, or retinal detachment surgery. The extraocular rectus muscle most frequently slipped or lost is the medial rectus muscle. Forced ductions, active force generation, saccadic velocity studies, differential intraocular pressure measurements, and orbital imaging studies may aid in identifying a slipped or lost muscle. However, no single diagnostic test provides absolute reliability for determining a lost muscle. Slipped muscles develop when the muscular capsule is imbricated without including the muscle or muscle tendon during strabismus surgery. When the capsule is reattached to the sclera, the tendon and muscle are then free to slip posteriorally from the site of attachment. Slipped muscles are retrieved by following the thin avascular muscle capsule posteriorally until the muscle is identified. A lost muscle can be found using a traditional conjunctival approach, by an external orbitotomy, or by an endoscopic transnasal approach. Although many diagnostic maneuvers are useful in identifying a lost rectus muscle, the oculocardiac reflex is the most important. Once the lost muscle is identified, the muscle should be imbricated with a nonabsorbable synthetic suture and securely reattached to the globe. PMID:11705143

  4. Late Quaternary Activity and Seismogenic Potential of the Gonave Microplate: Plantain Garden Strike-Slip Fault Zone of Eastern Jamaica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, P.; Prentice, C.; King, W.; Demets, C.; Wiggins-Grandison, M.; Benford, B.

    2008-12-01

    At the longitude of Jamaica, Caribbean (Carib)-North America (Noam) plate motion of 19 ± 2 mm/a is carried by two parallel, left-lateral strike-slip faults, the Oriente fault zone, immediately south of Cuba, and the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone (EPGFZ), which lies 100-150 km further south. It has been postulated that the lithosphere between these faults constitutes an independent Gonave microplate that has formed in response to the ongoing collision between the leading edge of Carib in Hispaniola and the Bahama carbonate platform. GPS measurements in Jamaica and Hispanola is supportive of the microplate hypothesis and indicates that roughly half of Carib-Noam plate motion (8-14 mm/a) is carried by the EPGFZ of southern Hispaniola and eastern Jamaica. This study applies geomorphic and paleoseismic methods as a direct test of the activity and amount of microplate motion carried on the Plantain Garden fault segment of eastern Hispaniola and how this motion is distributed across a large restraining bend that has formed the island of Jamaica since the late Miocene. The EPFZ curves gently to the northeast and forming a steep mountain front to the Blue Mountains restraining bend with elevations up to 2200 m. Geomorphic fault-related features along the mountain front fault zone include left-laterally deflected rivers and streams, but no small scale features indicative of Holocene activity. River and stream deflections range from 0.1 to 0.5 km. We identified and trenched the most active trace of the mountain front fault at the Morant River where the fault is characterized by a 1.5-m-wide sub-vertical fault zone juxtaposing sheared alluvium and fault Cretaceous basement rocks This section is overlain by a 6-m-thick fluvial terrace. Trenching in the unfaulted terrace immediately overlying the fault trace revealed radiocarbon and OSL ages ranging from 20 to 21 ka that are consistent with a prominent unfaulted alluvial fan along the projection of this fault 1.5 km to

  5. Quaternary estimates of average slip-rates for active faults in the Mongolian Altay Mountains: the advantages and assumptions of multiple dating techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, L. C.; Walker, R. T.; Thomas, A. L.; Amgaa, T.; Bayasgalan, G.; Amgalan, B.; West, A.

    2010-12-01

    Active faults in the Altay Mountains, western Mongolia, produce surface expressions that are generally well-preserved due to the arid central-Asian climate. Motion along the right-lateral strike-slip and oblique-reverse faults has displaced major river systems by kilometres over millions of years and there are clear scarps and linear features in the landscape along the surface traces of active fault strands. With combined remote sensing and field work, we have identified sites with surface features that have been displaced by tens of metres as a result of cumulative motion along faults. In an effort to accurately quantify an average slip-rate for the faults, we used multiple dating techniques to provide an age constraint for the displaced landscapes. At one site on the Olgiy fault, we applied 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCN) and uranium-series geochronology on boulder tops and in-situ formed carbonate rinds, respectively. Based on a displacement of approximately 17m, and geochronology results that range from 20-60ky, we resolve a slip-rate of less than 1 mm/yr. We have also applied optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), 10Be TCN, and U-series methods on the Ar Hotol fault. Each of these dating techniques provides unique constraints on the relationship between the ‘age’ of a displaced surface and the actual amount of displacement, and each has inherent assumptions. We will consider the advantages and assumptions made in utilising these techniques in western Mongolia- e.g. U-series dating of carbonate rinds can provide a minimum age for alluvial fan deposition, and inheritance must be considered when using TCN techniques on boulder tops. This will be put into the context of estimating accurate and geologically relevant slip-rates, and improving our understanding of the active deformation of the Mongolian Altay.

  6. Ground Motion Polarization in the Damage Zone of the Active, Strike-Slip Mattinata Fault, Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pischiutta, M.; Cianfarra, P.; Anselmi, M.; Salvini, F.; Rovelli, A.

    2013-12-01

    We have recently observed the occurrence of directional amplification effects in fault zones using both earthquakes and ambient noise records. In several faults we have found that ground motion polarization tends to have a high angle to cleavages produced by the stress related to the kinematics in the fault damage zone. We thus interpret this effect as due to the higher compliance of the fractured rocks of the damage zone in a direction transversal to the cleavage strike. Here we have tested the technique of the wavefield polarization using ambient vibrations recorded across the seismically active Mattinata Fault, in the Gargano Promontory, Italy. This fault has been chosen for the high number of structural investigations led out so far. The Mattinata Fault outcrops for over 40 km and shows an ondulated trajectory that is characterized by a number of significant tectonic-related morphological features compatible with a general left-lateral strike-slip kinematics. These features include a pull-apart basin and a transpressional zone. The main associated cleavage consists of a marked array of disjunctive, spaced pressure-solution surfaces developed within the 200-300 m wide fault damage zone. In order to relate the orientation of cleavage to the ground motion polarization, we measured 20-50 min of ambient noise at about 30 sites chosen in the fault damage zone close to rock outcrops where also structural geological measurements were carried out. Ground motion polarization is assessed both in the frequency and time domain through the individual-station horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio and covariance-matrix analysis, respectively. Two ambient noise measurements were performed close to permanent broadband stations of the Italian Seismic Telemetric Network. Results are consistent with those inferred on earthquake records at the two permanent stations, confirming that ambient noise yields results consistent with earthquake records as previously observed in other

  7. Mining-induced seismicity in faulted geologic structures: An analysis of seismicity-induced slip potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, P. L.

    1992-09-01

    Relationships between the locations of mining-induced seismic events, local fault structure, and mine geometry were examined in a deep hard-rock mine in northern Idaho. Stopes experiencing rock bursts and other large seismic events were found to fall into two structural regimes: the “Silver Vein”, and the “N48°W Trend,” a steeply dipping plane of seismic activity that is subparallel to major local steeply dipping faults which bound blocky structures. The N48°W Trend also intersects a shaft that was seriously damaged when fault gouge was expelled into the opening during a 3-month period of high seismic energy release. Models of stress interaction are used to support the hypothesis that mining-induced deformation was mobilized along a 1.5 km length of the N48°W Trend. Specifically, numerical models are used to simulate rupture of seismic events and estimate induced changes in the quasi-static stress field. A Coulomb failure criterion is used with these results to estimate the spatial variation in potential for slip on planes parallel to local faulting. Increases in the potential for slip on fault planes subparallel to the N48°W Trend are consistent with activation of deformation along its 1.5 km length. For events with constant seismic moment, stress drop is shown to be far more important than source dimension in elevating slip potential along the observed plane of seismic activity

  8. Mesoscopic structure of the Punchbowl Fault, Southern California and the geologic and geophysical structure of active strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Steven E.; Evans, James P.

    2000-07-01

    We examine the distribution, density, and orientation of outcrop-scale structures related to the Punchbowl Fault, an exhumed ancient trace of the San Andreas Fault, southern California, in order to determine the structure of the fault zone. The Punchbowl Fault has 44 km of right-lateral slip, and cuts the Cretaceous Pelona Schist in the study area. The mesoscopic structures examined include fractures, small faults, and veins; they were inventoried using scan lines at closely spaced stations along three strike-perpendicular traverses 200-250 m long across the fault. The fault zone thickness is a function of the type of structure measured. Slip along narrow (<2 m wide) ultracataclasite cores of the faults results in foliation reorientation over a distance of 50 m from the cores: fracture and fault densities appear to increase 50-80 m from the fault cores, and vein densities are highly variable across the fault zone. Fractures and faults in the damaged zone have a variety of orientations, but most are at high angles to the main fault zone. When coupled with previous geochemical and microstructural data, these data show that large-displacement faults of the San Andreas system, are up to 200-250 m thick, and enclose zones of mineralogic and geochemical alteration that are 20-30 m thick. Extreme slip localization occurs over zones 1-5 m thick. When reconciled with geophysical imaging, our data suggest that trapped headwaves travel in the damaged zone, and that some aftershock events produce slip on faults and fractures, which often have orientations very different from the principal slip surfaces.

  9. Determining the activation energies and slip systems for dislocation nucleation in body-centered cubic mo and face-centered cubic Ni single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Bei, Hongbin; Li, T.; Gao, Y. F.; George, Easo P; Nieh, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoindentation tests were performed on single crystals of Mo and Ni. The critical shear stress for the first pop-in was {approx}1/7 of the shear modulus in both crystals. The dependence of pop-in probability on load was understood in terms of a thermally activated dislocation nucleation process. Comparison of the activation energies suggests nucleation of full dislocations in Mo and partial dislocations in Ni. The activation energy analysis also offers information on the specific slip system on which dislocations are nucleated.

  10. The Fundamental Plane of the Broad-line Region in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Pu; Wang, Jian-Min; Hu, Chen; Ho, Luis C.; Li, Yan-Rong; Bai, Jin-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Broad emission lines in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) mainly arise from gas photoionized by continuum radiation from an accretion disk around a central black hole. The shape of the broad-line profile, described by {{ D }}{{H}β }={{FWHM}}/{σ }{{H}β }, the ratio of full width at half maximum to the dispersion of broad Hβ, reflects the dynamics of the broad-line region (BLR) and correlates with the dimensionless accretion rate (\\overset{\\quad \\cdot }{{M}}) or Eddington ratio ({L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}}). At the same time, \\overset{\\quad \\cdot }{{M}} and {L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}} correlate with {{ R }}{{Fe}}, the ratio of optical Fe ii to Hβ line flux emission. Assembling all AGNs with reverberation mapping measurements of broad Hβ, both from the literature and from new observations reported here, we find a strong bivariate correlation of the form {log}(\\overset{\\quad \\cdot }{{M}},{L}{{bol}}/{L}{{Edd}})=α +β {{ D }}{{H}β }+γ {{ R }}{{Fe}}, where α = (2.47, 0.31), β = -(1.59, 0.82), and γ = (1.34, 0.80). We refer to this as the fundamental plane of the BLR. We apply the plane to a sample of z < 0.8 quasars to demonstrate the prevalence of super-Eddington accreting AGNs are quite common at low redshifts.

  11. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000972.htm Slipped capital femoral epiphysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball ...

  12. Late quaternary active characteristics and slip-rate of Pingding-Huama Fault, the eastern segment of Guanggaishan-Dieshan Fault zone ( West Qinlin Mountain )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jingxing, Y.; Wenjun, Z.; Daoyang, Y.; Jianzhang, P.; Xingwang, L.; Baiyun, L.

    2012-12-01

    Stretching along the west QinlinShan in the north Tibet, the Guanggaishan-Dieshanfaultis composed of three sub-parallel faults among which the major one is a fault named Pingding-Huama fault. The Pingding-Huama fault can be further defined as a combination of a western segment and an eastern segment separated by Minjiang river at Dangchang. Along the western segment of the Pingding-Huama fault, significant linear characteristics, scars, and fault scarps cutting several alluvial fans can be easily distinguished, indicating that the western segment is active since the late Quatenary and the elapsed time of the last event should be less than 1ka B.P.. We estimated the slip rates of the western segment through geomorphology analysis and dating the age of the top surface of terraces and the deformed strata (OSL, 14C). The results show that its reverse slip rate ranges from 0.69±0.16 to 1.15±0.28mm/a and the sinistral slip rate is 0.51±0.13mm/a. In contrast to the simple structure of the western segment, the eastern segment consists of several sub-parallel faults as well as oblique intersected faults. On all faults of the eastern segment, no sign of recent movement was discovered. Along these faults, the tectonic topography features a sequence of linear valleys in the west and dominant folds in the east. Only striations in bedrock and geomorphology show that the eastern segment was reversely slipping on the whole with sinistral component. In summary, at present the Pingding-Huama fault is active along its western segment while shows very weak deformation along the eastern segment.

  13. Distribution and structure of active strike-slip faults in the Enshu forearc basin of the eastern Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojima, T.; Ashi, J.; Nakamura, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Accretionary prisms and forearc basins are developed in the Nankai Trough, SW Japan. Many active faults are recognized and classified into five fault systems in the eastern Nankai Trough. The Enshu Faults System, the most landward one, runs over 200 km along the northern edge of the Tokai, Enshu and Kumano forearc basins. Swath bathymetry and side-scan sonar surveys indicate a general fault trend of ENE-WSW and dextral displacement of submarine canyons across the landward-most fault. Seismic reflection profiles partly exhibit landward dipping fault planes and flower structures suggesting that the Enshu fault system is affected by oblique subduction of the Philippines Sea Plate. Structural investigation of this area is important for earthquake disaster mitigation as well as understanding of oblique subduction tectonics. However, activity of faults has not been clarified. Japan Oil, Gas and Metal National Corporation (JOGMEC) conducted dense seismic reflection survey at the Tokai-Kumano area in 2001. Seismic reflection profiles clearly show depositional sequences and deformation structures such as faults and folds. This study examined deformation styles and fault activities based on detailed interpretation of seismic reflection profiles. Sediment thickness mapped from seismic profiles clearly changes with age. Sediment thickness is almost homogeneous from the acoustic basement (probably Paleogene Shimanto Complex) to a Pliocene horizon in the survey area. In contrast, thickness between a Pliocene horizon and present seafloor shows large variations from east to west. It is suggested that sedimentary environments change drastically at this period. There are also small-scale variations in sediment thickness for all horizons. Some distinct changes are distributed along linear boundaries. It seems that they correspond to the faults recognized as lineaments on the sidescan sonar images. We estimated activities of faulting based on such sediment thickness changes and their

  14. An investigation of active subglacial thrust glaciotectonics and its role in stick-slip motion from Skalafellsjokull, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, J. K.; Rose, K. C.; Edwards, L.; Clayton, A.; Martinez, K.

    2012-12-01

    Glacier basal movement is by sliding, sediment shearing, or sediment shearing at depth. This movement can either be constant, or discontinuous via stick-slip motion. This is controlled by the interrelationship between pore water pressure and till rheology. There have been very few modern observations of subglacial shearing at depth, although glaciotectonic thrust sheets have been commonly reported from Quaternary and modern glacier forelands. Skalafellsjökull, Iceland represents a rare opportunity to study this style of basal movement. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) studies made in 2008 and 2011 showed that thrust slices of till were present beneath the glacier, and the amount of movement of these slices could be measured. Sediments exposed in the foreland also demonstrated that thin slices of till had been glaciotectonically deformed. We use this data combined with a 2 year record from the Glacsweb subglacial wireless probe, and passive seismics to investigate the relationship between subglacial shearing at depth and stick-slip motion.

  15. Cable connected active tuned mass dampers for control of in-plane vibrations of wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, B.; Basu, B.

    2014-11-01

    In-plane vibrations of wind turbine blades are of concern in modern multi-megawatt wind turbines. Today's turbines with capacities of up to 7.5 MW have very large, flexible blades. As blades have grown longer the increasing flexibility has led to vibration problems. Vibration of blades can reduce the power produced by the turbine and decrease the fatigue life of the turbine. In this paper a new active control strategy is designed and implemented to control the in-plane vibration of large wind turbine blades which in general is not aerodynamically damped. A cable connected active tuned mass damper (CCATMD) system is proposed for the mitigation of in-plane blade vibration. An Euler-Lagrangian wind turbine model based on energy formulation has been developed for this purpose which considers the structural dynamics of the system and the interaction between in-plane and out-of-plane vibrations and also the interaction between the blades and the tower including the CCATMDs. The CCATMDs are located inside the blades and are controlled by an LQR controller. The turbine is subject to turbulent aerodynamic loading simulated using a modification to the classic Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory with turbulence generated from rotationally sampled spectra. The turbine is also subject to gravity loading. The effect of centrifugal stiffening of the rotating blades has also been considered. Results show that the use of the proposed new active control scheme significantly reduces the in-plane vibration of large, flexible wind turbine blades.

  16. Detecting young, slow-slipping active faults by geologic and multidisciplinary high-resolution geophysical investigations: A case study from the Apennine seismic belt, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Improta, L.; Ferranti, L.; de Martini, P. M.; Piscitelli, S.; Bruno, P. P.; Burrato, P.; Civico, R.; Giocoli, A.; Iorio, M.; D'Addezio, G.; Maschio, L.

    2010-11-01

    The Southern Apennines range of Italy presents significant challenges for active fault detection due to the complex structural setting inherited from previous contractional tectonics, coupled to very recent (Middle Pleistocene) onset and slow slip rates of active normal faults. As shown by the Irpinia Fault, source of a M6.9 earthquake in 1980, major faults might have small cumulative deformation and subtle geomorphic expression. A multidisciplinary study including morphological-tectonic, paleoseismological, and geophysical investigations has been carried out across the extensional Monte Aquila Fault, a poorly known structure that, similarly to the Irpinia Fault, runs across a ridge and is weakly expressed at the surface by small scarps/warps. The joint application of shallow reflection profiling, seismic and electrical resistivity tomography, and physical logging of cored sediments has proved crucial for proper fault detection because performance of each technique was markedly different and very dependent on local geologic conditions. Geophysical data clearly (1) image a fault zone beneath suspected warps, (2) constrain the cumulative vertical slip to only 25-30 m, (3) delineate colluvial packages suggesting coseismic surface faulting episodes. Paleoseismological investigations document at least three deformation events during the very Late Pleistocene (<20 ka) and Holocene. The clue to surface-rupturing episodes, together with the fault dimension inferred by geological mapping and microseismicity distribution, suggest a seismogenic potential of M6.3. Our study provides the second documentation of a major active fault in southern Italy that, as the Irpinia Fault, does not bound a large intermontane basin, but it is nested within the mountain range, weakly modifying the landscape. This demonstrates that standard geomorphological approaches are insufficient to define a proper framework of active faults in this region. More in general, our applications have wide

  17. Coseismic and Early Post-Seismic Slip Distributions of the 2012 Emilia (Northern Italy) Seismic Sequence: New Insights in the Faults Activation and Resulting Stress Changes on Adjacent Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheloni, D.; Giuliani, R.; D'Agostino, N.; Mattone, M.; Bonano, M.; Fornaro, G.; Lanari, R.; Reale, D.

    2015-12-01

    The 2012 Emilia sequence (main shocks Mw 6.1 May 20 and Mw 5.9 May 29) ruptured two thrust segments of a ~E-W trending fault system of the buried Ferrara Arc, along a portion of the compressional system of the Apennines that had remained silent during past centuries. Here we use the rupture geometry constrained by the aftershocks and new geodetic data (levelling, InSAR and GPS measurements) to estimate an improved coseismic slip distribution of the two main events. In addition, we use post-seismic displacements, described and analyzed here for the first time, to infer a brand new post-seismic slip distribution of the May 29 event in terms of afterslip on the same coseismic plane. In particular, in this study we use a catalog of precisely relocated aftershocks to explore the different proposed geometries of the proposed thrust segments that have been published so far and estimate the coseismic and post-seismic slip distributions of the ruptured planes responsible for the two main seismic events from a joint inversion of the geodetic data.Joint inversion results revealed that the two earthquakes ruptured two distinct planar thrust faults, characterized by single main coseismic patches located around the centre of the rupture planes, in agreement with the seismological and geological information pointing out the Ferrara and the Mirandola thrust faults, as the causative structures of the May 20 and May 29 main shocks respectively.The preferred post-seismic slip distribution related to the 29 May event, yielded to a main patch of afterslip (equivalent to a Mw 5.6 event) located westward and up-dip of the main coseismic patch, suggesting that afterslip was triggered at the edges of the coseismic asperity. We then use these co- and post-seismic slip distribution models to calculate the stress changes on adjacent fault.

  18. Activity as Object-Related: Resolving the Dichotomy of Individual and Collective Planes of Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetsenko, Anna

    2005-01-01

    This article suggests that the principle of object-relatedness, introduced by Vygotsky and expanded by A. N. Leontiev, can be used to conceptualize human subjectivity within a profoundly social view of human development. This is achieved by reformulating the premises of cultural-historical activity theory to include the notion that material…

  19. Reconstruction of the slip distributions in historical earthquakes on the Sunda megathrust, W. Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nic Bhloscaidh, Mairéad; McCloskey, John; Naylor, Mark; Murphy, Shane; Lindsay, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    Spatially heterogeneous inversions for the slip in major earthquakes are typically only available for modern, instrumentally recorded events. Stress reconstructions on active faults, which are potentially vital elements of earthquake hazard assessment, are usually based on one or two instrumental inversions and some semi-quantitative information concerning historical seismic activity. Here we develop a new Bayesian Monte Carlo inversion method for sparse, large uncertainty data, such as is available for many historical earthquakes. We use it to reconstruct the slip in two great historical earthquakes on the Sunda megathrust, from 200 yr of paleogeodetic data recorded in the stratigraphy of coral microatolls on the forearc islands. The technique is based on the stochastic forward modelling of many slip distributions, which are constrained by the observed fractal scaling in the slip field. A set of static elastic Green's functions is used to estimate the vertical displacement at the coral locations resulting from each trial slip distribution. The posterior expected value of the slip and its variance are obtained from the average of the trial slips, weighted by their ability to reproduce the coral displacements. We successfully test the method on a synthetic slip distribution, before applying it to reconstruct the slip in a recent, instrumentally recorded event. We then invert for the great 1797 and 1833 megathrust events under the Mentawai Islands west of Sumatra. When compared with the slip distributions in recent earthquakes, our results unambiguously indicate that the sequence is not consistent with the classic characteristic earthquake model; earthquakes tend to incrementally tessellate the active fault plane rather than repeatedly breaking a segment of it. The results indicate that homogeneous loading of a fault with heterogeneous initial stress is enough to explain the observations on the Mentawai segment of the Sunda megathrust; no time dependence of material

  20. Active upper plate thrust faulting in regions of low plate interface coupling, repeated slow slip events, and coastal uplift: Example from the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountjoy, Joshu J.; Barnes, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    Contractional fore-arc faulting and deformation is a characteristic feature of many subduction systems. Definition of the three-dimensional geometry and displacement rates of active, upper plate, out-of-sequence thrust faults along ˜250 km of the upper Hikurangi Margin enables us to examine the relationship between fore-arc deformation and the subduction interface in light of interseismic coupling estimates and distribution of slow slip events, both modeled from GPS measurements. These mid-fore-arc structures include the seaward vergent, outer shelf Lachlan and Ariel faults, with vertical separation rates up to 5 mm/yr, and several other major inner shelf faults with rates that are up to 3.8 mm/yr and comparable with Holocene coastal uplift rates. Seismic reflection imaging and geometric projection of these faults at depth indicate that they splay from the region of the plate interface where geodetic inversions for interseismic coupling and slow slip events suggest that the plate boundary undergoes aseismic slip. This observation may indicate either (1) that frictional properties and interseismic coupling on the plate interface are independent and unrelated to the active splay fault deformation in the inner-middle fore arc or (2) that the active splay faulting reflects long-term mechanical coupling related to higher shear stress, or the relative yield strength of the plate interface to the overriding plate, and that the current pattern of interseismic coupling may not be persistent over geological time scales of 20 ka. We compare structure and processes on the northern Hikurangi and Costa Rican margins and find similarities and significant differences astride these subduction systems.

  1. Active Strike-Slip Faulting in the Inner Continental Borderland, Southern California: Results From New High-Resolution Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, J. E.; Ryan, H. F.; Sliter, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    The inner Continental Borderland offshore of southern California accommodates about 7 mm/yr of slip between the North American and Pacific plates. Nearly half of this total has previously been thought to be taken up on the Palos Verdes (PV) and Coronado Bank (CB) fault zones, which have been modeled as a single, continuous fault zone in recent seismic hazard assessments for southern California. Although these faults lie roughly on strike with each other, a connection between these faults has not been clearly demonstrated. Newly acquired high-resolution seismic reflection data indicate that the PV fault terminates southwest of Lasuen Knoll in a horsetail splay that becomes progressively buried to the south. The lack of a connection between the PV and CB fault zones implies that a significant amount of slip must be taken up elsewhere in the inner Continental Borderland. Two other significant offshore faults, the San Diego Trough (SDT) and San Pedro Basin (SPB) fault zones, lie about 10-15 km southwest of and sub parallel to the trace of the PV and CB faults. The SDT fault zone extends from south of the Mexican border near Punta Santo Tomas for about 150 km northward to near Crespi Knoll. The SPB fault zone extends northward from off Santa Catalina Island to near Point Dume. The new seismic reflection data reveal a previously unmapped but apparently active fault zone along strike and in the area between the known strands of the SDT and the SPB fault zones. This newly recognized fault links the SDT and SPB faults, forming a continuous, active fault zone that extends about 250 km along the inner Continental Borderland. Although there are no slip rate data available for this fault zone, its overall length, continuity, and active character suggest that a significant portion of the plate motion that occurs offshore is accommodated along the SDT-SPB fault zone, which may pose a more significant seismic hazard than previously recognized.

  2. Coseismic slip distribution of the 1923 Kanto earthquake, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Nyst, M.; Nishimura, T.; Thatcher, W.

    2005-01-01

    The slip distribution associated with the 1923 M = 7.9 Kanto, Japan, earthquake is reexamined in light of new data and modeling. We utilize a combination of first-order triangulation, second-order triangulation, and leveling data in order to constrain the coseismic deformation. The second-order triangulation data, which have not been utilized in previous studies of 1923 coseismic deformation, are associated with only slightly smaller errors than the first-order triangulation data and expand the available triangulation data set by about a factor of 10. Interpretation of these data in terms of uniform-slip models in a companion study by Nyst et al. shows that a model involving uniform coseismic slip on two distinct rupture planes explains the data very well and matches or exceeds the fit obtained by previous studies, even one which involved distributed slip. Using the geometry of the Nyst et al. two-plane slip model, we perform inversions of the same geodetic data set for distributed slip. Our preferred model of distributed slip on the Philippine Sea plate interface has a moment magnitude of 7.86. We find slip maxima of ???8-9 m beneath Odawara and ???7-8 m beneath the Miura peninsula, with a roughly 2:1 ratio of strike-slip to dip-slip motion, in agreement with a previous study. However, the Miura slip maximum is imaged as a more broadly extended feature in our study, with the high-slip region continuing from the Miura peninsula to the southern Boso peninsula region. The second-order triangulation data provide good evidence for ???3 m right-lateral strike slip on a 35-km-long splay structure occupying the volume between the upper surface of the descending Philippine Sea plate and the southern Boso peninsula. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Reconsidering Fault Slip Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, J. S.; Wech, A.; Creager, K. C.; Obara, K.; Agnew, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The scaling of fault slip events given by the relationship between the scalar moment M0, and duration T, potentially provides key constraints on the underlying physics controlling slip. Many studies have suggested that measurements of M0 and T are related as M0=KfT3 for 'fast' slip events (earthquakes) and M0=KsT for 'slow' slip events, in which Kf and Ks are proportionality constants, although some studies have inferred intermediate relations. Here 'slow' and 'fast' refer to slip front propagation velocities, either so slow that seismic radiation is too small or long period to be measurable or fast enough that dynamic processes may be important for the slip process and measurable seismic waves radiate. Numerous models have been proposed to explain the differing M0-T scaling relations. We show that a single, simple dislocation model of slip events within a bounded slip zone may explain nearly all M0-T observations. Rather than different scaling for fast and slow populations, we suggest that within each population the scaling changes from M0 proportional to T3 to T when the slipping area reaches the slip zone boundaries and transitions from unbounded, 2-dimensional to bounded, 1-dimensional growth. This transition has not been apparent previously for slow events because data have sampled only the bounded regime and may be obscured for earthquakes when observations from multiple tectonic regions are combined. We have attempted to sample the expected transition between bounded and unbounded regimes for the slow slip population, measuring tremor cluster parameters from catalogs for Japan and Cascadia and using them as proxies for small slow slip event characteristics. For fast events we employed published earthquake slip models. Observations corroborate our hypothesis, but highlight observational difficulties. We find that M0-T observations for both slow and fast slip events, spanning 12 orders of magnitude in M0, are consistent with a single model based on dislocation

  4. Activating and optimizing MoS2 basal planes for hydrogen evolution through the formation of strained sulphur vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hong; Tsai, Charlie; Koh, Ai Leen; Cai, Lili; Contryman, Alex W.; Fragapane, Alex H.; Zhao, Jiheng; Han, Hyun Soon; Manoharan, Hari C.; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Nørskov, Jens K.; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    As a promising non-precious catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER; refs ,,,,), molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) is known to contain active edge sites and an inert basal plane. Activating the MoS2 basal plane could further enhance its HER activity but is not often a strategy for doing so. Herein, we report the first activation and optimization of the basal plane of monolayer 2H-MoS2 for HER by introducing sulphur (S) vacancies and strain. Our theoretical and experimental results show that the S-vacancies are new catalytic sites in the basal plane, where gap states around the Fermi level allow hydrogen to bind directly to exposed Mo atoms. The hydrogen adsorption free energy (ΔGH) can be further manipulated by straining the surface with S-vacancies, which fine-tunes the catalytic activity. Proper combinations of S-vacancy and strain yield the optimal ΔGH = 0 eV, which allows us to achieve the highest intrinsic HER activity among molybdenum-sulphide-based catalysts.

  5. Breddin's Graph For Fault and Slip Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Célérier, B.

    A simple plot of rake versus strike of fault and slip or earthquake focal mechanism data provides insight into the stress regime that caused slippage on these faults provided one of the principal stress direction is near vertical. By overlaying an abacus on this plot, one can evaluate both the orientation of the horizontal principal stress directions and the stress tensor aspect ratio, (s1-s2)/(s1-s3), where s1, s2, s3 are the principal stress magnitudes ranked in decreasing order. The underlying geometrical properties are that the slip data that are near strike-slip, and that are mainly found on steeply dipping planes, constrain the horizontal principal stress directions whereas the slip data that are near dip-slip and that occur on shallow dipping planes striking away from the principal stress directions constrain the stress tensor aspect ratio. This abacus is an extension of the Breddin's abacus used to analyze two dimensional deformation in structural geology and it is used in a similar fashion. Its application to synthetic and natural monophase data show both its usefulness and limitation. It is not intended to replace stress inversion techniques because of limiting assumptions, but it is expected to provide insight into the complexity of natural data set from a simple viewpoint.

  6. Slip of c + a/2 dislocations in Ti{sub 3}Al single crystals strained in tension along the c-axis

    SciTech Connect

    Minonishi, Y.; Legros, M.; Caillard, D.

    1997-12-31

    In situ TEM straining experiments have been performed on a Ti{sub 3}Al single crystal, along the c-axis, in order to study the slip of 2c+a dislocations in pyramidal planes. The results show that slip takes place in {pi}{sub 1} planes, in contrast with what has been observed after compression tests (slip in {pi}{sub 2} planes), and that rows of loops are nucleated in the slip plane.The mechanisms which may control slip in the {pi}{sub 1} planes are briefly discussed.

  7. A new perspective on the Guerrero gap: Slow slip events and tremors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radiguet, Mathilde; Campillo, Michel

    2010-05-01

    The slow slip events (SSE) that have been detected in several subduction zones are characterized by an important variability (in terms of duration, migration, recurrence time). The physical mechanisms responsible for their occurrence and their role in the mechanical evolution leading to large thrust classic earthquakes are still unclear. Two of the largest events recorded occurred in 2002 and 2006 in the Guerrero segment of the Mexican subduction zone. These events where recorded by 8 and 15 continuous GPS stations respectively, and give us a good opportunity to constrain the characteristics of large SSEs. The total slip during the 2006 SSE has been also measured with InSAR. Combining GPS and InSAR allows a detailed study of the spatial and temporal evolution of slip at depth. We inverted the cumulative GPS displacements to find the distribution of total slip on the fault plane during the 2002 and 2006 SSEs. The two events show significantly different slip distributions, both extending in the deeper part of the seismogenic zone and in the transition zone. For the 2006 SSE, we modeled the spatial and temporal evolution of slip on the subduction interface by inverting the GPS time series. We assumed a functional form for the slip function, and we inverted for the slip amplitude, the initiation time and the duration, using a linearized least-square inversion procedure. The rupture initiated at a depth of 40 km (transition zone), in the western part of the Guerrero gap, and propagated with an average velocity of 1.2 km/day (with regional variations). The rise time (duration of slip in each cell) is about 170 days and the total duration of the event is 11-12 months. We also analyzed the energy of seismic records to detect non-volcanic tremors (NVT). We found that NVT are not synchronous with SSE slip and are separated spatially with the zones of large slip of the SSE. It is nevertheless observed that the NVT activity increased during the 2006 SSE. G-GAP team (LGIT

  8. Modeling of rock friction 2. Simulation of preseismic slip

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    The constitutive relations developed in the companion paper are used to model detailed observations of preseismic slip and the onset of unstable slip in biaxial laboratory experiments. The simulations employ a deterministic plane strain finite element model to represent the interactions both within the sliding blocks and between the blocks and the loading apparatus. Both experiments and simulations show that preseismic slip is controlled by initial inhomogeneity of shear stress along the sliding surface relative to the frictional strength. As a consequence of the inhomogeneity, stable slip begins at a point on the surface and the area of slip slowly expands as the external loading increases. A previously proposed correlation between accelerating rates of stable slip and growth of the area of slip is supported by the simulations. In the simulations and in the experiments, unstable slip occurs shortly after a propagating slip event traverses the sliding surface and breaks out at the ends of the sample. In the model the breakout of stable slip causes a sudden acceleration of slip rates. Because of velocity dependency of the constitutive relationship for friction, the rapid acceleration of slip causes a decrease in frictional strength. Instability occurs when the frictional strength decreases with displacement at a rate that exceeds the intrinsic unloading characteristics of the sample and test machine. A simple slider-spring model that does not consider preseismic slip appears to approximate the transition adequately from stable sliding to unstable slip as a function of normal stress, machine stiffness, and surface roughness for small samples. However, for large samples and for natural faults the simulations suggest that the simple model may be inaccurate because it does not take into account potentially large preseismic displacements that will alter the friction parameters prior to instability. Copyright ?? 1979 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball of the hip joint from the thigh bone (femur) at ... A slipped capital femoral epiphysis may affect both hips. An epiphysis is an area at the end of a long bone . ...

  10. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  11. Sagittal plane rotation center of lower lumbar spine during a dynamic weight-lifting activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Wang, Shaobai; Wu, Minfei; Zhong, Weiye; Li, Jing-Sheng; Cha, Thomas; Wood, Kirk; Li, Guoan

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the center of rotation (COR) of the intervertebral segments of the lower lumbar spine (L4-L5 and L5-S1 segments) in sagittal plane during a weight-lifting (3.6 kg in each hand) extension activity performed with the pelvis constrained. Seven healthy subjects were studied using a dual fluoroscopic imaging technique. Using the non-weightbearing, supine position during MRI scan as a reference, the average intervertebral flexion angles of the L4-L5 and L5-S1 were 6.6° and 5.3° at flexion position of the body, respectively, and were -1.8° and -3.5° at extension position of the body, respectively. The CORs of the lower lumbar spine were found segment-dependent and changed with the body postures. The CORs of the L4-L5 segment were at the location about 75% posterior from the anterior edge of the disc at flexion positions of the body, and moved to about 92% of the posterior portion of the disc at extension positions of the body. The CORs of the L5-S1 segment were at 95% posterior portion of the disc at flexion positions of the body, and moved outside of the posterior edge of the disc by about 12% of the disc length at extension positions of the body. These results could help understand the physiological motion characters of the lower lumbar spine. The data could also provide important insights for future improvement of artificial disc designs and surgical implantation of the discs that are aimed to reproduce normal spinal functions. PMID:26805460

  12. Localizing Circuits of Atrial Macro-Reentry Using ECG Planes of Coherent Atrial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Andrew M.; Krummen, David E.; Feld, Gregory K.; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2007-01-01

    Background The complexity of ablation for atrial macro-reentry (AFL) varies significantly depending upon the circuit location. Presently, surface ECG analysis poorly separates left from right atypical AFL and from some cases of typical AFL, delaying diagnosis until invasive study. Objective To differentiate and localize the intra-atrial circuits of left atypical AFL, right atypical, and typical AFL using quantitative ECG analysis. Methods We studied 66 patients (54 M, age 59±14 years) with typical (n=35), reverse typical (n=4) and atypical (n=27) AFL. For each, we generated filtered atrial waveforms from ECG leads V5 (X-axis), aVF (Y) and V1 (Z) by correlating a 120 ms F-wave sample to successive ECG regions. Atrial spatial loops were plotted for 3 orthogonal planes (frontal, XY=V5/aVF; sagittal, YZ=aVF/V1; axial, XZ=V5/V1), then cross-correlated to measure spatial regularity (‘coherence’: range −1 to 1). Results Mean coherence was greatest in the XY plane (p<10−3 vs XZ or YZ). Atypical AFL showed lower coherence than typical AFL in XY (p<10−3), YZ (p<10−6) and XZ (p<10−5) planes. Atypical left AFL could be separated from atypical right AFL by lower XY coherence (p=0.02); for this plane coherence < 0.69 detected atypical left AFL with 84% specificity and 75% sensitivity. F-wave amplitude did not separate typical, atypical right or atypical left AFL (p=NS). Conclusions Atypical AFL shows lower spatial coherence than typical AFL, particularly in sagittal and axial planes. Coherence in the Cartesian frontal plane separated left and right atypical AFL. Such analyses may be used to plan ablation strategy from the bedside. PMID:17399632

  13. Modeling the transition between upper plane bed regime and sheet flow without an active layer formulation. Preliminary results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viparelli, E.; Hernandez Moreira, R. R.; Blom, A.

    2015-12-01

    A perusal of the literature on bedload transport revealed that, notwithstanding the large number of studies on bedform morphology performed in the past decades, the upper plane bed regime has not been thoroughly investigated and the distinction between the upper plane bed and sheet flow transport regimes is still poorly defined. Previous experimental work demonstrated that the upper plane bed regime is characterized by long wavelength and small amplitude bedforms that migrate downstream. These bedforms, however, were not observed in experiments on sheet flow transport suggesting that the upper plane bed and the sheet flow are two different regimes. We thus designed and performed experiments in a sediment feed flume in the hydraulic laboratory of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of South Carolina at Columbia to study the transition from upper plane bed to sheet flow regime. Periodic measurements of water surface and bed elevation, bedform geometry and thicknesses of the bedload layer were performed by eyes, and with cameras, movies and a system of six ultrasonic probes that record the variations of bed elevation at a point over time. We used the time series of bed elevations to determine the probability functions of bed elevation. These probability functions are implemented in a continuous model of river morphodynamics, i.e. a model that does not use the active layer approximation to describe the sediment fluxes between the bedload and the deposit and that should thus be able to capture the details of the vertical and streamwise variation of the deposit grain size distribution. This model is validated against the experimental results for the case of uniform material. We then use the validated model in the attempt to study if and how the spatial distribution of grain sizes in the deposit changes from upper plane bed regime to sheet flow and if these results are influenced by the imposed rates of base level rise.

  14. Bonding Effects on the Slip Differences in the B 1 Monocarbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leon, Nicholas; Yu, Xiao-xiang; Yu, Hang; Weinberger, Christopher R.; Thompson, Gregory B.

    2015-04-01

    Differences in plasticity are usually attributed to significant changes in crystalline symmetry or the strength of the interatomic bonds. In the B 1 monocarbides, differences in slip planes exist at low temperatures despite having the same structure and very similar bonding characteristics. Our experimental results demonstrate concretely that HfC slips on {110 } planes while TaC slips on {111 } planes. Density functional theory calculations rationalize this difference through the formation of an intrinsic stacking fault on the {111 } planes, formation of Shockley partials, and enhanced metallic bonding because of the valence filling of electrons between these transitional metal carbides.

  15. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is held in place with a single central screw. This screw keeps the thigh bone from slipping and will ... including in-situ fixation with more than one screw) are used less often. Ask your doctor to ...

  16. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  17. A multiple-plane approach to measure the structural properties of functionally active regions in the human cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Garfinkel, Sarah N; King, Anthony P; Angstadt, Mike; Dennis, Michael J; Xie, Hong; Welsh, Robert C; Tamburrino, Marijo B; Liberzon, Israel

    2010-02-15

    Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques provide the means of studying both the structural and the functional properties of various brain regions, allowing us to address the relationship between the structural changes in human brain regions and the activity of these regions. However, analytical approaches combining functional (fMRI) and structural (sMRI) information are still far from optimal. In order to improve the accuracy of measurement of structural properties in active regions, the current study tested a new analytical approach that repeated a surface-based analysis at multiple planes crossing different depths of cortex. Twelve subjects underwent a fear conditioning study. During these tasks, fMRI and sMRI scans were acquired. The fMRI images were carefully registered to the sMRI images with an additional correction for cortical borders. The fMRI images were then analyzed with the new multiple-plane surface-based approach as compared to the volume-based approach, and the cortical thickness and volume of an active region were measured. The results suggested (1) using an additional correction for cortical borders and an intermediate template image produced an acceptable registration of fMRI and sMRI images; (2) surface-based analysis at multiple depths of cortex revealed more activity than the same analysis at any single depth; (3) projection of active surface vertices in a ribbon fashion improved active volume estimates; and (4) correction with gray matter segmentation removed non-cortical regions from the volumetric measurement of active regions. In conclusion, the new multiple-plane surface-based analysis approaches produce improved measurement of cortical thickness and volume of active brain regions. These results support the use of novel approaches for combined analysis of functional and structural neuroimaging. PMID:19922802

  18. Geodetically derived fault slip distribution model for the May, 11th 2011 Lorca earthquake (SE, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, P. J.; Tiampo, K. F.; Palano, M.; Cannavò, F.; Fernandez, J.

    2011-12-01

    The Alhama de Murcia Fault (AMF) is a compound multisegmented right-lateral to reverse fault system. The AMF is one the longest faults in the Eastern Betics Shear zone (Southeastern Spain). In the last decades its seismogenic potential has been evaluated and earthquake maximum magnitudes were forecast based on paleoseismic and dating data. On May 11th, 2011 a moderate (Mw 5.1) earthquake shook the region, causing 9 casualties and severe damages in Lorca city (Murcia region). The reported location of the aftershocks sequence did not follow any particular trend; furthermore in-situ geology surveys did not identify any fault slip related ground deformation. To contribute to a better seismic hazard assessment, we need to locate and, if possible, characterize the fault-slip distribution that generated the earthquake. In this work, we detected small but significant ground deformation in the epicentral area by using geodetic (GPS and satellite radar interferometry) data. Geodetic data was processed by using a stack of differential radar interferometry (corrected for a known subsidence contribution and estimating their error budget), daily GPS estimated coordinates and high-rate 1-Hz GPS data. We jointly inverted the detected static coseismic displacements (a GPS station and two ENVISAT interferograms from different tracks) for the fault plane geometry parameters by using a rectangular dislocation model embedded in a homogeneous elastic half-space. The best-fitting fault plane follows closely the geologically derived AMF geometry (NE-SW strike trend and dipping ~60-70o to NW). Later, the obtained model geometry was extended and divided into patches to allow for a detailed analysis of the fault slip distribution pattern. Slip distribution indicates that slip occurred in a single patch with reverse and right-lateral motion (with peak fault slip magnitude of ~9 cm). However, the modelling results also indicate that the fault slip was shallower along the centre and southwest

  19. Tsunami Hazards From Strike-Slip Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legg, M. R.; Borrero, J. C.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2003-12-01

    Strike-slip faulting is often considered unfavorable for tsunami generation during large earthquakes. Although large strike-slip earthquakes triggering landslides and then generating substantial tsunamis are now recognized hazards, many continue to ignore the threat from submarine tectonic displacement during strike-slip earthquakes. Historical data record the occurrence of tsunamis from strike-slip earthquakes, for example, 1906 San Francisco, California, 1994 Mindoro, Philippines, and 1999 Izmit, Turkey. Recognizing that strike-slip fault zones are often curved and comprise numerous en echelon step-overs, we model tsunami generation from realistic strike-slip faulting scenarios. We find that tectonic seafloor uplift, at a restraining bend or"pop-up" structure, provides an efficient mechanism to generate destructive local tsunamis; likewise for subsidence at divergent pull-apart basin structures. Large earthquakes on complex strike-slip fault systems may involve both types of structures. The California Continental Borderland is a high-relief submarine part of the active Pacific-North America transform plate boundary. Natural harbors and bays created by long term vertical motion associated with strike-slip structural irregularities are now sites of burgeoning population and major coastal infrastructure. Significant local tsunamis generated by large strike-slip earthquakes pose a serious, and previously unrecognized threat. We model several restraining bend pop-up structures offshore southern California to quantify the local tsunami hazard. Maximum runup derived in our scenarios ranges from one to several meters, similar to runup observed from the 1994 Mindoro, Philippines, (M=7.1) earthquake. The runup pattern is highly variable, with local extremes along the coast. We only model the static displacement field for the strike-slip earthquake source; dynamic effects of moving large island or submerged banks laterally during strike-slip events remains to be examined

  20. Uncorking Shallow Slip and the Slip History of the 2014 South Napa Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, B. A.; Minson, S. E.; Glennie, C. L.; Murray, J. R.; Hudnut, K. W.; Ericksen, T.; Langenheim, V. E.; Lockner, D. A.; Dawson, T. E.; Lutz, A. T.; Schwartz, D. P.; Lienkaemper, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow fault slip (< ~1km) during and immediately following earthquakes is poorly understood, largely because of challenges measuring deformation near a surface rupture. The need for better measurement is further motivated by an apparent deficit of shallow slip in regional source models of strike-slip earthquakes and by the suggestion that near-surface frictional heterogeneity over spatial scales of 100s of meters can control shallow fault slip. Here, we use a nascent mobile laser scanning technique to quantify with unprecedented detail the coseismic surface rupture and rapid post-seismic deformation from the 24 August, 2014 M6.0 South Napa earthquake. We infer shallow fault slip and find that both co- and post-seismic slip at depths of ~3-25 m significantly exceeds traditional measurements of surface displacements. There is no deficit in shallow slip: near-surface slip values are greater than maximum reported co-seismic fault slip values at depth. By ~ 1 month, afterslip along the southern portion of the fault accounted for as much shallow slip potency as the shallow co-seismic rupture on the northern portion. Further, we show that the afterslipping portion of the fault cuts across a ~3000 m thick sedimentary basin whereas the co-seismically ruptured portion does not. A rate and state friction model is consistent with the basin thickness, afterslip, and rock-sample mechanical measurements and strongly suggests that near-surface frictional heterogeneity controlled the distribution of coseismic and post-seismic shallow slip. In the future, we suggest that combining existing basin thickness data with active fault maps could provide more precise estimates of where surface rupture and/or afterslip may occur, both before, and in rapid response to, damaging earthquakes.

  1. Hairpin river loops and slip-sense inversion on southeast Asian strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacassin, Robin; Replumaz, Anne; Hervé Leloup, P.

    1998-08-01

    In the Golden Triangle region of southeast Asia (northern Thailand, Laos and Burma, southern Yunnan), the Mekong, Salween, and neighboring rivers show hairpin geometries where they cross active strike-slip faults. Restoration of young, left-lateral offsets of these rivers leaves residual right-lateral bends of many kilometers. We interpret these hairpins as evidence of late Cenozoic slip-sense inversion on these faults, about 5 to 20 Ma. Near the Red River fault, stress field and slip-sense inversion occurred ca. 5 Ma. This implies that the present course of these large rivers has existed for at least several million years. Pliocene Quaternary slip rates, possibly on the order of 1 mm/yr, are inferred on each of the strike-slip faults of the Golden Triangle.

  2. Free energy of dislocations in a multi-slip geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooiman, M.; Hütter, M.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2016-03-01

    The collective dynamics of dislocations is the underlying mechanism of plastic deformation in metallic crystals. Dislocation motion in metals generally occurs on multiple slip systems. The simultaneous activation of different slip systems plays a crucial role in crystal plasticity models. In this contribution, we study the energetic interactions between dislocations on different slip systems by deriving the free energy in a multi-slip geometry. In this, we restrict ourselves to straight and parallel edge dislocations. The obtained free energy has a long-range mean-field contribution, a statistical contribution and a many-body contribution. The many-body contribution is a local function of the total dislocation density on each slip system, and can therefore not be written in terms of the net dislocation density only. Moreover, this function is a strongly non-linear and non-convex function of the density on different slip systems, and hence the coupling between slip systems is of great importance.

  3. Epithermal neutron activation analysis investigation of Clarion-Clipperton abyssal plane clay and polymetallic micronodules.

    PubMed

    Duliu, O G; Cristache, C I; Culicovc, O A; Frontasyeva, M V; Szobotca, S A; Toma, M

    2009-05-01

    The content of seven major (Na, Al, Cl, Mn, K, Ca, Ti, Fe) and 30 trace (Sc, V, Cr, Ni, Co, Zn, Cu, As, Sr, Rb, Zr, Mo, Sn, In, Sb, Ba, Cs, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Sm, Tb, Dy, Yb, Hf, Ta, W, Th, U) elements determined by INAA in 13 samples of abyssal clay and two samples of micronodules collected from the North pacific Ocean Clarion-Clipperton abyssal plane is presented and discussed with respect to some rocks models. PMID:19230682

  4. RoboPol: optical polarization-plane rotations and flaring activity in blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, D.; Pavlidou, V.; Papadakis, I. E.; Hovatta, T.; Pearson, T. J.; Liodakis, I.; Panopoulou, G. V.; Angelakis, E.; Baloković, M.; Das, H.; Khodade, P.; Kiehlmann, S.; King, O. G.; Kus, A.; Kylafis, N.; Mahabal, A.; Marecki, A.; Modi, D.; Myserlis, I.; Paleologou, E.; Papamastorakis, I.; Pazderska, B.; Pazderski, E.; Rajarshi, C.; Ramaprakash, A.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reig, P.; Tassis, K.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-04-01

    We present measurements of rotations of the optical polarization of blazars during the second year of operation of RoboPol, a monitoring programme of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray bright blazars specially designed for effective detection of such events, and we analyse the large set of rotation events discovered in two years of observation. We investigate patterns of variability in the polarization parameters and total flux density during the rotation events and compare them to the behaviour in a non-rotating state. We have searched for possible correlations between average parameters of the polarization-plane rotations and average parameters of polarization, with the following results: (1) there is no statistical association of the rotations with contemporaneous optical flares; (2) the average fractional polarization during the rotations tends to be lower than that in a non-rotating state; (3) the average fractional polarization during rotations is correlated with the rotation rate of the polarization plane in the jet rest frame; (4) it is likely that distributions of amplitudes and durations of the rotations have physical upper bounds, so arbitrarily long rotations are not realized in nature.

  5. Thin active region, type II superlattice photodiode arrays: Single-pixel and focal plane array characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, J. W.; Svensson, S. P.; Beck, W. A.; Goldberg, A. C.; Kennerly, S. W.; Hongsmatip, T.; Winn, M.; Uppal, P.

    2007-02-01

    We have measured the radiometric properties of two midwave infrared photodiode arrays (320×256pixel2 format) fabricated from the same wafer comprising a thin (0.24μm), not intentionally doped InAs /GaSb superlattice between a p-doped GaSb layer and a n-doped InAs layer. One of the arrays was indium bump bonded to a silicon fanout chip to allow for the measurement of properties of individual pixels, and one was bonded to a readout integrated circuit to enable array-scale measurements and infrared imaging. The superlattice layer is thin enough that it is fully depleted at zero bias, and the collection efficiency of photogenerated carriers in the intrinsic region is close to unity. This simplifies the interpretation of photocurrent data as compared with previous measurements made on thick superlattices with complex doping profiles. Superlattice absorption coefficient curves, obtained from measurements of the external quantum efficiency using two different assumptions for optical coupling into the chip, bracket values calculated using an eight-band k •p model. Measurements of the quantum efficiency map of the focal plane array were in good agreement with the single-pixel measurements. Imagery obtained with this focal plane array demonstrates the high uniformity and crystal quality of the type II superlattice material.

  6. Oxygen reduction reaction in a droplet on graphite: direct evidence that the edge is more active than the basal plane.

    PubMed

    Shen, Anli; Zou, Yuqin; Wang, Qiang; Dryfe, Robert A W; Huang, Xiaobing; Dou, Shuo; Dai, Liming; Wang, Shuangyin

    2014-09-26

    Carbon-based metal-free electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline medium have been extensively investigated with the aim of replacing the commercially available, but precious platinum-based catalysts. For the proper design of carbon-based metal-free electrocatalysts for the ORR, it would be interesting to identify the active sites of the electrocatalyst. The ORR was now studied with an air-saturated electrolyte solution droplet (diameter ca. 15 μm), which was deposited at a specified position either on the edge or on the basal plane of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Electrochemical measurements suggest that the edge carbon atoms are more active than the basal-plane ones for the ORR. This provides a direct way to identify the active sites of carbon materials for the ORR. Ball-milled graphite and carbon nanotubes with more exposed edges were also prepared and showed significantly enhanced ORR activity. DFT calculations elucidated the mechanism by which the charged edge carbon atoms result in the higher ORR activity. PMID:25124986

  7. Stress triggering of the great Indian Ocean strike-slip earthquakes in a diffuse plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Kelly; Bürgmann, Roland

    2012-11-01

    On April 11, 2012, two great magnitude 8+ earthquakes occurred within a two-hour period off the west coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia, in the broadly distributed India-Australia plate boundary zone. The magnitude 8.6 mainshock holds the distinction of being both the largest instrumentally recorded strike-slip earthquake and the largest earthquake away from a recognized plate boundary fault. The mainshock involved sequential ruptures of multiple fault planes oriented nearly perpendicular to each other. The adjacent 2004 megathrust earthquake statically loaded the northern Wharton Basin oceanic lithosphere on both of the 2012 mainshock fault plane orientations, and greatly enhanced the rate of earthquake activity in the region for a year. Viscoelastic relaxation of the asthenosphere following the 2004 and 2005 megathrust earthquakes continued to positively stress the offshore region, correlating with the locations of later strike-slip earthquakes, including two magnitude 7+ and the 2012 magnitude 8+ earthquakes.

  8. Effects induced by an earthquake on its fault plane:a boundary element study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonafede, Maurizio; Neri, Andrea

    2000-04-01

    Mechanical effects left by a model earthquake on its fault plane, in the post-seismic phase, are investigated employing the `displacement discontinuity method'. Simple crack models, characterized by the release of a constant, unidirectional shear traction are investigated first. Both slip components-parallel and normal to the traction direction-are found to be non-vanishing and to depend on fault depth, dip, aspect ratio and fault plane geometry. The rake of the slip vector is similarly found to depend on depth and dip. The fault plane is found to suffer some small rotation and bending, which may be responsible for the indentation of a transform tectonic margin, particularly if cumulative effects are considered. Very significant normal stress components are left over the shallow portion of the fault surface after an earthquake: these are tensile for thrust faults, compressive for normal faults and are typically comparable in size to the stress drop. These normal stresses can easily be computed for more realistic seismic source models, in which a variable slip is assigned; normal stresses are induced in these cases too, and positive shear stresses may even be induced on the fault plane in regions of high slip gradient. Several observations can be explained from the present model: low-dip thrust faults and high-dip normal faults are found to be facilitated, according to the Coulomb failure criterion, in repetitive earthquake cycles; the shape of dip-slip faults near the surface is predicted to be upward-concave; and the shallower aftershock activity generally found in the hanging block of a thrust event can be explained by `unclamping' mechanisms.

  9. Revisiting the "Fundamental Plane" of Black Hole Activity at Extremely Low Luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F.; Yu, Z.; Ho, L. C.

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the origin of the X-ray emission in low-luminosity AGNs (LLAGNs). Yuan & Cui (2005) predicted that the X-ray emission should originate from jets rather than from an advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) when the X-ray luminosity LX of the source is below a critical value of LX,crit ≍ 10-6 LEdd. This prediction implies that the X-ray spectrum in such sources should be fitted by jets rather than ADAFs. Furthermore, below LX,crit the correlation between radio (LR) and X-ray (LX) luminosities and the black hole mass (M)—the so-called fundamental plane of black hole activity—should deviate from the general correlation obtained by Merloni, Heinz & Di Matteo (2003) and become steeper. The Merloni et al. correlation is described by logLR = 0.6logLX + 0.78logM + 7.33, while the predicted correlation is logL_R = 1.23logLX + 0.25logM - 13.45. We collect data from the literature to check the validity of these two expectations. We find that among the 16 LLAGNs with good X-ray and radio spectra, 13 are consistent with the Yuan & Cui prediction. For the 22 LLAGNs with LX < LX,crit, the fundamental plane correlation is described by logLR = 1.22logLX + 0.23logM - 12.46, also in excellent agreement with the prediction.

  10. Toward Implementing Long-term Slip History and Paleoseismicity Into Active Fault Databases to Compute Effective Recurrence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzenz, D. D.; Jalobeanu, A.; Ferry, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The first year of data from the Cascadia Initiative ocean-bottom seismograph deployment has provided a unique opportunity to image the structure of a plate from formation at the spreading center to subduction beneath the continental margin. However, traditional Rayleigh wave tomography of the Juan de Fuca plate using teleseismic sources is unusually difficult, because the region contains a large velocity heterogeneity at the ocean-continent margin; the azimuthal range of sources is limited, with most earthquakes lying in narrow azimuthal ranges to the northwest along the Aleutian and western Pacific trenches or to the southeast along the Middle and South American trenches; the orientation of many of the focal mechanisms leads to nodes in Rayleigh wave excitation towards the Juan de Fuca region; and the great circle paths from most sources to the receivers travel great distances close to ocean/continent boundaries or trenches and island arcs, producing complex waveforms. Nevertheless, we construct an initial tomographic image of the Juan de Fuca plate by subdividing the area into regions with relatively uniform wavefield composition when necessary; by using the two-plane-wave representation of the wavefield within the subregions; and by removing noise from the vertical component of the Rayleigh wave signals using information from the horizontal and pressure records. If the seismometer is slightly tilted, some of the often large horizontal noise contaminates the vertical component, and when water (gravity) waves penetrate to the seafloor, the associated pressure variations cause vertical displacements. By removing these two sources of noise, we are able to construct Rayleigh wave phase velocity maps in the period range 20 to 125 s, yielding excellent control on lithospheric mantle structure.

  11. Lower extremity corrective reactions to slip events.

    PubMed

    Cham, R; Redfern, M S

    2001-11-01

    A significant number of injuries in the workplace is attributed to slips and falls. Biomechanical responses to actual slip events determine whether the outcome of a slip will be recovery or a fall. The goal of this study was to examine lower extremity joint moments and postural adjustments for experimental evidence of corrective strategies evoked during slipping in an attempt to prevent falling. Sixteen subjects walked onto a possibly oily vinyl tile floor, while ground reaction forces and body motion were recorded at 350 Hz. The onset of corrective reactions by the body in an attempt to recover from slips became evident at about 25% of stance and continued until about 45% into stance, i.e. on average between 190 and 350 ms after heel contact. These reactions included increased flexion moment at the knee and extensor activity at the hip. The ankle, on the other hand, acted as a passive joint (no net moment) during fall trials. Joint kinematics showed increased knee flexion and forward rotation of the shank in an attempt to bring the foot back towards the body. Once again, the ankle kinematics appeared to play a less dominant role (compared to the knee) in recovery attempts. This study indicates that humans generate corrective reactions to slips that are different than previously reported responses to standing perturbations translating the supporting surface. PMID:11672718

  12. Oblique slip in Laramide foreland arches

    SciTech Connect

    Erslev, E.A.; Selvig, B.; Molzer, P. . Dept. of Earth Resources)

    1993-03-01

    Don Wise was one of the first structural geologists to recognize the complex, four-dimensional (space and time) nature of basement-involved faulting in the Rocky Mountain foreland. His focus on both small scale kinematic indicators and regional tectonic hypotheses has provided a launching point for many Rocky Mountain geologists. The implications of the anastomosing patterns of Laramide foreland arches on models of regional stress and strain have provoked considerable debate. Hypotheses range from those invoking multiple stages of lateral compression from different directions to single-stage models necessitating a component of strike-slip motion in east-west and north-south arches. These hypotheses were tested using slickenline analysis of minor faulting in structures with different orientations. In Wyoming, structures paralleling the dominant northwest structural trend have slickenlines in the NE-SW vertical plane, consistent with shortening and compression in this direction. The east-west Owl Creek and Casper Mountain structures also have NE-SW trending slickenlines, indicating slip oblique to these arches. In Colorado, minor faults in the north-south margin of the northeastern Front Range also indicate oblique slip, with shortening in the NE-SW quadrant. The actual trend of the slickenlines is more easterly, however, suggesting a change of slip trajectory with latitude, not time, possibly in response to identation by the Colorado Plateau.

  13. Deformation rates and localization of an active fault system in relation with rheological and frictional slip properties: The Corinth Rift case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Arem, S.; Lyon-Caen, H.; Bernard, P.; Garaud, J. D.; Rolandone, F.; Briole, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Gulf of Corinth in Greece has attracted increasing attention because of its seismically active complex fault system and considerable seismic hazard. It is one of the most active extensional regions in the Mediterranean area. However, there are still open questions concerning the role and the geometry of the numerous active faults bordering the basin, as well as the mechanisms governing the seismicity. The Corinth Rift Laboratory (CRL http://crlab.eu) project is based on the cooperation of various European institutions that merge their efforts to study fault mechanics and related hazards in this natural laboratory with 10 destructive earthquakes per century (Magnitude > 6), among which 4 in the selected region of CRL. This active rift continues to open over 10-12 Km of width at a rate of 1:5 cm=yr. Most of the faults of the investigated area are in their latest part of cycle, so that the probability of at least one moderate to large earthquake (Magnitude = 6 to 6:7) is very high within a few decades. In the first part of this work, two-dimensional finite element models of a fault system is considered to estimate the effects of the crust rheological parameters on the stress distribution, the horizontal and vertical deformation in the vicinity of the faults, and the plastic deformation localization. We consider elasto-visco-plastic rheology with a power law viscosity for dislocation creep modelling and the Drucker-Prager yield criterion for plasticity. We investigate the rheological properties of the crust and examine their compatibility with both horizontal and vertical GPS observations recorded during campaigns conducted in the last twenty years. The second part is devoted to simulations involving rate and slip history friction laws for earthquake occurence prediction and seismogenic depth approximation. The case of a single fault is examined first, then two active faults are considered to highlight the effect of their interactions on the seismic cycle

  14. Fault-slip accumulation in an active rift over thousands to millions of years and the importance of paleoearthquake sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Nicol, Andrew; Walsh, John; Begg, John; Townsend, Dougal; Hristopulos, Dionissios

    2013-04-01

    The catastrophic earthquakes that recently (September 4th, 2010 and February 22nd, 2011) hit Christchurch, New Zealand, show that active faults, capable of generating large-magnitude earthquakes, can be hidden beneath the Earth's surface. In this study we combine near-surface paleoseismic data with deep (<5 km) onshore seismic-reflection lines to explore the growth of normal faults over short (<27 kyr) and long (>1 Ma) timescales in the Taranaki Rift, New Zealand. Our analysis shows that the integration of different timescale datasets provides a basis for identifying active faults not observed at the ground surface, estimating maximum fault-rupture lengths, inferring maximum short-term displacement rates and improving earthquake hazard assessment. We find that fault displacement rates become increasingly irregular (both faster and slower) on shorter timescales, leading to incomplete sampling of the active-fault population. Surface traces have been recognised for <50% of the active faults and along ∼50% of their lengths. The similarity of along-strike displacement profiles for short and long time intervals suggests that fault lengths and maximum single-event displacements have not changed over the last 3.6 Ma. Therefore, rate changes are likely to reflect temporal adjustments in earthquake recurrence intervals due to fault interactions and associated migration of earthquake activity within the rift.

  15. Fault-slip accumulation in an active rift over thousands to millions of years and the importance of paleoearthquake sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Nicol, Andrew; Walsh, John J.; Begg, John G.; Townsend, Dougal B.; Hristopulos, Dionissios T.

    2012-03-01

    The catastrophic earthquakes that recently (September 4th, 2010 and February 22nd, 2011) hit Christchurch, New Zealand, show that active faults, capable of generating large-magnitude earthquakes, can be hidden beneath the Earth's surface. In this article we combine near-surface paleoseismic data with deep (<5 km) onshore seismic-reflection lines to explore the growth of normal faults over short (<27 kyr) and long (>1 Ma) timescales in the Taranaki Rift, New Zealand. Our analysis shows that the integration of different timescale datasets provides a basis for identifying active faults not observed at the ground surface, estimating maximum fault-rupture lengths, inferring maximum short-term displacement rates and improving earthquake hazard assessment. We find that fault displacement rates become increasingly irregular (both faster and slower) on shorter timescales, leading to incomplete sampling of the active-fault population. Surface traces have been recognised for <50% of the active faults and along ≤50% of their lengths. The similarity of along-strike displacement profiles for short and long time intervals suggests that fault lengths and maximum single-event displacements have not changed over the last 3.6 Ma. Therefore, rate changes are likely to reflect temporal adjustments in earthquake recurrence intervals due to fault interactions and associated migration of earthquake activity within the rift.

  16. A dynamical model for reflex activated head movements in the horizontal plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, G. C.; Hain, T. C.; Peterson, B. W.

    1996-01-01

    We present a controls systems model of horizontal-plane head movements during perturbations of the trunk, which for the first time interfaces a model of the human head with neural feedback controllers representing the vestibulocollic (VCR) and the cervicocollic (CCR) reflexes. This model is homeomorphic such that model structure and parameters are drawn directly from anthropomorphic, biomechanical and physiological studies. Using control theory we analyzed the system model in the time and frequency domains, simulating neck movement responses to input perturbations of the trunk. Without reflex control, the head and neck system produced a second-order underdamped response with a 5.2 dB resonant peak at 2.1 Hz. Adding the CCR component to the system dampened the response by approximately 7%. Adding the VCR component dampened head oscillations by 75%. The VCR also improved low-frequency compensation by increasing the gain and phase lag, creating a phase minimum at 0.1 Hz and a phase peak at 1.1 Hz. Combining all three components (mechanics, VCR and CCR) linearly in the head and neck system reduced the amplitude of the resonant peak to 1.1 dB and increased the resonant frequency to 2.9 Hz. The closed loop results closely fit human data, and explain quantitatively the characteristic phase peak often observed.

  17. Frictional properties of the active San Andreas Fault at SAFOD: Implications for fault strength and slip behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, B. M.; Saffer, D. M.; Marone, C.

    2015-07-01

    We present results from a comprehensive laboratory study of the frictional strength and constitutive properties for all three active strands of the San Andreas Fault penetrated in the San Andreas Observatory at Depth (SAFOD). The SAFOD borehole penetrated the Southwest Deforming Zone (SDZ), the Central Deforming Zone (CDZ), both of which are actively creeping, and the Northeast Boundary Fault (NBF). Our results include measurements of the frictional properties of cuttings and core samples recovered at depths of ~2.7 km. We find that materials from the two actively creeping faults exhibit low frictional strengths (μ = ~0.1), velocity-strengthening friction behavior, and near-zero or negative rates of frictional healing. Our experimental data set shows that the center of the CDZ is the weakest section of the San Andreas Fault, with μ = ~0.10. Fault weakness is highly localized and likely caused by abundant magnesium-rich clays. In contrast, serpentine from within the SDZ, and wall rock of both the SDZ and CDZ, exhibits velocity-weakening friction behavior and positive healing rates, consistent with nearby repeating microearthquakes. Finally, we document higher friction coefficients (μ > 0.4) and complex rate-dependent behavior for samples recovered across the NBF. In total, our data provide an integrated view of fault behavior for the three active fault strands encountered at SAFOD and offer a consistent explanation for observations of creep and microearthquakes along weak fault zones within a strong crust.

  18. Microstructural evolution from stable sliding to fast stick slip: insights from rock deformation experiments on quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collettini, Cristiano; Scuderi, Marco M.; Viti, Cecilia; Marone, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Inferring microstructural evolution and associated fault slip behaviour along natural and/or experimental faults is a long-standing problem in fault mechanics. For example, does grain-size reduction and shear localization facilitate earthquake slip or vice versa? We have sheared granular layers of quartz gouge in a double direct shear configuration using a biaxial apparatus. We varied loading stiffness and applied normal stresses to produce a spectrum of slip modes from stable sliding at 10 μm/s, slow stick-slip (average slip velocity 100 μm/s) and fast stick slip (average slip velocity 4 mm/s). At the end of the experiments we collected the experimental fault rocks for microstructural investigations. Additional samples were collected from control experiments to investigate shear fabric development and microstructural features before the onset of stick-slip instabilities. We investigated the role of normal stress and stick-slip properties, including slip velocity, in determining fault zone microstructural features. Ranging from stable sliding to fast stick-slip we observe a progressive localization of deformation along fault parallel boundary shear planes. Only during fast stick-slip is the deformation localized along continuous, thin (1-2 microns wide), boundary parallel shear planes. The shear zones are composed of nanograins dispersed within a patchy matrix. We conducted TEM analyses to characterize these materials. In experiments at the same normal stress, fast stick-slip results in localized shear zones and fabric with nanograins whereas for stable sliding the microstructure does not show a significant grain size reduction and localization. Our results indicate that the fault rheological properties and fault slip behaviour, ranging from stable to unstable slip, plays a significant role in shear localization and fault zone fabric development.

  19. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  20. Thermo-poro-mechanics of chemically active creeping faults: 3. The role of serpentinite in episodic tremor and slip sequences, and transition to chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, T.; Veveakis, E.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Yuen, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    During the last decade, knowledge over episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events has increased dramatically owing to the widespread installation of GPS and seismic networks. The most puzzling observations are (i) the periodic nature of slow seismic events, (ii) their localization at intermediate depths (estimated 15-40 km), and (iii) the origin of the nonvolcanic fluids that are responsible for the tremor activity. We reconcile these observations using a first principles approach relying on physics, continuum mechanics, and chemistry of serpentinite in the megathrust interface. The approach reproduces the GPS sequences of 17 years of recording in Cascadia, North America, as well as over 10 years in the Hikurangi Trench of New Zealand. We show that strongly endothermic reactions, such as serpentinite dehydration, are required for ETS events. We report that in this tectonic setting, it is its chemical reaction kinetics, not the low friction, that marks serpentinite as a key mineral for stable, self-sustained oscillations. We find that the subduction zone instabilities are driven from the ductile realm rather than the brittle cover. Even when earthquakes in the cover perturb the oscillator, it relaxes to its fundamental mode. Such a transition from stable oscillations to chaos is witnessed in the ETS signal of NZ following the M6.8, 2007 seismic event, which triggered a secondary mode of oscillations lasting for a few years. We consequently suggest that the rich dynamics of ductile modes of failure may be used to decipher the chaotic time sequences underpinning seismic events.

  1. New evidence for active deformation off the Annaba region (easternmost Algerian margin): Estimates of Quaternary shortening and slip rates from folding analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kherroubi, A.; Deverchere, J.; Yelles, A.; Mercier de Lepinay, B.; Domzig, A.; Graindorge, D.; Bracene, R.; Cattaneo, A.; Gaullier, V.

    2007-12-01

    From the first marine investigations off the region of Annaba (easternmost part of Algeria) made after the MARADJA2 survey in November 2005, a set of large active faults and folds was discovered near the foot of the margin. This active thrust system resumes a previous passive margin and creates growth strata deposition on the backlimbs of large Quaternary folds, resulting in the development of perched basins at the foot of the margin since less than 1 Ma. The system forms a set of overlapping fault segments verging towards the Algerian basin. From the seismic line analysis (high-resolution and Chirp data), and using sedimentation rates obtained from coring and extrapolated, a shortening rate of about 0.9 mm/yr is estimated. If we consider a single fault dipping at about 45° (hypothesized from the Boumerdès 2003 rupture zone), a fault slip rate of about 1.3 mm/yr can be postulated. Considering recent kinematic studies, this fault-related fold system could accommodate a significant part of the present-day submarine shortening rate between the European and African plates, predicted by Stich et al. (2006) to be 1.5 mm/yr from GPS modelling. This faulting is apparently active at a faster rate than the similar faulting observed at the foot of the margin NW of Algiers. This system of faults off Annaba represents a major threat for the region. Indeed, the location of this system changes drastically the seismic hazard assessment of the region, since no large historical earthquake is reported there since 3 centuries at least.

  2. Testing Physical Models of Episodic Tremor and Slip with Earthquake and Creep Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, J.; Pratt, T.; Bodin, P.

    2006-12-01

    We propose that the existence or lack of temporal and spatial correlations between characteristics of earthquake and creep activity may provide constraints on frictional models developed to explain episodic tremor and aseismic slip (ETS). Frictional models that predict aseismic episodic slip and involve fluids and elevated pore pressures are qualitatively consistent with suggestions that fluids also play a role in episodic tremor. Published models of ETS invoke variations in frictional parameters that are static spatial features and/or result from temporal changes in pore-pressures that affect the frictional properties (e.g., see Liu and Rice, 2005). Frictional models predict that elevated pore pressures cause higher aftershock rates (Beeler et al., 2001), and when pore pressures are sufficiently elevated earthquakes will more easily occur on unfavorably oriented fault planes (Sibson, 1990). Different frictional regimes also predict different ambient seismicity rate characteristics (Boatwright and Cocco, 1996). If episodic tremor is associated with transient increases in fluid pressure, and both are inferred to occur throughout a volume tens of kilometers in width above the related episodic aseismic slip event (Kao et al., 2005), these changes may be observable as temporal variations in seismic velocities in tomographic images derived from earthquake travel-times. ETS has been observed mostly in subduction zones, and models focus on explaining episodic aseismic slip that occurs down-dip of the locked portion of subduction interface faults. Similar frictional models have been invoked to explain shallow fault creep on crustal strike-slip faults, both as steady creep and as episodic slip events (Marone, et al. 1988). Thus, we also examine observations of such creep, and the potential for contemporary tremor, for lessons about the conditions leading to ETS. Beeler, N. M., Gomberg, J., Blanpied, M. L., Marone, C., and Richardson, E (2001), Compaction-induced pore

  3. Fault slip controlled by stress path and fluid pressurization rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Melodie E.; Zhu, Wenlu; Banker, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    The practice of injecting fluids into the crust is linked to regional increases in seismicity. Increasing fluid pressure along preexisting faults is believed to enhance seismicity rates by reducing the shear stress required for slip, but the processes that cause faults to slip under conditions of fluid pressurization are poorly constrained. We use experimental rock deformation to investigate the controls of fluid pressurization and pressurization rates on fault slip style. We show that pore fluid pressurization is less effective that mechanical changes in fault normal stress at initiating accelerated slip events. Fluid pressurization enhances the total slip, slip velocity, and shear stress drop of events initiated by mechanical changes in normal stress, and these parameters are correlated with pressurization rate, but not the magnitude of fluid pressure. This result is consistent with field-scale observations and indicates that processes active at the pore network scale affect induced seismicity.

  4. Active charge state control of single NV centres in diamond by in-plane Al-Schottky junctions

    PubMed Central

    Schreyvogel, C.; Polyakov, V.; Wunderlich, R.; Meijer, J.; Nebel, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate an active control of the charge state of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centre by using in-plane Schottky-diode geometries with aluminium on hydrogen-terminated diamond surface. A switching between NV+, NV0 and NV− can be performed with the Al-gates which apply electric fields in the hole depletion region of the Schottky junction that induces a band bending modulation, thereby shifting the Fermi-level over NV charge transition levels. We simulated the in-plane band structure of the Schottky junction with the Software ATLAS by solving the drift-diffusion model and the Poisson-equation self-consistently. We simulated the IV-characteristics, calculated the width of the hole depletion region, the position of the Fermi-level intersection with the NV charge transition levels for different reverse bias voltages applied on the Al-gate. We can show that the field-induced band bending modulation in the depletion region causes a shifting of the Fermi-level over NV charge transition levels in such a way that the charge state of a single NV centre and thus its electrical and optical properties is tuned. In addition, the NV centre should be approx. 1–2 μm away from the Al-edge in order to be switched with moderate bias voltages. PMID:26177799

  5. Recognising Paleoseismic Events and Slip Styles in Vein Microstructures - is Incrementality Enough?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Sibson, R. H.

    2008-12-01

    likely formed by relatively slow dissolution and precipitation of wall rock material, which may translate to a slip mode of rise-time intermediate between earthquakes (seconds - minutes) and aseismic creep (years - infinite). Fibres are typically ≤ 10 cm long, similar to slip observed in slow slip events (rise-time weeks - months). We propose that these veins are possible records of slow slip along weak, fluid-saturated and highly overpressured planes. No definite record of large, fast earthquakes is observed in the complex, either because the rocks never experienced such events, or because significant shear heating was inhibited by thermal pressurisation. The only record of fast events would be discrete planes of cataclasite, easily overprinted by slow interseismic material diffusion. The mélange is a record of episodic, distributed deformation over a range of time- and length-scales, which may reflect distributed seismic activity accommodated by a range of slip modes including episodic tremor and slow slip.

  6. Electro-Active Transducer Using Radial Electric Field To Produce/Motion Sense Out-Of-Plane Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An electro-active transducer includes a ferroelectric material sandwiched by first and second electrode patterns. When the device is used as an actuator, the first and second electrode patterns are configured to introduce an electric field into the ferroelectric material when voltage is applied to the electrode patterns. When the device is used as a sensor. the first and second electrode patterns are configured to introduce an electric field into the ferroelectric material when the ferroelectric material experiences deflection in a direction substantially perpendicular thereto. In each case, the electrode patterns are designed to cause the electric field to: i) originate at a region of the ferroelectric material between the first and second electrode patterns. and ii) extend radially outward from the region of the ferroelectric material (at which the electric field originates) and substantially parallel to the ferroelectric material s plane.

  7. Subduction zone structures and slip behavior in megathrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, S.; Nakanishi, A.; Nakamura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake, tsunami and geodetic data show that co-seismic slips of a large megathrust earthquakes do not uniformly propagate along a plate boundary. For example, a clear segmentation of slip zones of magnitude-8 class megathrust earthquakes are well recognized in the Nankai Trough. Moreover, a lateral variation of the slips are revealed even in one segment. In the Japan Trench, the most characteristic slip behavior of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake is an extremely large slip reaching to the trench axis, but geodetic, tsunami or teleseismic show the slip was heterogeneous near the trench. In order to examine whether those complex slip distributions are attributed by any distinct structural factor, we have been carried out active-source seismic surveys in the subduction seismogenic. In the Nankai Trough, large-scale subducted seamounts, ridges and doming structure intruded in an overriding accretion wedge are imaged. Comparing co-seismic slip distribution of the 1944 Tonankai and the 1946 Nankai earthquakes with the seismic images, we concluded that those structures are key factors to control the slip distributions. In the central part of the Japan Trench area, we fund a rough basement geometry is overprinted on the horst-and-graben structure. Those complex geometry of basement cause a strong lateral variation of the thickness of subducting pelagic/hemi-pelagic sediment. Many geological studies suggest that properties of the plate-boundary sediment attribute the large slip near the trench. We therefore plan to acquire additional high-resolution seismic data in the entire Japan Trench in order to examine a role of incoming sediment on the large slip to the trench axis. In this presentation we present an overview of the structural factors controlling slips in megathrust earthquakes, including new data acquired in the Nankai Trough and Japan Trench.

  8. Extended Peierls-Nabarro model for cross slip in face centered cubic metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Benjamin R.

    dislocation configurations are approximated by a network of cubic parametric splines with tangent continuity. The first approximation of cross-slip activation energy for zero stress was performed by using a non-singular dislocation theory with a core parameter determined from an atomistic method (Peierls-Nabarro approach). An energy barrier of 1.9 [eV] is determined for Cu at the saddle point, which is in good agreement with values determined by other models, including those of Puschl and Escaig. Furthermore, a refinement of the proposed model is developed by representing the Shockley partials with fractional dislocations and adding lattice restoring forces to the dislocations, which are determined from ab-initio methods. Thus, this calculation gives a value of 1.43 [eV] for the cross-slip activation energy, which is in excellent agreement with the activation energy determined from the Bonneville-Escaig experimental value of 1.11 +/- 0.37 [eV]. Finally, a cross-slip scenario with pile-up dislocations on the glide plane is simulated to show the versatility of the proposed model for more realistic dislocation arrangements.

  9. The Three Planes of Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Gloria

    1999-01-01

    Currently, the language sciences place together four different forms of mental activity on one plane of language, which results in confusion. This paper presents arguments from metaphysics, hermeneutics, and semiotics to demonstrate that there are actually three planes of language (a biologically-based information processing plane, a literal…

  10. Slip length crossover on a graphene surface

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2015-04-07

    Using equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we study the flow of argon fluid above the critical temperature in a planar nanochannel delimited by graphene walls. We observe that, as a function of pressure, the slip length first decreases due to the decreasing mean free path of gas molecules, reaches the minimum value when the pressure is close to the critical pressure, and then increases with further increase in pressure. We demonstrate that the slip length increase at high pressures is due to the fact that the viscosity of fluid increases much faster with pressure than the friction coefficient between the fluid and the graphene. This behavior is clearly exhibited in the case of graphene due to a very smooth potential landscape originating from a very high atomic density of graphene planes. By contrast, on surfaces with lower atomic density, such as an (100) Au surface, the slip length for high fluid pressures is essentially zero, regardless of the nature of interaction between fluid and the solid wall.

  11. Slip partitioning by elastoplastic propagation of oblique slip at depth.

    PubMed

    Bowman, David; King, Geoffrey; Tapponnier, Paul

    2003-05-16

    Oblique motion along tectonic boundaries is commonly partitioned into slip on faults with different senses of motion. The origin of slip partitioning is important to structural geology, tectonophysics, and earthquake mechanics. Partitioning can be explained by the upward elastoplastic propagation of oblique slip from a fault or shear zone at depth. The strain field ahead of the propagating fault separates into zones of predominantly normal, reverse, and strike-slip faulting. The model successfully predicts the distribution of fault types along parts of the San Andreas and Haiyuan faults. PMID:12750513

  12. Suppression of strike-slip fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curren, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    In orogens elongated parallel to a great circle about the Euler pole for the two bounding plates, theory requires simple-shear deformation in the form of distributed deformation or velocity discontinuities across strike-slip faults. This type of deformation, however, does not develop at all plate boundaries requiring toroidal motion. Using the global plate boundary model, PB2002 [Bird, 2003], as the basis for identifying areas where expected simple-shear deformation is absent or underdeveloped, it was also possible to identify two potential causes for this behavior: (1) the presence of extensive fracturing at right angles to the shear plane and (2) regional cover of flood basalts or andesites with columnar joints. To test this hypothesis, a new plane-stress finite-strain model was developed to study the effects of such pre-existing structures on the development of simple shear in a clay cake. A homogenous kaolinite-water mixture was poured into a deforming parallelogram box and partially dried to allow for brittle and plastic deformation at and below the surface of the clay, respectively. This was floated on a dense fluid foundation, effectively removing basal friction, and driven by a motor in a sinistral direction from the sides of the box. Control experiments produced classic Riedel model fault assemblages and discrete, through-going primary deformation zones (PDZs); experiments with pre-existing structures developed the same, though subdued and distributed, fault assemblages but did not develop through-going PDZs. Although formation of strike-slip faults was underdeveloped at the surface in clay with pre-existing structures, offset within the clay cake (measured, with respect to a fixed point, by markers on the clay surface) as a fraction of total offset of the box was consistently larger than that of the control experiments. This suggests that while the extent of surface faulting was lessened in clay with pre-existing structures, slip was still occurring at

  13. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  14. Volcanism and aseismic slip in subduction zones

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, H.

    1981-01-10

    The spatial and temporal relationship of volcanism to the occurrence of large earthquakes and convergent plate motion is examined. The number of volcanic eruptions per year in a convergent zone is found to be linearly related to the aseismic slip component of plate motion. If the aseismic slip rate is low (coupling between converging plates is strong), then the primary manifestation of tectonic activity is the occurrence of large earthquakes with only infrequent volcanic activity. If, however, the aseismic slip rate is high (coupling is weak), then there are few large earthquakes, and volcanism is the principal manifestation of tectonic activity. This model is consistent with the spatial distribution of large earthquakes and active volcanoes in the circum-Pacific area. It is tested by examining the extent of volcanic activity in the rupture zones of the 1952--1973 sequence of earthquakes in the Japan--Kurile Islands area. The number of volcanic euptions along these zones during the interval between large earthquakes is used to compute the aseismic slip rates for these segments, based on the relationship developed in this study. The aseismic slip rates so computed agree with those determined from the earthquake history of the area and rates of plate motion. The agreement suggests that in the interval between large earthquakes, the aseismic plate motion is manifested in a specific number of volcanic eruptions. Therefore in areas with adequate historial data it should be possible to use the model developed in this study to monitor volcanic eruptions for long-term prediction of large earthquakes.

  15. Slip distributions on active normal faults measured from LiDAR and field mapping of geomorphic offsets: an example from L'Aquila, Italy, and implications for modelling seismic moment release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Maxwell; Roberts, Gerald P.; McCaffrey, Ken; Cowie, Patience A.; Faure Walker, Joanna P.; Papanikolaou, Ioannis; Phillips, Richard J.; Michetti, Alessandro Maria; Vittori, Eutizio; Gregory, Laura; Wedmore, Luke; Watson, Zoë K.

    2015-05-01

    Surface slip distributions for an active normal fault in central Italy have been measured using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), in order to assess the impact of changes in fault orientation and kinematics when modelling subsurface slip distributions that control seismic moment release. The southeastern segment of the surface trace of the Campo Felice active normal fault near the city of L'Aquila was mapped and surveyed using techniques from structural geology and using TLS to define the vertical and horizontal offsets of geomorphic slopes since the last glacial maximum (15 ± 3 ka). The fault geometry and kinematics measured from 43 sites and throw/heave measurements from geomorphic offsets seen on 250 scarp profiles were analysed using a modification of the Kostrov equations to calculate the magnitudes and directions of horizontal principal strain-rates. The map trace of the studied fault is linear, except where a prominent bend has formed to link across a former left-stepping relay-zone. The dip of the fault and slip direction are constant across the bend. Throw-rates since 15 ± 3 ka decrease linearly from the fault centre to the tip, except in the location of the prominent bend where higher throw rates are recorded. Vertical coseismic offsets for two palaeo earthquake ruptures seen as fresh strips of rock at the base of the bedrock scarp also increase within the prominent bend. The principal strain-rate, calculated by combining strike, dip, slip-direction and post 15 ± 3 ka throw rate, decreases linearly from the fault centre towards the tip; the strain-rate does not increase across the prominent fault bend. The above shows that changes in fault strike, whilst having no effect on the principal horizontal strain-rate, can produce local maxima in throw-rates during single earthquakes that persist over the timescale of multiple earthquakes (15 ± 3 ka). Detailed geomorphological and structural characterisation of active faults is therefore a critical

  16. Universal behavior in ideal slip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Ferrante, John; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The slip energies and stresses are computed for defect-free crystals of Ni, Cu, Ag, and Al using the many-atom approach. A simple analytical expression for the slip energies is obtained, leading to a universal form for slip, with the energy scaled by the surface energy and displacement scaled by the lattice constant. Maximum stresses are found to be somewhat larger than but comparable with experimentally determined maximum whisker strengths.

  17. Fault orientations in extensional and conjugate strike-slip environments and their implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; Hill, D.P.

    1991-01-01

    Seismically active conjugate strike-slip faults in California and Japan typically have mutually orthogonal right- and left-lateral fault planes. Normal-fault dips at earthquake nucleation depths are concentrated between 40?? and 50??. The observed orientations and their strong clustering are surprising, because conventional faulting theory suggests fault initiation with conjugate 60?? and 120?? intersecting planes and 60?? normal-fault dip or fault reactivation with a broad range of permitted orientations. The observations place new constraints on the mechanics of fault initiation, rotation, and evolutionary development. We speculate that the data could be explained by fault rotation into the observed orientations and deactivation for greater rotation or by formation of localized shear zones beneath the brittle-ductile transition in Earth's crust. Initiation as weak frictional faults seems unlikely. -Authors

  18. Refining the shallow slip deficit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Tong, Xiaopeng; Sandwell, David T.; Milliner, Christopher W. D.; Dolan, James F.; Hollingsworth, James; Leprince, Sebastien; Ayoub, Francois

    2016-03-01

    Geodetic slip inversions for three major (Mw > 7) strike-slip earthquakes (1992 Landers, 1999 Hector Mine and 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah) show a 15-60 per cent reduction in slip near the surface (depth < 2 km) relative to the slip at deeper depths (4-6 km). This significant difference between surface coseismic slip and slip at depth has been termed the shallow slip deficit (SSD). The large magnitude of this deficit has been an enigma since it cannot be explained by shallow creep during the interseismic period or by triggered slip from nearby earthquakes. One potential explanation for the SSD is that the previous geodetic inversions lack data coverage close to surface rupture such that the shallow portions of the slip models are poorly resolved and generally underestimated. In this study, we improve the static coseismic slip inversion for these three earthquakes, especially at shallow depths, by: (1) including data capturing the near-fault deformation from optical imagery and SAR azimuth offsets; (2) refining the interferometric synthetic aperture radar processing with non-boxcar phase filtering, model-dependent range corrections, more complete phase unwrapping by SNAPHU (Statistical Non-linear Approach for Phase Unwrapping) assuming a maximum discontinuity and an on-fault correlation mask; (3) using more detailed, geologically constrained fault geometries and (4) incorporating additional campaign global positioning system (GPS) data. The refined slip models result in much smaller SSDs of 3-19 per cent. We suspect that the remaining minor SSD for these earthquakes likely reflects a combination of our elastic model's inability to fully account for near-surface deformation, which will render our estimates of shallow slip minima, and potentially small amounts of interseismic fault creep or triggered slip, which could `make up' a small percentages of the coseismic SSD during the interseismic period. Our results indicate that it is imperative that slip inversions include

  19. Slip flow in graphene nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Todd, B. D.; Hansen, J. S.; Daivis, Peter J.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the hydrodynamic boundary condition for simple nanofluidic systems such as argon and methane flowing in graphene nanochannels using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (EMD) in conjunction with our recently proposed method [J. S. Hansen, B. D. Todd, and P. J. Daivis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 016313 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.84.016313]. We first calculate the fluid-graphene interfacial friction coefficient, from which we can predict the slip length and the average velocity of the first fluid layer close to the wall (referred to as the slip velocity). Using direct nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD) we then calculate the slip length and slip velocity from the streaming velocity profiles in Poiseuille and Couette flows. The slip lengths and slip velocities from the NEMD simulations are found to be in excellent agreement with our EMD predictions. Our EMD method therefore enables one to directly calculate this intrinsic friction coefficient between fluid and solid and the slip length for a given fluid and solid, which is otherwise tedious to calculate using direct NEMD simulations at low pressure gradients or shear rates. The advantages of the EMD method over the NEMD method to calculate the slip lengths/flow rates for nanofluidic systems are discussed, and we finally examine the dynamic behaviour of slip due to an externally applied field and shear rate.

  20. Long-term slip deficit and the forecasting of slip in future earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, John; NicBhloscaidh, Mairead; Simao, Nuno

    2014-05-01

    stress field including both secular loading and earthquake interaction stresses. We show that the spatial distribution of energy release in the 2007 and 2010 earthquakes correlates strongly with regions of high slip deficit accumulated over the previous 350 years and that in principle both could have been identified as areas of particularly high seismic hazard. The following more general seismological lessons emerge from our work: 1 At least for this region of this margin, the characteristic earthquake concept entirely fails to explain the data 2 Earthquake slip tessellates the fault plane under the Mentawai Islands rather than repeatedly breaking the same patch. 3 The tessellation by high slip is largely constrained by the interface coupling distribution (which, of course, played no part in the slip reconstruction). 4 Homogeneous loading of a heterogeneous fault in a linear-elastic medium explains all the observations, no rheological time dependence is necessary. 5 Even small amounts of nonlinearity in the rupture process would ensure that this sequence will not be repeated, calling into question many long-standing, fundamental concepts in earthquake science.

  1. Seismic Slip on an Oblique Detachment Fault at Low Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecke, S. U.; Steely, A. N.; Evans, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    Pseudotachylytes are one of the few accepted indicators of seismic slip along ancient faults. Low-angle normal faults have produced few large earthquakes in historic times and low-angle normal faults (detachment faults) are typically severely misoriented relative to a vertical maximum compressive stress. As a result many geoscientists question whether low-angle normal faults produce earthquakes at low angles. Relationships in southern California show that a major low-angle normal-oblique fault slipped at low angles and produced large earthquakes. The exhumed Late Cenozoic West Salton detachment fault preserves spectacular fault- related pseudotachylytes along its fault plane and injected into its hanging wall and footwall. Composite pseudotachylyte zones are up to 1.25 m thick and persists over lateral distances of at least 10's of meters. Pseudotachylyte is common in most thin sections of damaged fault rocks with more than 20% (by volume) of cataclasite. We recognized the presence of original melt using numerous criteria: abundant spherulites in thin sections, injection structures at both the thin-section and outcrop scale, black aphanitic textures, quenched vein margins, variations in microcrystallite textures and/or size with respect to the vein margin, and glassy textures in hand sample. Multiple earthquakes are inferred to produce the layered "stratigraphy" in some exposures of pseudotachylytes. We infer that the West Salton detachment fault formed and slipped at low angles because it nearly perfectly reactivates a Cretaceous ductile thrust system at the half km scale and dips between 10 and 45 degrees. The about 30 degree NNE dip of the detachment fault on the north side of Yaqui Ridge is likely steeper than its dip during detachment slip because there is local steepening on the flanks of the Yaqui Ridge antiform in a contractional stepover of a crosscutting Quaternary San Felipe dextral fault zone. These relationships indicate a low dip on the detachment

  2. Coseismic and Postseismic slip distribution of the 2007 Solomon Islands Earthquake deduced from A Bayesian Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Gong, X.

    2011-12-01

    In inversion of geodetic data for distribution of fault slip minimizing the first or second order derivatives of slip across fault plane is generally employed to smooth slips of neighboring patches.Smoothing parameter is subjective selected to determine the relative weight placed on fitting data versus smoothing the slip distribution.We use the Fully Bayesian Inversion method(Fukuda,2008)to simultaneously estimate the slip distribution and smoothing parameter objectively in a Bayesian framework. The distributed slips,the posterior probability density function and the smoothing parameter is formulated with Bayes' theorem and sampled with a Markov chain Monte Carlo method. Here We will apply this method to Coseismic and Postseismic displacement data from the 2007 Solomon Islands Earthquake and compare the results of this method with generally favored method.

  3. Are non-slip socks really 'non-slip'? An analysis of slip resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Satyan; Haines, Terrence; Varghese, Paul; Economidis, Alyssia

    2009-01-01

    Background Non-slip socks have been suggested as a means of preventing accidental falls due to slips. This study compared the relative slip resistance of commercially available non-slip socks with other foot conditions, namely bare feet, compression stockings and conventional socks, in order to determine any traction benefit. Methods Phase one involved slip resistance testing of two commercially available non-slip socks and one compression-stocking sample through an independent blinded materials testing laboratory using a Wet Pendulum Test. Phase two of the study involved in-situ testing among healthy adult subjects (n = 3). Subjects stood unsupported on a variable angle, inclined platform topped with hospital grade vinyl, in a range of foot conditions (bare feet, non-slip socks, conventional socks and compression stockings). Inclination was increased incrementally for each condition until slippage of any magnitude was detected. The platform angle was monitored using a spatial orientation tracking sensor and slippage point was recorded on video. Results Phase one results generated through Wet Pendulum Test suggested that non-slip socks did not offer better traction than compression stockings. However, in phase two, slippage in compression stockings was detected at the lowest angles across all participants. Amongst the foot conditions tested, barefoot conditions produced the highest slip angles for all participants indicating that this foot condition provided the highest slip resistance. Conclusion It is evident that bare feet provide better slip resistance than non-slip socks and therefore might represent a safer foot condition. This study did not explore whether traction provided by bare feet was comparable to 'optimal' footwear such as shoes. However, previous studies have associated barefoot mobilisation with increased falls. Therefore, it is suggested that all patients continue to be encouraged to mobilise in appropriate, well-fitting shoes whilst in hospital

  4. Rock mechanics. Superplastic nanofibrous slip zones control seismogenic fault friction.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Berend A; Plümper, Oliver; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Spiers, Christopher J

    2014-12-12

    Understanding the internal mechanisms controlling fault friction is crucial for understanding seismogenic slip on active faults. Displacement in such fault zones is frequently localized on highly reflective (mirrorlike) slip surfaces, coated with thin films of nanogranular fault rock. We show that mirror-slip surfaces developed in experimentally simulated calcite faults consist of aligned nanogranular chains or fibers that are ductile at room conditions. These microstructures and associated frictional data suggest a fault-slip mechanism resembling classical Ashby-Verrall superplasticity, capable of producing unstable fault slip. Diffusive mass transfer in nanocrystalline calcite gouge is shown to be fast enough for this mechanism to control seismogenesis in limestone terrains. With nanogranular fault surfaces becoming increasingly recognized in crustal faults, the proposed mechanism may be generally relevant to crustal seismogenesis. PMID:25504714

  5. The Slip Hypothesis: Tactile Perception and its Neuronal Bases.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Cornelius

    2016-07-01

    The slip hypothesis of epicritic tactile perception interprets actively moving sensor and touched objects as a frictional system, known to lead to jerky relative movements called 'slips'. These slips depend on object geometry, forces, material properties, and environmental factors, and, thus, have the power to incorporate coding of the perceptual target, as well as perceptual strategies (sensor movement). Tactile information as transferred by slips will be encoded discontinuously in space and time, because slips sometimes engage only parts of the touching surfaces and appear as discrete and rare events in time. This discontinuity may have forced tactile systems of vibrissae and fingertips to evolve special ways to convert touch signals to a tactile percept. PMID:27311927

  6. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along‐fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault‐to‐fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson‐Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin

  7. Surface Activation of Plane and Curved Automotive Polymer Surfaces by Using a Fittable Multi-Pin DBD Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jörn, Heine; Roland, Damm; Christoph, Gerhard; Stephan, Wieneke; Wolfgang, Viöl

    2014-06-01

    In this work, surface activation of automotive polymers using atmospheric pressure plasmas was investigated. The aim was to increase the polar fraction of the surface energy of both plane and convex polymer devices with a radius in the range of 30 mm. For this purpose, a fittable low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma source based on capacitively coupled multi-pin electrodes was set up and applied. Each single electrode generates a treatment spot of approximately 2 cm2 with a tunable power density of up to 1.4 W/cm2. The surface energy was evaluated by contact angle measurements. After treatment at a low energy density of 1.01 J/cm2, the polar fraction of the surface energy of the investigated polymers was increased by a factor of 3.3 to 132, depending on the polymer materials. It was shown that by applying the presented fittable plasma source, this effect is independent of the surface radius of the polymer sample.

  8. Electro-hydrodynamics and kinetic modelling of polluted air flow activated by multi-tip-to-plane corona discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Meziane, M.; Eichwald, O.; Ducasse, O.; Marchal, F.; Sarrette, J. P.; Yousfi, M.

    2013-04-21

    The present paper is devoted to the 2D simulation of an Atmospheric Corona Discharge Reactor (ACDR) involving 10 pins powered by a DC high voltage and positioned 7 mm above a grounded metallic plane. The corona reactor is periodically crossed by thin mono filamentary streamers with a natural repetition frequency of some tens of kHz. The simulation involves the electro-dynamic, chemical kinetic, and neutral gas hydrodynamic phenomena that influence the kinetics of the chemical species transformation. Each discharge stage (including the primary and the secondary streamers development and the resulting thermal shock) lasts about one hundred nanoseconds while the post-discharge stages occurring between two successive discharge phases last one hundred microseconds. The ACDR is crossed by a lateral air flow including 400 ppm of NO. During the considered time scale of 10 ms, one hundred discharge/post-discharge cycles are simulated. The simulation involves the radical formation and thermal exchange between the discharges and the background gas. The results show how the successive discharges activate the flow gas and how the induced turbulence phenomena affect the redistribution of the thermal energy and the chemical kinetics inside the ACDR.

  9. Internal Structure of a Strike-Slip Dilational Fault Jog: Overlander Fault, Mt Isa Inlier, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.; Ghisetti, F.; Begbie, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    -parallel components indicate predominantly strike-slip motion on subvertical planes but there is some local evidence for dip-slip. Mutual cross-cutting relationships between all the principal components indicate penecontemporaneous development. Orientations of the various components are broadly compatible with the inferred regional stress field but there is some evidence for fluctuating stress trajectories. Vein textures record histories of incremental growth and are generally consistent with hydrothermal deposition under low effective stresses, probably in the epizonal environment (<1-2 km depth). Recorded dextral separations along the major shear fracture components are commonly of the order of 1-10 cm, consistent with small-to-moderate seismic slip increments. It is common for shearing increments along the main strike-slip faults in the stepover to be accompanied by significant dilatation. Rigid-body analysis of the deflected fault trace across the granite suggests that total dilatation in the stepover should be of the order of 300 m but the major veins account for c. 10-20% of this. Nonetheless, it is clear that progressive slip transfer across the jog involved substantial dilatation and massive fluid influx. The complex array of sub-structures within the stepover mesh invites comparison with structural complexity revealed by high resolution aftershock studies of dilational jog structures on seismically active strike-slip faults (e.g. Parkfield, Coyote Lake, Landers earthquakes) which are recognized sites of rupture perturbation or arrest.

  10. Intentional Action and Action Slips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckhausen, Heinz; Beckmann, Jurgen

    1990-01-01

    An explanation of action slips is offered that examines controlled actions in the context of an intentional behavior theory. Actions are considered guided by mentally represented intentions, subdivided into goal intentions and contingent instrumental intentions. Action slips are categorized according to problem areas in the enactment of goal…

  11. A new 3-D open-framework cadmium borovanadate with plane-shaped channels and high catalytic activity for the oxidation of cyclohexanol.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuquan; Qiu, Dongfang; Fan, Huitao; Li, Min; Huang, Qunzeng; Shi, Hengzhen

    2015-05-21

    A new 3-D open-framework cadmium borovanadate with 6-connected topology was hydrothermally obtained and structurally characterized. It not only features new cadmium(II) borovanadate which possesses an open-framework structure with unique plane-shaped channels, but also exhibits interesting absorption properties and high catalytic activities for the oxidation of cyclohexanol. PMID:25882921

  12. Phase Slips in Oscillatory Hair Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production.

  13. Phase Slips in Oscillatory Hair Bundles

    PubMed Central

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production. PMID:25167040

  14. Phase slips in oscillatory hair bundles.

    PubMed

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production. PMID:25167040

  15. Texture development and slip systems in bridgmanite and bridgmanite + ferropericlase aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagi, L.; Wenk, H.-R.

    2016-06-01

    Bridgmanite (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O are the most abundant phases in the lower mantle and localized regions of the D″ layer just above the core mantle boundary. Seismic anisotropy is observed near subduction zones at the top of the lower mantle and in the D″ region. One source of anisotropy is dislocation glide and associated texture (crystallographic preferred orientation) development. Thus, in order to interpret seismic anisotropy, it is important to understand texture development and slip system activities in bridgmanite and bridgmanite + ferropericlase aggregates. Here we report on in situ texture development in bridgmanite and bridgmanite + ferropericlase aggregates deformed in the diamond anvil cell up to 61 GPa. When bridgmanite is synthesized from enstatite, it exhibits a strong (4.2 m.r.d.) 001 transformation texture due to a structural relationship with the precursor enstatite phase. When bridgmanite + ferropericlase are synthesized from olivine or ringwoodite, bridgmanite exhibits a relatively weak 100 transformation texture (1.2 and 1.6 m.r.d., respectively). This is likely due to minimization of elastic strain energy as a result of Young's modulus anisotropy. In bridgmanite, 001 deformation textures are observed at pressures <55 GPa. The 001 texture is likely due to slip on (001) planes in the [100], [010] and < {110} rangle directions. Stress relaxation by laser annealing to 1500-1600 K does not result in a change in this texture type. However, at pressures >55 GPa a change in texture to a 100 maximum is observed, consistent with slip on the (100) plane. Ferropericlase, when deformed with bridgmanite, does not develop a coherent texture. This is likely due to strain heterogeneity within the softer ferropericlase grains. Thus, it is plausible that ferropericlase is not a significant source of anisotropy in the lower mantle.

  16. Nucleation and growth of strike slip faults in granite.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Segall, P.; Pollard, D.P.

    1983-01-01

    Fractures within granodiorite of the central Sierra Nevada, California, were studied to elucidate the mechanics of faulting in crystalline rocks, with emphasis on the nucleation of new fault surfaces and their subsequent propagation and growth. Within the study area the fractures form a single, subparallel array which strikes N50o-70oE and dips steeply to the S. Some of these fractures are identified as joints because displacements across the fracture surfaces exhibit dilation but no slip. The joints are filled with undeformed minerals, including epidote and chlorite. Other fractures are identified as small faults because they display left-lateral strike slip separations of up to 2m. Slickensides, developed on fault surfaces, plunge 0o-20o to the E. The faults occur parallel to, and in the same outcrop with, the joints. The faults are filled with epidote, chlorite, and quartz, which exhibit textural evidence of shear deformation. These observations indicate that the strike slip faults nucleated on earlier formed, mineral filled joints. Secondary, dilational fractures propagated from near the ends of some small faults contemporaneously with the left-lateral slip on the faults. These fractures trend 25o+ or -10o from the fault planes, parallel to the direction of inferred local maximum compressive stress. The faults did not propagate into intact rock in their own planes as shear fractures. -from Authors

  17. The geometry of the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault, Precordillera of San Juan, Central-Western Argentina: integrating resistivity surveys with structural and geomorphological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Cortés, José M.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2013-07-01

    The geometry and related geomorphological features of the right-lateral strike-slip El Tigre Fault, one of the main morphostructural discontinuities in the Central-Western Precordillera of Argentina, were investigated. Achievements of this survey include: recognition of structural and geometrical discontinuities along the fault trace, identification and classification of landforms associated with local transpressional and transtensional sectors, observation of significant changes in the fault strike and detection of right and left bends of different wavelength. In the Central Segment of the El Tigre Fault, 2D electrical resistivity tomography surveys were carried out across the fault zone. The resistivity imaging permitted to infer the orientation of the main fault surface, the presence of blind fault branches along the fault zone, tectonic tilting of the Quaternary sedimentary cover, subsurface structure of pressure ridges and depth to the water table. Based on this information, it is possible to characterize the El Tigre Fault also as an important hydro-geological barrier. Our survey shows that the main fault surface changes along different segments from a high-angle to a subvertical setting whilst the vertical-slip component is either reverse or normal, depending on the local transpressive or transtensive regime induced by major bends along the trace. These local variations are expressed as sections of a few kilometres in length with relatively homogeneous behaviour and frequently separated by oblique or transversal structures.

  18. Slip Line Field Applied To Deep Drawing

    SciTech Connect

    Miguel, V.; Coello, J.; Calatayud, A.; Martinez, A.; Benet, J

    2007-05-17

    Slip Line Field is a numerical method applied for modelling plane-strain processes. This method has been successfully checked properly for sheet drawing. Flange deformation in deep drawing is considered without change in thickness. A drawing mechanical test has been developed in order to reproduce the flange stresses state in sheet strips with the rolling direction selected. The fundamentals of this test, and some experimental results obtained from it, have been presented previously in different Congresses. In this work, an algorithm based on SLF has been implemented and theoretical results evaluated for different conditions. The algorithm have been applied to a mild DDQ steel and to a DDQ AISI 304 stainless steel. Theoretical and experimental results are compared. A good concordance in them has been found out under some conditions. One of the most important aspects is that it must not be considered tensile material properties but a modified behavior under multiaxial conditions.

  19. Rolling and slipping motion of Euler's disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caps, H.; Dorbolo, S.; Ponte, S.; Croisier, H.; Vandewalle, N.

    2004-05-01

    We present an experimental study of the motion of a circular disk spun onto a table. With the help of a high speed video system, the temporal evolution of (i) the inclination angle α , (ii) the angular velocity ω , and (iii) the precession rate Ω are studied. The influence of the mass of the disk as well as the friction between the disk and the supporting surface are considered. Both inclination angle and angular velocity are observed to decrease according to a power law. We also show that the precession rate diverges as the motion stops. Measurements are performed very near the collapse as well as on long range times. Times to collapse have been also measured. Results are compared with previous theoretical and experimental works. The major source of energy dissipation is found to be the slipping of the disk on the plane.

  20. Stress inversion of heterogeneous fault-slip data with unknown slip sense: An objective function algorithm contouring method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, John-Are; Bergh, Steffen G.; Osmundsen, Per Terje; Redfield, Tim F.

    2015-01-01

    fault plane as input. It is therefore a robust method to evaluate the number of mixed stress states and their respective stress tensors for complex heterogeneous fault-slip data.

  1. Slip Distribution of the 2001 West India Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, J.; Sato, T.; Negishi, H.

    2001-12-01

    We used the orientation and size of the fault determined from our aftershock results to carry out an inversion of teleseismic data for the slip distribution of the 2001 West India earthquake. Previous inversions for this earthquake have been done by but these solutions did not use the constraints on the fault geometry that are now available. Choosing the correct fault plane from the two nodal planes of the focal mechanism and limiting the mainshock source area to the size of the aftershock region affects the slip distribution. We used 19 teleseismic P waveforms which were well distributed in azimuth in a finite-fault inversion on a grid of 80 subfaults. Since the observed waveforms look similar at all azimuths, we decided that there was not much time resolution and used only one time window. The results of the inversion for the various rupture velocities tested, did not show significant differences. We show the results for a rupture velocity of 2.9 km per sec. The results of the inversion show that the largest area of slip is close to hypocenter. This asperity is about 10 km x 20 km with a maximum slip of about 10 meters. The area of large slip in the region of the hypocenter corresponds closely to the area of most severe damage in the villages east of Bhuj. This area probably experienced very strong shaking from the rupture of the asperity. Bhuj, is located more than 30 km west from the closest portion of the fault and probably experience somewhat lower levels of ground motions, as seen in the intensity distribution. The character of the slip distribution appears different from other shallow earthquakes of equal size. The area of the fault is small for a Mw7.7 event. Comparing the slip distribution of the 2001 West India earthquake to the similarly sized (Mw7.7) 1999 Taiwan earthquake. The Taiwan earthquake is spread out over a larger area and shows a more complicated slip distribution. These difference can also be seen in the teleseismic waveforms. The India

  2. Analysis of Fracture Pattern of Pulverized Quartz Formed by Stick Slip Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Muto, Jun; Otsuki, Kenshiro; Kano, Harumasa; Sasaki, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    In order to clarify how wall rocks of faults are damaged, fracture pattern analysis was performed imaging experimentally pulverized rocks by a micro-focus X-ray CT. Analyzed samples are core (diameter of 2cm) of single crystals of synthetic quartz and natural quartzites, which were pre-cut 50° to the core axis and mirror-polished. Experiments were conducted with axial strain rate of 10-3/s under the confining pressure of 180 MPa and room temperature using gas apparatus. Intense fracturing of the core occurred during the stick-slip with very large stress drop. Although thin melt layer is formed on the slip plane, the core is pulverized overall by tensile fracturing characterized by apparent lack of shear deformation. X-ray CT images demonstrate the fracture pattern being strongly controlled by slip direction and shear sense. Cracks are exponentially increased toward the slip plane and concentrated in the central portion rather than outer margin of core. Cracks tend to develop parallel to core axis and at high to moderate angles (90° ~ ±50°) with the plane including both core axis and slip direction, and lean to be higher angle to the surface near the slip plane. Due to this fracture pattern, the pulverized fragments show polygonal column or needle in shape with sharp and curving edges irrespective of their sizes, and the intensely fractured slip surface exhibit distinct rugged topography of an array of ridges developed perpendicular to slip direction. Mode and distribution pattern of fractures indicate that the stress concentration at the rupture front during dynamic rupture propagation or the constructive interference of reflected seismic waves focused at the center of core are possible mechanisms of pulverization.

  3. Variations in strength and slip rate along the san andreas fault system.

    PubMed

    Jones, C H; Wesnousky, S G

    1992-04-01

    Convergence across the San Andreas fault (SAF) system is partitioned between strike-slip motion on the vertical SAF and oblique-slip motion on parallel dip-slip faults, as illustrated by the recent magnitude M(s) = 6.0 Palm Springs, M(s) = 6.7 Coalinga, and M(s) = 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquakes. If the partitioning of slip minimizes the work done against friction, the direction of slip during these recent earthquakes depends primarily on fault dip and indicates that the normal stress coefficient and frictional coefficient (micro) vary among the faults. Additionally, accounting for the active dip-slip faults reduces estimates of fault slip rates along the vertical trace of the SAF by about 50 percent in the Loma Prieta and 100 percent in the North Palm Springs segments. PMID:17802597

  4. Creep and rupture strength of pearlitic and austenitic steels under active proportional loading in a plane stress state

    SciTech Connect

    Mozharovskaya, T.N.

    1985-04-01

    The authors conducted creep and creep-rupture tests of materials on a modernized DST-5 unit with allowance for the type of stress state. Steel 15Kh2MFA was subjected to creep tests at 823/sup 0/K, as was steel 08Kh18N9. It is shown that the minimum creep rate and rupture strength of materials depend significantly on the type of stress state. A universal relation is established between the minimum creep rate and stress intensity under long-term proportional loading with a plane stress state. A generalized rupture-strength criterion is proposed for plane stress under proportional loading and is substantiated on pearlitic and austenitic steels.

  5. Reactivated strike slip faults: examples from north Cornwall, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Seog; Andrews, Jim R.; Sanderson, David J.

    2001-10-01

    Several strike-slip faults at Crackington Haven, UK show evidence of right-lateral movement with tip cracks and dilatational jogs, which have been reactivated by left-lateral strike-slip movement. Evidence for reactivation includes two slickenside striae on a single fault surface, two groups of tip cracks with different orientations and very low displacement gradients or negative (left-lateral) displacements at fault tips. Evidence for the relative age of the two strike-slip movements is (1) the first formed tip cracks associated with right-lateral slip are deformed, whereas the tip cracks formed during left-lateral slip show no deformation; (2) some of the tip cracks associated with right-lateral movement show left-lateral reactivation; and (3) left-lateral displacement is commonly recorded at the tips of dominantly right-lateral faults. The orientation of the tip cracks to the main fault is 30-70° clockwise for right-lateral slip, and 20-40° counter-clockwise for left-lateral slip. The structure formed by this process of strike-slip reactivation is termed a "tree structure" because it is similar to a tree with branches. The angular difference between these two groups of tip cracks could be interpreted as due to different stress distribution (e.g., transtensional/transpressional, near-field or far-field stress), different fracture modes or fractures utilizing pre-existing planes of weakness. Most of the d- x profiles have similar patterns, which show low or negative displacement at the segment fault tips. Although the d- x profiles are complicated by fault segments and reactivation, they provide clear evidence for reactivation. Profiles that experienced two opposite slip movements show various shapes depending on the amount of displacement and the slip sequence. For a larger slip followed by a smaller slip with opposite sense, the profile would be expected to record very low or reverse displacement at fault tips due to late-stage tip propagation. Whereas for a

  6. ETS and tidal stressing: Fault weakening after main slip pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, H.

    2013-12-01

    Time-varying stresses from solid Earth tides and ocean loading influence slow slip (Hawthorne and Rubin, 2010) and, consequently, the frequency of occurrence and intensity of tremor during ETS episodes (Rubinstein et al., 2008). This relationship can illuminate changes in the mechanical response of the rupture surfaces(s) during slip in ETS. I compare the influence of tidal loading when and after the propagating ETS slip front (estimated by tremor density in time) ruptures the fault at a given spot. Using estimates of slip fronts that I derived from tremor locations, I divide ETS tremor into two groups: that occurring within a day of the start of the inferred slip front and that occurring over several days thereafter. The tremor catalog used contains 50K waveform cross-correlation locations of tremor in 7 large ETS in northern Cascadia between 2005 and 2012. I calculate normal, shear and volumetric stresses due to the Earth and ocean tides at numerous locations on the inferred rupture plane of the ETS following the method of Hawthorne and Rubin (2010). The Coulomb stress increment at each tremor time and location is compared with tremor occurrence for the two groups of tremor. Unreasonable results appear if the effective frictional coefficient mu > 0.2, and results are most 'reasonable' when mu is very near or equal to zero. Following passage of the main slip pulse, tremor generation is notably more sensitive to tidal stressing. One kPa of encouraging tidal Coulomb stress boosts the occurrence of tremor after the main slip pulse by about 50% above the average value, while the same amount of discouraging stress decreases the occurrence of such tremor by a similar factor. The greater the encouraging or discouraging stress, the greater the effect. In contrast, tremor in the main slip pulse is much less affected by positive or negative tidal stresses. I interpret the greater sensitivity to tidal stressing of the tremor after the main slip pulse as a measure of the

  7. Slip of Spreading Viscoplastic Droplets.

    PubMed

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Balmforth, Neil J; Stoeber, Boris

    2015-11-10

    The spreading of axisymmetric viscoplastic droplets extruded slowly on glass surfaces is studied experimentally using shadowgraphy and swept-field confocal microscopy. The microscopy furnishes vertical profiles of the radial velocity using particle image velocimetry (PIV) with neutrally buoyant tracers seeded in the fluid. Experiments were conducted for two complex fluids: aqueous solutions of Carbopol and xanthan gum. On untreated glass surfaces, PIV demonstrates that both fluids experience a significant amount of effective slip. The experiments were repeated on glass that had been treated to feature positive surface charges, thereby promoting adhesion between the negatively charged polymeric constituents of the fluids and the glass surface. The Carbopol and xanthan gum droplets spread more slowly on the treated surface and to a smaller radial distance. PIV demonstrated that this reduced spreading was associated with a substantial reduction in slip. For Carbopol, the effective slip could be eliminated entirely to within the precision of the PIV measurements; the reduction in slip was less effective for xanthan gum, with a weak slip velocity remaining noticeable. PMID:26418827

  8. Paleostress reconstruction from calcite twin and fault-slip data using the multiple inverse method in the East Walanae fault zone: Implications for the Neogene contraction in South Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaya, Asri; Nishikawa, Osamu

    2013-10-01

    A new approach for paleostress analysis using the multiple inverse method with calcite twin data including untwinned e-plane was performed in the East Walanae fault (EWF) zone in South Sulawesi, Indonesia. Application of untwinned e-plane data of calcite grain to constrain paleostress determination is the first attempt for this method. Stress states caused by the collision of the south-east margin of Sundaland with the Australian microcontinents during the Pliocene were successfully detected from a combination of calcite-twin data and fault-slip data. This Pliocene NE-SW-to-E-W-directed maximum compression activated the EWF as a reverse fault with a dextral component of slip with pervasive development of secondary structures in the narrow zone between Bone Mountain and Walanae Depression.

  9. Frictional melting of peridotite and seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gaudio, P.; di Toro, G.; Han, R.; Hirose, T.; Nielsen, S.; Shimamoto, T.; Cavallo, A.

    2009-06-01

    rates, (1) the "thermal" (as it includes the thermally activated first and second weakening) slip distance to achieve steady state from the first peak in strength decreased with increasing normal stress and slip rate and (2) the steady state shear stress slightly increased with increasing normal stress and, for a given normal stress, decreased with increasing slip rate. The ratio of shear stress versus normal stress was about 0.15, well below the typical friction coefficient of rocks (0.6-0.8). The dependence of steady state shear stress with normal stress was described by means of a constitutive equation for melt lubrication. The presence of microstructures similar to those found in natural pseudotachylytes and the determination of a constitutive equation that describes the experimental data allows extrapolation of the experimental observations to natural conditions and to the study of rupture dynamics in mantle rocks.

  10. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Goglia, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow is reported. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time-evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction-blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  11. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.

    1984-01-01

    Results obtained from a numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow are described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving periodic suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  12. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biringen, S.

    1984-02-01

    Results obtained from a numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow are described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving periodic suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  13. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biringen, S.; Goglia, G. L.

    1983-12-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow is reported. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time-evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction-blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  14. Stabilizing Stick-Slip Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fineberg, J.; Urbakh, M.; Rubinstein, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    Even the most regular stick-slip frictional sliding is always stochastic, with irregularity in both the intervals between slip events and the sizes of the associated stress drops. Applying small-amplitude oscillations to the shear force, we show, experimentally and theoretically, that the stick-slip periods synchronize. We further show that this phase locking is related to the inhibition of slow rupture modes which forces a transition to fast rupture, providing a possible mechanism for observed remote triggering of earthquakes. Such manipulation of collective modes may be generally relevant to extended nonlinear systems driven near to criticality. Reference: Rosario Capozza, Shmuel M. Rubinstein, Itay Barel, Michael Urbakh, and Jay Fineberg, Physical Review Letters 107, 024301 (2011).

  15. Strength and muscle activities during the toe-gripping action: comparison of ankle angle in the horizontal plane between the sitting upright and standing positions

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Masayuki; Murata, Shin; Kai, Yoshihiro; Nakae, Hideyuki; Satou, Yousuke

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate whether toe grip strength and muscle activities are affected by the ankle angle in the horizontal plane in the sitting upright and standing positions. [Subjects] The subjects were 16 healthy young women. [Methods] We measured toe grip strength and the maximum voluntary contraction activities of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, anterior tibialis, and medial head of the gastrocnemius. In addition, we calculated the percent integrated electromyography during foot gripping in 3 different ankle joint positions between the long axis of the foot and the line of progression on the horizontal plane, namely 10° of internal rotation, 0°, and 10° of external rotation. [Results] Two-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences. A significant main effect was observed in the measurement conditions for the percent integrated electromyography of the rectus femoris muscle and long head of the biceps femoris. However, two-way analysis of variance did not reveal any significant difference, and a significant main effect was not observed in toe grip strength. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that exerted toe grip strength is only slightly affected by the ankle angle in the horizontal plane in the sitting upright and standing positions. Therefore, the current measurement positions were shown to be optimal for measurement. PMID:27134399

  16. Electrokinetic flows through a parallel-plate channel with slipping stripes on walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Henry C. W.; Ng, Chiu-On

    2011-11-01

    Electrohydrodynamic flows through a periodically-micropatterned plane channel are considered. One unit of wall pattern consists of a slipping and non-slipping stripe, each with a distinct zeta potential. The problems are solved semi-analytically by eigenfunction expansion and point collocation. In the regime of linear response, the Onsager relation for the fluid and current fluxes are deduced as linear functions of the hydrodynamic and electric forcings. The phenomenological coefficients are explicitly expressed as functions of the channel height, the Debye parameter, the slipping area fraction of the wall, the intrinsic slip length, and the zeta potentials. We generalize the theoretical limits made in previous studies on electrokinetic flow over an inhomogeneously slipping surface. One should be cautious when applying these limits. First, when a surface is not 100% uniformly slipping but has a small fraction of area being covered by no-slip slots, the electroosmotic enhancement can be appreciably reduced. Second, when the electric double layer is only moderately thin, slipping-uncharged regions on a surface will have finite inhibition effect on the electroosmotic flow. Financial support by the RGC of the HKSAR, China: Project Nos. HKU715609E, HKU715510E; and the HKU under the Seed Funding Programme for Basic Research: Project Code 200911159024.

  17. Slip-localization within confined gouge powder sheared at moderate to high slip-velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Zeev; Chen, Xiaofeng; Morgan, Chance; Madden, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    conditions. The ultra-fine grains and extreme slip localization in these experiments are generally similar to ultra-cataclasites found in exhumed faults-zones, and the intensely pulverized gouge found in drilling across active faults.

  18. Whillans Ice Plain Stick Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, B.; Dunham, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Concern about future sea level rise motivates the study of fast flowing ice. The Whillans Ice Plain (WIP) region of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is notable for decelerating from previously fast motion during the instrumental record. Since most ice flux in Antarctica occurs through ice streams, understanding the conditions that cause ice stream stagnation is of basic importance in understanding the continent's contribution to future sea level rise. Although recent progress has been made in understanding the relationship between basal conditions and ice stream motion, direct observation of the temporal variation in subglacial conditions during ice stream stagnation has remained elusive. The Whillans Ice Plain flows to the sea mostly by way of stick-slip motion. We present numerical simulations of this stick-slip motion that capture the inertial dynamics, seismic waves, and the evolution of sliding with rate- and state-dependent basal friction. Large scale stick-slip behavior is tidally modulated and encompasses the entire WIP. Sliding initiates within one of several locked regions and then propagates outward with low average rupture velocity (~ 200 m/s). Sliding accelerates over a period of 200 s attain values as large as 65 m/d. From Newton's second law, this acceleration is ~ T / (rho H) for average shear stress drop T, ice thickness H, and ice density rho. This implies a 3 Pa stress drop that must be reconciled with the final stress drop of 300 Pa inferred from the total slip and fault dimensions. A possible explanation of this apparent discrepancy is that deceleration of the ice is associated with a substantial decrease in traction within rate-strengthening regions of the bed. During these large-scale sliding events, m-scale patches at the bed produce rapid (20 Hz) stick-slip motion. Each small event occurs over ~ 1/100 s, produces ~ 40 microns of slip, and gives rise to a spectacular form of seismic tremor. Variation between successive tremor episodes allows us

  19. Slip-Cast Superconductive Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Vasquez, Peter; Buck, Gregory M.; Hicks, Lana P.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Taylor, Theodore D.

    1993-01-01

    Complex shapes fabricated without machining. Nonaqueous slip-casting technique used to form complexly shaped parts from high-temperature superconductive materials like YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta). Such parts useful in motors, vibration dampers, and bearings. In process, organic solvent used as liquid medium. Ceramic molds made by lost-wax process used instead of plaster-of-paris molds, used in aqueous slip-casting but impervious to organic solvents and cannot drain away liquid medium. Organic-solvent-based castings do not stick to ceramic molds as they do to plaster molds.

  20. Modelling Paleoearthquake Slip Distributions using a Gentic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Anthony; Simão, Nuno; McCloskey, John; Nalbant, Suleyman; Murphy, Shane; Bhloscaidh, Mairead Nic

    2013-04-01

    Along the Sunda trench, the annual growth rings of coral microatolls store long term records of tectonic deformation. Spread over large areas of an active megathrust fault, they offer the possibility of high resolution reconstructions of slip for a number of paleo-earthquakes. These data are complex with spatial and temporal variations in uncertainty. Rather than assuming that any one model will uniquely fit the data, Monte Carlo Slip Estimation (MCSE) modelling produces a catalogue of possible models for each event. From each earthquake's catalogue, a model is selected and a possible history of slip along the fault reconstructed. By generating multiple histories, then finding the average slip during each earthquake, a probabilistic history of slip along the fault can be generated and areas that may have a large slip deficit identified. However, the MCSE technique requires the production of many hundreds of billions of models to yield the few models that fit the observed coral data. In an attempt to accelerate this process, we have designed a Genetic Algorithm (GA). The GA uses evolutionary operators to recombine the information held by a population of possible slip models to produce a set of new models, based on how well they reproduce a set of coral deformation data. Repeated iterations of the algorithm produce populations of improved models, each generation better satisfying the coral data. Preliminary results have shown the GA to be capable of recovering synthetically generated slip distributions based their displacements of sets of corals faster than the MCSE technique. The results of the systematic testing of the GA technique and its performance using both synthetic and observed coral displacement data will be presented.

  1. Steadily propagating slip pulses driven by thermal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, John D.; Viesca, Robert C.; Garagash, Dmitry I.

    2015-09-01

    Geophysical observations suggest that mature faults weaken significantly at seismic slip rates. Thermal pressurization and thermal decomposition are two mechanisms commonly used to explain this dynamic weakening. Both rely on pore fluid pressurization with thermal pressurization achieving this through thermal expansion of native solids and pore fluid and thermal decomposition by releasing additional pore fluid during a reaction. Several recent papers have looked at the role thermal pressurization plays during a dynamically propagating earthquake, but no previous models have studied the role of thermal decomposition. In this paper we present the first solutions accounting for thermal decomposition during dynamic rupture, solving for steady state self-healing slip pulses propagating at a constant rupture velocity. First, we show that thermal decomposition leads to longer slip durations, larger total slips, and a distinctive along-fault slip rate profile. Next, we show that accounting for more than one weakening mechanism allows multiple steady slip pulses to exist at a given background stress, with some solutions corresponding to different balances between thermal pressurization and thermal decomposition, and others corresponding to activating a single reaction multiple times. Finally, we study how the rupture properties depend on the fault properties and show that the impact of thermal decomposition is largely controlled by the ratio of the hydraulic and thermal diffusivities χ = αhy/αth and the ratio of pore pressure generated to temperature rise buffered by the reaction Pr/Er.

  2. Slip zone structure and processes in seismogenic carbonate faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, R. J.; De Paola, N.

    2011-12-01

    High velocity rotary shear experiments performed at seismic slip velocities (>1 m/s) have shown that experimental faults are weak; with increasing displacement, friction coefficient values decrease from Byerlee's values (μ = 0.6-0.85) to values of ~0.1. In carbonate rocks, experimental studies have shown that fault lubrication is due to the operation of multiple dynamic weakening mechanisms (e.g., flash heating, thermal pressurization, nanoparticle lubrication), which are thermally activated due to the frictional heat generated along localized slip surfaces during rapid slip. This study has set out to investigate whether evidence for the operation of these weakening mechanisms can be found in naturally occurring carbonate fault zones. Field studies were carried out on the active Gubbio fault zone (1984, Mw = 5.6) in the northern Apennines of Italy. Jurassic-Oligocene carbonates in the footwall are heavily deformed within a fault core of ~15 m thickness, which contains a number of very well exposed, highly localized principal slip surfaces (PSSs). Fault rocks are predominantly breccias and foliated cataclasites. Microstructural analyses of the PSSs reveal that slip is localized within very narrow principal slip zones (PSZs), ranging from 10-85 μm in thickness, with sub-millimetre scale asperities. PSZs are composed of very fine-grained, orange-brown ultracataclasite gouge containing a high proportion of nano-sized particles. The ultracataclasite commonly displays a foliated texture and sub-micron scale zones of extreme shear localization. A broader slip zone, up to 1.5 mm wide and containing multiple slip surfaces, is associated with the most evolved PSSs; it is located on the opposite side of the PSS to the PSZ. Here, the host rock material is heavily fractured, abraded and altered, sometimes with an ultracataclasite matrix. The surrounding wall rock often appears to have a porous texture, and calcite crystals within the slip zone have altered rims with lobate

  3. Experimental Investigations Of Failure Mechanisms Associated With Slow Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Tamarkin, T.

    2010-12-01

    Slow slip events such as very low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs) are detected in the Nankai accretionary prism [Ito and Obara, 2006]. It is proposed that high pore fluid pressure weakens the out-of-sequence-thrusts and mega-splay faults by reducing effective normal stress on the fault plane and consequently generates slip instability producing low stress drop VLFEs. However, the frictional behaviors and failure mechanisms associated with reduction of effective normal stress are not well understood. In this study, we conducted frictional experiments on porous sedimentary rocks with a saw-cut. Sediments with different clay content from NantroSEIZE drilling project ODP Legs 315, 316, and 322 are used as fault gouge. A new triaxial loading configuration was designed to investigate the effect of high pore pressure on frictional instability and failure modes. During the deformation experiments, samples were subjected to constant axial stress and decreasing radial stresses. Distinguishing from the conventional loading configuration in which mean stress increases during deformation, with the alternative loading path, mean stress decreases during deformation. Under fully drained conditions where pore pressure remains constant, the effective stress decreases in these experiments, analoguous to increasing pore pressure. Our preliminary results indicate that: 1) frictional strength is comparable to that observed under conventional loading; 2) the rate of fracture energy release is considerably slower, which bears similar characteristics with observed slow slip events. Microstructural analyses on the deformed samples provide experimental constraints on deformation mechanisms associated with slow slip events.

  4. Formation and Suppression of Strike-Slip Fault Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curren, Ivy S.; Bird, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Strike-slip faults are a defining feature of plate tectonics, yet many aspects of their development and evolution remain unresolved. For intact materials and/or regions, a standard sequence of shear development is predicted from physical models and field studies, commencing with the formation of Riedel shears and culminating with the development of a throughgoing fault. However, for materials and/or regions that contain crustal heterogeneities (normal and/or thrust faults, joints, etc.) that predate shear deformation, kinematic evolution of strike-slip faulting is poorly constrained. We present a new plane-stress finite-strain physical analog model developed to investigate primary deformation zone evolution in simple shear, pure strike-slip fault systems in which faults or joints are present before shear initiation. Experimental results suggest that preexisting mechanical discontinuities (faults and/or joints) have a marked effect on the geometry of such systems, causing deflection, lateral distribution, and suppression of shears. A lower limit is placed on shear offset necessary to produce a throughgoing fault in systems containing preexisting structures. Fault zone development observed in these experiments provides new insight for kinematic interpretation of structural data from strike-slip fault zones on Earth, Venus, and other terrestrial bodies.

  5. Chaotic mixing in a planar, curved channel using periodic slip

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, P.; Picardo, J. R.; Pushpavanam, S.

    2015-03-15

    We propose a novel strategy for designing chaotic micromixers using curved channels confined between two flat planes. The location of the separatrix between the Dean vortices, induced by centrifugal forces, is dependent on the location of the maxima of axial velocity. An asymmetry in the axial velocity profile can change the location of the separatrix. This is achieved physically by introducing slip alternatingly at the top and bottom walls. This leads to streamline crossing and Lagrangian chaos. An approximate analytical solution of the velocity field is obtained using perturbation theory. This is used to find the Lagrangian trajectories of fluid particles. Poincare sections taken at periodic locations in the axial direction are used to study the extent of chaos. We study two microchannel designs, called circlet and serpentine, in which the Dean vortices in adjacent half cells are co-rotating and counter-rotating, respectively. The extent of mixing, at low Re and low slip length, is shown to be greater in the serpentine case. Wide channels are observed to have much better mixing than tall channels; an important observation not made for separatrix flows till now. Eulerian indicators are used to gauge the extent of mixing, with varying slip length, and it is shown that an optimum slip length exists which maximizes the mixing in a particular geometry. Once the parameter space of relatively high mixing is identified, detailed variance computations are carried out to identify the detailed features.

  6. Slow-Slip Propagation Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, A. M.; Ampuero, J.

    2007-12-01

    Combined seismic and geodetic data from subduction zones and the Salton Trough have revealed slow slip events with reasonably well-defined propagation speeds. This in turn is suggestive of a more-or-less well- defined front separating nearly locked regions outside the slipping zone from interior regions that slide much more rapidly. Such crack-like nucleation fronts arise naturally in models of rate-and-state friction for lab-like values of a/b, where a and b are the coefficients of the velocity- and state-dependence of the frictional strength (with the surface being velocity-neutral for a/b=1). If the propagating front has a quasi-steady shape, the propagation and slip speeds are kinematically tied via the local slip gradient. Given a sufficiently sharp front, the slip gradient is given dimensionally by Δτp- r/μ', where Δτp-r is the peak-to-residual stress drop at the front and μ' the effective elastic shear modulus. Rate-and-state simulations indicate that Δτp-r is given reasonably accurately by bσ\\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc), where σ is the effective normal stress, Vmax is the maximum slip speed behind the propagating front, θi is the the value of "state" ahead of the propagating front, and Dc is the characteristic slip distance for state evolution. Except for a coefficient of order unity, Δτp-r is independent of the evolution law. This leads to Vprop/Vmax ~μ'/[bσ\\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc)]. For slip speeds a few orders of magnitude above background, \\ln(Vmaxθi/Dc) can with reasonable accuracy be assigned some representative value (~4-5, for example). Subduction zone transients propagate on the order of 10 km/day or 10-1 m/s. Geodetic data constrain the average slip speed to be a few times smaller than 1 cm/day or 10-7 m/s. However, numerical models indicate that the maximum slip speed at the front may be several times larger than the average, over a length scale that is probably too small to resolve geodetically, so a representative value of Vprop/Vmax may be ~106

  7. Assessing the role of fluids in episodic tremor and slip events using active seismic sources: results from a prototype experiment in Cascadia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, F.; Silver, P. G.; Nigbor, R.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, the so-called episodic tremor and slip (ETS) that consist of seismically recorded tremor events with characteristic frequencies of 1-15 Hz and slow slip events observed by GPS and strainmeters with durations of order weeks were widely observed in a variety of environments worldwide. While the community continues to make interesting observations, the underlying physical process remains poorly understood. There have been many proposed mechanisms, most of which invoke fluids. Many observations suggest that ETS can be triggered by very small stresses despite the high confining pressures at the depth of ETS, which has led many to conclude that fluids at the slab interface are under lithostatic pressure, and that furthermore there is likely fluid flow at the time of ETS events. Thus far, there is little data with which to evaluate these ideas. We have been interested in determining whether or not there are spatiotemporal structural changes in the crust and upper-most mantle associated with this phenomenon. We conducted a control-source experiment in Cascadia to examine the feasibility of using the reflection/scattering waves from the slab interface to look for structural changes that may reflect the migration of fluids. We selected a highly repeatable source, an eccentric-mass “shaker” designed for engineering studies, as the seismic source. The shaker was provided by NEES@UCLA. A 15’x15’ cement pad for installing the shaker was built on basaltic bedrock that is part of the Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Crescent Formation. We deployed arrays of short period instruments at two distances from the source: 30km and 90km away. The 90km array was deployed at the site of a previous deployment of the A of A team at Big Skidder Hill. Including our stations and those of A of A, we had 32 seismometers in all. The array has a station spacing of 60-100 m and an aperture about 1 to 1.5 km. During our experiment period, we were able to record a quarry blast near our

  8. THE INFLUENCE OF HEEL HEIGHT ON SAGITTAL PLANE KNEE KINEMATICS DURING LANDING TASKS IN RECREATIONALLY ACTIVE AND ATHLETIC COLLEGIATE FEMALES

    PubMed Central

    Carcia, Christopher R.; Phelps, Amy L.; Martin, RobRoy L.; Burrows, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if heel height alters sagittal plane knee kinematics when landing from a forward hop or drop landing. Background: Knee angles close to extension during landing are theorized to increase ACL injury risk in female athletes. Methods: Fifty collegiate females performed two single-limb landing tasks while wearing heel lifts of three different sizes (0, 12 & 24 mm) attached to the bottom of a sneaker. Using an electrogoniometer, sagittal plane kinematics (initial contact [KAIC], peak flexion [KAPeak], and rate of excursion [RE]) were examined. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine the influence of heel height on the dependent measures. Results: Forward hop task- KAIC with 0 mm, 12 mm, and 24 mm lifts were 8.88±6.5, 9.38±5.8 and 11.28±7.0, respectively. Significant differences were noted between 0 and 24 mm lift (p<.001) and 12 and 24 mm lifts (p=.003), but not between the 0 and 12 mm conditions (p=.423). KAPeak with 0 mm, 12 mm, and 24 mm lifts were 47.08±10.9, 48.18±10.3 and 48.88±9.7, respectively. A significant difference was noted between 0 and 24 mm lift (p=.004), but not between the 0 and 12 mm or 12 and 24 mm conditions (p=.071 and p=.282, respectively). The RE decreased significantly from 2128/sec±52 with the 12 mm lift to 1958/sec±55 with the 24 mm lift (p=.004). RE did not differ from 0 to 12 or 0 to 24 mm lift conditions (p=.351 and p=.086, respectively). Jump-landing task- No significant differences were found in KAIC (p=.531), KAPeak (p=.741), or the RE (p=.190) between any of the heel lift conditions. Conclusions: The addition of a 24 mm heel lift to the bottom of a sneaker significantly alters sagittal plane knee kinematics upon landing from a unilateral forward hop but not from a drop jump. PMID:21904697

  9. Hydrodynamic slip in silicon nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the hydrodynamic behavior of water flowing through silicon nanochannels. The water-silicon interaction potential was calibrated by means of size-independent molecular dynamics simulations of silicon wettability. The wettability of silicon was found to be dependent on the strength of the water-silicon interaction and the structure of the underlying surface. As a result, the anisotropy was found to be an important factor in the wettability of these types of crystalline solids. Using this premise as a fundamental starting point, the hydrodynamic slip in nanoconfined water was characterized using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium calculations of the slip length under low shear rate operating conditions. As was the case for the wettability analysis, the hydrodynamic slip was found to be dependent on the wetted solid surface atomic structure. Additionally, the interfacial water liquid structure was the most significant parameter to describe the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The calibration of the water-silicon interaction potential performed by matching the experimental contact angle of silicon led to the verification of the no-slip condition, experimentally reported for silicon nanochannels at low shear rates.

  10. Dynamic rupture simulation with an experimentally-determined friction law leads to slip-pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Z.; Chang, J. C.; Reches, Z.

    2013-12-01

    We simulate the dynamic rupture along a vertical, strike-slip fault in an elastic half-space. The fault has frictional properties that were determined in high-velocity, rotary shear apparatus Sierra-White granite. The experimental fault was abruptly loaded by a massive flywheel, which is assumed to simulate the loading of a fault patch during an earthquake, and termed Earthquake-Like-Slip Event (ELSE) (Chang et al., 2012). The experiments revealed systematic alteration between slip-weakening and slip-strengthening (Fig. 1A), and were considered as proxies of fault-patch behavior during earthquakes of M = 4-8. We used the friction-distance relations of these experiments to form an empirical slip-dependent friction model, ELSE-model (Fig. 1B). For the dynamic rupture simulation, we used the program of Ampuero (2002) (2D spectral boundary integral elements) designed for anti-plane (mode III) shear fracturing. To compare with published works, the calculations used a crust with mechanical properties and stress state of Version 3 benchmark of SCEC (Harris et al., 2004). The calculations with a fault of ELSE-model friction revealed: (1) Rupture propagation in a slip-pulse style with slip cessation behind the pulse; (2) Systematic decrease of slip distance away from the nucleation zone; and (3) Spontaneous arrest of the dynamic rupture without a barrier. These features suggest a rupture of a self-healing slip-pulse mode (Fig. 1C), in contrast to rupturing of a fault with linear slip-weakening friction (Fig. 1B) (Rojas et al., 2008) in crack-like mode and no spontaneous arrest. We deduce that the slip-pulse in our simulation results from the fast recovery of shear strength as observed in ELSE experiments, and argue that incorporating this experimentally-based friction model to rupture modeling produces realistic propagation style of earthquake rupture. Figure 1 Fault patch behavior during an earthquake. (A) Experimental evolution of frictional stress, slip velocity, and

  11. Frictional melt and seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S.; di Toro, G.; Hirose, T.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-01-01

    Frictional melt is implied in a variety of processes such as seismic slip, ice skating, and meteorite combustion. A steady state can be reached when melt is continuously produced and extruded from the sliding interface, as shown recently in a number of laboratory rock friction experiments. A thin, low-viscosity, high-temperature melt layer is formed resulting in low shear resistance. A theoretical solution describing the coupling of shear heating, thermal diffusion, and extrusion is obtained, without imposing a priori the melt thickness. The steady state shear traction can be approximated at high slip rates by the theoretical form τss = σn1/4 (A/?) ? under a normal stress σn, slip rate V, radius of contact area R (A is a dimensional normalizing factor and W is a characteristic rate). Although the model offers a rather simplified view of a complex process, the predictions are compatible with experimental observations. In particular, we consider laboratory simulations of seismic slip on earthquake faults. A series of high-velocity rotary shear experiments on rocks, performed for σn in the range 1-20 MPa and slip rates in the range 0.5-2 m s-1, is confronted to the theoretical model. The behavior is reasonably well reproduced, though the effect of radiation loss taking place in the experiment somewhat alters the data. The scaling of friction with σn, R, and V in the presence of melt suggests that extrapolation of laboratory measures to real Earth is a highly nonlinear, nontrivial exercise.

  12. Slip rate and tremor genesis in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wech, Aaron G.; Bartlow, Noel M.

    2014-01-01

    At many plate boundaries, conditions in the transition zone between seismogenic and stable slip produce slow earthquakes. In the Cascadia subduction zone, these events are consistently observed as slow, aseismic slip on the plate interface accompanied by persistent tectonic tremor. However, not all slow slip at other plate boundaries coincides spatially and temporally with tremor, leaving the physics of tremor genesis poorly understood. Here we analyze seismic, geodetic, and strainmeter data in Cascadia to observe for the first time a large, tremor-generating slow earthquake change from tremor-genic to silent and back again. The tremor falls silent at reduced slip speeds when the migrating slip front pauses as it loads the stronger adjacent fault segment to failure. The finding suggests that rheology and slip-speed-regulated stressing rate control tremor genesis, and the same section of fault can slip both with and without detectable tremor, limiting tremor's use as a proxy for slip.

  13. The influence of slip velocity and temperature on permeability during and after high-velocity fault slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, W.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Tadai, O.; Hirose, T.; Lin, W.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid transport properties in fault zones play an important role in dynamic processes during large earthquakes. If the permeability in a fault zone is low, high pore-fluid pressures caused by thermal pressurization (Sibson, 1973) or shear-induced compaction (Blanpied et al., 1992) can lead to an apparent reduction of fault strength. Changes in porosity and permeability of fault rocks within a fault zone during earthquakes and the subsequent progressive recovery of these properties may have a large influence on earthquake recurrence (Sleep and Blanpied, 1992). A rotary shear apparatus was used to investigate changes of fluid transport properties in a fault zone by real-time measurement of gas flow rates during and after shearing of hollow sandstone and granite cylinders at various slip rates. Our apparatus measures permeability parallel to the slip plane in both the slip zone and wall rocks. In all cases, permeability decreased rapidly with an increase of friction, but recovered soon after slip, reaching a steady state within several tens of minutes. The rate of reduction of permeability increased with increasing slip velocity. Permeability did not recover to pre-slip levels after low-velocity tests but recovered to exceed them after high-velocity tests. Frictional heating of gases at the slip surface increased gas viscosity, which increased gas flow rate to produce an apparent permeability increase. The irreversible permeability changes of the low-velocity tests were caused by gouge formation due to wearing and smoothing of the slip surface. The increase of permeability after high-velocity tests was caused by mesoscale fracturing in response to rapid temperature rise. Changes of pore fluid viscosity contributed more to changes of flow rate than did permeability changes caused by shear deformation, although test results from different rocks and pore fluids might be different. References Blanpied, M.L., Lockner, D.A., Byerlee, J.D., 1992. An earthquake mechanism

  14. Characterizing the Relationship of Tremor and Slip during Recent ETS Events in Northern Cascadia using Strainmeters, GPS, and Tremor Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogstad, R. D.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the relationship between slip and tremor during multiple recent slow slip events in northern Cascadia. While the relationship of geodetically detectable slow slip and nonvolcanic tremor appears to be broadly coincident, the exact spatial and temporal characteristics remain unclear at a finer scale. Typical GPS derived slip distributions tend to be spatially and temporally smoothed and offset slightly updip of tremor distributions. These discrepancies may be real, or they may be a consequence of the resolution of GPS data or an artifact of the inversion methodology. Borehole strainmeters provide additional independent geodetic constraints for characterizing slip, provide greater temporal resolution, and greater precision than GPS. However, various non-tectonic artifacts and other sources of error have limited the number of usable stations and made deriving reliable information from strainmeters during slip events difficult. We utilize strainmeters with low levels of noise and minimal observable artifacts to constrain forward models and to provide additional independent observations in joint geodetic inversions with GPS data. A series of slip distributions are derived by inverting strainmeter and GPS data using the Kalman-filter-based Extended Network Inversion Filter. To compare the tremor distributions to the geodetically derived slip we also construct slip distributions using tremor occurrences as a proxy for localized slip on the plate interface. The magnitude of slip per tremor occurrence is then scaled to best match the observed surface displacements. Separate slip distributions informed by GPS and tremor are then used to predict strain time series. The comparisons between strain predictions and observations produce mixed results. This may indicate that that tremor and slip are not always coincident. This is particularly evident during the Aug. 2010 event, where the peak GPS-derived slip is located in a region with decreased tremor activity

  15. The rupture process of the Manjil, Iran earthquake of 20 june 1990 and implications for intraplate strike-slip earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; Zednik, J.

    1997-01-01

    In terms of seismically radiated energy or moment release, the earthquake of 20 January 1990 in the Manjil Basin-Alborz Mountain region of Iran is the second largest strike-slip earthquake to have occurred in an intracontinental setting in the past decade. It caused enormous loss of life and the virtual destruction of several cities. Despite a very large meizoseismal area, the identification of the causative faults has been hampered by the lack of reliable earthquake locations and conflicting field reports of surface displacement. Using broadband data from global networks of digitally recording seismographs, we analyse broadband seismic waveforms to derive characteristics of the rupture process. Complexities in waveforms generated by the earthquake indicate that the main shock consisted of a tiny precursory subevent followed in the next 20 seconds by a series of four major subevents with depths ranging from 10 to 15 km. The focal mechanisms of the major subevents, which are predominantly strike-slip, have a common nodal plane striking about 285??-295??. Based on the coincidence of this strike with the dominant tectonic fabric of the region we presume that the EW striking planes are the fault planes. The first major subevent nucleated slightly south of the initial precursor. The second subevent occurred northwest of the initial precursor. The last two subevents moved progressively southeastward of the first subevent in a direction collinear with the predominant strike of the fault planes. The offsets in the relative locations and the temporal delays of the rupture subevents indicate heterogeneous distribution of fracture strength and the involvement of multiple faults. The spatial distribution of teleseismic aftershocks, which at first appears uncorrelated with meizoseismal contours, can be decomposed into stages. The initial activity, being within and on the periphery of the rupture zone, correlates in shape and length with meizoseismal lines. In the second stage

  16. Offset of latest pleistocene shoreface reveals slip rate on the Hosgri strike-slip fault, offshore central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Dartnell, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri–San Gregorio dextral strike‐slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high‐resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by an ∼265  m wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a latest Pleistocene sand spit. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault‐bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography resembling modern coastal geomorphology along the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6±0.9  mm/yr, considered a minimum rate for the Hosgri given the presence of an active western strand. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike‐slip fault budget and is the most active strike‐slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high‐resolution bathymetry in characterization of active offshore faults.

  17. Liquid slip on a nanostructured surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doo Jin; Cho, Ki Yeon; Jang, Soohwan; Song, Young Seok; Youn, Jae Ryoun

    2012-07-17

    We explored a liquid slip, referred to as the Navier slip, at liquid-solid interface. Such a slip is provoked by the physicochemical features of the liquid-solid system. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of a nanoengineered surface structure on liquid slip by fabricating the self-assembly structure of nano Zinc oxide (n-ZnO). We have also examined how the liquid-solid surface interaction controlled by hydrophobic chemical treatment affects the liquid slip. The findings showed that liquid slip increases with decreasing the characteristic length scales (e.g., channel height and depth), resulting in drag reduction. It was also found that dewetted (Cassie) state due to the generation of air gap developed by n-ZnO was more critical for the liquid slip than the minimization of interface interaction. The linear and nonlinear Navier slip models showed that liquid slip behavior is more obvious when increasing the nonlinearity. This study will contribute to understanding of the underlying physics behind fluid slip phenomena, such as the Navier slip for Newtonian liquids and Maxwell's slip for Newtonian gases. PMID:22717057

  18. Seismicity, fault plane solutions, depth of faulting, and active tectonics of the Andes of Peru, Ecuador, and southern Colombia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, G.; Molnar, P.; Burchfiel, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    The long-period P waveforms observed for 17 earthquakes in the Peruvian Andes during 1963-1976 are compared with synthetic waveforms to obtain fault-plane solutions and focal depths. The morphological units of the Peruvian Andes are characterized: coastal plains, Cordillera Occidental, altiplano and central high plateau, Cordillera Oriental, and sub-Andes. The data base and analysis methodology are discussed, and the results are presented in tables, diagrams, graphs, maps, and photographs illustrating typical formations. Most of the earthquakes are shown to occur in the transition zone from the sub-Andes to the Cordillera Oriental under formations of about 1 km elevation at focal depths of 10-38 km. It is suggested that the sub-Andean earthquakes reflect hinterland deformation of a detached fold and thrust belt, perhaps like that which occurred in parts of the Canadian Rockies. From the total crustal shortening evident in Andean morphology and the shortening rate of the recent earthquakes it is estimated that the topography and crustal root of the Andes have been formed during the last 90-135 Myr.

  19. Strike-slip movements and thrusting along a transpressive fault zone: The North Giudicarie line (Insubric line, northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosser, Giacomo

    1998-12-01

    This paper analyzes the kinematic evolution and the deformation partitioning within an important transpressive fault zone located in the central part of the Alpine chain. The North Giudicarie line is a NNE trending fault which offsets the dextral Insubric line with an apparent left-lateral displacement of about 70 km. The main fault plane of the North Giudicarie line dips about 35°-45° to the NW. The footwall is characterized by N-S striking strike-slip faults, which reactivate extensional faults of Early Jurassic to Late Cretaceous age. The early deformation history of the North Giudicarie line is revealed by basement-and limestone-mylonites. Shear sense of mylonites indicates on average top-to-the-east thrusting. These movements took place during the late Oligocene-early Miocene, when the Insubric line was active as a right-lateral strike-slip fault. Therefore, in this time span the North Giudicarie line can be interpreted as a dextral transpressive bend of the Insubric line. Mylonites have later been overprinted by brittle faults related to top-to-the-SE thrusting of middle-late Miocene age. During this event the shape of the Insubric line was strongly modified by left-lateral transpression along the Giudicarie fault zone. Deformation was partitioned between prevailing compression along the Giudicarie line and left-lateral strike-slip movements along the N-S striking faults. These faults transferred the strike-slip component of the Giudicarie line into a wider area of the central southern Alps.

  20. Relation between surface slip topography and stress corrosion cracking in Ti-8 wt % Al

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, J. D.; Hoagland, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    The deformation behavior of Ti-8 wt % Al has been investigated in an inert environment (air), and an aggressive environment (salt water). Details of surface slip geometry were examined by high resolution surface replicas at various stages of deformation in both environments. Specimens aged to contain a fine dispersion of Ti3Al precipitates failed by subcritical crack growth in salt water, whereas specimens in the single phase condition showed no effects of environment on the yield or fracture characteristics. The Ti3Al precipitates produce little change in strength level or slip character compared to the single phase alloy, and there is no evidence of any effects of environment on the character of surface slip. Rather, the presence of trenches along slip bands on the surface of aged specimens suggest that the specific effect of the Ti3Al precipitates is to render the surface slip steps chemically active relative to the surrounding matrix by slip induced dissolution of the particles.

  1. Slow slip beneath the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica and its effect on the interseismic cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outerbridge, Kimberly C.

    The close proximity of the Nicoya Peninsula to the Cocos-Caribbean Subduction zone plate boundary makes it a prime location to use GPS to study episodic tremor and slip. Nicoya Peninsula currently has operating networks of both continuous GPS (CGPS) and seismic stations designed to identify and characterize the pattern of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events along the seismogenic zone under Costa Rica's Pacific Margin. The occurrence of slow slip events has been previously postulated in this region based on correlated fluid flow and seismic tremor events recorded near the margin wedge in 2000 and from sparse GPS observations in 2003. Paucity of data prevented details of these events from being resolved. In May 2007 a slow slip event was recorded on our densified GPS network. This slow slip event was also accompanied by seismic tremor, worked up by colleagues at the University of California-San Diego. I will present the GPS time series, correlated with the seismic tremor for the event in May 2007. I will also present the inferred pattern of slip on the plate interface from elastic half space inversion modeling compared with the tremor and Low Frequency Earthquake (LFE) locations. The geodetic slip and seismic tremor co-locate temporally very well. Spatially the seismic tremor and LFE locations are offset but not independent of both the up dip and down dip patches of geodetic slip. The identification of these slow slip events enhances our understanding of the nuances of the interseismic period. Previous studies of the interseismic strain accumulation patterns in the region of the Nicoya Peninsula have not accounted for the occurrence of slow slip, thus underestimating the magnitude of locking on the fault plane. My study resolves this bias by using our CGPS network to estimate the interseismic surface velocity field, accounting for the May 2007 slow slip event. I will present the results of this velocity field estimation and the results of inversions for locking

  2. Fault zone connectivity: slip rates on faults in the san francisco bay area, california.

    PubMed

    Bilham, R; Bodin, P

    1992-10-01

    The slip rate of a fault segment is related to the length of the fault zone of which it is part. In turn, the slip rate of a fault zone is related to its connectivity with adjoining or contiguous fault zones. The observed variation in slip rate on fault segments in the San Francisco Bay area in California is consistent with connectivity between the Hayward, Calaveras, and San Andreas fault zones. Slip rates on the southern Hayward fault taper northward from a maximum of more than 10 millimeters per year and are sensitive to the active length of the Maacama fault. PMID:17835127

  3. Mossy fibres sending retinal-slip, eye, and head velocity signals to the flocculus of the monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Noda, H

    1986-01-01

    Discharges of mossy fibres were recorded from the cerebellar flocculus of monkeys trained to fixate a small visual target and to track the target when it moved slowly. The experimental paradigms used were designed to study neural responses to retinal-slip velocity, eye velocity, or head velocity, individually or in combination. Among 485 mossy-fibre units recorded from the flocculus, sixty-four units (or 13%) responded to movement of the visual stimulus in the horizontal plane. Two distinct groups of visual mossy fibres were found: they were designated 'visual units' (thirty-nine/sixty-four units or 61%) and 'visuomotor units' (twenty-five/sixty-four units or 39%). The visual units responded exclusively to the retinal-slip velocity. Stationary fixation was necessary for clear cyclic modulation of activity. Their responses declined when the retinal-slip velocity was reduced by eye movements in the same direction. The responses of the visual units were directionally selective and lagged behind the occurrence of 'turnabouts' (changes in direction of stimulus movement) and their peak discharges also lagged the occurrence of peak velocity. Each visual unit had a limited range of velocity sensitivity; in some units the range covered the velocity range of smooth-pursuit eye movements. The visuomotor units had visual receptive fields in the peripheral retina (outside of the central 10 deg); they received also oculomotor and vestibular signals. When the head was stationary, the visuomotor units responded to the target velocity (or visual stimulus velocity) which is the algebraic sum of the retinal-slip velocity and the eye velocity. Their responses reflected the retinal-slip velocity during stationary fixation and the eye velocity during smooth-pursuit eye movements. The responses to stimulus movements were, therefore, almost identical regardless of whether the eyes remained stationary or moved with the stimulus. In response to sinusoidal stimulus movements, the responses

  4. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Patua Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = τ / σn (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (σ1-σn) / (σ1-σ3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes

  5. Basal slip and mechanical anisotropy of biotite

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, A.K. ); Kirby, S.H.; Pinkston, J. )

    1990-11-10

    The basal slip systems of biotite and their mechanical expressions have been investigated by shortening single crystals oriented to maximize and minimize shear stresses on (001). Samples loaded at 45{degree} to (001) exhibit gentle external rotations associated with dislocation glide. Samples shortened perpendicular to (001) show no evidence of nonbasal slip and fail by fracture over all conditions tested. The mechanical response of biotite shortened at 45{degree} to (001) is nearly perfectly elastic-plastic; stress-strain curves are characterized by a steep elastic slope, a sharply defined yield point, and continued deformation at low (mostly < 100 MPa), relatively constant stresses at strains >1%. Stresses measured beyond the yield point are insensitive to confining pressure over the range 200 to 500 MPa and exhibit weak dependencies upon strain rate and temperature. Assuming an exponential relationship between differential stress {sigma}{sub d} and strain rate {epsilon} = C exp({minus}Q/RT), the data collected over strain rates and temperatures of 10-7 to 10-4 s-1 and 20 to 400C, respectively, are best fit by an exponential constant {alpha} of 0.41 {plus minus} 0.08 MPa{minus}1 and an activation energy Q of 82 {plus minus} 13 kJ/mol. A power law fits the data equally well with n = 18 {plus minus} 4 and Q = 51 {plus minus} 9 kJ/mol. The strength of biotite shortened perpendicular to (001) exceeds that measured parallel to (001) and is pressure dependent. Application of the results to deformation within the continental crust suggests that biotite oriented favorably for slip is much weaker than most silicates over a wide range of geologic conditions. Its presence within foliated rocks and shear zones may limit locally the stresses that can be supported.

  6. Hot, Fast Faults: Evidence for High-Temperature Slip on Exhumed Faults, and Insights into Seismic Slip Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. P.; Ault, A. K.; Janecke, S. U.; Prante, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Microstructural and geochemical techniques combined with prior observations of naturally occurring faults provide insights into slip rates and slip dimensions of seismicity. We review four indicators for high coseismic paleotemperatures in brittle to semi-brittle faults from a wide range of tectonic settings with mm to km of slip. Thin, high-gloss, Fe-rich slip surfaces indicate high-temperature slip occurred on mm- to m-scales. Elliptical and circular zones of concentric iridescence indicate localized sites of elevated temperature that may be caused by heating at asperity contacts. The surface iridescence is associated with changes in Fe oxidation states detected by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Minimum temperature increases of 300 °C above ambient are supported by geochemical arguments and up to 800 °C are supported by analogs to high-speed friction experiments in steels and ceramics firing in reduced conditions. The presence of clay-rich foliated fault-related rocks, and the presence of nm- to mm-thick clay coatings indicate that syn-kinematic endothermic reactions occur at a range of scales. We suggest these features reflect temperature increases of ≥100-200 °C for activation energy required to drive the clay alteration is sourced from seismic energy and Schleicher-van der Pluijm-type slip surfaces to record instantaneous slip. Dense, low porosity planar porcelainite zones mm- to cm-thick along fault surfaces are the result of sintering of quartz-clay-feldspar mixtures and indicate T≥1000 °C localized along the surfaces, the result of post-slip cooling. Highly indurated, ultrafine fault-related rocks often consists of comminuted grains, vein fragments, and neocrystallized grains that represent retrograde cooling or alteration after peak heating. These observations and those of other recent workers indicate that many naturally occurring exhumed faults record elevated temperatures. In many cases, careful observations can delineate fault slip

  7. Accessory slips of the extensor digiti minimi.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Mao, Qing Hua

    2014-01-01

    During the educational dissection of a 69-year-old Chinese male cadaver, an extensor digiti minimi (EDM) with five slips on the right hand was discovered. Except for the two slips of the little finger, the two radial slips were inserted into the dorsal aponeurosis of the middle finger and the ring finger, respectively. The middle slip was connected to the junctura tendinum in the fourth intermetacarpal spaces. Variations in this region are of paramount importance for the reconstructive surgeons, who may utilize the accessory slips to restore functional capacity of the fingers. PMID:24970007

  8. Two types of antigorite serpentinite controlling heterogeneous slow-slip behaviours of slab-mantle interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizukami, Tomoyuki; Yokoyama, Hironori; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Arai, Shoji; Kawahara, Hirokazu; Nagaya, Takayoshi; Wallis, Simon R.

    2014-09-01

    It is known that plate boundaries in subduction zones show heterogeneous slip nature with strongly coupled seismogenic zones and various types of episodic tremor and slip (ETS) zones. In order to examine the petrological controls on the large-scale structure, we compared recent geophysical observations in the Shikoku area, southwest Japan with petrological models of the hanging wall mantle wedge. As a result, we found a close relationship between mineral assemblages in the mantle wedge and the characteristics of slow slip behaviour recorded in the Shikoku area: Short-term ETSs take place in the antigorite + olivine stability field and silent long-term slow slip events (SSEs) take place in the antigorite + brucite stability field. Based on observations of natural antigorite serpentinites, we propose a model that the dominant serpentinization reaction in the mantle wedge changes with increasing depth resulting in variable extents of pore fluid pressures along slip planes. The serpentinization reaction in the antigorite + brucite stability field (olivine + H2O → antigorite + brucite) proceeds at the expense of water. This is consistent with moderately elevated pore pressures inferred for long-term SSEs. The existence of weak brucite enhances the development of shear zones oblique to the main foliation. The resultant anastomosing network provides fluid pathways that may help reduce pore pressures on slip planes. In contrast, progress of the serpentinization reaction in the antigorite + olivine stability field (olivine + H2O + SiO2 → antigorite) results in a large amount of residual water that contributes to further increase pore fluid pressures on slip planes of short-term SSEs. Our results imply that understanding of serpentinization reactions and their contributions to fluid networks in mantle wedge is important in constructing quantitative 3-D models for strain evolutions along plate boundaries.

  9. Thermophoretic Motion of a Sphere Parallel to an Insulated Plane.

    PubMed

    Chen

    2000-04-01

    An analytical study is presented for the thermophoresis of a sphere in a constant applied temperature gradient parallel to an adiabatic plane. The Knudsen number is assumed to be small so that the fluid flow can be described by a continuum model with a thermal creep and a hydrodynamic slip at the particle surface. A method of reflections is used to obtain the asymptotic formulas for the temperature and velocity fields in the quasisteady situation. The thermal insulated plane may be a solid wall (no-slip) and/or a free surface (perfect-slip). The boundary effect on the thermophoretic motion is found to be weaker than that on the axisymmetric thermophoresis of a sphere normal to a plane with constant temperature. In comparison with the motion driven by gravitational force, the interaction between the particle and the boundary is less significant under thermophoresis. Even so, the interaction between the plane and the particle can be very strong when the gap thickness approaches zero. For the thermophoretic motion of a particle parallel to a solid plane, the effect of the plane surface is to reduce the translational velocity of the particle. In the case of particle migration parallel to a free surface due to thermophoresis, the translating velocity of a particle can be either greater or smaller than that which would exist in the absence of the plane surface, depending on the relative thermal conductivity and the surface properties of the particle and its relative distance from the plane. Not only the translational velocity but also the rotational velocity of the thermophoretic sphere near the plane boundary is formulated analytically. The rotating direction of the particle is strongly dominated by its surface properties and the internal-to-external thermal conductivity. Besides the particle motion, the thickness of the thermophoretic boundary layer is evaluated by considering the thermophoretic mobility. Generally speaking, a free surface exerts less influence on the

  10. Texture evolution in calcite gouge formed at sub-seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Piane, Claudio; Luzin, Vladimir; Timms, Nick E.; Ben Clennell, M.; Giwelli, Ausama

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate rocks are abundant in the upper crust and are notoriously seismogenic with Mw>6 earthquakes nucleating in fault zones in carbonate dominated units around the world. Field observations describe fault zones as characterised by a narrow principal slip zone at their core, containing fine, granular wear material referred to as fault gouge, produced during cumulative slip. The current literature on the link between texture and frictional properties of calcite gouges is very limited and somewhat contradictory: based on the study of a natural calcite gouge a link has been proposed between the presence of a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) and past seismic activity on the gouge hosting fault zone. However, similar features in terms of CPO were also identified on gouges experimentally generated at slip velocities well below the seismic ones, therefore questioning their interpretation as diagnostic of past seismic events. We studied the evolution of friction coefficient and texture on calcite gouges experimentally produced by means of high pressure direct shear experiments on large, water saturated, intact blocks of travertine (calcite 99 % wt.). Several blocks were deformed at room temperature up to different amounts of maximum displacements (20 mm, 70 mm and 120 mm) under an imposed sub-seismic slip rate of approximately 0.1 microns/s. Microstructural characterization of the deformed blocks was subsequently carried out on samples representing the highest strained portion s of each blocks (i.e. gouge zones). Local and bulk texture of the original and deformed materials was studied by means of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and neutron diffraction, respectively. Direct shear experiments consistently indicate an evolution of the friction coefficient stabilizing at around values of 0.6 after 15 mm of slip. Macroscopic observations on the deformed blocks indicate that deformation is localised in a narrow band of extreme grain size reduction

  11. Determining the causes of fault slip rate variability for Northern Apennine thrusts on intermediate timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunderson, K. L.; Anastasio, D. J.; Pazzaglia, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Documenting fault slip rate variability on intermediate (10^4-10^5 yr) timescales is crucial for understanding the process-linkages of short-term (10^1-10^3 yr) and long-term (10^6 yr) patterns of deformation; however, the lack of long records of fault slip with 10^4-10^5 yr resolution presents a major barrier to understanding the underlying process responsible for slip rate variability at those timescales. Taking advantage of spectacular, continuous exposure of growth strata, we document 10^4-10^5 yr resolution records of unsteady fault slip for the past 3.0 myr for three unconnected, shallow blind thrust anticlines growing along the Northern Apennine mountain front, Italy. Fault slip rates for these thrusts were determined from progressive restorations of marine and continental growth strata deposited on the anticlinal limbs. These restorations were supported by subsurface corre-lations of the measured growth sections in order to constrain the fold geometries and kin-ematics. Magnetostratigraphy, cyclostratigraphy, cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) burial dating, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) burial dating provided the high-resolution age models for the growth sections. Slip histories determined from our pro-gressive restorations indicate that all three of the thrust faults exhibited high-frequency slip rate variability. This variability is typically manifest by longer periods of decelerated fault slip punctuated by shorter periods of accelerated fault slip, typically lasting between 80-200 kyr. During times when slip rates were slow, growth strata geometries show ac-celerated slip was accommodated by more foreland structures, suggesting slip partitioning at 10^4-10^5 yr timescales. This high frequency variability is superimposed on a low frequency slip rate variability manifest by an overall deceleration in slip on the shallow thrusts since 3.0 myr. Major decelerations in slip rates were coincident with the activation of thick-skinned thrusting in the

  12. Multi-asperity models of slow slip and tremor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampuero, Jean Paul; Luo, Yingdi; Lengline, Olivier; Inbal, Asaf

    2016-04-01

    Field observations of exhumed faults indicate that fault zones can comprise mixtures of materials with different dominant deformation mechanisms, including contrasts in strength, frictional stability and hydrothermal transport properties. Computational modeling helps quantify the potential effects of fault zone heterogeneity on fault slip styles from seismic to aseismic slip, including slow slip and tremor phenomena, foreshocks sequences and swarms, high- and low-frequency radiation during large earthquakes. We will summarize results of ongoing modeling studies of slow slip and tremor in which fault zone structure comprises a collection of frictionally unstable patches capable of seismic slip (tremorgenic asperities) embedded in a frictionally stable matrix hosting aseismic transient slips. Such models are consistent with the current view that tremors result from repeated shear failure of multiple asperities as Low Frequency Earthquakes (LFEs). The collective behavior of asperities embedded in creeping faults generate a rich spectrum of tremor migration patterns, as observed in natural faults, whose seismicity rate, recurrence time and migration speed can be mechanically related to the underlying transient slow slip rate. Tremor activity and slow slip also responds to periodic loadings induced by tides or surface waves, and models relate tremor tidal sensitivity to frictional properties, fluid pressure and creep rate. The overall behavior of a heterogeneous fault is affected by structural parameters, such as the ratio of stable to unstable materials, but also by time-dependent variables, such as pore pressure and loading rate. Some behaviors are well predicted by homogenization theory based on spatially-averaged frictional properties, but others are somewhat unexpected, such as seismic slip behavior found in asperities that are much smaller than their nucleation size. Two end-member regimes are obtained in rate-and-state models with velocity-weakening asperities

  13. Slip and Dilation Tendency Analysis of the Tuscarora Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = τ / σn (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (σ1-σn) / (σ1-σ3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson-Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes

  14. Temperature dependence of atomic-scale stick-slip friction.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lars; Hölscher, Hendrik; Fuchs, Harald; Schirmeisen, André

    2010-06-25

    We report experiments of atomic stick-slip friction on graphite as an explicit function of surface temperature between 100 and 300 K under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. A statistical analysis of the individual stick-slip events as a function of the velocity reveals an agreement with the thermally activated Prandtl-Tomlinson model at all temperatures. Taking into account an explicit temperature-dependence of the attempt frequency all data points collapse onto one single master curve. PMID:20867399

  15. Frictional slip of granite at hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanpied, M.L.; Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    To measure the strength, sliding behavior, and friction constitutive properties of faults at hydrothermal conditions, laboratory granite faults containing a layer of granite powder (simulated gouge) were slid. The mechanical results define two regimes. The first regime includes dry granite up to at least 845?? and wet granite below 250??C. In this regime the coefficient of friction is high (?? = 0.7 to 0.8) and depends only modestly on temperature, slip rate, and PH2O. The second regime includes wet granite above ~350??C. In this regime friction decreases considerably with increasing temperature (temperature weakening) and with decreasing slip rate (velocity strengthening). These regimes correspond well to those identified in sliding tests on ultrafine quartz. The results highlight the importance of fluid-assisted deformation processes active in faults at depth and the need for laboratory studies on the roles of additional factors such as fluid chemistry, large displacements, higher concentrations of phyllosilicates, and time-dependent fault healing. -from Authors

  16. Secondary Fracturing of Europa's Crust in Response to Combined Slip and Dilation Along Strike-Slip Faults

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    A commonly observed feature in faulted terrestrial rocks is the occurrence of secondary fractures alongside faults. Depending on exact morphology, such fractures have been termed tail cracks, wing cracks, kinks, or horsetail fractures, and typically form at the tip of a slipping fault or around small jogs or steps along a fault surface. The location and orientation of secondary fracturing with respect to the fault plane or the fault tip can be used to determine if fault motion is left-lateral or right-lateral.

  17. Using a genetic algorithm to estimate the details of earthquake slip distributions from point surface displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, A.; McCloskey, J.; Nic Bhloscaidh, M.

    2016-03-01

    Examining fault activity over several earthquake cycles is necessary for long-term modeling of the fault strain budget and stress state. While this requires knowledge of coseismic slip distributions for successive earthquakes along the fault, these exist only for the most recent events. However, overlying the Sunda Trench, sparsely distributed coral microatolls are sensitive to tectonically induced changes in relative sea levels and provide a century-spanning paleogeodetic and paleoseismic record. Here we present a new technique called the Genetic Algorithm Slip Estimator to constrain slip distributions from observed surface deformations of corals. We identify a suite of models consistent with the observations, and from them we compute an ensemble estimate of the causative slip. We systematically test our technique using synthetic data. Applying the technique to observed coral displacements for the 2005 Nias-Simeulue earthquake and 2007 Mentawai sequence, we reproduce key features of slip present in previously published inversions such as the magnitude and location of slip asperities. From the displacement data available for the 1797 and 1833 Mentawai earthquakes, we present slip estimates reproducing observed displacements. The areas of highest modeled slip in the paleoearthquake are nonoverlapping, and our solutions appear to tile the plate interface, complementing one another. This observation is supported by the complex rupture pattern of the 2007 Mentawai sequence, underlining the need to examine earthquake occurrence through long-term strain budget and stress modeling. Although developed to estimate earthquake slip, the technique is readily adaptable for a wider range of applications.

  18. Offset of Latest Pleistocene Shoreface Reveals Slip Rate on the Hosgri Strike-Slip Fault, Offshore Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. Y.; Hartwell, S. R.; Dartnell, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Hosgri fault is the southern part of the regional Hosgri-San Gregorio dextral strike-slip fault system, which extends primarily in the offshore region for about 400 km in central California. Between Morro Bay and San Simeon, high-resolution multibeam bathymetry reveals that the eastern strand of the Hosgri fault is crossed by a ~265-m-wide slope interpreted as the shoreface of a relict sand spit that formed during a period of relatively slower sea-level rise (Younger Dryas stadial) in the latest Pleistocene. This sand spit crossed an embayment and connected a western fault-bounded bedrock peninsula and an eastern bedrock highland, a paleogeography similar to modern geomorphology along coastal segments of the San Andreas fault. Detailed analysis of the relict shoreface with slope profiles and slope maps indicates a lateral slip rate of 2.6 ± 0.9 mm/yr. Because the Hosgri fault locally includes an active western strand, and regionally converges with several other faults, this slip rate should be considered a minimum for the Hosgri fault in central California and should not be applied for the entire Hosgri-San Gregorio fault system. This slip rate indicates that the Hosgri system takes up the largest share of the strike-slip fault budget and is the most active strike-slip fault west of the San Andreas fault in central California. This result further demonstrates the value and potential of high-resolution bathymetry in earthquake-hazard characterization of active offshore faults.

  19. In situ TEM observations of cross-slip mechanism in NiAl with a soft orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Vailhe, C.; Douin, J.; Caillard, D.

    1997-12-31

    In situ experiences have been conducted in NiAl single crystals in the soft orientation, at room temperature, in order to investigate the glide process of [100] dislocations. The results show that dislocations have a kinked shape in agreement with what is expected from anisotropic elasticity. Intensive cross-slip is observed, leading to slip in non-crystallographic planes and dipole formation. The ductility of the alloy is then discussed.

  20. Airborne Antenna System for Minimum-Cycle-Slip GPS Reception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. Wayne

    2009-01-01

    A system that includes a Global Positioning System (GPS) antenna and associated apparatus for keeping the antenna aimed upward has been developed for use aboard a remote-sensing-survey airplane. The purpose served by the system is to enable minimum- cycle-slip reception of GPS signals used in precise computation of the trajectory of the airplane, without having to restrict the airplane to maneuvers that increase the flight time needed to perform a survey. Cycle slip signifies loss of continuous track of the phase of a signal. Minimum-cycle-slip reception is desirable because maintaining constant track of the phase of the carrier signal from each available GPS satellite is necessary for surveying to centimeter or subcentimeter precision. Even a loss of signal for as short a time as a nanosecond can cause cycle slip. Cycle slips degrade the quality and precision of survey data acquired during a flight. The two principal causes of cycle slip are weakness of signals and multipath propagation. Heretofore, it has been standard practice to mount a GPS antenna rigidly on top of an airplane, and the radiation pattern of the antenna is typically hemispherical, so that all GPS satellites above the horizon are viewed by the antenna during level flight. When the airplane must be banked for a turn or other maneuver, the reception hemisphere becomes correspondingly tilted; hence, the antenna no longer views satellites that may still be above the Earth horizon but are now below the equatorial plane of the tilted reception hemisphere. Moreover, part of the reception hemisphere (typically, on the inside of a turn) becomes pointed toward ground, with a consequent increase in received noise and, therefore, degradation of GPS measurements. To minimize the likelihood of loss of signal and cycle slip, bank angles of remote-sensing survey airplanes have generally been limited to 10 or less, resulting in skidding or slipping uncoordinated turns. An airplane must be banked in order to make

  1. Late Quaternary slip rate of the frontal thrust of the Qilian Shan , NE Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagnac, J.-D.; Molnar, P.; Yuan, D.-Y.; Ge, W.-P.; Zheng, W.-J.

    2009-04-01

    The Qilian Shan, with peak elevations >5500 m, seems to have been built largely during late Miocene time (e.g. Tapponnier et al., 2001) and continues to be seismically active (Hetzel et al., 2004), having produced the very large the Gulang earthquake in 1927 (M=8.0) (e.g., Zheng et al., 2005). Associated deformation is partitioned into thrust faulting on planes dipping south-southwest and north-northeast and large sinistral strike-slip faults oriented WSW-ENE to WNW-ESE, as well as second order dextral faults oriented NNW-SSW. The thickened crust of the Qilian Shan seems to be due to reverse faulting in a region that seems to have grown east-northeastward as the Altyn Tagh fault extended eastward (e.g. Burchfiel et al., 1989). We constrain the slip rate of a frontal thrust of the Qilian Shan over millennial time scale by cosmogenic (10Be) exposure age dating of terraces offset by the reverse fault, combined with structural investigations, satellite imagery, topographic profiling, and exposure dating. We surveyed two terrace levels, and from each we took 6-7 samples in profiles dug to depths of two meters. These allowed us to constrain inheritance (equivalent to ~0-2 ka, for each) and to determine precise ages of abandonment of the terraces: 29.9 ± 7.8 kyrs for the upper terrace and 16.3 ± 4.4 kyrs for the lower one. Topographic profiles 4 km in length, with a determination of probable burial of the footwall by sediments, yield offsets of the surfaces of 96.4 ± 4.4 m and 40.1 ± 2.8 m.The average vertical rate is 2.8 ± 1.3 mm/yr, with a horizontal slip rate of ~2.5 ± 2.0 mm/yr. The vertical and horizontal rates determined by this study contrast with slower rates determined farther north by Hetzel et al. (2004) on a similar thrust fault. Our results are consistent with GPS constraints, which show a NNE shortening direction across the Qilian Shan at a rate of 5.5 ± 1.8 mm/yr (Zhang et al., 2004). Slip on the studied thrust fault over millennial timescale account

  2. Neuromuscular Fatigue Alters Postural Control and Sagittal Plane Hip Biomechanics in Active Females With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Barnett S.; Gilsdorf, Christine M.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Prentice, William E.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Females with history of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and subsequent ligament reconstruction are at high risk for future ACL injury. Fatigue may influence the increased risk of future injury in females by altering lower extremity biomechanics and postural control. Hypothesis: Fatigue will promote lower extremity biomechanics and postural control deficits associated with ACL injury. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Fourteen physically active females with ACL reconstruction (mean age, 19.64 ± 1.5 years; mean height, 163.52 ± 6.18 cm; mean mass, 62.6 ± 13.97 kg) volunteered for this study. Postural control and lower extremity biomechanics were assessed in the surgical limb during single-leg balance and jump-landing tasks before and after a fatigue protocol. Main outcome measures were 3-dimensional hip and knee joint angles at initial contact, peak angles, joint angular displacements and peak net joint moments, anterior tibial shear force, and vertical ground reaction force during the first 50% of the loading phase of the jump-landing task. During the single-leg stance task, the main outcome measure was center of pressure sway speed. Results: Initial contact hip flexion angle decreased (t = −2.82, P = 0.01; prefatigue, 40.98° ± 9.79°; postfatigue, 36.75° ± 8.61°) from pre- to postfatigue. Hip flexion displacement (t = 2.23, P = 0.04; prefatigue, 45.19° ± 14.1°; postfatigue, 47.48° ± 14.21°) and center of pressure sway speed (t = 3.95, P < 0.05; prefatigue, 5.18 ± 0.96 cm/s; postfatigue, 6.20 ± 1.72 cm/s) increased from pre- to postfatigue. There was a trending increase in hip flexion moment (t = 2.14, P = 0.05; prefatigue, 1.66 ± 0.68 Nm/kg/m; postfatigue, 1.91 ± 0.62 Nm/kg/m) from pre- to postfatigue. Conclusion: Fatigue may induce lower extremity biomechanics and postural control deficits that may be associated with ACL injury in physically active females with ACL reconstruction. Clinical Relevance

  3. Evidence of dislocation cross-slip in MAX phase deformed at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Guitton, Antoine; Joulain, Anne; Thilly, Ludovic; Tromas, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Ti2AlN nanolayered ternary alloy has been plastically deformed under confining pressure at 900°C. The dislocation configurations of the deformed material have been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The results show a drastic evolution compared to the dislocation configurations observed in the Ti2AlN samples deformed at room temperature. In particular, they evidence out-of-basal-plane dislocations and interactions. Moreover numerous cross-slip events from basal plane to prismatic or pyramidal planes are observed. These original results are discussed in the context of the Brittle-to-Ductile Transition of the nanolayered ternary alloys. PMID:25220949

  4. Process for slip casting textured tubular structures

    DOEpatents

    Steinlage, Greg A.; Trumble, Kevin P.; Bowman, Keith J.

    2002-01-01

    A process for centrifugal slip casting a textured hollow tube. A slip made up of a carrier fluid and a suspended powder is introduced into a porous mold which is rotated at a speed sufficient to create a centrifugal force that forces the slip radially outward toward the inner surface of the mold. The suspended powder, which is formed of particles having large dimensional aspect ratios such as particles of superconductive BSCCO, settles in a textured fashion radially outward toward the mold surface. The carrier fluid of the slip passes by capillary action radially outward around the settled particles and into the absorbent mold. A layer of mold release material is preferably centrifugally slip cast to cover the mold inner surface prior to the introduction of the BSCCO slip, and the mold release layer facilitates removal of the BSCCO greenbody from the mold without fracturing.

  5. Estimating Fault Slip Rates and Deformation at Complex Strike-Slip Plate Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, Wayne; Murray-Moraleda, Jessica

    2010-05-01

    Modeling GPS velocity fields in seismically active regions worldwide indicates deformation can be efficiently and usefully described as relative motions among elastic, fault-bounded crustal blocks. These models are providing hundreds of new decadal fault slip rate estimates that can be compared with the (much smaller) independent Holocene (<10 ka) to late Quaternary (<125 ka) rates obtained by geological methods. Updated comparisons show general agreement but a subset of apparently significant outliers. Some of these outliers have been discussed previously and attributed either to a temporal change in slip rate or systematic error in one of the estimates. Here we focus particularly on recent GPS and geologic results from southern California and discuss criteria for assessing the differing rates. In southern California (and elsewhere), subjective choices of block geometry are unavoidable and introduce significant uncertainties in model formulation and in the resultant GPS fault slip rate estimates. To facilitate comparison between GPS and geologic results in southern California we use the SCEC Community Fault Model (CFM) and geologic slip rates tabulated in the 2008 Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF2) report as starting points for identifying the most important faults and specifying the block geometry. We then apply this geometry in an inversion of the SCEC Crustal Motion Model (CMM4) GPS velocity field to estimate block motions and intra-block fault slip rates and compare our results with previous work. Here we use 4 criteria to evaluate GPS/geologic slip rate differences. First: Is there even-handed evaluation of random and systematic errors? ‘Random error' is sometimes subjectively estimated and its statistical properties are unknown or idealized. Differences between ~equally likely block models introduces a systematic error into GPS rate estimates that is difficult to assess and seldom discussed. Difficulties in constraining the true

  6. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Shallow Dip-Slip Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, K.

    2010-12-01

    In our earlier study (AGU 2005, SSJ 2005, JPGU 2006), using a finite difference technique, we have conducted some numerical simulations related to the source dynamics of shallow dip-slip earthquakes, and suggested the possibility of the existence of corner waves, i.e., shear waves that carry concentrated kinematic energy and generate extremely strong particle motions on the hanging wall of a nonvertical fault. In the numerical models, a dip-slip fault is located in a two-dimensional, monolithic linear elastic half space, and the fault plane dips either vertically or 45 degrees. We have investigated the seismic wave field radiated by crack-like rupture of this straight fault. If the fault rupture, initiated at depth, arrests just below or reaches the free surface, four Rayleigh-type pulses are generated: two propagating along the free surface into the opposite directions to the far field, the other two moving back along the ruptured fault surface (interface) downwards into depth. These downward interface pulses may largely control the stopping phase of the dynamic rupture, and in the case the fault plane is inclined, on the hanging wall the interface pulse and the outward-moving Rayleigh surface pulse interact with each other and the corner wave is induced. On the footwall, the ground motion is dominated simply by the weaker Rayleigh pulse propagating along the free surface because of much smaller interaction between this Rayleigh and the interface pulse. The generation of the downward interface pulses and corner wave may play a crucial role in understanding the effects of the geometrical asymmetry on the strong motion induced by shallow dip-slip faulting, but it has not been well recognized so far, partly because those waves are not expected for a fault that is located and ruptures only at depth. However, the seismological recordings of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, the 2004 Niigata-ken Chuetsu, Japan, earthquakes as well as a more recent one in Iwate-Miyagi Inland

  7. Reduced Aftershock Productivity in Regions with Known Slow Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G.; Mina, A.; Richardson, E.; McGuire, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Reduced aftershock activity has been observed in areas with high rates of aseismic slip, such as transform fault zones and some subduction zones. Fault conditions that could explain both of these observations include a low effective normal stress regime and/or a high temperature, semi-brittle/plastic rheology. To further investigate the possible connection between areas of aseismic slip and reduced aftershock productivity, we compared the mainshock-aftershock sequences in subduction zones where aseismic slip transients have been observed to those of adjacent (along-strike) regions where no slow slip events have been detected. Using the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) catalog, we counted aftershocks that occurred within 100 km and 14 days of 112 M>=5.0 slab earthquake mainshocks from January 1980 - July 2013, including 90 since January 2000, inside observed regions of detected slow slip: south central Alaska, Cascadia, the Nicoya Peninsula (Costa Rica), Guerrero (Mexico), and the North Island of New Zealand. We also compiled aftershock counts from 97 mainshocks from areas adjacent to each of these regions using the same criteria and over the same time interval. Preliminary analysis of these two datasets shows an aftershock triggering exponent (alpha in the ETAS model) of approximately 0.8, consistent with previous studies of aftershocks in a variety of tectonic settings. Aftershock productivity for both datasets is less than that of continental earthquakes. Contrasting the two datasets, aftershock productivity inside slow slip regions is lower than in adjacent areas along the same subduction zone and is comparable to that of mid-ocean ridge transform faults.

  8. Learning to predict slip for ground robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelova, Anelia; Matthies, Larry; Helmick, Daniel; Sibley, Gabe; Perona, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we predict the amount of slip an exploration rover would experience using stereo imagery by learning from previous examples of traversing similar terrain. To do that, the information of terrain appearance and geometry regarding some location is correlated to the slip measured by the rover while this location is being traversed. This relationship is learned from previous experience, so slip can be predicted later at a distance from visual information only.

  9. Fault slip distribution and fault roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, Thibault; Renard, François; Schmittbuhl, Jean; Bouchon, Michel; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2011-11-01

    We present analysis of the spatial correlations of seismological slip maps and fault topography roughness, illuminating their identical self-affine exponent. Though the complexity of the coseismic spatial slip distribution can be intuitively associated with geometrical or stress heterogeneities along the fault surface, this has never been demonstrated. Based on new measurements of fault surface topography and on statistical analyses of kinematic inversions of slip maps, we propose a model, which quantitatively characterizes the link between slip distribution and fault surface roughness. Our approach can be divided into two complementary steps: (i) Using a numerical computation, we estimate the influence of fault roughness on the frictional strength (pre-stress). We model a fault as a rough interface where elastic asperities are squeezed. The Hurst exponent ?, characterizing the self-affinity of the frictional strength field, approaches ?, where ? is the roughness exponent of the fault surface in the direction of slip. (ii) Using a quasi-static model of fault propagation, which includes the effect of long-range elastic interactions and spatial correlations in the frictional strength, the spatial slip correlation is observed to scale as ?, where ? represents the Hurst exponent of the slip distribution. Under the assumption that the origin of the spatial fluctuations in frictional strength along faults is the elastic squeeze of fault asperities, we show that self-affine geometrical properties of fault surface roughness control slip correlations and that ?. Given that ? for a wide range of faults (various accumulated displacement, host rock and slip movement), we predict that ?. Even if our quasi-static fault model is more relevant for creeping faults, the spatial slip correlations observed are consistent with those of seismological slip maps. A consequence is that the self-affinity property of slip roughness may be explained by fault geometry without considering

  10. The slipping rib syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    van Delft, E.A.K.; van Pul, K.M.; Bloemers, F.W.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report and review of literature about slipping rib syndrome, a syndrome rarely recognized and often un or misdiagnosed. In literature there is no clear consensus about the diagnosis and treatment. We present a case of a 47 year old man who was diagnosed with slipping rib syndrome after a cycling incident 8 years ago. Also, we developed a flow chart according the diagnostic and therapeutic steps in the treatment of slipping rib syndrome. Central massage Knowledge and treatment of the slipping rib syndrome can prevent chronic complaints and unnecessary comprehensive treatment. PMID:27082995

  11. Adaptive regularization of earthquake slip distribution inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chisheng; Ding, Xiaoli; Li, Qingquan; Shan, Xinjian; Zhu, Jiasong; Guo, Bo; Liu, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Regularization is a routine approach used in earthquake slip distribution inversion to avoid numerically abnormal solutions. To date, most slip inversion studies have imposed uniform regularization on all the fault patches. However, adaptive regularization, where each retrieved parameter is regularized differently, has exhibited better performances in other research fields such as image restoration. In this paper, we implement an investigation into adaptive regularization for earthquake slip distribution inversion. It is found that adaptive regularization can achieve a significantly smaller mean square error (MSE) than uniform regularization, if it is set properly. We propose an adaptive regularization method based on weighted total least squares (WTLS). This approach assumes that errors exist in both the regularization matrix and observation, and an iterative algorithm is used to solve the solution. A weight coefficient is used to balance the regularization matrix residual and the observation residual. An experiment using four slip patterns was carried out to validate the proposed method. The results show that the proposed regularization method can derive a smaller MSE than uniform regularization and resolution-based adaptive regularization, and the improvement in MSE is more significant for slip patterns with low-resolution slip patches. In this paper, we apply the proposed regularization method to study the slip distribution of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake. The retrieved slip distribution is less smooth and more detailed than the one retrieved with the uniform regularization method, and is closer to the existing slip model from joint inversion of the geodetic and seismic data.

  12. Longitudinal wheel slip during ABS braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartikainen, Lassi; Petry, Frank; Westermann, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Anti-lock braking system (ABS) braking tests with two subcompact passenger cars were performed on dry and wet asphalt, as well as on snow and ice surfaces. The operating conditions of the tyres in terms of wheel slip were evaluated using histograms of the wheel slip data. The results showed different average slip levels for different road surfaces. It was also found that changes in the tyre tread stiffness affected the slip operating range through a modification of the slip value at which the maximum longitudinal force is achieved. Variation of the tyre footprint length through modifications in the inflation pressure affected the slip operating range as well. Differences in the slip distribution between vehicles with different brake controllers were also observed. The changes in slip operating range in turn modified the relative local sliding speeds between the tyre and the road. The results highlight the importance of the ABS controller's ability to adapt to changing slip-force characteristics of tyres and provide estimates of the magnitude of the effects of different tyre and road operating conditions.

  13. Observation of slip flow in thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Franz M; Braun, Dieter

    2008-10-17

    Two differing theories aim to describe fluidic thermophoresis, the movement of particles along a temperature gradient. While thermodynamic approaches rely on local equilibrium, hydrodynamic descriptions assume a quasi-slip-flow boundary condition at the particle's surface. Evidence for slip flow is presented for the case of thermal gradients exceeding (aS_(T)(-1) with particle radius a and Soret coefficient S_(T). Thermophoretic slip flow at spheres near a surface attracts or repels tracer particles perpendicular to the thermal gradient. Moreover, particles mutually attract and form colloidal crystals. Fluid dynamic slip explains the latter quantitatively. PMID:18999718

  14. Development of a liquid metal slip ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberger, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    A liquid metal slip ring/solar orientation mechanism was designed and a model tested. This was a follow-up of previous efforts for the development of a gallium liquid metal slip ring in which the major problem was the formation and ejection of debris. A number of slip ring design approaches were studied. The probe design concept was fully implemented with detail drawings and a model was successfully tested for dielectric strength, shock vibration, acceleration and operation. The conclusions are that a gallium liquid metal slip ring/solar orientation mechanism is feasible and that the problem of debris formation and ejection has been successfully solved.

  15. Simulation of Unstable Fault Slip in Granite Using a Bonded-particle Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazzard, J. F.; Collins, D. S.; Pettitt, W. S.; Young, R. P.

    - A bonded-particle model is used to simulate shear-type microseismic events induced by tunnel excavation in granite. The model represents a volume of granite by an assembly of 50,000 individual particles bonded together at points of contact. A plane of weakness is included in the model and this plane is subjected to increasing shear load while the normal load across the plane is held constant. As shear stress in the model increases, bonds begin to break and small acoustic emissions (AE) result. After enough bonds have broken, macro-slip occurs across the large portions of the fault in an unstable manner. Since the model is run dynamically, seismic source information can be calculated for the simulated AE and macro-slip events. This information is compared with actual results obtained from seismic monitoring around an underground excavation. Although the modelled events exhibit larger magnitudes than the actual recorded events, there are many similarities between the model and the actual results, namely the presence of foreshocks before the macro-slip events and the patterns of energy release during loading. In particular, the model provides the ability to examine the complexity of the slip events in detail.

  16. Resistance coefficients for Stokes flow around a disk with a Navier slip condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, J. D.

    2012-09-01

    The Stokes drag and couple acting on a disk of zero thickness as it moves through Newtonian fluid are investigated for the case when slip can occur at the surface of the disk. It is shown that when the disk translates parallel to its axis, the well-known velocity field for a no-slip boundary condition exerts zero shear stress on the surface of the disk. The flow is therefore unchanged if the boundary condition on the disk is modified to a stress-free or to a Navier slip boundary condition. This invariance also holds for a disk that rotates about a diameter. However, flow around a disk that rotates about its axis, or that translates in its own plane (edgewise), is modified when the no-slip boundary condition is changed to a Navier slip condition. The fluid velocity can be expressed in terms of Hankel transforms, and the resulting dual integral equations are solved numerically. Results for the torque and drag on the disk are presented as functions of the slip length in the Navier boundary condition.

  17. Comparison of GPS and Quaternary slip rates: Insights from a new Quaternary fault database for Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd; Bendick, Rebecca; Mutz, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies related to the kinematics of deformation within the India-Asia collision zone have relied on slip rate data for major active faults to test kinematic models that explain the deformation of the region. The slip rate data, however, are generally disputed for many of the first-order faults in the region (e.g., Altyn Tagh and Karakorum faults). Several studies have also challenged the common assumption that geodetic slip rates are representative of Quaternary slip rates. What has received little attention is the degree to which geodetic slip rates relate to Quaternary slip rates for active faults in the India-Asia collision zone. In this study, we utilize slip rate data from a new Quaternary fault database for Central Asia to determine the overall relationship between Quaternary and GPS-derived slip rates for 18 faults. The preliminary analysis investigating this relationship uses weighted least squares and a re-sampling analysis to test the sensitivity of this relationship to different data point attributes (e.g., faults associated with data points and dating methods used for estimating Quaternary slip rates). The resulting sample subsets of data points yield a maximum possible Pearson correlation coefficient of ~0.6, suggesting moderate correlation between Quaternary and GPS-derived slip rates for some faults (e.g., Kunlun and Longmen Shan faults). Faults with poorly correlated Quaternary and GPS-derived slip rates were identified and dating methods used for the Quaternary slip rates were examined. Results indicate that a poor correlation between Quaternary and GPS-derived slip rates exist for the Karakorum and Chaman faults. Large differences between Quaternary and GPS slip rates for these faults appear to be connected to qualitative dating of landforms used in the estimation of the Quaternary slip rates and errors in the geomorphic and structural reconstruction of offset landforms (e.g., offset terrace riser reconstructions for Altyn Tagh fault

  18. Slip due to surface roughness for a Newtonian liquid in a viscous microscale disk pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligrani, Phil; Blanchard, Danny; Gale, Bruce

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, hydrophobic roughness is used to induce near-wall slip in a single rotating-disk micropump operating with Newtonian water. The amount of induced slip is altered by employing different sizes of surface roughness on the rotating disk. The magnitudes of slip length and slip velocities increase as the average size of the surface roughness becomes larger. In the present study, increased slip magnitudes from roughness are then associated with reduced pressure rise through the pump and lower radial-line-averaged shear stress magnitudes (determined within slip planes). Such shear stress and pressure rise variations are similar to those which would be present if the slip is induced by the intermolecular interactions which are associated with near-wall microscale effects. The present slip-roughness effects are quantified experimentally over rotational speeds from 50 to 1200 rpm, pressure increases from 0 to 312 kPa, net flow rates of 0-100 μl/min, and fluid chamber heights from 6.85 to 29.2 μm. Verification is provided by comparisons with analytic results determined from the rotating Couette flow forms of the Navier-Stokes equations, with different disk rotational speeds, disk roughness levels, and fluid chamber heights. These data show that slip length magnitudes show significant dependence on radial-line-averaged shear stress for average disk roughness heights of 404 and 770 nm. These slip length data additionally show a high degree of organization when normalized using by either the average roughness height or the fluid chamber height. For the latter case, such behavior provides evidence that the flow over a significant portion of the passage height is affected by the roughness, and near-wall slip velocities, especially when the average roughness height amounts to 11% of the h =6.86 μm passage height of the channel. Such scaling of the disk slip length bdisk with fluid chamber height h is consistent with d-type roughness scaling in macroscale

  19. Wrinkle-like slip pulse on a fault between different materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, D.J.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Pulses of slip velocity can propagate on a planar interface governed by a constant coefficient of friction, where the interface separates different elastic materials. Such pulses have been found in two-dimensional plane strain finite difference calculations of slip on a fault between elastic media with wave speeds differing by 20%. The self-sustaining propagation of the slip pulse arises from interaction between normal and tangential deformation that exists only with a material contrast. These calculations confirm the prediction of Weertman [1980] that a dislocation propagating steadily along a material interface has a tensile change of normal traction with the same pulse shape as slip velocity. The self-sustaining pulse is associated with a rapid transition from a head wave traveling along the interface with the S wave speed of the faster material, to an opposite polarity body wave traveling with the slower S speed. Slip occurs during the reversal of normal particle velocity. The pulse can propagate in a region with constant coefficient of friction and an initial stress state below the frictional criterion. Propagation occurs in only one direction, the direction of slip in the more compliant medium, with rupture velocity near the slower S wave speed. Displacement is larger in the softer medium, which is displaced away from the fault during the passage of the slip pulse. Motion is analogous to a propagating wrinkle in a carpet. The amplitude of slip remains approximately constant during propagation, but the pulse width decreases and the amplitudes of slip velocity and stress change increase. The tensile change of normal traction increases until absolute normal traction reaches zero. The pulse can be generated as a secondary effect of a drop of shear stress in an asperity. The pulse shape is unstable, and the initial slip pulse can change during propagation into a collection of sharper pulses. Such a pulse enables slip to occur with little loss of energy to friction

  20. Rapid Slip-Rate and Low Shear Strength of a High Finite-Slip Low-Angle Normal Fault: Normanby Island, Woodlark Rift, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, T. A.; Monteleone, B.; Baldwin, S. L.; Fitzgerald, P. G.

    2006-12-01

    A metamorphic core complex (MCC) punctuates the attenuated continental crust of Normanby Island in the D'Entrecasteaux Group of SE Papua New Guinea, 30 km west of the seafloor- spreading tip of the Woodlark Basin. The lower plate of this north-vergent MCC has been uplifted by as much as ~1100 m above sealevel and exposes a >1 km thick carapace of blueschist-derived quartzose mylonites that have a subhorizontal top-to-the-NNE shear fabric. Onshore, the variably back-tilted, inactive detachment fault capping these mylonites has been eroded away, but its corrugated geomorphology is preserved in the landscape of the asymmetric dome. Corrugations and stretching lineations parallel solutions for Woodlark- Australia plate motions from 3.6-0.52 Ma. North of the island, the detachment fault is preserved as a ~12° N-dipping scarp on the seafloor. The northern, submarine part of the Woodlark rift contains several active half-grabens, and has been the site of several >Mw 6.0 earthquakes on planes dipping 23-30° N. Focal depths in this part of the rift are <8-9 km (Abers {it et al.,} 1997). The ~40-km exhumed length of the fault, and estimates of the temperature and minimum depth (8-10 km) of mylonitization imply a finite dip-slip of at least 50 km. ODP stratigraphic data from nearby Moresby Seamount suggest that slip on the Normanby fault had begun by ~3.8 Ma. 40Ar/39Ar data from the lower plate have yielded plateau ages on mylonitic white mica of 3-4 Ma, interpreted as cooling ages. A preliminary estimate of the age gradient parallel to transport suggests a minimum slip-rate of ~24 ±5mm/yr (assumes a geotherm at dynamic equilibrium) on this rolling hinge-style MCC, one of the fastest slip-rates ever determined for a normal fault. This is ~70% of the rift's spreading rate during that interval, implying marked strain localization on a single, highly evolved low-angle normal fault. MCC's in the Woodlark Rift are bounded transversely by continental transform faults that

  1. Vertical-axis rotations and deformation along the active strike-slip El Tigre Fault (Precordillera of San Juan, Argentina) assessed through palaeomagnetism and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazzito, Sabrina Y.; Rapalini, Augusto E.; Cortés, José M.; Terrizzano, Carla M.

    2016-05-01

    Palaeomagnetic data from poorly consolidated to non-consolidated late Cenozoic sediments along the central segment of the active El Tigre Fault (Central-Western Precordillera of the San Juan Province, Argentina) demonstrate broad cumulative deformation up to ~450 m from the fault trace and reveal clockwise and anticlockwise vertical-axis rotations of variable magnitude. This deformation has affected in different amounts Miocene to late Pleistocene samples and indicates a complex kinematic pattern. Several inherited linear structures in the shear zone that are oblique to the El Tigre Fault may have acted as block boundary faults. Displacement along these faults may have resulted in a complex pattern of rotations. The maximum magnitude of rotation is a function of the age of the sediments sampled, with largest values corresponding to middle Miocene-lower Pliocene deposits and minimum values obtained from late Pleistocene deposits. The kinematic study is complemented by low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data to show that the local strain regime suggests a N-S stretching direction, subparallel to the strike of the main fault.

  2. Post-seismic slip on the San Andreas fault at the northwestern end of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake rupture zone

    SciTech Connect

    Langbein, J.O.

    1990-07-01

    A small geodetic network spanning the San Andreas fault was measured 7, 77, 157, and 200 days following the October 17, 1989 Loma Prieta M7.1 earthquake. This network is located at the northwestern end of the rupture plane defined by the locations of numerous aftershocks. In the initial 70-day interval, the measured line-length changes revealed that 5.4 {plus minus} 0.4 mm of right-lateral slip occurred within the network. However, during the later 4 month interval only a marginally significant rate, 3.2 {plus minus} 1.4 mm/yr, of right-lateral slip could be detected. Thus, it appears that the measured slip is a typical response of the fault following a major shock in that the rate of slip decreases rapidly with time. However, the magnitude of the post-seismic slip is less than 0.5% of the inferred co-seismic slip at depth.

  3. Slipping on pedestrian surfaces: methods for measuring and evaluating the slip resistance.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Christoph; Windhövel, Ulrich; Mewes, Detlef; Ceylan, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    Tripping, slipping and falling accidents are among the types of accident with a high incidence. This article describes the requirements concerning slip resistance, as well as the state of the art of slip resistance measurement standards in the European Community and the USA. The article also describes how risk assessment can be performed in the field. PMID:26414511

  4. Modifying stochastic slip distributions based on dynamic simulations for use in probabilistic tsunami hazard evaluation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Shane; Scala, Antonio; Lorito, Stefano; Herrero, Andre; Festa, Gaetano; Nielsen, Stefan; Trasatti, Elisa; Tonini, Roberto; Romano, Fabrizio; Molinari, Irene

    2016-04-01

    Stochastic slip modelling based on general scaling features with uniform slip probability over the fault plane is commonly employed in tsunami and seismic hazard. However, dynamic rupture effects driven by specific fault geometry and frictional conditions can potentially control the slip probability. Unfortunately dynamic simulations can be computationally intensive, preventing their extensive use for hazard analysis. The aim of this study is to produce a computationally efficient stochastic model that incorporates slip features observed in dynamic simulations. Dynamic rupture simulations are performed along a transect representing an average along-depth profile on the Tohoku subduction interface. The surrounding media, effective normal stress and friction law are simplified. Uncertainty in the nucleation location and pre-stress distribution are accounted for by using randomly located nucleation patches and stochastic pre-stress distributions for 500 simulations. The 1D slip distributions are approximated as moment magnitudes on the fault plane based on empirical scaling laws with the ensemble producing a magnitude range of 7.8 - 9.6. To measure the systematic spatial slip variation and its dependence on earthquake magnitude we introduce the concept of the Slip Probability density Function (SPF). We find that while the stochastic SPF is magnitude invariant, the dynamically derived SPF is magnitude-dependent and shows pronounced slip amplification near the surface for M > 8.6 events. To incorporate these dynamic features in the stochastic source models, we sub-divide the dynamically derived SPFs into 0.2 magnitude bins and compare them with the stochastic SPF in order to generate a depth and magnitude dependent transfer function. Applying this function to the traditional stochastic slip distribution allows for an approximated but efficient incorporation of regionally specific dynamic features in a modified source model, to be used specifically when a significant

  5. A study of the feasibility and performance of an active/passive imager using silicon focal plane arrays and incoherent continuous wave laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmerhausen, Richard H.

    This dissertation describes an active/passive imager (API) that provides reliable, nighttime, target acquisition in a man-portable package with effective visual range of about 4 kilometers. The reflective imagery is easier to interpret than currently used thermal imagery. Also, in the active mode, the API provides performance equivalent to the big-aperture, thermal systems used on weapons platforms like tanks and attack helicopters. This dissertation describes the research needed to demonstrate both the feasibility and utility of the API. Part of the research describes implementation of a silicon focal plane array (SFPA) capable of both active and passive imaging. The passive imaging mode exceeds the nighttime performance of currently fielded, man-portable sensors. Further, when scene illumination is insufficient for passive imaging, the low dark current of SFPA makes it possible to use continuous wave laser diodes (CWLD) to add an active imaging mode. CWLD have advantages of size, efficiency, and improved eye safety when compared to high peak-power diodes. Because of the improved eye safety, the API provides user-demanded features like video output and extended range gates in the active as well as passive imaging modes. Like any other night vision device, the API depends on natural illumination of the scene for passive operation. Although it has been known for decades that "starlight" illumination is actually from diffuse airglow emissions, the research described in this dissertation provides the first estimates of the global and temporal variation of ground illumination due to airglow. A third related element of the current research establishes the impact of atmospheric aerosols on API performance. We know from day experience that atmospheric scattering of sunlight into the imager line-of-sight can blind the imager and drastically degrade performance. Atmospheric scattering of sunlight is extensively covered in the literature. However, previous literature did not

  6. Bayesian Estimation of 3D Non-planar Fault Geometry and Slip: An application to the 2011 Megathrust (Mw 9.1) Tohoku-Oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Rishabh; Jónsson, Sigurjón

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake faults are generally considered planar (or of other simple geometry) in earthquake source parameter estimations. However, simplistic fault geometries likely result in biases in estimated slip distributions and increased fault slip uncertainties. In case of large subduction zone earthquakes, these biases and uncertainties propagate into tsunami waveform modeling and other calculations related to postseismic studies, Coulomb failure stresses, etc. In this research, we parameterize 3D non-planar fault geometry for the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw 9.1) and estimate these geometrical parameters along with fault slip parameters from onland and offshore GPS using Bayesian inference. This non-planar fault is formed using several 3rd degree polynomials in along-strike (X-Y plane) and along-dip (X-Z plane) directions that are tied together using a triangular mesh. The coefficients of these polynomials constitute the fault geometrical parameters. We use the trench and locations of past seismicity as a priori information to constrain these fault geometrical parameters and the Laplacian to characterize the fault slip smoothness. Hyper-parameters associated to these a priori constraints are estimated empirically and the posterior probability distribution of the model (fault geometry and slip) parameters is sampled using an adaptive Metropolis Hastings algorithm. The across-strike uncertainties in the fault geometry (effectively the local fault location) around high-slip patches increases from 6 km at 10km depth to about 35 km at 50km depth, whereas around low-slip patches the uncertainties are larger (from 7 km to 70 km). Uncertainties in reverse slip are found to be higher at high slip patches than at low slip patches. In addition, there appears to be high correlation between adjacent patches of high slip. Our results demonstrate that we can constrain complex non-planar fault geometry together with fault slip from GPS data using past seismicity as a priori

  7. Inverse Slip Accompanying Twinning and Detwinning during Cyclic Loading of Magnesium Single Crystal

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yu, Qin; Wang, Jian; Jiang, Yanyao

    2013-01-01

    In situ , observation of twinning and detwinning in magnesium single crystals during tension-compression cyclic loading was made using optical microscopy. A quantitative analysis of plastic strain indicates that twinning and detwinning experience two stages, low and high work hardening de-twinning, and pure re-twinning and fresh twinning combined with retwinning. Slip is always activated. For the first time, inverse slip accompanying with pure retwinning and high work hardening detwinning was experimentally identified, which provides insights in better understanding of the activity of twining, detwinning, and slips.

  8. Spatial variations in late Quaternary slip rates along the Doruneh Fault System (Central Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farbod, Yassaman; Shabanian, Esmaeil; Bellier, Olivier; Abbassi, Mohammad Reza; Braucher, Régis; Benedetti, Lucilla; Bourlès, Didier; Hessami, Khaled

    2016-02-01

    The Doruneh Fault System (DFS) is one of the major active strike-slip faults in the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone. Despite its geological activity, no large (M ≥ 6.5) historical or instrumental earthquakes have been recorded along it. To date, the rate and distribution of slip, as well as the seismic behavior of the DFS, have been unknown. We reconstructed 67 geomorphic offsets recorded by three successive alluvial abandonment surfaces (Q1, Q2, and Q3) displaced along the western (WFZ) and central (CFZ) fault zones. The determined ages of ~12, ~36, and ~120 ka, using in situ-produced 10Be and 36Cl cosmogenic nuclides for theses surfaces, allowed to estimate three sets of individual left-lateral slip rates and consequently to describe the spatiotemporal distribution of slip along the CFZ and WFZ. The slip rates averaged over time intervals of ~36 and ~120 ka reveal variable slip rates along length but similar slip rates at a point with a maximum rate of ~8.2 mm/yr. During the Holocene, however, the fault slip behavior appears more complex, with a maximum rate of ~5.3 mm/yr. The CFZ is divided into two ~4 km apart segments, with symmetrical slip distributions relative to a persistent boundary, which has not been ruptured over the last ~12 ka. The maximum length of seismic fault segments varies from 70 to 100 km, which could produce earthquakes with a magnitude of Mw 7.2-7.4. This emphasizes the necessity of segmentation models for long strike-slip faults that may not necessarily rupture along their whole length during a single earthquake.

  9. Experimental Deformation of Olivine Crystals at Mantle P and T: Evidences for a Pressure-Induced Slip Transition and Implications for Upper-Mantle Seismic Anisotropy and Low Viscosity Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raterron, P.; Chen, J.; Geenen, T.; Girard, J.

    2009-04-01

    Recent developments in high-pressure deformation devices coupled with synchrotron radiation allow investigating the rheology of mantle minerals and aggregates at the extreme pressure (P) and temperature (T) of their natural occurrence in the Earth. This is particularly true in the case of olivine, which rheology has been recently investigated in the Deformation-DIA apparatus (D-DIA, see Wang et al., 2003, Rev. Scientific Instr., 74, 3002) at upper-mantle P and T conditions. Olivine deforms by dislocation creep in the shallow upper-mantle, as revealed by the seismic velocity anisotropy observed in this region. The attenuation of seismic anisotropy at depth greater than 200 km is interpreted as a pressure-induced change in olivine main deformation mechanism. It was first attributed to a transition from dislocation creep to diffusion creep (Karato and Wu, 1993, Science, 260, 771). This interpretation has been challenged by deformation data obtained at high pressure (P > 3 GPa) in the dislocation creep regime (Couvy et al., 2004, EJM, 16, 877; Raterron et al., 2007, Am. Miner., 92, 1436; Raterron et al., 2009, PEPI, 72, 74), which support a second interpretation: a transition in olivine dominant dislocation slip, from [100] slip at low P to [001] slip at high P (e.g., Mainprice et al., 2005, Nature, 433, 731). Such a P -induced [100]/[001] slip transition is also supported by recent theoretical studies based on first-principle calculations of olivine dislocation slips (Durinck et al., 2005, PCM, 32, 646; Durinck et al., 2007, Eur. J. Mineral., 19, 631). In order to further constrain the effect of pressure on olivine slip system activities, deformation experiments were carried out in poor water condition at P > 5 GPa and T =1400˚ C, on pure forsterite (Fo100) and San Carlos olivine crystals, using the D-DIA at the X17B2 beamline of the NSLS (Upton, NY, USA). Crystals were oriented in order to active either [100] slip alone or [001] slip alone in (010) plane, or both

  10. Environmental study of miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radnik, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    Investigation studied the long term operation of miniature slip ring assembles in high vacuum of space and included the influence of ring, brush, and insulator materials on electrical noise and mechanical wear. Results show that soft metal vapor plating and niobium diselenide miniature slip rings are beneficial.

  11. Unified slip boundary condition for fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Thalakkottor, Joseph John; Mohseni, Kamran

    2016-08-01

    Determining the correct matching boundary condition is fundamental to our understanding of several everyday problems. Despite over a century of scientific work, existing velocity boundary conditions are unable to consistently explain and capture the complete physics associated with certain common but complex problems, such as moving contact lines and corner flows. The widely used Maxwell and Navier slip boundary conditions make an implicit assumption that velocity varies only in the wall normal direction. This makes their boundary condition inapplicable in the vicinity of contact lines and corner points, where velocity gradient exists both in the wall normal and wall tangential directions. In this paper, by identifying this implicit assumption we are able to extend Maxwell's slip model. Here, we present a generalized velocity boundary condition that shows that slip velocity is a function of not only the shear rate but also the linear strain rate. In addition, we present a universal relation for slip length, which shows that, for a general flow, slip length is a function of the principal strain rate. The universal relation for slip length along with the generalized velocity boundary condition provides a unified slip boundary condition to model a wide range of steady Newtonian fluid flows. We validate the unified slip boundary for simple Newtonian liquids by using molecular dynamics simulations and studying both the moving contact line and corner flow problems. PMID:27627398

  12. [Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we summarize work on Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows. The work was primarily performed by post-doc Hue Hu, and partially by grad students Lei Li and Danish Chopra. The work includes studies on droplet evaporation and its effects on temperature and velocity fields in an evaporating droplet, new 3-D microscopic particle image velocimetry and direct visualization on wall slip in a surfactant solution. With the exception of the slip measurements, these projects were those proposed in the grant application. Instead of slip flow, the original grant proposed imaging electro-osmotic flows. However, shortly after the grant was issued, the PI became aware of work on electro-osmotic flows by the group of Saville in Princeton that was similar to that proposed, and we therefore elected to carry out work on imaging slip flows rather than electro-osmotic flows.

  13. The role of water in slip casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, R. A.; Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Slips and casting are considered in terms of physical and colloidal chemistry. Casting slips are polydisperse suspensions of lyophobic particles in water, whose degree of coagulation is controlled by interaction of flocculating and deflocculating agents. Slip casting rate and viscosity are functions of temperature. Slip rheology and response to deflocculating agents varies significantly as the kinds and amounts of colloid modifiers change. Water is considered as a raw material. Various concepts of water/clay interactions and structures are discussed. Casting is a de-watering operation in which water moves from slip to cast to mold in response to a potential energy termed moisture stress. Drying is an evaporative process from a free water surface.

  14. Atomistic process of dislocation cross-slip in Ni{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, M.; Lin, D.

    1997-02-01

    In recent years, a great deal of interest has been given to the L1{sub 2} ordered intermetallic compound Ni{sub 3}Al because of its unusual flow behaviors. Based upon the measurements of mechanical properties and the observed dislocation configurations, several models have been proposed to explain the flow stress anomaly, including the anomalous increase of flow stress with temperature, the strain rate sensitivity, the pronounced orientation dependence and the tension/compression asymmetry. The most important common ground of these models is that the flow stress anomaly is the result of cross-slip of <110> superdislocations form {l_brace}111{r_brace} to {l_brace}100{r_brace} planes, forming so-called Kear-Wilsdorf (KW) locks. Computer simulations of superdislocation core structure in Ni{sub 3}Al indicate that the immobility of KW locks is due to the non-planar core structure of 1/2<110> superpartials which always spread their cores onto {l_brace}110{r_brace} planes other than the {l_brace}100{r_brace} antiphase boundary (APB) planes. However, up to now the authors are still unaware of how the cross-slip takes place. The purpose of the present study is to reveal the atomistic process of the cross-slip of 1/2<110> superpartials from {l_brace}111{r_brace} to {l_brace}100{r_brace} planes in L1{sub 2} ordered materials.

  15. Electro-optical hybrid slip ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, En

    2005-11-01

    The slip ring is a rotary electrical interface, collector, swivel or rotary joint. It is a physical system that can perform continuous data transfer and data exchange between a stationary and a rotating structure. A slip ring is generally used to transfer data or power from an unrestrained, continuously rotating electro-mechanical system in real-time, thereby simplifying operations and eliminating damage-prone wires dangling from moving joints. Slip rings are widely used for testing, evaluating, developing and improving various technical equipment and facilities with rotating parts. They are widely used in industry, especially in manufacturing industries employing turbo machinery, as in aviation, shipbuilding, aerospace, defense, and in precise facilities having rotating parts such as medical Computerized Tomography (CT) and MRI scanners and so forth. Therefore, any improvement in slip ring technology can impact large markets. Research and development in this field will have broad prospects long into the future. The goal in developing the current slip ring technology is to improve and increase the reliability, stability, anti-interference, and high data fidelity between rotating and stationary structures. Up to now, there have been numerous approaches used for signal and data transfer utilizing a slip ring such as metal contacts, wires, radio transmission, and even liquid media. However, all suffer from drawbacks such as data transfer speed limitations, reliability, stability, electro-magnetic interference and durability. The purpose of the current research is to break through these basic limitations using an optical solution, thereby improving performance in current slip ring applications. This dissertation introduces a novel Electro-Optical Hybrid Slip Ring technology, which makes "through the air" digital-optical communication between stationary and rotating systems a reality with high data transfer speed, better reliability and low interference susceptibility

  16. First-Principles Study of Secondary Slip in Zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaari, Nermine; Clouet, Emmanuel; Rodney, David

    2014-02-01

    Although the favored glide planes in hexagonal close-packed Zr are prismatic, screw dislocations can escape their habit plane to glide in either pyramidal or basal planes. Using ab initio calculations within the nudged elastic band method, we show that, surprisingly, both events share the same thermally activated process with an unusual conservative motion of the prismatic stacking fault perpendicularly to itself. Halfway through the migration, the screw dislocation adopts a nonplanar metastable configuration with stacking faults in adjacent prismatic planes joined by a two-layer pyramidal twin.

  17. Introduction to special section on phenomenology, underlying processes, and hazard implications of aseismic slip and nonvolcanic tremor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the special section on the "phenomenology, underlying processes, and hazard implications of aseismic slip and nonvolcanic tremor" by highlighting key results of the studies published in it. Many of the results indicate that seismic and aseismic manifestations of slow slip reflect transient shear displacements on the plate interface, with the outstanding exception of northern Cascadia where tremor sources have been located on and above the plate interface (differing models of the plate interface there also need to be reconciled). Slow slip phenomena appear to result from propagating deformation that may develop with persistent gaps and segment boundaries. Results add to evidence that when tectonic deformation is relaxed via slow slip, most relaxation occurs aseismically but with seismic signals providing higher-resolution proxies for the aseismic slip. Instead of two distinct slip modes as suggested previously, lines between "fast" and "slow" slip more appropriately may be described as blurry zones. Results reported also show that slow slip sources do not coincide with a specific temperature or metamorphic reaction. Their associations with zones of high conductivity and low shear to compressional wave velocity ratios corroborate source models involving pore fluid pressure buildup and release. These models and spatial anticorrelations between earthquake and tremor activity also corroborate a linkage between slow slip and frictional properties transitional between steady state and stick-slip. Finally, this special section highlights the benefits of global and multidisciplinary studies, which demonstrate that slow phenomena are not confined to beneath the locked zone but exist in many settings.

  18. Slow slip generated by dehydration reaction coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Teruo; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-05-01

    Sustained slow slip, which is a distinctive feature of slow slip events (SSEs), is investigated theoretically, assuming a fault embedded within a fluid-saturated 1D thermo-poro-elastic medium. The object of study is specifically SSEs occurring at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone in hot subduction zones, where mineral dehydrations (antigorite, lawsonite, chlorite, and glaucophane) are expected to occur near locations where deep slow slip events are observed. In the modeling, we introduce dehydration reactions, coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization, and slip evolution is assumed to interact with fluid pressure change through Coulomb's frictional stress. Our calculations show that sustained slow slip events occur when the dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Specifically, slow slip is favored by a low initial stress drop, an initial temperature of the medium close to that of the dehydration reaction equilibrium temperature, a low permeability, and overall negative volume change associated with the reaction (i.e., void space created by the reaction larger than the space occupied by the fluid released). Importantly, if we do not assume slip-induced dilatancy, slip is accelerated with time soon after the slip onset even if the dehydration reaction is assumed. This suggests that slow slip is sustained for a long time at hot subduction zones because dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Such slip-induced dilatancy may occur at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone at hot subduction zones because of repetitive occurrence of dehydration reaction there.

  19. Constraints and inferences of conditions of seismic slip from analyses of exhumed faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    The study of exhumed faults, where constrained by geochemical or geochronologic evidence for depth of deformation, has provided abundant insights into the processes by which the upper crust accommodates strain. What remains elusive in these studies are: a] what evidence do we have for diagnosing [paleo] seismic slip, b ] how do we extrapolate the textures and composition of formerly active faults to constraining the conditions at depth, c] determining the conditions that promote seismic vs. aseismic slip, and d] to what degree do interseismic [healing] and post-slip processes exhumation affect what we see at the surface. Field evidence for the conditions that promote or are of diagnostic seismic vs. aseismic slip, is elusive, as there are few ways to determine seismic rates of slip in faults other than the presence of pseudotachylytes. Recent work on these rocks in a variety of settings and the increase in recognition of the presence of fault- related melts document the relationships between pseudotachylytes and cataclastically deformed rocks in what is thought to be the frictional regime, or with ductily deformed rocks at the base of a fault. Conditions that appear to promote seismic slip are alteration of granitic host rock to lower melting temperature phases and the presence of geometric complexities that may act as stress risers in the faults. Drilling into portions of faults where earthquakes occur at the top of the seismogenic zone have sampled fault-related rocks that have striking similarities to exhumed faults, exhibiting narrow slip surfaces, foliated cataclasites, injected gouge textures, polished slip surfaces, and thermally altered rocks along slip surfaces. We review the recent work from a wide range of studies to suggest that relatively small changes in conditions may initiate seismic slip, and suggest further avenues of investigation.

  20. Experiments with Planing Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sottorf, W

    1934-01-01

    A previous report discusses the experimental program of a systematic exploration of all questions connected with the planing problem as well as the first fundamental results of the investigation of a flat planing surface. The present report is limited to the conversion of the model test data to full scale.

  1. Using a hybrid Monte Carlo/Genetic Algorithm Slip Estimator to produce high resolution models of paleoearthquakes from geodetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, A.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S. S.; Simao, N.; Murphy, S.; NicBhloscaidh, M.; Steacy, S.

    2013-12-01

    Identifying fault sections where slip deficits have accumulated may provide a means for understanding sequences of large megathrust earthquakes. Stress accumulated during the interseismic period on locked sections of an active fault is stored as potential slip. Where this potential slip remains unreleased during earthquakes, a slip deficit can be said to have accrued. Analysis of the spatial distribution of slip during antecedent events along the fault will show where the locked plate has spent its stored slip and indicate where the potential for large events remains. The location of recent earthquakes and their distribution of slip can be estimated instrumentally. To develop the idea of long-term slip-deficit modelling it is necessary to constrain the size and distribution of slip for pre-instrumental events dating back hundreds of years covering more than one ';seismic cycle'. This requires the exploitation of proxy sources of data. Coral microatolls, growing in the intertidal zone of the outer island arc of the Sunda trench, present the possibility of producing high resolution reconstructions of slip for a number of pre-instrumental earthquakes. Their growth is influenced by tectonic flexing of the continental plate beneath them allows them to act as long term geodetic recorders. However, the sparse distribution of data available using coral geodesy results in a under determined problem with non-unique solutions. Instead of producing one definite model satisfying the observed corals displacements, a Monte Carlo Slip Estimator based on a Genetic Algorithm (MCSE-GA) accelerating the rate of convergence is used to identify a suite of models consistent with the data. Successive iterations of the MCSE-GA sample different displacements at each coral location, from within the spread of associated uncertainties, producing a catalog of models from the full range of possibilities. The suite of best slip distributions are weighted according to their fitness and stacked to

  2. Determining the radio active galactic nuclei contribution to the radio-far-infrared correlation using the black hole Fundamental Plane relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, O. Ivy; Koss, M. J.; Schawinski, K.; Kapińska, A. D.; Lamperti, I.; Oh, K.; Ricci, C.; Berney, S.; Trakhtenbrot, B.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the 1.4-GHz radio properties of 92 nearby (z < 0.05) ultra-hard X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample. Through the ultra-hard X-ray selection, we minimize the biases against obscured or Compton-thick AGNs as well as confusion with emission derived from star formation that typically affect AGN samples selected from the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths. We find that all the objects in our sample of nearby, ultra-hard X-ray selected AGNs are radio quiet; 83 per cent of the objects are classed as high-excitation galaxies and 17 per cent as low-excitation galaxies. While these low-z BAT sources follow the radio-far-infrared correlation in a similar fashion to star-forming galaxies, our analysis finds that there is still significant AGN contribution in the observed radio emission from these radio-quiet AGNs. In fact, the majority of our BAT sample occupy the same X-ray-radio Fundamental Plane as has been observed in other samples, which include radio-loud AGNs - evidence that the observed radio emission (albeit weak) is connected to the AGN accretion mechanism, rather than star formation.

  3. Boundary conditions for fluids with internal orientational degrees of freedom: Apparent velocity slip associated with the molecular alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Hess, Siegfried; Ilg, Patrick

    2007-06-15

    Boundary effects are investigated for fluids with internal orientational degrees of freedom such as molecular liquids, thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals, and polymeric fluids. The orientational degrees of freedom are described by the second rank alignment tensor which is related to the birefringence. We use a standard model to describe the orientational dynamics in the presence of flow, the momentum balance equations, and a constitutive law for the pressure tensor to describe our system. In the spirit of irreversible thermodynamics, boundary conditions are formulated for the mechanical slip velocity and the flux of the alignment. They are set up such that the entropy production at the wall inferred from the entropy flux is positive definite. Even in the absence of a true mechanical slip, the coupling between orientation and flow leads to flow profiles with an apparent slip. This has consequences for the macroscopically measurable effective velocity. In analytical investigations, we consider the simplified case of an isotropic fluid in the Newtonian and stationary flow regime. For special geometries such as plane and cylindrical Couette flow, plane Poiseuille flow, and a flow down an inclined plane, we demonstrate explicitly how the boundary conditions lead to an apparent slip. Furthermore, we discuss the dependence of the effective viscosity and of the effective slip length on the model parameters.

  4. Boundary conditions for fluids with internal orientational degrees of freedom: apparent velocity slip associated with the molecular alignment.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Ilg, Patrick; Hess, Siegfried

    2007-06-01

    Boundary effects are investigated for fluids with internal orientational degrees of freedom such as molecular liquids, thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals, and polymeric fluids. The orientational degrees of freedom are described by the second rank alignment tensor which is related to the birefringence. We use a standard model to describe the orientational dynamics in the presence of flow, the momentum balance equations, and a constitutive law for the pressure tensor to describe our system. In the spirit of irreversible thermodynamics, boundary conditions are formulated for the mechanical slip velocity and the flux of the alignment. They are set up such that the entropy production at the wall inferred from the entropy flux is positive definite. Even in the absence of a true mechanical slip, the coupling between orientation and flow leads to flow profiles with an apparent slip. This has consequences for the macroscopically measurable effective velocity. In analytical investigations, we consider the simplified case of an isotropic fluid in the Newtonian and stationary flow regime. For special geometries such as plane and cylindrical Couette flow, plane Poiseuille flow, and a flow down an inclined plane, we demonstrate explicitly how the boundary conditions lead to an apparent slip. Furthermore, we discuss the dependence of the effective viscosity and of the effective slip length on the model parameters. PMID:17677352

  5. Dynamic Mechanochemistry of Seismic Slip -Nano Spherules Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Chen, W.; Chen, Y.; Song, Y.; Ma, K.

    2007-12-01

    The Chelungpu fault, which was activated during 1999Chi-Chi Earthquake, had been drilled (Hole A, B and C) to recover the earthquake slip zone materials. We present here the results of nano-scale observations for identified slip zone materials (Ma, Tanaka et al., 2006) by using HR-TEM and TXM technique. Minimum size of grains observed under HR-TEM is 3 nm. The grain size distribution for grains larger than 100 nm in diameter follows the fractal law and grain shape is highly irregular. Grains smaller than100 nm show some specific characteristics, that is, smaller the grains, more the spherical shapes and more equi-granular. Thus, the grains smaller than 100 nm are no longer described by fractal distribution model. By SAD and EDX analysis under HR-TEM, the nano spherules are mainly composed of crystallized quartz associated with minor amounts of carbonates and amorphous materials. Results of observations lead following three conclusions, (1) nano spherules are not generated just by fracturing based on their shapes and grain size distributions. (2) nano spherules would compose viscous materials enveloping larger fractured grains from SEM observations. (3) Mica clay minerals and feldspars are disappeared in ultra-fine grained layer. This implies that chemical process of dissolution - elements dissipation - SiO2 precipitation occurred associated with mechanical fracturing. Therefore nano spherules would be generated through mechano-chemical process during co-seismic slip. Dynamic shear strength drop by rapid slip experimentsare and formation of gelled materials are recently reported. Large differences of ultra-fine products between previous reports and our observations are existence of nano spherules and their crystallinity. If the nano- spherules are generated during seismic slip, dynamic weakening would be expected because mode of friction turns into rolling friction by huge amounts of equigranular and spherical grains. This may be alternative explanations for dynamic

  6. Fusion by earthquake fault friction: Stick or slip?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialko, Yuri; Khazan, Yakov

    2005-12-01

    Field observations of pseudotachylites and experimental studies of high-speed friction indicate that melting on a slipping interface may significantly affect the magnitude of shear stresses resisting slip. We investigate the effects of rock melting on the dynamic friction using theoretical models of shear heating that couple heat transfer, thermodynamics of phase transitions, and fluid mechanics. Results of laboratory experiments conducted at high (order of m/s) slip velocities but low (order of MPa) normal stresses suggest that the onset of frictional melting may give rise to substantial increases in the effective fault strength, presumably due to viscous effects. However, extrapolation of the modeling results to in situ conditions suggests that the efficiency of viscous braking is significantly reduced under high normal and shear stresses. When transient increases in the dynamic fault strength due to fusion are not sufficient to inhibit slip, decreases in the effective melt viscosity due to shear heating and melting of clasts drastically decrease the dynamic friction, resulting in a nearly complete stress drop ("thermal runaway"). The amount of energy dissipation associated with the formation of pseudotachylites is governed by the temperature dependence of melt viscosity and the average clast size in the fault gouge prior to melting. Clasts from a coarse-grained gouge have lower chances of survival in a pseudotachylite due to a higher likelihood of nonequilibrium overheating. The maximum temperature and energy dissipation attainable on the fault surface are ultimately limited by either the rock solidus (via viscous braking, and slip arrest) or liquidus (via thermal runaway and vanishing resistance to sliding). Our modeling results indicate that the thermally activated fault strengthening and rupture arrest are unlikely to occur in most mafic protoliths but might be relevant for quartz-rich rocks, especially at shallow (<5-7 km) depths where the driving shear

  7. Distribution of Slip at the Northern Sumatran Fault System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Genrich, J. F.; Bock, Y.; McCaffrey, R.; Prawirodirdjo, L.; Stevens, C. W.; Puntodewo, S. S. O.; Subarya, C.; Wdowinski, S.

    2000-01-01

    We model spatial variations in horizontal displacements of 117 geodetic sites measured during annual surveys in 1989-1996 with the Global Positioning System (GPS) as elastic strain across a locked strike-slip fault to infer the contemporary slip rate, locking depth, and location of the Sumatran fault (SF) in northern Sumatra (1 S-3 N). GPS-derived slip rate estimates increase slightly northward from 23 plus or minus 3 mm/yr at 0.8 deg S to 26 plus or minus 2mm/yr at 2.7 N. They agree with geologic estimates north of the Equator, but at 0.5 S they are about 10 mm/yr higher. Strain appears to be distributed asymmetrically about the fault. South of 2 N, about 5 mm/yr of shear is required within the offshore forearc, west of the fault, to achieve a closer agreement of fault locations inferred from GPS velocities with geologically identified traces of the SF. Locking depth estimates are on the order of 10-20 km. The western branch of the major fault bifurcation near 1 N slips at a rate five times higher than the eastern branch. The two main strands of the fault at the northwestern tip of Sumatra (5.5 N) appear to be nearly free of horizontal strain; significant slip must occur away from the two strands, probably further east at two other geologically active branches. The Banda Aceh embayment is extruded to the northwest at a rate of 5 plus or minus 2 mm/yr. Within the estimated velocity uncertainties of several mm/yr, fault-normal deformation along the SF is insignificant. Almost strain free, the northern part of the back-arc basin is part of a rigid Sunda shelf, while the northern forearc is subjected to 8 plus or minus 5 x 10 (exp -8)/yr of extension nearly parallel to the arc.

  8. Physicochemical analysis of slip flow phenomena in liquids under nanoscale confinement.

    PubMed

    Babu, Jeetu S; Uday, Swathi; Sekhar, Suneeth; Sathian, Sarith P

    2015-10-01

    Eyring theory employs the statistical mechanical theory of absolute reaction rates to analyse the transport mechanisms in fluids. A physicochemical methodology combining molecular dynamics (MD) and Eyring theory of reaction rates is proposed for investigating the liquid slip on a solid wall in the nanoscale domain. The method involves the determination of activation energy required for the flow process directly from the MD trajectory information and then calculate the important transport properties of the confined fluid from the activation energy. In order to demonstrate the universal applicability of the proposed methodology in nanofluidics, the slip flow behavior of argon, water and ionic liquid confined in various nanostructures has been investigated. The slip length is found to be size dependent in all the cases. The novelty of this method is that the variations in slip length are explained on the basis of molecular interactions and the subsequent changes in the activation energy. PMID:26490250

  9. Coseismic temporal changes of slip direction: the effect of absolute stress on dynamic rupture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guatteri, Mariagiovanna; Spudich, P.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of rupture at low-stress level. We show that one main difference between the dynamics of high- and low-stress events is the amount of coseismic temporal rake rotation occurring at given points on the fault. Curved stations on exposed fault surfaces and earthquake dislocation models derived from ground-motion inversion indicate that the slip direction may change with time at a pointon the fault during dynamic rupture. We use a 3D boundary integral method to model temporal rake variations during dynamic rupture propagation assuming a slip-weakening friction law and isotropic friction. The points at which the slip rotates most are characterized by an initial shear stress direction substantially different from the average stress direction over the fault plane. We show that for a given value of stress drop, the level of initial shear stress (i.e., the fractional stress drop) determines the amount of rotation in slip direction. We infer that seismic events that show evidence of temporal rake rorations are characterized by a low initial shear-stress level with spatially variable direction on the fault (possibly due to changes in fault surface geometry) and an almost complete stress drop. Our models motivate a new interpretation of curved and cross-cutting striations and put new constraints on their analysis. The initial rake is in general collinear with the initial stress at the hypocenter zone, supporting the assumptions made in stress-tensor inversion from first-motion analysis. At other points on the fualt, especially away from the hypocenter, the initial slip rake may not be collinear with the initial shear stress, contradicting a common assumption of structural geology. On the other hand, the later part of slip in our models is systematically more aligned withi the average stress direction than the early slip. Our modeling suggests that the length of the straight part of curved striations is usually an upper bound of the slip

  10. Slip history and dynamic implications of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, C.; Helmberger, D.V.; Wald, D.J.; Ma, K.-F.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the rupture process of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, earthquake using extensive near-source observations, including three-component velocity waveforms at 36 strong motion stations and 119 GPS measurements. A three-plane fault geometry derived from our previous inversion using only static data [Ji et al., 2001] is applied. The slip amplitude, rake angle, rupture initiation time, and risetime function are inverted simultaneously with a recently developed finite fault inverse method that combines a wavelet transform approach with a simulated annealing algorithm [Ji et al., 2002b]. The inversion results are validated by the forward prediction of an independent data set, the teleseismic P and SH ground velocities, with notable agreement. The results show that the total seismic moment release of this earthquake is 2.7 ?? 1020 N m and that most of the slip occured in a triangular-shaped asperity involving two fault segments, which is consistent with our previous static inversion. The rupture front propagates with an average rupture velocity of ???2.0 km s-1, and the average slip duration (risetime) is 7.2 s. Several interesting observations related to the temporal evolution of the Chi-Chi earthquake are also investigated, including (1) the strong effect of the sinuous fault plane of the Chelungpu fault on spatial and temporal variations in slip history, (2) the intersection of fault 1 and fault 2 not being a strong impediment to the rupture propagation, and (3 the observation that the peak slip velocity near the surface is, in general, higher than on the deeper portion of the fault plane, as predicted by dynamic modeling.

  11. The September 27, 2012, ML 4.1, Benevento earthquake: A case of strike-slip faulting in Southern Apennines (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinolfi, Guido Maria; De Matteis, Raffaella; Orefice, Antonella; Festa, Gaetano; Zollo, Aldo; de Nardis, Rita; Lavecchia, Giusy

    2015-10-01

    On September 27, 2012 at 01:08 (UTC) a ML 4.1 earthquake started a seismic sequence approximately 10 km east of the city of Benevento, in Southern Apennines (Italy). During the following four days, about 40 events with ML ranging between 1.3 and 4.1 were detected in the same area, where the seismic hazard is one of the largest of the Italian Peninsula and where several historical and destructive events took place. In order to investigate the seismicity spatio-temporal pattern and to identify the seismogenic source geometry, a detailed analysis was performed integrating data recorded at three different seismic networks. The earthquakes were relocated using the double-difference technique and focal mechanism solutions were obtained by the moment tensor inversion. Also, to better understand the rupture process, seismic source parameters were estimated and apparent source time functions were inverted to retrieve the slip distribution for the largest magnitude event. Our results show the existence in the study area of roughly E-W striking fault plane with a right-lateral strike-slip kinematics, seated at mid-crustal depths (10-20 km), revealing a characteristic seismicity quite different from that typically associated to the outcropping NW-SE-striking active normal faults that are responsible of moderate to large earthquakes in the Southern Apennines axial sector. In this work, we address questions concerning i) the presence in the Benevento area of a mid-crust seismogenic strike-slip fault, previously unrecognized; ii) its link to the regional seismotectonic setting; and iii) the existence of a strike-slip tectonic regime that uniformly extends in the footwall of the Apennines thrust at relevant depth, not only in the Apulian foreland, as demonstrated to date, but also under the mountain chain axial zone.

  12. Maximum slip in earthquake fault zones, apparent stress, and stick-slip friction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, Joe B.

    2003-01-01

    The maximum slip, observed or inferred, for a small patch within the larger fault zone of an earthquake is a remarkably well-constrained function of the seismic moment. A large set of maximum slips, mostly derived from slip models of major earthquakes, indicate that this parameter increases according to the cube root of the seismic moment. Consistent with this finding, neither the average slip rate for the patches of maximum slip nor the apparent stresses of earthquakes show any systematic dependence on seismic moment. Maximum average slip rates are several meters per second independent of moment and, for earthquakes in continental crustal settings, the apparent stress is limited to about 10 MPa. Results from stick-slip friction experiments in the laboratory, combined with information about the state of stress in the crust, can be used to predict, quite closely, the maximum slips and maximum average slip rates within the fault zones of major earthquakes as well as their apparent stresses. These findings suggest that stick-slip friction events observed in the laboratory and earthquakes in continental settings, even with large magnitudes, have similar rupture mechanisms.

  13. Electrostatic precursors to granular slip events

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Troy; Kim, Nam H.; Thyagu, N. Nirmal

    2012-01-01

    It has been known for over a century that electrical signals are produced by material failure, for example during crack formation of crystals and glasses, or stick-slip motion of liquid mercury on glass. We describe here new experiments revealing that slip events in cohesive powders also produce electrical signals, and remarkably these signals can appear significantly in advance of slip events. We have confirmed this effect in two different experimental systems and using two common powdered materials, and in a third experiment we have demonstrated that similar voltage signals are produced by crack-like defects in several powdered materials. PMID:22689956

  14. Dynamical Stability of Slip-stacking Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-04

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  15. Friction of water slipping in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming D.; Shen, Luming; Sheridan, John; Liu, Jefferson Zhe; Chen, Chao; Zheng, Quanshui

    2011-03-01

    Liquid slip is essential in nanofluidic systems, as shrinking channel size leads to a dramatic increase in flow resistance and thus high-energy consumption for driving nonslip flow. Using large-scale nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of water flowing in carbon nanotubes (CNT’s), we show that the relationship between the CNT wall-water interfacial friction stress and slip velocity follows a transition-state-theory-based inverse hyperbolic sine function, which remains universally valid regardless of wetting properties, CNT chiralities, and CNT sizes, and holds for all slip velocities from 0 to 1400 m/s. The finding could benefit the research in desalination and other chemical purification techniques.

  16. Slip mechanisms in complex fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2015-10-28

    The classical no-slip boundary condition of fluid mechanics is not always a valid assumption for the flow of several classes of complex fluids including polymer melts, their blends, polymer solutions, microgels, glasses, suspensions and pastes. In fact, it appears that slip effect in these systems is the rule and not the exemption. The occurrence of slip complicates the analysis of rheological data, although it provides new opportunities to understand their behavior in restricted environments delineating additional molecular mechanisms i.e. entropic restrictions due to limitations in the number of molecular conformations. This article discusses these complexities and provides future research opportunities. PMID:26345121

  17. Dynamical stability of slip-stacking particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-01

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  18. Imaging of early acceleration phase of the 2013-2014 Boso slow slip event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, J.; Kato, A.; Obara, K.; Miura, S.; Kato, T.

    2014-12-01

    Based on GPS and seismic data, we examine the spatiotemporal evolution of a slow slip event (SSE) and associated seismic activity that occurred off the Boso peninsula, central Japan, from December 2013 to January 2014. We use GPS data from 71 stations of the GEONET and 6 stations operated by Earthquake Research Institute of the University of Tokyo and Tohoku University around the Boso peninsula. We apply a modified version of the Network Inversion Filter to the GPS time series at the 77 stations to estimate the spatiotemporal evolution of daily cumulative slip and slip rate on the subducting Philippine Sea plate. In addition, we create an improved earthquake catalog by applying a matched filter technique to continuous seismograms and examine the spatiotemporal relations between slow slip and seismicity. We find that the SSE started in early December 2013. The spatiotemporal evolution of slow slip and seismicity is divided into two distinct phases, an earlier slow phase from early to 30 December 2013 (Phase I) and a subsequent faster phase from 30 December 2013 to 9 January 2014 (Phase II). During Phase I, slip accelerated slowly up to a maximum rate of 1.6 m/yr with potentially accelerating along-strike propagation at speeds on the order of 1 km/day or less and no accompanying seismicity. On the other hand, during Phase II, slip accelerated rapidly up to a maximum rate of 4.5 m/yr and then rapidly decelerated. The slip front propagated along strike at a constant speed of ~10 km/day. During the Phase II, slow slip was accompanied by seismic swarm activity that was highly correlated in space and time with slip rate, suggesting that the swarm activity was triggered by stress loading due to slow slip. Early slow acceleration of slip has not been identified in the past Boso SSEs in 1996, 2002, 2007, and 2011. It is not clear at this point whether the past Boso SSEs started with slow acceleration similarly to the 2013-2014 SSE. The transition from the slow to the

  19. Stress near geometrically complex strike-slip faults - Application to the San Andreas fault at Cajon Pass, southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saucier, Francois; Humphreys, Eugene; Weldon, Ray, II

    1992-01-01

    A model is presented to rationalize the state of stress near a geometrically complex major strike-slip fault. Slip on such a fault creates residual stresses that, with the occurrence of several slip events, can dominate the stress field near the fault. The model is applied to the San Andreas fault near Cajon Pass. The results are consistent with the geological features, seismicity, the existence of left-lateral stress on the Cleghorn fault, and the in situ stress orientation in the scientific well, found to be sinistral when resolved on a plane parallel to the San Andreas fault. It is suggested that the creation of residual stresses caused by slip on a wiggle San Andreas fault is the dominating process there.

  20. Multiparameter investigation of gravitational slip

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Scott F.; Caldwell, Robert R.; Cooray, Asantha; Serra, Paolo; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2009-07-15

    A detailed analysis of gravitational slip, a new post-general relativity cosmological parameter characterizing the degree of departure of the laws of gravitation from general relativity on cosmological scales, is presented. This phenomenological approach assumes that cosmic acceleration is due to new gravitational effects; the amount of spacetime curvature produced per unit mass is changed in such a way that a universe containing only matter and radiation begins to accelerate as if under the influence of a cosmological constant. Changes in the law of gravitation are further manifest in the behavior of the inhomogeneous gravitational field, as reflected in the cosmic microwave background, weak lensing, and evolution of large-scale structure. The new parameter {pi}{sub 0} is naively expected to be of order unity. However, a multiparameter analysis, allowing for variation of all of the standard cosmological parameters, finds that {pi}{sub 0}=0.09{sub -0.59}{sup +0.74}(2{sigma}), where {pi}{sub 0}=0 corresponds to a cosmological constant plus cold dark matter universe under general relativity. Future probes of the cosmic microwave background (Planck) and large-scale structure (Euclid) may improve the limits by a factor of 4.

  1. Dual Megathrust Slip Behaviors of the 2014 Iquique Earthquake Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L.; Huang, H.; Burgmann, R.; Ampuero, J. P.; Strader, A. E.

    2014-12-01

    The transition between seismic rupture and aseismic creep is of central interest to better understand the mechanics of subduction processes. A M 8.2 earthquake occurred on April 1st, 2014 in the Iquique seismic gap of Northern Chile. This event was preceded by a 2-week-long foreshock sequence including a M 6.7 earthquake. Repeating earthquakes are found among the foreshock sequence that migrated towards the mainshock area, suggesting a large scale slow-slip event on the megathrust preceding the mainshock. The variations of the recurrence time of repeating earthquakes highlights the diverse seismic and aseismic slip behaviors on different megathrust segments. The repeaters that were active only before the mainshock recurred more often and were distributed in areas of substantial coseismic slip, while other repeaters occurred both before and after the mainshock in the area complementary to the mainshock rupture. The spatial and temporal distribution of the repeating earthquakes illustrate the essential role of propagating aseismic slip in leading up to the mainshock and aftershock activities. Various finite fault models indicate that the coseismic slip generally occurred down-dip from the foreshock activity and the mainshock hypocenter. Source imaging by teleseismic back-projection indicates an initial down-dip propagation stage followed by a rupture-expansion stage. In the first stage, the finite fault models show slow initiation with low amplitude moment rate at low frequency (< 0.1 Hz), while back-projection shows a steady initiation at high frequency (> 0.5 Hz). This indicates frequency-dependent manifestations of seismic radiation in the low-stress foreshock region. In the second stage, the high-frequency rupture remains within an area of low gravity anomaly, suggesting possible upper-crustal structures that promote high-frequency generation. Back-projection also shows an episode of reverse rupture propagation which suggests a delayed failure of asperities in

  2. Is slow slip in Cascadia tidally modulated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawthorne, J. C.; Rubin, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Several studies have shown that the seismic tremor in episodic tremor and slip is tidally modulated, suggesting a strong sensitivity to the rather small tidal stresses. We address whether the slip is also tidally modulated by examining data from six borehole strainmeters in northwest Washington and southern Vancouver Island. We use the processed data provided by Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), which is resampled to 5-minute intervals. However, we recompute empirical corrections for tides, a long-term linear trend, and barometric pressure in the 50 days surrounding each slow slip event. We then fit sinusoids at the tidal periods to the processed data as proxies for the tidally modulated component of slip, along with a linear trend as a proxy for the net strain in the slow slip. The data are too noisy to allow detection any tidal modulation using only a single event and station. We therefore simultaneously fit data from multiple stations and from three slow slip events since 2007. This assumes that the phase of the tides at the slipping regions detected by all stations is the same and that the phase of the fault response to the tidal stress is constant. Combining the stations and events both reduces the noise at the tidal periods and creates a longer time series, which allows us to separate energy at the different tidal frequencies. We find significant tidal signals at the 12.4 and 25.8-hour periods which differ from zero at the 1.5 to 2-sigma level. Errors are estimated by bootstrapping the slow slip strain and by considering the tidal signal at times before the slow slip event. The 12.4 and 25.8-hour sinusoids have amplitudes of 23 (10-40 at 2-sigma) and 15 (0-30 at 2-sigma) percent of the maximum amplitude that does not allow the slow slip strain signal to change sign, where the mean strain rate is estimated from the linear trends fit to the slow slip data. In terms of slip rate, the sinusoids at each period could then modulate the slip rate 23 and 15 percent

  3. Slip systems in MgSiO3 post-perovskite: implications for D'' anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Lowell; Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn; Kaercher, Pamela; Lee, Kanani K M; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2010-09-24

    Understanding deformation of mineral phases in the lowermost mantle is important for interpreting seismic anisotropy in Earth's interior. Recently, there has been considerable controversy regarding deformation-induced slip in MgSiO(3) post-perovskite. Here, we observe that (001) lattice planes are oriented at high angles to the compression direction immediately after transformation and before deformation. Upon compression from 148 gigapascals (GPa) to 185 GPa, this preferred orientation more than doubles in strength, implying slip on (001) lattice planes. This contrasts with a previous experiment that recorded preferred orientation likely generated during the phase transformation rather than deformation. If we use our results to model deformation and anisotropy development in the D'' region of the lower mantle, shear-wave splitting (characterized by fast horizontally polarized shear waves) is consistent with seismic observations. PMID:20929846

  4. Effect of Shear Slip on Fault Permeability in Shale Reservoir Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece, J. S.; Zoback, M. D.; Kohli, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding flow along faults and fractures in shales is important for better understanding of hydraulic stimulation in unconventional reservoirs. For example, the re-activation of faults and fractures during hydraulic stimulation appears to be an important process contributing to reservoir permeability. In this study, we examine the effect of shear slip on fault permeability in shale reservoir rocks. We perform shear experiments in a triaxial apparatus on two types of samples: 1) a sample sawcut at 30° to the cylindrical axis and 2) a naturally broken sample. Both samples are from 3481 m (11422 ft) depth within the Haynesville reservoir containing 22 wt.% clay. First, we hydrostatically load the samples to a confining pressure of 15 MPa (2176 psi), followed by triaxial loading in which a constant axial displacement rate of 1 μm/s is applied for increments in axial displacement of initially 0.25 mm and later 1 mm. After each shear increment, we perform measurements of fault permeability at a constant mean pore pressure of 2.1 MPa (300 psi) using the steady state Darcy flow method. Boreholes drilled parallel to the cylindrical axis on either side of the shale sample allow pore fluid to access the fault plane. The coefficient of friction increases with shearing from 0.53 to 0.61 for the sawcut sample and from about 0.60 to 0.74 for the naturally broken sample. The sawcut sample indicates stable sliding behavior whereas small stick-slip events occur in the naturally broken sample. Upon shearing, fault permeability decreases by about 2.5 and 1.5 orders of magnitude within the first mm of shear displacement for the sawcut and naturally broken sample, respectively. Fault permeability of both samples continues to slowly decrease up to a maximum axial displacement of 4 mm and 2 mm, respectively. Laser scanning images before and after shearing show the formation of small striations in the direction of slip for the sawcut sample and the break-off of several grain

  5. Experimental study on propagation of fault slip along a simulated rock fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Around pre-existing geological faults in the crust, we have often observed off-fault damage zone where there are many fractures with various scales, from ~ mm to ~ m and their density typically increases with proximity to the fault. One of the fracture formation processes is considered to be dynamic shear rupture propagation on the faults, which leads to the occurrence of earthquakes. Here, I have conducted experiments on propagation of fault slip along a pre-cut rock surface to investigate the damaging behavior of rocks with slip propagation. For the experiments, I used a pair of metagabbro blocks from Tamil Nadu, India, of which the contacting surface simulates a fault of 35 cm in length and 1cm width. The experiments were done with the similar uniaxial loading configuration to Rosakis et al. (2007). Axial load σ is applied to the fault plane with an angle 60° to the loading direction. When σ is 5kN, normal and shear stresses on the fault are 1.25MPa and 0.72MPa, respectively. Timing and direction of slip propagation on the fault during the experiments were monitored with several strain gauges arrayed at an interval along the fault. The gauge data were digitally recorded with a 1MHz sampling rate and 16bit resolution. When σ is 4.8kN is applied, we observed some fault slip events where a slip nucleates spontaneously in a subsection of the fault and propagates to the whole fault. However, the propagation speed is about 1.2km/s, much lower than the S-wave velocity of the rock. This indicates that the slip events were not earthquake-like dynamic rupture ones. More efforts are needed to reproduce earthquake-like slip events in the experiments. This work is supported by the JSPS KAKENHI (26870912).

  6. Variability of fault slip behavior along the San Andreas Fault in the San Juan Bautista Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Bürgmann, Roland; Nadeau, Robert M.; Dreger, Douglas S.

    2014-12-01

    An improved understanding of the time history of fault slip at depth is an essential step toward understanding the underlying mechanics of the faulting process. Using a waveform cross-correlation approach, we document spatially and temporally varying fault slip along the northernmost creeping section of the San Andreas Fault near San Juan Bautista (SJB), California, by systematically examining spatiotemporal behaviors of characteristically repeating earthquakes (CREs). The spatial distribution of pre-1998 SJB earthquake (1984-1998) fault slip rate inferred from the CREs reveals a ~15 km long low creep or partially locked section located near the 1998 Mw 5.1 SJB earthquake rupture. A finite-fault slip inversion reveals that the rupture of the 1998 SJB earthquake is characterized by the failure of a compact ~4 km2 asperity with a maximum slip of about 90 cm and corresponding peak stress drop of up to 50 MPa, whereas the mean stress drop is about 15 MPa. Following the 1998 earthquake, the CRE activity was significantly increased in a 5-10 km deep zone extending 2-7 km northwest of the main shock, which indicates triggering of substantial aseismic slip. The postseismic slip inferred from the CRE activity primarily propagated to the northwest and released a maximum slip of 9 cm. In this 5-10 km depth range, the estimated postseismic moment release is 8.6 × 1016 N m, which is equivalent to Mw 5.22. The aseismic slip distribution following the 1998 earthquake is not consistent with coseismic stress-driven afterslip but represents a triggered, long-lasting slow earthquake.

  7. Slip maxima at fault junctions and rupturing of barriers during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shen, Z.-K.; Sun, Jielun; Zhang, P.; Wan, Y.; Wang, M.; Burgmann, R.; Zeng, Y.; Gan, Weijun; Liao, H.; Wang, Q.

    2009-01-01

    The disastrous 12 May 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China took the local population as well as scientists by surprise. Although the Longmen Shan fault zonewhich includes the fault segments along which this earthquake nucleatedwas well known, geologic and geodetic data indicate relatively low (<3 mm yr -1) deformation rates. Here we invert Global Positioning System and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar data to infer fault geometry and slip distribution associated with the earthquake. Our analysis shows that the geometry of the fault changes along its length: in the southwest, the fault plane dips moderately to the northwest but becomes nearly vertical in the northeast. Associated with this is a change in the motion along the fault from predominantly thrusting to strike-slip. Peak slip along the fault occurs at the intersections of fault segments located near the towns of Yingxiu, Beichuan and Nanba, where fatalities and damage were concentrated. We suggest that these locations represent barriers that failed in a single event, enabling the rupture to cascade through several fault segments and cause a major moment magnitude (Mw) 7.9 earthquake. Using coseismic slip distribution and geodetic and geological slip rates, we estimate that the failure of barriers and rupture along multiple segments takes place approximately once in 4,000 years. ?? 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  8. Fourier plane imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dominguez, Daniel Peralta, Luis Grave de; Alharbi, Nouf; Alhusain, Mdhaoui; Bernussi, Ayrton A.

    2014-09-14

    We show how the image of an unresolved photonic crystal can be reconstructed using a single Fourier plane (FP) image obtained with a second camera that was added to a traditional compound microscope. We discuss how Fourier plane imaging microscopy is an application of a remarkable property of the obtained FP images: they contain more information about the photonic crystals than the images recorded by the camera commonly placed at the real plane of the microscope. We argue that the experimental results support the hypothesis that surface waves, contributing to enhanced resolution abilities, were optically excited in the studied photonic crystals.

  9. Changes of static stress and aftershocks distribution for the strike-slip earthquakes in the West Pilippine Sea Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Lin, J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last few decades, several strike-slip type earthquakes have been observed within the West Philippine Sea Plate (WPSP), to the east of the Gagua Ridge area. Nearly all of these earthquakes possessed a similar focal mechanism pattern with one fault plane sub-parallel to approximately N35°E. Based on bathymetric and magnetic anomaly data, several obvious NE-SW ancient fracture zones have been identified in the WPSP and considered to be the main rupture plane of these strike-slip earthquakes. However, the aftershocks distributions of these strike-slip earthquakes show NW-SE trending pattern, which is almost in orthogonal with the fracture zones orientation. Thus, the real rupture plane of these events is still undetermined. Otherwise, many researches have provided evidence that stress increase promotes seismicity: the increase of static Coulomb stress is generally correlated to the high occurrence of aftershocks. In our study, we chose three large earthquakes occurred in the WPSP to analyze the relationship between static Coulomb stress changes and seismicity rate changes, in the aim of determining an appropriate rupture plane for these strike-slip events. In our analysis, two fault planes have been used to estimate the static Coulomb stress change. Then, we compared the aftershocks distribution with the Coulomb stress distribution pattern. Our results shows that when the fault plane is trending NW-SE direction, the aftershocks occurred in the region with positive Coulomb stress changes, while the seismicity was decreased in the region of negative Coulomb stress changes. Otherwise, the other fault plane could not at all explain the observed aftershocks distribution. Consequently, the NW-SE fault plane is the preferred rupture plane for the strike-slip events occurred in the WPSP. The 11 April 2012, Mw 8.6 and Mw 8.2 earthquakes occurred off the west coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia, are also strike-slip fault events within the Indo-Australia plate. These

  10. Constraining fault friction by re-examining earthquake nodal plane dips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Timothy A.; Copley, Alex

    2014-02-01

    We have assembled a catalogue of well-constrained focal mechanisms for earthquakes that occurred on continental dip-slip faults that have experienced only small displacements during their current phase of activity. Nodal planes for both reverse- and normal-faulting events are seen to vary between ˜30° and ˜60°, and are concentrated towards the centre of this range. The observed distributions suggest the reactivation of structures with a low coefficient of friction (less than ˜0.3, and possibly as low as ≤0.1). We propose that this low coefficient of friction corresponds to the presence of weak materials in pre-existing fault zones.

  11. Action slips during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Ishimatsu, Kazuma; Meland, Anders; Hansen, Tor Are S; Kåsin, Jan Ivar; Wagstaff, Anthony S

    2016-07-01

    Helicopter aircrew members engage in highly demanding cognitive tasks in an environment subject to whole-body vibration (WBV). Sometimes their actions may not be according to plan (e.g. action slips and lapses). This study used a Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) to examine whether action slips were more frequent during exposure to WBV. Nineteen participants performed the SART in two blocks. In the WBV block participants were exposed to 17 Hz vertical WBV, which is typical of larger helicopter working environments. In the No-WBV block there was no WBV. There were more responses to the rare no-go digit 3 (i.e. action slips) in the WBV block, and participants responded faster in the WBV block. These results suggest that WBV influences response inhibition, and can induce impulsive responding. WBV may increase the likelihood of action slips, mainly due to failure of response inhibition. PMID:26611989

  12. Slip-mediated dewetting of polymer microdroplets.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Joshua D; Chan, Tak Shing; Maurer, Simon; Salez, Thomas; Benzaquen, Michael; Raphaël, Elie; Brinkmann, Martin; Jacobs, Karin

    2016-02-01

    Classical hydrodynamic models predict that infinite work is required to move a three-phase contact line, defined here as the line where a liquid/vapor interface intersects a solid surface. Assuming a slip boundary condition, in which the liquid slides against the solid, such an unphysical prediction is avoided. In this article, we present the results of experiments in which a contact line moves and where slip is a dominating and controllable factor. Spherical cap-shaped polystyrene microdroplets, with nonequilibrium contact angle, are placed on solid self-assembled monolayer coatings from which they dewet. The relaxation is monitored using in situ atomic force microscopy. We find that slip has a strong influence on the droplet evolutions, both on the transient nonspherical shapes and contact line dynamics. The observations are in agreement with scaling analysis and boundary element numerical integration of the governing Stokes equations, including a Navier slip boundary condition. PMID:26787903

  13. Bone scintigraphy in slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gelfand, M.J.; Strife, J.L.; Graham, E.J.; Crawford, A.H.

    1983-12-01

    Tc-/sub 99m/ diphosphonate bone scans were performed on 11 children with slipped capital femoral epiphysis. On pinhole hip images, seven hips in seven patients had increased radionuclide uptake in the physis and adjacent proximal femoral metaphysis where the slip had occurred. Three hips in three patients had decreased radionuclide uptake in the femoral head on the side of the slipped epiphysis, indicating compromise of the femoral head blood supply. Three or more months following internal fixation, three children had scintigraphy that showed loss of the usual focal uptake in the physis and adjacent proximal femoral metaphysis. Bone scintigraphy in pediatric patients with slipped capital femoral epiphysis is valuable in defining the metabolic status of the femoral head. Absence of radiopharmaceutical uptake in the affected femoral head indicates that the femoral head is at risk for development of radiographic changes associated with aseptic necrosis.

  14. Slip boundary conditions over curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lin; Chen, Shiyi; Robbins, Mark O

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the influence of surface curvature on the slip boundary condition for a simple fluid. The slip length is measured for flows in planar and cylindrical geometries with a range of wall-fluid interactions. As wall curvature increases, the slip length decreases dramatically for closely packed surfaces and increases for sparse ones. The magnitude of the changes depends on the crystallographic orientation and differs for flow along and perpendicular to the direction of curvature. These different patterns of behavior are related to the curvature-induced variation in the ratio of the spacing between fluid atoms to the spacing between minima in the potential from the solid surface. The results are consistent with a microscopic theory for the viscous friction between fluid and wall that expresses the slip length in terms of the lateral response of the fluid to the wall potential and the characteristic decay time of this response. PMID:26871153

  15. Slip boundary conditions over curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lin; Chen, Shiyi; Robbins, Mark O.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the influence of surface curvature on the slip boundary condition for a simple fluid. The slip length is measured for flows in planar and cylindrical geometries with a range of wall-fluid interactions. As wall curvature increases, the slip length decreases dramatically for closely packed surfaces and increases for sparse ones. The magnitude of the changes depends on the crystallographic orientation and differs for flow along and perpendicular to the direction of curvature. These different patterns of behavior are related to the curvature-induced variation in the ratio of the spacing between fluid atoms to the spacing between minima in the potential from the solid surface. The results are consistent with a microscopic theory for the viscous friction between fluid and wall that expresses the slip length in terms of the lateral response of the fluid to the wall potential and the characteristic decay time of this response.

  16. Dual megathrust slip behaviors of the 2014 Iquique earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Lingsen; Huang, Hui; Bürgmann, Roland; Ampuero, Jean Paul; Strader, Anne

    2015-02-01

    The transition between seismic rupture and aseismic creep is of central interest to better understand the mechanics of subduction processes. A Mw 8.2 earthquake occurred on April 1st, 2014 in the Iquique seismic gap of northern Chile. This event was preceded by a long foreshock sequence including a 2-week-long migration of seismicity initiated by a Mw 6.7 earthquake. Repeating earthquakes were found among the foreshock sequence that migrated towards the mainshock hypocenter, suggesting a large-scale slow-slip event on the megathrust preceding the mainshock. The variations of the recurrence times of the repeating earthquakes highlight the diverse seismic and aseismic slip behaviors on different megathrust segments. The repeaters that were active only before the mainshock recurred more often and were distributed in areas of substantial coseismic slip, while repeaters that occurred both before and after the mainshock were in the area complementary to the mainshock rupture. The spatiotemporal distribution of the repeating earthquakes illustrates the essential role of propagating aseismic slip leading up to the mainshock and illuminates the distribution of postseismic afterslip. Various finite fault models indicate that the largest coseismic slip generally occurred down-dip from the foreshock activity and the mainshock hypocenter. Source imaging by teleseismic back-projection indicates an initial down-dip propagation stage followed by a rupture-expansion stage. In the first stage, the finite fault models show an emergent onset of moment rate at low frequency (< 0.1 Hz), while back-projection shows a steady increase of high frequency power (> 0.5 Hz). This indicates frequency-dependent manifestations of seismic radiation in the low-stress foreshock region. In the second stage, the rupture expands in rich bursts along the rim of a semi-elliptical region with episodes of re-ruptures, suggesting delayed failure of asperities. The high-frequency rupture remains within an

  17. Late Quaternary Range-Front Fault Scarps in the Western Sierra El Mayor, Baja California, Mexico: A Geomorphologic Expression of Slip Across an Active Low-Angle Normal Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spelz, R. M.; Fletcher, J.; Owen, L.

    2006-12-01

    The western margin of the Sierra El Mayor (SEM), in northeastern Baja California, is controlled by an active, top-to-the-west, low-angle normal fault named the Canada David detachment (CDD) that accommodates part of the extensional component of shearing between the Pacific and North American plates. The CDD has a length of 60 km and shows a curvilinear trace with two major antiformal and synformal megamullion pairs. Late Quaternary slip has produced a broad array of Quaternary scarps cutting alluvial fans along nearly the entire length of the CDD. Detailed mapping reveals eight regional strath terraces distinguished by surface weathering characteristics, soil profile development and relative elevation. Relative height between terraces increases in domains where the CDD and basin deposits are being uplifted due to either the basinward migration of faulting (e.g., rolling hinge) or flexural uplift in antiformal megamullion domains. Linear diffusion analysis of 46 synthetic fault scarps, with a calculated angle of repose Θo = 28.75°, reveal fault scarp domains exhibiting both multi-modal and unimodal distribution of diffusion ages (kt). Uni-modal domains are typically younger, but there is no systematic variation in scarp age with distance along the CDD. Scarps yielding negative kt ages (i.e. scarps steeper than Θo) are common in the north, near inferred locations of important historic seismic events. Microseismicity drops off significantly adjacent to these very young scarp arrays, which likely reflects a recent post-seismic stress drop. Domains of high seismic risk are identified by high microseismicity and lack of young scarps. Minimum estimates of the diffusivity constant (k) are calculated by coupling scarp diffusion ages and 10Be surface exposure ages of the faulted deposits. In the southernmost SEM a Q6 terrace with a minimum surface exposure age t = 233±6.6 ky (weighted mean of six rock samples) is cut by scarps with an average kt = 11.25±9.31 m2, which

  18. Study of nanocrystals in the dynamic slip zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Kireenkova, S. M.; Morozov, Yu. A.; Smul'skaya, A. I.; Vettegren, V. I.; Kulik, V. B.; Mamalimov, R. I.

    2012-09-01

    Mineral composition is studied and a search to detect nanocrystals is conducted in the surface layers of slickensides formed due to dynamic slip in arkose sandstone. The infrared and Raman spectroscopy show that the slickensided layer is composed of nanocrystals of montmorillonite and anatase measuring ≈15 nm and 3 nm, respectively. The crystalline lattice of the nanocrystals of montmorillonite is stretched by ≈2.5% while the lattice of the nanocrystals of anatase is compressed by ≈0.12%. Deeper than 3 mm below the slickenside surface, the sandstone contains nanocrystals of montmorillonite, beidellite and nontronite, quartz, plagioclase, and anatase. The nanocrystals of anatase have a linear size of ≈8 nm. Their crystalline lattice is compressed by ≈0.03%. It is supposed that montmorillonite in the slickensides was formed due to hydrolytic decomposition of silicates under friction of the fault planes sliding past each other.

  19. Preliminary Holocene History of Fault Slip for the Mojave Section of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, T.; Cowgill, E.; Scharer, K. M.; Gold, R. D.; Westerteiger, R.; Bernardin, T. S.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2012-12-01

    dateable offsets preserved along the MSAF, we used available airborne LiDAR and virtual-reality visualization software Crusta. Crusta is a virtual globe application that supports real-time interactive visualization of large (>60GB) LiDAR digital elevation models and merges the mapping functionality of ArcMap with the terrain visualization capabilities of Google Earth. On a 100km section of the MSAF we found 60 offsets ranging from 20 to 297m, many of which show promise as potential slip-rate sites. We determined offset uncertainties using the slicer tool, which is a recently developed function in Crusta that allows the user to assign a fault plane by dropping nodes along a linear fault trace and interactively moving one fault block relative to the other in any slip direction. This functionality allows the user to incrementally restore fault slip until topographic features on opposite sides of the fault are aligned. This tool has been helpful in identifying, evaluating, and reconstructing possible landform offsets. We plan to continue remote analysis using additional visualization tools such as a fully immersive CAVE environment and we will conduct fieldwork to determine ages of numerous identified offsets to build a more robust dataset for further slip history analysis.

  20. 2. VIEW SOUTH, INCLINE PLANE CAR, INCLINE PLANE TRACK, UPPER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH, INCLINE PLANE CAR, INCLINE PLANE TRACK, UPPER STATION. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  1. A search in strainmeter data for slow slip associated with triggered and ambient tremor near Parkfield, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Emily F.; Gomberg, Joan

    2009-12-01

    We test the hypothesis that, as in subduction zones, slow slip facilitates triggered and ambient tremor in the transform boundary setting of California. Our study builds on the study of Peng et al. (2009) of triggered and ambient tremor near Parkfield, California during time intervals surrounding 31, potentially triggering, M ≥ 7.5 teleseismic earthquakes; waves from 10 of these triggered tremor and 29 occurred in periods of ambient tremor activity. We look for transient slow slip during 3-month windows that include 11 of these triggering and nontriggering teleseisms, using continuous strain data recorded on two borehole Gladwin tensor strainmeters (GTSM) located within the distribution of tremor epicenters. We model the GTSM data assuming only tidal and "drift" signals are present and find no detectable slow slip, either ongoing when the teleseismic waves passed or triggered by them. We infer a conservative detection threshold of about 5 nanostrain for abrupt changes and about twice this for slowly evolving signals. This could be lowered slightly by adding analyses of other data types, modeled slow slip signals, and GTSM data calibration. Detection of slow slip also depends on the slipping fault's location and size, which we describe in terms of equivalent earthquake moment magnitude, M. In the best case of the GTSM above a very shallow slipping fault, detectable slip events must exceed M˜2, and if the slow slip is beneath the seismogenic zone (below ˜15 km depth), even M˜5 events are likely to remain hidden.

  2. A search in strainmeter data for slow slip associated with triggered and ambient tremor near Parkfield, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, E.F.; Gomberg, J.

    2009-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that, as in subduction zones, slow slip facilitates triggered and ambient tremor in the transform boundary setting of California. Our study builds on the study of Peng et al. (2009) of triggered and ambient tremor near Parkfield, California during time intervals surrounding 31, potentially triggering, M ≥ 7.5 teleseismic earthquakes; waves from 10 of these triggered tremor and 29 occurred in periods of ambient tremor activity. We look for transient slow slip during 3-month windows that include 11 of these triggering and nontriggering teleseisms, using continuous strain data recorded on two borehole Gladwin tensor strainmeters (GTSM) located within the distribution of tremor epicenters. We model the GTSM data assuming only tidal and “drift” signals are present and find no detectable slow slip, either ongoing when the teleseismic waves passed or triggered by them. We infer a conservative detection threshold of about 5 nanostrain for abrupt changes and about twice this for slowly evolving signals. This could be lowered slightly by adding analyses of other data types, modeled slow slip signals, and GTSM data calibration. Detection of slow slip also depends on the slipping fault's location and size, which we describe in terms of equivalent earthquake moment magnitude, M. In the best case of the GTSM above a very shallow slipping fault, detectable slip events must exceed M~2, and if the slow slip is beneath the seismogenic zone (below ~15 km depth), even M~5 events are likely to remain hidden.

  3. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul A; Knuth, Matthew W; Kaproth, Bryan M; Carpenter, Brett; Guyer, Robert A; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves; Daub, Eric G; Marone, Chris

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  4. Slip-Related Changes in Plantar Pressure Distribution, and Parameters for Early Detection of Slip Events

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seungyoung; Cho, Hyungpil; Kang, Boram; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Mi Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate differences in plantar pressure distribution between a normal gait and unpredictable slip events to predict the initiation of the slipping process. Methods Eleven male participants were enrolled. Subjects walked onto a wooden tile, and two layers of oily vinyl sheet were placed on the expected spot of the 4th step to induce a slip. An insole pressure-measuring system was used to monitor plantar pressure distribution. This system measured plantar pressure in four regions (the toes, metatarsal head, arch, and heel) for three events: the step during normal gait; the recovered step, when the subject recovered from a slip; and the uncorrected, harmful slipped step. Four variables were analyzed: peak pressure (PP), contact time (CT), the pressure-time integral (PTI), and the instant of peak pressure (IPP). Results The plantar pressure pattern in the heel was unique, as compared with other parts of the sole. In the heel, PP, CT, and PTI values were high in slipped and recovered steps compared with normal steps. The IPP differed markedly among the three steps. The IPPs in the heel for the three events were, in descending order (from latest to earliest), slipped, recovered, and normal steps, whereas in the other regions the order was normal, recovered, and slipped steps. Finally, the metatarsal head-to-heel IPP ratios for the normal, recovered, and slipped steps were 6.1±2.9, 3.1±3.0, and 2.2±2.5, respectively. Conclusion A distinctive plantar pressure pattern in the heel might be useful for early detection of a slip event to prevent slip-related injuries. PMID:26798603

  5. Depth segmentation of fault slip: deep rupture in the 2011 Van Earthquake leaves shallow hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J. R.; Copley, A.; Holley, R.; Scharer, K.; Parsons, B.

    2013-12-01

    We use InSAR, body-wave seismology, satellite imagery and field observations to constrain the fault parameters of the Mw 7.1 2011 Van (Eastern Turkey) reverse-slip earthquake, in the Turkish-Iranian Plateau. Distributed slip models from elastic dislocation modelling of the InSAR surface displacements from ENVISAT and COSMO-SkyMed interferograms indicate up to 9 m of reverse and oblique slip on a pair of en echelon NW 40-54 degree dipping fault planes which have surface extensions projecting to just 10 km north of the city of Van. The slip remained buried and is relatively deep, with a centroid depth of 14 km, and the rupture reaching only within 8--9 km of the surface, consistent with the lack of significant ground rupture. The up-dip extension of this modelled WSW-striking fault plane coincides with field observations of weak ground deformation seen on the western of the two fault segments, and has a dip consistent with that seen at the surface in fault gouge exposed in Quaternary sediments. No significant coseismic slip is found in the upper 8 km of the crust above the main slip patches, except for a small region on the eastern segment potentially resulting from the Mw 5.9 aftershock the same day. We perform extensive resolution tests on the data to confirm the robustness of the observed slip deficit in the shallow crust. We resolve a steep gradient in displacement at the point where the planes of the two fault segments ends are inferred to abut at depth, possibly exerting some structural control on rupture extent. This leaves an unruptured up-dip fault width of 8-11. Given that the surface trace of the fault is clearly visible in the geomorphology of the mountain range to the north of Van, and that fault gouge was found in Quaternary sediments at the surface, it is very likely that the upper portion of the crust is seismogenic. A rupture along a similar fault length of 30 km across the remaining unruptured fault width of 10 km, with a similar average slip of 3 m

  6. Slow earthquakes, preseismic velocity changes, and the origin of slow frictional stick-slip.

    PubMed

    Kaproth, Bryan M; Marone, C

    2013-09-13

    Earthquakes normally occur as frictional stick-slip instabilities, resulting in catastrophic failure and seismic rupture. Tectonic faults also fail in slow earthquakes with rupture durations of months or more, yet their origin is poorly understood. Here, we present laboratory observations of repetitive, slow stick-slip in serpentinite fault zones and mechanical evidence for their origin. We document a transition from unstable to stable frictional behavior with increasing slip velocity, providing a mechanism to limit the speed of slow earthquakes. We also document reduction of P-wave speed within the active shear zone before stick-slip events. If similar mechanisms operate in nature, our results suggest that higher-resolution studies of elastic properties in tectonic fault zones may aid in the search for reliable earthquake precursors. PMID:23950495

  7. Simultaneous realization of high catalytic activity and stability for catalytic cracking of n-heptane on highly exposed (010) crystal planes of nanosheet ZSM-5 zeolite.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xia; Zhang, Yaoyuan; Jiang, Guiyuan; Liu, Jia; Han, Shanlei; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Ruipu; Li, Cong; Xu, Chunming; Duan, Aijun; Wang, Yajun; Liu, Jian; Wei, Yuechang

    2016-08-01

    Nanosheet ZSM-5 zeolite with highly exposed (010) crystal planes demonstrates high reactivity and good anti-coking stability for the catalytic cracking of n-heptane, which is attributed to the synergy of high external surface area and acid sites, fully accessible channel intersection acid sites, and hierarchical porosity caused by the unique morphology. PMID:27458616

  8. Kids' Slips: What Young Children's Slips of the Tongue Reveal about Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Jeri J.

    2005-01-01

    The study of speech errors, or "slips of the tongue," is a time-honored methodology which serves as a window to the representation and processing of language and has proven to be the most reliable source of data for building theories of speech production planning. However, until "Kids' Slips," there has never been a corpus of such errors from…

  9. Spectrum of slip behaviour in Tohoku fault zone samples at plate tectonic slip rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Ujiie, Kohtaro; Kopf, Achim J.

    2015-11-01

    During the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake, extremely extensive coseismic slip ruptured shallow parts of the Japan Trench subduction zone and breached the sea floor. This part of the subduction zone also hosts slow slip events (SSE). The fault thus seems to have a propensity for slip instability or quasi-instability that is unexpected on the shallow portions of important fault zones. Here we use laboratory experiments to slowly shear samples of rock recovered from the Tohoku-oki earthquake fault zone as part of the Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project. We find that infrequent perturbations in rock strength appear spontaneously as long-term SSE when the samples are sheared at a constant rate of about 8.5 cm yr-1, equivalent to the plate-convergence rate. The shear strength of the rock drops by 3 to 6%, or 50 kPa to 120 kPa, over about 2 to 4 h. Slip during these events reaches peak velocities of up to 25 cm yr-1, similar to SSE observed in several circum-Pacific subduction zones. Furthermore, the sheared samples exhibit the full spectrum of fault-slip behaviours, from fast unstable slip to slow steady creep, which can explain the wide range of slip styles observed in the Japan Trench. We suggest that the occurrence of SSE at shallow depths may help identify fault segments that are frictionally unstable and susceptible to large coseismic slip propagation.

  10. Slip band propagation and slip vector transition in B2 FeAl single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, K.; Hanada, S.; Yoo, M.H.

    1998-10-09

    At the peak temperature, 823 K, of the yield strength anomaly of B2 FeAl, slip band propagation and slip vector transition were investigated using Fe-39 mol% Al single crystals. The single crystal oriented along a compression axis close to the [{bar 1}23] direction showed serrated flow during work-hardening at small strains (< 2%). Coarse slip bands propagate in the single crystal specimens, like Lueders band propagation in polycrystals, in the initial strain range. The slip vector was identified by TEM to be parallel to {l_angle}111{r_angle} in the early stage of strain corresponding to yielding. Beyond plastic strains of about 3%, serrations disappeared and significant work-softening occurred. The slip vector responsible for the later stage of deformation was observed to be {l_angle}100{r_angle}. That is, the slip vector changes from {l_angle}111{r_angle} to {l_angle}100{r_angle} as the plastic strain increases. Because the density of {l_angle}111{r_angle} superdislocations is found to be very low after the slip transition, glide decomposition of {l_angle}111{r_angle} superdislocations is believed to be the primary source mechanism for {l_angle}100{r_angle} dislocations. The slip band propagation in B2 single crystals is discussed in comparison with that of other intermetallic single-crystalline materials.

  11. Digital slip frequency generator and method for determining the desired slip frequency

    DOEpatents

    Klein, Frederick F.

    1989-01-01

    The output frequency of an electric power generator is kept constant with variable rotor speed by automatic adjustment of the excitation slip frequency. The invention features a digital slip frequency generator which provides sine and cosine waveforms from a look-up table, which are combined with real and reactive power output of the power generator.

  12. Age-related joint moment characteristics during normal gait and successful reactive-recovery from unexpected slip perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Lockhart, Thurmon E.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of aging on 3D lower extremity joint moments during successful reactive-recovery from unexpected slips. Unexpected slips were induced by having participants walk over a slippery floor surface. Successful reactive-recovery trials from nine young and nine elderly participants were identified and analyzed. Three-dimensional inverse dynamics were implemented to calculate reactive joint moments at the ankle, knee, and hip joints. Peak joint moment magnitude and the speed of peak joint moment generation were used to describe the balance recovery strategies from unexpected slips. Results indicated significantly higher peak joint moments in recovery than in normal walking for both the young and elderly. Meanwhile, during reactive-recovery, the elderly were found to utilize both frontal and sagittal joint moments while the younger adults relied primarily on sagittal joint moment. It was concluded that the ankle and knee joints were critical in controlling sagittal plane motion disturbance, while the hip joint was mainly responsible for stabilizing upper body balance in the frontal plane. This study confirmed age-related differences in joint moment generation during unexpected slips. Additionally, implementing 3D analysis is recommended in future slips and falls research. PMID:19581088

  13. SLIPPING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION TRIGGERING A SOLAR ERUPTION OF A TRIANGLE-SHAPED FLAG FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2014-08-10

    We report the first simultaneous activities of the slipping motion of flare loops and a slipping eruption of a flux rope in 131 Å and 94 Å channels on 2014 February 2. The east hook-like flare ribbon propagated with a slipping motion at a speed of about 50 km s{sup –1}, which lasted about 40 minutes and extended by more than 100 Mm, but the west flare ribbon moved in the opposite direction with a speed of 30 km s{sup –1}. At the later phase of flare activity, there was a well developed ''bi-fan'' system of flare loops. The east footpoints of the flux rope showed an apparent slipping motion along the hook of the ribbon. Simultaneously, the fine structures of the flux rope rose up rapidly at a speed of 130 km s{sup –1}, much faster than that of the whole flux rope. We infer that the east footpoints of the flux rope are successively heated by a slipping magnetic reconnection during the flare, which results in the apparent slippage of the flux rope. The slipping motion delineates a ''triangle-shaped flag surface'' of the flux rope, implying that the topology of a flux rope is more complex than anticipated.

  14. Slip instability development and earthquake nucleation as a dynamical system's fixed-point attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    A fault's transition from slow creep to the propagation of an earthquake-generating dynamic rupture is thought to start as a quasi-static slip instability. Here we examine how such an instability develops on a sliding interface whose strength is governed by a slip rate- and state-dependent friction, where the state variable evolves according to the aging law. We find that the development occurs as the attraction of a dynamical system to a fixed point. The fixed points are such that the state of slip and the rate at which velocity diverges (and its spatial distribution) are known. The fixed points are independent of the manner of external forcing and the values of slip rate and state before the onset of instability. For a fault under uniform normal stress and frictional properties, the sole parameter that determines the fixed point (to within a translational invariance) is the ratio of the frictional parameters, a/b (where, for steady-state rate weakening, 0slip instability may develop in a chaotic fashion. The fixed-point solutions, as well as the critical thresholds concerning their stability, depend on the configuration of slip (e.g., in/anti-plane or mixed-mode slip) and the elastic environment in which the interface is embedded (e.g., a slip surface between elastic half-spaces or one lying below and parallel to a free surface); solving for a fixed point reduces to the solution of an equivalent problem of an equilibrium slip-weakening fracture; and fixed-point stability is determined by linear stability analysis. Solutions of

  15. Influence of slip system hardening assumptions on modeling stress dependence of work hardening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Matthew; Dawson, Paul

    1997-11-01

    Due to the discrete directional nature of processes such as crystallographic slip, the orientation of slip planes relative to a fixed set of loading axes has a direct effect on the magnitude of the external load necessary to induce dislocation motion (yielding). The effect such geometric or textural hardening has on the macroscopic flow stress can be quantified in a polycrystal by the average Taylor factor M¯. Sources of resistance to dislocation motion such as interaction with dislocation structures, precipitates, and grain boundaries, contribute to the elevation of the critically resolved shear strength τcrss. In continuum slip polycrystal formulations, material hardening phenomena are reflected in the slip system hardness equations. Depending on the model, the hardening equations and the mean field assumption can both affect geometric hardening through texture evolution. In this paper, we examine continuum slip models and focus on how the slip system hardening model and the mean field assumption affect the stress-strain response. Texture results are also presented within the context of how the texture affects geometric hardening. We explore the effect of employing slip system hardnesses averaged over different size scales. We first compare a polycrystal simulation employing a single hardness per crystal to one using a latent hardening formulation producing distinct slip system hardnesses. We find little difference between the amplitude of the single hardness and a crystal-average of the latent hardening values. The geometric hardening is different due to the differences in the textures predicted by each model. We also find that due to the high degree of symmetry in an fcc crystal, macroscopic stress-strain predictions using simulations employing crystal- and aggregateaveraged hardnesses are nearly identical. We find this to be true for several different mean field assumptions. An aggregate-averaged hardness may be preferred in light of the difficulty

  16. Permeability and effective slip in confined flows transverse to wall slippage patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avinash; Datta, Subhra; Kalyanasundaram, Dinesh

    2016-08-01

    The pressure-driven Stokes flow through a plane channel with arbitrary wall separation having a continuous pattern of sinusoidally varying slippage of arbitrary wavelength and amplitude on one/both walls is modelled semi-analytically. The patterning direction is transverse to the flow. In the special situations of thin and thick channels, respectively, the predictions of the model are found to be consistent with lubrication theory and results from the literature pertaining to free shear flow. For the same pattern-averaged slip length, the hydraulic permeability relative to a channel with no-slip walls increases as the pattern wave-number, amplitude, and channel size are decreased. Unlike discontinuous wall patterns of stick-slip zones studied elsewhere in the literature, the effective slip length of a sinusoidally patterned wall in a confined flow continues to scale with both channel size and the pattern-averaged slip length even in the limit of thin channel size to pattern wavelength ratio. As a consequence, for sufficiently small channel sizes, the permeability of a channel with sinusoidal wall slip patterns will always exceed that of an otherwise similar channel with discontinuous patterns on corresponding walls. For a channel with one no-slip wall and one patterned wall, the permeability relative to that of an unpatterned reference channel of same pattern-averaged slip length exhibits non-monotonic behaviour with channel size, with a minimum appearing at intermediate channel sizes. Approximate closed-form estimates for finding the location and size of this minimum are provided in the limit of large and small pattern wavelengths. For example, if the pattern wavelength is much larger than the channel thickness, exact results from lubrication theory indicate that a worst case permeability penalty relative to the reference channel of ˜23% arises when the average slip of the patterned wall is ˜2.7 times the channel size. The results from the current study should

  17. An aseismic slip transient on the North Anatolian Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, Baptiste; Jolivet, Romain; Simons, Mark; Lasserre, Cécile; Riel, Bryan; Milillo, Pietro; ćakir, Ziyadin; Renard, François

    2016-04-01

    Constellations of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) satellites with short repeat time acquisitions allow exploration of active faults behavior with unprecedented temporal resolution. Along the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) in Turkey, an 80 km long section has been creeping at least since the 1944, Mw 7.3 earthquake near Ismetpasa, with a current Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)-derived average creep rate of 8 ± 3 mm/yr (i.e., a third of the NAF long-term slip rate). We use a dense set of SAR images acquired by the COSMO-SkyMed constellation to quantify the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of creep over 1 year. We identify a major burst of aseismic slip spanning 31 days with a maximum slip of 2 cm, between the surface and 4 km depth. This result shows that fault creep along this section of the NAF does not occur at a steady rate as previously thought, highlighting a need to revise our understanding of the underlying fault mechanics.

  18. Is frictional healing slip-dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Rubin, A. M.; Ryan, K. L.; Riviere, J. V.; Marone, C.

    2015-12-01

    Frictional re-strengthening of bare rock surfaces at very low stresses and near zero slip rate, as observed in the laboratory, is traditionally interpreted as showing support for purely time-dependent healing as embodied in the Aging law. However, while slide-hold-slide experiments on bare surfaces do show an apparent (purely) time-dependent increase in the static friction upon reslide, we show that the stress minima attained during the preceding holds show a strong slip-dependence which contradict the Aging law. A velocity strengthening Slip law explains such data much better. We also show that, large velocity step decreases, which drive the system far below steady state just like long holds, clearly support the slip-dependent response of the Slip law over the time-dependent healing contained in the Aging law. But, while time-dependent healing has an intuitive physical picture in terms of growth of the 'real contact area' with time, it is more difficult to ascribe one to slip-dependent healing. Here, we explore the possibility that the slip-dependence arises out of an interplay between contact `quality' and `quantity' at the scale of the asperity contacts. First, to further study the slip-dependence of healing, we carry out large velocity step decreases and sequences of long slide-hold-slides on both bare rock and gouge. Secondly, to probe the micro-mechanical origins of healing, we complement our mechanical data with amplitudes and travel time data of ultrasonic P- and S- waves transmitted across the sliding interface. While ultrasonic P-wave transmissivity has been used as a proxy for 'real contact area' in friction experiments by Nagata et al. (2012, 2014) before, the simultaneous use of P- and S-phases in our experiments is designed specifically to probe contact rheology. Initial results show strong correlations between changes in friction, transmitted wave amplitudes and travel times in response to changes in slip rate. We also observe important differences

  19. Fault zone roughness controls slip stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbord, Christopher; Nielsen, Stefan; De Paola, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Fault roughness is an important control factor in the mechanical behaviour of fault zones, in particular the frictional slip stability and subsequent earthquake nucleation. Despite this, there is little experimental quantification as to the effects of varying roughness upon rate- and state-dependant friction (RSF). Utilising a triaxial deformation apparatus and a novel adaptation of the direct shear methodology to simulate initially bare faults in Westerly Granite, we performed a series of velocity step frictional sliding experiments. Initial root mean square roughnesses (Sq) was varied in the range 6x10‑7 ‑ 2.4x10‑5 m. We also investigated the effects upon slip stability of normal stress variation in the range σn = 30 ‑ 200 MPa, and slip velocity between 0.1 ‑ 10 μm s‑1. A transition from stable sliding to unstable slip (manifested by stick-slip and slow slip events) was observed, depending on the parameter combination, thus covering the full spectrum of fault slip behaviours. At low normal stress (σn = 30MPa) smooth faults (Sq< 1x10‑6 m) are conditional unstable (stress drops on slow slip events upon velocity increase), with strongly velocity weakening friction. When normal stress is increased to intermediate values (σn = 100 ‑ 150 MPa), smooth faults (Sq< 1x10‑6 m) are fully unstable and generate seismic stick-slip behaviour. However at higher normal stress (σn = 200 MPa) a transition from unstable to stable sliding is observed for smooth faults, which is not expected using RSF stability criteria. At all conditions sliding is stable for rough faults (Sq> 1x10‑6 m). We find that instability can develop when the ratio of fault to critical stiffness kf kc > 10, or, alternatively, even when a ‑ b > 0 at σn = 150MPa, suggesting that bare surfaces may not strictly obey the R+S stability condition. Additionally we present white light interferometry and SEM analysis of experimentally deformed samples which provide information about the

  20. Creep versus Earthquake Slip: New insights from rock magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Y.-M.; Aubourg, C.; Song, S.-R.; Lee, T.-Q.; Song, Y.-F.

    2012-04-01

    Pseudotachylyte is generally believed as the best evidence of high-friction heating during earthquake. However, in clay-rich derived gouge, the temperature elevation is limited to large-scale endothermic dehydration reaction (Brantut et al., 2011). In such a context where melting is likely, it has been suggested that the characterization of neoformed mineral may be a diagnostic clue to distinguish between creep process and earthquake slip zone. Here we show evidence of neoformed magnetic mineral in the active Chelungpu fault gouge that hosts the Chi-Chi slip zone (Taiwan, Mw 7.6, 1999). Thanks to boreholes of Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Program and the recovery of fresh gouge, we get new evidence of neoformed magnetic minerals. Both rock magnetic investigation and transmission X-ray microscope image show the occurrence of neoformed 5 µm goethite (α-FeOOH) within the Chi-Chi 16 cm thick gouge. Goethite forms post-seismically from the cooling of >350°C fluids. In addition to goethite, we detect occurrence of neoformed pyrrhotite (Fe7S8). The pyrrhotite forms at the expense of pyrite, in response to elevation of temperature >500°C. Within the mm-thick Chi-Chi principal slip zone, we do not detect evidence of goethite, nor pyrrhotite. Instead, we detect magnetite (Fe3O4). We suggest that a part of magnetite formed during friction-induced temperature elevation. We propose a simple model of evolution between goethite and magnetite within the entire gouge. If confirmed elsewhere, the recognition of the assemblage of iron oxide (magnetite), iron hydroxide (goethite) and iron sulfide (pyrrhotite) is possibly a diagnostic evidence of earthquake slip rather than creep process.

  1. SNAP focal plane

    SciTech Connect

    Lampton, Michael L.; Kim, A.; Akerlof, C.W.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Berkovitz, J.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Carithers Jr., W.C.; Commins, E.D.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.E.; DiGennaro,R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.S.; Eriksson, M.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J.-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Harris, S.E.; Harvey, P.R.; Heetderks, H.D.; Holland, S.E.; Huterer, D.; Karcher, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Levi, M.E.; Levin, D.S.; Linder,E.V.; Loken, S.C.; Malina, R.; Massey, R.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.P.; Miquel, R.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Pratt, R.; Prieto, E.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Robinson, K.; Roe, N.; Sholl, M.; Schubnell, M.; Smadja, G.; Smoot, G.; Spadafora, A.; Tarle, G.; Tomasch,A.; von der Lippe, H.; Vincent, R.; Walder, J.-P.; Wang, G.

    2002-07-29

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square-degree field sensitive in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. We describe the requirements for the instrument suite and the evolution of the focal plane design to the present concept in which all the instrumentation--visible and near-infrared imagers, spectrograph, and star guiders--share one common focal plane.

  2. Quantifying slip balance in the earthquake cycle: Coseismic slip model constrained by interseismic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lifeng; Hainzl, Sebastian; Mai, P. Martin

    2015-12-01

    The long-term slip on faults has to follow, on average, the plate motion, while slip deficit is accumulated over shorter timescales (e.g., between the large earthquakes). Accumulated slip deficits eventually have to be released by earthquakes and aseismic processes. In this study, we propose a new inversion approach for coseismic slip, taking interseismic slip deficit as prior information. We assume a linear correlation between coseismic slip and interseismic slip deficit and invert for the coefficients that link the coseismic displacements to the required strain accumulation time and seismic release level of the earthquake. We apply our approach to the 2011 M9 Tohoku-Oki earthquake and the 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake. Under the assumption that the largest slip almost fully releases the local strain (as indicated by borehole measurements), our results suggest that the strain accumulated along the Tohoku-Oki earthquake segment has been almost fully released during the 2011 M9 rupture. The remaining slip deficit can be attributed to the postseismic processes. Similar conclusions can be drawn for the 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake. We also estimate the required time of strain accumulation for the 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake to be ~25 years (confidence interval of [17, 43] years), consistent with the observed average recurrence time of ~22 years for M6 earthquakes in Parkfield. For the Tohoku-Oki earthquake, we estimate the recurrence time of ~500-700 years. This new inversion approach for evaluating slip balance can be generally applied to any earthquake for which dense geodetic measurements are available.

  3. Slip rate and slip magnitudes of past earthquakes along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault (Mongolia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, Carol S.; Rizza, M.; Ritz, J.F.; Baucher, R.; Vassallo, R.; Mahan, S.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out morphotectonic studies along the left-lateral strike-slip Bogd Fault, the principal structure involved in the Gobi-Altay earthquake of 1957 December 4 (published magnitudes range from 7.8 to 8.3). The Bogd Fault is 260 km long and can be subdivided into five main geometric segments, based on variation in strike direction. West to East these segments are, respectively: the West Ih Bogd (WIB), The North Ih Bogd (NIB), the West Ih Bogd (WIB), the West Baga Bogd (WBB) and the East Baga Bogd (EBB) segments. Morphological analysis of offset streams, ridges and alluvial fans—particularly well preserved in the arid environment of the Gobi region—allows evaluation of late Quaternary slip rates along the different faults segments. In this paper, we measure slip rates over the past 200 ka at four sites distributed across the three western segments of the Bogd Fault. Our results show that the left-lateral slip rate is∼1 mm yr–1 along the WIB and EIB segments and∼0.5 mm yr–1 along the NIB segment. These variations are consistent with the restraining bend geometry of the Bogd Fault. Our study also provides additional estimates of the horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake along the western part of the Bogd rupture, complementing previously published studies. We show that the mean horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake decreases progressively from 5.2 m in the west to 2.0 m in the east, reflecting the progressive change of kinematic style from pure left-lateral strike-slip faulting to left-lateral-reverse faulting. Along the three western segments, we measure cumulative displacements that are multiples of the 1957 coseismic offset, which may be consistent with a characteristic slip. Moreover, using these data, we re-estimate the moment magnitude of the Gobi-Altay earthquake at Mw 7.78–7.95. Combining our slip rate estimates and the slip distribution per event we also determined a mean recurrence interval of∼2500

  4. Slip rate and slip magnitudes of past earthquakes along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault (Mongolia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizza, M.; Ritz, J.-F.; Braucher, R.; Vassallo, R.; Prentice, C.; Mahan, S.; McGill, S.; Chauvet, A.; Marco, S.; Todbileg, M.; Demberel, S.; Bourles, D.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out morphotectonic studies along the left-lateral strike-slip Bogd Fault, the principal structure involved in the Gobi-Altay earthquake of 1957 December 4 (published magnitudes range from 7.8 to 8.3). The Bogd Fault is 260 km long and can be subdivided into five main geometric segments, based on variation in strike direction. West to East these segments are, respectively: the West Ih Bogd (WIB), The North Ih Bogd (NIB), the West Ih Bogd (WIB), the West Baga Bogd (WBB) and the East Baga Bogd (EBB) segments. Morphological analysis of offset streams, ridges and alluvial fans-particularly well preserved in the arid environment of the Gobi region-allows evaluation of late Quaternary slip rates along the different faults segments. In this paper, we measure slip rates over the past 200 ka at four sites distributed across the three western segments of the Bogd Fault. Our results show that the left-lateral slip rate is ~1 mm yr-1 along the WIB and EIB segments and ~0.5 mm yr-1 along the NIB segment. These variations are consistent with the restraining bend geometry of the Bogd Fault. Our study also provides additional estimates of the horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake along the western part of the Bogd rupture, complementing previously published studies. We show that the mean horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake decreases progressively from 5.2 m in the west to 2.0 m in the east, reflecting the progressive change of kinematic style from pure left-lateral strike-slip faulting to left-lateral-reverse faulting. Along the three western segments, we measure cumulative displacements that are multiples of the 1957 coseismic offset, which may be consistent with a characteristic slip. Moreover, using these data, we re-estimate the moment magnitude of the Gobi-Altay earthquake at Mw 7.78-7.95. Combining our slip rate estimates and the slip distribution per event we also determined a mean recurrence interval of ~2500-5200 yr for past

  5. Global strike-slip fault distribution on Enceladus reveals mostly left-lateral faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. S.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    the SPT is devoid of shear: previous work has indicated that the tiger stripes may be undergoing strike-slip motions and the surrounding regions may be experiencing shear. The fracture patterns and geologic activity within the SPT have been previously documented to be the result of stresses induced by both NSR and diurnal tidal deformation. As these same mechanisms are the main controls on strike-slip fault patterns on Europa, the lack of a match between strike-slip patterns on Europa and Enceladus is intriguing. The pattern of strike-slip faults on Enceladus suggests a different combination of stress mechanisms is required to produce the observed distributions. We will present models of global stress mechanisms to consider how the global-scale pattern of strike-slip faults on Enceladus may have been produced. This problem will be investigated further by measuring the angles at which tailcracks have formed on Enceladus. Tailcracks produced by simple shear form at 70.5° to the fault. Any deviation from this angle indicates some ratio of concomitant shear and dilation, which may provide insights into elucidating the stresses controlling strike-slip formation on Enceladus.

  6. Slow Slip, Tremor and the Multi-Scale Mechanics of Heterogeneous Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ampuero, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    A now widespread view of slow slip and tectonic tremor activity involves faults with a highly heterogeneous mechanical behavior, in which tremor sources result from shear failure of a multitude of compact asperities (frictionally unstable regions capable of seismic slip) embedded in creeping fault regions (frictionally stable zones capable of aseismic transient slip). Coarse resolution geodetic observations of slow slip and fine resolution seismological observations of tremor migration patterns provide an opportunity to investigate the mechanical behavior of a complex natural system at multiple scales. I will provide a synthesis of ongoing studies of slow slip and tremor activity through computational modeling and analog experimental approaches within the framework of heterogeneous faults. A similar view of the structure of subduction fault zones has emerged from observations of low and high frequency slip in recent megathrust earthquakes. Simulations of the collective behavior of asperities embedded in creeping faults generate a rich spectrum of migration patterns, some of which are observed in natural faults. The seismicity rate, recurrence time and migration speed of these tremor swarms are mechanically related to the underlying transient slow slip. This provides a physical basis for using tremor activity as a natural creepmeter. This implies that, if aseismic slip transients preceding large earthquakes are large enough at tremor depths, changes of tremor activity patterns may indicate the approach to a large seismic event. Numerical models are developed to assess if this is viable. Tremor activity also responds to periodic loadings induced by tides or surface waves. Our recent models show that this response can be efficiently mediated by transient response of the surrounding creep. Fault regions close to neutral-stability are shown to be very sensitive to periodic loading within a broad range of periods. The sensitive range depends on frictional properties and

  7. Oscillatory electro-osmotic flow through a slit channel with slipping stripes on walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Henry C. W.; Ng, Chiu-On

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical model is presented in this paper for time-oscillating electro-osmotic flow through a plane channel bounded by two parallel plates, which are patterned with periodic stripes of distinct hydrodynamic slippage and wall potential. The flow is driven by oscillatory pressure gradient and electric field of the same frequency in the axial direction. Flows that are longitudinal or transverse to the stripes are investigated. Based on the Debye-Hückel approximation, and assuming Stokes flow, the electric potential and the velocity fields are found by the methods of eigenfunction expansion and point collocation. The phenomenological coefficients of the Onsager relations for the fluid and current fluxes are deduced as functions of the channel height, the area fraction of wall with slippage, the intrinsic slip length, the Debye parameter, the zeta potentials and the oscillation parameter. Considering several kinds of wall patterns, we extend the theoretical limits in the steady-flow regime to the oscillatory-flow regime. For a uniformly charged wall, the effective slip length obtained from the hydrodynamic problem can still be used directly in the electro-osmotic flow as if the wall were uniformly slipping. When the slipping stripes are perfectly slipping but uncharged, the presence of such stripes will always have a decreasing effect on the streaming conductance, unlike the steady case in which it gives no net effect on the flow in the limit of a very thin double layer. Furthermore, we confirm the presence of a threshold frequency, beyond which the flow will diminish significantly. The slipping fraction of the wall will always introduce a phase lag to the response and lower the threshold frequency. Increasing the wall potential in the presence of slippage can appreciably increase the streaming conductance and the phase lag.

  8. Investigation on the key parameters of slip weakening law in dynamic rupture simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Chen, X.

    2008-12-01

    How the crack propagates on the fault plane when an earthquake happens is a fundamental problem in earthquake studies. To understand the dynamics of a spontaneously propagating crack various constitutive laws for friction, e.g., slip weakening, slip rate weakening, effective temperature and rate-and-state laws, which define the relationship between the instantaneous stress and slip (or slip rate) on the fault have been widely used in various rupture simulations. One crucial aspect of the variety of rupture models is to to quantify how the main parameters characterizing a certain law affect the rupture process. We chose the slip weakening law and then massively computed a large suite of dynamic rupture simulations on a rectangular fault embedded in 3-D isotropic homogeneous medium. The simulations included hundreds of different sets of parameters varying Dc, the critical slip weakening distance and Te the initial stress. All are spatially constant except in a rectangular asperity, where the rupture is triggered. With the same parameter set we used several different discretizations to avoid the numerical effects. Computationally we use the boundary integral method. We have also given definitions of rupture status: non-growth rupture, growth rupture, subshear rupture and supershear rupture. With all of the simulations we construct a phase-diagram on which different rupture states locate in different parameter-set zones (phase boundary lines with errors less than 0.1%) We find that (1) In the areas with smaller Dc, phase boundary lines seems to fit the ones Madariaga (1998) predicted using non- dimensionalized parameter κ, but not for the whole phase line. (2) When Dc reaches a particular size, none of the ruptures will propagate regardless of the value of the initial stress on the fault. (3) Some transitional states may occur where a rupture propagates only 2-4 times the initial asperity size and then stops spontaneously.

  9. Nonlinear microscopy pulse optimization at the sample plane using second-harmonic generation from starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Cormack, Iain G.; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we report the use of a starch as a non-linear medium for characterising ultrashort pulses. The starch suspension in water is sandwiched between a slide holder and a cover-slip and placed within the sample plane of the nonlinear microscope. This simple arrangement enables direct measurement of the pulse where they interact with the sample.

  10. Fault Zone Drainage, Heating and Melting During Earthquake Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, A. W.; Rice, J. R.; Jacques, L. M.

    2003-12-01

    soon eliminated (Jacques and Rice, 2002). Then all of the fault-normal stress is supported by pressure in a slurry fluid which, when the normal stress exceeds the least principal stress, can inject into the bordering damage zone. Remaining dissipation in fault slip is dominated by fluid lubrication between the still-solid gouge particles rather than inter-particle friction. The slurry viscosity is thermally activated and reduces dramatically with increasing temperature and decreasing solids fraction. We quantify these effects approximately, and compare our predictions to records of slip behavior as preserved in pseudotachylytes (e.g. Otsuki et al., 2003).

  11. A Novel Algorithm for Cycle Slip Detection and Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezen, U.; Arikan, F.

    2012-04-01

    Accurate and reliable estimation of ionospheric parameters are very important for correct functioning of communication, navigation and positioning satellite systems. In recent years, dual-frequency GPS receivers are widely used for estimation of Total Electron Content (TEC), which is defined as the line integral of the electron density along a ray path. Since both electron density and TEC are functions of solar, geomagnetic, gravitational and seismic activity, any disturbance along the ray path can be detected using GPS receiver observables. It is observed that, with the development of recent sophisticated receivers, disruptions due to the receiver antenna, hardware or outside obstructions are minimized. Most of the observed sudden disturbances are signal phase lock losses due to ionosphere. These sudden phase shifts are named as cycle slips and if not corrected, they may lead to positioning errors or incorrect TEC estimates. There are many methods in the literature that deal with cycle slips and their repairs, yet these methods are not matured to detect all kinds of cycle slips. Most algorithms require double differencing, and/or complicated Kalman Filters, Wavelet transforms, Neural Network models, and integration of external INS systems. In this study, we propose a fast and efficient algorithm for identifying the cycle slips on individual observables, classifying them for future investigations and finally repairing them for more accurate and reliable TEC estimates. The algorithm traces the pseudorange and phase observables and computes the geometry free combinations of L4 and P4. The sudden disturbances on L1, L2, P1, C1 and P2 are classified and noted for further use. Most of the cases, the disruptions are on phase observables, yet for a few occasions, a sudden disturbance is also observed on pseudorange observables. The algorithm, then, checks the epoch section where P4 exists continually. When a disruption on L1 or L2 occurs, it becomes evident on L4. When P4

  12. Foreshocks and Premonitory Slip during Large Scale Friction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Xu, S.; Kawakata, H.; Mizoguchi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Fukuyama et al. (2013, AGU Fall Meeting) reported that using large-scale biaxial apparatus at NIED with a loading rate of 0.1mm/s, many foreshocks were observed and pre-slip was not evident under 2.6MPa normal stress (LB04-003), but pre-slip was always recognized prior to each stick slip and foreshocks were not common under 6.7MPa normal stress (LB04-005). To further investigate these phenomena to understand what controls the foreshock activity, we conducted another series of experiments using similar rock specimens made of gabbro. We conducted a series of ten experiments whose normal stress was 6.7MPa in the first seven experiments and was lowered to 3.4MPa in the rest of three. We could not find any foreshocks in 9 experiments and the only experiments we found foreshocks was the fifth one (LB09-005), which was under 6.7MPa normal stress with loading rate of 0.1mm/s and 0.01mm/s (loading rate was changed at the middle). It seems that foreshock activity does not depend only on the normal stress but is also related to the detailed fault surface condition, which was created by previous slip history. In Fukuyama et al. (2013), initial roughness of the simulated fault surface was #600 while in the present experiment it was #2000. These differences in initial condition might affect the foreshock generation. In the present cases, a most serious experiment with 1mm/s for 400mm slip (LB09-004) was included, which was a previous experiment of LB09-005. We think LB09-004 provided a damage distribution and that could help generate the foreshocks. It should be noted that foreshock hypocenters, estimated from the PZT array, are located on the grooves. And amount of grooves generated during the experiment was the largest for LB09-005. These features suggest the change in surface condition prior to LB09-005, which might facilitate the generation of foreshocks.

  13. Drag force on a sphere moving toward an anisotropic superhydrophobic plane.

    PubMed

    Asmolov, Evgeny S; Belyaev, Aleksey V; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2011-08-01

    We analyze theoretically a high-speed drainage of liquid films squeezed between a hydrophilic sphere and a textured superhydrophobic plane that contains trapped gas bubbles. A superhydrophobic wall is characterized by parameters L (texture characteristic length), b1 and b2 (local slip lengths at solid and gas areas), and φ1 and φ2 (fractions of solid and gas areas). Hydrodynamic properties of the plane are fully expressed in terms of the effective slip-length tensor with eigenvalues that depend on texture parameters and H (local separation). The effect of effective slip is predicted to decrease the force as compared with what is expected for two hydrophilic surfaces and described by the Taylor equation. The presence of additional length scales, L, b1, and b2, implies that a film drainage can be much richer than in the case of a sphere moving toward a hydrophilic plane. For a large (compared to L) gap the reduction of the force is small, and for all textures the force is similar to expected when a sphere is moving toward a smooth hydrophilic plane that is shifted down from the superhydrophobic wall. The value of this shift is equal to the average of the eigenvalues of the slip-length tensor. By analyzing striped superhydrophobic surfaces, we then compute the correction to the Taylor equation for an arbitrary gap. We show that at a thinner gap the force reduction becomes more pronounced, and that it depends strongly on the fraction of the gas area and local slip lengths. For small separations we derive an exact equation, which relates a correction for effective slip to texture parameters. Our analysis provides a framework for interpreting recent force measurements in the presence of a superhydrophobic surface. PMID:21929113

  14. Beamlet focal plane diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.A.; Nielsen, N.D.; Patton, H.G.; Seppala, L.G.; Thompson, C.E.; Wegner, P.J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper describes the major optical and mechanical design features of the Beamlet Focal Plane Diagnostic system as well as measurements of the system performance, and typical data obtained to date. We also discuss the NIF requirements on the focal spot that we are interested in measuring, and some of our plans for future work using this system.

  15. Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, Patrick M.

    2003-01-01

    Lockheed Martin has been an active participant in NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) programs over the past several years. SLI, part of NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan (ISTP), was restructured in November of 2002 to focus the overall theme of safer, more afford-able space transportation along two paths - the Orbital Space Plane Program and the Next Generation Launch Technology programs. The Orbital Space Plane Program has the goal of providing rescue capability from the International Space Station by 2008 and transfer capability for crew (and limited cargo) by 2012. The Next Generation Launch Technology program is combining research and development efforts from the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (2GRLV) program with cutting-edge, advanced space transportation programs (previously designated 3rd Generation) into one program aimed at enabling safe, reliable, cost-effective reusable launch systems by the middle of the next decade. Lockheed Martin is one of three prime contractors working to bring Orbital Space Plane system concepts to a system definition level of maturity by December of 2003. This paper and presentation will update the international community on the progress of the' OSP program, from an industry perspective, and provide insights into Lockheed Martin's role in enabling the vision of a safer, more affordable means of taking people to and from space.

  16. Wall slip of bubbles in foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saugey, A.; Drenckhan, W.; Weaire, D.

    2006-05-01

    We present a computational analysis of the flow of liquid foam along a smooth wall, as encountered in the transport of foams in vessels and pipes. We concentrate on the slip of the bubbles at the wall and present some novel finite element calculations of this motion for the case of fully mobile gas/liquid interfaces. Our two-dimensional simulations provide for the first time the bubble shapes and entire flow field, giving detailed insight into the distribution of stresses and dissipation in the system. In particular, we investigate the relationship between the drag force and the slip velocity of the bubble, which for small slip velocities obeys power laws, as predicted by previous semianalytical treatments.

  17. Fault geometry and slip distribution of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan Earthquake imaged from inversion of GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kaj M.; Hsu, Ya-Ju; Segall, Paul; Yu, Shui-Beih

    GPS measurements of coseismic displacements from the 1999, Chi-Chi, Taiwan earthquake are modeled using elastic dislocation theory. We find that a single fault plane cannot fit the data, but rather a curved fault surface consisting of multiple segments dipping 20-25° best fits the observations. The model fault exhibits reverse and left-lateral slip on a 75 km long N-S trending segment and reverse and right-lateral slip on a 25 km E-W trending segment at the northern end of the rupture. The 21° dipping E-W segment is inconsistent with previous interpretations of high angle tear faulting.

  18. Slip length measurement of gas flow.

    PubMed

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Colin, Stéphane; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-09-16

    In this paper, we present a review of the most important techniques used to measure the slip length of gas flow on isothermal surfaces. First, we present the famous Millikan experiment and then the rotating cylinder and spinning rotor gauge methods. Then, we describe the gas flow rate experiment, which is the most widely used technique to probe a confined gas and measure the slip. Finally, we present a promising technique using an atomic force microscope introduced recently to study the behavior of nanoscale confined gas. PMID:27505860

  19. Slip length measurement of gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Colin, Stéphane; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a review of the most important techniques used to measure the slip length of gas flow on isothermal surfaces. First, we present the famous Millikan experiment and then the rotating cylinder and spinning rotor gauge methods. Then, we describe the gas flow rate experiment, which is the most widely used technique to probe a confined gas and measure the slip. Finally, we present a promising technique using an atomic force microscope introduced recently to study the behavior of nanoscale confined gas.

  20. Frictional Melting of Peridotite and Seismic Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, G.; Del Gaudio, P.; Han, R.; Hirose, T.; Nielsen, S.; Shimamoto, T.; Cavallo, A.

    2008-12-01

    The evolution of the frictional strength along a fault at seismic slip rates (about 1 m/s) is one of the main factors controlling earthquake mechanics. In particular, friction-induced rock melting and melt lubrication during seismic slip may be typical at mantle depths, based on field studies, seismological evidence, torsion experiments and theoretical studies. To investigate the (1) dynamic strength of faults and (2) the frictional melting processes in mantle rocks, we performed 20 experiments with the Balmuccia peridotite in a high- velocity rotary shear apparatus. Experiments were conducted on cylindrical samples (21.8 mm in diameter) over a wide range of normal stresses (5.4 to 16.1 MPa), slip rates (0.23 to 1.14 m/s) and displacements (1.5 to 71 m). The dynamic strength of experimental faults evolved with displacement: after a peak (first strengthening) at the initiation of slip, fault strength abruptly decreased (first weakening), then increased (second strengthening) and eventually decreased (second weakening) towards a steady-state value. The microstructural and geochemical (FE-SEM, EPMA and EDS) investigation of the slipping zone from experiments interrupted at different displacements, revealed that second strengthening was associated with the production of a grain-supported melt-poor layer, while second weakening and steady-state with the formation of a continuous melt-rich layer. The temperature of the frictional melt was up to 1780 Celsius. Microstructures formed during the experiments were identical to those found in natural ultramafic pseudotachylytes. By performing experiments for increasing normal stresses and slip rates, steady-state shear stress slightly increased with increasing normal stress (friction coefficient of 0.15) and, for a given normal stress, decreased with increasing slip rate. The dependence of steady-state shear stress with normal stress and slip rate is described by a constitutive equation for melt lubrication. The presence of

  1. Slipping magnetic reconnection in coronal loops.

    PubMed

    Aulanier, Guillaume; Golub, Leon; Deluca, Edward E; Cirtain, Jonathan W; Kano, Ryouhei; Lundquist, Loraine L; Narukage, Noriyuki; Sakao, Taro; Weber, Mark A

    2007-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection of solar coronal loops is the main process that causes solar flares and possibly coronal heating. In the standard model, magnetic field lines break and reconnect instantaneously at places where the field mapping is discontinuous. However, another mode may operate where the magnetic field mapping is continuous but shows steep gradients: The field lines may slip across each other. Soft x-ray observations of fast bidirectional motions of coronal loops, observed by the Hinode spacecraft, support the existence of this slipping magnetic reconnection regime in the Sun's corona. This basic process should be considered when interpreting reconnection, both on the Sun and in laboratory-based plasma experiments. PMID:18063789

  2. Momentum compaction and phase slip factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Section 2.3.11 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping is updated. The slip factor and its higher orders are given in terms of the various orders of the momentum compaction. With the aid of a simplified FODO lattice, formulas are given for the alteration of the lower orders of the momentum compaction by various higher multipole magnets. The transition to isochronicity is next demonstrated. Formulas are given for the extraction of the first three orders of the slip factor from the measurement of the synchrotron tune while changing the rf frequency. Finally bunch-length compression experiments in semi-isochronous rings are reported.

  3. The mechanics of stick-slip

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1970-01-01

    Physical mechanisms that have been proposed to explain the occurrence of stick-slip motion during frictional sliding have been examined in the light of results obtained from experiments with rocks and brittle minerals. An instability caused by sudden brittle fracture of locked regions on surfaces in contact is the most likely explanation for stick-slip during dry frictional sliding of brittle rocks at room temperature. Areas requiring further study and the uncertainties in applying the results of laboratory experiments to earthquake studies are emphasized. ?? 1970.

  4. Dynamics of a strike-slip fault analog model : Effects of the tectonic loading rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniven, Y.; Dominguez, S.; Soliva, R.; Cattin, R.; Peyret, M.; Chéry, J.; Romano, C.

    2013-12-01

    The average seismic cycle duration extends from hundred to a few thousands years but geodetic measurements and seismological data extend over less than one century. This short time observation scale renders difficult to constrain the role of key parameters such as fault friction and geometry, crust rheology, stress and strain rate that control the kinematics and mechanics of active faults. To solve this time scale issue, we have developed a new experimental set-up that reproduces scaled micro-earthquakes and several hundreds of seismic cycles along a strike-slip fault. The model is constituted by two polyurethane foam plates laterally in contact, lying on a basal silicone layer, which simulate the mechanical behaviour of an elastoplastic upper crust over a ductile lower crust, respectively. To simulate the boundary conditions of a strike-slip fault, a computerized motoreductor system moves the two compartments on an opposite sens at a constant low velocity (a few μm/s). The model scaling, deduces from analog material physical parameters, implies that 1 cm in the model represents 2-3 km in the nature and 1 s is equivalent to 5-15 years. Surface-horizontal strain field is quantified by sub-pixel correlation of digital camera pictures recorded every 16 μm of displacement. We record about 2000 horizontal-velocity field measurements for each experiment. The analysis of model-interseismic and coseismic surface displacements and their comparison to seismogenic natural faults demonstrate that our analog model reproduces correctly both near and far-field surface strains. To compare the experiments, we have developed several algorithms that allow studying the main spatial and temporal evolution of the physical parameters and surface deformation processes that characterise the seismic cycle (magnitudes, stress, strain, friction coefficients, interseismic locking depth, recurrence time, ...). We also performed surface-velocity field inversions to assess the spatial

  5. Bond slip detection of steel plate and concrete beams using smart aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Feng; Kong, Qingzhao; Li, Mo; Mo, Y. L.; Song, Gangbing; Fan, Feng

    2015-11-01

    The newly emerged steel plate concrete (SC), benefited from a composite effect of steel and concrete materials, has been applied to shield building and internal structures of AP1000 nuclear power plants. The detection of bond-slip between steel plate and concrete is of great importance to provide early warnings of steel plate and concrete debonding and to ensure the safety of SC structures. In this paper, an active sensing approach using smart aggregates (SAs) is developed to detect the initiation and to monitor the development of bond-slip. A SA, designed by sandwiching a fragile piezoceramic patch between protection materials, can be utilized as both actuator and sensor by taking advantage of the piezoelectricity of piezoceramic material. Two SC beams with distinct shear reinforcement ratios ≤ft({ρ }t\\right) were experimentally investigated. Based on the wavelet packet decomposition of the received signals from SAs, the initiation of bond-slip is detected, and the development of bond-slip is quantitatively monitored to better understand the structural performance of SC beams, including the stiffness and capacity. The bond-slip severities of the two SC beams are compared to study the improvement of bond-slip condition rendered by providing more shear reinforcement.

  6. Slip rates across the sinistral slip fault system of the Shan Plateau, northern SE Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Sieh, K.; Wang, Y.; Liu, J.; Weldon, R. J.; Feng, L.; Chan, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The sinistral-slip fault system of the Shan Plateau, arcing around the eastern Himalayan syntaxis and extending > 700 km from northwest to southeast, poses a high seismic hazard in northern SE Asia. Knowing slip rates and earthquake recurrence intervals of these faults is key to better quantification of that hazard. However, estimates of slip rates along the fault system remain poorly constrained. Here we report a preliminary estimate of the slip rate across the fault system from available campaign GPS velocities. We projected the horizontal GPS velocity vectors relative to the Sunda block reference frame perpendicular to the general strike (~ 240°) of the sinistral faults. The velocity profile shows a gradient of ~ 9 mm/yr over a distance of ~ 550 km that crosses 8 faults, from the Dayingjiang fault in the northwest to the Mengxing fault in the southeast. This suggests the average slip rate across each fault in the system is ~ 1 mm/yr. The 9 mm/yr of GPS velocity gradient across the fault system, however, is only half of the long-term rates determined from offsets of major rivers, ridges and plutons. These geological determinations suffer, however, from poor dating constraints. The discrepancy between the geodetic and geological analyses highlights the need of reliable constraints on slip rates along each of the faults. We have begun field work aimed at determining the slip rate of one of these, the Jinghong fault.

  7. A jumping cylinder on an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, R. W.; Hernández-Gómez, J. J.; Marquina, V.

    2012-09-01

    The problem of a cylinder of mass m and radius r, with its centre of mass out of the cylinder’s axis, rolling on an inclined plane that makes an angle α with respect to the horizontal, is analysed. The equation of motion is partially solved to obtain the site where the cylinder loses contact with the inclined plane (jumps). Several simplifications are made: the analysed system consists of an homogeneous disc with a one-dimensional straight line mass parallel to the disc axis at a distance y < r of the centre of the cylinder. To compare our results with experimental data, we use a styrofoam cylinder to which a long brass rod is embedded parallel to the disc axis at a distance y < r from it, so the centre of mass lies at a distance d from the centre of the cylinder. Then the disc rolls without slipping on a long wooden ramp inclined at 15°, 30° and 45° with respect to the horizontal. To determine the jumping site, the movements are recorded with a high-speed video camera (Casio EX ZR100) at 240 and 480 frames per second. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  8. Drag reduction at a plane wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    The objective is to determine by analytical means how drag on a plane wall may be modified favorably using a minimal amount of flow information - preferably only information at the wall. What quantities should be measured? How should that information be assimilated in order to arrive at effective control? As a prototypical problem, incompressible, viscous flow, governed by the Navier-Stokes equations, past a plane wall at which the no-slip condition was modified was considered. The streamwise and spanwise velocity components are required to be zero, but the normal component is to be specified according to some control law. The challenge is to choose the wall-normal velocity component based on flow conditions at the wall so that the mean drag is as small as possible. There can be no net mass flux through the wall, and the total available control energy is constrained. A turbulent flow is highly unsteady and has detailed spatial structure. The mean drag on the wall is the integral over the wall of the local shear forces exerted by the fluid, which is then averaged in time; it is a 'macroscopic' property of the flow. It is not obvious how unsteady boundary control is to be applied in order to modify the mean flow most effectively, especially in view of the non- self-adjoint nature of the governing equations. An approximate analytical solution to the suboptimal scheme is pursued.

  9. Geodetic inversion for spatial distribution of slip under smoothness, discontinuity, and sparsity constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Ryoko; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Okada, Masato; Hori, Takane

    2016-02-01

    In geodetic data inversion, insufficient observational data and smoothness constraints for model parameters make it difficult to clearly resolve small-scale heterogeneous structures with discontinuous boundaries. We therefore developed a novel regularization scheme for the inversion problem that uses discontinuity, sparsity, and smoothness constraints. In order to assess its usefulness and applicability, the proposed method was applied to synthetic displacements calculated by a ring-shaped and sharply varying afterslip distribution on a plate interface. The afterslip was obtained from reasonable numerical simulation of earthquake generation cycle with a rate- and state- dependent friction law and realistic three-dimensional plate geometry. The obtained afterslip distribution was heterogeneous, and the discontinuous boundary was sharper than that obtained by using smoothness constraint only. The same inversion test was conducted with a smoothly varying circular slip distribution with large slips inside the ring-shaped distribution. The method accurately reproduces the smooth distribution of the slip area as well as the ring-shaped distribution. Therefore, the method could be applied to any slip distribution, with both discontinuous and continuous boundaries. Adopting this method for measured data will make it possible to obtain detailed heterogeneous distributions of physical structures on fault planes. The proposed method is therefore applicable to various geophysical inversion problems that exhibit discontinuous heterogeneity.

  10. Seismic slip on an upper-plate normal fault during a large subduction megathrust rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen P.; Rietbrock, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of stress accumulation and release during subduction zone seismic cycles requires an understanding of the distribution of fault slip during earthquakes. Reconstructions of slip are typically constrained to a single, known fault plane. Yet, slip has been shown to occur on multiple faults within the subducting plate owing to stress triggering, resulting in phenomena such as earthquake doublets. However, rapid stress triggering from the plate interface to faults in the overriding plate has not been documented before. We have analysed seismic data from the magnitude 7.1 Araucania earthquake that occurred in the Chilean subduction zone in January 2011. We find that the earthquake, which was reported as a single event in global moment tensor solutions, was instead composed of two ruptures on two separate faults. We use 3-D full waveform simulations to better constrain the centroid of the second rupture. Within 12 s, a thrust earthquake (Mw 6.8) on the plate interface triggered a second large rupture on a normal fault 30 km away in the overriding plate (Mw 6.7). We define this set of events as a 'closely spaced doublet' (CSD). This configuration of partitioned rupture is consistent with normal-faulting mechanisms in the ensuing aftershock sequence. We conclude that plate interface rupture can trigger almost instantaneous slip in the overriding plate of a subduction zone. This shallow upper-plate rupture may be masked from teleseismic data, posing a challenge for real-time tsunami warning systems.

  11. Postseismic deformation due to subcrustal viscoelastic relaxation following dip-slip earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The deformation of the Earth following a dip-slip earthquake is calculated using a three layer rheological model and finite element techniques. The three layers are an elastic upper lithosphere, a standard linear solid lower lithosphere, and a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere-a model previously analyzed in the strike-clip case (Cohen, 1981, 1982). Attention is focused on the magnitude of the postseismic subsidence and the width of the subsidence zone that can develop due to the viscoelastic response to coseismic reverse slip. Detailed analysis for a fault extending from the surface to 15 km with a 45 deg dip reveals that postseismic subsidence is sensitive to the depth to the asthenosphere but is only weakly dependent on lower lithosphere depth. The greatest subsidence occurs when the elastic lithosphere is about 30 km thick and the asthenosphere lies just below this layer (asthenosphere depth = 2 times the fault depth). The extremum in the subsidence pattern occurs at about 5 km from the surface trace of the fault and lies over the slip plane. In a typical case after a time t = 30 tau (tau = Maxwell time) following the earthquake the subsidence at this point is 60% of the coseismic uplift. Unlike the horizontal deformation following a strike slip earthquake, significant vertical deformation due to asthenosphere flow persists for many times tau and the magnitude of the vertical deformation is not necessarily enhanced by having a partially relaxing lower lithosphere.

  12. Postseismic deformation due to subcrustal viscoelastic relaxation following dip-slip earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    The deformation of the earth following a dip-slip earthquake is calculated using a three layer rheological model and finite element techniques. The three layers are an elastic upper lithosphere, a standard linear solid lower lithosphere, and a Maxwell viscoelastic asthenosphere - a model previously analyzed in the strike-clip case (Cohen, 1981, 1982). Attention is focused on the magnitude of the postseismic subsidence and the width of the subsidence zone that can develop due to the viscoelastic response to coseismic reverse slip. Detailed analysis for a fault extending from the surface to 15 km with a 45 deg dip reveals that postseismic subsidence is sensitive to the depth to the asthenosphere but is only weakly dependent on lower lithosphere depth. The greatest subsidence occurs when the elastic lithosphere is about 30 km thick and the asthenosphere lies just below this layer (asthenosphere depth = 2 times the fault depth). The extremum in the subsidence pattern occurs at about 5 km from the surface trace of the fault and lies over the slip plane. In a typical case after a time t = 30 tau (tau = Maxwell time) following the earthquake, the subsidence at this point is 60 percent of the coseismic uplift. Unlike the horizontal deformation following a strike slip earthquake, significant vertical deformation due to asthenosphere flow persists for many times tau and the magnitude of the vertical deformation is not necessarily enhanced by having a partially relaxing lower lithosphere. Previously announced in STAR as N83-13683

  13. SNAP Satellite Focal Plane Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bebek, C.; Akerlof, C.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Bergstrom, L.; Berstein, G.P.; Bester, M.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Day, C.; Deustua, S.; DiGennaro, R.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmett, W.; Eriksson, M.; Fouchez,D.; Fruchter, A.; Genat, J-F.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Holland, S.; Huterer, D.; Johnson, W.; Kadel, R.; Karcher,A.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureaux, J.; Lampton, M.; Lefevre, O.; Levi, M.; Levin, D.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Malina, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Roe, N.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz,D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Smadja, G.; Smith, R.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle,G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.

    2003-07-07

    The proposed SuperNova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission will have a two-meter class telescope delivering diffraction-limited images to an instrumented 0.7 square degree field in the visible and near-infrared wavelength regime. The requirements for the instrument suite and the present configuration of the focal plane concept are presented. A two year R&D phase, largely supported by the Department of Energy, is just beginning. We describe the development activities that are taking place to advance our preparedness for mission proposal in the areas of detectors and electronics.

  14. Statistical Analysis of the Surface Slip Profiles and Slip Models for the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, D.; Shao, G.; Ji, C.

    2009-12-01

    The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake provides a remarkable opportunity to study the statistical properties of slip profiles recorded at the surface. During the M 8 Wenchuan earthquake, the surface ruptured over 300 km along the Longmenshan fault system. The surface slip profiles have been measured along the fault for a distance of the order of 270 km without any significant change in the strike direction. Field investigations suggest that the earthquake generated a 240 km surface rupture along the Beichuan segment and 72 km surface rupture along the Guanxian segment. Maximum vertical and horizontal slip of 10 m and 4.9 m have been observed along the Beichuan fault. Measurements include the displacement parallel and perpendicular to the fault as well as the width of the rupture zone. However, the recorded earthquake slip profiles are irregularly sampled. Traditional algorithms used to compute the discrete Fourier transform are developed for data sampled at regularly spaced intervals. It should be noted that interpolating the slip profile over a regular grid is not appropriate when investigating the spectrum functional behavior or when computing the discrete Fourier transform. Interpolation introduces bias in the estimation of the Fourier transform that adds artificial correlation to the original data. To avoid this problem, we developed an algorithm to compute the Fourier transform of irregularly sampled data. It consists essentially in determining the coefficients that best fit the data to the Sine and Cosine functions at a given wave number. We compute the power spectrum of the slip profiles of the Wenchuan earthquakes. In addition, we also compute the power spectrum for the slip inversions computed for the Wenchuan earthquakes. To model the functional behavior of the spectrum curves, we consider two functions: the power law function and the von Karman function. For all the slip models, we compute the parameters of the power law function and the von Karman function that

  15. Strong near-trench locking and its temporal change in the rupture area of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake estimated from cumulative slip and slip vectors of interplate earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, N.; Hasegawa, A.; Matsuzawa, T.

    2012-12-01

    The 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake is characterized by large near-trench slip that excited disastrous Tsunami. It is of great importance to estimate the coupling state near the trench to understand temporal evolution of interplate coupling near the earthquake source as well as for the assessment of tsunami risk along the trench. However, the coupling states at the near trench areas far from the land are usually not well constrained. The cumulative offset of small repeating earthquakes reflects the in situ slip history on a fault and the slip vectors of interplate earthquakes reflect heterogeneous distribution of coupling on the plate boundary. In this study, we use the repeating earthquake and slip vector data to estimate spatio-temporal change in slip and coupling in and around the source area of the Tohoku-oki earthquake near the Japan trench. The repeating earthquake data for 27 years before the Tohoku-oki earthquake show absence of repeating earthquake groups in the large-coseismic-slip area and low and variable slip rates in the moderate-coseismic-slip region surrounding the large-slip. The absence of repeaters itself could have been explained by both models with very weak coupling and very strong coupling. However, the rotation of slip vectors of interplate earthquakes at the deeper extension of the large-coseismic-slip suggest the plate boundary was locked in the near-trench area before the earthquake, which is consistent with the estimation by Hasegawa et al. (2012) based on stress tensor analysis of the upper plate events near the trench axis. The repeating earthquake data, on the other hand, show small but distinct increases in the slip rate in the 3-5 years before the earthquake near the area of large coseismic slip suggesting preseismic unfastening of the locked area in the last stage of the earthquake cycle. After the Tohoku-oki earthquake, repeating earthquakes activity in the main rupture area disappeared almost completely and slip vectors of

  16. Support for the slip hypothesis from whisker-related tactile perception of rats in a noisy environment

    PubMed Central

    Waiblinger, Christian; Brugger, Dominik; Whitmire, Clarissa J.; Stanley, Garrett B.; Schwarz, Cornelius

    2015-01-01

    Rodents use active whisker movements to explore their environment. The “slip hypothesis” of whisker-related tactile perception entails that short-lived kinematic events (abrupt whisker movements, called “slips”, due to bioelastic whisker properties that occur during active touch of textures) carry the decisive texture information. Supporting this hypothesis, previous studies have shown that slip amplitude and frequency occur in a texture-dependent way. Further, experiments employing passive pulsatile whisker deflections revealed that perceptual performance based on pulse kinematics (i.e., signatures that resemble slips) is far superior to the one based on time-integrated variables like frequency and intensity. So far, pulsatile stimuli were employed in a noise free environment. However, the realistic scenario involves background noise (e.g., evoked by rubbing across the texture). Therefore, if slips are used for tactile perception, the tactile neuronal system would need to differentiate slip-evoked spikes from those evoked by noise. To test the animals under these more realistic conditions, we presented passive whisker-deflections to head-fixed trained rats, consisting of “slip-like” events (waveforms mimicking slips occurring with touch of real textures) embedded into background noise. Varying the (i) shapes (ramp or pulse); (ii) kinematics (amplitude, velocity, etc.); and (iii) the probabilities of occurrence of slip-like events, we observed that rats could readily detect slip-like events of different shapes against noisy background. Psychophysical curves revealed that the difference of slip event and noise amplitude determined perception, while increased probability of occurrence (frequency) had barely any effect. These results strongly support the notion that encoding of kinematics dominantly determines whisker-related tactile perception while the computation of frequency or intensity plays a minor role. PMID:26528148

  17. The tail plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, Max M

    1923-01-01

    This report deals with the calculation of the equilibrium, statistical stability, and damping of the tail plane. The author has simplified the present theory of longitudinal stability for the particular purpose of obtaining one definite coefficient characteristics of the effect of the tail plane. This coefficient is obtained by substituting certain aerodynamic characteristics and some dimensions of the airplane in a comparatively simple mathematical expression. Care has been taken to confine all aerodynamical information necessary for the calculation of the coefficient to the well-known curves representing the qualities of the wing section. This is done by making use of the present results of modern aerodynamics. All formulas and relations necessary for the calculation are contained in the paper. They give in some cases only an approximation of the real values. An example of calculation is added in order to illustrate the application of the method. The coefficient indicates not only whether the effect of the tail plane is great enough, but also whether it is not too great. It appears that the designer has to avoid a certain critical length of the fuselage, which inevitably gives rise to periodical oscillations of the airplane. The discussion also shows the way and in what direction to carry out experimental work.

  18. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G P

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems. PMID:26986407

  19. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems.

  20. Beyond the no-slip boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Howard

    2011-10-01

    This paper offers a simple macroscopic approach to the question of the slip boundary condition to be imposed upon the tangential component of the fluid velocity at a solid boundary. Plausible reasons are advanced for believing that it is the energy equation rather than the momentum equation that determines the correct fluid-mechanical boundary condition. The scheme resulting therefrom furnishes the following general, near-equilibrium linear constitutive relation for the slip velocity of mass along a relatively flat wall bounding a single-component gas or liquid: (v(m))(slip)=-α∂lnρ/∂s|(wall), where α and ρ are, respectively, the fluid's thermometric diffusivity and mass density, while the length δs refers to distance measured along the wall in the direction in which the slip or creep occurs. This constitutive relation is shown to agree with experimental data for gases and liquids undergoing thermal creep or pressure-driven viscous creep at solid surfaces. PMID:22181263

  1. PRODUCTION OF SLIP CAST CALCIA HOLLOWWARE

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.; Cowan, R.E.

    1963-12-31

    A method for producing slip cast calcia hollow ware in which a dense calcia grain is suspended in isobutyl acetate or a mixture of tertiary amyl alcohol and o-xylene is presented. A minor amount of triethanolamine and oleic acid is added to the suspension vehicle as viscosity adjusting agents and the suspension is cast in a plaster mold, dried, and fired. (AEC)

  2. 7 CFR 51.491 - Wet slip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet slip. 51.491 Section 51.491 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND...

  3. 7 CFR 51.491 - Wet slip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wet slip. 51.491 Section 51.491 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 FRESH FRUITS, VEGETABLES AND...

  4. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-03-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  5. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  6. Multi-level slip-link modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, Jay

    2014-03-01

    That the dynamics of concentrated, high-molecular-weight polymers are largely governed by entanglements is now widely accepted, and typically understood by the tube model. Although the original idea for slip-links was proposed at the same time as tubes, only recently have detailed, quantitative mathematical models arisen based on this picture. We argue here for the use of a slip-link model that has strong connections to atomistic, multichain levels of description, agrees with non-equilibrium thermodynamics, applies to any chain architecture and can be used in linear or non-linear rheology. We present a hierarchy of slip-link models that are connected to each other through successive coarse graining. One might choose a particular member of the hierarchy depending on the problem at hand, in order to minimize computational effort. In particular, the most detailed level of description has four parameters, three of which can be determined directly from atomistic simulations. The least-detailed member is suitable for predicting non-linear, non-uniform flow fields. We will show how using this hierarchy of slip-link models we can make predictions about the nonlinear rheology of monodisperse homopolymer melts, polydisperse melts, or blends of different architectures.

  7. Slip Dynamics in Small Scale Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maass, Robert; Derlet, Peter; Greer, Julia; Volkert, Cynthia

    2015-03-01

    Classical work showed that dislocation velocities are strongly dependent on applied stress. Numerous experiments have validated this for individual or groups of dislocations in macroscopic crystals by using imaging techniques combined with either mechanical data or time resolved topological data. Developments in small scale mechanical testing allow to correlate the intermittency of collective dislocation motion with the mechanical response. Discrete forward surges in displacement can be related to dislocation avalanches, which are triggered by the evolving dislocation sub-structure. We study the spatiotemporal characteristics of intermittent plastic flow in quasi-statically sheared single crystalline Au crystals with diameters between 300 nm and 10000 nm, whose displacement bursts were recorded at several kHz (Scripta Mater. 2013, 69, 586; Small, available online). Both the crystallographic slip magnitude, as well as the velocity of the slip events are exhibiting power-law scaling as. The obtained slip velocity distribution has a cubic decay at high values, and a saturated flat shoulder at lower velocities. No correlation between the slip velocity and the applied stress or plastic strain is found. Further, we present DD-simulations that are supportive of our experimental findings. The simulations suggest that the dynamics of the internal stress fields dominate the evolving dislocation structure leading to velocities that are insensitive to the applied stress - a regime indicative of microplasticity.

  8. Acoustic plane wave preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Tolt, Thomas L.; Poeppel, Roger B.

    1991-01-01

    A polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities. With the superconducting metal oxide in the form of a ceramic slip which has not yet set, orientation of the crystal basal planes parallel with the direction of desired current flow is accomplished by an applied acoustic plane wave in the acoustic or ultrasonic frequency range (either progressive or standing) in applying a torque to each crystal particle. The ceramic slip is then set and fired by conventional methods to produce a conductor with preferentially oriented grains and substantially enhanced current carrying capacity.

  9. New Quaternary slip-rate estimates for the central Garlock fault in SE California - Evidence for large transient slip-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittase, W. M.; Walker, D.; Kirby, E.; McDonald, E.

    2009-12-01

    Significant short-term fluctuations in a mature fault’s slip rate are enigmatic. Work over the last decade in southern California has demonstrated this behavior on the San Andreas Fault (SAF) in the LA basin and the Eastern California shear zone (ECSZ) (e.g., Peltzer, Oskin and Dolan). We report here new slip-rate data for the central Garlock fault in the Pilot Knob Valley area that suggests that it also shows an irregular late Quaternary slip-rate history. An abandoned drainage containing an estimated 3-4 k.y. debris flow is faulted against a 47-m-long shutter ridge (UTM 481630E, 3935170N), implying a 11.8 - 15.6 mm/yr slip rate. Well-preserved bar-and-swale morphology on the surface of the debris flow abuts the shutter ridge perpendicularly, indicating that the debris flow predates slip. Surface clasts have only incipient development of varnish and rubification. A 140-cm-deep hand-dug trench displays incipient Av- and Bw-horizon soil development typical of late-Holocene alluvial deposits in the Mojave Desert. A silt lens in the deposit was sampled ~200 m upstream and has been submitted for OSL dating. Terrestrial-based LiDAR scanning will be performed to map the site’s surface morphology at mm-scale resolution. Two possible implications of this data are (1) that the GF now acts as a conjugate to the SAF and that faster slip on the GF is correlated with fast slip on the Big Bend section of the SAF and on faults within the LA basin, while the ECSZ is quiescent; or (2) that the GF is near the end of its current earthquake cycle. Faster slip on the GF in the past 3-4 k.y., coupled with a more active SAF and a quieter ECSZ, may help explain how the GF can cut across the ECSZ without itself being cut by the ECSZ. In addition, the lack of resolvable sinistral shear across the GF in the geodetic record suggests that either the GF has come out of its transient high slip-rate period, or conversely, it is near the end of its earthquake cycle.

  10. Slow earthquakes coincident with episodic tremors and slow slip events.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshihiro; Obara, Kazushige; Shiomi, Katsuhiko; Sekine, Shutaro; Hirose, Hitoshi

    2007-01-26

    We report on the very-low-frequency earthquakes occurring in the transition zone of the subducting plate interface along the Nankai subduction zone in southwest Japan. Seismic waves generated by very-low-frequency earthquakes with seismic moment magnitudes of 3.1 to 3.5 predominantly show a long period of about 20 seconds. The seismicity of very-low-frequency earthquakes accompanies and migrates with the activity of deep low-frequency tremors and slow slip events. The coincidence of these three phenomena improves the detection and characterization of slow earthquakes, which are thought to increase the stress on updip megathrust earthquake rupture zones. PMID:17138867

  11. The structure of slip-pulses and supershear ruptures driving slip in bimaterial friction

    PubMed Central

    Shlomai, Hadar; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The most general frictional motion in nature involves bimaterial interfaces, when contacting bodies possess different elastic properties. Frictional motion occurs when the contacts composing the interface separating these bodies detach via propagating rupture fronts. Coupling between slip and normal stress variations is unique to bimaterial interfaces. Here we use high speed simultaneous measurements of slip velocities, real contact area and stresses to explicitly reveal this bimaterial coupling and its role in determining different classes of rupture modes and their structures. We directly observe slip-pulses, highly localized slip accompanied by large local reduction of the normal stress near the rupture tip. These pulses propagate in the direction of motion of the softer material at a selected (maximal) velocity and continuously evolve while propagating. In the opposite direction bimaterial coupling favors crack-like ‘supershear' fronts. The robustness of these structures shows the importance of bimaterial coupling to frictional motion and modes of frictional dissipation. PMID:27278687

  12. The structure of slip-pulses and supershear ruptures driving slip in bimaterial friction.

    PubMed

    Shlomai, Hadar; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The most general frictional motion in nature involves bimaterial interfaces, when contacting bodies possess different elastic properties. Frictional motion occurs when the contacts composing the interface separating these bodies detach via propagating rupture fronts. Coupling between slip and normal stress variations is unique to bimaterial interfaces. Here we use high speed simultaneous measurements of slip velocities, real contact area and stresses to explicitly reveal this bimaterial coupling and its role in determining different classes of rupture modes and their structures. We directly observe slip-pulses, highly localized slip accompanied by large local reduction of the normal stress near the rupture tip. These pulses propagate in the direction of motion of the softer material at a selected (maximal) velocity and continuously evolve while propagating. In the opposite direction bimaterial coupling favors crack-like 'supershear' fronts. The robustness of these structures shows the importance of bimaterial coupling to frictional motion and modes of frictional dissipation. PMID:27278687

  13. Effective slip lengths for longitudinal shear flow over partial-slip circular bubble mattresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowdy, Darren

    2015-12-01

    The problem of longitudinal shear flow over a circular bubble mattress with partial slip and protrusion angle 90o is solved in a quasi-analytical fashion by a novel transform scheme recently devised by the author. The general approach can be readily adapted to other mixed boundary value problems. From the analysis explicit approximations for the effective slip lengths are found as a function of the Navier-slip parameter and the area fraction of the surface covered by protrusions. These new approximation formulas for the slip lengths both unify and extend those based on empirical polynomial fits to numerical data given recently by Ng and Wang (2011 Fluid Dyn. Res. 43 065504).

  14. The structure of slip-pulses and supershear ruptures driving slip in bimaterial friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomai, Hadar; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-06-01

    The most general frictional motion in nature involves bimaterial interfaces, when contacting bodies possess different elastic properties. Frictional motion occurs when the contacts composing the interface separating these bodies detach via propagating rupture fronts. Coupling between slip and normal stress variations is unique to bimaterial interfaces. Here we use high speed simultaneous measurements of slip velocities, real contact area and stresses to explicitly reveal this bimaterial coupling and its role in determining different classes of rupture modes and their structures. We directly observe slip-pulses, highly localized slip accompanied by large local reduction of the normal stress near the rupture tip. These pulses propagate in the direction of motion of the softer material at a selected (maximal) velocity and continuously evolve while propagating. In the opposite direction bimaterial coupling favors crack-like `supershear' fronts. The robustness of these structures shows the importance of bimaterial coupling to frictional motion and modes of frictional dissipation.

  15. Viscous Moment, Mechanism of Slow Slip, and Subduction Megathrust Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.

    2015-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) represent transient slip velocities slower than earthquakes but faster than steady, average plate motion. SSEs repeating at the same location have characteristic slip magnitude and duration. Contrary to earthquakes, however, average slip relates to neither duration nor area. Variations in duration, slip, and slip rate can instead be tied to variations in effective viscosity, calculated from a viscous definition of moment. In this paradigm, the observation that deep slow slip events are slower and longer, implies a higher effective viscosity than in shallower, colder SSEs. Observed variations in effective viscosity and slip rate can be interpreted in terms of differences in driving stress and shear zone width, and likely arise in anastomosing shear zones containing a heterogeneous mixture of materials.

  16. Development of compact slip detection sensor using dielectric elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-young; Hwang, Do-Yeon; Kim, Baek-chul; Moon, Hyungpil; Choi, Hyouk Ryeol; Koo, Ja Choon

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we developed a resistance tactile sensor that can detect a slip on the surface of sensor structure. The presented sensor device has fingerprint-like structures that are similar with the role of the humans finger print. The resistance slip sensor that the novel developed uses acrylo-nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) as a dielectric substrate and graphene as an electrode material. We can measure the slip as the structure of sensor makes a deformation and it changes the resistance through forming a new conductive route. To manufacture our sensor, we developed a new imprint process. By using this process, we can produce sensor with micro unit structure. To verify effectiveness of the proposed slip detection, experiment using prototype of resistance slip sensor is conducted with an algorithm to detect slip and slip is successfully detected. We will discuss the slip detection properties.

  17. Provenance of alluvial fan deposits to constrain the mid-term offsets along a strike-slip active fault: the Elsinore fault in the Coyote Mountains, Imperial Valley, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masana, Eulalia; Stepancikova, Petra; Rockwell, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The lateral variation in rates along a fault and its constancy along time is a matter of discussion. To give light to this discussion, short, mid and long term offset distribution along a fault is needed. Many studies analyze the short-term offset distribution along a strike-slip fault that can be obtained by the analysis of offset features imprinted in the morphology of the near-fault area. We present an example on how to obtain the mid- to long-term offset values based on the composition of alluvial fans that are offset by the fault. The study area is on the southern tip of the Elsinore fault, which controls the mountain front of the Coyote Mountains (California). The Elsinore-Laguna Salada fault is part of the San Andreas fault (SAF) system, extending 250 km from the Los Angeles Basin southeastward into the Gulf of California, in Mexico. The slip-rate on the southern Elsinore fault is believed to be moderate based on recent InSAR observations, although a recent study near Fossil Canyon (southern Coyote Mountains) suggests a rate in the range of 1-2 mm/yr. For this study we processed the airborne LiDAR dataset (EarthScope Southern & Eastern California, SoCal) to map short to mid-term alluvial offsets. We reprocessed the point clouds to produce DEMs with 0.5m and 0.25m grids and we varied the insolation angles to illuminate the various fault strands and the offset features. We identified numerous offset features, such as rills, channel bars, channel walls, alluvial fans, beheaded channels and small erosional basins that varied in displacement from 1 to 350 m. For the mid- to long-term offsets of the alluvial fans we benefited from the diverse petrological composition of their sources. Moreover, we recognized that older alluvium, which is offset by greater amounts, is in some cases buried beneath younger alluvial fan deposits and separated by buried soils. To determine the source canyon of various alluvial elements, we quantified the clast assemblage of each source

  18. Seismic slip direction deduced from the magnetic fabric of frictional melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferre, E. C.

    2015-12-01

    The direction of seismic slip constitutes an important focal mechanism parameter particularly for ancient-prehistoric earthquakes. Here I show that in most cases, the magnetic fabric of fault pseudotachylytes indicates the direction of coseismic slip as a result of the dominant simple shear nature of frictional melt flow. The magnetic fabric arises from the shape or crystallographic preferred orientation of magnetically anisotropic minerals (paramagnetic silicates or ferromagnetic oxides) in a viscous medium. This fabric, acquired in a manner similar to that of other magmas, becomes rapidly frozen as the frictional melt is quenched. This kinematic information, coupled with fault plane orientation and generation vein thickness, provides new and critical insight for the earthquake focal mechanism. The magnetic fabric of pseudotachylytes, therefore, not only constitutes a valuable kinematic criterion for these fault rocks but also could expand our knowledge on prehistoric seismic events.

  19. Influence of the slip conditions on the stress corrosion cracking microprocesses in fcc materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chambreuil-Paret, A.; Chateau, J.P.; Magnin, T.

    1997-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is to carefully analyze the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) microprocesses of f.c.c. single crystals, not only for the influence of the tensile axis orientation but also for the influence of the cracking direction (imposed or not). 316L (in MgCl{sub 2}) and copper (in nitrites) single crystals of well defined tensile axis will be strained using the slow strain rate technique. The authors focus on the influence of the relative orientations of the cracking direction and the slip planes on the crystallography of fracture. The effect of slip conditions on the corrosion-deformation interactions leading to fracture are then emphasized, which gives major information relevant to the micromodelling of SCC.

  20. Inspiration of slip effects on electromagnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) nanofluid flow through a horizontal Riga plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, M.; Abbas, T.; Bhatti, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    The boundary layer flow of nanofluid that is electrically conducting over a Riga plate is considered. The Riga plate is an electromagnetic actuator which comprises a spanwise adjusted cluster of substituting terminal and lasting magnets mounted on a plane surface. The numerical model fuses the Brownian motion and the thermophoresis impacts because of the nanofluid and the Grinberg term for the wall parallel Lorentz force due to the Riga plate in the presence of slip effects. The numerical solution of the problem is presented using the shooting method. The novelties of all the physical parameters such as modified Hartmann number, Richardson number, nanoparticle concentration flux parameter, Prandtl number, Lewis number, thermophoresis parameter, Brownian motion parameter and slip parameter are demonstrated graphically. Numerical values of reduced Nusselt number, Sherwood number are discussed in detail.

  1. Episodic Tremor and Slip in the Cascadia Subduction Zone: A Story of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragert, H.

    2003-12-01

    migration velocity of slip for the GPS-determined Cascadia slip events, to the depth and migration velocity of the Japanese tremors triggered the search for seismic signatures for the Cascadia slip events. An examination of seismic records from 1996 to 2002 for sites on Vancouver Is. revealed that what had previously been deemed surface noise was signal from seismic tremors that accompanied slip events. The Cascadia tremors were found to be similar in character to the Japanese deep tremors. In addition, their source region was found to coincide with, or directly overlie, the region of the subducting slab interface where transient slip occurs. The close correlation of tremors with slip coined the naming of the phenomenon as Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS). The physical processes which give rise to this dynamic behavior on the deeper plate interface are not yet well understood. To date, only the Nankai and Cascadia subduction zones have been observed to share aspects of this behavior, suggesting that this phenomenon may be restricted to young subduction zones. The release of fluids, contact with a hydrated mantle wedge, and episodic changes in shear strength or mechanical coupling may all play a part in governing this behavior. Possible connections of ETS with the development of "E-zone" reflector bands, basal erosion, and pulsating metamorphism await further research. In the context of seismic hazard, the ETS zone may mark the down-dip limit of coseismic rupture of the next megathrust earthquake. Also, since it is conceivable for a slip event to trigger a large subduction thrust earthquake, the onset of ETS activity could identify times of higher probability for the occurrence of megathrust earthquakes.

  2. The variations of long time period slow slip events along the Ryukyu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Y. T.; Heki, K.

    2014-12-01

    Slow slip events (SSEs) are a type of slow earthquakes that can be observed with Global Positioning System (GPS) networks in the world. Those events are detected on intensely coupled plate boundaries such as Cascadia subduction zone (Dragert et al., 2001), western North America, Mexico (Kostoglodov et al., 2003), Alaska (Ohta et al., 2007) and Tokai and Boso areas (Ozawa et al., 2002, 2003), central Japan and are considered to have relations to large subduction thrust earthquakes. However, in southwestern Ryukyu trench where most of researchers believe that it should be a decoupled plate boundary, SSEs recur regularly and are located at a patch that is as deep as 20 to 40 km (Heki and Kataoka, 2008). For comprehending the characteristics and time variations of SSEs in this area, the GEONET GPS data of 16 years are used in this study. During 1997 to 2014, more than thirty SSEs are identified near Hateruma Island, Ryukyu. The average recurrence interval is calculated to be 6.3 months and release seismic moment is Mw 6.6 on average. However, the values of recurrence interval are not invariable. From 1997 to 2002, interval period of SSEs is 7.5 months, but during 2002 to 2008, the interval period decreases suddenly to 5.5 months. After 2008, the value restores to 7.2 months again. Furthermore, the slip amount of SSEs in this area varies with time. From 1997 to 2002, the slip is 9.5 cm/year; and during 2002 to 2008, the value slightly increases to 10.5 cm/year. However, in 2008 to 2013, the slip drops to 6.6 cm/year, but accord to the trend of cumulative slip, the slip value would increase in 2014. Considering these data, we find the slip values increase conspicuously in 2002 and 2013. Coincidentally, one Mw 7.1 thrust earthquake occurred in 2002 and earthquake swarm activity started in the Okinawa trough approximately 50km north of the SSE patch. In 2013, another earthquake swarm activity occurred in nearly the same area as the 2002 activity. This suggests that the

  3. The Tripoli, Libya, Earthquake of September 4, 1974: Implications for the active tectonics of the central Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westaway, Rob

    1990-04-01

    Source parameters have been determined for the earthquake (Ms 5.6) that occurred offshore of Tripoli, Libya, on September 4, 1974. One nodal plane of its focal mechanism has dip 37°, strike 297°, and rake -141°, indicating oblique normal faulting. This nodal plane is subparallel to many west-northwest striking normal faults in the epicentral area and is most likely the fault plane, indicating a component of right-lateral strike-slip with slip vector azimuth N84°E. Inversion of long-period teleseismic body waves indicates 12-km centroid depth and 0.4 × 1018 N m seismic moment. A much larger earthquake (Ms 7.0) on April 19, 1935, that occurred in the same zone of active oblique normal faults ˜400 km farther southeast near Sirte probably involved similar slip sense. This zone, for which the name "Tunisia-Libya seismic zone" appears appropriate, has overall northwest-southeast extent ˜1000 km from northern Libya to between Tunisia and Sicily. It takes up a change in motion direction relative to stable Europe from west of north inside the African plate to between N30°E and N50°E in the Ionian Sea between Sicily, southernmost peninsular Italy, southwest Greece, and Libya. This suggested motion direction of Sicily relative to stable Europe agrees with independent estimates from fault slip rates and senses elsewhere in Italy.

  4. Time Dependent Model of the Slow Slip Event in the Tokai Region, South Central Japan, Detected by GPS Measurements in 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Y.; Kimata, F.

    2003-04-01

    The slow slip event is detected in the Tokai region, south central Japan, by national GPS network (GEONET) in 2001. Generally, as the Philippine Sea Plate is subducting toward to northwest in the Suruga-Nankai Trough, ground displacements in the direction of northwest with rates of 1-2cm/yr are detected in this area. The northwestward displacements are no longer observed at this region from the GPS measurements in 2001. Reports from the ground deformation monitoring by GSI suggest that the slow event is still advancing as of January 2003. Repeated slow slip events are estimated from the leveling and EDM ranging by Kimata et al. (2001). Mogi (1989) suggested the pre-slip of the 1944 Tonankai earthquake in the region from the leveling operated at the current day of the earthquake. Based on these past experience, we take an interest in relationship to slow slip event and plate boundary great earthquake. The 2001 Tokai slow slip models are estimated from the GPS measurements and leveling data [Ozawa et al. (2002) and Kimata et al. (2002)]. They suggest the slow slip southeastward with 10-20 cm is occurred in the area less than 100 sq km. The location of the slow slip fault is the inland of the plate boundary with low angle of subducting at a depth 20-30 km. Additionally; there are GPS stations immediately above slow slip fault, and high density. To make clear the slow slip with more detail, we are re-processing the GEONET GPS data using PPP method at GIPSY OASIS II, and discuss the time-dependent model of the slow slip event. In midterm of 2000, Tokai region came under the influence of ground deformations causes by the volcanic activity at the Miyakejima Volcano, and it makes difficult to discuss the deformation start point associated with the slow slip event from the GPS measurements. From our preliminary results, the vertical movements and shortening of base length between the neighboring GPS stations suggest that slow slip event is occurred in the western part of

  5. Downscaling of slip distribution for strong earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Oya, S.; Kuzuha, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We intend to develop a downscaling model to enhance the earthquake slip distribution resolution. Slip distributions have been obtained by other researchers using various inversion methods. As a downscaling model, we are discussing fractal models that include mono-fractal models (fractional Brownian motion, fBm; fractional Lévy motion, fLm) and multi-fractal models as candidates. Log - log-linearity of k (wave number) versus E (k) (power spectrum) is the necessary condition for fractality: the slip distribution is expected to satisfy log - log-linearity described above if we can apply fractal model to a slip distribution as a downscaling model. Therefore, we conducted spectrum analyses using slip distributions of 11 earthquakes as explained below. 1) Spectrum analyses using one-dimensional slip distributions (strike direction) were conducted. 2) Averaging of some results of power spectrum (dip direction) was conducted. Results show that, from the viewpoint of log - log-linearity, applying a fractal model to slip distributions can be inferred as valid. We adopt the filtering method after Lavallée (2008) to generate fBm/ fLm. In that method, generated white noises (random numbers) are filtered using a power law type filter (log - log-linearity of the spectrum). Lavallée (2008) described that Lévy white noise that generates fLm is more appropriate than the Gaussian white noise which generates fBm. In addition, if the 'alpha' parameter of the Lévy law, which governs the degree of attenuation of tails of the probability distribution, is 2.0, then the Lévy distribution is equivalent to the Gauss distribution. We analyzed slip distributions of 11 earthquakes: the Tohoku earthquake (Wei et al., 2011), Haiti earthquake (Sladen, 2010), Simeulue earthquake (Sladen, 2008), eastern Sichuan earthquake (Sladen, 2008), Peru earthquake (Konca, 2007), Tocopilla earthquake (Sladen, 2007), Kuril earthquake (Sladen, 2007), Benkulu earthquake (Konca, 2007), and southern Java

  6. Tsunami Modeling to Validate Slip Models of the 2007 M w 8.0 Pisco Earthquake, Central Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioualalen, M.; Perfettini, H.; Condo, S. Yauri; Jimenez, C.; Tavera, H.

    2013-03-01

    Following the 2007, August 15th, M w 8.0, Pisco earthquake in central Peru, Sladen et al. (J Geophys Res 115: B02405, 2010) have derived several slip models of this event. They inverted teleseismic data together with geodetic (InSAR) measurements to look for the co-seismic slip distribution on the fault plane, considering those data sets separately or jointly. But how close to the real slip distribution are those inverted slip models? To answer this crucial question, the authors generated some tsunami records based on their slip models and compared them to DART buoys, tsunami records, and available runup data. Such an approach requires a robust and accurate tsunami model (non-linear, dispersive, accurate bathymetry and topography, etc.) otherwise the differences between the data and the model may be attributed to the slip models themselves, though they arise from an incomplete tsunami simulation. The accuracy of a numerical tsunami simulation strongly depends, among others, on two important constraints: (i) A fine computational grid (and thus the bathymetry and topography data sets used) which is not always available, unfortunately, and (ii) a realistic tsunami propagation model including dispersion. Here, we extend Sladen's work using newly available data, namely a tide gauge record at Callao (Lima harbor) and the Chilean DART buoy record, while considering a complete set of runup data along with a more realistic tsunami numerical that accounts for dispersion, and also considering a fine-resolution computational grid, which is essential. Through these accurate numerical simulations we infer that the InSAR-based model is in better agreement with the tsunami data, studying the case of the Pisco earthquake indicating that geodetic data seems essential to recover the final co-seismic slip distribution on the rupture plane. Slip models based on teleseismic data are unable to describe the observed tsunami, suggesting that a significant amount of co-seismic slip may have

  7. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of the drag force on a sphere approaching a superhydrophobic striped plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubov, Alexander L.; Schmieschek, Sebastian; Asmolov, Evgeny S.; Harting, Jens; Vinogradova, Olga I.

    2014-01-01

    By means of lattice-Boltzmann simulations the drag force on a sphere of radius R approaching a superhydrophobic striped wall has been investigated as a function of arbitrary separation h. Superhydrophobic (perfect-slip vs. no-slip) stripes are characterized by a texture period L and a fraction of the gas area ϕ. For very large values of h/R, we recover the macroscopic formulae for a sphere moving towards a hydrophilic no-slip plane. For h/R = O(1), the drag force is smaller than predicted by classical theories for hydrophilic no-slip surfaces, but larger than expected for a sphere interacting with a uniform perfectly slipping wall. At a thinner gap, h ≪ R the force reduction compared to a classical result becomes more pronounced, and is maximized by increasing ϕ. In the limit of very small separations, our simulation data are in quantitative agreement with an asymptotic equation, which relates a correction to a force for superhydrophobic slip to texture parameters. In addition, we examine the flow and pressure field and observe their oscillatory character in the transverse direction in the vicinity of the wall, which reflects the influence of the heterogeneity and anisotropy of the striped texture. Finally, we investigate the lateral force on the sphere, which is detectable in case of very small separations and is maximized by stripes with ϕ = 0.5.

  8. Discrete Element Modeling of Stick-Slip Instability and Induced Microseismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaei, Cyrus; Hazzard, Jim; Chalaturnyk, Rick

    2016-03-01

    Using Particle Flow Code, a discrete element model is presented in this paper that allows direct modeling of stick-slip behavior in pre-existing weak planes such as joints, beddings, and faults. The model is used to simulate a biaxial sliding experiment from literature on a saw-cut specimen of Sierra granite with a single fault. The fault is represented by the smooth-joint contact model. Also, an algorithm is developed to record the stick-slip induced microseismic events along the fault. Once the results compared well with laboratory data, a parametric study was conducted to investigate the evolution of the model's behavior due to varying factors such as resolution of the model, particle elasticity, fault coefficient of friction, fault stiffness, and normal stress. The results show a decrease in shear strength of the fault in the models with smaller particles, smaller coefficient of friction of the fault, harder fault surroundings, softer faults, and smaller normal stress on the fault. Also, a higher rate of displacement was observed for conditions resulting in smaller shear strength. An increase in b-values was observed by increasing the resolution or decreasing the normal stress on the fault, while b-values were not sensitive to changes in elasticity of the fault or its surrounding region. A larger number of recorded events were observed for the models with finer particles, smaller coefficient of friction of the fault, harder fault surroundings, harder fault, and smaller normal stress on the fault. The results suggest that it is possible for the two ends of a fault to be still while there are patches along the fault undergoing stick-slips. Such local stick-slips seem to provide a softer surrounding for their neighbor patches facilitating their subsequent stick-slips.

  9. Coseismic Deformation Field and Fault Slip Distribution of the 2015 Chile Mw8.3 Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Chunyan; Zuo, Ronghu; Shan, Xin Jian; Zhang, Guohong; Zhang, Yingfeng; Song, Xiaogang

    2016-06-01

    On September 16, 2015, a magnitude 8.3 earthquake struck west of Illapel, Chile. We analyzed Sentinel-1A/IW InSAR data on the descending track acquired before and after the Chile Mw8.3 earthquake of 16 September 2015. We found that the coseismic deformation field of this event consists of many semi circular fringes protruding to east in an approximately 300km long and 190km wide region. The maximum coseismic displacement is about 1.33m in LOS direction corresponding to subsidence or westward shift of the ground. We inverted the coseismic fault slip based on a small-dip single plane fault model in a homogeneous elastic half space. The inverted coseismic slip mainly concentrates at shallow depth above the hypocenter with a symmetry shape. The rupture length along strike is about 340 km with maximum slip of about 8.16m near the trench. The estimated moment is 3.126×1021 N.m (Mw8.27) the maximum depth of coseismic slip near zero appears to 50km. We also analyzed the postseismic deformation fields using four interferograms with different time intervals. The results show that postseismic deformation occurred in a narrow area of approximately 65km wide with maximum slip 11cm, and its predominant motion changes from uplift to subsidence with time. that is to say, at first, the postseismic deformation direction is opposite to that of coseismic deformation, then it tends to be consistent with coseismic deformation.It maybe indicates the differences and changes in the velocity between the Nazca oceanic plate and the South American continental plate.

  10. Slow slip event within a gap between tremor and locked zones in the Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Ryota; Obara, Kazushige; Maeda, Takuto

    2016-02-01

    We report on two small long-term slow slip events (SSEs) within a gap between tremor and locked zones in the Nankai subduction zone, southwest Japan. The SSEs were detected by subtracting the steady state component and postseismic effects of large earthquakes from long-term and high-density Global Navigation Satellite System data. Both SSEs occurred in adjacent regions of the Bungo channel following long-term SSEs in the Bungo channel in 2003 and 2010. The estimated slip was 1-5 cm/year that lasted at least 1-2 years after 2004 and 2011, partly accommodating plate convergence. As the low-frequency tremor in the downdip region is activated at the same time as the Bungo channel long-term SSE, a spatiotemporal correlation was observed between the detected SSEs and long-term tremor activity in the downdip region. This correlation indicates along-dip interaction of the slips on the subducting plate interface.

  11. Effects of slip, slip rate, and shear heating on the friction of granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanpied, M.L.; Tullis, T.E.; Weeks, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The stability of fault slip is sensitive to the way in which frictional strength responds to changes in slip rate and in particular to the effective velocity dependence of steady state friction ????ss/?? ln V. This quantity can vary substantially with displacement, temperature and slip rate. To investigate the physical basis for this behavior and the possible influence of shear heating, we slid initially bare granite surfaces in unconfined rotary shear to displacements of hundreds of millimeters at normal stresses, ??n, of 10 and 25 MPa and at room temperature. We imposed step changes in slip rate within the range 10-2 to 103.5 ??m/s and also monitored frictional heating with thermistors embedded in the granite. The transient response of ?? to slip rate steps was fit to a rate- and state-dependent friction law using two state variables to estimate the values of several parameters in the constitutive law. The first 20 mm of slip shows rising friction and falling ????ss/?? ln V; further slip shows roughly constant friction, ????ss/?? ln V and parameter values, suggesting that a steady state condition is reached on the fault surface. At V ??? 10 ??m/s, ????ss/?? ln V = -0.004 ?? 0.001. At higher rates the response is sensitive to normal stress: At ??n = 25 MPa granite shows a transition to effective velocity strengthening (????ss/?? ln V = 0.008 ?? 0.004) at the highest slip rates tested. At 10 MPa granite shows a less dramatic change to ????ss/?? ln V ??? 0 at the highest rates. The maximum temperature measured in the granite is ???60??C at 25 MPa and 103.5 ??m/s. Temperatures are in general agreement with a numerical model of heat conduction which assumes spatially homogeneous frictional heating over the sliding surface. The simplest interpretation of our measurements of ????ss/?? ln V is that the granite is inherently veocity weakening (?????ss/??? In V 0 mimics velocity strengthening. These results have implications for the frictional behavior of faults during

  12. Permeability control on transient slip weakening during gypsum dehydration: Implications for earthquakes in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclère, Henri; Faulkner, Daniel; Wheeler, John; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2016-05-01

    A conflict has emerged from recent laboratory experiments regarding the question of whether or not dehydration reactions can promote unstable slip in subduction zones leading to earthquakes. Although reactions produce mechanical weakening due to pore-fluid pressure increase, this weakening has been associated with both stable and unstable slip. Here, new results monitoring strength, permeability, pore-fluid pressure, reaction progress and microstructural evolution during dehydration reactions are presented to identify the conditions necessary for mechanical instability. Triaxial experiments are conducted using gypsum and a direct shear sample assembly with constant normal stress that allows the measurement of permeability during sliding. Tests are conducted with temperature ramp from 70 to 150 °C and with different effective confining pressures (50, 100 and 150 MPa) and velocities (0.1 and 0.4 μm s-1). Results show that gypsum dehydration to bassanite induces transient stable-slip weakening that is controlled by pore-fluid pressure and permeability evolution. At the onset of dehydration, the low permeability promoted by pore compaction induces pore-fluid pressure build-up and stable slip weakening. The increase of bassanite content during the reaction shows clear evidence of dehydration related with the development of R1 Riedel shears and P foliation planes where bassanite is preferentially localized along these structures. The continued production of bassanite, which is stronger than gypsum, provides a supporting framework for newly formed pores, thus resulting in permeability increase, pore-fluid pressure drop and fault strength increase. After dehydration reaction, deformation is characterized by unstable slip on the fully dehydrated reaction product, controlled by the transition from velocity-strengthening to velocity-weakening behaviour of bassanite at temperature above ∼140 °C and the localization of deformation along narrow Y-shear planes. This study

  13. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Hermann, M.R.; Dane, C.B.; Tiszauer, D.H.

    1995-12-12

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 {micro}m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only about 1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power. 1 fig.

  14. Fourier plane image amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Dane, C. Brent; Tiszauer, Detlev H.

    1995-01-01

    A solid state laser is frequency tripled to 0.3 .mu.m. A small portion of the laser is split off and generates a Stokes seed in a low power oscillator. The low power output passes through a mask with the appropriate hole pattern. Meanwhile, the bulk of the laser output is focused into a larger stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) amplifier. The low power beam is directed through the same cell in the opposite direction. The majority of the amplification takes place at the focus which is the fourier transform plane of the mask image. The small holes occupy large area at the focus and thus are preferentially amplified. The amplified output is now imaged onto the multichip module where the holes are drilled. Because of the fourier plane amplifier, only .about.1/10th the power of a competitive system is needed. This concept allows less expensive masks to be used in the process and requires much less laser power.

  15. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, David L.; Horner, Scott D.; Aamodt, Earl K.

    2002-12-01

    Advances in systems engineering, applied sciences, and manufacturing technologies have enabled the development of large ground based and spaced based astronomical instruments having a large Field of View (FOV) to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A larger FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optical elements, improved support structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPA). A mFPA designed for astronomy can use multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single camera baseplate integrated at the instrument plane of focus. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tighter control on the design trades, component development, CCD characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the capability Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company's (LMSSC) Advanced Technology Center (ATC) has developed to perform CCD characterization, mFPA assembly and alignment, and mFPA system level testing.

  16. Mosaic Focal Plane Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, D.; Horner, S.; Aamodt, E.

    Advances in manufacturing and applied sciences have enabled the development of large ground and spaced based astronomical instruments having a Field of View (FOV) large enough to capture a large portion of the universe in a single image. A large FOV can be accomplished using light weighted optics, improved structures, and the development of mosaic Focal Plane Assemblies (mFPAs). A mFPA comprises multiple Charged Coupled Devices (CCD) mounted onto a single baseplate integrated at the focus plane of the instrument. Examples of current, or proposed, missions utilizing mFPA technology include FAME, GEST, Kepler, GAIA, LSST, and SNAP. The development of a mFPA mandates tight control on the design trades of component development, CCD definition and characterization, component integration, and performance verification testing. This paper addresses the results of the Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC), Advanced Technology Center (ATC) developed mFPA. The design trades and performance characterization are services provided by the LMSSC ATC but not detailed in this paper.

  17. 'Shooting at the sun god Apollo': the Apollonian-Dionysian balance of the TimeSlips Storytelling Project.

    PubMed

    George, Daniel R

    2013-09-01

    In The Birth of Tragedy, Friedrich Nietzsche celebrated the dueling forces of reason and emotion as personified by the ancient Greek gods Apollo and Dionysus. A subtle Apollonian-Dionysian balance can be observed in TimeSlips, a group-based creative storytelling activity developed in the 1990s and increasingly used in dementia care settings worldwide. This article explains how the Apollonion-Dionysian aspects of TimeSlips are beneficial not only for persons with dementia, but also for their carers. Narrative data from medical students at Penn State College of Medicine who participated in TimeSlips at a local retirement community are shared. PMID:23722245

  18. Stress interaction of strike-slip and thrust faults associated with the 2010 M=7.0 Haiti earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, J.; Stein, R. S.; Sevilgen, V.; Toda, S.

    2010-12-01

    Recent investigations from combined seismological and space geodetic constraints suggest that the mainshock source faults of the 12 January 2010 Haiti earthquake might be complex and consist of both strike-slip and thrust faults. We calculate Coulomb stress changes on adjacent strike-slip and thrust faults caused by the 2010 M=7.0 rupture by considering a range of mainshock and receiver fault models. We find that for all of the mainshock source models examined, including Hayes et al. (submitted to Nature Geoscience), the Coulomb stress is calculated to have increased on sections of the Enriquillo Fault to both the east and west of the January ruptures. We assume the Enriquillo is dominantly strike-slip. While the magnitude of the calculated stress increase depends on the complexity of the proposed mainshock models, the Enriquillo Fault segment immediately south of Port-au-Prince is calculated to be within a zone of stress increases regardless if the Enriquillo Fault is assumed south dipping or vertical. We further calculate that 60-70% of the nodal planes of the aftershocks determined by Nettles & Hjorleifsdottir (GJI, 2010) were brought closer to failure by the mainshock. Relocating these aftershock locations north by 10 km would bring additional 10% of the aftershock nodal planes into Coulomb stress increases. Overall the 2010 Haiti earthquake illustrates the complex stress interaction between strike-slip and thrust motion on various segments of a larger compressional fault system.

  19. Age-Related Striatal Dopaminergic Denervation and Severity of a Slip Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Subashan; Studenski, Stephanie A.; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Striatal dopamine activity declines with normal aging. Age-related striatal dopaminergic denervation (SDD) has been implicated in standing balance and unperturbed gait. The goal of this study was to analyze the association between the degree of SDD and the magnitude of an unexpected slip perturbation induced during gait. Methods. Fifty healthy participants aged 20–86 years old underwent dopamine transporter positron emission tomography to classify SDD severity as mild, moderate, or severe. Participants also walked on a floor that was unexpectedly contaminated with a glycerol solution for gait testing. The magnitude of a slip was quantified using the peak slip velocity (PSV), measured at the slipping foot. Data were analyzed for both fast (greater than 1.2 m/s) and slow walkers as gait speed correlated with slip severity. All data analyses were age adjusted. Results. Greater severity of dopaminergic denervation in the caudate nucleus was correlated with higher PSV (p < .01) but only in the fast speed walking group. The relationship between SDD in the putamen and slip severity was not statistically significant in fast and slow walkers. Conclusions. Age-related SDD may impact the ability to recover from large perturbations during walking in individuals who typically walk fast. This effect, prominent in the caudate nucleus, may implicate a role of cognitive frontostriatal pathways in the executive control of gait when balance is challenged by large perturbations. Finally, a cautious gait behavior present in slow walkers may explain the apparent lack of involvement of striatal dopaminergic pathways in postural responses to slips. PMID:21746736

  20. Slip and Dilation Tendency Anlysis of McGinness Hills Geothermal Area

    DOE Data Explorer

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Slip and Dilation Tendency in focus areas Critically stressed fault segments have a relatively high likelihood of acting as fluid flow conduits (Sibson, 1994). As such, the tendency of a fault segment to slip (slip tendency; Ts; Morris et al., 1996) or to dilate (dilation tendency; Td; Ferrill et al., 1999) provides an indication of which faults or fault segments within a geothermal system are critically stressed and therefore likely to transmit geothermal fluids. The slip tendency of a surface is defined by the ratio of shear stress to normal stress on that surface: Ts = τ / σn (Morris et al., 1996). Dilation tendency is defined by the stress acting normal to a given surface: Td = (σ1-σn) / (σ1-σ3) (Ferrill et al., 1999). Slip and dilation were calculated using 3DStress (Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by ambient stress conditions. Values range from a maximum of 1, a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions to zero, a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate. Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the focus study areas at, McGinness Hills, Neal Hot Springs, Patua, Salt Wells, San Emidio, and Tuscarora on fault traces. As dip is not well constrained or unknown for many faults mapped in within these we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip tendency or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum tendency of each fault to slip or dilate. The resulting along-fault and fault-to-fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault-to-fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998

  1. Geodetic Measurements of Slow Slip and Tremor in Parkfield, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbridge, B. G.; Burgmann, R.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    It has been proposed that large bursts of deep tremor ( >20km depth) near Parkfield, CA are associated with quasi-periodic shear dislocations on the deep extent of the San Andreas Fault. Geodetic studies have shown that slow slip accompanies tremor in several subduction zones [e.g. Rogers and Dragert, 2003; Ide et al 2008]. However, prior to this study deformation associated with tremor in a transform fault environment had not been observed despite the ubiquitous presence of tremor and LFEs [Shelly et al, 2007; Nadeau et al 2005] and targeted attempts to observe this deformation [Smith 2009]. In this study we report geodetic measurements of surface strains associated with large tremor swarms that are inferred to be concurrent with slow-slip events with moment magnitudes exceeding 5 [Guilhem et al 2012]. The strain rates associated with these events are below the detection level of GPS networks, thus in order to observe this deformation we have utilized two long-baseline laser strainmeters (LSM) located in Cholame, CA. In order to overcome a small signal-to noise-ratio in the strainmeter data, we have stacked the strain records associated with more than 50 large tremor-burst events, each approximately 10 days in duration. The average surface strains associated with these events are on the order of several nanometers and correspond to fault slip on the order of 5 millimeters per event (assuming a fault patch extending ~25 km along-strike and ~15km in depth). The measured moment associated with these events is a factor of two smaller than previously proposed based on theoretical estimates [Guilhem et al 2012]. In this study we also explore the deformation associated with a large increase in tremor activity following the August 24, 2014 M6.0 Napa earthquake, the largest observed burst in the Parkfield-Cholame area since the large tremor rate increase associated with the 2004 Parkfield M6 earthquake.

  2. Evidence for right-lateral strike-slip environment in the Kutch basin of northwestern India from moment tensor inversion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ch. Nagabhushana; Rao, N. Purnachandra; Rastogi, B. K.

    2013-03-01

    The Kutch region located in northwestern part of India is an ancient rift basin that was active until Cretaceous period. The region falls close to the India-Arabia and the India-Eurasia plate boundaries and has experienced devastating earthquakes in the past, namely the 1819 Allah Bund earthquake, the 1956 Anjar earthquake and the 2001 Bhuj earthquake. To understand the tectonics of this region with respect to the adjacent plate boundaries, we invert seismic waveform data of 11 earthquakes in this region recorded by a network of the Institute of Seismological Research (ISR) during 2007-2009. The study yields focal mechanism solutions of reverse fault and strike-slip type mechanism. The inferred fault planes correlate well with the local trends of the known tectonic faults while the principal stress directions derived from stress inversion based on a linearized least squares approach, trend agreeably with the ambient stress field directions. A consistently right-lateral sense of shear is found on all the local faults as derived from each of the matching planes of the focal mechanism solutions computed in the present study. It is inferred that in the Kutch region a right-lateral strike-slip environment prevails along predominantly EW to NW-SE oriented deep-seated pre-existing faults in an otherwise compressive stress regime. This, in conjunction with the left-lateral movements along the Girnar mountain in southern Saurashtra, inferred from previous studies, indicates a westward escape of the Kutch-Saurashtra block as a consequence of the northward collision of the Indian plate with respect to the Eurasian landmass.

  3. Ambient Tremor Triggered by Long-term Slow Slip Event in Bungo Channel, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, K.; Hirose, H.; Matsuzawa, T.; Tanaka, S.; Maeda, T.

    2014-12-01

    Episodic tremor and slip (ETS) is a stick-slip in the transition zone between locked and stable sliding zones on the plate interface in Southwest Japan and Cascadia. ETS episode with duration of several days usually recurs at interval of several months at each segment. On the other hand, in the Bungo channel region where is the western edge of the ETS zone in SW Japan, tremor activity continued for several months during the long-term slow slip event (SSE) in 2003 and 2010. In this paper, the relationship between long-term SSE and surrounded triggered tremor is discussed. Tremor triggered by the long-term SSE is spatially localized in the narrow width of about 10 km at the shallowest part of the tremor zone, and at the neighboring area just downdip from the source fault of the SSE. The frequency distribution of tremor along the dip direction during the SSE period is consistent with the spatial distribution of total slip estimated for 2010 SSE. Therefore, the slip of the long-term SSE penetrated in the ETS zone may generate tremor. The daily number of the activated tremor is 12-14 during the SSE; however, it is 40-50 for regular ETS episode during the inter-SSE period. On the other hand, slip rates of the long-term SSE and ETS are typically 1 mm/d and 3 mm/d, respectively. Therefore, tremor rate may be controlled by slip rate. After SSEs in 2003 and 2010, tremor activity seems to slightly increase in the east region within 50 km from the triggered tremor area. Such 7-year period variation in tremor activity is observed in only the shallower side of the tremor zone. Moreover, pattern of the long-term variation seems to slightly migrate to east during a few years. We interpret that a tiny transient slip after the long-term SSE slowly propagates between transition and locked zones. Tremor activity at the shallowest part of the tremor zone in the Bungo channel continued longer than that of regular ETS in the late 2006 during the inter-SSE period. Associated tiny GPS

  4. Interfacial Slip in Polymer Blends with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Joseph; Jaber, Eihab; Gersappe, Dilip

    2010-03-01

    The interfacial region in polymer blends has been identified as a low viscosity region in which considerable slip can occur when the blend is subjected to shear forces. Here we use Molecular Dynamics simulations to establish the role that added nanoparticle fillers play in modifying the interfacial rheology. By choosing conditions under which the fillers are localized, either in the two phases or at the interface, we can look at the interplay between the strengthening capability of nanoparticles and the change in the interfacial slip behavior. We examine particle size, attraction between the particle and the polymer component, and the amount of filler in the material. Our studies are performed both above and below the point at which the filler particles form a transient network in the blend.

  5. Interfacial Slip in Polymer Blends with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Joseph; Jaber, Eihab; Gersappe, Dilip

    2009-03-01

    The interfacial region in polymer blends has been identified as a low viscosity region in which considerable slip can occur when the blend is subjected to shear forces. Here we use Molecular Dynamics simulations to establish the role that added nanoparticle fillers play in modifying the interfacial rheology. By choosing conditions under which the fillers are localized, either in the two phases or at the interface, we can look at the interplay between the strengthening capability of nanoparticles and the change in the interfacial slip behavior. We examine particle size, attraction between the particle and the polymer component, and the amount of filler in the material. Our studies are performed both above and below the point at which the filler particles form a transient network in the blend.

  6. Interfacial slip in polymer blends with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Joseph; Jaber, Eihab; Gersappe, Dilip

    2008-03-01

    The interfacial region in polymer blends has been identified as a low viscosity region in which considerable slip can occur when the blend is subjected to shear forces. Here, we use Molecular Dynamics simulations to establish the role that added nanofiller particles play in modifying the interfacial rheology. By choosing conditions under which the fillers are localized either in the two phases, or at the interface we can look at the interplay between the strengthening capability of nanoparticles, and the change in the interfacial slip behavior. We examine particle size, attraction between the particle and the polymer component and the amount of filler in the material. Our studies are performed both above and below the point at which the filler particles form a transient network in the blend.

  7. Wall slip and fluidity in emulsion flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, José; Shahidzadeh, Noushine; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    The microscopic origin of apparent wall slip is studied systematically using a confocal laser scanning microscope coupled to a rheometer. We obtain flow curves on a model emulsion from classical macroscopic measurements that are compared with flow curves obtained from microscopic measurements. By controlling the wetting properties of the shearing walls, we show that the characteristic length used in the so-called fluidity model, proposed by Goyon et al. [Nature (London) 454, 84 (2008), 10.1038/nature07026], can be understood in terms of roughness induced by adsorbed droplets on the surface. Additionally, we disentangle two different effects that contribute to the difference between micro- and macrorheology. Both effects manifest themselves as gap-dependent viscosities due to either the formation of a lubricating layer close to the shearing walls or cooperative effects when the flow is strongly confined. Finally, we show that the cooperative effects can also be translated into an effective slip velocity.

  8. Ductile shear zones beneath strike-slip faults: Implications for the thermomechanics of the San Andreas Fault Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, Wayne; England, Philip C.

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out two-dimensional (2-D) numerical experiments on the bulk flow of a layer of fluid that is driven in a strike-slip sense by constant velocities applied at its boundaries. The fluid has the (linearized) conventional rheology assumed to apply to lower crust/upper mantle rocks. The temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of the fluid and the shear heating that accompanies deformation have been incorporated into the calculations, as has thermal conduction in an overlying crustal layer. Two end-member boundary conditions have been considered, corresponding to a strong upper crust driving a weaker ductile substrate and a strong ductile layer driving a passive, weak crust. In many cases of practical interest, shear heating is concentrated close to the axial plane of the shear zone for either boundary condition. For these cases, the resulting steady state temperature field is well approximated by a cylindrical heat source embedded in a conductive half-space at a depth corresponding to the top of the fluid layer. This approximation, along with the application of a theoretical result for one-dimensional shear zones, permits us to obtain simple analytical approximations to the thermal effects of 2-D ductile shear zones for a range of assumed rheologies and crustal geotherms, making complex numerical calculations unnecessary. Results are compared with observable effects on heat flux near the San Andreas fault using constraints on the slip distribution across the entire fault system. Ductile shearing in the lower crust or upper mantle can explain the observed increase in surface heat flux southeast of the Mendocino triple junction and match the amplitude of the regional heat flux anomaly in the California Coast Ranges. Because ductile dissipation depends only weakly on slip rate, faults moving only a few millimeters per year can be important heat sources, and the superposition of effects of localized ductile shearing on both currently active and now

  9. Ductile shear zones beneath strike-slip faults: Implications for the thermomechanics of the San Andreas fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thatcher, W.; England, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out two-dimensional (2-D) numerical experiments on the bulk flow of a layer of fluid that is driven in a strike-slip sense by constant velocities applied at its boundaries. The fluid has the (linearized) conventional rheology assumed to apply to lower crust/upper mantle rocks. The temperature dependence of the effective viscosity of the fluid and the shear heating that accompanies deformation have been incorporated into the calculations, as has thermal conduction in an overlying crustal layer. Two end-member boundary conditions have been considered, corresponding to a strong upper crust driving a weaker ductile substrate and a strong ductile layer driving a passive, weak crust. In many cases of practical interest, shear heating is concentrated close to the axial plane of the shear zone for either boundary condition. For these cases, the resulting steady state temperature field is well approximated by a cylindrical heat source embedded in a conductive half-space at a depth corresponding to the top of the fluid layer. This approximation, along with the application of a theoretical result for one-dimensional shear zones, permits us to obtain simple analytical approximations to the thermal effects of 2-D ductile shear zones for a range of assumed rheologies and crustal geotherms, making complex numerical calculations unnecessary. Results are compared with observable effects on heat flux near the San Andreas fault using constraints on the slip distribution across the entire fault system. Ductile shearing in the lower crust or upper mantle can explain the observed increase in surface heat flux southeast of the Mendocino triple junction and match the amplitude of the regional heat flux anomaly in the California Coast Ranges. Because ductile dissipation depends only weakly on slip rate, faults moving only a few millimeters per year can be important heat sources, and the superposition of effects of localized ductile shearing on both currently active and now

  10. Origin and characterization of different stick-slip friction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, A.D.; Ducker, W.A.; Israelachvili, J.N.

    1996-09-18

    Mechanical parts often move, not smoothly, but in jerks known as stick-slip. Stick-slip motion may be regular (repetitive or periodic) or irregular (erratic or intermittent). In the case of frictional sliding, stick-slip can have serious and often undesirable consequences - resulting in noise (chatter), high energy loss (friction), surface damage (wear), and component failure. We review the origins of stick-slip friction and present new experimental results on model surfaces that clarify its different origins, its dependence on experimental conditions or `system parameters`, and how stick-slip can be controlled in practical situations. 20 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Elastic stress transfer as a diffusive process due to aseismic fault slip in response to fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface fluid injection is often followed by observations of an enlarging cloud of microseismicity. The cloud's diffusive growth is thought to be a direct response to the diffusion of elevated pore fluid pressure reaching pre-stressed faults, triggering small instabilities; the observed high rates of this growth are interpreted to reflect a relatively high permeability of a fractured subsurface [e.g., Shapiro, GJI 1997]. We investigate an alternative mechanism for growing a microseismic cloud: the elastic transfer of stress due to slow, aseismic slip on a subset of the pre-existing faults in this damaged subsurface. We show that the growth of the slipping region of the fault may be self-similar in a diffusive manner. While this slip is driven by fluid injection, we show that, for critically stressed faults, the apparent diffusion of this slow slip may quickly exceed the poroelastically driven diffusion of the elevated pore fluid pressure. Under these conditions, microseismicity can be first triggered by the off-fault stress perturbation due to the expanding region of slip on principal faults. This provides an alternative interpretation of diffusive growth rates in terms of the subsurface stress state rather than an enhanced hydraulic diffusivity. That such aseismic slip may occur, outpace fluid diffusion, and in turn trigger microseismic events, is also suggested by on- and near-fault observations in past and recently reported fluid injection experiments [e.g., Cornet et al., PAGEOPH 1997; Guglielmi et al., Science 2015]. The model of injection-induced slip assumes elastic off-fault behavior and a fault strength determined by the product of a constant friction coefficient and the local effective normal stress. The sliding region is enlarged by the pore pressure increase resolved on the fault plane. Remarkably, the rate of self-similar expansion may be determined by a single parameter reflecting both the initial stress state and the magnitude of the pore pressure

  12. IMPROVED MAGNESIUM OXIDE SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.

    1963-12-31

    A process for making an aqueous magnesium oxide slip casting slurry comprising the steps of mixing finely ground fused magnesium oxide with water, milling the slurry for at least 30 hours at a temperature of 2-10 deg C (the low temperature during milling inhibiting the formation of hydrated magnesium oxide), discharging the slurry from the mill, adding hydrochloric acid as a deflocculent, and adding a scum inhibitor is presented. (AEC)

  13. Slip complexity in earthquake fault models.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, J R; Ben-Zion, Y

    1996-01-01

    We summarize studies of earthquake fault models that give rise to slip complexities like those in natural earthquakes. For models of smooth faults between elastically deformable continua, it is critical that the friction laws involve a characteristic distance for slip weakening or evolution of surface state. That results in a finite nucleation size, or coherent slip patch size, h*. Models of smooth faults, using numerical cell size properly small compared to h*, show periodic response or complex and apparently chaotic histories of large events but have not been found to show small event complexity like the self-similar (power law) Gutenberg-Richter frequency-size statistics. This conclusion is supported in the present paper by fully inertial elastodynamic modeling of earthquake sequences. In contrast, some models of locally heterogeneous faults with quasi-independent fault segments, represented approximately by simulations with cell size larger than h* so that the model becomes "inherently discrete," do show small event complexity of the Gutenberg-Richter type. Models based on classical friction laws without a weakening length scale or for which the numerical procedure imposes an abrupt strength drop at the onset of slip have h* = 0 and hence always fall into the inherently discrete class. We suggest that the small-event complexity that some such models show will not survive regularization of the constitutive description, by inclusion of an appropriate length scale leading to a finite h*, and a corresponding reduction of numerical grid size. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:11607669

  14. Slip-trace-induced vicinal step destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupeau, C.; Camara, O.; Drouet, M.; Durinck, J.; Bonneville, J.; Colin, J.; Grilhé, J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold single crystals were deformed by uniaxial compression tests with the help of an experimental apparatus that allows one to characterize in situ, by UHV scanning tunneling microscopy, the evolution of surface structures under stress. It is demonstrated that the slip traces resulting from the emergence of moving dislocations at the free surface highly modify the organization of the vicinal steps. A model based on energetic considerations is proposed and discussed to explain the observed phenomenon.

  15. Surface slip during large Owens Valley earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddon, E. K.; Amos, C. B.; Zielke, O.; Jayko, A. S.; Bürgmann, R.

    2016-06-01

    The 1872 Owens Valley earthquake is the third largest known historical earthquake in California. Relatively sparse field data and a complex rupture trace, however, inhibited attempts to fully resolve the slip distribution and reconcile the total moment release. We present a new, comprehensive record of surface slip based on lidar and field investigation, documenting 162 new measurements of laterally and vertically displaced landforms for 1872 and prehistoric Owens Valley earthquakes. Our lidar analysis uses a newly developed analytical tool to measure fault slip based on cross-correlation of sublinear topographic features and to produce a uniquely shaped probability density function (PDF) for each measurement. Stacking PDFs along strike to form cumulative offset probability distribution plots (COPDs) highlights common values corresponding to single and multiple-event displacements. Lateral offsets for 1872 vary systematically from ˜1.0 to 6.0 m and average 3.3 ± 1.1 m (2σ). Vertical offsets are predominantly east-down between ˜0.1 and 2.4 m, with a mean of 0.8 ± 0.5 m. The average lateral-to-vertical ratio compiled at specific sites is ˜6:1. Summing displacements across subparallel, overlapping rupture traces implies a maximum of 7-11 m and net average of 4.4 ± 1.5 m, corresponding to a geologic Mw ˜7.5 for the 1872 event. We attribute progressively higher-offset lateral COPD peaks at 7.1 ± 2.0 m, 12.8 ± 1.5 m, and 16.6 ± 1.4 m to three earlier large surface ruptures. Evaluating cumulative displacements in context with previously dated landforms in Owens Valley suggests relatively modest rates of fault slip, averaging between ˜0.6 and 1.6 mm/yr (1σ) over the late Quaternary.

  16. New geologic slip rates for the Agua Blanca Fault, northern Baja California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, P. O.; Behr, W. M.; Fletcher, J. M.; Hinojosa-Corona, A.; Rockwell, T. K.

    2015-12-01

    Within the southern San Andreas transform plate boundary system, relatively little is known regarding active faulting in northern Baja California, Mexico, or offshore along the Inner Continental Borderland. The inner offshore system appears to be fed from the south by the Agua Blanca Fault (ABF), which strikes northwest across the Peninsular Ranges of northern Baja California. Therefore, the geologic slip rate for the ABF also provides a minimum slip rate estimate for the offshore system, which is connected to the north to faults in the Los Angeles region. Previous studies along the ABF determined slip rates of ~4-6 mm/yr (~10% of relative plate motion). However, these rates relied on imprecise age estimates and offset geomorphic features of a type that require these rates to be interpreted as minima, allowing for the possibility that the slip rate for the ABF may be greater. Although seismically quiescent, the surface trace of the ABF clearly reflects Holocene activity, and given its connectivity with the offshore fault system, more quantitative slip rates for the ABF are needed to better understand earthquake hazard for both US and Mexican coastal populations. Using newly acquired airborne LiDAR, we have mapped primary and secondary fault strands along the segmented western 70 km of the ABF. Minimal development has left the geomorphic record of surface slip remarkably well preserved, and we have identified abundant evidence meter to km scale right-lateral displacement, including new Late Quaternary slip rate sites. We verified potential reconstructions at each site during summer 2015 fieldwork, and selected an initial group of three high potential slip rate sites for detailed mapping and geochronologic analyses. Offset landforms, including fluvial terrace risers, alluvial fans, and incised channel fill deposits, record displacements of ~5-80 m, and based on minimal soil development, none appear older than early Holocene. To quantitatively constrain landform ages

  17. Periodic slow slip triggers megathrust zone earthquakes in northeastern Japan.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoki; Iinuma, Takeshi; Nadeau, Robert M; Bürgmann, Roland; Hino, Ryota

    2016-01-29

    Both aseismic and seismic slip accommodate relative motion across partially coupled plate-boundary faults. In northeastern Japan, aseismic slip occurs in the form of decelerating afterslip after large interplate earthquakes and as relatively steady slip on uncoupled areas of the subduction thrust. Here we report on a previously unrecognized quasi-periodic slow-slip behavior that is widespread in the megathrust zone. The repeat intervals of the slow slip range from 1 to 6 years and often coincide with or precede clusters of large [magnitude (M) ≥ 5] earthquakes, including the 2011 M 9 Tohoku-oki earthquake. These results suggest that inherently periodic slow-slip events result in periodic stress perturbations and modulate the occurrence time of larger earthquakes. The periodicity in the slow-slip rate has the potential to help refine time-dependent earthquake forecasts. PMID:26823425

  18. Motion of an inclined cylinder on an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2015-09-01

    We consider in this paper the motion of an inclined cylinder on an inclined plane. At low inclined plane angles, the cylinder rolls without slipping across the incline, in a direction perpendicular to its long axis. At steeper angles, long cylinders follow a straight line path in a direction that veers away from the low angle path. Short cylinders follow a curved path. These effects are described in terms of a transition from rolling to sliding as the incline angle is increased. The results help to explain why a vehicle normally turns in the direction that the wheels are pointing and why a vehicle can veer away from that direction on a slippery surface.

  19. Earthquake Rupture Process Based on the Source Slip Solution of the 2013 Mw 6.6 Lushan Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Q.; Shi, B.

    2013-12-01

    The Lushan, Sichuan Mw 6.6 earthquake on April 20, 2013 occurred on the southern segment of the Longmenshan fault zone. Three simplified analytical models of Lushan earthquake slip distributions have been established in this study, respectively, based on ω-square model, ω-cube model and the exponential decay source models. In order to improve the computational efficiency, we use the Fourier transform method to compute the stress changes due to slip distributions on the fault. Slip displacements and stress changes of each model have been compared to the source inversion slip data on the fault. In the spatial domain, both ω-cube and the exponential decay source models gives a result morphologically close to the source inversion solution derived by Wang et al., while ω-square source model with a constant stress distribution inside a circular slip area with a given abrupt stress changes (infinite) at edge is clearly inconsistent with the source inversion solution of slip distribution appearance. In the frequency domain, the spectrum of actual slip on the fault decays with ω-3.6, which is close to the ω-cube source model. In a comparison between the theoretical source models proposed in this study and the inversion source solution from this earthquake, our result shows that the ω-cube source model could be much close to the source rupture process of the Lushan event. Moreover, the ω-cube source model suggests that the positive stress changes on the fault plane could occur in the area where fault slip displacement exists, which means that the spatial distribution of aftershocks may occur in the main-shock slip zone. Moreover, differing with the classical ω-square circular source model, the ω-cube circular source model corresponds directly to a nonsingular stress distribution, and the far-field stress changes are inversely proportional to the distance r. The current study could provide us an effective way in source slip constraint, and gives us deep

  20. Superlubric to stick-slip sliding of incommensurate graphene flakes on graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wijk, M. M.; Dienwiebel, M.; Frenken, J. W. M.; Fasolino, A.

    2013-12-01

    We calculate the friction of fully mobile graphene flakes sliding on graphite. For incommensurately stacked flakes, we find a sudden and reversible increase in friction with load, in agreement with experimental observations. The transition from smooth sliding to stick-slip and the corresponding increase in friction is neither due to rotations to commensurate contact nor to dislocations but to a pinning caused by vertical distortions of edge atoms also when they are saturated by hydrogen. This behavior should apply to all layered materials with strong in-plane bonding.

  1. Stick-slip melting of a boundary lubricant between two rigid surfaces with nanoscale asperities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyashenko, I. A.; Vinnichenko, I. V.

    2013-09-01

    With a simple mechanical analog of the elastic tribological system, the friction of two rough surfaces is studied using the model of first-order phase transitions. The surfaces rub under boundary friction conditions in the presence of a lubricant layer in between. Stick-slip motion is considered, which is due to periodic phase transitions arising between kinetic friction conditions. It is shown that when rubbing surfaces are rough, a time-varying domain structure with a spatially distributed order parameter occurs in the plane of friction during motion.

  2. Slip-parallel seismic lineations on the Northern Hayward Fault, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldhauser, F.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Cole, A.

    1999-01-01

    A high-resolution relative earthquake location procedure is used to image the fine-scale seismicity structure of the northern Hayward fault, California. The seismicity defines a narrow, near-vertical fault zone containing horizontal alignments of hypocenters extending along the fault zone. The lineations persist over the 15-year observation interval, implying the localization of conditions on the fault where brittle failure conditions are met. The horizontal orientation of the lineations parallels the slip direction of the fault, suggesting that they are the result of the smearing of frictionally weak material along the fault plane over thousands of years.

  3. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains how our weather occurs, and why Solar radiation is responsible. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  4. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how they form. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  5. NASA Connect: 'Plane Weather'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Excerpt from the NASA Connect show 'Plane Weather' This clip explains what high and low pressure weather systems are, and how these affect weather patterns. Weather affects our daily lives. The elements of weather: rain, wind, fog, ice and snow affect the operation and flight of an airplane. In this program, NASA and FAA researchers will introduce students to math, science, and weather; demonstrate how these elements influence flight; and show how NASA and FAA research is used to limit the effects of these elements on flight. Students will examine: the tools, techniques, and technologies used by engineers and scientists to detect these and other climatological factors affecting aircraft in flight. The lesson and classroom experiment will involve students in the scientific process and emphasizing problem solving, measurement, and reasoning skills.

  6. Detectability of slow slip beneath the seismogenic zone of strike-slip faults using borehole tiltmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chery, J.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades, geodetic tools like C-GPS allowed the detection of slow slip events associated with transient motion below the seismogenic zone. This new class of fault motion lead us to revise the standard version of the seismic cycle simply including coseismic, postseismic and interseismic phases. Most of these discoveries occurred on subduction margins in various places like Japan, Cascadia, Chile and Indonesia. By contrast, GPS and strainmeters have provided little evidence of slow slip beneath the seismogenic zone of large continental faults like the San Andreas fault or the North Anatolian fault. Because the detectability of such motions is mostly tributary from instrumental precision, we examine the theoretical capability of tiltmeter arrays for detecting horizontal motion of a buried vertical fault. We define the slipping part of the strike-slip fault like a buried rectangular patch submitted to horizontal motion. This motion provides horizontal and vertical surface deformation as a function of both patch geometry (length, width, depth) and motion amplitude. Using a dislocation buried at 15km depth, we compute the maximum motion and tilt as a function of seismic moment. Assuming yields of detectability of 1mm for GPS horizontal motion and 10 nrad for a tiltmeter, we show that small slip events could be better detected using high resolution and stability tiltmeters. We then examine how tiltmeters arrays could be used for such a purpose. In particular, we discuss how to deal with usual problems often plaguing tiltmeters data like instrumental drift, borehole coupling and hydrological strain.

  7. Simulation of Tremor and Slow Slip Earthquakes Along a Strike-Slip Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payton, K. A.; Cochran, E. S.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.; Dieterich, J. H.; Harrington, R. M.; Kroll, K.

    2014-12-01

    We use an earthquake simulator to investigate the conditions that may result in tectonic tremor. Tremor comprises small seismic events often associated with slow slip earthquakes (SSEs) that were initially discovered in subduction zones, but have subsequently been observed along transform faults such as the San Andreas Fault. For this study, our primary region of interest is the Parkfield-Cholame segment of the San Andreas, which is located between the locked segment to the south and the creeping segment to the north. Due to Parkfield's unique history of successive earthquakes at quasi-regular intervals, deep borehole seismometers were installed in this region, enabling the discovery of low-amplitude tectonic tremor. To better understand the fault properties that result in SSEs and tremor, we utilize the earthquake simulator RSQSim to simulate multi-cycle SSEs and tremor along a planar strike-slip fault. RSQSim is a computationally efficient method that uses rate- and state- dependent friction to simulate a wide range of event sizes for long time histories of slip [Dieterich and Richards-Dinger, 2010; Richards-Dinger and Dieterich, 2012]. RSQSim has been previously used to investigate slow slip events in Cascadia [Colella et al., 2011; 2012]. Here, we examine a suite of parameters to understand the influence of normal stress, rate-and-state constants a and b, and slip speed as well as the distribution of tremor patches on tremor and SSE occurrence. We compare the simulation results to previous tremor observations.

  8. Quantifying Fault Slip Rate Variations and Earthquake Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowie, Patience; Roberts, Gerald; Phillips, Richard

    2010-05-01

    An outstanding challenge to our understanding of fault behaviour remains the appropriate characterisation and mechanistic understanding of episodic fault activity and temporal variations in slip rate. This gap in understanding inhibits our ability to reconcile geodetic and geologic strain rates and hence predict future earthquakes. Existing models for earthquake recurrence and seismic hazard are based on the key principle that a mean recurrence interval, Tmeancan be defined. For areas of active crustal deformation where there are several active faults, and/or the regional strain rate is relatively low, historical earthquake catalogues are unable to provide adequate constraints on Tmean because the earthquake cycle of some faults is longer than the catalogue itself. Paleoseismological trench studies have extended the window of observation back for a few thousand years and suggest that large temporal variability in recurrence interval occurs on individual faults. Current practice in seismic hazard analysis is to characterise variability in recurrence interval by defining the Coefficient of Variation (CV) for a sequence of earthquakes where CV = σ/ Tmean, and σ is the standard deviation of the inter-event times. Several studies acknowledge that CV values for earthquake recurrence intervals are poorly constrained yet small differences in CV can lead to order of magnitude difference in conditional probability calculations. We use a numerical fault growth model, which includes earthquake rupture, healing and elastic interaction, to investigate the controls on CV, both spatially across the fault array and through time as the fault pattern evolves. We find that CV varies inversely with fault slip rate, which itself varies as a function of fault zone complexity, i.e., when the strain is partitioned on more than one structure CV increases. However, we also find that CV is not the most informative parameter to measure in our model output. Firstly, it only takes into account

  9. Slow Slip Events on a 760 mm Long Granite Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclaskey, G.; Yamashita, F.

    2015-12-01

    We describe slow slip events and dynamic rupture events generated on a newly constructed large-scale biaxial friction apparatus at Cornell University that provide insights into the mechanisms of aseismic and seismic slip. We find that, under nominally similar experimental conditions, the 760 mm long granite sample sometimes slips in dynamic stick-slip events and sometimes relieves accumulated shear stress through slow slip events. To provide insights into this curious behavior and the underlying mechanisms, fault slip and shear stress are each measured at 8 locations along the 760 mm long fault. This allows us to map slow slip fronts and the nucleation and propagation of dynamic fault rupture. The granite sample is also instrumented with an array of piezoelectric sensors that are the laboratory equivalent of a seismic network. When the sample is loaded relatively slowly, at 0.03 MPa/s, slow slip occurs on large sections of the fault and the slow slipping region soon expands to the sample boundary. In this case, stress is released in a slow slip event with peak slip velocities < 2 mm/s. Alternatively, when one end of the sample is loaded rapidly (4 MPa/s), or the sample is allowed to heal in stationary contact for a few minutes, slow slip initiates near the load point and accelerates to slip velocities exceeding 200 mm/s before the slow slipping region expands all the way to the sample boundary. This produces a dynamic slip event (stick-slip). The dynamic slip events radiate seismic waves equivalent to a M = -2.5 earthquake. In contrast, the laboratory-generated slow slip events are predominantly aseismic and produce only bursts of tiny and discrete seismic events (M = -6) reminiscent of swarms of microseismicity. The experiments illustrate how a single fault can slide slowly and aseismically or rapidly and dynamically depending on stress state and loading conditions. We compare the behavior observed on this Cornell apparatus to the behavior of other large

  10. Detailed history of slip along the Sunda mega-thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão, Nuno; Lindsay, Anthony; Murphy, Shane; McCloskey, John; Bhloscaidh, Mairead Nic; Nalbant, Suleyman

    2013-04-01

    We undertook a reconstruction of more than 200 years of deformation on the Sunda mega-thrust using the history of vertical displacement recorded in the stratigraphy of coral micro-atolls. This reconstruction gave an unprecedented opportunity to understand the distributions of slip on the recent series of great earthquakes and its relationship with coupling. We have seen with the recent earthquakes that, whilst the slip-coupling relationship may be complex and certainly depends on the pre-stress, the greatest slip generally occurs in areas of high coupling. We have also seen that the spatial distributions of the greatest slip reveals tessellation between earthquakes. Using Monte Carlo techniques, we compare ground deformation produced by different fractal slip distributions with micro-atoll coral data to estimate slip distributions for the 1797 and 1833 historical earthquakes. The resulting slip estimations have a more realistic spatial distribution and provide a better fit to the micro-atoll data than previously published solutions. Preliminary results seem to imply that the 1797 and 1833 ruptures reveal a level of complementarity, where the greatest values of slip tessellate with the greatest slip values observed in the two great earthquakes of 2007 and the earthquake of 2010. In addition, the spatial stacking of all slips from all available earthquake slip distributions reveals a strong correlation with the spatial distribution of the coupling. Discrepancies in the spatial slip-coupling correlation, although strongly influenced by the uncertainties of the slip distributions, and with the 1797 and 1833 earthquakes playing a stronger role, can still be used as a way to pin-point possible areas of slip deficit when compared with the spatial distribution of coupling. This seems to imply that correspondence between the slip probability in 1797 and 1833 and present-day earthquakes slip and coupling appears to show the same basic relationship indicating that the broad

  11. Soft-bed experiments beneath Engabreen, Norway: Regelation, infiltration, basal slip and bed deformation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, N.R.; Hooyer, T.S.; Fischer, U.H.; Cohen, D.; Moore, P.L.; Jackson, M.; Lappegard, G.; Kohler, J.

    2007-01-01

    To avoid some of the limitations of studying soft-bed processes through boreholes, a prism of simulated till (1.8 m ?? 1.6 m ?? 0.45 m) with extensive instrumentation was constructed in a trough blasted in the rock bed of Engabreen, a temperate glacier in Norway. Tunnels there provide access to the bed beneath 213 m of ice. Pore-water pressure was regulated in the prism by pumping water to it. During experiments lasting 7-12 days, the glacier regelated downward into the prism to depths of 50-80 mm, accreting ice-infiltrated till at rates predicted by theory. During periods of sustained high pore-water pressure (70-100% of overburden), ice commonly slipped over the prism, due to a water layer at the prism surface. Deformation of the prism was activated when this layer thinned to a sub-millimeter thickness. Shear strain in the til