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Sample records for active smoothened mutants

  1. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol.

  2. Inhibition mechanism exploration of investigational drug TAK-441 as inhibitor against Vismodegib-resistant Smoothened mutant.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Yuji; Nakashima, Kosuke; Kondo, Shigeru; Ogawa, Kazumasa; Sasaki, Satoshi; Matsui, Hideki

    2014-01-15

    Hedgehog signaling is a driving force in medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), making it an attractive therapeutic target. Vismodegib recently received FDA approval for the treatment of inoperable BCC, but a drug-resistant Smoothened (Smo) mutant (D473H) was identified in a clinical study. TAK-441 is a pyrrolo[3,2-c]pyridine-4-one derivative that potently inhibits Hh signal transduction and is currently under investigation in clinical trials. We demonstrated that TAK-441 inhibits reporter activity in D473H-transfected cells with an IC50 of 79nM, while Vismodegib showed an IC50=7100nM. In order to investigate the mode of inhibition, we evaluated the Smo inhibitors with three different binding assays, such as [(3)H]-TAK-441 membrane binding assay, affinity selection-MS detection assay, and bodipy-cylopamine whole cell assay. In three different assays, Vismodegib and cyclopamine showed lower affinity for the D473H mutant in comparison with wild-type Smo. On the other hand, TAK-441 showed almost equal binding affinity for the D473H mutant compared with wild-type Smo in the binding assays, although TAK-441 binds to the same binding site as two other well-known inhibitors. These in vitro findings suggest that TAK-441 has the potential for clinical use in cancers that are dependent on Hedgehog signaling, including wild-type tumors and Vismodegib-resistant D473H mutants.

  3. Novel small molecules targeting ciliary transport of Smoothened and oncogenic Hedgehog pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bomi; Messias, Ana C.; Schorpp, Kenji; Geerlof, Arie; Schneider, Günter; Saur, Dieter; Hadian, Kamyar; Sattler, Michael; Wanker, Erich E.; Hasenöder, Stefan; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Smoothened (Smo) to the primary cilium (PC) is a potential target to inhibit oncogenic Hh pathway activation in a large number of tumors. One drawback is the appearance of Smo mutations that resist drug treatment, which is a common reason for cancer treatment failure. Here, we undertook a high content screen with compounds in preclinical or clinical development and identified ten small molecules that prevent constitutive active mutant SmoM2 transport into PC for subsequent Hh pathway activation. Eight of the ten small molecules act through direct interference with the G protein-coupled receptor associated sorting protein 2 (Gprasp2)-SmoM2 ciliary targeting complex, whereas one antagonist of ionotropic receptors prevents intracellular trafficking of Smo to the PC. Together, these findings identify several compounds with the potential to treat drug-resistant SmoM2-driven cancer forms, but also reveal off-target effects of established drugs in the clinics. PMID:26931153

  4. Pancreatic fibroblasts smoothen their activities via AKT–GLI2–TGFα

    PubMed Central

    Rustgi, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic stromal fibroblasts provide structural support. Activated fibroblasts are critical in the tumor microenvironment. In this issue of Genes & Development, Liu and colleagues (pp. 1943–1955) unravel the finding that depletion of Smoothened (Smo) in pancreatic stromal fibroblasts results in AKT activation and noncanonical GLI2 activation with subsequent TGFα secretion, activation of EGFR in pancreatic epithelial cells, and augmentation of acinar–ductal metaplasia. Additionally, Smo-mediated signaling has proproliferative effects on pancreatic tumor cells. PMID:27664234

  5. The presence of primary cilia in cancer cells does not predict responsiveness to modulation of smoothened activity.

    PubMed

    Spann, Ashley L; Yuan, Kun; Goliwas, Kayla F; Steg, Adam D; Kaushik, Devanshu D; Kwon, Yeon-Jin; Frost, Andra R

    2015-07-01

    Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that regulate smoothened-dependent activation of the GLI transcription factors in canonical hedgehog signaling. In many cancers, primary cilia are markedly decreased or absent. The lack of primary cilia may inhibit or alter canonical hedgehog signaling and, thereby, interfere in the cellular responsiveness to modulators of smoothened activity. Clinical trials of smoothened antagonists for cancer treatment have shown the best response in basal cell carcinomas, with limited response in other solid tumors. To determine whether the presence or absence of primary cilia in cancer cells will predict their responsiveness to modulation of smoothened activity, we compared the ability of an agonist and/or inhibitor of smoothened (SAG and SANT1, respectively) to modulate GLI-mediated transcription, as measured by GLI1 mRNA level or GLI-luciferase reporter activity, in non-cancer cells with primary cilia (ovarian surface epithelial cells and breast fibroblasts), in cancer cells that cannot assemble primary cilia (MCF7, MDA-MB-231 cell lines), and in cancer cells with primary cilia (SKOV3, PANC1 cell lines). As expected, SAG and SANT1 resulted in appropriate modulation of GLI transcriptional activity in ciliated non-cancer cells, and failed to modulate GLI transcriptional activity in cancer cells without primary cilia. However, there was also no modulation of GLI transcriptional activity in either ciliated cancer cell line. SAG treatment of SKOV3 induced localization of smoothened to primary cilia, as assessed by immunofluorescence, even though there was no increase in GLI transcriptional activity, suggesting a defect in activation of SMO in the primary cilia or in steps later in the hedgehog pathway. In contrast to SKOV3, SAG treatment of PANC1 did not cause the localization of smoothened to primary cilia. Our data demonstrate that the presence of primary cilia in the cancer epithelial cells lines tested does not indicate their

  6. Pitchfork and Gprasp2 Target Smoothened to the Primary Cilium for Hedgehog Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bomi; Padula, Daniela; Burtscher, Ingo; Landerer, Cedric; Lutter, Dominik; Theis, Fabian; Messias, Ana C.; Geerlof, Arie; Sattler, Michael; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The seven-transmembrane receptor Smoothened (Smo) activates all Hedgehog (Hh) signaling by translocation into the primary cilia (PC), but how this is regulated is not well understood. Here we show that Pitchfork (Pifo) and the G protein-coupled receptor associated sorting protein 2 (Gprasp2) are essential components of an Hh induced ciliary targeting complex able to regulate Smo translocation to the PC. Depletion of Pifo or Gprasp2 leads to failure of Smo translocation to the PC and lack of Hh target gene activation. Together, our results identify a novel protein complex that is regulated by Hh signaling and required for Smo ciliary trafficking and Hh pathway activation. PMID:26901434

  7. Identification of Novel Smoothened Ligands Using Structure-Based Docking

    PubMed Central

    Torosyan, Hayarpi; Parathaman, Pranavan; Irwin, John J.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    The seven transmembrane protein Smoothened is required for Hedgehog signaling during embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. Inappropriate activation of the Hedgehog signalling pathway leads to cancers such as basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma, and Smoothened inhibitors are now available clinically to treat these diseases. However, resistance to these inhibitors rapidly develops thereby limiting their efficacy. The determination of Smoothened crystal structures enables structure-based discovery of new ligands with new chemotypes that will be critical to combat resistance. In this study, we docked 3.2 million available, lead-like molecules against Smoothened, looking for those with high physical complementarity to its structure; this represents the first such campaign against the class Frizzled G-protein coupled receptor family. Twenty-one high-ranking compounds were selected for experimental testing, and four, representing three different chemotypes, were identified to antagonize Smoothened with IC50 values better than 50 μM. A screen for analogs revealed another six molecules, with IC50 values in the low micromolar range. Importantly, one of the most active of the new antagonists continued to be efficacious at the D473H mutant of Smoothened, which confers clinical resistance to the antagonist vismodegib in cancer treatment. PMID:27490099

  8. GPCR-like signaling mediated by smoothened contributes to acquired chemoresistance through activating Gli

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Smoothened (Smo), which possesses a structural similarity with classic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), is the most important molecular target in Hedgehog (Hh) signaling system for developing anticancer drugs; however, whether Smo may transmit GPCR-like signaling to activate the canonical transcriptional factor Gli of Hh signaling system and consequently to be involved in the Gli-dependent biological events remains controversial. Results In this study, using the acquired chemoresistant cancer cell lines and their respective parental cells, we found that Smo may activate Gli through Gαi, Gβγ-JNK signaling axis, thereby promoting the Gli-dependent acquired chemoresistance. These observations were further complementarily strengthened by data obtained from chemosensitive cancer cells with artificially elevated Hh pathway activity. Conclusions Hence, our data demonstrate that GPCR-like signaling mediated by Smo contributes to the acquired chemoresistance through activating the canonical Hh transcriptional factor Gli; therefore improving our knowledge of the nature of the signal transduction of Smo and the molecular mechanisms responsible for the acquired chemoresistance maintained by Hh pathway. Moreover, our data that JNK after activated by Smo-Gβγ signaling axis may stimulate the Gli activity and consequently promotes acquired chemoresistance expose a promising and potential target for developing anti-cancer drugs aimed at Hh pathway and for combating the acquired resistance raised by using of anti-cancer drugs targeting Smo. PMID:24393163

  9. Cholesterol activates the G-protein coupled receptor Smoothened to promote Hedgehog signaling

    PubMed Central

    Luchetti, Giovanni; Sircar, Ria; Kong, Jennifer H; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Sagner, Andreas; Byrne, Eamon FX; Covey, Douglas F; Siebold, Christian; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is necessary for the function of many G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). We find that cholesterol is not just necessary but also sufficient to activate signaling by the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway, a prominent cell-cell communication system in development. Cholesterol influences Hh signaling by directly activating Smoothened (SMO), an orphan GPCR that transmits the Hh signal across the membrane in all animals. Unlike many GPCRs, which are regulated by cholesterol through their heptahelical transmembrane domains, SMO is activated by cholesterol through its extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Residues shown to mediate cholesterol binding to the CRD in a recent structural analysis also dictate SMO activation, both in response to cholesterol and to native Hh ligands. Our results show that cholesterol can initiate signaling from the cell surface by engaging the extracellular domain of a GPCR and suggest that SMO activity may be regulated by local changes in cholesterol abundance or accessibility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20304.001 PMID:27705744

  10. Hedgehog-regulated atypical PKC promotes phosphorylation and activation of Smoothened and Cubitus interruptus in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kai; Liu, Yajuan; Fan, Junkai; Epperly, Garretson; Gao, Tianyan; Jiang, Jin; Jia, Jianhang

    2014-01-01

    Smoothened (Smo) is essential for transduction of the Hedgehog (Hh) signal in both insects and vertebrates. Cell surface/cilium accumulation of Smo is thought to play an important role in Hh signaling, but how the localization of Smo is controlled remains poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that atypical PKC (aPKC) regulates Smo phosphorylation and basolateral accumulation in Drosophila wings. Inactivation of aPKC by either RNAi or a mutation inhibits Smo basolateral accumulation and attenuates Hh target gene expression. In contrast, expression of constitutively active aPKC elevates basolateral accumulation of Smo and promotes Hh signaling. The aPKC-mediated phosphorylation of Smo at Ser680 promotes Ser683 phosphorylation by casein kinase 1 (CK1), and these phosphorylation events elevate Smo activity in vivo. Moreover, aPKC has an additional positive role in Hh signaling by regulating the activity of Cubitus interruptus (Ci) through phosphorylation of the Zn finger DNA-binding domain. Finally, the expression of aPKC is up-regulated by Hh signaling in a Ci-dependent manner. Our findings indicate a direct involvement of aPKC in Hh signaling beyond its role in cell polarity. PMID:25349414

  11. SUMO regulates the activity of Smoothened and Costal-2 in Drosophila Hedgehog signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Yajuan; Jiang, Kai; Jia, Jianhang

    2017-01-01

    In Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, the GPCR-family protein Smoothened (Smo) acts as a signal transducer that is regulated by phosphorylation and ubiquitination, which ultimately change the cell surface accumulation of Smo. However, it is not clear whether Smo is regulated by other post-translational modifications, such as sumoylation. Here, we demonstrate that knockdown of the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) pathway components Ubc9 (a SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2), PIAS (a SUMO-protein ligase E3), and Smt3 (the SUMO isoform in Drosophila) by RNAi prevents Smo accumulation and alters Smo activity in the wing. We further show that Hh-induced-sumoylation stabilizes Smo, whereas desumoylation by Ulp1 destabilizes Smo in a phosphorylation independent manner. Mechanistically, we discover that excessive Krz, the Drosophila β-arrestin 2, inhibits Smo sumoylation and prevents Smo accumulation through Krz regulatory domain. Krz likely facilitates the interaction between Smo and Ulp1 because knockdown of Krz by RNAi attenuates Smo-Ulp1 interaction. Finally, we provide evidence that Cos2 is also sumoylated, which counteracts its inhibitory role on Smo accumulation in the wing. Taken together, we have uncovered a novel mechanism for Smo activation by sumoylation that is regulated by Hh and Smo interacting proteins. PMID:28195188

  12. Regulation of Smoothened Phosphorylation and High-Level Hedgehog Signaling Activity by a Plasma Membrane Associated Kinase.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangxi; Li, Shuang; Han, Yuhong; Tong, Chao; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-family protein Smoothened (Smo). Upon stimulation, Smo accumulates on the cell surface in Drosophila or primary cilia in vertebrates, which is thought to be essential for its activation and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Hh stimulates the binding of Smo to a plasma membrane-associated kinase Gilgamesh (Gish)/CK1γ and that Gish fine-tunes Hh pathway activity by phosphorylating a Ser/Thr cluster (CL-II) in the juxtamembrane region of Smo carboxyl-terminal intracellular tail (C-tail). We find that CL-II phosphorylation is promoted by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of Smo C-tail and depends on cell surface localization of both Gish and Smo. Consistent with CL-II being critical for high-threshold Hh target gene expression, its phosphorylation appears to require higher levels of Hh or longer exposure to the same level of Hh than PKA-site phosphorylation on Smo. Furthermore, we find that vertebrate CK1γ is localized at the primary cilium to promote Smo phosphorylation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation. Our study reveals a conserved mechanism whereby Hh induces a change in Smo subcellular localization to promote its association with and activation by a plasma membrane localized kinase, and provides new insight into how Hh morphogen progressively activates Smo.

  13. Smoothened Regulates Migration of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis via Activation of Rho GTPase Signaling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei-Xiang; Zhu, Shang-Ling; Zhang, Bai-Yu; Shi, Yi-Ming; Feng, Xiao-Xue; Liu, Fang; Huang, Jian-Lin; Zheng, Song Guo

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) acquire aggressive phenotypes characterized with enhanced migration abilities and inherent invasive qualities in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Smoothened (Smo) is a key component of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling and contributes to tumor cell invasion and metastasis. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of Smo in the modulation of cell migration and explore the underlying molecular mechanism(s). FLSs were isolated from RA synovium. Shh levels were regulated by a Smo agonist (purmorphamine), Smo antagonist (KAAD-cyclopamine), or small interfering RNA targeting the Smo gene (Smo-siRNA) in RA-FLSs. Expression of Smo was detected by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Cell migration was examined by Transwell assay and activation of Rho GTPases was measured by pull-down assays. Incubation with purmorphamine resulted in a significant increase of cell migration and activation of Rho GTPase signaling compared to controls (P < 0.05). However, treatment with KAAD-cyclopamine or transfection with Smo-siRNA suppressed migration of RA-FLSs and showed an inhibitory effect of Rho GTPase signaling. Together, these results suggest that Smo plays an important role in RA-FLSs migration through activation of Rho GTPase signaling and may contribute to progression of RA, thus, targeting Shh signal may have a therapeutic potential in patients with RA.

  14. Smoothened Regulates Migration of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis via Activation of Rho GTPase Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Wei-xiang; Zhu, Shang-ling; Zhang, Bai-yu; Shi, Yi-ming; Feng, Xiao-xue; Liu, Fang; Huang, Jian-lin; Zheng, Song Guo

    2017-01-01

    Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) acquire aggressive phenotypes characterized with enhanced migration abilities and inherent invasive qualities in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Smoothened (Smo) is a key component of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling and contributes to tumor cell invasion and metastasis. The objective of this study is to investigate the role of Smo in the modulation of cell migration and explore the underlying molecular mechanism(s). FLSs were isolated from RA synovium. Shh levels were regulated by a Smo agonist (purmorphamine), Smo antagonist (KAAD-cyclopamine), or small interfering RNA targeting the Smo gene (Smo-siRNA) in RA-FLSs. Expression of Smo was detected by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Cell migration was examined by Transwell assay and activation of Rho GTPases was measured by pull-down assays. Incubation with purmorphamine resulted in a significant increase of cell migration and activation of Rho GTPase signaling compared to controls (P < 0.05). However, treatment with KAAD-cyclopamine or transfection with Smo-siRNA suppressed migration of RA-FLSs and showed an inhibitory effect of Rho GTPase signaling. Together, these results suggest that Smo plays an important role in RA-FLSs migration through activation of Rho GTPase signaling and may contribute to progression of RA, thus, targeting Shh signal may have a therapeutic potential in patients with RA. PMID:28261216

  15. Clobetasol and Halcinonide Act as Smoothened Agonists to Promote Myelin Gene Expression and RxRγ Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    De Nardis, Velia; Di Giandomenico, Daniele; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Scardapane, Marco; Poma, Anna; Ragnini-Wilson, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    One of the causes of permanent disability in chronic multiple sclerosis patients is the inability of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) to terminate their maturation program at lesions. To identify key regulators of myelin gene expression acting at the last stages of OPC maturation we developed a drug repositioning strategy based on the mouse immortalized oligodendrocyte (OL) cell line Oli-neu brought to the premyelination stage by stably expressing a key factor regulating the last stages of OL maturation. The Prestwick Chemical Library® of 1,200 FDA-approved compound(s) was repositioned at three dosages based on the induction of Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) expression. Drug hits were further validated using dosage-dependent reproducibility tests and biochemical assays. The glucocorticoid class of compounds was the most highly represented and we found that they can be divided in three groups according to their efficacy on MBP up-regulation. Since target identification is crucial before bringing compounds to the clinic, we searched for common targets of the primary screen hits based on their known chemical-target interactomes, and the pathways predicted by top ranking compounds were validated using specific inhibitors. Two of the top ranking compounds, Halcinonide and Clobetasol, act as Smoothened (Smo) agonists to up-regulate myelin gene expression in the Oli-neuM cell line. Further, RxRγ activation is required for MBP expression upon Halcinonide and Clobetasol treatment. These data indicate Clobetasol and Halcinonide as potential promyelinating drugs and also provide a mechanistic understanding of their mode of action in the pathway leading to myelination in OPCs. Furthermore, our classification of glucocorticoids with respect to MBP expression provides important novel insights into their effects in the CNS and a rational criteria for their choice in combinatorial therapies in de-myelinating diseases. PMID:26658258

  16. Clobetasol and Halcinonide Act as Smoothened Agonists to Promote Myelin Gene Expression and RxRγ Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Giampiero; Serone, Eliseo; De Nardis, Velia; Di Giandomenico, Daniele; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Scardapane, Marco; Poma, Anna; Ragnini-Wilson, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    One of the causes of permanent disability in chronic multiple sclerosis patients is the inability of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) to terminate their maturation program at lesions. To identify key regulators of myelin gene expression acting at the last stages of OPC maturation we developed a drug repositioning strategy based on the mouse immortalized oligodendrocyte (OL) cell line Oli-neu brought to the premyelination stage by stably expressing a key factor regulating the last stages of OL maturation. The Prestwick Chemical Library of 1,200 FDA-approved compound(s) was repositioned at three dosages based on the induction of Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) expression. Drug hits were further validated using dosage-dependent reproducibility tests and biochemical assays. The glucocorticoid class of compounds was the most highly represented and we found that they can be divided in three groups according to their efficacy on MBP up-regulation. Since target identification is crucial before bringing compounds to the clinic, we searched for common targets of the primary screen hits based on their known chemical-target interactomes, and the pathways predicted by top ranking compounds were validated using specific inhibitors. Two of the top ranking compounds, Halcinonide and Clobetasol, act as Smoothened (Smo) agonists to up-regulate myelin gene expression in the Oli-neuM cell line. Further, RxRγ activation is required for MBP expression upon Halcinonide and Clobetasol treatment. These data indicate Clobetasol and Halcinonide as potential promyelinating drugs and also provide a mechanistic understanding of their mode of action in the pathway leading to myelination in OPCs. Furthermore, our classification of glucocorticoids with respect to MBP expression provides important novel insights into their effects in the CNS and a rational criteria for their choice in combinatorial therapies in de-myelinating diseases.

  17. Trimeric G protein-CARMA1 axis links smoothened, the hedgehog receptor transducer, to NF-κB activation in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Qu, Changju; Liu, Yadong; Kunkalla, Kranthi; Singh, Rajesh R; Blonska, Marzenna; Lin, Xin; Agarwal, Nitin Kumar; Vega, Francisco

    2013-06-06

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoid malignancy in adults. Aberrant activation of Hedgehog (Hh) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathways is ubiquitously observed and known to mediate tumor growth, survival, and chemoresistance in DLBCL. Here, we find that activation of Hh signaling is positively correlated with NF-κB pathway in DLBCL tumors, and that smoothened (SMO), the signal transducer subunit of Hh pathway, contributes to NF-κB activation through recruiting G protein subunits Gαi and Gα12 to activate PKCβ/CARMA1/TRAF6/NEMO signaling axis followed by assembling of the CARMA1/BCL10/MALT1/TRAF6 complex to SMO. Moreover, functional inhibition of SMO enhances the cytotoxic effects of NF-κB inhibitor. Altogether, our study reveals a noncanonical Hh signaling pathway in which SMO activates trimeric G proteins and CARMA1-associated signaling complex, leading to NF-κB activation. This signaling cascade contributes to the survival of DLBCL and may serve as a potential target for combination therapies in DLBCL.

  18. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  19. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Eamon F. X.; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD-linker domain-TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains.

  20. Smoothened regulation in response to Hedgehog stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kai; Jia, Jianhang

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway play critical roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. A critical step in Hh signal transduction is how Hh receptor Patched (Ptc) inhibits the atypical G protein-coupled receptor Smoothened (Smo) in the absence of Hh and how this inhibition is release by Hh stimulation. It is unlikely that Ptc inhibits Smo by direct interaction. Here we discuss how Hh regulates the phosphorylation and ubiquitination of Smo, leading to cell surface and ciliary accumulation of Smo in Drosophila and vertebrate cells, respectively. In addition, we discuss how PI(4)P phospholipid acts in between Ptc and Smo to regulate Smo phosphorylation and activation in response to Hh stimulation. PMID:26973699

  1. A Smoothened-Evc2 complex transduces the Hedgehog signal at primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Dorn, Karolin V; Hughes, Casey E; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2012-10-16

    Vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is initiated at primary cilia by the ligand-triggered accumulation of Smoothened (Smo) in the ciliary membrane. The underlying biochemical mechanisms remain unknown. We find that Hh agonists promote the association between Smo and Evc2, a ciliary protein that is defective in two human ciliopathies. The formation of the Smo-Evc2 complex is under strict spatial control, being restricted to a distinct ciliary compartment, the EvC zone. Mutant Evc2 proteins that localize in cilia but are displaced from the EvC zone are dominant inhibitors of Hh signaling. Disabling Evc2 function blocks Hh signaling at a specific step between Smo and the downstream regulators protein kinase A and Suppressor of Fused, preventing activation of the Gli transcription factors. Our data suggest that the Smo-Evc2 signaling complex at the EvC zone is required for Hh signal transmission and elucidate the molecular basis of two human ciliopathies.

  2. Smoothened variants explain the majority of drug resistance in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Scott X; Sarin, Kavita Y; Whitson, Ramon J; Li, Jiang R; Kim, Geurim; Rezaee, Melika; Ally, Mina S; Kim, Jinah; Yao, Catherine; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Oro, Anthony E; Tang, Jean Y

    2015-03-09

    Advanced basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) frequently acquire resistance to Smoothened (SMO) inhibitors through unknown mechanisms. Here we identify SMO mutations in 50% (22 of 44) of resistant BCCs and show that these mutations maintain Hedgehog signaling in the presence of SMO inhibitors. Alterations include four ligand binding pocket mutations defining sites of inhibitor binding and four variants conferring constitutive activity and inhibitor resistance, illuminating pivotal residues that ensure receptor autoinhibition. In the presence of a SMO inhibitor, tumor cells containing either class of SMO mutants effectively outcompete cells containing the wild-type SMO. Finally, we show that both classes of SMO variants respond to aPKC-ι/λ or GLI2 inhibitors that operate downstream of SMO, setting the stage for the clinical use of GLI antagonists.

  3. Smoothened is a poor prognosis factor and a potential therapeutic target in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yiming; Niu, Mingshan; Xie, Peng; Yue, Chenglong; Liu, Ning; Qi, Zhenglei; Gao, Shangfeng; Liu, Hongmei; Shi, Qiong; Yu, Rutong; Liu, Xuejiao

    2017-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are associated with a high mortality rate. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of novel targeted therapeutics. Aberrant Hedgehog signaling has been directly linked to glioma. GDC-0449 is a novel small molecule inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling that blocks the activity of smoothened (Smo). In this study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of the smoothened inhibitor GDC-0449 on cell proliferation in human gliomas. We found that high expression of smoothened in glioma is a predictor of short overall survival and poor patient outcome. Our data suggest that GDC-0449 significantly inhibits the proliferation of glioma cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Our results demonstrate that GDC-0449 can effectively inhibit the migration and invasion of glioma cells. Furthermore, GDC-0449 treatment significantly suppressed glioma cell xenograft tumorigenesis. Mechanistically, GDC-0449 treatment markedly decreases the expression levels of key Hedgehog pathway component genes (Shh, Patched-1, Patched-2, smoothened, Gli1 and Gli2). These results indicate that GDC-0449 works through targeting the Hedgehog pathway. Taken together, our study suggests that smoothened could be used as a prognostic marker and molecular therapeutic target for glioma. PMID:28195165

  4. Smoothened is a poor prognosis factor and a potential therapeutic target in glioma.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yiming; Niu, Mingshan; Xie, Peng; Yue, Chenglong; Liu, Ning; Qi, Zhenglei; Gao, Shangfeng; Liu, Hongmei; Shi, Qiong; Yu, Rutong; Liu, Xuejiao

    2017-02-14

    Malignant gliomas are associated with a high mortality rate. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of novel targeted therapeutics. Aberrant Hedgehog signaling has been directly linked to glioma. GDC-0449 is a novel small molecule inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling that blocks the activity of smoothened (Smo). In this study, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of the smoothened inhibitor GDC-0449 on cell proliferation in human gliomas. We found that high expression of smoothened in glioma is a predictor of short overall survival and poor patient outcome. Our data suggest that GDC-0449 significantly inhibits the proliferation of glioma cells by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. Our results demonstrate that GDC-0449 can effectively inhibit the migration and invasion of glioma cells. Furthermore, GDC-0449 treatment significantly suppressed glioma cell xenograft tumorigenesis. Mechanistically, GDC-0449 treatment markedly decreases the expression levels of key Hedgehog pathway component genes (Shh, Patched-1, Patched-2, smoothened, Gli1 and Gli2). These results indicate that GDC-0449 works through targeting the Hedgehog pathway. Taken together, our study suggests that smoothened could be used as a prognostic marker and molecular therapeutic target for glioma.

  5. Sonidegib, a novel smoothened inhibitor for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Doan, Hung Q; Silapunt, Sirunya; Migden, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common nonmelanoma skin cancer. If left untreated, BCCs can become locally aggressive or even metastasize. Currently available treatments include local destruction, surgery, and radiation. Systemic options for advanced disease are limited. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is aberrantly activated in a majority of BCCs and in other cancers. Hh pathway inhibitors are targeted agents that inhibit the aberrant activation of the Hh pathway, with smoothened being a targeted component. Sonidegib is a novel smoothened inhibitor that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. This review focuses on BCC pathogenesis and the clinical efficacy of sonidegib for the treatment of advanced BCC.

  6. Sonidegib, a novel smoothened inhibitor for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Hung Q; Silapunt, Sirunya; Migden, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common nonmelanoma skin cancer. If left untreated, BCCs can become locally aggressive or even metastasize. Currently available treatments include local destruction, surgery, and radiation. Systemic options for advanced disease are limited. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is aberrantly activated in a majority of BCCs and in other cancers. Hh pathway inhibitors are targeted agents that inhibit the aberrant activation of the Hh pathway, with smoothened being a targeted component. Sonidegib is a novel smoothened inhibitor that was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. This review focuses on BCC pathogenesis and the clinical efficacy of sonidegib for the treatment of advanced BCC. PMID:27695345

  7. Activation of the thrombopoietin receptor by mutant calreticulin in CALR-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Araki, Marito; Yang, Yinjie; Masubuchi, Nami; Hironaka, Yumi; Takei, Hiraku; Morishita, Soji; Mizukami, Yoshihisa; Kan, Shin; Shirane, Shuichi; Edahiro, Yoko; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2016-03-10

    Recurrent somatic mutations of calreticulin (CALR) have been identified in patients harboring myeloproliferative neoplasms; however, their role in tumorigenesis remains elusive. Here, we found that the expression of mutant but not wild-type CALR induces the thrombopoietin (TPO)-independent growth of UT-7/TPO cells. We demonstrated that c-MPL, the TPO receptor, is required for this cytokine-independent growth of UT-7/TPO cells. Mutant CALR preferentially associates with c-MPL that is bound to Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) over the wild-type protein. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutant-specific carboxyl terminus portion of CALR interferes with the P-domain of CALR to allow the N-domain to interact with c-MPL, providing an explanation for the gain-of-function property of mutant CALR. We showed that mutant CALR induces the phosphorylation of JAK2 and its downstream signaling molecules in UT-7/TPO cells and that this induction was blocked by JAK2 inhibitor treatment. Finally, we demonstrated that c-MPL is required for TPO-independent megakaryopoiesis in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hematopoietic stem cells harboring the CALR mutation. These findings imply that mutant CALR activates the JAK2 downstream pathway via its association with c-MPL. Considering these results, we propose that mutant CALR promotes myeloproliferative neoplasm development by activating c-MPL and its downstream pathway.

  8. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed. PMID:26618142

  9. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed.

  10. Structure and function of the Smoothened extracellular domain in vertebrate Hedgehog signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Whalen, Daniel M; Mydock, Laurel K; Zhao, Zhonghua; Malinauskas, Tomas; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Ingham, Philip W; Covey, Douglas F; Siebold, Christian; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2013-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signal is transduced across the membrane by the heptahelical protein Smoothened (Smo), a developmental regulator, oncoprotein and drug target in oncology. We present the 2.3 Å crystal structure of the extracellular cysteine rich domain (CRD) of vertebrate Smo and show that it binds to oxysterols, endogenous lipids that activate Hh signaling. The oxysterol-binding groove in the Smo CRD is analogous to that used by Frizzled 8 to bind to the palmitoleyl group of Wnt ligands and to similar pockets used by other Frizzled-like CRDs to bind hydrophobic ligands. The CRD is required for signaling in response to native Hh ligands, showing that it is an important regulatory module for Smo activation. Indeed, targeting of the Smo CRD by oxysterol-inspired small molecules can block signaling by all known classes of Hh activators and by clinically relevant Smo mutants. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01340.001 PMID:24171105

  11. [Pigment composition and photosynthetic activity of pea chlorophyll mutants].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G

    2003-01-01

    Pea chlorophyll mutants chlorotica 2004 and 2014 have been studied. The mutants differ from the initial form (pea cultivar Torsdag) in stem and leaf color (light green in the mutant 2004 and yellow-green in the mutant 2014), relative chlorophyll content (approximately 80 and 50%, respectively), and the composition of carotenoids: the mutant 2004 contains a significantly smaller amount of carotene but accumulates more lutein and violaxanthine; in the mutant 2014, the contents of all carotenoids are decreased proportionally to the decrease in chlorophyll content. It is shown that the rates of CO2 assimilation and oxygen production in the mutant chlorotica 2004 and 2014 plants are reduced. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in the mutants is 29-30% lower than in the control plants; in their hybrids, however, it is 1.5-2 higher. It is proposed that both the greater role of dark respiration in gas exchange and the reduced photosynthetic activity in chlorotica mutants are responsible for the decreased phytomass increment in these plants. On the basis of these results, the conclusion is drawn that the mutations chlorotica 2004 and 2014 affect the genes controlling the formation and functioning of various components of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  12. Subunit interface mutants of rabbit muscle aldolase form active dimers.

    PubMed Central

    Beernink, P. T.; Tolan, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    We report the construction of subunit interface mutants of rabbit muscle aldolase A with altered quaternary structure. A mutation has been described that causes nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia and produces a thermolabile aldolase (Kishi H et al., 1987, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 84:8623-8627). The disease arises from substitution of Gly for Asp-128, a residue at the subunit interface of human aldolase A. To elucidate the role of this residue in the highly homologous rabbit aldolase A, site-directed mutagenesis is used to replace Asp-128 with Gly, Ala, Asn, Gln, or Val. Rabbit aldolase D128G purified from Escherichia coli is found to be similar to human D128G by kinetic analysis, CD, and thermal inactivation assays. All of the mutant rabbit aldolases are similar to the wild-type rabbit enzyme in secondary structure and kinetic properties. In contrast, whereas the wild-type enzyme is a tetramer, chemical crosslinking and gel filtration indicate that a new dimeric species exists for the mutants. In sedimentation velocity experiments, the mutant enzymes as mixtures of dimer and tetramer at 4 degrees C. Sedimentation at 20 degrees C shows that the mutant enzymes are > 99.5% dimeric and, in the presence of substrate, that the dimeric species is active. Differential scanning calorimetry demonstrates that Tm values of the mutant enzymes are decreased by 12 degrees C compared to wild-type enzyme. The results indicate that Asp-128 is important for interface stability and suggest that 1 role of the quaternary structure of aldolase is to provide thermostability. PMID:7833800

  13. Nucleophosmin leukemogenic mutant activates Wnt signaling during zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Elisa; Deflorian, Gianluca; Pezzimenti, Federica; Valli, Debora; Saia, Marco; Meani, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM1) is a ubiquitous multifunctional phosphoprotein with both oncogenic and tumor suppressor functions. Mutations of the NPM1 gene are the most frequent genetic alterations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and result in the expression of a mutant protein with aberrant cytoplasmic localization, NPMc+. Although NPMc+ causes myeloproliferation and AML in animal models, its mechanism of action remains largely unknown. Here we report that NPMc+ activates canonical Wnt signaling during the early phases of zebrafish development and determines a Wnt-dependent increase in the number of progenitor cells during primitive hematopoiesis. Coherently, the canonical Wnt pathway is active in AML blasts bearing NPMc+ and depletion of the mutant protein in the patient derived OCI-AML3 cell line leads to a decrease in the levels of active β-catenin and of Wnt target genes. Our results reveal a novel function of NPMc+ and provide insight into the molecular pathogenesis of AML bearing NPM1 mutations. PMID:27486814

  14. Insulator dysfunction and oncogene activation in IDH mutant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Flavahan, William A; Drier, Yotam; Liau, Brian B; Gillespie, Shawn M; Venteicher, Andrew S; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Suvà, Mario L; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2016-01-07

    Gain-of-function IDH mutations are initiating events that define major clinical and prognostic classes of gliomas. Mutant IDH protein produces a new onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate, which interferes with iron-dependent hydroxylases, including the TET family of 5'-methylcytosine hydroxylases. TET enzymes catalyse a key step in the removal of DNA methylation. IDH mutant gliomas thus manifest a CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), although the functional importance of this altered epigenetic state remains unclear. Here we show that human IDH mutant gliomas exhibit hypermethylation at cohesin and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-binding sites, compromising binding of this methylation-sensitive insulator protein. Reduced CTCF binding is associated with loss of insulation between topological domains and aberrant gene activation. We specifically demonstrate that loss of CTCF at a domain boundary permits a constitutive enhancer to interact aberrantly with the receptor tyrosine kinase gene PDGFRA, a prominent glioma oncogene. Treatment of IDH mutant gliomaspheres with a demethylating agent partially restores insulator function and downregulates PDGFRA. Conversely, CRISPR-mediated disruption of the CTCF motif in IDH wild-type gliomaspheres upregulates PDGFRA and increases proliferation. Our study suggests that IDH mutations promote gliomagenesis by disrupting chromosomal topology and allowing aberrant regulatory interactions that induce oncogene expression.

  15. Abnormal grooming activity in Dab1(scm) (scrambler) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Strazielle, C; Lefevre, A; Jacquelin, C; Lalonde, R

    2012-07-15

    Dab1(scm) mutant mice, characterized by cell ectopias and degeneration in cerebellum, hippocampus, and neocortex, were compared to non-ataxic controls for different facets of grooming caused by brief water immersions, as well as some non-grooming behaviors. Dab1(scm) mutants were strongly affected in their quantitative functional parameters, exhibiting higher starting latencies before grooming relative to non-ataxic littermates of the A/A strain, fewer grooming bouts, and grooming components of shorter duration, with an unequal regional distribution targeting almost totally the rostral part (head washing and forelimb licking) of the animal. Only bouts of a single grooming element were preserved. The cephalocaudal order of grooming elements appeared less disorganized, mutant and control mice initiating the grooming with head washing and forelimb licking prior to licking posterior parts. However, mutants differed from controls in that all their bouts were incomplete but uninterrupted, although intergroup difference for percentage of the incorrect transitions was not significant. In contrast to grooming, Dab1(scm) mice ambulated for a longer time. During walking episodes, they exhibited more body scratching than controls, possibly to compensate for the lack of licking different body parts. In conjunction with studies with other ataxic mice, these results indicate that the cerebellar cortex affects grooming activity and is consequently involved in executing various components, but not in its sequential organization, which requires other brain regions such as cerebral cortices or basal ganglia.

  16. Novel mutants of NAB corepressors enhance activation by Egr transactivators.

    PubMed Central

    Svaren, J; Sevetson, B R; Golda, T; Stanton, J J; Swirnoff, A H; Milbrandt, J

    1998-01-01

    The NGFI-A binding corepressors NAB1 and NAB2 interact with a conserved domain (R1 domain) within the Egr1/NGFI-A and Egr2/Krox20 transactivators, and repress the transcription of Egr target promoters. Using a novel adaptation of the yeast two-hybrid screen, we have identified several point mutations in NAB corepressors that interfere with their ability to bind to the Egr1 R1 domain. Surprisingly, NAB proteins bearing some of these mutations increased Egr1 activity dramatically. The mechanism underlying the unexpected behavior of these mutants was elucidated by the discovery that NAB conserved domain 1 (NCD1) not only binds to Egr proteins but also mediates multimerization of NAB molecules. The activating mutants exert a dominant negative effect on NAB repression by multimerizing with native NAB proteins and preventing binding of endogenous NAB proteins with Egr transactivators. To examine NAB repression of a native Egr target gene, we show that NAB2 represses Egr2/Krox20-mediated activation of the bFGF/FGF-2 promoter, and that repression is reversed by coexpression of dominant negative NAB2. Because of their specific ability to alleviate NAB repression of Egr target genes, the dominant negative NAB mutants will be useful in elucidating the mechanism and function of NAB corepressors. PMID:9774344

  17. The extracellular domain of Smoothened regulates ciliary localization and is required for high-level Hh signaling.

    PubMed

    Aanstad, Pia; Santos, Nicole; Corbit, Kevin C; Scherz, Paul J; Trinh, Le A; Salvenmoser, Willi; Huisken, Jan; Reiter, Jeremy F; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2009-06-23

    Members of the Hedgehog (Hh) family of secreted proteins function as morphogens to pattern developing tissues and control cell proliferation. The seven-transmembrane domain (7TM) protein Smoothened (Smo) is essential for the activation of all levels of Hh signaling. However, the mechanisms by which Smo differentially activates low- or high-level Hh signaling are not known. Here we show that a newly identified mutation in the extracellular domain (ECD) of zebrafish Smo attenuates Smo signaling. The Smo agonist purmorphamine induces the stabilization, ciliary translocation, and high-level signaling of wild-type Smo. In contrast, purmorphamine induces the stabilization but not the ciliary translocation or high-level signaling of the Smo ECD mutant protein. Surprisingly, a truncated form of Smo that lacks the cysteine-rich domain of the ECD localizes to the cilium but is unable to activate high-level Hh signaling. We also present evidence that cilia may be required for Hh signaling in early zebrafish embryos. These data indicate that the ECD, previously thought to be dispensable for vertebrate Smo function, both regulates Smo ciliary localization and is essential for high-level Hh signaling.

  18. Sequential Phosphorylation of Smoothened Transduces Graded Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ying; Ospina, Jason K.; Zhang, Junzheng; Michelson, Andrew P.; Schoen, Adam M.; Zhu, Alan Jian

    2012-01-01

    The correct interpretation of a gradient of the morphogen Hedgehog (Hh) during development requires phosphorylation of the Hh signaling activator Smoothened (Smo); however, the molecular mechanism by which Smo transduces graded Hh signaling is not well understood. We show that regulation of the phosphorylation status of Smo by distinct phosphatases at specific phosphorylated residues creates differential thresholds of Hh signaling. Phosphorylation of Smo was initiated by adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP)–dependent protein kinase (PKA) and further enhanced by casein kinase I (CKI). We found that protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) directly dephosphorylated PKA-phosphorylated Smo to reduce signaling mediated by intermediate concentrations of Hh, whereas PP2A specifically dephosphorylated PKA-primed, CKI-phosphorylated Smo to restrict signaling by high concentrations of Hh. We also established a functional link between sequentially phosphorylated Smo species and graded Hh activity. Thus, we propose a sequential phosphorylation model in which precise interpretation of morphogen concentration can be achieved upon versatile phosphatase-mediated regulation of the phosphorylation status of an essential activator in developmental signaling. PMID:21730325

  19. Structural basis for Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How such large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened (SMO), which contains two distinct ligand-binding sites in its TMD and CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain (LD). Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, LD and TMD stabilises the inactive state of SMO. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to SMO in the CRD-binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of SMO to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD-LD-TMD interface. Our work elucidates the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains. PMID:27437577

  20. Bacillus pumilus Cyanide Dihydratase Mutants with Higher Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Crum, Mary A.; Sewell, B. Trevor; Benedik, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide degrading nitrilases are noted for their potential to detoxify industrial wastewater contaminated with cyanide. However, such application would benefit from an improvement to characteristics such as their catalytic activity and stability. Following error-prone PCR for random mutagenesis, several cyanide dihydratase mutants from Bacillus pumilus were isolated based on improved catalysis. Four point mutations, K93R, D172N, A202T, and E327K were characterized and their effects on kinetics, thermostability and pH tolerance were studied. K93R and D172N increased the enzyme’s thermostability whereas E327K mutation had a less pronounced effect on stability. The D172N mutation also increased the affinity of the enzyme for its substrate at pH 7.7 but lowered its kcat. However, the A202T mutation, located in the dimerization or the A surface, destabilized the protein and abolished its activity. No significant effect on activity at alkaline pH was observed for any of the purified mutants. These mutations help confirm the model of CynD and are discussed in the context of the protein–protein interfaces leading to the protein quaternary structure. PMID:27570524

  1. Active-site mutants of beta-lactamase: use of an inactive double mutant to study requirements for catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dalbadie-McFarland, G; Neitzel, J J; Richards, J H

    1986-01-28

    We have studied the catalytic activity and some other properties of mutants of Escherichia coli plasmid-encoded RTEM beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6) with all combinations of serine and threonine residues at the active-site positions 70 and 71. (All natural beta-lactamases have conserved serine-70 and threonine-71.) From the inactive double mutant Ser-70----Thr, Thr-71----Ser [Dalbadie-McFarland, G., Cohen, L. W., Riggs, A. D., Morin, C., Itakura, K., & Richards, J. H. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 6409-6413], an active revertant, Thr-71----Ser (i.e., residue 70 in the double mutant had changed from threonine to the serine conserved at position 70 in the wild-type enzyme), was isolated by an approach that allows identification of active revertants in the absence of a background of wild-type enzyme. This mutant (Thr-71----Ser) has about 15% of the catalytic activity of wild-type beta-lactamase. The other possible mutant involving serine and threonine residues at positions 70 and 71 (Ser-70----Thr) shows no catalytic activity. The primary nucleophiles of a serine or a cysteine residue [Sigal, I. S., Harwood, B. G., & Arentzen, R. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 79, 7157-7160] at position 70 thus seem essential for enzymatic activity. Compared to wild-type enzyme, all three mutants show significantly reduced resistance to proteolysis; for the active revertant (Thr-71----Ser), we have also observed reduced thermal stability and reduced resistance to denaturation by urea.

  2. Response to inhibition of smoothened in diverse epithelial cancer cells that lack smoothened or patched 1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    GALIMBERTI, FABRIZIO; BUSCH, ALEXANDER M.; CHINYENGETERE, FADZAI; MA, TIAN; SEKULA, DAVID; MEMOLI, VINCENT A.; DRAGNEV, KONSTANTIN H.; LIU, FANG; JOHNSON, KEVIN C.; GUO, YONGLI; FREEMANTLE, SARAH J.; ANDREW, ANGELINE S.; GRENINGER, PATRICIA; ROBBINS, DAVID J.; SETTLEMAN, JEFF; BENES, CYRIL; DMITROVSKY, ETHAN

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) pathway Smoothened (Smo) inhibitors are active against Gorlin syndrome-associated basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and medulloblastoma where Patched (Ptch) mutations occur. We interrogated 705 epithelial cancer cell lines for growth response to the Smo inhibitor cyclopamine and for expressed HH pathway-regulated species in a linked genetic database. Ptch and Smo mutations that respectively conferred Smo inhibitor response or resistance were undetected. Previous studies revealed HH pathway activation in lung cancers. Therefore, findings were validated using lung cancer cell lines, transgenic and transplantable murine lung cancer models, and human normal-malignant lung tissue arrays in addition to testing other Smo inhibitors. Cyclopamine sensitivity most significantly correlated with high cyclin E (P=0.000009) and low insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6 (IGFBP6) (P=0.000004) levels. Gli family members were associated with response. Cyclopamine resistance occurred with high GILZ (P=0.002) expression. Newer Smo inhibitors exhibited a pattern of sensitivity similar to cyclopamine. Gain of cyclin E or loss of IGFBP6 in lung cancer cells significantly increased Smo inhibitor response. Cyclin E-driven transgenic lung cancers expressed a gene profile implicating HH pathway activation. Cyclopamine treatment significantly reduced proliferation of murine and human lung cancers. Smo inhibition reduced lung cancer formation in a syngeneic mouse model. In human normal-malignant lung tissue arrays cyclin E, IGFBP6, Gli1 and GILZ were each differentially expressed. Together, these findings indicate that Smo inhibitors should be considered in cancers beyond those with activating HH pathway mutations. This includes tumors that express genes indicating basal HH pathway activation. PMID:22923130

  3. Smoothened as a new therapeutic target for human osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Hedgehog signaling pathway functions as an organizer in embryonic development. Recent studies have demonstrated constitutive activation of Hedgehog pathway in various types of malignancies. However, it remains unclear how Hedgehog pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. To explore the involvement of aberrant Hedgehog pathway in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma, we investigated the expression and activation of Hedgehog pathway in osteosarcoma and examined the effect of SMOOTHENED (SMO) inhibition. Results To evaluate the expression of genes of Hedgehog pathway, we performed real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry using osteosarcoma cell lines and osteosarcoma biopsy specimens. To evaluate the effect of SMO inhibition, we did cell viability, colony formation, cell cycle in vitro and xenograft model in vivo. Real-time PCR revealed that osteosarcoma cell lines over-expressed Sonic hedgehog, Indian hedgehog, PTCH1, SMO, and GLI. Real-time PCR revealed over-expression of SMO, PTCH1, and GLI2 in osteosarcoma biopsy specimens. These findings showed that Hedgehog pathway is activated in osteosarcomas. Inhibition of SMO by cyclopamine, a specific inhibitor of SMO, slowed the growth of osteosarcoma in vitro. Cell cycle analysis revealed that cyclopamine promoted G1 arrest. Cyclopamine reduced the expression of accelerators of the cell cycle including cyclin D1, cyclin E1, SKP2, and pRb. On the other hand, p21cip1 wprotein was up-regulated by cyclopamine treatment. In addition, knockdown of SMO by SMO shRNA prevents osteosarcoma growth in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions These findings suggest that inactivation of SMO may be a useful approach to the treatment of patients with osteosarcoma. PMID:20067614

  4. DNA synthesis and DNA polymerase activity of herpes simplex virus type 1 temperature-sensitive mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Aron, G M; Purifoy, D J; Schaffer, P A

    1975-01-01

    Fifteen temperature-sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 were studied with regard to the relationship between their ability to synthesize viral DNA and to induce viral DNA polymerase (DP) activity at permissive (34 C) and nonpermissive (39 C) temperatures. At 34 C, all mutants synthesized viral DNA, while at 39 C four mutants demonstrated a DNA+ phenotype, three were DNA+/-, and eight were DNA-. DNA+ mutants induced levels of DP activity similar to thhose of the wild-type virus at both temperatures, and DNA+/- mutants induced reduced levels of DP activity at 39 C but not at 34 C. Among the DNA- mutants three were DP+, two were DP+/-, and three showed reduced DP activity at 34 C with no DP activity at 39 C. DNA-, DP- mutants induced the synthesis of a temperature-sensitive DP as determined by in vivo studies. PMID:169388

  5. Epilepsy-Related Slack Channel Mutants Lead to Channel Over-Activity by Two Different Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qiong-Yao; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Jie; Wang, Ran; Chen, Jian; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Zhang, Zhe

    2016-01-05

    Twelve sodium-activated potassium channel (KCNT1, Slack) genetic mutants have been identified from severe early-onset epilepsy patients. The changes in biophysical properties of these mutants and the underlying mechanisms causing disease remain elusive. Here, we report that seven of the 12 mutations increase, whereas one mutation decreases, the channel's sodium sensitivity. Two of the mutants exhibit channel over-activity only when the intracellular Na(+) ([Na(+)]i) concentration is ∼80 mM. In contrast, single-channel data reveal that all 12 mutants increase the maximal open probability (Po). We conclude that these mutant channels lead to channel over-activity predominantly by increasing the ability of sodium binding to activate the channel, which is indicated by its maximal Po. The sodium sensitivity of these epilepsy causing mutants probably determines the [Na(+)]i concentration at which these mutants exert their pathological effects.

  6. Xanthine Dehydrogenase (XDH) cross-reacting material in mutants of Drosophila melanogaster deficient in XDH activity.

    PubMed

    Browder, L W; Tucker, L; Wilkes, J

    1982-02-01

    Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate xanthine dehydrogenase cross-reacting material (XDH-CRM) in strains containing the cin and cin mutant genes, which are deficient in XDH enzymatic activity. CRM levels were determined as percentages of CRM in the Oregon-R wild-type strain. The mutant strains contain 72 and 76% of Oregon-R CRM, respectively. CRM levels in strains containing the XDH-deficient mutant genes lxd and mal are 93 and 105%, respectively. The high levels of CRM in these four mutant strains indicate that the primary effects of the mutant genes are on the function of XDH protein rather than its accumulation.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant with impaired glutamate synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Folch, J L; Antaramián, A; Rodríguez, L; Bravo, A; Brunner, A; González, A

    1989-12-01

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lacks glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activity has been isolated. This mutant was obtained after chemical mutagenesis of a NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase-less mutant strain. The gdh gus mutant is a glutamate auxotroph. The genetic analysis of the gus mutant showed that the GOGAT-less phenotype is due to the presence of two loosely linked mutations. Evidence is presented which suggests the possibility that S. cerevisiae has two GOGAT activities, designated GOGAT A and GOGAT B. These activities can be distinguished by their pH optima and by their regulation by glutamate. Furthermore, one of the mutations responsible for the GOGAT-less phenotype affected GOGAT A activity, while the other mutation affected GOGAT B activity.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant with impaired glutamate synthase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Folch, J L; Antaramián, A; Rodríguez, L; Bravo, A; Brunner, A; González, A

    1989-01-01

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lacks glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activity has been isolated. This mutant was obtained after chemical mutagenesis of a NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase-less mutant strain. The gdh gus mutant is a glutamate auxotroph. The genetic analysis of the gus mutant showed that the GOGAT-less phenotype is due to the presence of two loosely linked mutations. Evidence is presented which suggests the possibility that S. cerevisiae has two GOGAT activities, designated GOGAT A and GOGAT B. These activities can be distinguished by their pH optima and by their regulation by glutamate. Furthermore, one of the mutations responsible for the GOGAT-less phenotype affected GOGAT A activity, while the other mutation affected GOGAT B activity. PMID:2687252

  9. Regulation of Smoothened Trafficking and Hedgehog Signaling by the SUMO Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guoqiang; Li, Shuang; Han, Yuhong; Li, Shuangxi; Yue, Tao; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2016-11-21

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays a central role in development and diseases. Hh activates its signal transducer and GPCR-family protein Smoothened (Smo) by inducing Smo phosphorylation, but whether Smo is activated through other post-translational modifications remains unexplored. Here we show that sumoylation acts in parallel with phosphorylation to promote Smo cell-surface expression and Hh signaling. We find that Hh stimulates Smo sumoylation by dissociating it from a desumoylation enzyme Ulp1. Sumoylation of Smo in turn recruits a deubiquitinase UBPY/USP8 to antagonize Smo ubiquitination and degradation, leading to its cell-surface accumulation and elevated Hh pathway activity. We also provide evidence that Shh stimulates sumoylation of mammalian Smo (mSmo) and that sumoylation promotes ciliary localization of mSmo and Shh pathway activity. Our findings reveal a conserved mechanism whereby the SUMO pathway promotes Hh signaling by regulating Smo subcellular localization and shed light on how sumoylation regulates membrane protein trafficking.

  10. Increased riboflavin production from activated bleaching earth by a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Satoshi; Itoh, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2009-10-01

    The production of riboflavin from vegetable oil was increased using a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii. This mutant was generated by treating the wild-type strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Riboflavin production was 10-fold higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type strain. The specific intracellular catalase activity after 3 d of culture was 6-fold higher in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. For the mutant, riboflavin production in the presence of 40 mM hydrogen peroxide was 16% less than that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas it was 56% less for the wild-type strain. The isocitrate lyase (ICL) activity of the mutant was 0.26 mU/mg of protein during the active riboflavin production phase, which was 2.6-fold higher than the wild-type strain. These data indicate that the mutant utilizes the carbon flux from the TCA cycle to the glyoxylate cycle more efficiently than the wild-type strain, resulting in enhanced riboflavin production. This novel mutant has the potential to be of use for industrial-scale riboflavin production from waste-activated bleaching earth (ABE), thereby transforming a useless material into a valuable bioproduct.

  11. Addressing PXR liabilities of phthalazine-based hedgehog/smoothened antagonists using novel pyridopyridazines.

    PubMed

    Kaizerman, Jacob A; Aaron, Wade; An, Songzhu; Austin, Richard; Brown, Matt; Chong, Angela; Huang, Tom; Hungate, Randall; Jiang, Ben; Johnson, Michael G; Lee, Gary; Lucas, Brian S; Orf, Jessica; Rong, Minqing; Toteva, Maria M; Wickramasinghe, Dineli; Xu, Guifen; Ye, Qiuping; Zhong, Wendy; McMinn, Dustin L

    2010-08-01

    Pyridopyridazine antagonists of the hedgehog signaling pathway are described. Designed to optimize our previously described phthalazine smoothened antagonists, a representative compound eliminates a PXR liability while retaining potency and in vitro metabolic stability. Moreover, the compound has improved efficacy in a hedgehog/smoothened signaling mouse pharmacodynamic model.

  12. Hedgehog Pathway Modulation by Multiple Lipid Binding Sites on the Smoothened Effector of Signal Response

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Benjamin R.; Sever, Navdar; Chong, Yong Chun; Kim, James; Belani, Jitendra D.; Rychnovsky, Scott; Bazan, J. Fernando; Beachy, Philip A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hedgehog (Hh) signaling during development and in postembryonic tissues requires activation of the 7TM oncoprotein Smoothened (Smo), by mechanisms that may involve endogenous lipidic modulators. Exogenous Smo ligands previously identified include the plant sterol cyclopamine (and its therapeutically useful synthetic mimics) and hydroxylated cholesterol derivatives (oxysterols); Smo is also highly sensitive to cellular sterol levels. The relationships between these effects are unclear because the relevant Smo structural determinants are unknown. We identify the conserved extracellular cysteine rich domain (CRD) as the site of action for oxysterols on Smo, involving residues structurally analogous to those contacting the Wnt lipid adduct in the homologous Frizzled CRD; this modulatory effect is distinct from that of cyclopamine mimics, from Hh-mediated regulation, and from the permissive action of cellular sterol pools. These results imply that Hh pathway activity is sensitive to lipid binding at several Smo sites, suggesting mechanisms for tuning by multiple physiological inputs. PMID:23954590

  13. Activity of KB-5246 against outer membrane mutants of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Kotera, Y; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1990-01-01

    The inhibitory activity of KB-5246 against Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and the antibacterial activity and apparent uptake in E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium outer membrane mutants of KB-5246 were measured. The 50% inhibitory concentrations of KB-5246, ciprofloxacin, oflaxacin, and norfloxacin for E. coli KL-16 DNA gyrase were 0.72, 0.62, 0.84, and 1.16 micrograms/ml, respectively. The activity of KB-5246 was twofold lower against an OmpF-deficient mutant and twofold higher against a mutant which produced OmpF constitutively than against the parent with osmoregulated OmpF production. KB-5246 had twofold-higher activity against a deep rough mutant of S. typhimurium than against the parent. The apparent uptake of KB-5246 in the OmpF-deficient mutant was decreased and its uptake in the deep rough mutant was increased when compared with those in the parents. These results suggest that KB-5246 is taken up by porin and nonporin pathways and has strong inhibitory activity against DNA gyrase, resulting in potent antibacterial activity. PMID:2167038

  14. Analysis of crystal structure of Arabidopsis MPK6 and generation of its mutants with higher activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Qin, Xinghua; Wu, Juan; Deng, Hongying; Li, Yuan; Yang, Hailian; Chen, Zhongzhou; Liu, Guoqin; Ren, Dongtao

    2016-05-10

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, which are the highly conserved signalling modules in eukaryotic organisms, have been shown to play important roles in regulating growth, development, and stress responses. The structures of various MAPKs from yeast and animal have been solved, and structure-based mutants were generated for their function analyses, however, the structures of plant MAPKs remain unsolved. Here, we report the crystal structure of Arabidopsis MPK6 at a 3.0 Å resolution. Although MPK6 is topologically similar to ERK2 and p38, the structures of the glycine-rich loop, MAPK insert, substrate binding sites, and L16 loop in MPK6 show notable differences from those of ERK2 and p38. Based on the structural comparison, we constructed MPK6 mutants and analyzed their kinase activity both in vitro and in planta. MPK6(F364L) and MPK6(F368L) mutants, in which Phe364 and Phe368 in the L16 loop were changed to Leu, respectively, acquired higher intrinsic kinase activity and retained the normal MAPKK activation property. The expression of MPK6 mutants with basal activity is sufficient to induce camalexin biosynthesis; however, to induce ethylene and leaf senescence, the expression of MPK6 mutants with higher activity is required. The results suggest that these mutants can be used to analyze the specific biological functions of MPK6.

  15. Evidence for allosteric interactions of antagonist binding to the smoothened receptor.

    PubMed

    Rominger, Cynthia M; Bee, Wei-Lin Tiger; Copeland, Robert A; Davenport, Elizabeth A; Gilmartin, Aidan; Gontarek, Richard; Hornberger, Keith R; Kallal, Lorena A; Lai, Zhihong; Lawrie, Kenneth; Lu, Quinn; McMillan, Lynette; Truong, Maggie; Tummino, Peter J; Turunen, Brandon; Will, Matthew; Zuercher, William J; Rominger, David H

    2009-06-01

    The Smoothened receptor (Smo) mediates hedgehog (Hh) signaling critical for development, cell growth, and migration, as well as stem cell maintenance. Aberrant Hh signaling pathway activation has been implicated in a variety of cancers, and small-molecule antagonists of Smo have entered human clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Here, we report the biochemical characterization of allosteric interactions of agonists and antagonists for Smo. Binding of two radioligands, [(3)H]3-chloro-N-[trans-4-(methylamino)cyclohexyl]-N-{[3-(4-pyridinyl)-phenyl]methyl}-1-benzothiophene-2-carboxamide (SAG-1.3) (agonist) and [(3)H]cyclopamine (antagonist), was characterized using human Smo expressed in human embryonic kidney 293F membranes. We observed full displacement of [(3)H]cyclopamine by all Smo agonist and antagonist ligands examined. N-[(1E)-(3,5-Dimethyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)methylidene]-4-(phenylmethyl)-1-piperazinamine (SANT-1), an antagonist, did not fully inhibit the binding of [(3)H]SAG-1.3. In a functional cell-based beta-lactamase reporter gene assay, SANT-1 and N-[3-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-4-chlorophenyl]-3,4,5-tris(ethyloxy)-benzamide (SANT-2) fully inhibited 3-chloro-4,7-difluoro-N-[trans-4-(methylamino)cyclohexyl]-N-{[3-(4-pyridinyl)phenyl]methyl}-1-benzothiophene-2-carboxamide (SAG-1.5)-induced Hh pathway activation. Detailed "Schild-type" radioligand binding analysis with [(3)H]SAG-1.3 revealed that two structurally distinct Smoothened receptor antagonists, SANT-1 and SANT-2, bound in a manner consistent with that of allosteric modulation. Our mechanism of action characterization of radioligand binding to Smo combined with functional data provides a better understanding of small-molecule interactions with Smo and their influence on the Hh pathway.

  16. Genetic Screening for Bacterial Mutants in Liquid Growth Media By Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Abuaita, Basel H.; Withey, Jeffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens have defined in vitro virulence inducing conditions in liquid media which lead to production of virulence factors important during an infection. Identifying mutants that no longer respond to virulence inducing conditions will increase our understanding of bacterial pathogenesis. However, traditional genetic screens require growth on solid media. Bacteria in a single colony are in every phase of the growth curve, which complicates the analysis and make screens for growth phase-specific mutants problematic. Here, we utilize fluorescence-activated cell sorting in conjunction with random transposon mutagenesis to isolate bacteria grown in liquid media that are defective in virulence activation. This method permits analysis of an entire bacterial population in real time and selection of individual bacterial mutants with the desired gene expression profile at any time point after induction. We have used this method to identify Vibrio cholerae mutants defective in virulence induction. PMID:21094189

  17. Targeting Smoothened Sensitizes Gastric Cancer to Chemotherapy in Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Huifa; Tian, Yongsheng; Yu, Xiangyang

    2017-01-01

    Background The Hedgehog pathway receptor smoothened (SMO) has critical roles in tumor progression. However, whether SMO is a key factor regulating gastric cancer chemotherapy resistance is unknown. Material/Methods We investigated the potential functions of SMO in inducing gastric cancer paclitaxel resistance in clinical samples, gastric cancer cell lines (424GC and AGS), and subcutaneous syngeneic mouse models. Results We found high SMO expression in paclitaxel-resistant gastric cancer clinical samples. Paclitaxel gastric cancer cells had higher SMO expression than in drug-sensitive cells. Upregulating SMO expression induced paclitaxel resistance in gastric cells lines via enhancing cell proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. The combination of IPI-926, an inhibitor of SMO, with paclitaxel decreased cell viability of paclitaxel-resistant gastric cancer cells in vitro and controlled tumor growth in animal models. Conclusions The Hedgehog pathway receptor SMO is an important regulator of gastric cancer paclitaxel resistance and could be a target for sensitizing paclitaxel-resistant tumors. PMID:28350784

  18. NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity is impaired in mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lack aconitase.

    PubMed

    González, A; Rodríguez, L; Olivera, H; Soberón, M

    1985-10-01

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking aconitase did not grow on minimal medium (MM) and had five- to tenfold less NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity than the wild-type, although its glutamine synthetase (GS) activity was still inducible. When this mutant was incubated with glutamate as the sole nitrogen source, the 2-oxoglutarate content rose, and the NADP+-dependent GDH activity increased. Furthermore, carbon-limited cultures showed a direct relation between NADP+-dependent GDH activity and the intracellular 2-oxoglutarate content. We propose that the low NADP+-dependent GDH activity found in the mutant was due to the lack of 2-oxoglutarate or some other intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

  19. Highly-substrate active isoenzyme acetylcholinesterase-II, in rosy eye mutant of Aedes aegypti mosquito.

    PubMed

    Mourya, D T; Gokhale, M D; Barde, P V; Deobagkar, D N

    2001-08-01

    Insecticide bioassays were carried out on larvae and adults of rosy eye mutant and wildtype strains of A. aegypti. Both the strains were equally susceptible to DDT, malathion and deltamethrin. Biochemical assays showed an increase in acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) activity in all the stages of mutant strain with both the substrates i.e. acetylthiocholine iodide and S-butyrylthiocholine iodide. However, there was no difference in the percent inhibition of enzyme activity with propoxur in these two strains. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis performed in native conditions on the homogenates of adults of rosy eye mosquitoes showed that AChE-II allele was highly active with the substrate acetylthiocholine iodide as compared to wildtype strain. Frequency of the highly active AChE-II allele in the mutant strain was about 68%, whereas it was about 5% in the wildtype strain.

  20. [High throughput screening atrazine chlorohydrolase mutants with enhanced activity through Haematococcus pluvialis expression system].

    PubMed

    Wang, Huizhuan; Chen, Xiwen; Hao, Xiaohua; Chen, Defu

    2011-04-01

    Developing a high-throughput screening method is of great importance for directed evolution of atrazine chlorohydrolase. A mutagenesis library of atzA from Pseudomonas sp. ADP and Arthrobacter sp. AD1 was constructed using error-prone PCR and DNA shuffling. Candidate mutants were screened through Haematococcus pluvialis expression system, using atrazine as selection pressure. Sequence analysis showed that mutations in the obtained 12 mutants with enhanced activity were all point-substitutions and scattered throughout the gene. Enzymatic activity analysis showed that the mutants all had higher activities than that of the wild type. The activities were 1.8-3.6 fold of the wild-type enzyme when cultured in BBM medium with 1 mg/L atrazine, whereas 1.8-2.6 fold with 2 mg/L atrazine. These results indicated that Haematococcus pluvialis expression system is an ideal high throughput screening system for directed evolution of atrazine chlorohydrolase.

  1. Relative activities and stabilities of mutant Escherichia coli tryptophan synthase alpha subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, W K; Shin, H J; Milton, D L; Hardman, J K

    1991-01-01

    In vitro mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli trpA gene has yielded 66 mutant tryptophan synthase alpha subunits containing single amino acid substitutions at 49 different residue sites and 29 double and triple amino acid substitutions at 16 additional sites, all within the first 121 residues of the protein. The 66 singly altered mutant alpha subunits encoded from overexpression vectors have been examined for their ability to support growth in trpA mutant host strains and for their enzymatic and stability properties in crude extracts. With the exception of mutant alpha subunits altered at catalytic residue sites Glu-49 and Asp-60, all support growth; this includes those (48 of 66) that have no enzymatic defects and those (18 of 66) that do. The majority of the enzymatically defective mutant alpha subunits have decreased capacities for substrate (indole-3-glycerol phosphate) utilization, typical of the early trpA missense mutants isolated by in vivo selection methods. These defects vary in severity from complete loss of activity for mutant alpha subunits altered at residue positions 49 and 60 to those, altered elsewhere, that are partially (up to 40 to 50%) defective. The complete inactivation of the proteins altered at the two catalytic residue sites suggest that, as found via in vitro site-specific mutagenesis of the Salmonella typhimurium tryptophan synthetase alpha subunit, both residues probably also participate in a push-pull general acid-base catalysis of indole-3-glycerol phosphate breakdown for the E. coli enzyme as well. Other classes of mutant alpha subunits include some novel types that are defective in their functional interaction with the other tryptophan synthetase component, the beta 2 subunit. Also among the mutant alpha subunits, 19 were found altered at one or another of the 34 conserved residue sites in this portion of the alpha polypeptide sequence; surprisingly, 10 of these have wild-type enzymatic activity, and 16 of these can satisfy growth

  2. ID4 regulates transcriptional activity of wild type and mutant p53 via K373 acetylation.

    PubMed

    Morton, Derrick J; Patel, Divya; Joshi, Jugal; Hunt, Aisha; Knowell, Ashley E; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2017-01-10

    Given that mutated p53 (50% of all human cancers) is over-expressed in many cancers, restoration of mutant p53 to its wild type biological function has been sought after as cancer therapy. The conformational flexibility has allowed to restore the normal biological function of mutant p53 by short peptides and small molecule compounds. Recently, studies have focused on physiological mechanisms such as acetylation of lysine residues to rescue the wild type activity of mutant p53. Using p53 null prostate cancer cell line we show that ID4 dependent acetylation promotes mutant p53 DNA-binding capabilities to its wild type consensus sequence, thus regulating p53-dependent target genes leading to subsequent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Specifically, by using wild type, mutant (P223L, V274F, R175H, R273H), acetylation mimics (K320Q and K373Q) and non-acetylation mimics (K320R and K373R) of p53, we identify that ID4 promotes acetylation of K373 and to a lesser extent K320, in turn restoring p53-dependent biological activities. Together, our data provides a molecular understanding of ID4 dependent acetylation that suggests a strategy of enhancing p53 acetylation at sites K373 and K320 that may serve as a viable mechanism of physiological restoration of mutant p53 to its wild type biological function.

  3. Characterization of antimicrobial activity against Listeria and cytotoxicity of native melittin and its mutant variants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi; Singh, Atul K; Wu, Xiaoyu; Lyu, Yuan; Bhunia, Arun K; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2016-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are relatively short peptides that have the ability to penetrate the cell membrane, form pores leading to cell death. This study compares both antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity of native melittin and its two mutants, namely, melittin I17K (GIGAVLKVLTTGLPALKSWIKRKRQQ) with a higher charge and lower hydrophobicity and mutant G1I (IIGAVLKVLTTGLPALISWIKRKRQQ) of higher hydrophobicity. The antimicrobial activity against different strains of Listeria was investigated by bioassay, viability studies, fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity was examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay on mammalian Caco-2 cells. The minimum inhibitory concentration of native, mutant I17K, mutant G1I against Listeria monocytogenes F4244 was 0.315±0.008, 0.814±0.006 and 0.494±0.037μg/ml respectively, whereas the minimum bactericidal concentration values were 3.263±0.0034, 7.412±0.017 and 5.366±0.019μg/ml respectively. Lag time for inactivation of L. monocytogenes F4244 was observed at concentrations below 0.20 and 0.78μg/ml for native and mutant melittin I17K respectively. The antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes F4244 was in the order native>G1I>I17K. Native melittin was cytotoxic to mammalian Caco-2 cells above concentration of 2μg/ml, whereas the two mutants exhibited negligible cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 8μg/ml. Pore formation in cell wall/membrane was observed by transmission electron microscopy. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of native and its mutants indicated that (i) surface native melittin and G1I exhibited higher tendency to penetrate a mimic of bacterial cell membrane and (ii) transmembrane native and I17K formed water channel in mimics of bacterial and mammalian cell membranes.

  4. Isolation and characterization of a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L. ) Heynh lacking ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tsanpiao; Caspar, T.; Somerville, C.; Preiss, J. )

    1988-04-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana lacking ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity (EC 2.7.7.27) was isolated (from a mutagenized population of plants) by screening for the absence of leaf starch. The mutant grows as vigorously as the wild type in continuous light but more slowly than the wild type in a 12 hours light/12 hours dark photoperiod. Genetic analysis showed that the deficiency of both starch and ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity were attributable to a single, nuclear, recessive mutation at a locus designated adg1. The absence of starch in the mutant demonstrates that starch synthesis in the chloroplast is entirely dependent on a pathway involving ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase. Analysis of leaf extracts by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Western blotting experiments using antibodies specific for spinach ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase showed that two proteins, present in the wild type, were absent from the mutant. The heterozygous F{sub 1} progeny of a cross between the mutant and wild type had a specific activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase indistinguishable from the wild type. These observations suggest that the mutation in the adg1 gene in TL25 might affect a regulatory locus.

  5. Reduced activity of glutamine synthetase in Rhodospirillum rubrum mutants lacking the adenylyltransferase GlnE.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Anders; Nordlund, Stefan; Teixeira, Pedro Filipe

    2009-10-01

    In the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, the GlnE adenylyltransferase (encoded by glnE) catalyzes reversible adenylylation of glutamine synthetase, thereby regulating nitrogen assimilation. We have generated glnE mutant strains that are unable to adenylylate glutamine synthetase (GS). Surprisingly, the activity of GS was lower in the mutants than in the wild type, even when grown in nitrogen-fixing conditions. Our results support the proposal that R. rubrum can only cope with the absence of an adenylylation system in the presence of lowered GS expression or activity. In general terms, this report also provides further support for the central role of GS in bacterial metabolism.

  6. Smoothened transduces Hedgehog signal by forming a complex with Evc/Evc2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuiping; Chen, Wenlin; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2012-11-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays pivotal roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis in species ranging from Drosophila to mammals. The Hh signal is transduced by Smoothened (Smo), a seven-transmembrane protein related to G protein coupled receptors. Despite a conserved mechanism by which Hh activates Smo in Drosophila and mammals, how mammalian Hh signal is transduced from Smo to the Gli transcription factors is poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that two ciliary proteins, Evc and Evc2, the products of human disease genes responsible for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, act downstream of Smo to transduce the Hh signal. We found that loss of Evc/Evc2 does not affect Sonic Hedgehog-induced Smo phosphorylation and ciliary localization but impedes Hh pathway activation mediated by constitutively active forms of Smo. Evc/Evc2 are dispensable for the constitutive Gli activity in Sufu(-/-) cells, suggesting that Evc/Evc2 act upstream of Sufu to promote Gli activation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Hh stimulates binding of Evc/Evc2 to Smo depending on phosphorylation of the Smo C-terminal intracellular tail and that the binding is abolished in Kif3a(-/-) cilium-deficient cells. We propose that Hh activates Smo by inducing its phosphorylation, which recruits Evc/Evc2 to activate Gli proteins by antagonizing Sufu in the primary cilia.

  7. Smoothened determines β-arrestin–mediated removal of the G protein–coupled receptor Gpr161 from the primary cilium

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Kasturi; Hwang, Sun-hee; Somatilaka, Bandarigoda; Badgandi, Hemant; Jackson, Peter K.; DeFea, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic changes in membrane protein composition of the primary cilium are central to development and homeostasis, but we know little about mechanisms regulating membrane protein flux. Stimulation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway in vertebrates results in accumulation and activation of the effector Smoothened within cilia and concomitant disappearance of a negative regulator, the orphan G protein–coupled receptor (GPCR), Gpr161. Here, we describe a two-step process determining removal of Gpr161 from cilia. The first step involves β-arrestin recruitment by the signaling competent receptor, which is facilitated by the GPCR kinase Grk2. An essential factor here is the ciliary trafficking and activation of Smoothened, which by increasing Gpr161–β-arrestin binding promotes Gpr161 removal, both during resting conditions and upon Shh pathway activation. The second step involves clathrin-mediated endocytosis, which functions outside of the ciliary compartment in coordinating Gpr161 removal. Mechanisms determining dynamic compartmentalization of Gpr161 in cilia define a new paradigm for down-regulation of GPCRs during developmental signaling from a specialized subcellular compartment. PMID:27002170

  8. Beam sensorimotor learning and habituation to motor activity in lurcher mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, R; Joyal, C C; Thifault, S

    1996-01-01

    Lurcher mutant mice lose cerebellar granule cells and Purkinje cells. The mutants were compared to normal mice in a beam-walking task. Normal mice were placed on a slippery bridge while lurchers, because of their severe ataxia, were placed on a bridge with the same diameter, but enveloped with surgical tape to improve traction. The performance of both groups improved with repeated trials. In an activity box, lurcher mutants were as active as normal mice, showed normal intrasession habituation, and emerged from a toy object as easily as normal mice. These results indicate that the cerebellar damage in lurchers does not prevent the acquisition of a motor skill task requiring balance in an immobile apparatus. Ataxia was not accompanied by hypoactivity, inhibition or disturbances in intrasession habituation.

  9. Olesoxime suppresses calpain activation and mutant huntingtin fragmentation in the BACHD rat.

    PubMed

    Clemens, Laura E; Weber, Jonasz J; Wlodkowski, Tanja T; Yu-Taeger, Libo; Michaud, Magali; Calaminus, Carsten; Eckert, Schamim H; Gaca, Janett; Weiss, Andreas; Magg, Janine C D; Jansson, Erik K H; Eckert, Gunter P; Pichler, Bernd J; Bordet, Thierry; Pruss, Rebecca M; Riess, Olaf; Nguyen, Huu P

    2015-12-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal human neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the HTT gene, which translates into a mutant huntingtin protein. A key event in the molecular pathogenesis of Huntington's disease is the proteolytic cleavage of mutant huntingtin, leading to the accumulation of toxic protein fragments. Mutant huntingtin cleavage has been linked to the overactivation of proteases due to mitochondrial dysfunction and calcium derangements. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of olesoxime, a mitochondria-targeting, neuroprotective compound, in the BACHD rat model of Huntington's disease. BACHD rats were treated with olesoxime via the food for 12 months. In vivo analysis covered motor impairments, cognitive deficits, mood disturbances and brain atrophy. Ex vivo analyses addressed olesoxime's effect on mutant huntingtin aggregation and cleavage, as well as brain mitochondria function. Olesoxime improved cognitive and psychiatric phenotypes, and ameliorated cortical thinning in the BACHD rat. The treatment reduced cerebral mutant huntingtin aggregates and nuclear accumulation. Further analysis revealed a cortex-specific overactivation of calpain in untreated BACHD rats. Treated BACHD rats instead showed significantly reduced levels of mutant huntingtin fragments due to the suppression of calpain-mediated cleavage. In addition, olesoxime reduced the amount of mutant huntingtin fragments associated with mitochondria, restored a respiration deficit, and enhanced the expression of fusion and outer-membrane transport proteins. In conclusion, we discovered the calpain proteolytic system, a key player in Huntington's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders, as a target of olesoxime. Our findings suggest that olesoxime exerts its beneficial effects by improving mitochondrial function, which results in reduced calpain activation. The observed alleviation of behavioural and neuropathological phenotypes encourages further

  10. A cytochrome c mutant with high electron transfer and antioxidant activities but devoid of apoptogenic effect.

    PubMed Central

    Abdullaev, Ziedulla Kh; Bodrova, Marina E; Chernyak, Boris V; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Kluck, Ruth M; Pereverzev, Mikhail O; Arseniev, Alexander S; Efremov, Roman G; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Mokhova, Elena N; Newmeyer, Donald D; Roder, Heinrich; Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2002-01-01

    A cytochrome c mutant lacking apoptogenic function but competent in electron transfer and antioxidant activities has been constructed. To this end, mutant species of horse and yeast cytochromes c with substitutions in the N-terminal alpha-helix or position 72 were obtained. It was found that yeast cytochrome c was much less effective than the horse protein in activating respiration of rat liver mitoplasts deficient in endogenous cytochrome c as well as in inhibition of H(2)O(2) production by the initial segment of the respiratory chain of intact rat heart mitochondria. The major role in the difference between the horse and yeast proteins was shown to be played by the amino acid residue in position 4 (glutamate in horse, and lysine in yeast; horse protein numbering). A mutant of the yeast cytochrome c containing K4E and some other "horse" modifications in the N-terminal alpha-helix, proved to be (i) much more active in electron transfer and antioxidant activity than the wild-type yeast cytochrome c and (ii), like the yeast cytochrome c, inactive in caspase stimulation, even if added in 400-fold excess compared with the horse protein. Thus this mutant seems to be a good candidate for knock-in studies of the role of cytochrome c-mediated apoptosis, in contrast with the horse K72R, K72G, K72L and K72A mutant cytochromes that at low concentrations were less active in apoptosis than the wild-type, but were quite active when the concentrations were increased by a factor of 2-12. PMID:11879204

  11. Hedgehog-regulated ubiquitination controls smoothened trafficking and cell surface expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Chen, Yongbin; Shi, Qing; Yue, Tao; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog transduces signal by promoting cell surface expression of the seven-transmembrane protein Smoothened (Smo) in Drosophila, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that Smo is downregulated by ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis and degradation, and that Hh increases Smo cell surface expression by inhibiting its ubiquitination. We find that Smo is ubiquitinated at multiple Lysine residues including those in its autoinhibitory domain (SAID), leading to endocytosis and degradation of Smo by both lysosome- and proteasome-dependent mechanisms. Hh inhibits Smo ubiquitination via PKA/CK1-mediated phosphorylation of SAID, leading to Smo cell surface accumulation. Inactivation of the ubiquitin activating enzyme Uba1 or perturbation of multiple components of the endocytic machinery leads to Smo accumulation and Hh pathway activation. In addition, we find that the non-visual β-arrestin Kurtz (Krz) interacts with Smo and acts in parallel with ubiquitination to downregulate Smo. Finally, we show that Smo ubiquitination is counteracted by the deubiquitinating enzyme UBPY/USP8. Gain and loss of UBPY lead to reciprocal changes in Smo cell surface expression. Taken together, our results suggest that ubiquitination plays a key role in the downregulation of Smo to keep Hh pathway activity off in the absence of the ligand, and that Hh-induced phosphorylation promotes Smo cell surface accumulation by inhibiting its ubiquitination, which contributes to Hh pathway activation.

  12. High-throughput fluorescence-activated cell sorting for lipid hyperaccumulating Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutants.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bo; Stessman, Dan; Hart, Jason H; Dong, Haili; Wang, Yingjun; Wright, David A; Nikolau, Basil J; Spalding, Martin H; Halverson, Larry J

    2014-09-01

    The genetically tractable microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has many advantages as a model for renewable bioproducts and/or biofuels production. However, one limitation of C. reinhardtii is its relatively low-lipid content compared with some other algal species. To overcome this limitation, we combined ethane methyl sulfonate mutagenesis with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of cells stained with the lipophilic stain Nile Red to isolate lipid hyperaccumulating mutants of C. reinhardtii. By manipulating the FACS gates, we sorted mutagenized cells with extremely high Nile Red fluorescence signals that were rarely detected in nonmutagenized populations. This strategy successfully isolated several putative lipid hyperaccumulating mutants exhibiting 23% to 58% (dry weight basis) higher fatty acid contents than their progenitor strains. Significantly, for most mutants, nitrogen starvation was not required to attain high-lipid content nor was there a requirement for a deficiency in starch accumulation. Microscopy of Nile Red stained cells revealed that some mutants exhibit an increase in the number of lipid bodies, which correlated with TLC analysis of triacyglycerol content. Increased lipid content could also arise through increased biomass production. Collectively, our findings highlight the ability to enhance intracellular lipid accumulation in algae using random mutagenesis in conjunction with a robust FACS and lipid yield verification regime. Our lipid hyperaccumulating mutants could serve as a genetic resource for stacking additional desirable traits to further increase lipid production and for identifying genes contributing to lipid hyperaccumulation, without lengthy lipid-induction periods.

  13. Structural features and activity of Brazzein and its mutants upon substitution of a surfaced exposed alanine.

    PubMed

    Ghanavatian, Parisa; Khalifeh, Khosrow; Jafarian, Vahab

    2016-12-01

    Brazzein (Brz) is a member of sweet-tasting protein containing four disulfide bonds. It was reported as a compact and heat-resistant protein. Here, we have used site-directed mutagenesis and replaced a surface-exposed alanine with aspartic acid (A19D mutant), lysine (A19K mutant) and glycine (A19G mutant). Activity comparisons of wild-type (WT) and mutants using taste panel test procedure showed that A19G variant has the same activity as WT protein. However, introduction of a positive charge in A19K mutant led to significant increase in Brz's sweetness, while A19D has reduced sweetness compared to WT protein. Docking studies showed that mutation at position 19 results in slight chain mobility of protein at the binding surface and changing the patterns of interactions toward more effective binding of E9K variant in the concave surface of sweet taste receptor. Far-UV CD data spectra have a characteristic shape of beta structure for all variants, however different magnitudes of spectra suggest that beta-sheet structure in WT and A19G is more stable than that of A19D and A19K. Equilibrium unfolding studies with fluorescence spectroscopy and using urea and dithiothritol (DTT) as chemical denaturants indicates that A19G mutant gains more stability against urea denaturation; while conformational stability of A19D and A19K decreases when compared with WT and A19G variants. We concluded that the positive charge at the surface of protein is important factor responsible for the interaction of protein with the human sweet receptor and Ala(19) can be considered as a key region for investigating the mechanism of the interaction of Brz with corresponding receptor.

  14. Active transcriptomic and proteomic reprogramming in the C. elegans nucleotide excision repair mutant xpa-1.

    PubMed

    Arczewska, Katarzyna D; Tomazella, Gisele G; Lindvall, Jessica M; Kassahun, Henok; Maglioni, Silvia; Torgovnick, Alessandro; Henriksson, Johan; Matilainen, Olli; Marquis, Bryce J; Nelson, Bryant C; Jaruga, Pawel; Babaie, Eshrat; Holmberg, Carina I; Bürglin, Thomas R; Ventura, Natascia; Thiede, Bernd; Nilsen, Hilde

    2013-05-01

    Transcription-blocking oxidative DNA damage is believed to contribute to aging and to underlie activation of oxidative stress responses and down-regulation of insulin-like signaling (ILS) in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) deficient mice. Here, we present the first quantitative proteomic description of the Caenorhabditis elegans NER-defective xpa-1 mutant and compare the proteome and transcriptome signatures. Both methods indicated activation of oxidative stress responses, which was substantiated biochemically by a bioenergetic shift involving increased steady-state reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. We identify the lesion-detection enzymes of Base Excision Repair (NTH-1) and global genome NER (XPC-1 and DDB-1) as upstream requirements for transcriptomic reprogramming as RNA-interference mediated depletion of these enzymes prevented up-regulation of genes over-expressed in the xpa-1 mutant. The transcription factors SKN-1 and SLR-2, but not DAF-16, were identified as effectors of reprogramming. As shown in human XPA cells, the levels of transcription-blocking 8,5'-cyclo-2'-deoxyadenosine lesions were reduced in the xpa-1 mutant compared to the wild type. Hence, accumulation of cyclopurines is unlikely to be sufficient for reprogramming. Instead, our data support a model where the lesion-detection enzymes NTH-1, XPC-1 and DDB-1 play active roles to generate a genomic stress signal sufficiently strong to result in transcriptomic reprogramming in the xpa-1 mutant.

  15. Staphylococcal enterotoxin type A internal deletion mutants: serological activity and induction of T-cell proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, T O; Hufnagle, W O; Betley, M J

    1993-01-01

    Previous findings indicate that the N-terminal region of staphylococcal enterotoxin type A (SEA) is required for its ability to induce T-cell proliferation. To better localize internal peptides of SEA that are important for induction of murine T-cell proliferation, SEA mutants that had internal deletions in their N-terminal third were constructed. A series of unique restriction enzyme sites were first engineered into sea; only one of these changes resulted in an amino acid substitution (the aspartic acid residue at position 60 of mature SEA was changed to a glycine [D60G]). Because the D60G substitution had no discernible effect on serological or biological activity, the sea allele encoding this mutant SEA was used to construct a panel of mutant SEAs lacking residues 3 to 17, 19 to 23, 24 to 28, 29 to 49, 50 to 55, 56 to 59, 61 to 73, 68 to 74, or 74 to 85. Recombinant plasmids with the desired mutations were constructed in Escherichia coli and transferred to Staphylococcus aureus. Staphylococcal culture supernatants containing the mutant SEAs were examined. Western immunoblot analysis with polyclonal anti-SEA antiserum revealed that each of the recombinant S. aureus strains produced a mutant SEA of the predicted size. All the mutant SEAs exhibited increased sensitivity to monkey stomach lavage fluid in vitro, which is consistent with these mutants having conformations unlike that of wild-type SEA or the SEA D60G mutant. In general, deletion of internal peptides had a deleterious effect on the ability to induce T-cell proliferation; only SEA mutants lacking either residues 3 to 17 or 56 to 59 consistently produced a statistically significant increase in the incorporation of [3H]thymidine. In the course of this work, two monoclonal antibodies that had different requirements for binding to SEA in Western blots were identified. The epitope for one monoclonal antibody was contained within residues 108 to 230 of mature SEA. Binding of the other monoclonal antibody to

  16. Genetic ablation of Smoothened in pancreatic fibroblasts increases acinar–ductal metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Pitarresi, Jason R.; Cuitiño, Maria C.; Kladney, Raleigh D.; Woelke, Sarah A.; Sizemore, Gina M.; Nayak, Sunayana G.; Egriboz, Onur; Schweickert, Patrick G.; Yu, Lianbo; Trela, Stefan; Schilling, Daniel J.; Halloran, Shannon K.; Li, Maokun; Dutta, Shourik; Fernandez, Soledad A.; Rosol, Thomas J.; Lesinski, Gregory B.; Shakya, Reena; Ludwig, Thomas; Konieczny, Stephen F.; Leone, Gustavo; Wu, Jinghai; Ostrowski, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the microenvironment to pancreatic acinar-to-ductal metaplasia (ADM), a preneoplastic transition in oncogenic Kras-driven pancreatic cancer progression, is currently unclear. Here we show that disruption of paracrine Hedgehog signaling via genetic ablation of Smoothened (Smo) in stromal fibroblasts in a KrasG12D mouse model increased ADM. Smo-deleted fibroblasts had higher expression of transforming growth factor-α (Tgfa) mRNA and secreted higher levels of TGFα, leading to activation of EGFR signaling in acinar cells and increased ADM. The mechanism involved activation of AKT and noncanonical activation of the GLI family transcription factor GLI2. GLI2 was phosphorylated at Ser230 in an AKT-dependent fashion and directly regulated Tgfa expression in fibroblasts lacking Smo. Additionally, Smo-deleted fibroblasts stimulated the growth of KrasG12D/Tp53R172H pancreatic tumor cells in vivo and in vitro. These results define a non-cell-autonomous mechanism modulating KrasG12D-driven ADM that is balanced by cross-talk between Hedgehog/SMO and AKT/GLI2 pathways in stromal fibroblasts. PMID:27633013

  17. Anti-oncogenic activity of signalling-defective epidermal growth factor receptor mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Redemann, N; Holzmann, B; von Rüden, T; Wagner, E F; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1992-01-01

    Overexpression and autocrine activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) cause transformation of cultured cells and correlate with tumor progression in cancer patients. Dimerization and transphosphorylation are crucial events in the process by which receptors with tyrosine kinase activity generate normal and transforming cellular signals. Interruption of this process by inactive receptor mutants offers the potential to inhibit ligand-induced cellular responses. Using recombinant retroviruses, we have examined the effects of signalling-incompetent EGF-R mutants on the growth-promoting and transforming potential of ligand-activated, overexpressed wild-type EGF-R and the v-erbB oncogene product. Expression of a soluble extracellular EGF-R domain had little if any effect on the growth and transformation of NIH 3T3 cells by either tyrosine kinase. However, both a kinase-negative EGF-R point mutant (HERK721A) and an EGF-R lacking 533 C-terminal amino acids efficiently inhibited wild-type EGF-R-mediated, de novo DNA synthesis and cell transformation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, coexpression with the v-erbBES4 oncogene product in NIH 3T3 cells resulted in transphosphorylation of the HERK721A mutant receptor and reduced soft-agar colony growth but had no effect in a focus formation assay. These results demonstrate that signalling-defective receptor tyrosine kinase mutants differentially interfere with oncogenic signals generated by either overexpressed EGF-R or the retroviral v-erbBES4 oncogene product. Images PMID:1346334

  18. A Mutant Strain of a Surfactant-Producing Bacterium with Increased Emulsification Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingmei; Yao, Jianming; Pan, Renrui; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-06-01

    As reported in this paper, a strain of oil-degrading bacterium Sp-5-3 was determined to belong to Enterobacteriaceae, which would be useful for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). The aim of our study was to generate a mutant using low energy N+ beam implantation. With 10 keV of energy and 5.2 × 1014 N+/cm2 of dose - the optimum condition, a mutant, S-34, was obtained, which had nearly a 5-fold higher surface and a 13-fold higher of emulsification activity than the wild type. The surface activity was measured by two methods, namely, a surface tension measuring instrument and a recording of the repulsive circle of the oil film; the emulsification activity was scaled through measuring the separating time of the oil-fermentation mixture. The metabolic acid was determined as methane by means of gas chromatography.

  19. Antibacterial Activity of Sirodesmin PL Phytotoxin: Application to the Selection of Phytotoxin-Deficient Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Boudart, Georges

    1989-01-01

    Sirodesmin PL, a phytotoxin and mycotoxin produced by Leptosphaeria maculans, the causal agent of stem-canker disease of crucifers, exhibited antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria and particularly Bacillus subtilis. The importance of the disulfide bridge of the molecule in antibacterial activity was demonstrated. A simple and reliable bioassay based on the antibacterial activity of the toxin was performed for screening sirodesmin PL-deficient mutants when grown on solid culture medium. A mutant was selected and found to produce 3,700-fold less toxin than did the wild-type strain. A sensitive procedure for quantification of the toxin by high-pressure liquid chromatography was developed. Levels of product as low as 100 ng could be detected by this procedure. Images PMID:16347949

  20. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway: Review of Smoothened and GLI Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rimkus, Tadas K; Carpenter, Richard L; Qasem, Shadi; Chan, Michael; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2016-02-15

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is a major regulator of cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and tissue polarity. Aberrant activation of the Shh pathway has been shown in a variety of human cancers, including, basal cell carcinoma, malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma, leukemias, and cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, and prostate. Tumorigenesis, tumor progression and therapeutic response have all been shown to be impacted by the Shh signaling pathway. Downstream effectors of the Shh pathway include smoothened (SMO) and glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI) family of zinc finger transcription factors. Both are regarded as important targets for cancer therapeutics. While most efforts have been devoted towards pharmacologically targeting SMO, developing GLI-targeted approach has its merit because of the fact that GLI proteins can be activated by both Shh ligand-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To date, two SMO inhibitors (LDE225/Sonidegib and GDC-0449/Vismodegib) have received FDA approval for treating basal cell carcinoma while many clinical trials are being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this exciting class of targeted therapy in a variety of cancers. In this review, we provide an overview of the biology of the Shh pathway and then detail the current landscape of the Shh-SMO-GLI pathway inhibitors including those in preclinical studies and clinical trials.

  1. USP8 promotes smoothened signaling by preventing its ubiquitination and changing its subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ruohan; Jia, Hongge; Fan, Junkai; Liu, Yajuan; Jia, Jianhang

    2012-01-01

    The seven transmembrane protein Smoothened (Smo) is a critical component of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and is regulated by phosphorylation, dimerization, and cell-surface accumulation upon Hh stimulation. However, it is not clear how Hh regulates Smo accumulation on the cell surface or how Hh regulates the intracellular trafficking of Smo. In addition, little is known about whether ubiquitination is involved in Smo regulation. In this study, we demonstrate that Smo is multi-monoubiquitinated and that Smo ubiquitination is inhibited by Hh and by phosphorylation. Using an in vivo RNAi screen, we identified ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8) as a deubiquitinase that down-regulates Smo ubiquitination. Inactivation of USP8 increases Smo ubiquitination and attenuates Hh-induced Smo accumulation, leading to decreased Hh signaling activity. Moreover, overexpression of USP8 prevents Smo ubiquitination and elevates Smo accumulation, leading to increased Hh signaling activity. Mechanistically, we show that Hh promotes the interaction of USP8 with Smo aa625-753, which covers the three PKA and CK1 phosphorylation clusters. Finally, USP8 promotes the accumulation of Smo at the cell surface and prevents localization to the early endosomes, presumably by deubiquitinating Smo. Our studies identify USP8 as a positive regulator in Hh signaling by down-regulating Smo ubiquitination and thereby mediating Smo intracellular trafficking.

  2. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway: Review of Smoothened and GLI Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rimkus, Tadas K.; Carpenter, Richard L.; Qasem, Shadi; Chan, Michael; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is a major regulator of cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and tissue polarity. Aberrant activation of the Shh pathway has been shown in a variety of human cancers, including, basal cell carcinoma, malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma, leukemias, and cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, and prostate. Tumorigenesis, tumor progression and therapeutic response have all been shown to be impacted by the Shh signaling pathway. Downstream effectors of the Shh pathway include smoothened (SMO) and glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI) family of zinc finger transcription factors. Both are regarded as important targets for cancer therapeutics. While most efforts have been devoted towards pharmacologically targeting SMO, developing GLI-targeted approach has its merit because of the fact that GLI proteins can be activated by both Shh ligand-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To date, two SMO inhibitors (LDE225/Sonidegib and GDC-0449/Vismodegib) have received FDA approval for treating basal cell carcinoma while many clinical trials are being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this exciting class of targeted therapy in a variety of cancers. In this review, we provide an overview of the biology of the Shh pathway and then detail the current landscape of the Shh-SMO-GLI pathway inhibitors including those in preclinical studies and clinical trials. PMID:26891329

  3. Mutational analysis of the lac regulatory region: second-site changes that activate mutant promoters.

    PubMed Central

    Rothmel, R K; LeClerc, J E

    1989-01-01

    Second-site mutations that restored activity to severe lacP1 down-promoter mutants were isolated. This was accomplished by using a bacteriophage f1 vector containing a fusion of the mutant E. coli lac promoters with the structural gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), so that a system was provided for selecting phage revertants (or pseudorevertants) that conferred resistance of phage-infected cells to chloramphenicol. Among the second-site changes that relieved defects in mutant lac promoters, the only one that restored lacP1 activity was a T----G substitution at position -14, a weakly conserved site in E. coli promoters. Three other sequence changes, G----A at -2, A----T at +1, and C----A at +10, activated nascent promoters in the lac regulatory region. The nascent promoters conformed to the consensus rule, that activity is gained by sequence changes toward homology with consensus sequences at the -35 and -10 regions of the promoter. However, the relative activities of some promoters cannot be explained solely by consideration of their conserved sequence elements. Images PMID:2660105

  4. Abelson murine leukemia virus transformation-defective mutants with impaired P120-associated protein kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, F H; Van de Ven, W J; Stephenson, J R

    1980-01-01

    Several transformation-defective (td) mutants of Abelson murine leukemia virus (AbLV) are described. Cells nonproductively infected with such mutants exhibited a high degree of growth contact inhibition, failed to form colonies in soft agar, lacked rescuable transforming virus, and were as susceptible as uninfected control cells to transformation by wild-type (wt) AbLV pseudotype virus. In addition, each of several td AbLV nonproductively infected cell clones analyzed was found to be nontumorigenic in vivo. Biochemical analysis of td mutant AbLV-infected clones revealed levels of expression of the major AbLV translational product, P120, and a highly related 80,000-Mr AbLV-encoded protein, P80, at concentrations analogous to those in wt AbLV-transformed cells. Although the AbLV-specific 120,000-Mr polyproteins expressed in td mutant AbLV-infected clones were indistinguishable from those in wt AbLV-transformed lines with respect to molecular weight and [35S]methionine tryptic peptide composition, they each differed from wt AbLV P120 in their patterns of post-translational phosphorylation. A previously described AbLV-associated protein kinase activity is shown to recognize as substrate a major tyrosine-specific acceptor site(s) contained within a single well-resolved tryptic peptide common to both AbLV P120 and P80. In vitro [gamma-32P]ATP-mediated labeling of this phosphorylation site was reduced to below detectable levels in td mutant nonproductively infected cell clones. These findings establish that the AbLV-encoded polyprotein P120 and its associated protein kinase activity are involved in AbLV tumorigenesis. Images PMID:6253663

  5. Lactose metabolism in Streptococcus lactis: studies with a mutant lacking glucokinase and mannose-phosphotransferase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.; Chassy, B.M.; Egan, W.

    1985-04-01

    A mutant of Streptococcus lactis 133 has been isolated that lacks both glucokinase and phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent mannose- phosphotransferase (mannose-PTS) activities. The double mutant S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- is unable to utilize either exogenously supplied or intracellularly generated glucose for growth. Fluorographic analyses of metabolites formed during the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)lactose labeled specifically in the glucose or galactosyl moiety established that the cells were unable to phosphorylate intracellular glucose. However, cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- readily metabolized intracellular glucose 6-phosphate, and the growth rates and cell yield of the mutant and parental strains on sucrose were the same. During growth on lactose, S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- fermented only the galactose moiety of the disaccharide, and 1 mol of glucose was generated per mol of lactose consumed. For an equivalent concentration of lactose, the cell yield of the mutant was 50% that of the wild type. The specific rate of lactose utilization by growing cells of S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- was ca. 50% greater than that of the wild type, but the cell doubling times were 70 and 47 min, respectively. High-resolution /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance studies of lactose transport by starved cells of S. lactis 133 and S. lactis 133 mannose-PTSd GK- showed that the latter cells contained elevated lactose-PTS activity. Throughout exponential growth on lactose, the mutant maintained an intracellular steady-state glucose concentration of 100 mM.

  6. Mutants of Micromonospora viridifaciens sialidase have highly variable activities on natural and non-natural substrates.

    PubMed

    Jers, C; Guo, Y; Kepp, K P; Mikkelsen, J D

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to improve the hydrolase activity of the well-characterised bacterial sialidase from Micromonospora viridifaciens. The enzyme and its mutated versions were produced in Bacillus subtilis and secreted to the growth medium. Twenty amino acid positions in or near the active site were subjected to site-saturation mutagenesis and evaluated on the artificial sialidase substrate 2-O-(p-nitrophenyl)-α-d-N-acetylneuraminic acid and on the natural substrate casein glycomacropeptide. A considerably higher fraction of the mutants exhibited increased activity on the artificial substrate compared with the natural one, with the most proficient mutant showing a 13-fold improvement in kcat/Km. In contrast, no mutants displayed more than a 2-fold increase in activity on the natural substrate. To gain further insight into this important discrepancy, we analysed the stability of mutants using the PoPMuSiC software, a property that also correlates with the potential for introducing chemical variation, after validating the method with a set of experimental stability estimates. We found a significant correlation between improved hydrolase activity on the artificial substrate and reduced apparent stability. Together with the minor improvement on the natural substrate this shows an important difference between naturally evolved functionality and new laboratory functionality. Our results suggest that when engineering sialidases and potentially other proteins towards non-natural substrates that are not optimized by natural evolution, major changes in chemical properties are advantageous, and these changes tend to correlate with decreased stability, partly explaining commonly observed trade-offs between stability and proficiency.

  7. Modeled changes of cerebellar activity in mutant mice are predictive of their learning impairments

    PubMed Central

    Badura, Aleksandra; Clopath, Claudia; Schonewille, Martijn; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Translating neuronal activity to measurable behavioral changes has been a long-standing goal of systems neuroscience. Recently, we have developed a model of phase-reversal learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, a well-established, cerebellar-dependent task. The model, comprising both the cerebellar cortex and vestibular nuclei, reproduces behavioral data and accounts for the changes in neural activity during learning in wild type mice. Here, we used our model to predict Purkinje cell spiking as well as behavior before and after learning of five different lines of mutant mice with distinct cell-specific alterations of the cerebellar cortical circuitry. We tested these predictions by obtaining electrophysiological data depicting changes in neuronal spiking. We show that our data is largely consistent with the model predictions for simple spike modulation of Purkinje cells and concomitant behavioral learning in four of the mutants. In addition, our model accurately predicts a shift in simple spike activity in a mutant mouse with a brainstem specific mutation. This combination of electrophysiological and computational techniques opens a possibility of predicting behavioral impairments from neural activity. PMID:27805050

  8. Subunit dissociation and activation of wild-type and mutant glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Gehring, U; Mugele, K; Arndt, H; Busch, W

    1987-09-01

    Apparent molecular weights of wild-type and nti ('increased nuclear transfer') mutant glucocorticoid receptors were obtained from Stokes radii and sedimentation coefficients. At low salt concentrations molecular forms of Mr 328,000 and 298,000 of the wild-type and mutant, respectively, were predominant. Increasing ionic strength resulted in receptor dissociation. Dissociated forms of Mr 130,000 and 63,000 of the wild-type and mutant, respectively, were obtained at 300 mM KCl and above. Some metal oxi-anions prevented dissociation. Receptor activation to allow DNA binding produced the dissociated forms which could be separated from non-activated receptors by filtration through DNA-cellulose or by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Non-activated wild-type and nti receptors eluted from DEAE-cellulose under identical conditions while activated wild-type and nti receptors eluted differently. Partially proteolyzed wild-type receptors behaved identically to nti receptors. We conclude that the large forms of wild-type and nti receptors are heteromeric and contain only one hormone-building polypeptide per complex.

  9. Heterodimerization of Two Pathological Mutants Enhances the Activity of Human Phosphomannomutase2

    PubMed Central

    Andreotti, Giuseppina; Monti, Maria Chiara; Citro, Valentina; Cubellis, Maria Vittoria

    2015-01-01

    The most frequent disorder of glycosylation is due to mutations in the gene encoding phosphomannomutase2 (PMM2-CDG). For this disease, which is autosomal and recessive, there is no cure at present. Most patients are composite heterozygous and carry one allele encoding an inactive mutant, R141H, and one encoding a hypomorphic mutant. Phosphomannomutase2 is a dimer. We reproduced composite heterozygosity in vitro by mixing R141H either with the wild type protein or the most common hypomorphic mutant F119L and compared the quaternary structure, the activity and the stability of the heterodimeric enzymes. We demonstrated that the activity of R141H/F119L heterodimers in vitro, which reproduces the protein found in patients, has the same activity of wild type/R141H, which reproduces the protein found in healthy carriers. On the other hand the stability of R141H/F119L appears to be reduced both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that a therapy designed to enhance protein stability such as those based on pharmacological chaperones or modulation of proteostasis could be beneficial for PMM2-CDG patients carrying R141H/F119L genotype as well as for other genotypes where protein stability rather than specific activity is affected by mutations. PMID:26488408

  10. Modeled changes of cerebellar activity in mutant mice are predictive of their learning impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badura, Aleksandra; Clopath, Claudia; Schonewille, Martijn; de Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2016-11-01

    Translating neuronal activity to measurable behavioral changes has been a long-standing goal of systems neuroscience. Recently, we have developed a model of phase-reversal learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, a well-established, cerebellar-dependent task. The model, comprising both the cerebellar cortex and vestibular nuclei, reproduces behavioral data and accounts for the changes in neural activity during learning in wild type mice. Here, we used our model to predict Purkinje cell spiking as well as behavior before and after learning of five different lines of mutant mice with distinct cell-specific alterations of the cerebellar cortical circuitry. We tested these predictions by obtaining electrophysiological data depicting changes in neuronal spiking. We show that our data is largely consistent with the model predictions for simple spike modulation of Purkinje cells and concomitant behavioral learning in four of the mutants. In addition, our model accurately predicts a shift in simple spike activity in a mutant mouse with a brainstem specific mutation. This combination of electrophysiological and computational techniques opens a possibility of predicting behavioral impairments from neural activity.

  11. Functional determinants of ras interference 1 mutants required for their inhbitory activity on endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Galvis, Adriana; Giambini, Hugo; Villasana, Zoilmar; Barbieri, M. Alejandro

    2009-03-10

    In this study, we initiated experiments to address the structure-function relationship of Rin1. A total of ten substitute mutations were created, and their effects on Rin1 function were examined. Of the ten mutants, four of them (P541A, E574A, Y577F, T580A) were defective in Rab5 binding, while two other Rin1 mutants (D537A, Y561F) partially interacted with Rab5. Mutations in several other residues (Y506F, Y523F, T572A, Y578F) resulted in partial loss of Rab5 function. Biochemical studies showed that six of them (D537A, P541A, Y561F, E574A, Y577F, T580A) were unable to activate Rab5 in an in vitro assay. In addition, Rin1: D537A and Rin1: Y561F mutants showed dominant inhibition of Rab5 function. Consistent with the biochemical studies, we observed that these two Rin1 mutants have lost their ability to stimulate the endocytosis of EGF, form enlarged Rab5-positive endosomes, or support in vitro endosome fusion. Based on these data, our results showed that mutations in the Vps9 domain of Rin1 lead to a loss-of-function phenotype, indicating a specific structure-function relationship between Rab5 and Rin1.

  12. Activation of the anticancer drugs cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide by cytochrome P450 BM3 mutants.

    PubMed

    Vredenburg, Galvin; den Braver-Sewradj, Shalenie; van Vugt-Lussenburg, Barbara M A; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M; Vos, J Chris

    2015-01-05

    Cyclophosphamide (CPA) and ifosfamide (IFA) are widely used anticancer agents that require metabolic activation by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. While 4-hydroxylation yields DNA-alkylating and cytotoxic metabolites, N-dechloroethylation results in the generation of neuro- and nephrotoxic byproducts. Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapies (GDEPT) have been suggested to facilitate local CPA and IFA bioactivation by expressing CYP enzymes within the tumor cells, thereby increasing efficacy. We screened bacterial CYP BM3 mutants, previously engineered to metabolize drug-like compounds, for their ability to catalyze 4-hydroxylation of CPA and IFA. Two CYP BM3 mutants showed very rapid initial bioactivation of CPA and IFA, followed by a slower phase of product formation. N-dechloroethylation by these mutants was very low (IFA) to undetectable (CPA). Using purified CYP BM3 as an extracellular bioactivation tool, cytotoxicity of CPA and IFA metabolism was confirmed in U2OS cells. This novel application of CYP BM3 possibly provides a clean and catalytically efficient alternative to liver microsomes or S9 for the study of CYP-mediated drug toxicity. To our knowledge, the observed rate of CPA and IFA 4-hydroxylation by these CYP BM3 mutants is the fastest reported to date, and might be of potential interest for CPA and IFA GDEPT.

  13. Hepatitis B virus X protein mutants exhibit distinct biological activities in hepatoma Huh7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaohong; Zhang Shuhui; Lin Jing; Zhang Shunmin; Feitelson, Mark A.; Gao Hengjun; Zhu Minghua

    2008-09-05

    The role of the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in hepatocarcinogenesis remains controversial. To investigate the biological impact of hepatitis B virus x gene (HBx) mutation on hepatoma cells, plasmids expressing the full-length HBx or HBx deletion mutants were constructed. The biological activities in these transfectants were analyzed by a series of assays. Results showed that HBx3'-20 and HBx3'-40 amino acid deletion mutants exhibited an increase in cellular proliferation, focus formation, tumorigenicity, and invasive growth and metastasis through promotion of the cell cycle from G0/G1 to the S phase, when compared with the full-length HBx. In contrast, HBx3'-30 amino acid deletion mutant repressed cell proliferation by blocking in G1 phase. The expression of P53, p21{sup WAF1}, p14{sup ARF}, and MDM2 proteins was regulated by expression of HBx mutants. In conclusions, HBx variants showed different effects and functions on cell proliferation and invasion by regulation of the cell cycle progression and its associated proteins expression.

  14. Altered motor activity, exploration and anxiety in heterozygous neuregulin 1 mutant mice: implications for understanding schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Karl, T; Duffy, L; Scimone, A; Harvey, R P; Schofield, P R

    2007-10-01

    Human genetic studies have shown that neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a potential susceptibility gene for schizophrenia. Nrg1 influences various neurodevelopmental processes, which are potentially related to schizophrenia. The neurodevelopmental theory of schizophrenia suggests that interactions between genetic and environmental factors are responsible for biochemical alterations leading to schizophrenia. To investigate these interactions and to match experimental design with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, we applied a comprehensive behavioural phenotyping strategy for motor activity, exploration and anxiety in a heterozygous Nrg1 transmembrane domain mutant mouse model (Nrg1 HET) using different housing conditions and age groups. We observed a locomotion- and exploration-related hyperactive phenotype in Nrg1 HETs. Increased age had a locomotion- and exploration-inhibiting effect, which was significantly attenuated in mutant mice. Environmental enrichment (EE) had a stimulating influence on locomotion and exploration. The impact of EE was more pronounced in Nrg1 hypomorphs. Our study also showed a moderate task-specific anxiolytic-like phenotype for Nrg1 HETs, which was influenced by external factors. The behavioural phenotype detected in heterozygous Nrg1 mutant mice is not specific to schizophrenia per se, but the increased sensitivity of mutant mice to exogenous factors is consistent with the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and the neurodevelopmental theory. Our findings reinforce the importance of carefully controlling experimental designs for external factors and of comprehensive, integrative phenotyping strategies. Thus, Nrg1 HETs may, in combination with other genetic and drug models, help to clarify pathophysiological mechanisms behind schizophrenia.

  15. Interfering with Resistance to Smoothened Antagonists by Inhibition of the PI3K Pathway in Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonamici, Silvia; Williams, Juliet; Morrissey, Michael; Wang, Anlai; Guo, Ribo; Vattay, Anthony; Hsiao, Kathy; Yuan, Jing; Green, John; Ospina, Beatrice; Yu, Qunyan; Ostrom, Lance; Fordjour, Paul; Anderson, Dustin L.; Monahan, John E.; Kelleher, Joseph F.; Peukert, Stefan; Pan, Shifeng; Wu, Xu; Maira, Sauveur-Michel; Garcia-Echeverria, Carlos; Briggs, Kimberly J.; Watkins, D. Neil; Yao, Yung-mae; Lengauer, Christoph; Warmuth, Markus; Sellers, William R.; Dorsch, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in Hedgehog (Hh) pathway genes, leading to constitutive activation of Smoothened (Smo), occur in medulloblastoma. Antagonists of Smo induce tumor regression in mouse models of medulloblastoma and hold great promise for treating this disease. However, acquired resistance has emerged as a challenge to targeted therapeutics and may limit their anti-cancer efficacy. Here, we describe novel mechanisms of acquired resistance to Smo antagonists in medulloblastoma. NVP-LDE225, a potent and selective Smo antagonist, inhibits Hh signaling and induces tumor regressions in allograft models of medulloblastoma that are driven by mutations of Patched (Ptch), a tumor suppressor in the Hh pathway. However, evidence of resistance was observed during the course of treatment. Molecular analysis of resistant tumors revealed distinct resistance mechanisms. Chromosomal amplification of Gli2, a downstream effector of Hh signaling, or more rarely point mutations in Smo led to reactivated Hh signaling and restored tumor growth. Unexpectedly, analysis of pathway gene-expression signatures selectively deregulated in resistant tumors identified increased phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling as another potential resistance mechanism. Probing the functional relevance of increased PI3K signaling, we demonstrated that the combination of NVP-LDE225 with the PI3K class I inhibitor NVP-BKM120 or the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 markedly delayed the development of resistance. Our findings have important clinical implications for future treatment strategies in medulloblastoma. PMID:20881279

  16. A Novel Synthetic Smoothened Antagonist Transiently Inhibits Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Xenografts in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Martin F.; Wilson, Steven R.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; Holsworth, Daniel D.; Khvat, Alexander; Okun, Ilya; Petersen, Dirk; Krauss, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Background Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is over-activated in several solid tumors where it plays a central role in cell growth, stroma recruitment and tumor progression. In the Hh signaling pathway, the Smoothened (SMO) receptor comprises a primary drug target with experimental small molecule SMO antagonists currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Principal Findings Using Shh-Light II (Shh-L2) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) based screening formats on a “focused diversity” library we identified a novel small molecule inhibitor of the Hh pathway, MS-0022 (2-bromo-N-(4-(8-methylimidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-2-yl)phenyl)benzamide). MS-0022 showed effective Hh signaling pathway inhibition at the level of SMO in the low nM range, and Hh pathway inhibition downstream of Suppressor of fused (SUFU) in the low µM range. MS-0022 reduced growth in the tumor cell lines PANC-1, SUIT-2, PC-3 and FEMX in vitro. MS-0022 treatment led to a transient delay of tumor growth that correlated with a reduction of stromal Gli1 levels in SUIT-2 xenografts in vivo. Significance We document the in vitro and in vivo efficacy and bioavailability of a novel small molecule SMO antagonist, MS-0022. Although MS-0022 primarily interferes with Hh signaling at the level of SMO, it also has a downstream inhibitory effect and leads to a stronger reduction of growth in several tumor cell lines when compared to related SMO antagonists. PMID:21698280

  17. Patched1 and Patched2 inhibit Smoothened non-cell autonomously

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Brock; Casillas, Catalina; Alfaro, Astrid C; Jägers, Carina; Roelink, Henk

    2016-01-01

    Smoothened (Smo) inhibition by Patched (Ptch) is central to Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Ptch, a proton driven antiporter, is required for Smo inhibition via an unknown mechanism. Hh ligand binding to Ptch reverses this inhibition and activated Smo initiates the Hh response. To determine whether Ptch inhibits Smo strictly in the same cell or also mediates non-cell-autonomous Smo inhibition, we generated genetically mosaic neuralized embryoid bodies (nEBs) from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). These experiments utilized novel mESC lines in which Ptch1, Ptch2, Smo, Shh and 7dhcr were inactivated via gene editing in multiple combinations, allowing us to measure non-cell autonomous interactions between cells with differing Ptch1/2 status. In several independent assays, the Hh response was repressed by Ptch1/2 in nearby cells. When 7dhcr was targeted, cells displayed elevated non-cell autonomous inhibition. These findings support a model in which Ptch1/2 mediate secretion of a Smo-inhibitory cholesterol precursor. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17634.001 PMID:27552050

  18. Structural basis for Smoothened receptor modulation and chemoresistance to anti-cancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Wu, Huixian; Evron, Tama; Vardy, Eyal; Han, Gye Won; Huang, Xi-Ping; Hufeisen, Sandy J.; Mangano, Thomas J.; Urban, Dan J.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Cherezov, Vadim; Caron, Marc G.; Roth, Bryan L.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2014-01-01

    The Smoothened receptor (SMO) mediates signal transduction in the hedgehog pathway, which is implicated in normal development and carcinogenesis. SMO antagonists can suppress the growth of some tumors; however, mutations at SMO have been found to abolish their anti-tumor effects, a phenomenon known as chemoresistance. Here we report three crystal structures of human SMO bound to the antagonists SANT1 and Anta XV, and the agonist, SAG1.5, at 2.6–2.8Å resolution. The long and narrow cavity in the transmembrane domain of SMO harbors multiple ligand binding sites, where SANT1 binds at a deeper site as compared with other ligands. Distinct interactions at D4736.55 elucidated the structural basis for the differential effects of chemoresistance mutations on SMO antagonists. The agonist SAG1.5 induces a conformational rearrangement of the binding pocket residues, which could contribute to SMO activation. Collectively, these studies reveal the structural basis for the modulation of SMO by small molecules. PMID:25008467

  19. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor and genetically engineered PAF receptor mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, S; Shimizu, T

    2000-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is a biologically active phospholipid mediator. Although PAF was initially recognized for its potential to induce platelet aggregation and secretion, intense investigations have elucidated potent biological actions of PAF in a broad range of cell types and tissues, many of which also produce the molecule. PAF acts by binding to a unique G-protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptor. PAF receptor is linked to intracellular signal transduction pathways, including turnover of phosphatidylinositol, elevation in intracellular calcium concentration, and activation of kinases, resulting in versatile bioactions. On the basis of numerous pharmacological reports, PAF is thought to have many pathophysiological and physiological functions. Recently advanced molecular technics enable us not only to clone PAF receptor cDNAs and genes, but also generate PAF receptor mutant animals, i.e., PAF receptor-overexpressing mouse and PAF receptor-deficient mouse. These mutant mice gave us a novel and specific approach for identifying the pathophysiological and physiological functions of PAF. This review also describes the phenotypes of these mutant mice and discusses them by referring to previously reported pharmacological and genetical data.

  20. Monomeric yeast PCNA mutants are defective in interacting with and stimulating the ATPase activity of RFC.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Costin N; Shea, Kathleen A; Mehra, Rajendra; Prundeanu, Lucia; McAlear, Michael A

    2002-10-29

    Yeast PCNA is a homo-trimeric, ring-shaped DNA polymerase accessory protein that can encircle duplex DNA. The integrity of this multimeric sliding DNA clamp is maintained through the protein-protein interactions at the interfaces of adjacent subunits. To investigate the importance of trimer stability for PCNA function, we introduced single amino acid substitutions at residues (A112T, S135F) that map to opposite ends of the monomeric protein. Recombinant wild-type and mutant PCNAs were purified from E. coli, and they were tested for their properties in vitro. Unlike the stable wild-type PCNA trimers, the mutant PCNA proteins behaved as monomers when diluted to low nanomolar concentrations. In contrast to what has been reported for a monomeric form of the beta clamp in E. coli, the monomeric PCNAs were compromised in their ability to interact with their associated clamp loader, replication factor C (RFC). Similarly, monomeric PCNAs were not effective in stimulating the ATPase activity of RFC. The mutant PCNAs were able to form mixed trimers with wild-type subunits, although these mixed trimers were unstable when loaded onto DNA. They were able to function as weak DNA polymerase delta processivity factors in vitro, and when the monomeric PCNA-41 (A112T, S135F double mutant) allele was introduced as the sole source of PCNA in vivo, the cells were viable and healthy. These pol30-41 mutants were, however, sensitive to UV irradiation and to the DNA damaging agent methylmethane sulfonate, implying that DNA repair pathways have a distinct requirement for stable DNA clamps.

  1. Activation of chitin synthetase in permeabilized cells of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, M P; Correa, J U; Cabib, E

    1982-01-01

    Digitonin treatment at 30 degrees C of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B permeabilized the cells and caused rapid and extensive activation of chitin synthetase in situ. The same result was obtained with a mutant generally defective in vacuolar proteases. By lowering the temperature and using different permeabilization procedures, we showed that increases in permeability and activation are distinct processes. Activation was inhibited by the protease inhibitors antipain and leupeptin, but by pepstatin or chymostatin. Metal chelators were also inhibitory, and their effect was reversed by the addition of Ca2+ but not by Mg2+. Antipain added together with Ca2+ after incubation of the cells in the presence of a chelating agent prevented reversal of inhibition, a result that was interpreted as indicating that antipain acts either on the same step affected by Ca2+ or on a subsequent step. Efforts to obtain activation in cell-free extracts were unsuccessful, but it was possible to extract the synthetase, once activated, by breaking permeabilized cells with glass beads. Treatment of the cell-free extracts with trypsin led not only to increased activity of chitin synthetase, but also to a change in the pH-activity curve and a diminished requirement by the enzyme for free N-acetylglucosamine. These observations suggest that the modification undergone by the synthetase during endogenous activation is different from that brought about by trypsin treatment. Images PMID:6216245

  2. Simultaneous measurement of smoothened entry into and exit from the primary cilium.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jynho; Hsia, Elaine Y C; Kim, James; Sever, Navdar; Beachy, Philip A; Zheng, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary accumulation of signaling proteins must result from a rate of ciliary entry that exceeds ciliary exit, but approaches for distinguishing ciliary entry vs. exit are lacking. Using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein tag, we establish an assay that allows a separate but simultaneous examination of ciliary entry and exit of the Hedgehog signaling protein Smoothened in individual cells. We show that KAAD-cyclopamine selectively blocks entry, whereas ciliobrevin interferes initially with exit and eventually with both entry and exit of ciliary Smoothened. Our study provides an approach to understanding regulation of ciliary entry vs. exit of Hedgehog signaling components as well as other ciliary proteins.

  3. Labeling of human clots in vitro with an active-site mutant of t-PA

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, E.T.; Mack, D.L.; Monge, J.C.; Billadello, J.J.; Sobel, B.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Prompt detection of acute thrombosis and its response to treatment with thrombolytic agents generally require angiography. Scintigraphic approaches with labeled antibodies to or components of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems have been disappointing because of prolonged circulating half-lives of tracers and relatively slow or limited binding to thrombi. Accordingly, we developed and characterized a thrombolytically inactive, active-site mutant (Ser-478----Thr) of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) designed to detect thrombi in vivo. Binding of iodine-125-({sup 125}I) labeled Ser----Thr t-PA to thrombi in vitro was time- and concentration-dependent, and specific judging from inhibition by pre-incubation with anti-t-PA IgG. Clearance of 125I-labeled mutant t-PA in rabbits was rapid and biexponential (alpha t1/2 = 1.9 +/- 0.4 min, beta t1/2 = 39.8 +/- 11.2 min). Thus, the amidolytically inactive mutant of t-PA designed binds rapidly and specifically to human thrombi in vitro and is cleared rapidly from the circulation in vivo--properties rendering it attractive as a potentially useful clot imaging agent.

  4. Mutant APH(2″)-IIa Enzymes with Increased Activity against Amikacin and Isepamicin▿

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Marta; Frase, Hilary; Chow, Joseph W.; Smith, Clyde; Vakulenko, Sergei B.

    2010-01-01

    Directed evolution by random PCR mutagenesis of the gene for the aminoglycoside 2″-IIa phosphotransferase generated R92H/D268N and N196D/D268N mutant enzymes, resulting in elevated levels of resistance to amikacin and isepamicin but not to other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Increases in the activities of the mutant phosphotransferases for isepamicin are the result of decreases in Km values, while improved catalytic efficiency for amikacin is the result of both a decrease in Km values and an increase in turnover of the antibiotic. Enzymes with R92H, D268N, and D268N single amino acid substitutions did not result in elevated MICs for aminoglycosides. PMID:20145089

  5. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the brain of dystonia musculorum (Dst(dt-J)) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Clément, C; Lalonde, R; Strazielle, C

    2012-01-01

    The dystonia musculorum (Dst(dt-J)) mutant mouse suffers from severe motor coordination deficits, characterized, among various symptoms, by a spastic ataxia and dystonic movements, indicating central defects in motor structures in addition to dystrophy of peripheral sensory tracts and partial degeneration of spinocerebellar tracts. Neurochemical alterations, notably in dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems, were previously observed in basal ganglia and cerebellum. A quantitative histochemical cartography of brain acetylcholinesterase activity in Dst(dt-J) mutants, in comparison with controls, revealed increases in the neostriatum, the habenula-interpeduncular pathway, the cholinergic pedunculopontine nucleus and its target structures, the thalamus, major regions of the basal ganglia, such as substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, globus pallidum, and subthalamic nucleus, as well as in associated extrapyramidal regions, such as red nucleus, brainstem reticular formation, and superior colliculus. These acetylcholinesterase changes may play a role in motor deficits, particularly the dystonic symptomatology observed in the mutation.

  6. A dark and constitutively active mutant of the tiger salamander UV pigment.

    PubMed

    Kono, Masahiro; Crouch, Rosalie K; Oprian, Daniel D

    2005-01-18

    A triple mutant (F86L/T93P/S118T; bovine rhodopsin numbering) of the tiger salamander UV cone pigment appears to be trapped in an open conformation that is metarhodopsin-II-like. The pigment is able to activate transducin in the dark, and the ligand-free apoprotein is also able to activate transducin constitutively. The pigment permits protons and chloride ions from solution access to the active site as it displays a pH- and NaCl-dependent absorption spectrum not observed with the wild-type pigment. However, the wild-type properties of light-dependent activity and a pH-independent absorption spectrum are recovered upon reconstitution of the triple mutant with 11-cis-9-demethyl retinal. These results suggest that binding the native chromophore cannot deactivate the protein because of steric interactions between the protein, possibly residue 118, and the 9-methyl group of the chromophore. Furthermore, the absorption spectrum of the 9-demethyl retinal regenerated pigment exhibits a band broader and with lower extinction at the absorption maximum than either the human blue or salamander UV wild-type pigments generated with the same retinal analogue. The broad spectrum appears to be comprised of two or more species and can be well-fit by a sum of scaled spectra of the two wild-type pigments. Binding the chromophore appears to trap the pigment in two or more conformations. The triple mutant reported here represents the first example of a dark-active cone pigment and constitutively active cone opsin.

  7. Characterization of Triosephosphate Isomerase Mutants with Reduced Enzyme Activity in Mus Musculus

    PubMed Central

    Merkle, S.; Pretsch, W.

    1989-01-01

    Four heterozygous triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) mutants with approximately 50% reduced activity in blood compared to wild type were detected in offspring of 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea treated male mice. Breeding experiments displayed an autosomal, dominant mode of inheritance for the mutations. All mutations were found to be homozygous lethal at an early postimplantation stage of embryonic development, probably due to a total lack of TPI activity and consequently to the inability to utilize glucose as a source of metabolic energy. Although activity alteration was also found in liver, lung, kidney, spleen, heart, brain and muscle the TPI deficiency in heterozygotes has no influence on the following physiological traits: hematological parameters, plasma glucose, glucose consumption of blood cells, body weight and organo-somatic indices of liver, spleen, heart, kidney and lung. Biochemical investigations of TPI in the four mutant lines indicated no difference of physicochemical properties compared to the wild type. Results from immunoinactivation assays indicate that the decrease of enzyme activity corresponds to a decrease in the level of an immunologically active moiety. It is suggested that the mutations have affected the Tpi-1 structural locus and resulted in alleles which produce no detectable enzyme activity and no immunologically cross-reacting material. The study furthermore suggests one functional TPI gene per haploid genome in the erythrocyte and seven other tested organs of the mouse. PMID:2693209

  8. Physiological and fermentation properties of Bacillus coagulans and a mutant lacking fermentative lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Su, Yue; Rhee, Mun Su; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-03-01

    Bacillus coagulans, a sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, grows optimally at 50-55 °C and produces lactic acid as the primary fermentation product from both hexoses and pentoses. The amount of fungal cellulases required for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 55 °C was previously reported to be three to four times lower than for SSF at the optimum growth temperature for Saccharomyces cerevisiae of 35 °C. An ethanologenic B. coagulans is expected to lower the cellulase loading and production cost of cellulosic ethanol due to SSF at 55 °C. As a first step towards developing B. coagulans as an ethanologenic microbial biocatalyst, activity of the primary fermentation enzyme L-lactate dehydrogenase was removed by mutation (strain Suy27). Strain Suy27 produced ethanol as the main fermentation product from glucose during growth at pH 7.0 (0.33 g ethanol per g glucose fermented). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) acting in series contributed to about 55% of the ethanol produced by this mutant while pyruvate formate lyase and ADH were responsible for the remainder. Due to the absence of PDH activity in B. coagulans during fermentative growth at pH 5.0, the l-ldh mutant failed to grow anaerobically at pH 5.0. Strain Suy27-13, a derivative of the l-ldh mutant strain Suy27, that produced PDH activity during anaerobic growth at pH 5.0 grew at this pH and also produced ethanol as the fermentation product (0.39 g per g glucose). These results show that construction of an ethanologenic B. coagulans requires optimal expression of PDH activity in addition to the removal of the LDH activity to support growth and ethanol production.

  9. A fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based strategy for rapid isolation of high-lipid Chlamydomonas mutants.

    PubMed

    Terashima, Mia; Freeman, Elizabeth S; Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in farming algae for the direct production of biofuels and valuable lipids. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the leading model system for studying lipid metabolism in green algae, but current methods for isolating mutants of this organism with a perturbed lipid content are slow and tedious. Here, we present the Chlamydomonas high-lipid sorting (CHiLiS) strategy, which enables enrichment of high-lipid mutants by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of pooled mutants stained with the lipid-sensitive dye Nile Red. This method only takes 5 weeks from mutagenesis to mutant isolation. We developed a staining protocol that allows quantification of lipid content while preserving cell viability. We improved separation of high-lipid mutants from the wild type by using each cell's chlorophyll fluorescence as an internal control. We initially demonstrated 20-fold enrichment of the known high-lipid mutant sta1 from a mixture of sta1 and wild-type cells. We then applied CHiLiS to sort thousands of high-lipid cells from a pool of about 60,000 mutants. Flow cytometry analysis of 24 individual mutants isolated by this approach revealed that about 50% showed a reproducible high-lipid phenotype. We further characterized nine of the mutants with the highest lipid content by flame ionization detection and mass spectrometry lipidomics. All mutants analyzed had a higher triacylglycerol content and perturbed whole-cell fatty acid composition. One arbitrarily chosen mutant was evaluated by microscopy, revealing larger lipid droplets than the wild type. The unprecedented throughput of CHiLiS opens the door to a systems-level understanding of green algal lipid biology by enabling genome-saturating isolation of mutants in key genes.

  10. Suppressor Mutations for Presenilin 1 Familial Alzheimer Disease Mutants Modulate γ-Secretase Activities.

    PubMed

    Futai, Eugene; Osawa, Satoko; Cai, Tetsuo; Fujisawa, Tomoya; Ishiura, Shoichi; Tomita, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    γ-Secretase is a multisubunit membrane protein complex containing presenilin (PS1) as a catalytic subunit. Familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) mutations within PS1 were analyzed in yeast cells artificially expressing membrane-bound substrate, amyloid precursor protein, or Notch fused to Gal4 transcriptional activator. The FAD mutations, L166P and G384A (Leu-166 to Pro and Gly-384 to Ala substitution, respectively), were loss-of-function in yeast. We identified five amino acid substitutions that suppress the FAD mutations. The cleavage of amyloid precursor protein or Notch was recovered by the secondary mutations. We also found that secondary mutations alone activated the γ-secretase activity. FAD mutants with suppressor mutations, L432M or S438P within TMD9 together with a missense mutation in the second or sixth loops, regained γ-secretase activity when introduced into presenilin null mouse fibroblasts. Notably, the cells with suppressor mutants produced a decreased amount of Aβ42, which is responsible for Alzheimer disease. These results indicate that the yeast system is useful to screen for mutations and chemicals that modulate γ-secretase activity.

  11. Identification and characterization of barley mutants lacking glycine decarboxylase and carboxyl esterase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, R.; Lewis, K.; Lea, P. )

    1990-05-01

    A barley mutant has been isolated, from a selection of fifty air-sensitive seed-lines, using a standard gel stain technique which lacks carboxyl esterase activity, but has normal levels of carbonic anhydrase. In addition, two barley mutants lacking the ability to convert glycine to serine in the mitochondria, have been characterized. Both plants accumulate glycine in air and are unable to metabolize ({sup 14}C)glycine in the short-term. When ({sup 14}C)glycine was supplied over 2h LaPr 85/55 metabolized 90%, whereas the second mutant (LaPr 87/30) metabolized 10%. Results indicate that the mutation in LaPr 85/55 is almost certainly in the glycine transporter into the mitochondrion. The mutation in LaPr 87/30 has been shown, using western blotting, to be in both the P and H proteins, two of four proteins which comprise glycine decarboxylase (P, H, T and L).

  12. Metabolism of Benzyladenine is Impaired in a Mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana Lacking Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Moffatt, Barbara; Pethe, Claude; Laloue, Michel

    1991-01-01

    Formation of the riboside-5′-monophosphate is a general feature of the metabolism of cytokinins in plants. As part of a study of the biological significance of the nucleotide form of cytokinins, we analyzed a mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) activity for its ability to metabolize N6-benzyladenine (BA). Formation of N6-benzyladenosine-5′-monophosphate (BAMP) was assayed in vivo, by feeding tritiated BA to wild-type and mutant plantlets, and in crude plantlet extracts. Metabolites were separated by high performance liquid chromatography and quantitated by on-line liquid scintillation spectrometry. BA was rapidly absorbed by A. thaliana plantlets and primarily converted to BAMP and to BA 7- and 9-glucosides. BA was also rapidly absorbed by APRT-deficient plantlets, but its conversion to BAMP was strongly reduced. Formation of BAMP from N6-benzyladenosine was not affected in the mutant plantlets. In vitro conversion of BA to its nucleoside-5′-monophosphate was detected in crude extracts of wild-type plantlets, but not in extracts of APRT-deficient plantlets. Therefore, results of both assays indicate that APRT-deficient tissue does not convert BA to BAMP to a significant extent. Further, nondenaturing isoelectric focusing analysis of APRT activity in leaf extracts indicated that the enzyme activities which metabolize adenine and BA into their corresponding riboside-5′-monophosphate in extracts of wild-type plantlets have the same apparent isoelectric point. These activities were not detected in extracts prepared from APRT-deficient plantlets. Thus, these results demonstrate that APRT is the main enzyme which converts BA to its nucleotide form in young A. thaliana plants and that the ribophosphorylation of BA is not a prerequisite of its absorption by the plantlets. Images Figure 4 PMID:16668070

  13. Smoothened (SMO) receptor mutations dictate resistance to vismodegib in basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pricl, Sabrina; Cortelazzi, Barbara; Dal Col, Valentina; Marson, Domenico; Laurini, Erik; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Licitra, Lisa; Pilotti, Silvana; Bossi, Paolo; Perrone, Federica

    2015-02-01

    Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and a subset of medulloblastomas are characterized by loss-of-function mutations in the tumor suppressor gene, PTCH1. PTCH1 normally functions by repressing the activity of the Smoothened (SMO) receptor. Inactivating PTCH1 mutations result in constitutive Hedgehog pathway activity through uncontrolled SMO signaling. Targeting this pathway with vismodegib, a novel SMO inhibitor, results in impressive tumor regression in patients harboring genetic defects in this pathway. However, a secondary mutation in SMO has been reported in medulloblastoma patients following relapse on vismodegib to date. This mutation preserves pathway activity, but appears to confer resistance by interfering with drug binding. Here we report for the first time on the molecular mechanisms of resistance to vismodegib in two BCC cases. The first case, showing progression after 2 months of continuous vismodegib (primary resistance), exhibited the new SMO G497W mutation. The second case, showing a complete clinical response after 5 months of treatment and a subsequent progression after 11 months on vismodegib (secondary resistance), exhibited a PTCH1 nonsense mutation in both the pre- and the post-treatment specimens, and the SMO D473Y mutation in the post-treatment specimens only. In silico analysis demonstrated that SMO(G497W) undergoes a conformational rearrangement resulting in a partial obstruction of the protein drug entry site, whereas the SMO D473Y mutation induces a direct effect on the binding site geometry leading to a total disruption of a stabilizing hydrogen bond network. Thus, the G497W and D473Y SMO mutations may represent two different mechanisms leading to primary and secondary resistance to vismodegib, respectively.

  14. Biologically active mutants with deletions in the v-mos oncogene assayed with retroviral vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Bold, R J; Donoghue, D J

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed retroviral expression vectors by manipulation of the Moloney murine leukemia virus genome such that an exogenous DNA sequence may be inserted and subsequently expressed when introduced into mammalian cells. A series of N-terminal deletions of the v-mos oncogene was constructed and assayed for biological activity with these retroviral expression vectors. The results of the deletion analysis demonstrate that the region of p37mos coding region upstream of the third methionine codon is dispensable with respect to transformation. However, deletion mutants of v-mos which allow initiation of translation at the fourth methionine codon have lost the biological activity of the parental v-mos gene. Furthermore, experiments were also carried out to define the C-terminal limit of the active region of p37mos by the construction of premature termination mutants by the insertion of a termination oligonucleotide. Insertion of the oligonucleotide just 69 base pairs upstream from the wild-type termination site abolished the focus-forming ability of v-mos. Thus, we have shown the N-terminal limit of the active region of p37mos to be between the third and fourth methionines, while the C-terminal limit is within the last 23 amino acids of the protein. PMID:3018503

  15. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; Vakeel, Padmanabhan; Span, Elise A.; Kalous, Kelsey S.; Kutty, Raman G.; Jensen, Davin R.; Pokkuluri, Phani Raj; Sem, Daniel S.; Rathore, Rajendra; Ramchandran, Ramani

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function. We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.

  16. Modulating vascular intimal hyperplasia using HSV-1 mutant requires activated MEK.

    PubMed

    Skelly, C L; He, Q; Spiguel, L; McCormick, S; Weichselbaum, R

    2013-02-01

    Outcomes of cardiovascular procedures, such as angioplasty and stent or bypass grafting are limited by failure, predominantly caused by pathological smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, known as intimal hyperplasia. Local delivery of a genetically engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV) is known to block vascular SMC proliferation while allowing for re-endothelialization. However, the mechanism this mutant virus uses to prevent SMC hyperplasia is unknown. The Ras signaling cascade is activated in SMCs undergoing hyperplasia leading to phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In this study we tested the hypothesis that MAPK kinase (MEK) activity is the molecular basis by which SMCs are susceptible to mutant HSV. We show that genetically engineered herpes simplex-1 viruses (HSV-1) can target proliferating SMCs. We demonstrate that the molecular basis of this HSV-1 anti-proliferative effect is MEK activation in SMCs. We demonstrate efficacy and practicality of the MEK-dependent HSV-1 for the treatment of intimal hyperplasia in a clinically relevant in vivo model. Important to this strategy is the ability to modulate the effects by controlling viral dose. These results propel genetically engineered HSV-1 therapy towards clinical evaluation in treatment of intimal hyperplasia.

  17. The activating transcription factor 3 protein suppresses the oncogenic function of mutant p53 proteins.

    PubMed

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-03-28

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer.

  18. Design of Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase mutants with improved trans-sialidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Nyffenegger, Christian; Nordvang, Rune Thorbjørn; Meyer, Anne S.; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2017-01-01

    A sialidase (EC 3.2.1.18) from the non-pathogenic Trypanosoma rangeli, TrSA, has been shown to exert trans-sialidase activity after mutation of five specific amino acids in the active site (M96V, A98P, S120Y, G249Y, Q284P) to form the so-called TrSA5mut enzyme. By computational and hypothesis driven approaches additional mutations enhancing the trans-sialidase activity have been suggested. In the present work, we made a systematic combination of these mutations leading to seven new variants of the T. rangeli sialidase, having 6–16 targeted amino acid mutations. The resulting enzyme variants were analyzed via kinetics for their ability to carry out trans-sialidase reaction using CGMP and D-lactose as substrates. The sialidase variants with 15 and 16 mutations, respectively, exhibited significantly improved trans-sialidase activity for D-lactose sialylation. Our results corroborate, that computational studies of trans-glycosylation can be a valuable input in the design of novel trans-glycosidases, but also highlight the importance of experimental validation in order to assess the performance. In conclusion, two of the seven mutants displayed a dramatic switch in specificity from hydrolysis towards trans-sialylation and constitute the most potent trans-sialidase mutants of TrSA described in literature to date. PMID:28158299

  19. Protein expression, characterization and activity comparisons of wild type and mutant DUSP5 proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Nayak, Jaladhi; Gastonguay, Adam J.; Talipov, Marat R.; ...

    2014-12-18

    Background: The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway is critical for cellular signaling, and proteins such as phosphatases that regulate this pathway are important for normal tissue development. Based on our previous work on dual specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5), and its role in embryonic vascular development and disease, we hypothesized that mutations in DUSP5 will affect its function. Results: In this study, we tested this hypothesis by generating full-length glutathione-S-transferase-tagged DUSP5 and serine 147 proline mutant (S147P) proteins from bacteria. Light scattering analysis, circular dichroism, enzymatic assays and molecular modeling approaches have been performed to extensively characterize the protein form and function.more » We demonstrate that both proteins are active and, interestingly, the S147P protein is hypoactive as compared to the DUSP5 WT protein in two distinct biochemical substrate assays. Furthermore, due to the novel positioning of the S147P mutation, we utilize computational modeling to reconstruct full-length DUSP5 and S147P to predict a possible mechanism for the reduced activity of S147P. Conclusion: Taken together, this is the first evidence of the generation and characterization of an active, full-length, mutant DUSP5 protein which will facilitate future structure-function and drug development-based studies.« less

  20. Glycosynthase Mutants of Endoglycosidase S2 Show Potent Transglycosylation Activity and Remarkably Relaxed Substrate Specificity for Antibody Glycosylation Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiezheng; Tong, Xin; Yang, Qiang; Giddens, John P; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2016-08-05

    Glycosylation can exert a profound impact on the structures and biological functions of antibodies. Glycosylation remodeling using the endoglycosidase-catalyzed deglycosylation and transglycosylation approach is emerging as a promising platform to produce homogeneous glycoforms of antibodies, but the broad application of this method will require the availability of highly efficient glycosynthase mutants. We describe in this paper a systematic site-directed mutagenesis of an endoglycosidase from Streptococcus pyogenes of serotype M49 (Endo-S2) and the evaluation of the resulting mutants for their hydrolysis and transglycosylation activities. We found that mutations at the Asp-184 residue gave mutants that demonstrated significantly different properties, some possessed potent transglycosylation activity with diminished hydrolysis activity but others did not, which would be otherwise difficult to predict without the comparative study. In contrast to the previously reported Endo-S mutants that are limited to action on complex type N-glycans, the Endo-S2 glycosynthases described here, including D184M and D184Q, were found to have remarkably relaxed substrate specificity and were capable of transferring three major types (complex, high-mannose, and hybrid type) of N-glycans for antibody glycosylation remodeling. In addition, the Endo-S2 glycosynthase mutants were found to be much more active in general than the Endo-S mutants for transglycosylation. The usefulness of these Endo-S2 glycosynthase mutants was exemplified by an efficient glycosylation remodeling of two therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, rituximab and trastuzumab (Herceptin).

  1. Active site mutants of human cyclophilin A separate peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity from cyclosporin A binding and calcineurin inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Zydowsky, L. D.; Etzkorn, F. A.; Chang, H. Y.; Ferguson, S. B.; Stolz, L. A.; Ho, S. I.; Walsh, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    Based on recent X-ray structural information, six site-directed mutants of human cyclophilin A (hCyPA) involving residues in the putative active site--H54, R55, F60, Q111, F113, and H126--have been constructed, overexpressed, and purified from Escherichia coli to homogeneity. The proteins W121A (Liu, J., Chen, C.-M., & Walsh, C.T., 1991a, Biochemistry 30, 2306-2310), H54Q, R55A, F60A, Q111A, F113A, and H126Q were assayed for cis-trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) activity, their ability to bind the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA), and protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) inhibition in the presence of CsA. Results indicate that H54Q, Q111A, F113A, and W121A retain 3-15% of the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of wild-type recombinant hCyPA. The remaining three mutants (R55A, F60A, and H126Q) each retain less than 1% of the wild-type catalytic efficiency, indicating participation by these residues in PPIase catalysis. Each of the mutants bound to a CsA affinity matrix. The mutants R55A, F60A, F113A, and H126Q inhibited calcineurin in the presence of CsA, whereas W121A did not. Although CsA is a competitive inhibitor of PPIase activity, it can complex with enzymatically inactive cyclophilins and inhibit the phosphatase activity of calcineurin. PMID:1338979

  2. Expression and characterization of glycogen synthase kinase-3 mutants and their effect on glycogen synthase activity in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eldar-Finkelman, H; Argast, G M; Foord, O; Fischer, E H; Krebs, E G

    1996-01-01

    In these studies we expressed and characterized wild-type (WT) GSK-3 (glycogen synthase kinase-3) and its mutants, and examined their physiological effect on glycogen synthase activity. The GSK-3 mutants included mutation at serine-9 either to alanine (S9A) or glutamic acid (S9E) and an inactive mutant, K85,86MA. Expression of WT and the various mutants in a cell-free system indicated that S9A and S9E exhibit increased kinase activity as compared with WT. Subsequently, 293 cells were transiently transfected with WT GSK-3 and mutants. Cells expressing the S9A mutant exhibited higher kinase activity (2.6-fold of control cells) as compared with cells expressing WT and S9E (1.8- and 2.0-fold, respectively, of control cells). Combined, these results suggest serine-9 as a key regulatory site of GSK-3 inactivation, and indicate that glutamic acid cannot mimic the function of the phosphorylated residue. The GSK-3-expressing cell system enabled us to examine whether GSK-3 can induce changes in the endogenous glycogen synthase activity. A decrease in glycogen synthase activity (50%) was observed in cells expressing the S9A mutant. Similarly, glycogen synthase activity was suppressed in cells expressing WT and the S9E mutant (20-30%, respectively). These studies indicate that activation of GSK-3 is sufficient to inhibit glycogen synthase in intact cells, and provide evidence supporting a physiological role for GSK-3 in regulating glycogen synthase and glycogen metabolism. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8816781

  3. [Pigment accumulation and functional activity of chloroplasts in common Pisum sativum L. mutants with low chlorophyll level (chlorotica)].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G

    2003-01-01

    Pea mutants chlorotica 2004 and 2014 with a low content of chlorophyll were studied. The mutant 2004 has light green leaves and stem, and the mutant 2014 has yellow green leaves and stem. They accumulate approximately 80 and 50% chlorophylls of the parent form of pea Torsdag cv. The content of carotene in carotenoids of the mutant 2004 was much lower, and the accumulation of lutein and violaxanthine was increased. The accumulation of all carotenoids in the mutant 2014 decreased almost proportionally to a decrease in the chlorophyll content. The rate of CO2 evolution in mutant chlorotica 2004 and 2014 was established to be lower. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in the mutants was 29-30% lower as compared to the control, and in hybrid plants it was 1.5-2-fold higher. It is assumed that the increase in the activity of the night-time respiration in gas exchange of chlorotica mutants and the drop of photosynthesis lead to a decrease in biomass increment. The results obtained allow us to conclude that the mutation of chlorotica 2004 and 2014 affects the genes controlling the formation and functioning of different components of the photosynthetic apparatus.

  4. Approximated maximum adsorption of His-tagged enzyme/mutants on Ni2+-NTA for comparison of specific activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanli; Long, Gaobo; Yang, Xiaolan; Hu, Xiaolei; Feng, Yiran; Tan, Deng; Xie, Yanling; Pu, Jun; Liao, Fei

    2015-03-01

    By approximating maximum activities of six-histidine (6His)-tagged enzyme/mutants adsorbed on Ni2+-NTA-magnetic-submicron-particle (Ni2+-NTA-MSP), a facile approach was tested for comparing enzyme specific activities in cell lysates. On a fixed quantity of Ni2+-NTA-MSP, the activity of an adsorbed 6His-tagged enzyme/mutant was measured via spectrophotometry; the activity after saturation adsorption (Vs) was predicted from response curve with quantities of total proteins from the same lysate as the predictor; Vs was equivalent of specific activity for comparison. This approach required abundance of a 6His-tagged enzyme/mutant over 3% among total proteins in lysate, an accurate series of quantities of total proteins from the same lysate, the largest activity generated by enzyme occupying over 85% binding sites on Ni2+-NTA-MSP and the minimum activity as absorbance change rates of 0.003 min(-1) for analysis. The prediction of Vs tolerated errors in concentrations of total proteins in lysates and was effective to 6His-tagged alkaline phosphatase and its 6His-tagged mutant in lysates. Notably, of those two 6His-tagged enzymes, Vs was effectively approximated with just one optimized quantity of lysates. Hence, this approach with Ni2+-NTA-MSP worked for comparison of specific activities of 6His-tagged enzyme/mutants in lysates when they had sufficient abundance among proteins and activities of adsorbed enzymes were measurable.

  5. Further studies on O sub 2 -resistant photosynthesis and photorespiration in a tobacco mutant with enhanced catalase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Zelitch, I. )

    1990-02-01

    The increase in net photosynthesis in M{sub 4} progeny of an O{sub 2}-resistant tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) mutant relative to wild-type plants at 21 and 42% O{sub 2} has been confirmed and further investigated. Self-pollination of an M{sub 3} mutant produced M{sub 4} progeny segregating high catalase phenotypes (average 40% greater than wild type) at a frequency of about 60%. The high catalase phenotype cosegregated precisely with O{sub 2}-resistant photosynthesis. About 25% of the F{sub 1} progeny of reciprocal crosses between the same M{sub 3} mutant and wild type had high catalase activity, whether the mutant was used as the maternal or paternal parent, indicating nuclear inheritance. In high-catalase mutants the activity of NADH-hydroxypyruvate reductase, another peroxisomal enzyme, was the same as wild type. The mutants released 15% less photorespiratory CO{sub 2} as a percent of net photosynthesis in CO{sub 2}-free 21% O{sub 2} and 36% less in CO{sub 2}-free 42% O{sub 2} compared with wild type. The mutant leaf tissue also released less {sup 14}CO{sub 2} per (1-{sup 14}C)glycolate metabolized than wild type in normal air, consistent with less photorespiration in the mutant. The O{sub 2}-resistant photosynthesis appears to be caused by a decrease in photorespiration especially under conditions of high O{sub 2} where the stoichiometry of CO{sub 2} release per glycolate metabolized is expected to be enhanced. The higher catalase activity in the mutant may decrease the nonenzymatic peroxidation of keto-acids such as hydroxypyruvate and glyoxylate by photorespiratory H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  6. Mutant Huntingtin promotes autonomous microglia activation via myeloid lineage-determining factors

    PubMed Central

    Crotti, A.; Benner, C.; Kerman, B.; Gosselin, D.; Lagier-Tourenne, C.; Zuccato, C.; Cattaneo, E.; Gage, F.H.; Cleveland, D.W.; Glass, C.K.

    2014-01-01

    Huntington’s Disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by an extended polyglutamine repeat in the N-terminus of the Huntingtin protein (HTT). Reactive microglia and elevated cytokine levels are observed in the brains of HD patients, but the extent to which neuroinflammation results from extrinsic or cell-autonomous mechanisms within microglia is unknown. Using genome-wide approaches, we show that expression of mutant Huntingtin (mHTT) in microglia promotes cell-autonomous pro-inflammatory transcriptional activation by increasing the expression and transcriptional activities of the myeloid lineage-determining factors PU.1 and C/EBPs. Elevated levels of PU.1 and its target genes are observed in the brains of mouse models and HD individuals. Moreover, mutant Huntingtin-expressing microglia exhibit an increased capacity to induce neuronal death ex vivo and in vivo in the presence of sterile inflammation. These findings suggest a cell autonomous basis for enhanced microglia reactivity that may influence non-cell autonomous HD pathogenesis. PMID:24584051

  7. [Suppression of telomerase activity leukemic cells by mutant forms of Rhodospirillum rubrum L-asparaginase].

    PubMed

    Pokrovskaya, M V; Zhdanov, D D; Eldarov, M A; Aleksandrova, S S; Veselovskiy, A V; Pokrovskiy, V S; Grishin, D V; Gladilina, Ju A; Sokolov, N N

    2017-01-01

    The active and stable mutant forms of short chain cytoplasmic L-asparaginase type I of Rhodospirillum rubrum (RrA): RrA+N17, D60K, F61L, RrA+N17, A64V, E67K, RrA+N17, E149R, V150P, RrAE149R, V150P and RrAE149R, V150P, F151T were obtained by the method of site-directed mutagenesis. It is established that variants RrA-N17, E149R, V150P, F151T and RrАE149R, V150P are capable to reduce an expression hTERT subunit of telomerase and, hence, activity of telomeres in Jurkat cells, but not in cellular lysates. During too time, L-asparaginases of Escherichia coli, Erwinia carotovora and Wolinella succinogenes, mutant forms RrА+N17, D60K, F61L and RrА+N17, A64V, E67K do not suppress of telomerase activity. The assumption of existence in structure RrA of areas (amino acids residues in the position 146-164, 1-17, 60-67) which are responsible for suppression of telomerase activity is made. The received results show that antineoplastic activity of some variants RrA is connected both with reduction of concentration of free L-asparagine, and with expression suppression of hTERT telomerase subunit, that opens new prospects for antineoplastic therapy.

  8. Kinetic and Spectroscopic Studies of Bicupin Oxalate Oxidase and Putative Active Site Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moomaw, Ellen W.; Hoffer, Eric; Moussatche, Patricia; Salerno, John C.; Grant, Morgan; Immelman, Bridget; Uberto, Richard; Ozarowski, Andrew; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ceriporiopsis subvermispora oxalate oxidase (CsOxOx) is the first bicupin enzyme identified that catalyzes manganese-dependent oxidation of oxalate. In previous work, we have shown that the dominant contribution to catalysis comes from the monoprotonated form of oxalate binding to a form of the enzyme in which an active site carboxylic acid residue must be unprotonated. CsOxOx shares greatest sequence homology with bicupin microbial oxalate decarboxylases (OxDC) and the 241-244DASN region of the N-terminal Mn binding domain of CsOxOx is analogous to the lid region of OxDC that has been shown to determine reaction specificity. We have prepared a series of CsOxOx mutants to probe this region and to identify the carboxylate residue implicated in catalysis. The pH profile of the D241A CsOxOx mutant suggests that the protonation state of aspartic acid 241 is mechanistically significant and that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site. The observation that the D241S CsOxOx mutation eliminates Mn binding to both the N- and C- terminal Mn binding sites suggests that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. The introduction of a proton donor into the N-terminal Mn binding site (CsOxOx A242E mutant) does not affect reaction specificity. Mutation of conserved arginine residues further support that catalysis takes place at the N-terminal Mn binding site and that both sites must be intact for Mn incorporation into either site. PMID:23469254

  9. Dynamics and Mechanism of Efficient DNA Repair Reviewed by Active-Site Mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chuang; Liu, Zheyun; Li, Jiang; Guo, Xunmin; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2010-06-01

    Photolyases repair the UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in damage DNA via a photoreaction which includes a series of light-driven electron transfers between the two-electron-reduced flavin cofactor FADH^- and the dimer. We report here our systematic studies of the repair dynamics in E. coli photolyase with mutation of several active-site residues. With femtosecond resolution, we observed the significant change in the forward electron transfer from the excited FADH^- to the dimer and the back electron transfer from the repaired thymines by mutation of E274A, R226A, R342A, N378S and N378C. We also found that the mutation of E274A accelerates the bond-breaking of the thymine dimer. The dynamics changes are consistent with the quantum yield study of these mutants. These results suggest that the active-site residues play a significant role, structurally and chemically, in the DNA repair photocycle.

  10. Functional Reconstitution and Channel Activity Measurements of Purified Wildtype and Mutant CFTR Protein

    PubMed Central

    Eckford, Paul D. W.; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E.

    2015-01-01

    The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a unique channel-forming member of the ATP Binding Cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporters. The phosphorylation and nucleotide dependent chloride channel activity of CFTR has been frequently studied in whole cell systems and as single channels in excised membrane patches. Many Cystic Fibrosis-causing mutations have been shown to alter this activity. While a small number of purification protocols have been published, a fast reconstitution method that retains channel activity and a suitable method for studying population channel activity in a purified system have been lacking. Here rapid methods are described for purification and functional reconstitution of the full-length CFTR protein into proteoliposomes of defined lipid composition that retains activity as a regulated halide channel. This reconstitution method together with a novel flux-based assay of channel activity is a suitable system for studying the population channel properties of wild type CFTR and the disease-causing mutants F508del- and G551D-CFTR. Specifically, the method has utility in studying the direct effects of phosphorylation, nucleotides and small molecules such as potentiators and inhibitors on CFTR channel activity. The methods are also amenable to the study of other membrane channels/transporters for anionic substrates. PMID:25867140

  11. Kinetic and structural evaluation of selected active site mutants of the Aspergillus fumigatus KDNase (sialidase).

    PubMed

    Yeung, Juliana H F; Telford, Judith C; Shidmoossavee, Fahimeh S; Bennet, Andrew J; Taylor, Garry L; Moore, Margo M

    2013-12-23

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an airborne fungal pathogen. We previously cloned and characterized an exo-sialidase from A. fumigatus and showed that it preferred 2-keto-3-deoxynononic acid (KDN) as a substrate to N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac). The purpose of this study was to investigate the structure-function relationships of critical catalytic site residues. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to create three mutant recombinant enzymes: the catalytic nucleophile (Y358H), the general acid/base catalyst (D84A), and an enlargement of the binding pocket to attempt to accommodate the N-acetyl group of Neu5Ac (R171L). Crystal structures for all enzymes were determined. The D84A mutation had an effect in decreasing the activity of AfKDNase that was stronger than that of the same mutation in the structurally similar sialidase from the bacterium Micromonospora viridifaciens. These data suggest that the catalytic acid is more important in the reaction of AfKDNase and that catalysis is less dependent on nucleophilic or electrostatic stabilization of the developing positive charge at the transition state for hydrolysis. Removal of the catalytic nucleophile (Y358H) significantly lowered the activity of the enzyme, but this mutant remained a retaining glycosidase as demonstrated by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis. This is a novel finding that has not been shown with other sialidases. Kinetic activity measured at pH 5.2 revealed that R171L had higher activity on a Neu5Ac-based substrate than wild-type KDNase; hence, leucine in place of arginine in the binding pocket improved catalysis toward Neu5Ac substrates. Hence, whether a sialidase is primarily a KDNase or a neuraminidase is due in part to the presence of an amino acid that creates a steric clash with the N-acetyl group.

  12. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae start mutant carrying the cdc25 mutation is defective in activation of plasma membrane ATPase by glucose.

    PubMed Central

    Portillo, F; Mazón, M J

    1986-01-01

    Activation of plasma membrane ATPase by the addition of glucose was examined in several cell division cycle mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The start mutant carrying the cdc25 mutation was shown to be defective in ATPase activation at the restrictive temperature. Genetic analysis showed that lack of growth and defective activation of ATPase at the restrictive temperature were caused by the same mutation. It was also found that CDC25 does not map at the same locus as the structural gene of plasma membrane ATPase (PMA1). We conclude that the product of CDC25 controls the activation of ATPase. PMID:2877973

  13. Alterations in growth, photosynthesis, and respiration in a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L. ) deficient in chloroplast phosphoglucomutase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Caspar, T.; Huber, S.C.; Somerville, C.

    1985-09-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. which lacks leaf starch was isolated by screening for plants which did not stain with iodine. When grown in a 12-h photoperiod, leaves of the wild-type accumulated substantial amounts of starch but lower levels of soluble sugars. Under these conditions, the mutant accumulated relatively high levels of soluble sugars. Rates of growth and net photosynthesis of the mutant and wild-type were indistinguishable when the plants were grown in constant illumination. However, in a short photoperiod, the growth of the mutant was severely impaired, the rate of photosynthesis was depressed relative to the wild-type, and the rate of dark respiration, which was high following the onset of darkness, exhibited an uncharacteristic decay throughout the dark period. The depressed photosynthetic capacity of the mutant may also reflect a metabolic adaptation to the accumulation of high levels of soluble carbohydrate which mimics the effects of alterations in source/sink ratio. The activities of sucrose phosphate synthase and acid invertase are significantly higher in the mutant than in the wild-type whereas ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity is lower. This suggests that the activities of these enzymes may be modulated in response to metabolite concentrations or flux through the pathways.

  14. Combined inhibition of MEK and Plk1 has synergistic anti-tumor activity in NRAS mutant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Vujic, I; Sanlorenzo, M; Ma, J; Kim, ST; Kleffel, S; Schatton, T; Rappersberger, K; Gutteridge, R; Ahmad, N; Ortiz/Urda, S

    2015-01-01

    About one third of cancers harbor activating mutations in rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (RAS) oncogenes. In melanoma, aberrant neuroblastoma-RAS (NRAS) signaling fuels tumor progression in about 20% of patients. Current therapeutics for NRAS driven malignancies barely impact overall survival. To date, pathway interference downstream of mutant NRAS seems to be the most promising approach. In this study, data revealed that mutant NRAS induced Plk1 expression, and pharmacologic inhibition of Plk1 stabilized the size of NRAS mutant melanoma xenografts. The combination of MEK and Plk1 inhibitors resulted in a significant growth reduction of NRAS mutant melanoma cells in vitro, and regression of xenografted NRAS mutant melanoma in vivo. Independent cell cycle arrest and increased induction of apoptosis underlies the synergistic effect of this combination. Data further suggest that the p53 signaling pathway is of key importance to the observed therapeutic efficacy. This study provides in vitro, in vivo and first mechanistic data, that a MEK/Plk1 inhibitor combination might be a promising treatment approach for patients with NRAS driven melanoma. Since mutant NRAS signaling is similar across different malignancies, this inhibitor combination could also offer a previously unreported treatment modality for NRAS mutant tumors of other cell origins. PMID:26016894

  15. Partial Agonist and Antagonist Activities of a Mutant Scorpion β-Toxin on Sodium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Karbat, Izhar; Ilan, Nitza; Zhang, Joel Z.; Cohen, Lior; Kahn, Roy; Benveniste, Morris; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Scorpion β-toxin 4 from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css4) enhances the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels through a voltage sensor trapping mechanism by binding the activated state of the voltage sensor in domain II and stabilizing it in its activated conformation. Here we describe the antagonist and partial agonist properties of a mutant derivative of this toxin. Substitution of seven different amino acid residues for Glu15 in Css4 yielded toxin derivatives with both increased and decreased affinities for binding to neurotoxin receptor site 4 on sodium channels. Css4E15R is unique among this set of mutants in that it retained nearly normal binding affinity but lost its functional activity for modification of sodium channel gating in our standard electrophysiological assay for voltage sensor trapping. More detailed analysis of the functional effects of Css4E15R revealed weak voltage sensor trapping activity, which was very rapidly reversed upon repolarization and therefore was not observed in our standard assay of toxin effects. This partial agonist activity of Css4E15R is observed clearly in voltage sensor trapping assays with brief (5 ms) repolarization between the conditioning prepulse and the test pulse. The effects of Css4E15R are fit well by a three-step model of toxin action involving concentration-dependent toxin binding to its receptor site followed by depolarization-dependent activation of the voltage sensor and subsequent voltage sensor trapping. Because it is a partial agonist with much reduced efficacy for voltage sensor trapping, Css4E15R can antagonize the effects of wild-type Css4 on sodium channel activation and can prevent paralysis by Css4 when injected into mice. Our results define the first partial agonist and antagonist activities for scorpion toxins and open new avenues of research toward better understanding of the structure-function relationships for toxin action on sodium channel voltage sensors and toward potential toxin

  16. Partial agonist and antagonist activities of a mutant scorpion beta-toxin on sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Karbat, Izhar; Ilan, Nitza; Zhang, Joel Z; Cohen, Lior; Kahn, Roy; Benveniste, Morris; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A; Gordon, Dalia; Gurevitz, Michael

    2010-10-01

    Scorpion β-toxin 4 from Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css4) enhances the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels through a voltage sensor trapping mechanism by binding the activated state of the voltage sensor in domain II and stabilizing it in its activated conformation. Here we describe the antagonist and partial agonist properties of a mutant derivative of this toxin. Substitution of seven different amino acid residues for Glu(15) in Css4 yielded toxin derivatives with both increased and decreased affinities for binding to neurotoxin receptor site 4 on sodium channels. Css4(E15R) is unique among this set of mutants in that it retained nearly normal binding affinity but lost its functional activity for modification of sodium channel gating in our standard electrophysiological assay for voltage sensor trapping. More detailed analysis of the functional effects of Css4(E15R) revealed weak voltage sensor trapping activity, which was very rapidly reversed upon repolarization and therefore was not observed in our standard assay of toxin effects. This partial agonist activity of Css4(E15R) is observed clearly in voltage sensor trapping assays with brief (5 ms) repolarization between the conditioning prepulse and the test pulse. The effects of Css4(E15R) are fit well by a three-step model of toxin action involving concentration-dependent toxin binding to its receptor site followed by depolarization-dependent activation of the voltage sensor and subsequent voltage sensor trapping. Because it is a partial agonist with much reduced efficacy for voltage sensor trapping, Css4(E15R) can antagonize the effects of wild-type Css4 on sodium channel activation and can prevent paralysis by Css4 when injected into mice. Our results define the first partial agonist and antagonist activities for scorpion toxins and open new avenues of research toward better understanding of the structure-function relationships for toxin action on sodium channel voltage sensors and toward

  17. RAI1 transcription factor activity is impaired in mutants associated with Smith-Magenis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Mora, Paulina; Canales, Cesar P; Cao, Lei; Perez, Irene C; Srivastava, Anand K; Young, Juan I; Walz, Katherina

    2012-01-01

    Smith-Magenis Syndrome (SMS) is a complex genomic disorder mostly caused by the haploinsufficiency of the Retinoic Acid Induced 1 gene (RAI1), located in the chromosomal region 17p11.2. In a subset of SMS patients, heterozygous mutations in RAI1 are found. Here we investigate the molecular properties of these mutated forms and their relationship with the resulting phenotype. We compared the clinical phenotype of SMS patients carrying a mutation in RAI1 coding region either in the N-terminal or the C-terminal half of the protein and no significant differences were found. In order to study the molecular mechanism related to these two groups of RAI1 mutations first we analyzed those mutations that result in the truncated protein corresponding to the N-terminal half of RAI1 finding that they have cytoplasmic localization (in contrast to full length RAI1) and no ability to activate the transcription through an endogenous target: the BDNF enhancer. Similar results were found in lymphoblastoid cells derived from a SMS patient carrying RAI1 c.3103insC, where both mutant and wild type products of RAI1 were detected. The wild type form of RAI1 was found in the chromatin bound and nuclear matrix subcellular fractions while the mutant product was mainly cytoplasmic. In addition, missense mutations at the C-terminal half of RAI1 presented a correct nuclear localization but no activation of the endogenous target. Our results showed for the first time a correlation between RAI1 mutations and abnormal protein function plus they suggest that a reduction of total RAI1 transcription factor activity is at the heart of the SMS clinical presentation.

  18. Correlation between In Vitro Cytotoxicity and In Vivo Lethal Activity in Mice of Epsilon Toxin Mutants from Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Dorca-Arévalo, Jonatan; Pauillac, Serge; Díaz-Hidalgo, Laura; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Popoff, Michel R.; Blasi, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Epsilon toxin (Etx) from Clostridium perfringens is a pore-forming protein with a lethal effect on livestock, producing severe enterotoxemia characterized by general edema and neurological alterations. Site-specific mutations of the toxin are valuable tools to study the cellular and molecular mechanism of the toxin activity. In particular, mutants with paired cysteine substitutions that affect the membrane insertion domain behaved as dominant-negative inhibitors of toxin activity in MDCK cells. We produced similar mutants, together with a well-known non-toxic mutant (Etx-H106P), as green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins to perform in vivo studies in an acutely intoxicated mouse model. The mutant (GFP-Etx-I51C/A114C) had a lethal effect with generalized edema, and accumulated in the brain parenchyma due to its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the renal system, this mutant had a cytotoxic effect on distal tubule epithelial cells. The other mutants studied (GFP-Etx-V56C/F118C and GFP-Etx-H106P) did not have a lethal effect or cross the BBB, and failed to induce a cytotoxic effect on renal epithelial cells. These data suggest a direct correlation between the lethal effect of the toxin, with its cytotoxic effect on the kidney distal tubule cells, and the ability to cross the BBB. PMID:25013927

  19. Endogenous B-ring oxysterols inhibit the Hedgehog component Smoothened in a manner distinct from cyclopamine or side-chain oxysterols.

    PubMed

    Sever, Navdar; Mann, Randall K; Xu, Libin; Snell, William J; Hernandez-Lara, Carmen I; Porter, Ned A; Beachy, Philip A

    2016-05-24

    Cellular lipids are speculated to act as key intermediates in Hedgehog signal transduction, but their precise identity and function remain enigmatic. In an effort to identify such lipids, we pursued a Hedgehog pathway inhibitory activity that is particularly abundant in flagellar lipids of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, resulting in the purification and identification of ergosterol endoperoxide, a B-ring oxysterol. A mammalian analog of ergosterol, 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC), accumulates in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, a human genetic disease that phenocopies deficient Hedgehog signaling and is caused by genetic loss of 7-DHC reductase. We found that depleting endogenous 7-DHC with methyl-β-cyclodextrin treatment enhances Hedgehog activation by a pathway agonist. Conversely, exogenous addition of 3β,5α-dihydroxycholest-7-en-6-one, a naturally occurring B-ring oxysterol derived from 7-DHC that also accumulates in Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, blocked Hedgehog signaling by inhibiting activation of the essential transduction component Smoothened, through a mechanism distinct from Smoothened modulation by other lipids.

  20. Endogenous B-ring oxysterols inhibit the Hedgehog component Smoothened in a manner distinct from cyclopamine or side-chain oxysterols

    PubMed Central

    Sever, Navdar; Mann, Randall K.; Xu, Libin; Snell, William J.; Hernandez-Lara, Carmen I.; Porter, Ned A.; Beachy, Philip A.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular lipids are speculated to act as key intermediates in Hedgehog signal transduction, but their precise identity and function remain enigmatic. In an effort to identify such lipids, we pursued a Hedgehog pathway inhibitory activity that is particularly abundant in flagellar lipids of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, resulting in the purification and identification of ergosterol endoperoxide, a B-ring oxysterol. A mammalian analog of ergosterol, 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC), accumulates in Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome, a human genetic disease that phenocopies deficient Hedgehog signaling and is caused by genetic loss of 7-DHC reductase. We found that depleting endogenous 7-DHC with methyl-β-cyclodextrin treatment enhances Hedgehog activation by a pathway agonist. Conversely, exogenous addition of 3β,5α-dihydroxycholest-7-en-6-one, a naturally occurring B-ring oxysterol derived from 7-DHC that also accumulates in Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome, blocked Hedgehog signaling by inhibiting activation of the essential transduction component Smoothened, through a mechanism distinct from Smoothened modulation by other lipids. PMID:27162362

  1. Normal and Mutant Rhodopsin Activation Measured with the Early Receptor Current in a Unicellular Expression System

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Pragati; Sullivan, Jack M.

    1999-01-01

    The early receptor current (ERC) represents molecular charge movement during rhodopsin conformational dynamics. To determine whether this time-resolved assay can probe various aspects of structure–function relationships in rhodopsin, we first measured properties of expressed normal human rhodopsin with ERC recordings. These studies were conducted in single fused giant cells containing on the order of a picogram of regenerated pigment. The action spectrum of the ERC of normal human opsin regenerated with 11-cis-retinal was fit by the human rhodopsin absorbance spectrum. Successive flashes extinguished ERC signals consistent with bleaching of a rhodopsin photopigment with a normal range of photosensitivity. ERC signals followed the univariance principle since millisecond-order relaxation kinetics were independent of the wavelength of the flash stimulus. After signal extinction, dark adaptation without added 11-cis-retinal resulted in spontaneous pigment regeneration from an intracellular store of chromophore remaining from earlier loading. After the ERC was extinguished, 350-nm flashes overlapping metarhodopsin-II absorption promoted immediate recovery of ERC charge motions identified by subsequent 500-nm flashes. Small inverted R2 signals were seen in response to some 350-nm flashes. These results indicate that the ERC can be photoregenerated from the metarhodopsin-II state. Regeneration with 9-cis-retinal permits recording of ERC signals consistent with flash activation of isorhodopsin. We initiated structure–function studies by measuring ERC signals in cells expressing the D83N and E134Q mutant human rhodopsin pigments. D83N ERCs were simplified in comparison with normal rhodopsin, while E134Q ERCs had only the early phase of charge motion. This study demonstrates that properties of normal rhodopsin can be accurately measured with the ERC assay and that a structure–function investigation of rapid activation processes in analogue and mutant visual pigments is

  2. Activity of mutant sigma F proteins truncated near the C terminus.

    PubMed Central

    Min, K T; Yudkin, M D

    1992-01-01

    sigma F, the product of the spoIIAC gene of Bacillus subtilis, is homologous in amino acid sequence throughout most of its length with several other sigma factors of B. subtilis and Escherichia coli. However, 8 residues from the C terminus the homology abruptly breaks down, suggesting that the C-terminal tail of the protein may be dispensable. It is known that an amber mutation at the 11th codon (wild-type glutamine 245) from the C terminus abolishes the function of the sigma factor. We have now placed chain-terminating codons at the ninth codon (wild-type lysine 247), the eighth codon (wild-type valine 248), or the seventh codon (wild-type glutamine 249) from the C terminus. We have tested the resulting mutants for their capacity to sporulate and for their ability to transcribe from a promoter (spoIIIG) that is normally read by RNA polymerase bound to sigma F (E sigma F). The results indicate that a mutant sigma F lacking the terminal 7 residues functions almost normally, which suggests that glutamine 249 is dispensable. By contrast, lysine 247 is crucial for the activity of sigma F: deletion of the 9 C-terminal residues totally inactivates the protein. When the terminal 8 residues were deleted, placing lysine 247 at the C terminus, the transcriptional activity of the factor is reduced by about 80%: we attribute this effect to neutralization of the positive charge of lysine 247 by formation of a salt bridge with the -COO- terminus. Images PMID:1429437

  3. Mutagenesis and behavioral screening for altered circadian activity identifies the mouse mutant, Wheels.

    PubMed

    Pickard, G E; Sollars, P J; Rinchik, E M; Nolan, P M; Bucan, M

    1995-12-24

    The molecular processes underlying the generation of circadian behavior in mammals are virtually unknown. To identify genes that regulate or alter circadian activity rhythms, a mouse mutagenesis program was initiated in conjunction with behavioral screening for alterations in circadian period (tau), a fundamental property of the biological clock. Male mice of the inbred BALB/c strain, treated with the potent mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea were mated with wild-type hybrids. Wheel-running activity of approximately 300 male progeny was monitored for 6-10 weeks under constant dark (DD) conditions. The tau DD of a single mouse (#187) was longer than the population mean by more than three standard deviations (24.20 vs. 23.32 +/- 0.02 h; mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 277). In addition, mouse #187 exhibited other abnormal phenotypes, including hyperactive bi-directional circling/spinning activity and an abnormal response to light. Heterozygous progeny of the founder mouse, generated from outcrossings with wild-type C57BL/6J mice, displayed lengthened tau DD although approximately 20% of the animals showed no wheel-running activity despite being quite active. Under light:dark conditions, all animals displaying circling behavior that ran in the activity wheels exhibited robust wheel-running activity at lights-ON and these animals also showed enhanced wheel-running activity in constant light conditions. The genetic dissection of the complex behavior associated with this mutation was facilitated by the previously described genetic mapping of the mutant locus causing circling behavior, designated Wheels (Whl), to the subcentromeric portion of mouse chromosome 4. In this report, the same locus is shown to be responsible for the abnormal responses to light and presumably for the altered circadian behavior. Characterization of the gene altered in the novel Whl mutation will contribute to understanding the molecular elements involved in mammalian circadian regulation.

  4. Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase Activity in Developing Seedlings and Chloroplasts of Barley and Its Virescens Mutant 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Lawrence W.; Zalik, Saul

    1981-01-01

    Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase activity of whole tissue homogenates and chloroplast preparations was analyzed as the acetyl-CoA-dependent incorporation of [14C]bicarbonate into an acid-stable product. The absolute requirement for ATP and MgCl2, the complete inhibition with avidin, and end-product analysis were consistent with the presence of acetyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Little difference was found between the mutant and normal tissue homogenates from the 1- to 3-day growth stages, during which period both showed a 3-fold increase. However, by 4 days, the activity of the mutant exceeded that of the normal. Fractionation studies showed that the enzyme was a soluble protein present in the stromal fraction of chloroplasts. The biotin content was also highest in the stroma, although it was found in the lamellar fraction as well. For both the mutant and the normal, the highest acetyl-CoA carboxylase activities were obtained in the stromal preparations from 4-day seedlings (54 and 31 nmoles per milligram protein per minute for the mutant and the normal, respectively) with a progressive decline by 6 and 8 days. The difference between the mutant and the normal was not due to the accumulation of an inhibitor in the normal. PMID:16661731

  5. Zinc pyrithione-mediated activation of voltage-gated KCNQ potassium channels rescues epileptogenic mutants.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Qiaojie; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Min

    2007-05-01

    KCNQ potassium channels are activated by changes in transmembrane voltage and play an important role in controlling electrical excitability. Human mutations of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 potassium channel genes result in reduction or loss of channel activity and cause benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNCs). Thus, small molecules capable of augmenting KCNQ currents are essential both for understanding the mechanism of channel activity and for developing therapeutics. We performed a high-throughput screen in search for agonistic compounds potentiating KCNQ potassium channels. Here we report identification of a new opener, zinc pyrithione (1), which activates both recombinant and native KCNQ M currents. Interactions with the channel protein cause an increase of single-channel open probability that could fully account for the overall conductance increase. Separate point mutations have been identified that either shift the concentration dependence or affect potentiation efficacy, thereby providing evidence for residues influencing ligand binding and downstream events. Furthermore, zinc pyrithione is capable of rescuing the mutant channels causal to BFNCs.

  6. DNA-ligase activities appear normal in the CHO mutant EM9.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y; Thompson, L H; Becker, F F

    1984-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant strain EM9 was previously shown to be hypersensitive to killing by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), to have a 12-fold increased baseline incidence of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE), and to be defective in rejoining DNA strand breaks after treatment with EMS, MMS, or X-rays. A study was performed to determine if the primary biochemical defect might be a DNA ligase. DNA-ligase activities were assayed and compared after separation of the multiple forms of ligase by AcA 34 gel-filtration chromatography of total cellular extracts. In EM9 cells the levels of the presumptive replicative forms, DNA ligase Ia (480 kd) and ligase Ib (240 kd) were about 50% and 60%, respectively, of those in the parental AA8 cells, whereas DNA ligase II (80 kd) was unaltered in EM9 . In a phenotypic revertant line ( 9R1 ) ligases Ia, Ib and II levels were 35%, 37% and 100%, respectively, of those in AA8 . The reduced levels of ligases Ia and Ib in EM9 and 9R1 cells are apparently not related directly to the mutant phenotype and may be attributable to the somewhat slower growth rates of these strains compared with those of AA8 . To determine if the repair defect in EM9 might reside in the ability to induce DNA-ligase activity after treatment with a DNA-damaging agent, AA8 and EM9 cells were treated with MMS at 30 micrograms/ml for 60 min before preparing fractions for ligase assays. Under these conditions the activities of ligases Ia and Ib decreases 70-80% in both cell lines, but ligase II increased 2.0- and 2.6-fold, respectively, in AA8 and EM9 . As a further test of defective ligase activities in EM9 , assays were performed in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl or after heating the fractions for 10 min at 50 degrees C. Although all 3 forms of ligase showed altered activity under both of these conditions, there were no significant differences between EM9 and AA8 cells. These data combined with the above results provide strong

  7. Antitumor activity of mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase gene for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Long-Ying; Wang, Jian-Ping; Gui, Zhi-Fu; Shen, Li-Zong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) mutant D314A and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) for treatment of colon cancer in a mouse model. METHODS: Recombinant lentivirus vectors that contained wild-type bCD gene (bCDwt), and bCD mutant D314A gene (bCD-D314A) with green fluorescence protein gene were constructed and used to infect human colon carcinoma LoVo cells, to generate stable transfected cells, LoVo/null, LoVo/bCDwt or LoVo/bCD-D314A. These were injected subcutaneously into Balb/c nude mice to establish xenograft models. Two weeks post-LoVo cell inoculation, PBS or 5-FC (500 mg/kg) was administered by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection once daily for 14 d. On the day after LoVo cell injection, mice were monitored daily for tumor volume and survival. RESULTS: Sequence analyses confirmed the construction of recombinant lentiviral plasmids that contained bCDwt or bCD-D314A. The lentiviral vector had high efficacy for gene delivery, and RT-PCR showed that bCDwt or bCD-D314A gene was transferred to LoVo cells. Among these treatment groups, gene delivery or 5-FC administration alone had no effect on tumor growth. However, bCDwt/5-FC or bCD-D314A/5-FC treatment inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival of mice significantly (P < 0.05). Importantly, the tumor volume in the bCD-D314A/5-FC-treated group was lower than that in the bCDwt/5-FC group (P < 0.05), and bCD-D314A plus 5-FC significantly prolonged survival of mice in comparison with bCDwt plus 5-FC (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The bCD mutant D314A enhanced significantly antitumor activity in human colon cancer xenograft models, which provides a promising approach for human colon carcinoma therapy. PMID:21734808

  8. Clueless regulates aPKC activity and promotes self-renewal cell fate in Drosophila lgl mutant larval brains.

    PubMed

    Goh, Li Hui; Zhou, Xiu; Lee, Mei Chin; Lin, Shuping; Wang, Huashan; Luo, Yan; Yang, Xiaohang

    2013-09-15

    Asymmetric cell division of Drosophila neural stem cells or neuroblasts is an important process which gives rise to two different daughter cells, one of which is the stem cell itself and the other, a committed or differentiated daughter cell. During neuroblast asymmetric division, atypical Protein Kinase C (aPKC) activity is tightly regulated; aberrant levels of activity could result in tumorigenesis in third instar larval brain. We identified clueless (clu), a genetic interactor of parkin (park), as a novel regulator of aPKC activity. It preferentially binds to the aPKC/Bazooka/Partition Defective 6 complex and stabilizes aPKC levels. In clu mutants, Miranda (Mira) and Numb are mislocalized in small percentages of dividing neuroblasts. Adult mutants are short-lived with severe locomotion defects. Clu promotes tumorigenesis caused by loss of function of lethal(2) giant larvae (lgl) in the larval brain. Removal of clu in lgl mutants rescues Mira and Numb mislocalization and restores the enlarged brain size. Western blot analyses indicate that the rescue is due to the down-regulation of aPKC levels in the lgl clu double mutant. Interestingly, the phenotype of the park mutant, which causes Parkinson's Disease-like symptoms in adult flies, is reminiscent of that of clu in neuroblast asymmetric division. Our study provides the first clue for the potential missing pathological link between temporally separated neurogenesis and neurodegeneration events; the minor defects during early neurogenesis could be a susceptible factor contributing to neurodegenerative diseases at later stages of life.

  9. A partially active mutant aldolase B from a patient with hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Brooks, C C; Tolan, D R

    1994-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially fatal autosomal recessive disease of carbohydrate metabolism. HFI patients are deficient in aldolase B, the isozyme expressed in fructose-metabolizing tissues. The eight protein coding exons, including splicing signals, of the aldolase B gene from one American HFI patient were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct sequence determination were applied to the amplified fragments. The mutations in the patient's alleles were identified as a nonsense mutation (R59op) in exon 3 and a missense mutation (C134R) in exon 5. These mutations were confirmed by sequence determination of cloned PCR-amplified exons 3 and 5 from the patient. Allele specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridizations of amplified exons 3 and 5 showed the Mendelian inheritance of both mutations. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate an expression plasmid for the C134R mutation, and the mutant enzyme was expressed in bacteria. Assays of partially purified enzyme preparations showed that this missense mutation results in an apparently unstable enzyme that retains partial activity. This is the first evidence for a partially active aldolase B from an HFI individual with an identified mutation, and supports the hypothesis that adequate gluconeogenesis/glycolysis is maintained in HFI patients by the presence of partially active enzymes.

  10. Defective co-activator recruitment in osteoclasts from microphthalmia-oak ridge mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sudarshana M; Sif, Said; Ostrowski, Michael C; Sankar, Uma

    2009-07-01

    The three basic DNA-binding domain mutations of the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mitf), Mitf(mi/mi), Mitf(or/or), and Mitf(wh/wh) affect osteoclast differentiation with variable penetrance while completely impairing melanocyte development. Mitf(or/or) mice exhibit osteopetrosis that improves with age and their osteoclasts form functional multinuclear osteoclasts, raising the question as to why the Mitf(or/or) mutation results in osteopetrosis. Here we show that Mitf(or/or) osteoclasts express normal levels of acid phosphatase 5 (Acp5) mRNA and significantly lower levels of Cathepsin K (Ctsk) mRNA during receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) ligand (RANKL)-mediated differentiation. Studies using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis indicate that low levels of Mitf(or/or) protein are recruited to the Ctsk promoter. However, enrichment of Mitf-transcriptional co-activators PU.1 and Brahma-related gene 1 (Brg1) are severely impaired at the Ctsk promoter of Mitf(or/or) osteoclast precursors, indicating that defective recruitment of co-activators by the mutant Mitf(or/or) results in impaired Ctsk expression in osteoclasts. Cathepsin K may thus represent a unique class of Mitf-regulated osteoclast-specific genes that are important for osteoclast function.

  11. Activity Suppression Behavior Phenotype in SULT4A1 Frameshift Mutant Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Frank; Thomas, Holly R.; Parant, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Since its identification in 2000, sulfotransferase (SULT) 4A1 has presented an enigma to the field of cytosolic SULT biology. SULT4A1 is exclusively expressed in neural tissue, is highly conserved, and has been identified in every vertebrate studied to date. Despite this singular level of conservation, no substrate or function for SULT4A1 has been identified. Previous studies demonstrated that SULT4A1 does not bind the obligate sulfate donor, 3′-phosphoadenosine-5′-phosphosulfate, yet SULT4A1 is classified as a SULT superfamily member based on sequence and structural similarities to the other SULTs. In this study, transcription activator-like effector nucleases were used to generate heritable mutations in the SULT4A1 gene of zebrafish. The mutation (SULT4A1Δ8) consists of an 8-nucleotide deletion within the second exon of the gene, resulting in a frameshift mutation and premature stop codon after 132 AA. During early adulthood, casual observations were made that mutant zebrafish were exhibiting excessively sedentary behavior during the day. These observations were inconsistent with published reports on activity in zebrafish that are largely diurnal organisms and are highly active during the day. Thus, a decrease in activity during the day represents an abnormal behavior and warranted further systematic analysis. EthoVision video tracking software was used to monitor activity levels in wild-type (WT) and SULT4A1Δ8/Δ8 fish over 48 hours of a normal light/dark cycle. SULT4A1Δ8/Δ8 fish were shown to exhibit increased inactivity bout length and frequency as well as a general decrease in daytime activity levels when compared with their WT counterparts. PMID:25934576

  12. In vitro and in vivo activities of T4 endonuclease V mutants altered in the C-terminal aromatic region

    SciTech Connect

    Ishida, M.; Kanamori, Y.; Hori, N.; Inaoka, T.; Ohtsuka, E. )

    1990-04-24

    Genes encoding mutants of the thymine photodimer repair enzyme from bacteriophage T4 (T4 endonuclease V) having an amino acid substitution (T127M, W128A, W128S, Y129A, K130L, Y131A, Y132A) were constructed by use of a previously obtained synthetic gene and expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of the E. coli tryptophan promoter. An in vitro assay of partially fractionated mutant proteins for glycosylase activity was performed with chemically synthesized substrates containing a thymine photodimer. T127M and K130L showed almost the same activity as the wild-type protein. Although W128S, Y131A, and Y132A were slightly active, W128A and Y129A lost activity. The results indicated that the aromatic amino acids around position 130 may be important for the glycosylase activity. Mutant T127M was purified, and the Km value was found to be of the same order as that of the wild type (10(-8) M). In vivo activities for all mutants were characterized with UV-sensitive E. coli. The results showed that substitution of Thr-127 with Met or Lys-130 with Leu did not have an effect on the survival of the bacteria but substitution of aromatic amino acids (128-132) had various effects on survival.

  13. An essential role for Gα(i2) in Smoothened-stimulated epithelial cell proliferation in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Hugo; Visbal, Adriana P; Obeid, Nadine F; Ta, Andrew Q; Faruki, Adeel A; Wu, Meng-Fen; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Shaw, Chad A; Yu, Peng; Plummer, Nicholas W; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Lewis, Michael T

    2015-09-15

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical for organogenesis, tissue homeostasis, and stem cell maintenance. The gene encoding Smoothened (SMO), the primary effector of Hh signaling, is expressed aberrantly in human breast cancer, as well as in other cancers. In mice that express a constitutively active form of SMO that does not require Hh stimulation in mammary glands, the cells near the transgenic cells proliferate and participate in hyperplasia formation. Although SMO is a seven-transmembrane receptor like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), SMO-mediated activation of the Gli family of transcription factors is not known to involve G proteins. However, data from Drosophila and mammalian cell lines indicate that SMO functions as a GPCR that couples to heterotrimeric G proteins of the pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive Gαi class. Using genetically modified mice, we demonstrated that SMO signaling through G proteins occurred in the mammary gland in vivo. SMO-induced stimulation of proliferation was PTX-sensitive and required Gαi2, but not Gαi1, Gαi3, or activation of Gli1 or Gli2. Our findings show that activated SMO functions as a GPCR to stimulate proliferation in vivo, a finding that may have clinical importance because most SMO-targeted agents have been selected based largely on their ability to block Gli-mediated transcription.

  14. Positive Feedback Genetic Circuit Incorporating a Constitutively Active Mutant Gal3 into Yeast GAL Induction System.

    PubMed

    Ryo, Shintaro; Ishii, Jun; Matsuno, Toshihide; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Matsubara, Daiki; Tominaga, Masahiro; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-03-27

    The GAL expression system is the most frequently used induction technique in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we report a simple but powerful genetic circuit for use with the GAL induction system. Briefly, an artificial positive feedback circuit was incorporated into the GAL regulatory network. We selected green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter of GAL1 induction, and designed a strain that expressed a constitutively active Gal3 mutant protein (Gal3(c)) under control of the GAL10 promoter. In the resulting strain, GAL1 and GAL10 promoters regulate the expression of GFP and GAL3(c), respectively. Because Gal3(c) sequesters the Gal80 repressor away from the Gal4 transcriptional activator in the same manner as the galactose-bound Gal3, the expressed Gal3(c) protein provokes further expression of GFP and Gal3(c), yielding further enhancement of GAL induction. Thus, this GAL3(c)-mediated positive feedback circuit permits substantially enriched induction of a target gene at extremely low concentrations, or even in the absence, of galactose, while maintaining the strict glucose-mediated repression of the target.

  15. Reduced hydroperoxidase (HPI and HPII) activity in the Deltafur mutant contributes to increased sensitivity to UVA radiation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoerter, James D; Arnold, Alan A; Ward, Christopher S; Sauer, Michael; Johnson, Steve; Fleming, Todd; Eisenstark, Abraham

    2005-05-13

    In Escherichia coli, Deltafur (ferric uptake regulator) mutants are hypersensitive to various oxidative agents, including UVA radiation (400-315 nm). Studies suggest that UVA radiation mediates its biological effects on bacteria via oxidative mechanisms that lead to reactive oxygen species, including the superoxide anion radical (O2.-), hydroxyl radical (HO.), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and singlet oxygen (1O2). There is accumulating evidence that Fur may play an important role in the defense against UVA radiation. In addition to regulating almost all genes directly involved in iron acquisition, Fur also regulates the expression of manganese and iron superoxide dismutase (MnSOD, FeSOD), key enzymes in the defense against oxygen toxicity in E. coli. In Deltafur mutants, there is a complete absence of FeSOD. Previous results suggest that the native iron chelating agent, enterobactin, which exists in increased levels in Deltafur mutants, is an endogenous chromophore for UVA, releasing Fe2+ into the cytoplasm to catalyze the production of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. We now report that the hypersensitivity of Deltafur mutants to UVA irradiation is associated with reduced hydroperoxidase I (HPI) and hydroperoxidase II (HPII) activity, and is associated with a decrease in the transcription of katE and katG genes. The observed decrease in HPII activity in Deltafur mutants is also associated with reduced rpoS gene transcription. This study provides additional evidence that the Fur gene product, in addition to its known regulatory effect on the expression of SOD and iron uptake mechanisms, also regulates HPI and HPII activity levels in E. coli. An H2O2-inducible antioxidant defense system leading to an increase in HPI activity, is unaltered in Deltafur mutants.

  16. Nonlinear effects of hyperpolarizing shifts in activation of mutant NaV1.7 channels on resting membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Estacion, Mark; Waxman, Stephen G

    2017-02-01

    The Nav1.7 sodium channel is preferentially expressed within dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and sympathetic ganglion neurons. Gain-of-function mutations that cause the painful disorder inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) shift channel activation in a hyperpolarizing direction. When expressed within DRG neurons, these mutations produce a depolarization of resting membrane potential (RMP). The biophysical basis for the depolarized RMP has to date not been established. To explore the effect on RMP of the shift in activation associated with a prototypical IEM mutation (L858H), we used dynamic clamp models that represent graded shifts that fractionate the effect of the mutation on activation voltage-dependence. Dynamic clamp recording from DRG neurons using a before-and-after protocol for each cell made it possible, even in the presence of cell-to-cell variation in starting RMP, to assess the effects of these graded mutant models. Our results demonstrate a non-linear, progressively larger effect on RMP as the shift in activation voltage-dependence becomes more hyperpolarized. The observed differences in RMP were predicted by the "late" current of each mutant model. Since the depolarization of RMP imposed by IEM mutant channels is known, in itself, to produce hyperexcitability of DRG neurons, the development of pharmacological agents that normalize or partially normalize activation voltage-dependence of IEM mutant channels merits further study.

  17. PI(4)P Promotes Phosphorylation and Conformational Change of Smoothened through Interaction with Its C-terminal Tail

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Xiang-An; Evers, B. Mark; Zhu, Haining; Jia, Jianhang

    2016-01-01

    In Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, binding of Hh to the Patched-Interference Hh (Ptc-Ihog) receptor complex relieves Ptc inhibition on Smoothened (Smo). A longstanding question is how Ptc inhibits Smo and how such inhibition is relieved by Hh stimulation. In this study, we found that Hh elevates production of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI(4)P). Increased levels of PI(4)P promote, whereas decreased levels of PI(4)P inhibit, Hh signaling activity. We further found that PI(4)P directly binds Smo through an arginine motif, which then triggers Smo phosphorylation and activation. Moreover, we identified the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (Gprk2) as an essential component for enriching PI(4)P and facilitating Smo activation. PI(4)P also binds mouse Smo (mSmo) and promotes its phosphorylation and ciliary accumulation. Finally, Hh treatment increases the interaction between Smo and PI(4)P but decreases the interaction between Ptc and PI(4)P, indicating that, in addition to promoting PI(4)P production, Hh regulates the pool of PI(4)P associated with Ptc and Smo. PMID:26863604

  18. Compensatory premotor activity during affective face processing in subclinical carriers of a single mutant Parkin allele.

    PubMed

    Anders, Silke; Sack, Benjamin; Pohl, Anna; Münte, Thomas; Pramstaller, Peter; Klein, Christine; Binkofski, Ferdinand

    2012-04-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease suffer from significant motor impairments and accompanying cognitive and affective dysfunction due to progressive disturbances of basal ganglia-cortical gating loops. Parkinson's disease has a long presymptomatic stage, which indicates a substantial capacity of the human brain to compensate for dopaminergic nerve degeneration before clinical manifestation of the disease. Neuroimaging studies provide evidence that increased motor-related cortical activity can compensate for progressive dopaminergic nerve degeneration in carriers of a single mutant Parkin or PINK1 gene, who show a mild but significant reduction of dopamine metabolism in the basal ganglia in the complete absence of clinical motor signs. However, it is currently unknown whether similar compensatory mechanisms are effective in non-motor basal ganglia-cortical gating loops. Here, we ask whether asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers show altered patterns of brain activity during processing of facial gestures, and whether this might compensate for latent facial emotion recognition deficits. Current theories in social neuroscience assume that execution and perception of facial gestures are linked by a special class of visuomotor neurons ('mirror neurons') in the ventrolateral premotor cortex/pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44/6). We hypothesized that asymptomatic Parkin mutation carriers would show increased activity in this area during processing of affective facial gestures, replicating the compensatory motor effects that have previously been observed in these individuals. Additionally, Parkin mutation carriers might show altered activity in other basal ganglia-cortical gating loops. Eight asymptomatic heterozygous Parkin mutation carriers and eight matched controls underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging and a subsequent facial emotion recognition task. As predicted, Parkin mutation carriers showed significantly stronger activity in

  19. Kras mutations increase telomerase activity and targeting telomerase is a promising therapeutic strategy for Kras-mutant NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bowen; Zhang, Lianmin; Qian, Dong; Li, Chenguang; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Shengguang; Zhu, Jinfang; Gao, Liuwei; Zhang, Qiang; Jia, Bin; Hao, Ligang; Wang, Changli; Zhang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    As shortened telomeres inhibit tumor formation and prolong life span in a KrasG12D mouse lung cancer model, we investigated the implications of telomerase in Kras-mutant NSCLC. We found that Kras mutations increased TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase) mRNA expression and telomerase activity and telomere length in both immortalized bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and lung adenocarcinoma cells (Calu-3). MEK inhibition led to reduced TERT expression and telomerase activity. Furthermore, telomerase inhibitor BIBR1532 shortened telomere length and inhibited mutant Kras-induced long-term proliferation, colony formation and migration capabilities of BEAS-2B and Calu-3 cells. Importantly, BIBR1532 sensitized oncogenic Kras expressing Calu-3 cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The Calu-3-KrasG12D xenograft mouse model confirmed that BIBR1532 enhanced the antitumor efficacy of paclitaxel in vivo. In addition, higher TERT expression was seen in Kras-mutant NSCLC than that with wild-type Kras. Our data suggest that Kras mutations increase telomerase activity and telomere length by activating the RAS/MEK pathway, which contributes to an aggressive phenotype of NSCLC. Kras mutations-induced lung tumorigenesis and chemoresistance are attenuated by telomerase inhibition. Targeting telomerase/telomere may be a promising therapeutic strategy for patients with Kras-mutant NSCLC. PMID:27329725

  20. Novel DNA motif binding activity observed in vivo with an estrogen receptor α mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A; Pedersen, Lars C; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B; DeMayo, Francesco J; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as "tethering." Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used "KIKO" mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the "EAAE" ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null-like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo.

  1. Novel DNA Motif Binding Activity Observed In Vivo With an Estrogen Receptor α Mutant Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A.; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J.; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as “tethering.” Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used “KIKO” mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the “EAAE” ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null–like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo. PMID:24713037

  2. Allele-Specific Reduction of the Mutant Huntingtin Allele Using Transcription Activator-Like Effectors in Human Huntington's Disease Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Fink, Kyle D; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Josh; Anderson, Joseph S; Torrest, Audrey; Komarla, Anvita; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Cary, Whitney; Anderson, Johnathon D; Gruenloh, William; Duffy, Alexandra; Tempkin, Teresa; Annett, Geralyn; Wheelock, Vicki; Segal, David J; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of CAG repeats. Although pathogenesis has been attributed to this polyglutamine expansion, the underlying mechanisms through which the huntingtin protein functions have yet to be elucidated. It has been suggested that postnatal reduction of mutant huntingtin through protein interference or conditional gene knockout could prove to be an effective therapy for patients suffering from HD. For allele-specific targeting, transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) were designed to target single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the mutant allele and packaged into a vector backbone containing KRAB to promote transcriptional repression of the disease-associated allele. Additional TALEs were packaged into a vector backbone containing heterodimeric FokI and were designed to be used as nucleases (TALEN) to cause a CAG-collapse in the mutant allele. Human HD fibroblasts were treated with each TALE-SNP or TALEN. Allele-expression was measured using a SNP-genotyping assay and mutant protein aggregation was quantified with Western blots for anti-ubiquitin. The TALE-SNP and TALEN significantly reduced mutant allele expression (p < 0.05) when compared to control transfections while not affecting expression of the nondisease allele. This study demonstrates the potential of allele-specific gene modification using TALE proteins, and provides a foundation for targeted treatment for individuals suffering from Huntington's or other genetically linked diseases.

  3. Rescue of mutant rhodopsin traffic by metformin-induced AMPK activation accelerates photoreceptor degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Athanasiou, Dimitra; Aguila, Monica; Opefi, Chikwado A.; South, Kieron; Bellingham, James; Bevilacqua, Dalila; Munro, Peter M.; Kanuga, Naheed; Mackenzie, Francesca E.; Dubis, Adam M.; Georgiadis, Anastasios; Graca, Anna B.; Pearson, Rachael A.; Ali, Robin R.; Sakami, Sanae; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Sherman, Michael Y.; Reeves, Philip J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Protein misfolding caused by inherited mutations leads to loss of protein function and potentially toxic ‘gain of function’, such as the dominant P23H rhodopsin mutation that causes retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Here, we tested whether the AMPK activator metformin could affect the P23H rhodopsin synthesis and folding. In cell models, metformin treatment improved P23H rhodopsin folding and traffic. In animal models of P23H RP, metformin treatment successfully enhanced P23H traffic to the rod outer segment, but this led to reduced photoreceptor function and increased photoreceptor cell death. The metformin-rescued P23H rhodopsin was still intrinsically unstable and led to increased structural instability of the rod outer segments. These data suggest that improving the traffic of misfolding rhodopsin mutants is unlikely to be a practical therapy, because of their intrinsic instability and long half-life in the outer segment, but also highlights the potential of altering translation through AMPK to improve protein function in other protein misfolding diseases. PMID:28065882

  4. Intermolecular disintegration and intramolecular strand transfer activities of wild-type and mutant HIV-1 integrase.

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, A; Engelman, A; Craigie, R; Fesen, M; Pommier, Y

    1994-01-01

    We report the activities of HIV integrase protein on a novel DNA substrate, consisting of a pair of gapped duplex molecules. Integrase catalyzed an intermolecular disintegration reaction that requires positioning of a pair of the gapped duplexes in a configuration that resembles the intgration intermediate. However, the major reaction resulted from an intramolecular reaction involving a single gapped duplex, giving rise to a hairpin. Surprisingly, a deletion mutant of integrase that lacks both the amino and carboxyl terminal regions still catalyzed the intermolecular disintegration reaction, but supported only a very low level of the intramolecular reaction. The central core region of integrase is therefore sufficient to both bind the gapped duplex DNA and juxtapose a pair of such molecules through protein-protein interactions. We suggest that the branched DNA structures of the previously reported disintegration substrate, and the intermolecular disintegration substrate described here, assist in stabilizing protein-protein interactions that otherwise require the amino and carboxy terminal regions of integrase. Images PMID:8152908

  5. DYRK1B as therapeutic target in Hedgehog/GLI-dependent cancer cells with Smoothened inhibitor resistance.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Wolfgang; Hutzinger, Martin; Elmer, Dominik Patrick; Parigger, Thomas; Sternberg, Christina; Cegielkowski, Lukasz; Zaja, Mirko; Leban, Johann; Michel, Susanne; Hamm, Svetlana; Vitt, Daniel; Aberger, Fritz

    2016-02-09

    A wide range of human malignancies displays aberrant activation of Hedgehog (HH)/GLI signaling, including cancers of the skin, brain, gastrointestinal tract and hematopoietic system. Targeting oncogenic HH/GLI signaling with small molecule inhibitors of the essential pathway effector Smoothened (SMO) has shown remarkable therapeutic effects in patients with advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma. However, acquired and de novo resistance to SMO inhibitors poses severe limitations to the use of SMO antagonists and urgently calls for the identification of novel targets and compounds.Here we report on the identification of the Dual-Specificity-Tyrosine-Phosphorylation-Regulated Kinase 1B (DYRK1B) as critical positive regulator of HH/GLI signaling downstream of SMO. Genetic and chemical inhibition of DYRK1B in human and mouse cancer cells resulted in marked repression of HH signaling and GLI1 expression, respectively. Importantly, DYRK1B inhibition profoundly impaired GLI1 expression in both SMO-inhibitor sensitive and resistant settings. We further introduce a novel small molecule DYRK1B inhibitor, DYRKi, with suitable pharmacologic properties to impair SMO-dependent and SMO-independent oncogenic GLI activity. The results support the use of DYRK1B antagonists for the treatment of HH/GLI-associated cancers where SMO inhibitors fail to demonstrate therapeutic efficacy.

  6. miR-326 Is Downstream of Sonic Hedgehog Signaling and Regulates the Expression of Gli2 and Smoothened

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhihua; Cushing, Leah; Lü, Jining

    2014-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed and secreted from the embryonic lung epithelium and acts on the adjacent mesenchymal cells via its receptor Patched (Ptch)/Smoothened (Smo) and transcriptional effectors Gli proteins. Genetic studies showed that the Shh pathway plays critical roles in mouse lung development. However, little is known about microRNAs (miRNAs) downstream of Shh in embryonic lungs. Here we profiled miRNAs in embryonic lung cultures treated with cyclopamine, a specific Smo antagonist or with Smo agonist by next-generation of sequencing. We then performed functional screening to examine whether some of these miRNAs can modulate the induction of Gli-responsive luciferase by Shh treatment. These analyses revealed that expression of miR-326 and its host gene, Arrestin β1, is selectively enriched in embryonic lung mesenchymal cells and is specifically influenced by Shh activity. Furthermore, functional analyses showed that miR-326 acts as a negative modulator for Shh signaling by directly targeting Smo and Gli2. Together, these findings suggest a novel miR-326–negative feedback loop in regulating the activity of Shh signaling. PMID:24617895

  7. Smoothened Agonist Reduces Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vir B.; Singh, Meera V.; Gorantla, Santhi; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2016-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorder is characterized by recruitment of activated/infected leukocytes into the CNS via disrupted Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) that contributes to persistent neuro-inflammation. In this report, humanized NOD/scid-IL2Rγcnull mice were used to establish that impaired Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is associated with loss of BBB function and neurological damage, and that modulating Shh signaling can rescue these detrimental effects. Plasma viral load, p24 levels and CD4+ T cells were measured as markers of productive HIV infection. These mice also showed impaired exclusion of Evans blue dye from the brain, increased plasma levels of S100B, an astrocytic protein, and down-regulation of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin5, collectively indicating BBB dysfunction. Further, brain tissue from HIV+ mice indicated reduced synaptic density, neuronal atrophy, microglial activation, and astrocytosis. Importantly, reduced expression of Shh and Gli1 was also observed in these mice, demonstrating diminished Shh signaling. Administration of Shh mimetic, smoothened agonist (SAG) restored BBB integrity and also abated the neuropathology in infected mice. Together, our results suggest a neuroprotective role for Shh signaling in the context of HIV infection, underscoring the therapeutic potential of SAG in controlling HAND pathogenesis. PMID:27241024

  8. miR-326 is downstream of Sonic hedgehog signaling and regulates the expression of Gli2 and smoothened.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihua; Cushing, Leah; Ai, Xingbin; Lü, Jining

    2014-08-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed and secreted from the embryonic lung epithelium and acts on the adjacent mesenchymal cells via its receptor Patched (Ptch)/Smoothened (Smo) and transcriptional effectors Gli proteins. Genetic studies showed that the Shh pathway plays critical roles in mouse lung development. However, little is known about microRNAs (miRNAs) downstream of Shh in embryonic lungs. Here we profiled miRNAs in embryonic lung cultures treated with cyclopamine, a specific Smo antagonist or with Smo agonist by next-generation of sequencing. We then performed functional screening to examine whether some of these miRNAs can modulate the induction of Gli-responsive luciferase by Shh treatment. These analyses revealed that expression of miR-326 and its host gene, Arrestin β1, is selectively enriched in embryonic lung mesenchymal cells and is specifically influenced by Shh activity. Furthermore, functional analyses showed that miR-326 acts as a negative modulator for Shh signaling by directly targeting Smo and Gli2. Together, these findings suggest a novel miR-326-negative feedback loop in regulating the activity of Shh signaling.

  9. DYRK1B as therapeutic target in Hedgehog/GLI-dependent cancer cells with Smoothened inhibitor resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Wolfgang; Hutzinger, Martin; Elmer, Dominik Patrick; Parigger, Thomas; Sternberg, Christina; Cegielkowski, Lukasz; Zaja, Mirko; Leban, Johann; Michel, Susanne; Hamm, Svetlana; Vitt, Daniel; Aberger, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of human malignancies displays aberrant activation of Hedgehog (HH)/GLI signaling, including cancers of the skin, brain, gastrointestinal tract and hematopoietic system. Targeting oncogenic HH/GLI signaling with small molecule inhibitors of the essential pathway effector Smoothened (SMO) has shown remarkable therapeutic effects in patients with advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma. However, acquired and de novo resistance to SMO inhibitors poses severe limitations to the use of SMO antagonists and urgently calls for the identification of novel targets and compounds. Here we report on the identification of the Dual-Specificity-Tyrosine-Phosphorylation-Regulated Kinase 1B (DYRK1B) as critical positive regulator of HH/GLI signaling downstream of SMO. Genetic and chemical inhibition of DYRK1B in human and mouse cancer cells resulted in marked repression of HH signaling and GLI1 expression, respectively. Importantly, DYRK1B inhibition profoundly impaired GLI1 expression in both SMO-inhibitor sensitive and resistant settings. We further introduce a novel small molecule DYRK1B inhibitor, DYRKi, with suitable pharmacologic properties to impair SMO-dependent and SMO-independent oncogenic GLI activity. The results support the use of DYRK1B antagonists for the treatment of HH/GLI-associated cancers where SMO inhibitors fail to demonstrate therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26784250

  10. The activity of nodules of the supernodulating mutant Mtsunn is not limited by photosynthesis under optimal growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Ricardo A; Lingner, Annika; Liese, Rebecca; Sulieman, Saad; Senbayram, Mehmet; Tränkner, Merle; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-04-10

    Legumes match the nodule number to the N demand of the plant. When a mutation in the regulatory mechanism deprives the plant of that ability, an excessive number of nodules are formed. These mutants show low productivity in the fields, mainly due to the high carbon burden caused through the necessity to supply numerous nodules. The objective of this study was to clarify whether through optimal conditions for growth and CO2 assimilation a higher nodule activity of a supernodulating mutant of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) can be induced. Several experimental approaches reveal that under the conditions of our experiments, the nitrogen fixation of the supernodulating mutant, designated as sunn (super numeric nodules), was not limited by photosynthesis. Higher specific nitrogen fixation activity could not be induced through short- or long-term increases in CO2 assimilation around shoots. Furthermore, a whole plant P depletion induced a decline in nitrogen fixation, however this decline did not occur significantly earlier in sunn plants, nor was it more intense compared to the wild-type. However, a distinctly different pattern of nitrogen fixation during the day/night cycles of the experiment indicates that the control of N2 fixing activity of the large number of nodules is an additional problem for the productivity of supernodulating mutants.

  11. The Activity of Nodules of the Supernodulating Mutant Mtsunn Is not Limited by Photosynthesis under Optimal Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cabeza, Ricardo A.; Lingner, Annika; Liese, Rebecca; Sulieman, Saad; Senbayram, Mehmet; Tränkner, Merle; Dittert, Klaus; Schulze, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Legumes match the nodule number to the N demand of the plant. When a mutation in the regulatory mechanism deprives the plant of that ability, an excessive number of nodules are formed. These mutants show low productivity in the fields, mainly due to the high carbon burden caused through the necessity to supply numerous nodules. The objective of this study was to clarify whether through optimal conditions for growth and CO2 assimilation a higher nodule activity of a supernodulating mutant of Medicago truncatula (M. truncatula) can be induced. Several experimental approaches reveal that under the conditions of our experiments, the nitrogen fixation of the supernodulating mutant, designated as sunn (super numeric nodules), was not limited by photosynthesis. Higher specific nitrogen fixation activity could not be induced through short- or long-term increases in CO2 assimilation around shoots. Furthermore, a whole plant P depletion induced a decline in nitrogen fixation, however this decline did not occur significantly earlier in sunn plants, nor was it more intense compared to the wild-type. However, a distinctly different pattern of nitrogen fixation during the day/night cycles of the experiment indicates that the control of N2 fixing activity of the large number of nodules is an additional problem for the productivity of supernodulating mutants. PMID:24727372

  12. Mutagenesis of the redox-active disulfide in mercuric ion reductase: Catalysis by mutant enzymes restricted to flavin redox chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Distefano, M.D.; Au, K.G.; Walsh, C.T. )

    1989-02-07

    Mercuric reductase, a flavoenzyme that possesses a redox-active cystine, Cys{sub 135}Cys{sub 140}, catalyzes the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by NADPH. As a probe of mechanism, the authors have constructed mutants lacking a redox-active disulfide by eliminating Cys{sub 135} (Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 140}), Cys{sub 14} (Cys{sub 135}Ala{sub 140}), or both (Ala{sub 135}Ala{sub 140}). Additionally, they have made double mutants that lack Cys{sub 135} (Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Cys{sub 140}) or Cys{sub 140} (Cys{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Ala{sub 140}) but introduce a new Cys in place of Gly{sub 139} with the aim of constructing dithiol pairs in the active site that do not form a redox-active disulfide. The resulting mutant enzymes all lack redox-active disulfides and are hence restricted to FAD/FADH{sub 2} redox chemistry. Each mutant enzyme possesses unique physical and spectroscopic properties that reflect subtle differences in the FAD microenvironment. Preliminary evidence for the Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 139}Cys{sub 14} mutant enzyme suggests that this protein forms a disulfide between the two adjacent Cys residues. Hg(II) titration experiments that correlate the extent of charge-transfer quenching with Hg(II) binding indicate that the Ala{sub 135}Cys{sub 140} protein binds Hg(II) with substantially less avidity than does the wild-type enzyme. All mutant mercuric reductases catalyze transhydrogenation and oxygen reduction reactions through obligatory reduced flavin intermediates at rates comparable to or greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. In multiple-turnover assays which monitored the production of Hg(0), two of the mutant enzymes were observed to proceed through at least 30 turnovers at rates ca. 1000-fold slower than that of wild-type mercuric reductase. They conclude that the Cys{sub 135} and Cys{sub 140} thiols serve as Hg(II) ligands that orient the Hg(II) for subsequent reduction by a reduced flavin intermediate.

  13. Discovery of PF-04449913, a Potent and Orally Bioavailable Inhibitor of Smoothened

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitors of the Hedgehog signaling pathway have generated a great deal of interest in the oncology area due to the mounting evidence of their potential to provide promising therapeutic options for patients. Herein, we describe the discovery strategy to overcome the issues inherent in lead structure 1 that resulted in the identification of Smoothened inhibitor 1-((2R,4R)-2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-1-methylpiperidin-4-yl)-3-(4-cyanophenyl)urea (PF-04449913, 26), which has been advanced to human clinical studies. PMID:24900436

  14. Preclinical efficacy of a RAF inhibitor that evades paradoxical MAPK pathway activation in protein kinase BRAF-mutant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Okimoto, Ross A; Lin, Luping; Olivas, Victor; Chan, Elton; Markegard, Evan; Rymar, Andrey; Neel, Dana; Chen, Xiao; Hemmati, Golzar; Bollag, Gideon; Bivona, Trever G

    2016-11-22

    Oncogenic activation of protein kinase BRAF drives tumor growth by promoting mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway signaling. Because oncogenic mutations in BRAF occur in ∼2-7% of lung adenocarcinoma (LA), BRAF-mutant LA is the most frequent cause of BRAF-mutant cancer mortality worldwide. Whereas most tumor types harbor predominantly the BRAF(V600E)-mutant allele, the spectrum of BRAF mutations in LA includes BRAF(V600E) (∼60% of cases) and non-V600E mutant alleles (∼40% of cases) such as BRAF(G469A) and BRAF(G466V) The presence of BRAF(V600E) in LA has prompted clinical trials testing selective BRAF inhibitors such as vemurafenib in BRAF(V600E)-mutant patients. Despite promising clinical efficacy, both innate and acquired resistance often result from reactivation of MAPK pathway signaling, thus limiting durable responses to the current BRAF inhibitors. Further, the optimal therapeutic strategy to block non-V600E BRAF-mutant LA remains unclear. Here, we report the efficacy of the Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine protein kinase (RAF) inhibitor, PLX8394, that evades MAPK pathway reactivation in BRAF-mutant LA models. We show that PLX8394 treatment is effective in both BRAF(V600E) and certain non-V600 LA models, in vitro and in vivo. PLX8394 was effective against treatment-naive BRAF-mutant LAs and those with acquired vemurafenib resistance caused by an alternatively spliced, truncated BRAF(V600E) that promotes vemurafenib-insensitive MAPK pathway signaling. We further show that acquired PLX8394 resistance occurs via EGFR-mediated RAS-mTOR signaling and is prevented by upfront combination therapy with PLX8394 and either an EGFR or mTOR inhibitor. Our study provides a biological rationale and potential polytherapy strategy to aid the deployment of PLX8394 in lung cancer patients.

  15. Targeting the Hedgehog signaling pathway in cancer: beyond Smoothened.

    PubMed

    Gonnissen, Annelies; Isebaert, Sofie; Haustermans, Karin

    2015-06-10

    An essential role for Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in human cancer has been established beyond doubt. At present, targeting Hh signaling has mainly been investigated with SMO inhibitors. Unfortunately, resistance against currently used SMO inhibitors has already been observed in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) patients. Therefore, the use of Hh inhibitors targeting the signaling cascade more downstream of SMO could represent a more promising strategy. Furthermore, besides the classical canonical way of Hh signaling activation, non-canonical activation of the GLI transcription factors by multiple important signaling pathways (e.g. MAPK, PI3K, TGFβ) has also been described, pinpointing the importance of targeting the transcription factors GLI1/2. The most promising agent in this context is probably the GLI1/2 inhibitor GANT61 which has been investigated preclinically in numerous tumor types in the last few years. In this review, the emerging role of Hh signaling in cancer is critically evaluated focusing on the potential of targeting Hh signaling more downstream of SMO, i.e. at the level of the GLI transcription factors. Furthermore, the working mechanism and therapeutic potential of the most extensively studied GLI inhibitor in human cancer, i.e. GANT61, is discussed in detail. In conclusion, GANT61 appears to be highly effective against human cancer cells and in xenograft mouse models, targeting almost all of the classical hallmarks of cancer and could hence represent a promising treatment option for human cancer.

  16. Deregulated hedgehog pathway signaling is inhibited by the smoothened antagonist LDE225 (Sonidegib) in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, David A.; Zhang, Bin; Kinstrie, Ross; Tarafdar, Anuradha; Morrison, Heather; Campbell, Victoria L.; Moka, Hothri A.; Ho, Yinwei; Nixon, Colin; Manley, Paul W.; Wheadon, Helen; Goodlad, John R.; Holyoake, Tessa L.; Bhatia, Ravi; Copland, Mhairi

    2016-01-01

    Targeting the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway represents a potential leukaemia stem cell (LSC)-directed therapy which may compliment tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) to eradicate LSC in chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). We set out to elucidate the role of Hh signaling in CP-CML and determine if inhibition of Hh signaling, through inhibition of smoothened (SMO), was an effective strategy to target CP-CML LSC. Assessment of Hh pathway gene and protein expression demonstrated that the Hh pathway is activated in CD34+ CP-CML stem/progenitor cells. LDE225 (Sonidegib), a small molecule, clinically investigated SMO inhibitor, used alone and in combination with nilotinib, inhibited the Hh pathway in CD34+ CP-CML cells, reducing the number and self-renewal capacity of CML LSC in vitro. The combination had no effect on normal haemopoietic stem cells. When combined, LDE225 + nilotinib reduced CD34+ CP-CML cell engraftment in NSG mice and, upon administration to EGFP+ /SCLtTA/TRE-BCR-ABL mice, the combination enhanced survival with reduced leukaemia development in secondary transplant recipients. In conclusion, the Hh pathway is deregulated in CML stem and progenitor cells. We identify Hh pathway inhibition, in combination with nilotinib, as a potentially effective therapeutic strategy to improve responses in CP-CML by targeting both stem and progenitor cells. PMID:27157927

  17. Patched (ptch)-associated preferential expression of smoothened (smoh) in human basal cell carcinoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Kallassy, M; Toftgård, R; Ueda, M; Nakazawa, K; Vorechovský, I; Yamasaki, H; Nakazawa, H

    1997-11-01

    The discovery of specific overexpression of a gatekeeper gene, ptch, in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) led to a hypothesis that the human homologue of patched (PTCH) normally functions as a negative regulator of the signaling pathway that is initiated by hedgehogs (HHs) and activated by the human homologue of smoothened (SMOH); however, no evidence for the involvement of smoh and hhs has been provided. Here, we show novel evidence that smoh is also preferentially overexpressed in BCC, together with ptch (P < 0.002), and that Sonic hh was expressed in only some BCCs. Our data, therefore, indicate that such overexpression of smoh may be associated with overexpression or mutation of PTCH and that this overexpression subsequently stimulates the PTCH/SMOH signaling pathway. In an investigation of a possible regulation of ptch and smoh, we demonstrated that expression of exogenous p21WAF1 in immortalized keratinocytes down-regulates both ptch and smoh and that the down-regulation is accompanied by growth arrest, which suggests the involvement of p21WAF1 in regulation of the PTCH/SMOH signaling pathway.

  18. Inhibition of HSP90 by AUY922 Preferentially Kills Mutant KRAS Colon Cancer Cells by Activating Bim through ER Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun Yan; Guo, Su Tang; Wang, Jia Yu; Liu, Fen; Zhang, Yuan Yuan; Yari, Hamed; Yan, Xu Guang; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Xu Dong; Jiang, Chen Chen

    2016-03-01

    Oncogenic mutations of KRAS pose a great challenge in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Here we report that mutant KRAS colon cancer cells are nevertheless more susceptible to apoptosis induced by the HSP90 inhibitor AUY922 than those carrying wild-type KRAS. Although AUY922 inhibited HSP90 activity with comparable potency in colon cancer cells irrespective of their KRAS mutational statuses, those with mutant KRAS were markedly more sensitive to AUY922-induced apoptosis. This was associated with upregulation of the BH3-only proteins Bim, Bik, and PUMA. However, only Bim appeared essential, in that knockdown of Bim abolished, whereas knockdown of Bik or PUMA only moderately attenuated apoptosis induced by AUY922. Mechanistic investigations revealed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was responsible for AUY922-induced upregulation of Bim, which was inhibited by a chemical chaperone or overexpression of GRP78. Conversely, siRNA knockdown of GRP78 or XBP-1 enhanced AUY922-induced apoptosis. Remarkably, AUY922 inhibited the growth of mutant KRAS colon cancer xenografts through activation of Bim that was similarly associated with ER stress. Taken together, these results suggest that AUY922 is a promising drug in the treatment of mutant KRAS colon cancers, and the agents that enhance the apoptosis-inducing potential of Bim may be useful to improve the therapeutic efficacy.

  19. Effects of active site cleft residues on oligosaccharide binding, hydrolysis, and glycosynthase activities of rice BGlu1 and its mutants.

    PubMed

    Pengthaisong, Salila; Ketudat Cairns, James R

    2014-12-01

    Rice BGlu1 (Os3BGlu7) is a glycoside hydrolase family 1 β-glucosidase that hydrolyzes cellooligosaccharides with increasing efficiency as the degree of polymerization (DP) increases from 2 to 6, indicating six subsites for glucosyl residue binding. Five subsites have been identified in X-ray crystal structures of cellooligosaccharide complexes with its E176Q acid-base and E386G nucleophile mutants. X-ray crystal structures indicate that cellotetraose binds in a similar mode in BGlu1 E176Q and E386G, but in a different mode in the BGlu1 E386G/Y341A variant, in which glucosyl residue 4 (Glc4) interacts with Q187 instead of the eliminated phenolic group of Y341. Here, we found that the Q187A mutation has little effect on BGlu1 cellooligosaccharide hydrolysis activity or oligosaccharide binding in BGlu1 E176Q, and only slight effects on BGlu1 E386G glycosynthase activity. X-ray crystal structures showed that cellotetraose binds in a different position in BGlu1 E176Q/Y341A, in which it interacts directly with R178 and W337, and the Q187A mutation had little effect on cellotetraose binding. Mutations of R178 and W337 to A had significant and nonadditive effects on oligosaccharide hydrolysis by BGlu1, pNPGlc cleavage and cellooligosaccharide inhibition of BGlu1 E176Q and BGlu1 E386G glycosynthase activity. Hydrolysis activity was partially rescued by Y341 for longer substrates, suggesting stacking of Glc4 on Y341 stabilizes binding of cellooligosaccharides in the optimal position for hydrolysis. This analysis indicates that complex interactions between active site cleft residues modulate substrate binding and hydrolysis.

  20. Detailed conformation dynamics and activation process of wild type c-Abl and T315I mutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Jun; Zhao, Wen-Hua; Liu, Qian

    2014-10-01

    Bcr-Abl is an important target for therapy against chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The synergistic effect between myristyl pocket and the ATP pocket has been found. But its detailed information based on molecular level still has not been achieved. In this study, conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) and target molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations were performed to explore the effect of T315I mutation on dynamics and activation process of Abl containing the N-terminal cap (Ncap). The CMD simulation results reveal the increasing flexibility of ATP pocket in kinase domain (KD) after T315I mutation which confirms the disability of ATP-pocket inhibitors to the Abl-T315I mutant. On the contrary, the T315I mutation decreased the flexibility of remote helix αI which suggests the synergistic effect between them. The mobility of farther regions containing Ncap, SH3, SH2 and SH2-KD linker were not affected by T315I mutation. The TMD simulation results show that the activation process of wild type Abl and Abl-T315I mutant experienced global conformation change. Their differences were elucidated by the activation motion of subsegments including A-loop, P-loop and Ncap. Besides, the T315I mutation caused decreasing energy barrier and increasing intermediate number in activation process, which results easier activation process. The TMD and CMD results indicate that a drug targeting only the ATP pocket is not enough to inhibit the Abl-T315I mutant. An effective way to inhibit the abnormal activity of Abl-T315I mutant is to combine the ATP-pocket inhibitors with inhibitors binding at non-ATP pockets mainly related to Ncap, SH2-KD linker and myristyl pocket.

  1. Analogue-resistant mutants of Azotobacter chroococcum derepressed for nitrogenase activity and early ammonia excretion having potential as inoculants for cereal crops.

    PubMed

    Lakshminarayana, K; Shukla, B; Sindhu, S S; Kumari, P; Narula, N; Sheoran, R K

    2000-04-01

    Spontaneous mutants resistant to methionine sulfoximine (Msx), methyl alanine (Mal) and methyl ammonium chloride (Mac) were derived from A. chroococcum strain A103. Msx and Mal-resistant mutants expressed 1.73 to 10.98% of the fully derepressed nitrogenase activity when grown in Burk's medium containing ammonium acetate. Mac-resistant mutants did not express nitrogenase activity in ammonium acetate supplemented medium. The mutants excreted ammonia even after 2 days of growth and some mutants excreted more ammonia as compared to the parent. Selected mutants were inoculated on wheat (Triticum aestivum) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) under field conditions. Majority of the derepressed mutants increased grain yield of wheat and barley varying from 1.2 to 33.3%. However, host-dependent effects on grain yield were observed with different mutants. Two mutants, Mal 27 and Mac 19 showed significant increase in grain yields of both the crops. The results suggest that metabolic analogue-resistant mutants of Azotobacter have potential for use as a biofertilizer for cereal crops.

  2. Structure and function of chicken interleukin-1 beta mutants: uncoupling of receptor binding and in vivo biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Ting; Huang, Wen-Yang; Chen, Ting; Salawu, Emmanuel Oluwatobi; Wang, Dongli; Lee, Yi-Zong; Chang, Yuan-Yu; Yang, Lee-Wei; Sue, Shih-Che; Wang, Xinquan; Yin, Hsien-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-binding and subsequent signal-activation of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) are essential to immune and proinflammatory responses. We mutated 12 residues to identify sites important for biological activity and/or receptor binding. Four of these mutants with mutations in loop 9 (T117A, E118K, E118A, E118R) displayed significantly reduced biological activity. Neither T117A nor E118K mutants substantially affected receptor binding, whereas both mutants lack the IL-1β signaling in vitro but can antagonize wild-type (WT) IL-1β. Crystal structures of T117A, E118A, and E118K revealed that the secondary structure or surface charge of loop 9 is dramatically altered compared with that of wild-type chicken IL-1β. Molecular dynamics simulations of IL-1β bound to its receptor (IL-1RI) and receptor accessory protein (IL-1RAcP) revealed that loop 9 lies in a pocket that is formed at the IL-1RI/IL-1RAcP interface. This pocket is also observed in the human ternary structure. The conformations of above mutants in loop 9 may disrupt structural packing and therefore the stability in a chicken IL-1β/IL-1RI/IL-1RAcP signaling complex. We identify the hot spots in IL-1β that are essential to immune responses and elucidate a mechanism by which IL-1β activity can be inhibited. These findings should aid in the development of new therapeutics that neutralize IL-1 activity. PMID:27278931

  3. Remarkable Transglycosylation Activity of Glycosynthase Mutants of Endo-D, an Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae*

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shu-Quan; Huang, Wei; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2012-01-01

    Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (Endo-D) is an endoglycosidase capable of hydrolyzing the Fc N-glycan of intact IgG antibodies after sequential removal of the sialic acid, galactose, and internal GlcNAc residues in the N-glycan. Endo-D also possesses transglycosylation activity with sugar oxazoline as the donor substrate, but the transglycosylation yield is low due to enzymatic hydrolysis of the donor substrate and the product. We report here our study on the hydrolytic and transglycosylation activity of recombinant Endo-D and its selected mutants. We found that Endo-D preferred core-fucosylated N-glycan for hydrolysis but favored nonfucosylated GlcNAc acceptor for transglycosylation. Several mutants showed significantly enhanced transglycosylation efficiency over the wild type enzyme. Two mutants (N322Q and N322A) were identified as typical glycosynthases that demonstrated remarkable transglycosylation activity with only marginal or no product hydrolysis activity. Kinetic studies revealed that the N332Q and N322A glycosynthases had much higher catalytic efficiency for glycosylating the nonfucosylated GlcNAc acceptor. In comparison, the N322Q was much more efficient than N322A for transglycosylation. However, N332Q and N332A could not take more complex N-glycan oxazoline as substrate for transglycosylation, indicating their strict substrate specificity. The usefulness of the N332Q glycosynthase was exemplified by its application for efficient glycosylation remodeling of IgG-Fc domain. PMID:22318728

  4. Crystal Structures and Functional Characterization of Wild Type and Active Sites Mutants of CYP101D1

    PubMed Central

    Batabyal, Dipanwita; Poulos, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Although CYP101D1 and P450cam catayze the same reaction at a similar rate and share strikingly similar active site architectures, there are significance functional differences. CYP101D1 thus provides an opportunity to probe what structural and functional features must be shared and what can differ yet maintain high catalytic efficiency. Crystal structures of the cyanide complex of wild type CYP101D1 and it active site mutants, D259N and T260A, have been solved. The conformational changes in CYP101D1 upon cyanide binding are very similar to P450cam indicating a similar mechanism for proton delivery during oxygen activation using solvent assisted proton transfer. The D259N-CN− complex shows a perturbed solvent structure compared to wild type which is similar to what was observed in the oxy-complex of the corresonding D251N mutant in P450cam. As in P450cam the T260A mutant is highly uncoupled while the D259N gives barely detectable activity. Despite these similarities, CYP101D1 is able to use the P450cam redox partners while P450cam cannot use the CYP101D1 redox partners. Thus the strict requirement of P450cam for its own redox partner is relaxed in CYP101D1. Differences in the local environment of the essential Asp (Asp259 in CYP101D1) provides a strucutral basis for understanding these functional differences. PMID:24261604

  5. Role of ELA region in auto-activation of mutant KIT receptor: a molecular dynamics simulation insight.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-01-01

    KIT receptor is the prime target in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GISTs) therapy. Second generation inhibitor, Sunitinib, binds to an inactivated conformation of KIT receptor and stabilizes it in order to prevent tumor formation. Here, we investigated the dynamic behavior of wild type and mutant D816H KIT receptor, and emphasized the extended A-loop (EAL) region (805-850) by conducting molecular dynamics simulation (∼100 ns). We analyzed different properties such as root mean square cutoff or deviation, root mean square fluctuation, radius of gyration, solvent-accessible surface area, hydrogen bonding network analysis, and essential dynamics. Apart from this, clustering and cross-correlation matrix approach was used to explore the conformational space of the wild type and mutant EAL region of KIT receptor. Molecular dynamics analysis indicated that mutation (D816H) was able to alter intramolecular hydrogen bonding pattern and affected the structural flexibility of EAL region. Moreover, flexible secondary elements, specially, coil and turns were dominated in EAL region of mutant KIT receptor during simulation. This phenomenon increased the movement of EAL region which in turn helped in shifting the equilibrium towards the active kinase conformation. Our atomic investigation of mutant KIT receptor which emphasized on EAL region provided a better insight into the understanding of Sunitinib resistance mechanism of KIT receptor and would help to discover new therapeutics for KIT-based resistant tumor cells in GIST therapy.

  6. Allelic differences in Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD mutants correlate with their encoded proteins' transport activities in planta.

    PubMed

    Salehin, Mohammad; Huang, Ying-Sheng; Bagchi, Rammyani; Sherrier, D Janine; Dickstein, Rebecca

    2013-02-01

    Medicago truncatula NIP/LATD gene, required for symbiotic nitrogen fixing nodule and root architecture development, encodes a member of the NRT1(PTR) family that demonstrates high-affinity nitrate transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Of three Mtnip/latd mutant proteins, one retains high-affinity nitrate transport in oocytes, while the other two are nitrate-transport defective. To further examine the mutant proteins' transport properties, the missense Mtnip/latd alleles were expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana chl1-5, resistant to the herbicide chlorate because of a deletion spanning the nitrate transporter AtNRT1.1(CHL1) gene. Mtnip-3 expression restored chlorate sensitivity in the Atchl1-5 mutant, similar to wild type MtNIP/LATD, while Mtnip-1 expression did not. The high-affinity nitrate transporter AtNRT2.1 gene was expressed in Mtnip-1 mutant roots; it did not complement, which could be caused by several factors. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that MtNIP/LATD may have another biochemical activity.

  7. Characterization of an activation-tagged mutant uncovers a role of GLABRA2 in anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xianling; Hu, Qingnan; ...

    2015-06-17

    In Arabidopsis, anthocyanin biosynthesis is controlled by a MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) transcriptional activator complex. The MBW complex activates the transcription of late biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway, leading to the production of anthocyanins. A similar MBW complex regulates epidermal cell fate by activating the transcription of GLABRA2 (GL2), a homeodomain transcription factor required for trichome formation in shoots and non-hair cell formation in roots. Here we provide experimental evidence to show that GL2 also plays a role in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. From an activation-tagged mutagenized population of Arabidopsis plants, we isolated a dominant, gain-of-function mutant with reduced anthocyanins.more » Molecular cloning revealed that this phenotype is caused by an elevated expression of GL2, thus the mutant was named gl2-1D. Consistent with the view that GL2 acts as a negative regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis, gl2-1D seedlings accumulated less whereas gl2-3 seedlings accumulated more anthocyanins in response to sucrose. Gene expression analysis indicated that expression of late, but not early, biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway was dramatically reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants. Further analysis showed that expression of some MBW component genes involved in the regulation of late biosynthesis genes was reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants, and chromatin immunoprecipitation results indicated that some MBW component genes are targets of GL2. We also showed that GL2 functions as a transcriptional repressor. Altogether, these results indicate that GL2 negatively regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by directly repressing the expression of some MBW component genes.« less

  8. Characterization of an activation-tagged mutant uncovers a role of GLABRA2 in anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xianling; Hu, Qingnan; Dai, Xuemei; Tian, Hainan; Zheng, Kaijie; Wang, Xiaoping; Mao, Tonglin; Chen, Jin -Gui; Wang, Shucai

    2015-06-17

    In Arabidopsis, anthocyanin biosynthesis is controlled by a MYB-bHLH-WD40 (MBW) transcriptional activator complex. The MBW complex activates the transcription of late biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway, leading to the production of anthocyanins. A similar MBW complex regulates epidermal cell fate by activating the transcription of GLABRA2 (GL2), a homeodomain transcription factor required for trichome formation in shoots and non-hair cell formation in roots. Here we provide experimental evidence to show that GL2 also plays a role in regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. From an activation-tagged mutagenized population of Arabidopsis plants, we isolated a dominant, gain-of-function mutant with reduced anthocyanins. Molecular cloning revealed that this phenotype is caused by an elevated expression of GL2, thus the mutant was named gl2-1D. Consistent with the view that GL2 acts as a negative regulator of anthocyanin biosynthesis, gl2-1D seedlings accumulated less whereas gl2-3 seedlings accumulated more anthocyanins in response to sucrose. Gene expression analysis indicated that expression of late, but not early, biosynthesis genes in the flavonoid pathway was dramatically reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants. Further analysis showed that expression of some MBW component genes involved in the regulation of late biosynthesis genes was reduced in gl2-1D but elevated in gl2-3 mutants, and chromatin immunoprecipitation results indicated that some MBW component genes are targets of GL2. We also showed that GL2 functions as a transcriptional repressor. Altogether, these results indicate that GL2 negatively regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by directly repressing the expression of some MBW component genes.

  9. Pathogenicity and protective activity in pregnant goats of a Brucella melitensis Deltaomp25 deletion mutant.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, M D; Cloeckaert, A; Hagius, S D; Samartino, L E; Fulton, W T; Walker, J V; Enright, F M; Booth, N J; Elzer, P H

    2002-06-01

    The Brucella melitensis mutant BM 25, which lacks the major 25 kDa outer membrane protein Omp25, has previously been found to be attenuated in the murine brucellosis model. In the present study, the capacity of the Deltaomp25 mutant to colonise and cause abortions in the caprine host was evaluated. The vaccine potential of BM 25 was also investigated in goats. Inoculation of nine pregnant goats in late gestation with the B. melitensis mutant resulted in 0/9 abortions, while the virulent parental strain, B. melitensis 16M, induced 6/6 dams to abort (P<0.001, n=6). BM 25 also colonised fewer adults (P<0.05, n=6) and kids (P<0.01, n=6) than strain 16M. The Deltaomp25 mutant was found capable of transient in vivo colonisation of non-pregnant goats for two weeks post-infection. Owing to the ability of BM 25 to colonise both non-pregnant and pregnant adults without inducing abortions, a vaccine efficacy study was performed. Vaccination of goats prior to breeding with either BM 25 or the current caprine vaccine B. melitensis strain Rev. 1 resulted in 100 per cent protection against abortion following challenge in late gestation with virulent strain 16M (P<0.05, n=7). However, unlike strain Rev. 1, BM 25 does not appear to cause abortions in late gestation based on this study with a small number of animals. The B. melitensis Deltaomp25 mutant, BM 25, may be a safe and efficacious alternative to strain Rev. 1 when dealing with goat herds of mixed age and pregnancy status.

  10. DNA-binding-defective mutants of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic switch activator Zta transactivate with altered specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Flemington, E K; Lytle, J P; Cayrol, C; Borras, A M; Speck, S H

    1994-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 and BZLF1 genes are the first viral genes transcribed upon induction of the viral lytic cycle. The protein products of both genes (referred to here as Rta and Zta, respectively) activate expression of other viral genes, thereby initiating the lytic cascade. Among the viral antigens expressed upon induction of the lytic cycle, however, Zta is unique in its ability to disrupt viral latency; expression of the BZLF1 gene is both necessary and sufficient for triggering the viral lytic cascade. We have previously shown that Zta can activate its own promoter (Zp), through binding to two Zta recognition sequences (ZIIIA and ZIIIB). Here we describe mutant Zta proteins that do not bind DNA (referred to as Zta DNA-binding mutants [Zdbm]) but retain the ability to transactivate Zp. Consistent with the inability of these mutants to bind DNA, transactivation of Zp by Zdbm is not dependent on the Zta recognition sequences. Instead, transactivation by Zdbm is dependent upon promoter elements that bind cellular factors. An examination of other viral and cellular promoters identified promoters that are weakly responsive or unresponsive to Zdbm. An analysis of a panel of artificial promoters containing one copy of various promoter elements demonstrated a specificity for Zdbm activation that is distinct from that of Zta. These results suggest that non-DNA-binding forms of some transactivators retain the ability to transactivate specific target promoters without direct binding to DNA. Images PMID:8164660

  11. The plasma membrane Ca(2+) pump PMCA4b inhibits the migratory and metastatic activity of BRAF mutant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hegedũs, Luca; Garay, Tamás; Molnár, Eszter; Varga, Karolina; Bilecz, Ágnes; Török, Szilvia; Padányi, Rita; Pászty, Katalin; Wolf, Matthias; Grusch, Michael; Kállay, Enikõ; Döme, Balázs; Berger, Walter; Hegedũs, Balázs; Enyedi, Agnes

    2016-11-04

    Oncogenic mutations of BRAF lead to constitutive ERK activity that supports melanoma cell growth and survival. While Ca(2+) signaling is a well-known regulator of tumor progression, the crosstalk between Ca(2+) signaling and the Ras-BRAF-MEK-ERK pathway is much less explored. Here we show that in BRAF mutant melanoma cells the abundance of the plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase isoform 4b (PMCA4b, ATP2B4) is low at baseline but markedly elevated by treatment with the mutant BRAF specific inhibitor vemurafenib. In line with these findings gene expression microarray data also shows decreased PMCA4b expression in cutaneous melanoma when compared to benign nevi. The MEK inhibitor selumetinib-similarly to that of the BRAF-specific inhibitor-also increases PMCA4b levels in both BRAF and NRAS mutant melanoma cells suggesting that the MAPK pathway is involved in the regulation of PMCA4b expression. The increased abundance of PMCA4b in the plasma membrane enhances [Ca(2+) ]i clearance from cells after Ca(2+) entry. Moreover we show that both vemurafenib treatment and PMCA4b overexpression induce marked inhibition of migration of BRAF mutant melanoma cells. Importantly, reduced migration of PMCA4b expressing BRAF mutant cells is associated with a marked decrease in their metastatic potential in vivo. Taken together, our data reveal an important crosstalk between Ca(2+) signaling and the MAPK pathway through the regulation of PMCA4b expression and suggest that PMCA4b is a previously unrecognized metastasis suppressor.

  12. An ALS-Associated Mutant SOD1 Rapidly Suppresses KCNT1 (Slack) Na(+)-Activated K(+) Channels in Aplysia Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yalan; Ni, Weiming; Horwich, Arthur L; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2017-02-22

    Mutations that alter levels of Slack (KCNT1) Na(+)-activated K(+) current produce devastating effects on neuronal development and neuronal function. We now find that Slack currents are rapidly suppressed by oligomers of mutant human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), which are associated with motor neuron toxicity in an inherited form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We recorded from bag cell neurons of Aplysia californica, a model system to study neuronal excitability. We found that injection of fluorescent wild-type SOD1 (wt SOD1YFP) or monomeric mutant G85R SOD1YFP had no effect on net ionic currents measured under voltage clamp. In contrast, outward potassium currents were significantly reduced by microinjection of mutant G85R SOD1YFP that had been preincubated at 37°C or of cross-linked dimers of G85R SOD1YFP. Reduction of potassium current was also seen with multimeric G85R SOD1YFP of ∼300 kDa or >300 kDa that had been cross-linked. In current clamp recordings, microinjection of cross-linked 300 kDa increased excitability by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, and decreasing the latency of action potentials triggered by depolarization. The effect of cross-linked 300 kDa on potassium current was reduced by removing Na(+) from the bath solution, or by knocking down levels of Slack using siRNA. It was also prevented by pharmacological inhibition of ASK1 (apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1) or of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, but not by an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. These results suggest that soluble mutant SOD1 oligomers rapidly trigger a kinase pathway that regulates the activity of Na(+)-activated K(+) channels in neurons.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Slack Na(+)-activated K(+) channels (KCNT1, KNa1.1) regulate neuronal excitability but are also linked to cytoplasmic signaling pathways that control neuronal protein translation. Mutations that alter the amplitude of these currents have devastating effects on neuronal

  13. Analysis of HeLa cell hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase mutants and revertants by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis: evidence for silent gene activation.

    PubMed Central

    Milman, G; Lee, E; Ghangas, G S; McLaughlin, J R; George, M

    1976-01-01

    The spot corresponding to hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT; IMP:pyrophosphate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.8) has been identified in two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels of HeLa cell extracts. This spot is absent in gels of 24 HPRT dificient mutants. A missense mutant displays a new HPRT spot at the same molecular weight but different isoelectric focusing position. Five independently isolated revertants of the missense mutant display spots corresponding to both the wild-type and mutant proteins indicating that they synthesize HPRT from two separate genes. If the missense protein is synthesized from a mutated form of the initially active HPRT gene, then wild-type HPRT protein in the revertants must be snythesized from a newly activated but prevously silent wild-type gene. The newly activated gene in the revertants of the missense mutation appears unstable producing a high frequency of spontaneous HPRT mutants. Images PMID:63948

  14. The diageotropica mutant of tomato lacks high specific activity auxin binding sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, G. R.; Rayle, D. L.; Lomax, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Tomato plants homozygous for the diageotropica (dgt) mutation exhibit morphological and physiological abnormalities which suggest that they are unable to respond to the plant growth hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid). The photoaffinity auxin analog [3H]5N3-IAA specifically labels a polypeptide doublet of 40 and 42 kilodaltons in membrane preparations from stems of the parental variety, VFN8, but not from stems of plants containing the dgt mutation. In roots of the mutant plants, however, labeling is indistinguishable from that in VFN8. These data suggest that the two polypeptides are part of a physiologically important auxin receptor system, which is altered in a tissue-specific manner in the mutant.

  15. Activation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae filamentation/invasion pathway by osmotic stress in high-osmolarity glycogen pathway mutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, K. D.; Williams, K. E.; Ullmann, B. D.; Gustin, M. C.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are frequently used signal transduction mechanisms in eukaryotes. Of the five MAPK cascades in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the high-osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway functions to sense and respond to hypertonic stress. We utilized a partial loss-of-function mutant in the HOG pathway, pbs2-3, in a high-copy suppressor screen to identify proteins that modulate growth on high-osmolarity media. Three high-copy suppressors of pbs2-3 osmosensitivity were identified: MSG5, CAK1, and TRX1. Msg5p is a dual-specificity phosphatase that was previously demonstrated to dephosphorylate MAPKs in yeast. Deletions of the putative MAPK targets of Msg5p revealed that kss1delta could suppress the osmosensitivity of pbs2-3. Kss1p is phosphorylated in response to hyperosmotic shock in a pbs2-3 strain, but not in a wild-type strain nor in a pbs2-3 strain overexpressing MSG5. Both TEC1 and FRE::lacZ expressions are activated in strains lacking a functional HOG pathway during osmotic stress in a filamentation/invasion-pathway-dependent manner. Additionally, the cellular projections formed by a pbs2-3 mutant on high osmolarity are absent in strains lacking KSS1 or STE7. These data suggest that the loss of filamentation/invasion pathway repression contributes to the HOG mutant phenotype.

  16. Activity-dependent BDNF release and TRPC signaling is impaired in hippocampal neurons of Mecp2 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Calfa, Gaston; Larimore, Jennifer; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2012-10-16

    Dysfunction of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated in Rett syndrome (RTT), but the state of its releasable pool and downstream signaling in mice lacking methyl-CpG-binding protein-2 (Mecp2) is unknown. Here, we show that membrane currents and dendritic Ca(2+) signals evoked by recombinant BDNF or an activator of diacylglycerol (DAG)-sensitive transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels are impaired in CA3 pyramidal neurons of symptomatic Mecp2 mutant mice. TRPC3 and TRPC6 mRNA and protein levels are lower in Mecp2 mutant hippocampus, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) identified Trpc3 as a target of MeCP2 transcriptional regulation. BDNF mRNA and protein levels are also lower in Mecp2 mutant hippocampus and dentate gyrus granule cells, which is reflected in impaired activity-dependent release of endogenous BDNF estimated from TRPC currents and dendritic Ca(2+) signals in CA3 pyramidal neurons. These results identify the gene encoding TRPC3 channels as a MeCP2 target and suggest a potential therapeutic strategy to boost impaired BDNF signaling in RTT.

  17. Increased phagocytosis of Mycobacterium marinum mutants defective in lipooligosaccharide production: a structure-activity relationship study.

    PubMed

    Alibaud, Laeticia; Pawelczyk, Jakub; Gannoun-Zaki, Laila; Singh, Vipul K; Rombouts, Yoann; Drancourt, Michel; Dziadek, Jaroslaw; Guérardel, Yann; Kremer, Laurent

    2014-01-03

    Mycobacterium marinum is a waterborne pathogen responsible for tuberculosis-like infections in ectotherms and is an occasional opportunistic human pathogen. In the environment, M. marinum also interacts with amoebae, which may serve as a natural reservoir for this microorganism. However, the description of mycobacterial determinants in the early interaction with macrophages or amoebae remains elusive. Lipooligosaccharides (LOSs) are cell surface-exposed glycolipids capable of modulating the host immune system, suggesting that they may be involved in the early interactions of M. marinum with macrophages. Herein, we addressed whether LOS composition affects the uptake of M. marinum by professional phagocytes. Mutants with various truncated LOS variants were generated, leading to the identification of several previously uncharacterized biosynthetic genes (wbbL2, MMAR_2321, and MMAR_2331). Biochemical and structural approaches allowed resolving the structures of LOS precursors accumulating in this set of mutants. These strains with structurally defined LOS profiles were then used to infect both macrophages and Acanthamoebae. An inverse correlation between LOS completeness and uptake of mycobacteria by phagocytes was found, allowing the proposal of three mutant classes: class I (papA4), devoid of LOS and highly efficiently phagocytosed; class II, accumulating only early LOS intermediates (wbbL2 and MMAR_2331) and efficiently phagocytosed but less than class I mutants; class III, lacking LOS-IV (losA, MMAR_2319, and MMAR_2321) and phagocytosed similarly to the control strain. These results indicate that phagocytosis is conditioned by the LOS pattern and that the LOS pathway used by M. marinum in macrophages is conserved during infection of amoebae.

  18. Comparative mutant prevention concentration and antibacterial activity of fluoroquinolones against Escherichia coli in diarrheic buffalo calves.

    PubMed

    Beri, Supriya; Sidhu, Pritam K; Kaur, Gurpreet; Chandra, Mudit; Rampal, Satyavan

    2015-10-01

    Owing to emerging threat of antimicrobial resistance, mutant prevention concentration (MPC) is considered as an important parameter to evaluate the antimicrobials for their capacity to restrict/allow the emergence of resistant mutants. Therefore, MPCs of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and norfloxacin were determined against Escherichia coli isolates of diarrheic buffalo calves. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were also established. The MICs of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and norfloxacin were 0·009, 0·022, 0·024, 0·028, and 0·036 μg/ml, respectively. The MBCs obtained were very close to the MICs of respective drugs that suggested a bactericidal mode of action of antimicrobials. The MPCs (μg/ml) of ciprofloxacin (4·2×MIC), moxifloxacin (4·8×MIC), and norfloxacin (5·1×MIC) were approximately equal but slightly lower than enrofloxacin (7·6×MIC) and levofloxacin (8·5×MIC) against clinical isolates of E. coli. The MPC data suggested that enrofloxacin has the potential for restricting the selection of E. coli mutants during treatment at appropriate dosing.

  19. Antioxidant status, peroxidase activity, and PR protein transcript levels in ascorbate-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana vtc mutants.

    PubMed

    Colville, Louise; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    Ascorbate is the most abundant small molecule antioxidant in plants and is proposed to function, along with other members of an antioxidant network, in controlling reactive oxygen species. A biochemical and molecular characterization of four ascorbate-deficient (vtc) Arabidopsis thaliana mutants has been carried out to determine if ascorbate deficiency is compensated by changes in the other major antioxidants. Seedlings grown in vitro were used to minimize stress and longer term developmental differences. Comparison was made with the low glutathione cad2 mutant and vtc2-1 treated with D,L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulphoximine to cause combined ascorbate and glutathione deficiency. The pool sizes and oxidation state of ascorbate and glutathione were not altered by deficiency of the other. alpha-Tocopherol and activities of monodehydroascorbate reductase, dehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase, and catalase were little affected. Ascorbate peroxidase activity was higher in vtc1, vtc2-1, and vtc2-2. Ionically bound cell wall peroxidase activity was increased in vtc1, vtc2-1, and vtc4. Supplementation with ascorbate increased cell wall peroxidase activity. 2,6-Dichlorobenzonitrile, an inhibitor of cellulose synthesis, increased cell wall peroxidase activity in the wild type and vtc1. The transcript level of an endochitinase, PR1, and PR2, but not GST6, was increased in vtc1, vtc2-1, and vtc-2-2. Endochitinase transcript levels increased after ascorbate, paraquat, salicylic acid, and UV-C treatment, PR1 after salicylic acid treatment, and PR2 after paraquat and UV-C treatment. Camalexin was higher in vtc1 and the vtc2 alleles. Induction of PR genes, cell wall peroxidase activity, and camalexin in vtc1, vtc2-1, and vtc2-2 suggests that the mutants are affected in pathogen response signalling pathways.

  20. Thermolabile in vivo DNA-binding activity associated with a protein encoded by mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C K; Knipe, D M

    1983-01-01

    The major DNA-binding protein encoded by several temperature-sensitive mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 was thermolabile for binding to intracellular viral DNA. The ability of DNase I to release this protein from isolated nuclei was used as a measure of the amount of protein bound to viral DNA. This assay was based upon our previous observation that the fraction of herpesviral DNA-binding protein which can be eluted from nuclei with DNase I represents proteins associated with progeny viral DNA (D. M. Knipe and A. E. Spang, J. Virol. 43:314-324, 1982). In this study, we found that several temperature-sensitive mutants encoded proteins which rapidly chased from a DNase I-sensitive to a DNase I-resistant nuclear form upon shift to the nonpermissive temperature. We interpret this change in DNase I sensitivity to represent the denaturation of the DNA-binding site at the nonpermissive temperature and the association with the nuclear framework via a second site on the protein. The DNA-binding activity measured by the DNase I sensitivity assay represents an important function of the protein in viral replication because three of five mutants tested were thermolabile for this activity. A fourth mutant encoded a protein which did not associate with the nucleus at the nonpermissive temperature and therefore would not be available for DNA binding in the nucleus. We also present supportive evidence for the binding of the wild-type protein to intracellular viral DNA by showing that a monoclonal antibody coprecipitated virus-specific DNA sequences with the major DNA-binding protein. Images PMID:6304350

  1. Virtual screening of mandelate racemase mutants with enhanced activity based on binding energy in the transition state.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jiali; Liu, Min; Guo, Fei; Xie, Wenping; Lu, Wenqiang; Ye, Lidan; Chen, Zhirong; Yuan, Shenfeng; Yu, Hongwei

    2014-02-05

    Mandelate racemase (MR) is a promising candidate for the dynamic kinetic resolution of racemates. However, the poor activity of MR towards most of its non-natural substrates limits its widespread application. In this work, a virtual screening method based on the binding energy in the transition state was established to assist in the screening of MR mutants with enhanced catalytic efficiency. Using R-3-chloromandelic acid as a model substrate, a total of 53 mutants were constructed based on rational design in the two rounds of screening. The number of mutants for experimental validation was brought down to 17 by the virtual screening method, among which 14 variants turned out to possess improved catalytic efficiency. The variant V26I/Y54V showed 5.2-fold higher catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) towards R-3-chloromandelic acid than that observed for the wild-type enzyme. Using this strategy, mutants were successfully obtained for two other substrates, R-mandelamide and R-2-naphthylglycolate (V26I and V29L, respectively), both with a 2-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency. These results demonstrated that this method could effectively predict the trend of mutational effects on catalysis. Analysis from the energetic and structural assays indicated that the enhanced interactions between the active sites and the substrate in the transition state led to improved catalytic efficiency. It was concluded that this virtual screening method based on the binding energy in the transition state was beneficial in enzyme rational redesign and helped to better understand the catalytic properties of the enzyme.

  2. Application of homology modeling to generate CYP1A1 mutants with enhanced activation of the cancer chemotherapeutic prodrug dacarbazine.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Benjamin C; Mackenzie, Peter I; Miners, John O

    2011-11-01

    The chemotherapeutic prodrug dacarbazine (DTIC) has limited efficacy in human malignancies and exhibits numerous adverse effects that arise from systemic exposure to the cytotoxic metabolite. DTIC is activated by CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 catalyzed N-demethylation. However, structural features of these enzymes that confer DTIC N-demethylation have not been characterized. A validated homology model of CYP1A1 was employed to elucidate structure-activity relationships and to engineer CYP1A1 enzymes with altered DTIC activation. In silico docking demonstrated that DTIC orientates proximally to Ser122, Phe123, Asp313, Ala317, Ile386, Tyr259, and Leu496 of human CYP1A1. The site of metabolism is positioned 5.6 Å from the heme iron at an angle of 105.3°. Binding in the active site is stabilized by H-bonding between Tyr259 and the N(2) position of the imidazole ring. Twenty-seven CYP1A1 mutants were generated and expressed in Escherichia coli in yields ranging from 9 to 225 pmol P450/mg. DTIC N-demethylation by the E161K, E256K, and I458V mutants exhibited Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with decreases in K(m) (183-249 μM) that doubled the catalytic efficiency (p < 0.05) relative to wild-type CYP1A1 (K(m), 408 ± 43 μM; V(max), 28 ± 4 pmol · min(-1) · pmol of P450(-1)). The generation of enzymes with catalytically enhanced DTIC activation highlights the potential use of mutant CYP1A1 proteins in P450-based gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy for the treatment of metastatic malignant melanoma.

  3. Loss of ATP-dependent transport activity in pseudoxanthoma elasticum-associated mutants of human ABCC6 (MRP6).

    PubMed

    Iliás, Attila; Urbán, Zsolt; Seidl, Thomas L; Le Saux, Olivier; Sinkó, Emese; Boyd, Charles D; Sarkadi, Balázs; Váradi, András

    2002-05-10

    Mutations in the ABCC6 (MRP6) gene cause pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a rare heritable disorder resulting in the calcification of elastic fibers. In the present study a cDNA encoding a full-length normal variant of ABCC6 was amplified from a human kidney cDNA library, and the protein was expressed in Sf9 insect cells. In isolated membranes ATP binding as well as ATP-dependent active transport by ABCC6 was demonstrated. We found that glutathione conjugates, including leukotriene C(4) and N-ethylmaleimide S-glutathione (NEM-GS), were actively transported by human ABCC6. Organic anions (probenecid, benzbromarone, indomethacin), known to interfere with glutathione conjugate transport of human ABCC1 and ABCC2, inhibited the ABCC6-mediated NEM-GS transport in a specific manner, indicating that ABCC6 has a unique substrate specificity. We have also expressed three missense mutant forms of ABCC6, which have recently been shown to cause PXE. MgATP binding was normal in these proteins; ATP-dependent NEM-GS or leukotriene C(4) transport, however, was abolished. Our data indicate that human ABCC6 is a primary active transporter for organic anions. In the three ABCC6 mutant forms examined, the loss of transport activity suggests that these mutations result in a PXE phenotype through a direct influence on the transport activity of this ABC transporter.

  4. Structure of the human smoothened receptor 7TM bound to an antitumor agent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Wu, Huixian; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Huang, Xi-Ping; Liu, Wei; Siu, Fai Yiu; Roth, Bryan L.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    The smoothened (SMO) receptor, a key signal transducer in the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is both responsible for the maintenance of normal embryonic development and implicated in carcinogenesis. The SMO receptor is classified as a class Frizzled (class F) G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), although the canonical Hh signaling pathway involves the transcription factor Gli and the sequence similarity with class A GPCRs is less than 10%. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.5 Å resolution of the transmembrane domain of the human SMO receptor bound to the small molecule antagonist LY2940680. Although the SMO receptor shares the seven transmembrane helical (7TM) fold, most conserved motifs for class A GPCRs are absent, and the structure reveals an unusually complex arrangement of long extracellular loops stabilized by four disulfide bonds. The ligand binds at the extracellular end of the 7TM bundle and forms extensive contacts with the loops. PMID:23636324

  5. Increased tolerance to salt stress in OPDA-deficient rice ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE mutants is linked to an increased ROS-scavenging activity

    PubMed Central

    Hazman, Mohamed; Hause, Bettina; Eiche, Elisabeth; Nick, Peter; Riemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress represents a global constraint for rice, the most important staple food worldwide. Therefore the role of the central stress signal jasmonate for the salt response was analysed in rice comparing the responses to salt stress for two jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis rice mutants (cpm2 and hebiba) impaired in the function of ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) and their wild type. The aoc mutants were less sensitive to salt stress. Interestingly, both mutants accumulated smaller amounts of Na+ ions in their leaves, and showed better scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under salt stress. Leaves of the wild type and JA mutants accumulated similar levels of abscisic acid (ABA) under stress conditions, and the levels of JA and its amino acid conjugate, JA–isoleucine (JA-Ile), showed only subtle alterations in the wild type. In contrast, the wild type responded to salt stress by strong induction of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), which was not observed in the mutants. Transcript levels of representative salinity-induced genes were induced less in the JA mutants. The absence of 12-OPDA in the mutants correlated not only with a generally increased ROS-scavenging activity, but also with the higher activity of specific enzymes in the antioxidative pathway, such as glutathione S-transferase, and fewer symptoms of damage as, for example, indicated by lower levels of malondialdehyde. The data are interpreted in a model where the absence of OPDA enhanced the antioxidative power in mutant leaves. PMID:25873666

  6. Increased tolerance to salt stress in OPDA-deficient rice ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE mutants is linked to an increased ROS-scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Hazman, Mohamed; Hause, Bettina; Eiche, Elisabeth; Nick, Peter; Riemann, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Salinity stress represents a global constraint for rice, the most important staple food worldwide. Therefore the role of the central stress signal jasmonate for the salt response was analysed in rice comparing the responses to salt stress for two jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis rice mutants (cpm2 and hebiba) impaired in the function of ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) and their wild type. The aoc mutants were less sensitive to salt stress. Interestingly, both mutants accumulated smaller amounts of Na(+) ions in their leaves, and showed better scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under salt stress. Leaves of the wild type and JA mutants accumulated similar levels of abscisic acid (ABA) under stress conditions, and the levels of JA and its amino acid conjugate, JA-isoleucine (JA-Ile), showed only subtle alterations in the wild type. In contrast, the wild type responded to salt stress by strong induction of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), which was not observed in the mutants. Transcript levels of representative salinity-induced genes were induced less in the JA mutants. The absence of 12-OPDA in the mutants correlated not only with a generally increased ROS-scavenging activity, but also with the higher activity of specific enzymes in the antioxidative pathway, such as glutathione S-transferase, and fewer symptoms of damage as, for example, indicated by lower levels of malondialdehyde. The data are interpreted in a model where the absence of OPDA enhanced the antioxidative power in mutant leaves.

  7. Neuroprotective Effects of a Smoothened Receptor Agonist against Early Brain Injury after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Quan; Li, Tong; Wang, Lingxiao; Xie, Yunkai; Liu, Song; Bai, Xuemei; Zhang, Tiantian; Bo, Shishi; Xin, Danqing; Xue, Hao; Li, Gang; Wang, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway plays a fundamental role in the central nervous system (CNS) development, but its effects on neural cell survival and brain repair after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has not been well-investigated. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of an agonist of the Shh co-receptor Smoothened (Smo), purmorphamine (PUR), on early brain injury (EBI) as well as the underlying mechanisms after SAH. PUR was administered via an intraperitoneal injection with a dose of 0.5, 1, and 5 mg/kg at 2, 6, 24, and 46 h after SAH in rat model. The results showed that PUR treatment significantly ameliorated brain edema, improved neurobehavioral function, and attenuated neuronal cell death in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), associated with a decrease in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and suppression of caspase-3 activation at 48 h after SAH. PUR also promoted phospho-ERK levels. Additionally, PUR treatment markedly decreased MDA concentration accompanied with the elevation in the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 and heme oxygenase-1 in PFC. Notably, PUR treatment significantly reversed the changes of Shh pathway mediators containing Patched, Gli1, and Shh by SAH insult, and the neuroprotection of PUR on SAH was blocked by Smo antagonist cyclopamine. These results indicated that PUR exerts neuroprotection against SAH-evoked injury in rats, mediated in part by anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant mechanism, up-regulating phospho-ERK levels, mediating Shh signaling molecules in the PFC. PMID:28149272

  8. Lipid Tail Protrusion in Simulations Predicts Fusogenic Activity of Influenza Fusion Peptide Mutants and Conformational Models

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Per; Kasson, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Fusion peptides from influenza hemagglutinin act on membranes to promote membrane fusion, but the mechanism by which they do so remains unknown. Recent theoretical work has suggested that contact of protruding lipid tails may be an important feature of the transition state for membrane fusion. If this is so, then influenza fusion peptides would be expected to promote tail protrusion in proportion to the ability of the corresponding full-length hemagglutinin to drive lipid mixing in fusion assays. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of influenza fusion peptides in lipid bilayers, comparing the X-31 influenza strain against a series of N-terminal mutants. As hypothesized, the probability of lipid tail protrusion correlates well with the lipid mixing rate induced by each mutant. This supports the conclusion that tail protrusion is important to the transition state for fusion. Furthermore, it suggests that tail protrusion can be used to examine how fusion peptides might interact with membranes to promote fusion. Previous models for native influenza fusion peptide structure in membranes include a kinked helix, a straight helix, and a helical hairpin. Our simulations visit each of these conformations. Thus, the free energy differences between each are likely low enough that specifics of the membrane environment and peptide construct may be sufficient to modulate the equilibrium between them. However, the kinked helix promotes lipid tail protrusion in our simulations much more strongly than the other two structures. We therefore predict that the kinked helix is the most fusogenic of these three conformations. PMID:23505359

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae aldolase mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Z

    1984-01-01

    Six mutants lacking the glycolytic enzyme fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase have been isolated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by inositol starvation. The mutants grown on gluconeogenic substrates, such as glycerol or alcohol, and show growth inhibition by glucose and related sugars. The mutations are recessive, segregate as one gene in crosses, and fall in a single complementation group. All of the mutants synthesize an antigen cross-reacting to the antibody raised against yeast aldolase. The aldolase activity in various mutant alleles measured as fructose 1,6-bisphosphate cleavage is between 1 to 2% and as condensation of triose phosphates to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is 2 to 5% that of the wild-type. The mutants accumulate fructose 1,6-bisphosphate from glucose during glycolysis and dihydroxyacetone phosphate during gluconeogenesis. This suggests that the aldolase activity is absent in vivo. PMID:6384192

  10. Antibody-mediated activation of a defective beta-D-galactosidase: dimeric form of the activatable mutant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Conway de Macario, E; Ellis, J; Guzman, R; Rotman, B

    1978-02-01

    Sedimentation analyses of AMEF, an activatable mutant beta-D-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23), and the products of its reaction with Fab fragments of activating antibody show that this enzyme exists mainly as 10S dimers. Activation of AMEF by purified antibody resulted in formation of 16S tetramers. A unifying hypothesis postulating a dimer--tetramer equilibrium accounts for this observation as the counterpart of inactivation, which was shown to involve the breakdown of tetramers into inactive subunits [Roth, R. A. & Rotman, B. (1975) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 67, 1382--1390]. Conditions are described under which AMEF loses the specific antigenic determinant(s) responsible for binding activating antibody, allowing its subsequent use as an absorption to obtain immunologically purified activating antibody,

  11. Antibody-mediated activation of a defective beta-D-galactosidase: dimeric form of the activatable mutant enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    de Macario, E C; Ellis, J; Guzman, R; Rotman, B

    1978-01-01

    Sedimentation analyses of AMEF, an activatable mutant beta-D-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23), and the products of its reaction with Fab fragments of activating antibody show that this enzyme exists mainly as 10S dimers. Activation of AMEF by purified antibody resulted in formation of 16S tetramers. A unifying hypothesis postulating a dimer--tetramer equilibrium accounts for this observation as the counterpart of inactivation, which was shown to involve the breakdown of tetramers into inactive subunits [Roth, R. A. & Rotman, B. (1975) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 67, 1382--1390]. Conditions are described under which AMEF loses the specific antigenic determinant(s) responsible for binding activating antibody, allowing its subsequent use as an absorption to obtain immunologically purified activating antibody, PMID:416439

  12. Prediction of P53 Mutants (Multiple Sites) Transcriptional Activity Based on Structural (2D&3D) Properties

    PubMed Central

    Geetha Ramani, R.; Jacob, Shomona Gracia

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of secondary site mutations that reinstate mutated p53 to normalcy has been the focus of intense research in the recent past owing to the fact that p53 mutants have been implicated in more than half of all human cancers and restoration of p53 causes tumor regression. However laboratory investigations are more often laborious and resource intensive but computational techniques could well surmount these drawbacks. In view of this, we formulated a novel approach utilizing computational techniques to predict the transcriptional activity of multiple site (one-site to five-site) p53 mutants. The optimal MCC obtained by the proposed approach on prediction of one-site, two-site, three-site, four-site and five-site mutants were 0.775,0.341,0.784,0.916 and 0.655 respectively, the highest reported thus far in literature. We have also demonstrated that 2D and 3D features generate higher prediction accuracy of p53 activity and our findings revealed the optimal results for prediction of p53 status, reported till date. We believe detection of the secondary site mutations that suppress tumor growth may facilitate better understanding of the relationship between p53 structure and function and further knowledge on the molecular mechanisms and biological activity of p53, a targeted source for cancer therapy. We expect that our prediction methods and reported results may provide useful insights on p53 functional mechanisms and generate more avenues for utilizing computational techniques in biological data analysis. PMID:23468845

  13. Isolation of catalase-deficient Escherichia coli mutants and genetic mapping of katE, a locus that affects catalase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Loewen, P C

    1984-01-01

    A number of catalase-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli which exhibit no assayable catalase activity were isolated. The only physiological difference between the catalase mutants and their parents was a 50- to 60-fold greater sensitivity to killing by hydrogen peroxide. For comparison, mutations in the xthA and recA genes of the same strains increased the sensitivity of the mutants to hydrogen peroxide by seven- and fivefold, respectively, showing that catalase was the primary defense against hydrogen peroxide. One class of mutants named katE was localized between pfkB and xthA at 37.8 min on the E. coli genome. A second class of catalase mutants was found which did not map in this region. PMID:6319370

  14. Stereospecific suppression of active site mutants by methylphosphonate substituted substrates reveals the stereochemical course of site-specific DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Paul A; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Ma, Chien-Hui; Maciaszek, Anna D; Guga, Piotr; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2015-07-13

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases, which promote one class of biologically important phosphoryl transfer reactions in DNA, exemplify active site mechanisms for stabilizing the phosphate transition state. A highly conserved arginine duo (Arg-I; Arg-II) of the recombinase active site plays a crucial role in this function. Cre and Flp recombinase mutants lacking either arginine can be rescued by compensatory charge neutralization of the scissile phosphate via methylphosphonate (MeP) modification. The chemical chirality of MeP, in conjunction with mutant recombinases, reveals the stereochemical contributions of Arg-I and Arg-II. The SP preference of the native reaction is specified primarily by Arg-I. MeP reaction supported by Arg-II is nearly bias-free or RP-biased, depending on the Arg-I substituent. Positional conservation of the arginines does not translate into strict functional conservation. Charge reversal by glutamic acid substitution at Arg-I or Arg-II has opposite effects on Cre and Flp in MeP reactions. In Flp, the base immediately 5' to the scissile MeP strongly influences the choice between the catalytic tyrosine and water as the nucleophile for strand scission, thus between productive recombination and futile hydrolysis. The recombinase active site embodies the evolutionary optimization of interactions that not only favor the normal reaction but also proscribe antithetical side reactions.

  15. Characterization of a JAZ7 activation-tagged Arabidopsis mutant with increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Louise F; Cevik, Volkan; Grant, Murray; Zhai, Bing; Jones, Jonathan D G; Manners, John M; Kazan, Kemal

    2016-04-01

    In Arabidopsis, jasmonate (JA)-signaling plays a key role in mediating Fusarium oxysporum disease outcome. However, the roles of JASMONATE ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins that repress JA-signaling have not been characterized in host resistance or susceptibility to this pathogen. Here, we found most JAZ genes are induced following F. oxysporum challenge, and screening T-DNA insertion lines in Arabidopsis JAZ family members identified a highly disease-susceptible JAZ7 mutant (jaz7-1D). This mutant exhibited constitutive JAZ7 expression and conferred increased JA-sensitivity, suggesting activation of JA-signaling. Unlike jaz7 loss-of-function alleles, jaz7-1D also had enhanced JA-responsive gene expression, altered development and increased susceptibility to the bacterial pathogen PstDC3000 that also disrupts host JA-responses. We also demonstrate that JAZ7 interacts with transcription factors functioning as activators (MYC3, MYC4) or repressors (JAM1) of JA-signaling and contains a functional EAR repressor motif mediating transcriptional repression via the co-repressor TOPLESS (TPL). We propose through direct TPL recruitment, in wild-type plants JAZ7 functions as a repressor within the JA-response network and that in jaz7-1D plants, misregulated ectopic JAZ7 expression hyper-activates JA-signaling in part by disturbing finely-tuned COI1-JAZ-TPL-TF complexes.

  16. Role of various enterotoxins in Aeromonas hydrophila-induced gastroenteritis: generation of enterotoxin gene-deficient mutants and evaluation of their enterotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Sha, Jian; Kozlova, E V; Chopra, A K

    2002-04-01

    Three enterotoxins from the Aeromonas hydrophila diarrheal isolate SSU have been molecularly characterized in our laboratory. One of these enterotoxins is cytotoxic in nature, whereas the other two are cytotonic enterotoxins, one of them heat labile and the other heat stable. Earlier, by developing an isogenic mutant, we demonstrated the role of a cytotoxic enterotoxin in causing systemic infection in mice. In the present study, we evaluated the role of these three enterotoxins in evoking diarrhea in a murine model by developing various combinations of enterotoxin gene-deficient mutants by marker-exchange mutagenesis. A total of six isogenic mutants were prepared in a cytotoxic enterotoxin gene (act)-positive or -negative background strain of A. hydrophila. We developed two single knockouts with truncation in either the heat-labile (alt) or the heat-stable (ast) cytotonic enterotoxin gene; three double knockouts with truncations of genes encoding (i) alt and ast, (ii) act and alt, and (iii) act and ast genes; and a triple-knockout mutant with truncation in all three genes, act, alt, and ast. The identity of these isogenic mutants developed by double-crossover homologous recombination was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that the expression of different enterotoxin genes in the mutants was correspondingly abrogated. We tested the biological activity of these mutants in a diet-restricted and antibiotic-treated mouse model with a ligated ileal loop assay. Our data indicated that all of these mutants had significantly reduced capacity to evoke fluid secretion compared to that of wild-type A. hydrophila; the triple-knockout mutant failed to induce any detectable level of fluid secretion. The biological activity of selected A. hydrophila mutants was restored after complementation. Taken together, we have established a role for three enterotoxins in A. hydrophila-induced gastroenteritis in a mouse model with the greatest

  17. Modulation of Escherichia coli Adenylyl Cyclase Activity by Catalytic-Site Mutants of Protein IIAGlc of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Prasad; Kamireddi, Madhavi

    1998-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated form of the glucose-specific phosphocarrier protein IIAGlc of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system is an activator of adenylyl cyclase and that unphosphorylated IIAGlc has no effect on the basal activity of adenylyl cyclase. To elucidate the specific role of IIAGlc phosphorylation in the regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity, both the phosphorylatable histidine (H90) and the interactive histidine (H75) of IIAGlc were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to glutamine and glutamate. Wild-type IIAGlc and the H75Q mutant, in which the histidine in position 75 has been replaced by glutamine, were phosphorylated by the phosphohistidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr∼P) and were equally potent activators of adenylyl cyclase. Neither the H90Q nor the H90E mutant of IIAGlc was phosphorylated by HPr∼P, and both failed to activate adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, replacement of H75 by glutamate inhibited the appearance of a steady-state level of phosphorylation of H90 of this mutant protein by HPr∼P, yet the H75E mutant of IIAGlc was a partial activator of adenylyl cyclase. The H75E H90A double mutant, which cannot be phosphorylated, did not activate adenylyl cyclase. This suggests that the H75E mutant was transiently phosphorylated by HPr∼P but the steady-state level of the phosphorylated form of the mutant protein was decreased due to the repulsive forces of the negatively charged glutamate at position 75 in the catalytic pocket. These results are discussed in the context of the proximity of H75 and H90 in the IIAGlc structure and the disposition of the negative charge in the modeled glutamate mutants. PMID:9457881

  18. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-09-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

  19. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  20. The diageotropica mutant of tomato lacks high specific activity auxin sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, G.R.; Lomax, T.L. ); Rayle, D.L. )

    1989-04-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum, Mill) plants homozygous for the single gene diageotropica (dgt) mutation have reduced shoot growth, abnormal vascular tissue, altered leaf morphology, and lack of lateral root branching. These and other morphological and physiological abnormalities suggest that dgt plants are unable to respond to the plant growth hormone auxin (indole-3-acetic acid, IAA). The photoaffinity auxin analogue {sup 3}H-5N{sub 3}-IAA specifically labels a polypeptide doublet of 40 ad 42 kD in membrane preparations from stems of the parental variety VFN8, but not from stems of dgt. In elongation tests, excised dgt roots respond in the same manner to IAA an VFN8 roots. These data suggest that the two polypeptides are part of a physiologically important auxin receptor system which is altered in a tissue-specific manner in the mutant.

  1. A midgut lysate of the Riptortus pedestris has antibacterial activity against LPS O-antigen-deficient Burkholderia mutants.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ho Am; Seo, Eun Sil; Seong, Min Young; Lee, Bok Luel

    2017-02-01

    Riptortus pedestris, a common pest in soybean fields, harbors a symbiont Burkholderia in a specialized posterior midgut region of insects. Every generation of second nymphs acquires new Burkholderia cells from the environment. We compared in vitro cultured Burkholderia with newly in vivo colonized Burkholderia in the host midgut using biochemical approaches. The bacterial cell envelope of in vitro cultured and in vivo Burkholderia differed in structure, as in vivo bacteria lacked lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen. The LPS O-antigen deficient bacteria had a reduced colonization rate in the host midgut compared with that of the wild-type Burkholderia. To determine why LPS O-antigen-deficient bacteria are less able to colonize the host midgut, we examined in vitro survival rates of three LPS O-antigen-deficient Burkholderia mutants and lysates of five different midgut regions. The LPS O-antigen-deficient mutants were highly susceptible when cultured with the lysate of a specific first midgut region (M1), indicating that the M1 lysate contains unidentified substance(s) capable of killing LPS O-antigen-deficient mutants. We identified a 17 kDa protein from the M1 lysate, which was enriched in the active fractions. The N-terminal sequence of the protein was determined to be a soybean Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor. These data suggest that the 17 kDa protein, which was originated from a main soybean source of the R. pedestris host, has antibacterial activity against the LPS O-antigen deficient (rough-type) Burkholderia.

  2. The BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib activates mitochondrial metabolism and inhibits hyperpolarized pyruvate-lactate exchange in BRAF mutant human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Goni, Teresa; Falck Miniotis, Maria; Wantuch, Slawomir; Parkes, Harold G.; Marais, Richard; Workman, Paul; Leach, Martin O.; Beloueche-Babari, Mounia

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the impact of BRAF signaling inhibition in human melanoma on key disease mechanisms is important for developing biomarkers of therapeutic response and combination strategies to improve long term disease control. This work investigates the downstream metabolic consequences of BRAF inhibition with vemurafenib, the molecular and biochemical processes that underpin them, their significance for antineoplastic activity and potential as non-invasive imaging response biomarkers.1H NMR spectroscopy showed that vemurafenib decreases the glycolytic activity of BRAF mutant (WM266.4 and SKMEL28) but not BRAFWT (CHL-1 and D04) human melanoma cells. In WM266.4 cells, this was associated with increased acetate, glycine and myo-inositol levels and decreased fatty acyl signals, while the bioenergetic status was maintained. 13C NMR metabolic flux analysis of treated WM266.4 cells revealed inhibition of de novo lactate synthesis and glucose utilization, associated with increased oxidative and anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylase mitochondrial metabolism and decreased lipid synthesis. This metabolic shift was associated with depletion of HKII, acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9, 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 1 and 4 in BRAF mutant but not BRAFWT cells and, interestingly, decreased BRAF mutant cell dependency on glucose and glutamine for growth. Further, the reduction in MCT1 expression observed led to inhibition of hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate-lactate exchange, a parameter that is translatable to in vivo imaging studies, in live WM266.4 cells. In conclusion, our data provide new insights into the molecular and metabolic consequences of BRAF inhibition in BRAF-driven human melanoma cells that may have potential for combinatorial therapeutic targeting as well as non-invasive imaging of response. PMID:27765851

  3. A pure chloride channel mutant of CLC-5 causes Dent's disease via insufficient V-ATPase activation.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Hideomi; Yamazaki, Osamu; Suzuki, Masashi; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ashida, Akira; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Kaku, Yoshitsugu; Sekine, Takashi; Seki, George; Horita, Shoko

    2016-07-01

    Dent's disease is characterized by defective endocytosis in renal proximal tubules (PTs) and caused by mutations in the 2Cl(-)/H(+) exchanger, CLC-5. However, the pathological role of endosomal acidification in endocytosis has recently come into question. To clarify the mechanism of pathogenesis for Dent's disease, we examined the effects of a novel gating glutamate mutation, E211Q, on CLC-5 functions and endosomal acidification. In Xenopus oocytes, wild-type (WT) CLC-5 showed outward-rectifying currents that were inhibited by extracellular acidosis, but E211Q and an artificial pure Cl(-) channel mutant, E211A, showed linear currents that were insensitive to extracellular acidosis. Moreover, depolarizing pulse trains induced a robust reduction in the surface pH of oocytes expressing WT CLC-5 but not E211Q or E211A, indicating that the E211Q mutant functions as a pure Cl(-) channel similar to E211A. In HEK293 cells, E211A and E211Q stimulated endosomal acidification and hypotonicity-inducible vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) activation at the plasma membrane. However, the stimulatory effects of these mutants were reduced compared with WT CLC-5. Furthermore, gene silencing experiments confirmed the functional coupling between V-ATPase and CLC-5 at the plasma membrane of isolated mouse PTs. These results reveal for the first time that the conversion of CLC-5 from a 2Cl(-)/H(+) exchanger into a Cl(-) channel induces Dent's disease in humans. In addition, defective endosomal acidification as a result of insufficient V-ATPase activation may still be important in the pathogenesis of Dent's disease.

  4. A constitutively activated mutant of human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC): implication for the mechanism of sGC activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida; Kots, Alexander; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Heterodimeric alphabeta soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a recognized receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and mediates many of its physiological functions. Although it has been clear that the heme moiety coordinated by His-105 of the beta subunit is crucial for mediating the activation of the enzyme by NO, it is not understood whether the heme moiety plays any role in the function of the enzyme in the absence of NO. Here we analyze the effects of biochemical and genetic removal of heme and its reconstitution on the activity of the enzyme. Detergent-induced loss of heme from the wild-type alphabeta enzyme resulted in several-fold activation of the enzyme. This activation was inhibited after hemin reconstitution. A heme-deficient mutant alphabetaCys-105 with Cys substituted for His-105 was constitutively active with specific activity approaching the activity of the wild-type enzyme activated by NO. However, reconstitution of mutant enzyme with heme and/or DTT treatment significantly inhibited the enzyme. Mutant enzyme reconstituted with ferrous heme was activated by NO and CO alone and showed additive effects between gaseous effectors and the allosteric activator 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrim idin-4-ylamine. We propose that the heme moiety through its coordination with His-105 of the beta subunit acts as an endogenous inhibitor of sGC. Disruption of the heme-coordinating bond induced by binding of NO releases the restrictions imposed by this bond and allows the formation of an optimally organized catalytic center in the heterodimer.

  5. A constitutively activated mutant of human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC): Implication for the mechanism of sGC activation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida; Kots, Alexander; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Heterodimeric αβ soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a recognized receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and mediates many of its physiological functions. Although it has been clear that the heme moiety coordinated by His-105 of the β subunit is crucial for mediating the activation of the enzyme by NO, it is not understood whether the heme moiety plays any role in the function of the enzyme in the absence of NO. Here we analyze the effects of biochemical and genetic removal of heme and its reconstitution on the activity of the enzyme. Detergent-induced loss of heme from the wild-type αβ enzyme resulted in several-fold activation of the enzyme. This activation was inhibited after hemin reconstitution. A heme-deficient mutant αβCys-105 with Cys substituted for His-105 was constitutively active with specific activity approaching the activity of the wild-type enzyme activated by NO. However, reconstitution of mutant enzyme with heme and/or DTT treatment significantly inhibited the enzyme. Mutant enzyme reconstituted with ferrous heme was activated by NO and CO alone and showed additive effects between gaseous effectors and the allosteric activator 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrimidin-4-ylamine. We propose that the heme moiety through its coordination with His-105 of the β subunit acts as an endogenous inhibitor of sGC. Disruption of the heme-coordinating bond induced by binding of NO releases the restrictions imposed by this bond and allows the formation of an optimally organized catalytic center in the heterodimer. PMID:12883009

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an active-site mutant hydantoin racemase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; González-Ramírez, Luis Antonio; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Gavira, Jose Antonio García-Ruiz, Juan Ma.

    2008-01-01

    Crystals of an active-site mutated hydantoin racemase from S. meliloti have been obtained in the presence and absence of d,l-5-isopropyl-hydantoin and characterized by X-ray diffraction. A recombinant active-site mutant of hydantoin racemase (C76A) from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT 4114 (SmeHyuA) has been crystallized in the presence and absence of the substrate d,l-5-isopropyl hydantoin. Crystals of the SmeHyuA mutant suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown using the counter-diffusion method. X-ray data were collected to resolutions of 2.17 and 1.85 Å for the free and bound enzymes, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group R3 and contain two molecules of SmeHyuA per asymmetric unit. The crystals of the free and complexed SmeHyuA have unit-cell parameters a = b = 85.43, c = 152.37 Å and a = b = 85.69, c = 154.38 Å, crystal volumes per protein weight (V{sub M}) of 1.94 and 1.98 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and solvent contents of 36.7 and 37.9%, respectively.

  7. Mutagenesis of the potato ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase and characterization of an allosteric mutant defective in 3-phosphoglycerate activation

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, T.W.; Chantler, S.E.; Kahn, M.L.

    1996-02-20

    ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (glucose-1-phosphate adenylytransferase; AD P:{alpha}-D-glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.27) catalyzes a key regulatory step in {alpha}-glucan synthesis in bacteria and higher plants. We have previously shown that the expression of the cDNA sequences of the potato tuber large (LS) and small (SS) subunits yielded a functional heterotetrameric enzyme capable of complementing a mutation in the single AGP (glgC) structural gene of Escherichia coli. This heterologous complementation provides a powerful genetic approach to obtain biochemical information on the specific roles of LS and SS in enzyme function. By mutagenizing the LS cDNA with hydroxylamine and then coexpressing with wild-type SS in an E. coli glgC{sup {minus}} strain, >350 mutant colonies were identified that were impaired in glycogen production. One mutant exhibited enzymatic and antigen levels comparable to the wild-type recombinant enzyme but required 45-fold greater levels of the activator 3-phosphoglycerate for maximum activity. Sequence analysis identified a single nucleotide change that resulted in the change of Pro-52 to Leu. This heterologous genetic system provides and efficient means to identify residues important for catalysis and allosteric functioning and should lead to novel approaches to increase plant productivity. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. DNA binding activity studies and computational approach of mutant SRY in patients with 46, XY complete pure gonadal dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreno, Irene; Canto, Patricia; Munguía, Patricia; de León, Mario Bermúdez; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Vilchis, Felipe; Reyes, Edgardo; Méndez, Juan Pablo

    2009-02-27

    Mutations of SRY are the cause of 46,XY complete pure gonadal dysgenesis (PGD) in 10-15% of patients. In this study, DNA was isolated and sequenced from blood leukocytes and from paraffin-embedded gonadal tissue in five patients with 46,XY complete PGD. DNA binding capability was analyzed by three different methods. The structure of the full length SRY and its mutant proteins was carried out using a protein molecular model. DNA analysis revealed two mutations and one synonymous polymorphism: in patient #4 a Y96C mutation, and a E156 polymorphism; in patient #5 a S143G mosaic mutation limited to gonadal tissue. We demonstrated, by all methods used, that both mutant proteins reduced SRY DNA binding activity. The three-dimensional structure of SRY suggested that besides the HMG box, the carboxy-terminal region of SRY interacts with DNA. In conclusion, we identified two SRY mutations and a polymorphism in two patients with 46,XY complete PGD, demonstrating the importance of the carboxy-terminal region of SRY in DNA binding activity.

  9. Active site mutant transgene confers tolerance to human β-glucuronidase without affecting the phenotype of MPS VII mice

    PubMed Central

    Sly, William S.; Vogler, Carole; Grubb, Jeffrey H.; Zhou, Mi; Jiang, Jinxing; Zhou, Xiao Yan; Tomatsu, Shunji; Bi, Yanhua; Snella, Elizabeth M.

    2001-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII; Sly syndrome) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder due to an inherited deficiency of β-glucuronidase. A naturally occurring mouse model for this disease was discovered at The Jackson Laboratory and shown to be due to homozygosity for a 1-bp deletion in exon 10 of the gus gene. The murine model MPS VII (gusmps/mps) has been very well characterized and used extensively to evaluate experimental strategies for lysosomal storage diseases, including bone marrow transplantation, enzyme replacement therapy, and gene therapy. To enhance the value of this model for enzyme and gene therapy, we produced a transgenic mouse expressing the human β-glucuronidase cDNA with an amino acid substitution at the active site nucleophile (E540A) and bred it onto the MPS VII (gusmps/mps) background. We demonstrate here that the mutant mice bearing the active site mutant human transgene retain the clinical, morphological, biochemical, and histopathological characteristics of the original MPS VII (gusmps/mps) mouse. However, they are now tolerant to immune challenge with human β-glucuronidase. This “tolerant MPS VII mouse model” should be useful for preclinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of enzyme and/or gene therapy with the human gene products likely to be administered to human patients with MPS VII. PMID:11226217

  10. Active site mutant transgene confers tolerance to human beta-glucuronidase without affecting the phenotype of MPS VII mice.

    PubMed

    Sly, W S; Vogler, C; Grubb, J H; Zhou, M; Jiang, J; Zhou, X Y; Tomatsu, S; Bi, Y; Snella, E M

    2001-02-27

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VII (MPS VII; Sly syndrome) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder due to an inherited deficiency of beta-glucuronidase. A naturally occurring mouse model for this disease was discovered at The Jackson Laboratory and shown to be due to homozygosity for a 1-bp deletion in exon 10 of the gus gene. The murine model MPS VII (gus(mps/mps)) has been very well characterized and used extensively to evaluate experimental strategies for lysosomal storage diseases, including bone marrow transplantation, enzyme replacement therapy, and gene therapy. To enhance the value of this model for enzyme and gene therapy, we produced a transgenic mouse expressing the human beta-glucuronidase cDNA with an amino acid substitution at the active site nucleophile (E540A) and bred it onto the MPS VII (gus(mps/mps)) background. We demonstrate here that the mutant mice bearing the active site mutant human transgene retain the clinical, morphological, biochemical, and histopathological characteristics of the original MPS VII (gus(mps/mps)) mouse. However, they are now tolerant to immune challenge with human beta-glucuronidase. This "tolerant MPS VII mouse model" should be useful for preclinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of enzyme and/or gene therapy with the human gene products likely to be administered to human patients with MPS VII.

  11. Mutant LRRK2 toxicity in neurons depends on LRRK2 levels and synuclein but not kinase activity or inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, Gaia; Nakamura, Ken; Cookson, Mark R; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2014-01-08

    By combining experimental neuron models and mathematical tools, we developed a "systems" approach to deconvolve cellular mechanisms of neurodegeneration underlying the most common known cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). Neurons ectopically expressing mutant LRRK2 formed inclusion bodies (IBs), retracted neurites, accumulated synuclein, and died prematurely, recapitulating key features of PD. Degeneration was predicted from the levels of diffuse mutant LRRK2 that each neuron contained, but IB formation was neither necessary nor sufficient for death. Genetic or pharmacological blockade of its kinase activity destabilized LRRK2 and lowered its levels enough to account for the moderate reduction in LRRK2 toxicity that ensued. By contrast, targeting synuclein, including neurons made from PD patient-derived induced pluripotent cells, dramatically reduced LRRK2-dependent neurodegeneration and LRRK2 levels. These findings suggest that LRRK2 levels are more important than kinase activity per se in predicting toxicity and implicate synuclein as a major mediator of LRRK2-induced neurodegeneration.

  12. The effect of cerebellar transplantation and enforced physical activity on motor skills and spatial learning in adult Lurcher mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Cendelín, Jan; Korelusová, Ivana; Vozeh, Frantisek

    2009-03-01

    Lurcher mutant mice represent a model of olivocerebellar degeneration. They are used to investigate cerebellar functions, consequences of cerebellar degeneration and methods of therapy influencing them. The aim of the work was to assess the effect of foetal cerebellar graft transplantation, repeated enforced physical activity and the combination of both these types of treatment on motor skills, spontaneous motor activity and spatial learning ability in adult B6CBA Lurcher mice. Foetal cerebellar grafts were applied into the cerebellum of Lurchers in the form of solid tissue pieces. Enforced motor activity was realised through rotarod training. Motor functions were examined using bar, ladder and rotarod tests. Spatial learning was tested in the Morris water maze. Spontaneous motor activity in the open field was observed. The presence of the graft was examined histologically. Enforced physical activity led to moderate improvement of some motor skills and to a significant amelioration of spatial learning ability in Lurchers. The transplantation of cerebellar tissue did not influence motor functions significantly but led to an improvement of spatial learning ability. Mutual advancement of the effects of both types of treatment was not observed. Spontaneous motor activity was influenced neither by physical activity nor by the transplantation. Physical activity did not influence the graft survival and development. Because nerve sprouting and cell migration from the graft to the host cerebellum was poor, the functional effects of the graft should be explained with regard to its trophic influence rather than with any involvement of the grafted cells into neural circuitries.

  13. Dehydrocostuslactone, a sesquiterpene lactone activates wild-type and ΔF508 mutant CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Zhang, Yao-Fang; Yu, Bo; Yang, Shuang; Luan, Jian; Liu, Xin; Yang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) represents the main cAMP-activated Cl⁻ channel expressed in the apical membrane of serous epithelial cells. Both deficiency and overactivation of CFTR may cause fluid and salt secretion related diseases. The aim of this study was to identify natural compounds that are able to stimulate wild-type (wt) and ΔF508 mutant CFTR channel activities in CFTR-expressing Fischer rat thyroid (FRT) cells. We found that dehydrocostuslactone [DHC, (3aS, 6aR, 9aR, 9bS)-decahydro-3,6,9-tris (methylene) azuleno [4,5-b] furan-2(3H)-one)] dose dependently potentiates both wt and ΔF508 mutant CFTR-mediated iodide influx in cell-based fluorescent assays and CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ currents in short-circuit current studies, and the activations could be reversed by the CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh-172. Maximal CFTR-mediated apical Cl⁻ current secretion in CFTR-expressing FRT cells was stimulated by 100 μM DHC. Determination of intracellular cAMP content showed that DHC modestly but significantly increased cAMP level in FRT cells, but cAMP elevation effects contributed little to DHC-stimulated iodide influx. DHC also stimulated CFTR-mediated apical Cl⁻ current secretion in FRT cells expressing ΔF508-CFTR. Subsequent studies demonstrated that activation of CFTR by DHC is forskolin dependent. DHC represents a new class of CFTR potentiators that may have therapeutic potential in CFTR-related diseases.

  14. Cotton leaf curl Burewala virus with intact or mutant transcriptional activator proteins: complexity of cotton leaf curl disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jitendra; Gunapati, Samatha; Alok, Anshu; Lalit, Adarsh; Gadre, Rekha; Sharma, Naresh C; Roy, Joy K; Singh, Sudhir P

    2015-05-01

    Cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) is a serious disease of cotton on the Indian subcontinent. In the present study, three cotton leaf curl viruses, cotton leaf curl Burewala virus (CLCuBuV), cotton leaf curl Kokhran virus (CLCuKoV) and cotton leaf curl Multan virus (CLCuMV), and their associated satellites, cotton leaf curl Multan betasatellite (CLCuMB) and cotton leaf curl Multan alphasatellite (CLCuMA), were detected. CLCuBuV with either intact (CLCuBuV-1) or mutant (CLCuBuV-2) transcriptional activator protein (TrAP) were detected in different plants. Agroinoculation with CLCuBuV-1 or CLCuBuV-2 together with CLCuMB and CLCuMA, resulted in typical leaf curling and stunting of tobacco plants. Inoculation with CLCuKoV or an isolate of CLCuMV (CLCuMV-2), together with CLCuMB and CLCuMA, induced severe leaf curling, while the other isolate of CLCuMV (CLCuMV-1), which was recombinant in origin, showed mild leaf curling in tobacco. To investigate the effect of intact or mutant TrAP and also the recombination events, CLCuBuV-1, CLCuBuV-2, CLCuMV-1 or CLCuMV-2 together with the satellites (CLCuMA and CLCuMB) were transferred to cotton via whitefly-mediated transmission. Cotton plants containing CLCuBuV-1, CLCuBuV-2 or CLCuMV-2 together with satellites showed curling and stunting, whereas the plants having CLCuMV-1 and the satellites showed only mild and indistinguishable symptoms. CLCuBuV-1 (intact TrAP) showed severe symptoms in comparison to CLCuBuV-2 (mutant TrAP). The present study reveals that two types of CLCuBuV, one with an intact TrAP and the other with a mutant TrAP, exist in natural infection of cotton in India. Additionally, CLCuMuV-1, which has a recombinant origin, induces mild symptoms in comparison to the other CLCuMV isolates.

  15. SCH529074, a small molecule activator of mutant p53, which binds p53 DNA binding domain (DBD), restores growth-suppressive function to mutant p53 and interrupts HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of wild type p53.

    PubMed

    Demma, Mark; Maxwell, Eugene; Ramos, Robert; Liang, Lianzhu; Li, Cheng; Hesk, David; Rossman, Randall; Mallams, Alan; Doll, Ronald; Liu, Ming; Seidel-Dugan, Cynthia; Bishop, W Robert; Dasmahapatra, Bimalendu

    2010-04-02

    Abrogation of p53 function occurs in almost all human cancers, with more than 50% of cancers harboring inactivating mutations in p53 itself. Mutation of p53 is indicative of highly aggressive cancers and poor prognosis. The vast majority of mutations in p53 occur in its core DNA binding domain (DBD) and result in inactivation of p53 by reducing its thermodynamic stability at physiological temperature. Here, we report a small molecule, SCH529074, that binds specifically to the p53 DBD in a saturable manner with an affinity of 1-2 microm. Binding restores wild type function to many oncogenic mutant forms of p53. This small molecule reactivates mutant p53 by acting as a chaperone, in a manner similar to that previously reported for the peptide CDB3. Binding of SCH529074 to the p53 DBD is specifically displaced by an oligonucleotide with a sequence derived from the p53-response element. In addition to reactivating mutant p53, SCH529074 binding inhibits ubiquitination of p53 by HDM2. We have also developed a novel variant of p53 by changing a single amino acid in the core domain of p53 (N268R), which abolishes binding of SCH529074. This amino acid change also inhibits HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of p53. Our novel findings indicate that through its interaction with p53 DBD, SCH529074 restores DNA binding activity to mutant p53 and inhibits HDM2-mediated ubiquitination.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of an active-site mutant hydantoin racemase from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT4114

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Rodríguez, Sergio; González-Ramírez, Luis Antonio; Clemente-Jiménez, Josefa María; Rodríguez-Vico, Felipe; Las Heras-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Gavira, Jose Antonio; García-Ruiz, Juan Ma.

    2008-01-01

    A recombinant active-site mutant of hydantoin racemase (C76A) from Sinorhizobium meliloti CECT 4114 (SmeHyuA) has been crystallized in the presence and absence of the substrate d,l-5-isopropyl hydantoin. Crystals of the SmeHyuA mutant suitable for data collection and structure determination were grown using the counter-diffusion method. X-ray data were collected to resolutions of 2.17 and 1.85 Å for the free and bound enzymes, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group R3 and contain two molecules of SmeHyuA per asymmetric unit. The crystals of the free and complexed SmeHyuA have unit-cell parameters a = b = 85.43, c = 152.37 Å and a = b = 85.69, c = 154.38 Å, crystal volumes per protein weight (V M) of 1.94 and 1.98 Å3 Da−1 and solvent contents of 36.7 and 37.9%, respectively. PMID:18097103

  17. Comparison of the Growth Promoting Activities and Toxicities of Various Auxin Analogs on Cells Derived from Wild Type and a Nonrooting Mutant of Tobacco 1

    PubMed Central

    Caboche, Michel; Muller, Jean-François; Chanut, Françoise; Aranda, Gérard; C̷irakoǵlu, Sheyda

    1987-01-01

    A naphthaleneacetic acid tolerant mutant isolated from a mutagenized culture of tobacco mesophyll protoplasts and impaired in root morphogenesis has been previously characterized by genetic analysis. To understand the biochemical basis for naphthaleneacetic acid resistance, cells derived from this mutant and from wild-type tobacco were compared for their ability to respond to various growth regulators. The growth promoting abilities and cytotoxicities of auxin analogs were different for mutant and wild-type cells. These different activities were not correlated with increased rate of conjugation or breakdown of the auxins by mutant cells. These observations, as well as previous studies on the interaction of the mutant with Agrobacterium, suggest that mutant resistance to auxins is not a result of a specific modification of the process by which auxins induce cell killing, but to a more general alteration of the cellular response to auxin. A screening of auxin-related molecules which induce cell death in wild-type cells but not mutant cells without promoting growth in either was performed. p-Bromophenyleacetic acid was found to display these characteristics. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:16665341

  18. Jasmonate-Sensitivity-Assisted Screening and Characterization of Nicotine Synthetic Mutants from Activation-Tagged Population of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Guoying; Wang, Wenjing; Niu, Haixia; Ding, Yongqiang; Zhang, Dingyu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Guanshan; Wang, Sangen; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine is a secondary metabolite that is important to the defense system and commercial quality of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Jasmonate and its derivatives (JAs) are phytohormone regulators of nicotine formation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism of this process remains largely unclear. Owing to the amphitetraploid origin of N. tabacum, research on screening and identification of nicotine-synthetic mutants is relatively scarce. Here, we describe a method based on JA-sensitivity for screening nicotine mutants from an activation-tagged population of tobacco. In this approach, the mutants were first screened for abnormal JA responses in seed germination and root elongation, and then the levels of nicotine synthesis and expression of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants with altered JA-response were measured to determine the nicotine-synthetic mutants. We successfully obtained five mutants that maintained stable nicotine contents and JA responses for three generations. This method is simple, effective and low-cost, and the finding of transcriptional changes of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants shows potentials for identifying novel regulators involved in JA-regulated nicotine biosynthesis. PMID:28243248

  19. Comparison of the growth promoting activities and toxicities of various auxin analogs on cells derived from wild type and a nonrooting mutant of tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Caboche, M.; Muller, J.F. ); Chanut, F. ); Aranda, G.; Cirakoglu, S. )

    1987-01-01

    A naphthaleneacetic acid tolerant mutant isolated from a mutagenized culture of tobacco mesophyll protoplasts and impaired in root morphogenesis has been previously characterized by genetic analysis. To understand the biochemical basis for naphthaleneacetic acid resistance, cells derived from this mutant and from wild-type tobacco were compared for their ability to respond to various growth regulators. The growth promoting abilities and cytotoxicities of auxin analogs were different for mutant and wild-type cells. These different activities were not correlated with increased rate of conjugation or breakdown of the auxins by mutant cells. These observations, as well as previous studies on the interaction of the mutant with Agrobacterium, suggest that mutant resistance to auxins is not a result of a specific modification of the process by which auxins induce cell killing, but to a more general alteration of the cellular response to auxin. A screening of auxin-related molecules which induce cell death in wild-type cells but not mutant cells without promoting growth in either was performed. p-Bromophenyleacetic acid was found to display these characteristics.

  20. Jasmonate-Sensitivity-Assisted Screening and Characterization of Nicotine Synthetic Mutants from Activation-Tagged Population of Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Yin, Guoying; Wang, Wenjing; Niu, Haixia; Ding, Yongqiang; Zhang, Dingyu; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Guanshan; Wang, Sangen; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-01-01

    Nicotine is a secondary metabolite that is important to the defense system and commercial quality of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.). Jasmonate and its derivatives (JAs) are phytohormone regulators of nicotine formation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism of this process remains largely unclear. Owing to the amphitetraploid origin of N. tabacum, research on screening and identification of nicotine-synthetic mutants is relatively scarce. Here, we describe a method based on JA-sensitivity for screening nicotine mutants from an activation-tagged population of tobacco. In this approach, the mutants were first screened for abnormal JA responses in seed germination and root elongation, and then the levels of nicotine synthesis and expression of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants with altered JA-response were measured to determine the nicotine-synthetic mutants. We successfully obtained five mutants that maintained stable nicotine contents and JA responses for three generations. This method is simple, effective and low-cost, and the finding of transcriptional changes of nicotine synthetic genes in the mutants shows potentials for identifying novel regulators involved in JA-regulated nicotine biosynthesis.

  1. A mutant crp allele that differentially activates the operons of the fuc regulon in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Lin, E C

    1988-05-01

    L-Fucose is used by Escherichia coli through an inducible pathway mediated by a fucP-encoded permease, a fucI-encoded isomerase, a fucK-encoded kinase, and a fucA-encoded aldolase. The adolase catalyzes the formation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and L-lactaldehyde. Anaerobically, lactaldehyde is converted by a fucO-encoded oxidoreductase to L-1,2-propanediol, which is excreted. The fuc genes belong to a regulon comprising four linked operons: fucO, fucA, fucPIK, and fucR. The positive regulator encoded by fucR responds to fuculose 1-phosphate as the effector. Mutants serially selected for aerobic growth on propanediol became constitutive in fucO and fucA [fucO(Con) fucA(Con)], but noninducible in fucPIK [fucPIK(Non)]. An external suppressor mutation that restored growth on fucose caused constitutive expression of fucPIK. Results from this study indicate that this suppressor mutation occurred in crp, which encodes the cyclic AMP-binding (or receptor) protein. When the suppressor allele (crp-201) was transduced into wild-type strains, the recipient became fucose negative and fucose sensitive (with glycerol as the carbon and energy source) because of impaired expression of fucA. The fucPIK operon became hyperinducible. The growth rate on maltose was significantly reduced, but growth on L-rhamnose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, glycerol, or glycerol 3-phosphate was close to normal. Lysogenization of fuc+ crp-201 cells by a lambda bacteriophage bearing crp+ restored normal growth ability on fucose. In contrast, lysogenization of [fucO(Con)fucA(Con)fucPIK(Non)crp-201] cells by the same phage retarded their growth on fucose.

  2. Restoration of DNA-Binding and Growth-Suppressive Activity of Mutant Forms of p53 Via a PCAF-Mediated Acetylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    PEREZ, RICARDO E.; KNIGHTS, CHAD D.; SAHU, GEETARAM; CATANIA, JASON; KOLUKULA, VAMSI K.; STOLER, DANIEL; GRAESSMANN, ADOLF; OGRYZKO, VASILY; PISHVAIAN, MICHAEL; ALBANESE, CHRISTOPHER; AVANTAGGIATI, MARIA LAURA

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-derived mutant forms of p53 compromise its DNA binding, transcriptional, and growth regulatory activity in a manner that is dependent upon the cell-type and the type of mutation. Given the high frequency of p53 mutations in human tumors, reactivation of the p53 pathway has been widely proposed as beneficial for cancer therapy. In support of this possibility p53 mutants possess a certain degree of conformational flexibility that allows for re-induction of function by a number of structurally different artificial compounds or by short peptides. This raises the question of whether physiological pathways for p53 mutant reactivation also exist and can be exploited therapeutically. The activity of wild-type p53 is modulated by various acetyl-transferases and deacetylases, but whether acetylation influences signaling by p53 mutant is still unknown. Here, we show that the PCAF acetyl-transferase is down-regulated in tumors harboring p53 mutants, where its re-expression leads to p53 acetylation and to cell death. Furthermore, acetylation restores the DNA-binding ability of p53 mutants in vitro and expression of PCAF, or treatment with deacetylase inhibitors, promotes their binding to p53-regulated promoters and transcriptional activity in vivo. These data suggest that PCAF-mediated acetylation rescues activity of at least a set of p53 mutations. Therefore, we propose that dis-regulation of PCAF activity is a pre-requisite for p53 mutant loss of function and for the oncogenic potential acquired by neoplastic cells expressing these proteins. Our findings offer a new rationale for therapeutic targeting of PCAF activity in tumors harboring oncogenic versions of p53. PMID:20589832

  3. Accumulation of mutant alpha1-antitrypsin Z in the endoplasmic reticulum activates caspases-4 and -12, NFkappaB, and BAP31 but not the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Hidvegi, Tunda; Schmidt, Bela Z; Hale, Pamela; Perlmutter, David H

    2005-11-25

    In alpha(1)-antitrypsin (alpha1AT) deficiency, a polymerogenic mutant form of the secretory glycoprotein alpha1AT, alpha1ATZ, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of liver cells. It is not yet known how this results in liver injury in a subgroup of deficient individuals and how the remainder of deficient individuals escapes liver disease. One possible explanation is that the "susceptible" subgroup is unable to mount the appropriate protective cellular responses. Here we examined the effect of mutant alpha1ATZ on several potential protective signaling pathways by using cell lines with inducible expression of mutant alpha1AT as well as liver from transgenic mice with liver-specific inducible expression of mutant alpha1AT. The results show that ER retention of polymerogenic mutant alpha1ATZ does not result in an unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR can be induced in the presence of alpha1ATZ by tunicamycin excluding the possibility that the pathway has been disabled. In striking contrast, ER retention of nonpolymerogenic alpha1AT mutants does induce the UPR. These results indicate that the machinery responsible for activation of the UPR can distinguish the physical characteristics of proteins that accumulate in the ER in such a way that it can respond to misfolded but not relatively ordered polymeric structures. Accumulation of mutant alpha1ATZ does activate specific signaling pathways, including caspase-12 in mouse, caspase-4 in human, NFkappaB, and BAP31, a profile that was distinct from that activated by nonpolymerogenic alpha1AT mutants.

  4. Hh-induced Smoothened conformational switch is mediated by differential phosphorylation at its C-terminal tail in a dose- and position-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fan, Junkai; Liu, Yajuan; Jia, Jianhang

    2012-06-15

    The activation of Smoothened (Smo) requires phosphorylation at three clusters of Serine residues in Drosophila Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. However, the mechanism by which phosphorylation promotes Smo conformational change and subsequently activates Smo in response to Hh gradient remains unclear. Here, we show that the conformational states of Smo are determined by not only the amount but also the position of the negative charges provided by phosphorylation. By using a Smo phospho-specific antibody, we demonstrate that Smo is differentially phosphorylated at three clusters of serine residues in response to levels of Hh activity. Mutating the first cluster, compared to mutating the other clusters, impairs Smo activity more severely, whereas mutating the last cluster prohibits C-terminus dimerization. In addition, phosphorylation of the membrane proximal cluster promotes phosphorylation of the distal cluster. We propose a zipper-lock model in which the gradual phosphorylation at these clusters induces a gradual conformational change in the Smo cytoplasmic tail, which promotes the interaction between Smo and Costal2 (Cos2). Moreover, we show that Hh regulates both PKA and CK1 phosphorylation of Smo. Thus, the differential phosphorylation of Smo mediates the thresholds of Hh activity.

  5. A Disease-associated Mutant of NLRC4 Shows Enhanced Interaction with SUG1 Leading to Constitutive FADD-dependent Caspase-8 Activation and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Raghawan, Akhouri Kishore; Sripada, Anand; Gopinath, Gayathri; Pushpanjali, Pendyala; Kumar, Yatender; Radha, Vegesna; Swarup, Ghanshyam

    2017-01-27

    Nod-like receptor family card containing 4 (NLRC4)/Ipaf is involved in recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns leading to caspase-1 activation and cytokine release, which mediate protective innate immune response. Point mutations in NLRC4 cause autoinflammatory syndromes. Although all the mutations result in constitutive caspase-1 activation, their phenotypic presentations are different, implying that these mutations cause different alterations in properties of NLRC4. NLRC4 interacts with SUG1 and induces caspase-8-mediated cell death. Here, we show that one of the autoinflammatory syndrome-causing mutants of NLRC4, H443P, but not T337A and V341A, constitutively activates caspase-8 and induces apoptotic cell death in human lung epithelial cells. Compared with wild type NLRC4, the H443P mutant shows stronger interaction with SUG1 and with ubiquitinated cellular proteins. Phosphorylation of NLRC4 at Ser(533) plays a crucial role in caspase-8 activation and cell death. However, H443P mutant does not require Ser(533) phosphorylation for caspase-8 activation and cell death. Caspase-8 activation by NLRC4 and its H443P mutant are dependent on the adaptor protein FADD. A phosphomimicking mutant of NLRC4, S533D does not require SUG1 activity for inducing cell death. Ubiquitin-tagged NLRC4 could induce cell death and activate caspase-8 independent of Ser(533) phosphorylation. Our work suggests that SUG1-mediated signaling results in enhanced ubiquitination and regulates FADD-dependent caspase-8 activation by NLRC4. We show that the autoinflammation-associated H443P mutant is altered in interaction with SUG1 and ubiquitinated proteins, triggering constitutive caspase-8-mediated cell death dependent on FADD but independent of Ser(533) phosphorylation.

  6. Electron density contour smoothening for epitaxial Ag islands on Ag(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedrossian, Peter; Poelsema, Bene; Rosenfeld, Georg; Jorritsma, Louis C.; Lipkin, Nuphar N.; Comsa, George

    1995-07-01

    Rocking curves acquired with thermal energy He-atom scattering indicate that for small 2D Ag islands grown on Ag(100) at 200 K, the apparent step height normal to the surface is reduced by about 0.6 Å compared to the step height calculated on the basis of bulk separation. For higher growth temperatures this effect is not observed. SPA-LEED measurements indicate that this behavior cannot be explained with a corresponding relaxation of island atoms. Rather, it may be attributed to a smoothening of the electronic corrugation (Smoluchowski effect), which is probed by the He atoms and which can be expected to occur for small and/or closely spaced islands. The dependence on the growth temperature indicates that this effect is, indeed, related to the size and proximity of the islands, being most pronounced for closely spaced islands consisting of a few tens of atoms only. These findings suggest that the difference between the morphology of the electron density contours, probed by methods which are sensitive to the density of valence electrons, such as atom scattering or scanning tunneling microscopy, and the morphology at the atomic core level is significant for small metal structures on metal surfaces.

  7. Advanced basal cell carcinoma, the hedgehog pathway, and treatment options – role of smoothened inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, Leslie A; Sharfman, William H

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer and its incidence is rising worldwide. Ultraviolet radiation exposure, including tanning bed use, as well as host factors play a role in its development. The majority of cases are treated and cured with local therapies including surgery. Yet, the health care costs of diagnosis and treatment of BCCs in the US is substantial. In the United States, the cost of nonmelanoma skin cancer care in the Medicare population is estimated to be US$426 million per year. While rare, locally advanced BCCs that can no longer be controlled with surgery and/or radiation, and metastatic BCCs do occur and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Vismodegib (GDC-0449), a smoothened inhibitor targeted at the hedgehog pathway, is the first US Food and Drug Association (FDA)-approved agent in the treatment of locally advanced, unresectable, and metastatic BCCs. This class of agents appears to be changing the survival rates in advanced BCC patients, but appropriate patient selection and monitoring are important. Multidisciplinary assessments are essential for the optimal care and management of these patients. For some patients with locally advanced BCC, treatment with a hedgehog inhibitor may eliminate the need for an excessively disfiguring or morbid surgery. PMID:26604681

  8. Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin C2 mutants: biological activity assay in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hui, Jing; Cao, Yan; Xiao, Fang; Zhang, Jin; Li, Hui; Hu, Fengqing

    2008-09-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) is one member of bacterial superantigens produced by Staphylococcus aureus. It can be attributed to its superantigenic activity to cross-link major histocompatibility complex class II molecules with T-cell receptors and activate a large number of resting T cells resulting in release of massive cytokines, which will produce significant tumor inhibition in vivo and in vitro. However, it could be not broadly applied to cure malignant tumors in clinic because of emetic activity of SEC2. The aim of this study was to inactivate emetic activity of SEC2 through site-directed mutagenesis. Cys93, Cys110 and His118 were selected as substitutional sites based on the functional sites responsible for emesis. The mutated proteins were used to determine Peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation activity and anti-tumor activity in vitro. Results showed that these mutated proteins efficiently stimulated T cell and exhibited the same tumor-inhibition effect as SEC2. It is possible to inactivate emetic activity of SEC2 through site-directed mutagenesis and provide satisfying agents for tumor treatment in clinic.

  9. Constitutively active ESCRT-II suppresses the MVB-sorting phenotype of ESCRT-0 and ESCRT-I mutants.

    PubMed

    Mageswaran, Shrawan Kumar; Johnson, Natalie K; Odorizzi, Greg; Babst, Markus

    2015-02-01

    The endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) protein complexes function at the endosome in the formation of intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) containing cargo proteins destined for the vacuolar/lysosomal lumen. The early ESCRTs (ESCRT-0 and -I) are likely involved in cargo sorting, whereas ESCRT-III and Vps4 function to sever the neck of the forming ILVs. ESCRT-II links these functions by initiating ESCRT-III formation in an ESCRT-I-regulated manner. We identify a constitutively active mutant of ESCRT-II that partially suppresses the phenotype of an ESCRT-I or ESCRT-0 deletion strain, suggesting that these early ESCRTs are not essential and have redundant functions. However, the ESCRT-III/Vps4 system alone is not sufficient for ILV formation but requires cargo sorting mediated by one of the early ESCRTs.

  10. An interferon alpha2 mutant optimized by phage display for IFNAR1 binding confers specifically enhanced antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Kalie, Eyal; Jaitin, Diego A; Abramovich, Renne; Schreiber, Gideon

    2007-04-13

    All alpha-interferons (IFNalpha) bind the IFNAR1 receptor subunit with low affinity. Increasing the binding affinity was shown to specifically increase the antiproliferative potency of IFNalpha2. Here, we constructed a phage display library by randomizing three positions on IFNalpha2 previously shown to confer weak binding to IFNAR1. The tightest binding variant selected, comprised of mutations H57Y, E58N, and Q61S (YNS), was shown to bind IFNAR1 60-fold tighter compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, and 3-fold tighter compared with IFNbeta. Binding of YNS to IFNAR2 was comparable with wild-type IFNalpha2. The YNS mutant conferred a 150-fold higher antiproliferative potency in WISH cells compared with wild-type IFNalpha2, whereas its antiviral activity was increased by only 3.5-fold. The high antiproliferative activity was related to an induction of apoptosis, as demonstrated by annexin V binding assays, and to specific gene induction, particularly TRAIL. To determine the potency of the YNS mutant in a xenograft cancer model, we injected it twice a week to nude mice carrying transplanted MDA231 human breast cancer cells. After 5 weeks, no tumors remained in mice treated with YNS, whereas most mice treated with wild-type IFNalpha2 showed visible tumors. Histological analysis of these tumors showed a significant anti-angiogenic effect of YNS, compared with wild-type IFNalpha2. This work demonstrates the application of detailed biophysical understanding in the process of protein engineering, yielding an interferon variant with highly increased biological potency.

  11. Synergistic inhibition of T-cell activation by a cell-permeable ZAP-70 mutant and ctCTLA-4

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyun-Do; Choi, Je-Min; Chae, Wook-Jin; Lee, Sang-Kyou

    2009-04-10

    T-cell activation requires TcR-mediated and co-stimulatory signals. ZAP-70 participates in the initial step of TcR signal transduction, while a co-receptor, CTLA-4, inhibits T-cell activation. In previous studies, the overexpression of a ZAP-70 mutant (ZAP-70-Y319F) inhibited the TcR-induced activation of NFAT and IL-2 production, while Hph-1-ctCTLA-4 prevented allergic inflammation. To develop an effective immunosuppressive protein drug that blocks both TcR-mediated and co-stimulatory signaling pathways, a fusion protein of ZAP-70-Y319F and the Hph-1 protein transduction domain was generated. Hph-1-ZAP-70-Y319F inhibited the phosphorylation of ZAP-70-Tyr{sup 319}, LAT-Tyr{sup 191}, and p44/42 MAPK induced by TcR stimulation, NFAT- and AP-1-mediated gene transcription, and the induction of CD69 expression and IL-2 secretion. Hph-1-ZAP-70-Y319F and Hph-1-ctCTLA-4 synergistically inhibited signaling events during T-cell activation. This is the first report to demonstrate the synergistic inhibition of signals transmitted via TcR and its co-stimulatory receptor by cell-permeable forms of intracellular signal mediators.

  12. Organophosphate and Pyrethroid Hydrolase Activities of Mutant Esterases from the Cotton Bollworm Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongqiang; Farnsworth, Claire A.; Coppin, Chris W.; Teese, Mark G.; Liu, Jian-Wei; Scott, Colin; Zhang, Xing; Russell, Robyn J.; Oakeshott, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Two mutations have been found in five closely related insect esterases (from four higher Diptera and a hymenopteran) which each confer organophosphate (OP) hydrolase activity on the enzyme and OP resistance on the insect. One mutation converts a Glycine to an Aspartate, and the other converts a Tryptophan to a Leucine in the enzymes’ active site. One of the dipteran enzymes with the Leucine mutation also shows enhanced activity against pyrethroids. Introduction of the two mutations in vitro into eight esterases from six other widely separated insect groups has also been reported to increase substantially the OP hydrolase activity of most of them. These data suggest that the two mutations could contribute to OP, and possibly pyrethroid, resistance in a variety of insects. We therefore introduced them in vitro into eight Helicoverpa armigera esterases from a clade that has already been implicated in OP and pyrethroid resistance. We found that they do not generally enhance either OP or pyrethroid hydrolysis in these esterases but the Aspartate mutation did increase OP hydrolysis in one enzyme by about 14 fold and the Leucine mutation caused a 4–6 fold increase in activity (more in one case) of another three against some of the most insecticidal isomers of fenvalerate and cypermethrin. The Aspartate enzyme and one of the Leucine enzymes occur in regions of the H. armigera esterase isozyme profile that have been previously implicated in OP and pyrethroid resistance, respectively. PMID:24204917

  13. Increased longevity of some C. elegans mitochondrial mutants explained by activation of an alternative energy-producing pathway.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Marco; Park, Donha; Riddle, Donald L

    2011-10-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans misc-1 gene encodes a mitochondrial carrier with a role in oxidative stress response. The knock-out mutant has no lifespan phenotype and fails to upregulate the gei-7-mediated glyoxylate shunt, an extra-mitochondrial pathway of energy production. We show that gei-7 is required for the longevity of the mitochondrial mutant clk-1. Our data suggest that only mitochondrial mutants that upregulate gei-7 can achieve longevity.

  14. Molecular mechanisms in the selective basal activation of pyrabactin receptor 1: Comparative analysis of mutants.

    PubMed

    Dorosh, Lyudmyla; Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Loewen, Michele C; Stepanova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Pyrabactin receptors (PYR) play a central role in abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction; they are ABA receptors that inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2C). Molecular aspects contributing to increased basal activity of PYR against PP2C are studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. An extensive series of MD simulations of the apo-form of mutagenized PYR1 as a homodimer and in complex with homology to ABA-insensitive 1 (HAB1) phosphatase are reported. In order to investigate the detailed molecular mechanisms mediating PYR1 activity, the MD data was analyzed by essential collective dynamics (ECD), a novel approach that allows the identification, with atomic resolution, of persistent dynamic correlations based on relatively short MD trajectories. Employing the ECD method, the effects of select mutations on the structure and dynamics of the PYR1 complexes were investigated and considered in the context of experimentally determined constitutive activities against HAB1. Approaches to rationally design constitutively active PYR1 constructs to increase PP2C inhibition are discussed.

  15. JAK3 mutants transform hematopoietic cells through JAK1 activation, causing T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Degryse, Sandrine; de Bock, Charles E; Cox, Luk; Demeyer, Sofie; Gielen, Olga; Mentens, Nicole; Jacobs, Kris; Geerdens, Ellen; Gianfelici, Valentina; Hulselmans, Gert; Fiers, Mark; Aerts, Stein; Meijerink, Jules P; Tousseyn, Thomas; Cools, Jan

    2014-11-13

    JAK3 is a tyrosine kinase that associates with the common γ chain of cytokine receptors and is recurrently mutated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). We tested the transforming properties of JAK3 pseudokinase and kinase domain mutants using in vitro and in vivo assays. Most, but not all, JAK3 mutants transformed cytokine-dependent Ba/F3 or MOHITO cell lines to cytokine-independent proliferation. JAK3 pseudokinase mutants were dependent on Jak1 kinase activity for cellular transformation, whereas the JAK3 kinase domain mutant could transform cells in a Jak1 kinase-independent manner. Reconstitution of the IL7 receptor signaling complex in 293T cells showed that JAK3 mutants required receptor binding to mediate downstream STAT5 phosphorylation. Mice transplanted with bone marrow progenitor cells expressing JAK3 mutants developed a long-latency transplantable T-ALL-like disease, characterized by an accumulation of immature CD8(+) T cells. In vivo treatment of leukemic mice with the JAK3 selective inhibitor tofacitinib reduced the white blood cell count and caused leukemic cell apoptosis. Our data show that JAK3 mutations are drivers of T-ALL and require the cytokine receptor complex for transformation. These results warrant further investigation of JAK1/JAK3 inhibitors for the treatment of T-ALL.

  16. Effect of mitochondrial genome rearrangement on respiratory activity, photosynthesis, photorespiration and energy status of MSC16 cucumber (Cucumis sativus) mutant.

    PubMed

    Juszczuk, Izabela M; Flexas, Jaume; Szal, Bozena; Dabrowska, Zofia; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel; Rychter, Anna M

    2007-12-01

    The effects of changes in mitochondrial DNA in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) mosaic mutant (MSC16) on respiration, photosynthesis and photorespiration were analyzed under non-stressed conditions. Decreased respiratory capacity of complex I in MSC16 mitochondria was indicated by lower respiration rates of intact mitochondria with malate and by rotenone-inhibited NADH or malate oxidation in the presence of alamethicin. Moreover, blue native PAGE indicated decreased intensity of protein bands of respiratory chain complex I in MSC16 leaves. Concerning the redox state, complex I impairment could be compensated to some extent by increased external NADH dehydrogenases (ND(ex)NADH) and alternative oxidase (AOX) capacity, the latter presenting differential expression in the light and in the dark. Although MSC16 mitochondria have a higher AOX protein level and an increased capacity, the AOX activity measured in the dark conditions by oxygen discrimination technique is similar to that in wild-type (WT) plants. Photosynthesis induction by light followed different patterns in WT and MSC16, suggesting changes in feedback chloroplast DeltapH caused by different adenylate levels. At steady-state, net photosynthesis was only slightly impaired in MSC16 mutants, while photorespiration rate (PR) was significantly increased. This was the result of large decreases in both stomatal and mesophyll conductance to CO2, which resulted in a lower CO2 concentration in the chloroplasts. The observed changes on CO2 diffusion caused by mitochondrial mutations open a whole new view of interaction between organelle metabolism and whole tissue physiology. The sum of all the described changes in photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism resulted in a lower ATP availability and a slower plant growth.

  17. A Carboxyl Ester Lipase (CEL) Mutant Causes Chronic Pancreatitis by Forming Intracellular Aggregates That Activate Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xunjun; Jones, Gabrielle; Sevilla, Wednesday A; Stolz, Donna B; Magee, Kelsey E; Haughney, Margaret; Mukherjee, Amitava; Wang, Yan; Lowe, Mark E

    2016-10-28

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) frequently have genetic risk factors for disease. Many of the identified genes have been connected to trypsinogen activation or trypsin inactivation. The description of CP in patients with mutations in the variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) domain of carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) presents an opportunity to study the pathogenesis of CP independently of trypsin pathways. We tested the hypothesis that a deletion and frameshift mutation (C563fsX673) in the CEL VNTR causes CP through proteotoxic gain-of-function activation of maladaptive cell signaling pathways including cell death pathways. HEK293 or AR42J cells were transfected with constructs expressing CEL with 14 repeats in the VNTR (CEL14R) or C563fsX673 CEL (CEL maturity onset diabetes of youth with a deletion mutation in the VNTR (MODY)). In both cell types, CEL MODY formed intracellular aggregates. Secretion of CEL MODY was decreased compared with that of CEL14R. Expression of CEL MODY increased endoplasmic reticulum stress, activated the unfolded protein response, and caused cell death by apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that disorders of protein homeostasis can lead to CP and suggest that novel therapies to decrease the intracellular accumulation of misfolded protein may be successful in some patients with CP.

  18. The Structure of Dasatinib (BNS-354825) Bound to Activated ABL Kinase Domain Elucidates its Inhibitory Activity Against Imatinib-Resistant ABL Mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarski,J.; Newitt, J.; Chang, C.; Cheng, J.; Wittekind, M.; Kiefer, S.; Kish, K.; Lee, F.; Borzilerri, R.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is caused by the constitutively activated tyrosine kinase breakpoint cluster (BCR)-ABL. Current frontline therapy for CML is imatinib, an inhibitor of BCR-ABL. Although imatinib has a high rate of clinical success in early phase CML, treatment resistance is problematic, particularly in later stages of the disease, and is frequently mediated by mutations in BCR-ABL. Dasatinib (BMS-354825) is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets oncogenic pathways and is a more potent inhibitor than imatinib against wild-type BCR-ABL. It has also shown preclinical activity against all but one of the imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL mutants tested to date. Analysis of the crystal structure of dasatinib-bound ABL kinase suggests that the increased binding affinity of dasatinib over imatinib is at least partially due to its ability to recognize multiple states of BCR-ABL. The structure also provides an explanation for the activity of dasatinib against imatinib-resistant BCR-ABL mutants.

  19. Validation of a mutant of the pore-forming toxin sticholysin-I for the construction of proteinase-activated immunotoxins.

    PubMed

    Pentón, David; Pérez-Barzaga, Victor; Díaz, Iscel; Reytor, Mey L; Campos, Javier; Fando, Rafael; Calvo, Loany; Cilli, Eduardo M; Morera, Vivian; Castellanos-Serra, Lila R; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, María E; Alvarez, Carlos; Pons, Tirso; Tejuca, Mayra

    2011-06-01

    The use of pore-forming toxins from sea anemones (actinoporins) in the construction of immunotoxins (ITs) against tumour cells is an alternative for cancer therapy. However, the main disadvantage of actinoporin-based ITs obtained so far has been the poor cellular specificity associated with the toxin's ability to bind and exert its activity in almost any cell membrane. Our final goal is the construction of tumour proteinase-activated ITs using a cysteine mutant at the membrane binding region of sticholysin-I (StI), a cytolysin isolated from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. The mutant and the ligand moiety would be linked by proteinase-sensitive peptides through the StI cysteine residue blocking the toxin binding region and hence the IT non-specific killing activity. To accomplish this objective the first step was to obtain the mutant StI W111C, and to evaluate the impact of mutating tryptophan 111 by cysteine on the toxin pore-forming capacity. After proteolysis of the cleavage sequence, a short peptide would remain attached to the toxin. The next step was to evaluate whether this mutant is able to form pores even with a residual peptide linked to cysteine 111. In this work we demonstrated that (i) StI W111C shows pore-forming capacity in a nanomolar range, although it is 8-fold less active than the wild-type recombinant StI, corroborating the previously reported importance of residue 111 for the binding of StI to membranes, and (ii) the mutant is able to form pores even with a residual seven-residue peptide linked to cysteine 111. In addition, it was demonstrated that binding of a large molecule to cysteine 111 renders an inactive toxin that is no longer able to bind to the membrane. These results validate the mutant StI W111C for its use in the construction of tumour proteinase-activated ITs.

  20. Definition of a dioxin receptor mutant that is a constitutive activator of transcription: delineation of overlapping repression and ligand binding functions within the PAS domain.

    PubMed

    McGuire, J; Okamoto, K; Whitelaw, M L; Tanaka, H; Poellinger, L

    2001-11-09

    The intracellular dioxin (aryl hydrocarbon) receptor is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the adaptive and toxic responses to environmental pollutants such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and structurally related congeners. Whereas the ligand-free receptor is characterized by its association with the molecular chaperone hsp90, exposure to ligand initiates a multistep activation process involving nuclear translocation, dissociation from the hsp90 complex, and dimerization with its partner protein Arnt. In this study, we have characterized a dioxin receptor deletion mutant lacking the minimal ligand-binding domain of the receptor. This mutant did not bind ligand and localized constitutively to the nucleus. However, this protein was functionally inert since it failed to dimerize with Arnt and to bind DNA. In contrast, a dioxin receptor deletion mutant lacking the minimal PAS B motif but maintaining the N-terminal half of the ligand-binding domain showed constitutive dimerization with Arnt, bound DNA, and activated transcription in a ligand-independent manner. Interestingly, this mutant showed a more potent functional activity than the dioxin-activated wild-type receptor in several different cell lines. In conclusion, the constitutively active dioxin receptor may provide an important mechanistic tool to investigate receptor-mediated regulatory pathways in closer detail.

  1. Escherichia coli B/r leuK mutant lacking pseudouridine synthase I activity.

    PubMed Central

    Searles, L L; Jones, J W; Fournier, M J; Grambow, N; Tyler, B; Calvo, J M

    1986-01-01

    Escherichia coli B/r strain EB146 containing mutation leuK16 has elevated levels of enzymes involved in the synthesis of leucine, valine, isoleucine, histidine, and tryptophan (Brown et al., J. Bacteriol. 135:542-550, 1978). We show here that strain EB146 (leuK16) has properties that are similar to those of E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium hisT strains. In tRNA1Leu from both hisT and leuK strains, positions 39 and 41 are uridine residues rather than pseudouridine residues. Furthermore, in tRNA3Leu and tRNA4Leu from a leuK strain, uridine residues at positions 39 and 40, respectively, are unmodified. Pseudouridine synthase I activity is missing in extracts of strain EB146 (leuK16), and extracts of strain EB146 (leuK16) and of a hisT strain do not complement one another in vitro. Four phenotypes of strain EB146 (leuK16), leucine excretion, wrinkled colony morphology, and elevated levels of leu and his enzymes, are complemented by a plasmid having a 1.65-kilobase DNA fragment containing the E. coli K-12 hisT locus. These results indicate that either leuK codes for pseudouridine synthase I (and is thus a hisT locus in reality) or, less likely, it codes for a product that affects the synthesis or activity of pseudouridine synthase I. Images PMID:3514581

  2. MiR-338* targeting smoothened to inhibit pulmonary fibrosis by epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yi; Dai, Jinghong; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhang, Huan; Li, Xinxiu; Wang, Chunli; Cao, Mengshu; Liu, Yin; Ding, Jingjing; Cai, Hourong; Zhang, Deping; Wang, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic lung disease involving pulmonary injury associated with tissue repair, dysfunction and fibrosis. Recent studies indicate that some microRNAs (miRNAs) may play critical roles in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we aim to investigate whether miR-338* (miR-338-5p), which has been found to be associated with tumor progression, is associated with pathological process of pulmonary fibrosis. Balb/c mice were treated with bleomycin (BLM) to establish IPF models. Targtscan was used to predict the downstream target of miR-338*. Morphological changes were observed with light microscope and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers were detected by western blot. The expression of miR-338* or downstream target SMO was analyzed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR, northern blot or western blot. MiR-338* was down-regulated in the lung tissue from mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The smoothened (SMO) is a direct target of miR-338*, and knocking-down the expression of SMO could partially rescue the fibrotic phenotype of TGF-β-induced NuLi-1 cells. Over-expression of SMO led to the fibrotic phenotype of NuLi-1 cells even without TGF-β treatment. These findings showed that the over-expression of SMO contributed to the fibrotic phenotype of NuLi-1 cells by affecting the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) procedure. Furthermore, in vivo, lentivirus-mediated over-expression of miR-338* can alleviate lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin in mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that miR-338* can target SMO to reduce the EMT procedure and thus postpone the development of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27508042

  3. A starch deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana with low ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity lacks one of the two subunits of the enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tsanpiao; Caspar, T.; Somerville, C.R.; Preiss, J. )

    1988-12-01

    A starch deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. has been isolated in which leaf extracts contain only about 5% as much activity of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27) as the wild type. A single, nuclear mutation at a previously undescribed locus designated adg2 is responsible for the mutant phenotype. Although the mutant contained only 5% as much ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity as the wild type, it accumulated 40% as much starch when grown in a 12 hour photoperiod. The mutant also contained about 40% as much starch as the wild type when grown in continuous light, suggesting that the rate of synthesis regulates its steady state accumulation. Immunological analysis of leaf extracts using antibodies against the spinach 54 and 51 kilodalton (kD) ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase subunits indicated that the mutant is deficient in a cross-reactive 54 kD polypeptide and has only about 4% as much as the wild type of a cross-reactive 51 kD polypeptide. This result and genetic studies suggested that adg2 is a structural gene which codes for the 54 kD polypeptide, and provides the first functional evidence that the 54 kD polypeptide is a required component of the native ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase enzyme.

  4. Isolation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain deficient in deoxycytidylate deaminase activity and partial characterization of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, E M; Haynes, R H

    1984-01-01

    Deoxycytidylate deaminase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been partially characterized. The yeast enzyme was found to exhibit properties similar to those of dCMP deaminases isolated from higher eucaryotes. A mutant strain completely deficient in dCMP deaminase activity was isolated by selection for resistance to 5-fluoro-2'-deoxycytidylate followed by screening for cross sensitivity to 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridylate, a potent inhibitor of the yeast thymidylate synthetase. We have designated this new allele dcd1 . A strain exhibiting an auxotrophic requirement for dUMP was isolated after mutagenesis of a dcd1 tup7 haploid. Genetic analysis revealed that this auxotrophic phenotype resulted from a combination of the dcd1 allele and a second, unlinked, nuclear mutation that we designated dmp1 . This allele, which by itself conveys no readily discernible phenotype, presumably impairs efficient synthesis of dUMP from UDP. The auxotrophic requirement of dcd1 dmp1 tup7 strains also can be satisfied by exogenous dTMP but not deoxyuridine. PMID:6373725

  5. AICAR prevents heat-induced sudden death in RyR1 mutant mice independent of AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Lanner, Johanna T; Georgiou, Dimitra K; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Ainbinder, Alina; Cheng, Qing; Joshi, Aditya D; Chen, Zanwen; Yarotskyy, Viktor; Oakes, Joshua M; Lee, Chang Seok; Monroe, Tanner O; Santillan, Arturo; Dong, Keke; Goodyear, Laurie; Ismailov, Iskander I; Rodney, George G; Dirksen, Robert T; Hamilton, Susan L

    2012-01-08

    Mice with a knock-in mutation (Y524S) in the type I ryanodine receptor (Ryr1), a mutation analogous to the Y522S mutation that is associated with malignant hyperthermia in humans, die when exposed to short periods of temperature elevation (≥37 °C). We show here that treatment with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) prevents this heat-induced sudden death in this mouse model. The protection by AICAR is independent of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation and results from a newly identified action of the compound on mutant Ryr1 to reduce Ca(2+) leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the sarcoplasm. AICAR thus prevents Ca(2+)-dependent increases in the amount of both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that act to further increase resting Ca(2+) concentrations. If unchecked, the temperature-driven increases in resting Ca(2+) concentrations and the amounts of ROS and RNS create an amplifying cycle that ultimately triggers sustained muscle contractions, rhabdomyolysis and death. Although antioxidants are effective in reducing this cycle in vitro, only AICAR prevents heat-induced death in vivo. Our findings suggest that AICAR is probably effective in prophylactic treatment of humans with enhanced susceptibility to exercise- and/or heat-induced sudden death associated with RYR1 mutations.

  6. A cyanobacterial light activated adenylyl cyclase partially restores development of a Dictyostelium discoideum, adenylyl cyclase a null mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Hui; Raffelberg, Sarah; Losi, Aba; Schaap, Pauline; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-12-10

    A light-regulated adenylyl cyclase, mPAC, was previously identified from the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes PCC7420. MPAC consists of a flavin-based blue light-sensing LOV domain and a catalytic domain. In this work, we expressed mPAC in an adenylate cyclase A null mutant (aca-) of the eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum and tested to what extent light activation of mPAC could restore the cAMP-dependent developmental programme of this organism. Amoebas of Dictyostelium, a well-established model organism, generate and respond to cAMP pulses, which cause them to aggregate and construct fruiting bodies. mPAC was expressed under control of a constitutive actin-15 promoter in D. discoideum and displayed low basal adenylyl cyclase activity in darkness that was about five-fold stimulated by blue light. mPAC expression in aca- cells marginally restored aggregation and fruiting body formation in darkness. However, more and larger fruiting bodies were formed when mPAC expressing cells were incubated in light. Extending former applications of light-regulated AC, these results demonstrate that mPAC can be used to manipulate multicellular development in eukaryotes in a light dependent manner.

  7. Development of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist mutants with enhanced antagonistic activity in vitro and improved therapeutic efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dahlén, Eva; Barchan, Karin; Herrlander, Daniel; Höjman, Patrik; Karlsson, Marie; Ljung, Lill; Andersson, Mats; Bäckman, Eva; Hager, Ann-Christin Malmborg; Walse, Björn; Joosten, Leo; van den Berg, Wim

    2008-04-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a naturally occurring inhibitor of the pro-inflammatory interleukin-1-mediated activation of the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R). Although wild-type IL-1Ra is used for treatment of inflammatory diseases, its effect is moderate and/or short-lived. The objective of this study was to generate IL-1Ra mutants with enhanced antagonistic activity for potential therapeutic use. Using a directed evolution approach in which libraries of IL-1Ra gene mutants were generated and screened in functional assays, mutants with desired properties were identified. Initially, diversity was introduced into the IL-1Ra using random mutagenesis. Mutations resulting in enhanced antagonistic activity were identified by screening in a reporter cell assay. To further enhance the antagonistic activity, selected mutations were recombined using the DNA recombination technology Fragment-INduced Diversity (FIND). Following three rounds of FIND recombination, several mutants with up to nine times enhanced antagonistic activity (mean IC50 +/- SEM value: 0.78 +/- 0.050 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.1 ng/ml for mutant and wild-type, respectively) were identified. Sequence analysis identified the mutations D47N, E52R and E90Y as being most important for this effect, however, the mutations P38Y, H54R, Q129L and M136N further enhanced the antagonistic function. Analysis of identified mutations in protein models based on the crystal structure of the IL-1Ra/IL-1R complex suggested that mutations found to enhance the antagonistic activity had a stabilizing effect on the IL-1Ra mutants or increased the affinity for the IL-1R. Finally, the therapeutic effect of one mutant was compared to that of wild-type IL-1Ra in collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Indeed, the enhanced antagonistic effect of the mutants observed in vitro was also seen in vivo. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that directed evolution of IL-1Ra is an effective means of generating highly potent therapeutic

  8. Clinical Light Exposure, Photoreceptor Degeneration, and AP-1 Activation: A Cell Death or Cell Survival Signal in the Rhodopsin Mutant Retina?

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Danian; Beltran, William A.; Li, Zexiao; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The T4R RHO mutant dog retina shows retinal degeneration with exposures to light comparable to those used in clinical eye examinations of patients. To define the molecular mechanisms of the degeneration, AP-1 DNA-binding activity, composition, posttranslational modification of the protein complex, and modulation of ERK/MAPK signaling pathways were examined in light-exposed mutant retinas. Methods Dark-adapted retinas were exposed to short-duration light flashes from a retinal camera used clinically for retinal photography and were collected at different time points after exposure. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), super-shift EMSA, Western blot analysis, and immunocytochemistry were used to examine AP-1 signaling. Results Exposure to light of mutant retinas significantly increased AP-1 DNA-binding activity by 1 hour after exposure, and levels remained elevated for 6 hours. Shielded mutant retinas had similar AP-1 levels to shielded or exposed wild-type retinas. The parallel phosphorylation of c-Fos and activation of ERK1/2 was detected only in exposed mutant retinas. Exposure to light changed the composition of the AP-1 protein complex in the mutant retina from c-Jun/Fra-1/c-Fos to JunB/c-Fos. Immunohistochemistry showed that the components of activated AP-1 (JunB, and phosphorylated c-Fos, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 isoforms) were localized in Müller cells. Conclusions The inner nuclear layer/Müller cell localization of the key proteins induced by light exposure raises the question of the direct involvement of AP-1 in mediating photoreceptor cell death in this model of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. PMID:17962438

  9. Conservative Tryptophan Mutants of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase YopH Exhibit Impaired WPD-Loop Function and Crystallize with Divanadate Esters in Their Active Sites

    PubMed Central

    Moise, Gwendolyn; Gallup, Nathan M.; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.; Hengge, Alvan C.; Johnson, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Catalysis in protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) involves movement of a protein loop called the WPD loop that brings a conserved aspartic acid into the active site to function as a general acid. Mutation of the tryptophan in the WPD loop of the PTP YopH to any other residue with a planar, aromatic side chain (phenylalanine, tyrosine, or histidine) disables general acid catalysis. Crystal structures reveal these conservative mutations leave this critical loop in a catalytically unproductive, quasi-open position. Although the loop positions in crystal structures are similar for all three conservative mutants, the reasons inhibiting normal loop closure differ for each mutant. In the W354F and W354Y mutants, steric clashes result from six-membered rings occupying the position of the five-membered ring of the native indole side chain. The histidine mutant dysfunction results from new hydrogen bonds stabilizing the unproductive position. The results demonstrate how even modest modifications can disrupt catalytically important protein dynamics. Crystallization of all the catalytically compromised mutants in the presence of vanadate gave rise to vanadate dimers at the active site. In W354Y and W354H, a divanadate ester with glycerol is observed. Such species have precedence in solution and are known from the small molecule crystal database. Such species have not been observed in the active site of a phosphatase, as a functional phosphatase would rapidly catalyze their decomposition. The compromised functionality of the mutants allows the trapping of species that undoubtedly form in solution and are capable of binding at the active sites of PTPs, and, presumably, other phosphatases. In addition to monomeric vanadate, such higher-order vanadium-based molecules are likely involved in the interaction of vanadate with PTPs in solution. PMID:26445170

  10. Synthesis, Biological Activity, and Crystal Structure of Potent Nonnucleoside Inhibitors of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase That Retain Activity against Mutant Forms of the Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Marshall L.; Roth, Thomas; Farnsworth, David W.; Smith, Marilyn Kroeger; Watson, Karen; Buckheit, Robert W.; Das, Kalyan; Zhang, Wanyi; Arnold, Eddy; Julias, John G.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Michejda, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    In an ongoing effort to develop novel and potent nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors that are effective against the wild type (WT) virus and clinically observed mutants, 1,2-bis-substituted benzimidazoles were synthesized and tested. Optimization of the N1 and C2 positions of benzimidazole led to the development of 1-(2,6-difluorobenzyl)-2-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-4-methylbenzimidazole (1) (IC50 = 0.2 μM, EC50 = 0.44 μM, and TC50 ≥ 100 against WT). This paper describes how substitution on the benzimidazole ring profoundly affects activity. Substituents at the benzimidazole C4 dramatically enhanced potency, while at C5 or C6 substituents were generally detrimental or neutral to activity, respectively. A 7-methyl analogue did not inhibit HIV-1 RT. Determination of the crystal structure of 1 bound to RT provided the basis for accurate modeling of additional analogues, which were synthesized and tested. Several derivatives were nanomolar inhibitors of wild-type virus and were effective against clinically relevant HIV-1 mutants. PMID:17663538

  11. NF-{kappa}B signaling is activated and confers resistance to apoptosis in three-dimensionally cultured EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakuma, Yuji; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Nakamura, Yoshiyasu; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Matsukuma, Shoichi; Koizume, Shiro; Miyagi, Yohei

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR-mutant cells in 3D culture resist EGFR inhibition compared with suspended cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation of I{kappa}B and activation of NF-{kappa}B are observed in 3D-cultured cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibiting NF-{kappa}B enhances the efficacy of the EGFR inhibitor in 3D-cultured cells. -- Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells in suspension undergo apoptosis to a greater extent than adherent cells in a monolayer when EGFR autophosphorylation is inhibited by EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This suggests that cell adhesion to a culture dish may activate an anti-apoptotic signaling pathway other than the EGFR pathway. Since the microenvironment of cells cultured in a monolayer are substantially different to that of cells existing in three-dimension (3D) in vivo, we assessed whether two EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, HCC827 and H1975, were more resistant to EGFR TKI-induced apoptosis when cultured in a 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) as compared with in suspension. The ECM-adherent EGFR-mutant cells in 3D were significantly less sensitive to treatment with WZ4002, an EGFR TKI, than the suspended cells. Further, a marked degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, the inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B, was observed only in the 3D-cultured cells, leading to an increase in the activation of NF-{kappa}B. Moreover, the inhibition of NF-{kappa}B with pharmacological inhibitors enhanced EGFR TKI-induced apoptosis in 3D-cultured EGFR-mutant cells. These results suggest that inhibition of NF-{kappa}B signaling would render ECM-adherent EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells in vivo more susceptible to EGFR TKI-induced cell death.

  12. NMR structure of the noncytotoxic α-sarcin mutant Δ(7-22): The importance of the native conformation of peripheral loops for activity

    PubMed Central

    García-Mayoral, Ma Flor; García-Ortega, Lucia; Lillo, Ma Pilar; Santoro, Jorge; Martínez Del Pozo, Álvaro; Gavilanes, José G.; Rico, Manuel; Bruix, Marta

    2004-01-01

    The deletion mutant Δ(7-22) of α-sarcin, unlike its wild-type protein counterpart, lacks the specific ability to degrade rRNA in intact ribosomes and exhibits an increased unspecific ribonuclease activity and decreased interaction with lipid vesicles. In trying to shed light on these differences, we report here on the three-dimensional structure of the Δ(7-22) α-sarcin mutant using NMR methods. We also evaluated its dynamic properties on the basis of theoretical models and measured its correlation time (6.2 nsec) by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. The global fold characteristic of ribotoxins is preserved in the mutant. The most significant differences with respect to the α-sarcin structure are concentrated in (1) loop 2, (2) loop 3, which adopts a new orientation, and (3) loop 5, which shows multiple conformations and an altered dynamics. The interactions between loop 5 and the N-terminal hairpin are lost in the mutant, producing increased solvent accessibility of the active-site residues. The degree of solvent exposure of the catalytic His 137 is similar to that shown by His 92 in RNase T1. Additionally, the calculated order parameters of residues belonging to loop 5 in the mutant correspond to an internal dynamic behavior more similar to RNase T1 than α-sarcin. On the other hand, changes in the relative orientation of loop 3 move the lysine-rich region 111–114, crucial for substrate recognition, away from the active site. All of the structural and dynamic data presented here reveal that the mutant is a hybrid of ribotoxins and noncytotoxic ribonucleases, consistent with its biological properties. PMID:15044731

  13. Influence of low glycolytic activities in gcr1 and gcr2 mutants on the expression of other metabolic pathway genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiromi; Uemura, Hiroshi

    2005-01-30

    A complex of the transcription factors Gcr1p and Gcr2p coordinately regulates the expression of glycolytic genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To understand the effects of gcr mutations on other metabolic pathways, genome-wide gene expression profiles in gcr1 and gcr2 mutants were examined. The biggest effects of gcr1 and gcr2 mutations were observed on the glycolytic genes and the expressions of most of the glycolytic genes were substantially decreased compared to those in the wild-type strain in both glucose and glycerol+lactate growth conditions. On the other hand, the expressions of genes encoding the TCA cycle and respiration were increased in gcr mutants when the cells were grown in glucose. RT-PCR analyses revealed that the expression of SIP4 and HAP5, which are known to affect the expression of some of the gluconeogenic, TCA cycle and respiratory genes, were also increased under this condition. The growth of gcr mutants on glucose was impaired by adding respiration inhibitor antimycin A, whereas the growth of the wild-type strain was not. The conversion of glucose to biomass was higher and, to the contrary, ethanol yield was lower in the gcr2 mutant compared to those in the wild-type strain. These results suggest the possibility that the gcr mutants, in which glycolytic activities are low, changed their metabolic patterns under glucose growth condition to enhance the expression of TCA cycle and respiratory genes to produce more energy.

  14. Stability and activity of Dictyoglomus thermophilum GH11 xylanase and its disulphide mutant at high pressure and temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, He; Voutilainen, Sanni; Ojamo, Heikki; Turunen, Ossi

    2015-03-01

    The functional properties of extremophilic Dictyoglomus thermophilum xylanase (XYNB) and the N-terminal disulphide-bridge mutant (XYNB-DS) were studied at high pressure and temperature. The enzymes were quite stable even at the pressure of 500MPa at 80°C. The half-life of inactivation in these conditions was over 30h. The inactivation at 80°C in atmospheric pressure was only 3-times slower. The increase of pressure up to 500MPa at 80°C decreased only slightly the enzyme's stability, whereas in 500MPa the increase of temperature from 22 to 80°C decreased significantly more the enzyme's stability. While the high temperature (80-100°C) decreased the enzyme reaction with short xylooligosaccharides (xylotetraose and xylotriose), the high pressure (100-300MPa) had an opposite effect. The temperature of 100°C strongly increased the Km but did not affect the kcat to the same extent, thus indicating that the interaction of the substrate with the active site suffers before the catalytic reaction begins to decrease as the temperature rises. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed the high structural stability of XYNB and XYNB-DS at 93°C.

  15. Enantioselective Reduction of Citral Isomers in NCR Ene Reductase: Analysis of an Active-Site Mutant Library.

    PubMed

    Kress, Nico; Rapp, Johanna; Hauer, Bernhard

    2017-02-08

    A deeper understanding of the >99 % S-selective reduction of both isomers of citral catalyzed by NCR ene reductase was achieved by active-site mutational studies and docking simulation. Though structurally similar, the E/Z isomers of citral showed a significantly varying selectivity response to introduced mutations. Although it was possible to invert (E)-citral reduction enantioselectivity to ee 46 % (R) by introducing mutation W66A, for (Z)-citral it remained ≥88 % (S) for all single-residue variants. Residue 66 seems to act as a lever for opposite binding modes. This was underlined by a W66A-based double-mutant library that enhanced the (E)-citral derived enantioselectivity to 63 % (R) and significantly lowered the S selectivity for (Z)-citral to 44 % (S). Formation of (R)-citronellal from an (E/Z)-citral mixture is a desire in industrial (-)-menthol synthesis. Our findings pave the way for a rational enzyme engineering solution.

  16. Cell homeostasis in a Leishmania major mutant overexpressing the spliced leader RNA is maintained by an increased proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Juliano S; Ferreira, Tiago R; Defina, Tânia P A; Dossin, Fernando de M; Beattie, Kenneth A; Lamont, Douglas J; Cloutier, Serge; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Schenkman, Sergio; Cruz, Angela K

    2010-10-01

    Although several stage-specific genes have been identified in Leishmania, the molecular mechanisms governing developmental gene regulation in this organism are still not well understood. We have previously reported an attenuation of virulence in Leishmania major and L. braziliensis carrying extra-copies of the spliced leader RNA gene. Here, we surveyed the major differences in proteome and transcript expression profiles between the spliced leader RNA overexpressor and control lines using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and differential display reverse transcription PCR, respectively. Thirty-nine genes related to stress response, cytoskeleton, proteolysis, cell cycle control and proliferation, energy generation, gene transcription, RNA processing and post-transcriptional regulation have abnormal patterns of expression in the spliced leader RNA overexpressor line. The evaluation of proteolytic pathways in the mutant revealed a selective increase of cysteine protease activity and an exacerbated ubiquitin-labeled protein population. Polysome profile analysis and measurement of cellular protein aggregates showed that protein translation in the spliced leader RNA overexpressor line is increased when compared to the control line. We found that L. major promastigotes maintain homeostasis in culture when challenged with a metabolic imbalance generated by spliced leader RNA surplus through modulation of intracellular proteolysis. However, this might interfere with a fine-tuned gene expression control necessary for the amastigote multiplication in the mammalian host.

  17. A p27Kip1 mutant that does not inhibit CDK activity promotes centrosome amplification and micronucleation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S S; Ma, L; Bagui, T K; Forinash, K D; Pledger, W J

    2012-08-30

    Mitotic catastrophe occurs when cells enter mitosis with damaged DNA or excess centrosomes. Cells overexpressing the centrosome protein CP110 or depleted of cyclin F, which targets CP110 for destruction, have more than two centrosomes and undergo mitotic catastrophe. Our studies show centrosome reduplication and mitotic catastrophe in osteosarcoma cells inducibly expressing a p27Kip1 mutant (termed p27K) that binds cyclins but not cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). p27K inhibited cell proliferation but not CDK activity or cell cycle progression. It did not induce apoptosis; however, cells expressing p27K had more than two centrosomes and, indicative of mitotic catastrophe, irregularly shaped nuclei or multiple micronuclei. p27K interacted with cyclin F in vivo (as did endogenous p27Kip1) and displaced cyclin F from CP110. Depletion of CP110 rescued p27K-expressing cells from centrosome reduplication and mitotic catastrophe. Collectively, our data show that p27Kip1 can perturb mitosis and suggest that it does so by sequestering cyclin F, which prevents its interaction with and the subsequent degradation of CP110, ultimately resulting in centrosome reduplication, mitotic catastrophe and abrogation of cell proliferation.

  18. IS256 abolishes gelatinase activity and biofilm formation in a mutant of the nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecalis V583.

    PubMed

    Perez, Marta; Calles-Enríquez, Marina; del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-07-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is one of the most controversial species of lactic acid bacteria. Some strains are used as probiotics, while others are associated with severe and life-threatening nosocomial infections. Their pathogenicity depends on the acquisition of multidrug resistance and virulence factors. Gelatinase, which is required in the first steps of biofilm formation, is an important virulence determinant involved in E. faecalis pathogenesis, including endocarditis and peritonitis. The gene that codes for gelatinase (gelE) is controlled by the Fsr quorum-sensing system, whose encoding genes (fsrA, fsrB, fsrC, and fsrD) are located immediately upstream of gelE. The integration of a DNA fragment into the fsr locus of a derived mutant of E. faecalis V583 suppressed the gelatinase activity and prevented biofilm formation. Sequence analysis indicated the presence of IS256 integrated into the fsrC gene at nucleotide position 321. Interestingly, IS256 is also associated with biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus. This is the first description of an insertion sequence that prevents biofilm formation in E. faecalis.

  19. Increased vulnerability of hippocampal neurons from presenilin-1 mutant knock-in mice to amyloid beta-peptide toxicity: central roles of superoxide production and caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Sebastian, L; Sopher, B L; Miller, M W; Ware, C B; Martin, G M; Mattson, M P

    1999-03-01

    Many cases of early-onset inherited Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by mutations in the presenilin-1 (PS1) gene. Overexpression of PS1 mutations in cultured PC12 cells increases their vulnerability to apoptosis-induced trophic factor withdrawal and oxidative insults. We now report that primary hippocampal neurons from PS1 mutant knock-in mice, which express the human PS1M146V mutation at normal levels, exhibit increased vulnerability to amyloid beta-peptide toxicity. The endangering action of mutant PS1 was associated with increased superoxide production, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, and caspase activation. The peroxynitrite-scavenging antioxidant uric acid and the caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone protected hippocampal neurons expressing mutant PS1 against cell death induced by amyloid beta-peptide. Increased oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenic action of PS1 mutations, and antioxidants may counteract the adverse property of such AD-linked mutations.

  20. Mechanisms of inverse agonism of antipsychotic drugs at the D(2) dopamine receptor: use of a mutant D(2) dopamine receptor that adopts the activated conformation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J; Lin, H; Fu, D; Javitch, J A; Strange, P G

    2001-04-01

    The antipsychotic drugs have been shown to be inverse agonists at the D(2) dopamine receptor. We have examined the mechanism of this inverse agonism by making mutations in residue T343 in the base of the sixth transmembrane spanning region of the receptor. T343R, T343S and T343K mutant D(2) dopamine receptors were made and the T343R mutant characterized in detail. The T343R mutant D(2) dopamine receptor exhibits properties of a receptor that resides more in the activated state, namely increased agonist binding affinity (independent of G-protein coupling and dependent on agonist efficacy), increased agonist potency in functional tests (adenylyl cyclase inhibition) and increased inverse agonist effects. The binding of agonists to the mutant receptor also shows sensitivity to sodium ions, unlike the native receptor, so that isomerization of the receptor to its inactive state may be driven by sodium ions. The binding of inverse agonists to the receptor is, however, unaffected by the mutation. We conclude that inverse agonism at this receptor is not achieved by the inverse agonist binding preferentially to the non-activated state of the receptor over the activated state. Rather the inverse agonist appears to bind to all forms of the receptor but then renders the receptor inactive.

  1. Acyl-CoA synthetase activity links wild-type but not mutant α-synuclein to brain arachidonate metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Golovko, Mikhail Y.; Rosenberger, Thad A.; Faergeman, Nils J.; Feddersen, Søren; Cole, Nelson B.; Pribill, Ingrid; Berger, Johannes; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Murphy, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Because α-synuclein (Snca) has a role in brain lipid metabolism, we determined the impact that the loss of α-synuclein had on brain arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) metabolism in vivo using Snca-/- mice. We measured [1-14C]20:4n-6 incorporation and turnover kinetics in brain phospholipids using an established steady-state kinetic model. Liver was used as a negative control and no changes were observed between groups. In Snca-/- brains, there was a marked reduction in 20:4n-6-CoA mass and in microsomal acyl-CoA synthetases (Acsl) activity toward 20:4n-6. Microsomal Acsl activity was completely restored after the addition of exogenous wt mouse or human α-synuclein, but not by A30P, E46K, and A53T forms of α-synuclein. Acsl and acyl-CoA hydrolase expression was not different between groups. The incorporation and turnover of 20:4n-6 into brain phospholipid pools was markedly reduced. The dilution coefficient lambda, which indicates 20:4n-6 recycling between the acyl-CoA pool and brain phospholipids, was increased 3.3-fold, indicating more 20:4n-6 was entering the 20:4n-6-CoA pool from the plasma relative to that being recycled from the phospholipids. This is consistent with the reduction in Acsl activity observed in the Snca-/- mice. Using titration microcalorimetry, we determined that α-synuclein bound free 20:4n-6 (Kd of 3.7 μM), but did not bind 20:4n-6-CoA. These data suggest α-synuclein is involved in substrate presentation to Acsl rather than product removal. In summary, our data demonstrate that α-synuclein has a major role in brain 20:4n-6 metabolism through its modulation of endoplasmic reticulum localized acyl-CoA synthetase activity, although mutants forms of α-synuclein fail to restore this activity. PMID:16734431

  2. Suppression by enhanced RpoE activity of the temperature-sensitive phenotype of a degP ssrA double mutant in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ono, Katsuhiko; Kutsukake, Kazuhiro; Abo, Tatsuhiko

    2009-02-01

    SsrA is a small RNA playing a crucial role in trans-translation, which leads to rescue of stalled ribosomes on or at the end of mRNA and addition of the degradation tag to a growing polypeptide. The lack of SsrA has been shown to enhance the temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype of an E. coli strain defective in the degP gene, which encodes one of the periplasmic proteases. This severe ts phenotype was relieved only partially by an SsrADD variant, which can lead to ribosome rescue but adds a protease-resistant tag instead of the degradation tag, suggesting that accumulation of polypeptides programmed by truncated mRNAs is responsible for growth defect of the ssrA degP mutant. Expression of an S210A-mutant DegP protein, which lacks the protease activity but retains the chaperone activity, could relieve the ts phenotype of the double mutant, suggesting that the chaperone activity but not the protease activity of DegP is required for growth of the ssrA-deficient cells at high temperature. Overexpression of the rpoE gene, which encodes sigmaE responsible for the expression of factors involved in extracellular stress response, also suppressed the ts phenotype of the ssrA degP mutant. This suggests that the stress-responsing pathway(s) may be involved in the enhancement of ts phenotype of degP mutant in the absence of SsrA.

  3. Deep Sequencing of Random Mutant Libraries Reveals the Active Site of the Narrow Specificity CphA Metallo-β-Lactamase is Fragile to Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhizeng; Mehta, Shrenik C.; Adamski, Carolyn J.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    CphA is a Zn2+-dependent metallo-β-lactamase that efficiently hydrolyzes only carbapenem antibiotics. To understand the sequence requirements for CphA function, single codon random mutant libraries were constructed for residues in and near the active site and mutants were selected for E. coli growth on increasing concentrations of imipenem, a carbapenem antibiotic. At high concentrations of imipenem that select for phenotypically wild-type mutants, the active-site residues exhibit stringent sequence requirements in that nearly all residues in positions that contact zinc, the substrate, or the catalytic water do not tolerate amino acid substitutions. In addition, at high imipenem concentrations a number of residues that do not directly contact zinc or substrate are also essential and do not tolerate substitutions. Biochemical analysis confirmed that amino acid substitutions at essential positions decreased the stability or catalytic activity of the CphA enzyme. Therefore, the CphA active - site is fragile to substitutions, suggesting active-site residues are optimized for imipenem hydrolysis. These results also suggest that resistance to inhibitors targeted to the CphA active site would be slow to develop because of the strong sequence constraints on function. PMID:27616327

  4. Mutant HbpR transcription activator isolation for 2‐chlorobiphenyl via green fluorescent protein‐based flow cytometry and cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Beggah, Siham; Vogne, Christelle; Zenaro, Elena; Van Der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2008-01-01

    Summary Mutants were produced in the A‐domain of HbpR, a protein belonging to the XylR family of σ54‐dependent transcription activators, with the purpose of changing its effector recognition specificity from 2‐hydroxybiphenyl (2‐HBP, the cognate effector) to 2‐chlorobiphenyl (2‐CBP). Mutations were introduced in the hbpR gene part for the A‐domain via error‐prone polymerase chain reaction, and assembled on a gene circuitry plasmid in Escherichia coli, permitting HbpR‐dependent induction of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (egfp). Cells with mutant HbpR proteins responsive to 2‐CBP were enriched and separated in a flow cytometry‐assisted cell‐sorting procedure. Some 70 mutants were isolated and the A‐domain mutations mapped. One of these had acquired true 2‐CBP recognition but reacted hypersensitively to 2‐HBP (20‐fold more than the wild type), whereas others had reduced sensitivity to 2‐HBP but a gain of 2‐CBP recognition. Sequencing showed that most mutants carried double or triple mutations in the A‐domain gene part, and were not located in previously recognized conserved residues within the XylR family members. Further selection from a new mutant pool prepared of the hypersensitive mutant did not result in increased 2‐CBP or reduced 2‐HBP recognition. Our data thus demonstrate that a one‐step in vitro‘evolutionary’ adaptation of the HbpR protein can result in both enhancement and reduction of the native effector recognition. PMID:21261823

  5. Abnormal N-Glycosylation of a Novel Missense Creatine Transporter Mutant, G561R, Associated with Cerebral Creatine Deficiency Syndromes Alters Transporter Activity and Localization.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Tatsuki; Ito, Shingo; Ohta, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori; Wada, Takahito; Terasaki, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Sumio

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral creatine deficiency syndromes (CCDSs) are caused by loss-of-function mutations in creatine transporter (CRT, SLC6A8), which transports creatine at the blood-brain barrier and into neurons of the central nervous system (CNS). This results in low cerebral creatine levels, and patients exhibit mental retardation, poor language skills and epilepsy. We identified a novel human CRT gene missense mutation (c.1681 G>C, G561R) in Japanese CCDSs patients. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the reduction of creatine transport in G561R-mutant CRT-expressing 293 cells, and to clarify the mechanism of its functional attenuation. G561R-mutant CRT exhibited greatly reduced creatine transport activity compared to wild-type CRT (WT-CRT) when expressed in 293 cells. Also, the mutant protein is localized mainly in intracellular membrane fraction, while WT-CRT is localized in plasma membrane. Western blot analysis revealed a 68 kDa band of WT-CRT protein in plasma membrane fraction, while G561R-mutant CRT protein predominantly showed bands at 55, 110 and 165 kDa in crude membrane fraction. The bands of both WT-CRT and G561R-mutant CRT were shifted to 50 kDa by N-glycosidase treatment. Our results suggest that the functional impairment of G561R-mutant CRT was probably caused by incomplete N-linked glycosylation due to misfolding during protein maturation, leading to oligomer formation and changes of cellular localization.

  6. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F. Scott

    2009-06-12

    (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed {approx}100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by the glycine-to-alanine mutation may account for the lowered catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme, which is consistent with the 30 mV lower flavin redox potential. Furthermore, the altered binding mode of the indolelactate substrate may account for its reduced activity compared with octanoate, as observed in the crystalline state.

  7. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates.

    PubMed

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F Scott

    2009-06-01

    (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed approximately 100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 A resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by the glycine-to-alanine mutation may account for the lowered catalytic activity of the mutant enzyme, which is consistent with the 30 mV lower flavin redox potential. Furthermore, the altered binding mode of the indolelactate substrate may account for its reduced activity compared with octanoate, as observed in the crystalline state.

  8. Hydrophilicity of quinolones is not an exclusive factor for decreased activity in efflux-mediated resistant mutants of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Takenouchi, T; Tabata, F; Iwata, Y; Hanzawa, H; Sugawara, M; Ohya, S

    1996-08-01

    The elevated expression of the norA gene is responsible for efflux-mediated resistance to quinolones in Staphylococcus aureus (E.Y.W. Ng, M. Trucksis, and D.C. Hooper, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 38:1345-1355, 1994). For S. aureus transformed with a plasmid containing the cloned norA gene, SA113(pTUS20) (H. Yoshida, M. Bogaki, S. Nakamura, K. Ubukata, and M. Konno, J. Bacteriol. 172:6942-6949, 1990), and an overexpressed mutant, SA-1199B (G.W. Kaatz, S.M. Seo, and C.A. Ruble, J. Infect. Dis. 163:1080-1086, 1991), the MICs of norfloxacin increased 16 and 64 times compared with its MICs for the recipient and wild-type strains, SA113 and SA-1199, respectively. MICs of CS-940, however, increased only two and eight times, even though these two fluoroquinolones are similarly hydrophilic (apparent logPs of approximately -1). No good correlation was found, among 15 developed and developing quinolones, between the increment ratio in MICs and hydrophobicity (r = 0.61). Analysis of the quantitative structure-activity relationship among 40 fluoroquinolones revealed that the MIC increment ratio was significantly correlated with the bulkiness of the C-7 substituent and bulkiness and hydrophobicity of the C-8 substituent of fluoroquinolones (r = 0.87) and not with its molecular hydrophobicity (r = 0.47). Cellular accumulation of norfloxacin in SA-1199B was significantly lower than that in SA-1199, and it was increased by addition of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone. On the other hand, accumulations of CS-940 in these strains were nearly identical, and they were not affected by addition of the protonophore.

  9. Phenotypic effects of maternal immune activation and early postnatal milieu in mice mutant for the schizophrenia risk gene neuregulin-1.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, C; Desbonnet, L; Clarke, N; Petit, E; Tighe, O; Lai, D; Harvey, R; Waddington, J L; O'Tuathaigh, C

    2014-09-26

    Risk of schizophrenia is likely to involve gene × environment (G × E) interactions. Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a schizophrenia risk gene, hence any interaction with environmental adversity, such as maternal infection, may provide further insights into the basis of the disease. This study examined the individual and combined effects of prenatal immune activation with polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid (Poly I:C) and disruption of the schizophrenia risk gene NRG1 on the expression of behavioral phenotypes related to schizophrenia. NRG1 heterozygous (NRG1 HET) mutant breeding pairs were time-mated. Pregnant dams received a single injection (5mg/kg i.p.) of Poly I:C or vehicle on gestation day 9 (GD9). Offspring were then cross-fostered to vehicle-treated or Poly I:C-treated dams. Expression of schizophrenia-related behavioral endophenotypes was assessed at adolescence and in adulthood. Combining NRG1 disruption and prenatal environmental insult (Poly I:C) caused developmental stage-specific deficits in social behavior, spatial working memory and prepulse inhibition (PPI). However, combining Poly I:C and cross-fostering produced a number of behavioral deficits in the open field, social behavior and PPI. This became more complex by combining NRG1 deletion with both Poly I:C exposure and cross-fostering, which had a robust effect on PPI. These findings suggest that concepts of G × E interaction in risk of schizophrenia should be elaborated to multiple interactions that involve individual genes interacting with diverse biological and psychosocial environmental factors over early life, to differentially influence particular domains of psychopathology, sometimes over specific stages of development.

  10. Structure of a Highly Active Cephalopod S-crystallin Mutant: New Molecular Evidence for Evolution from an Active Enzyme into Lens-Refractive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wei-Hung; Cheng, Shu-Chun; Liu, Yu-Tung; Wu, Cheng-Guo; Lin, Min-Han; Chen, Chiao-Che; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Chou, Chi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Crystallins are found widely in animal lenses and have important functions due to their refractive properties. In the coleoid cephalopods, a lens with a graded refractive index provides good vision and is required for survival. Cephalopod S-crystallin is thought to have evolved from glutathione S-transferase (GST) with various homologs differentially expressed in the lens. However, there is no direct structural information that helps to delineate the mechanisms by which S-crystallin could have evolved. Here we report the structural and biochemical characterization of novel S-crystallin-glutathione complex. The 2.35-Å crystal structure of a S-crystallin mutant from Octopus vulgaris reveals an active-site architecture that is different from that of GST. S-crystallin has a preference for glutathione binding, although almost lost its GST enzymatic activity. We’ve also identified four historical mutations that are able to produce a “GST-like” S-crystallin that has regained activity. This protein recapitulates the evolution of S-crystallin from GST. Protein stability studies suggest that S-crystallin is stabilized by glutathione binding to prevent its aggregation; this contrasts with GST-σ, which do not possess this protection. We suggest that a tradeoff between enzyme activity and the stability of the lens protein might have been one of the major driving force behind lens evolution. PMID:27499004

  11. Structure of a Highly Active Cephalopod S-crystallin Mutant: New Molecular Evidence for Evolution from an Active Enzyme into Lens-Refractive Protein.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wei-Hung; Cheng, Shu-Chun; Liu, Yu-Tung; Wu, Cheng-Guo; Lin, Min-Han; Chen, Chiao-Che; Lin, Chao-Hsiung; Chou, Chi-Yuan

    2016-08-08

    Crystallins are found widely in animal lenses and have important functions due to their refractive properties. In the coleoid cephalopods, a lens with a graded refractive index provides good vision and is required for survival. Cephalopod S-crystallin is thought to have evolved from glutathione S-transferase (GST) with various homologs differentially expressed in the lens. However, there is no direct structural information that helps to delineate the mechanisms by which S-crystallin could have evolved. Here we report the structural and biochemical characterization of novel S-crystallin-glutathione complex. The 2.35-Å crystal structure of a S-crystallin mutant from Octopus vulgaris reveals an active-site architecture that is different from that of GST. S-crystallin has a preference for glutathione binding, although almost lost its GST enzymatic activity. We've also identified four historical mutations that are able to produce a "GST-like" S-crystallin that has regained activity. This protein recapitulates the evolution of S-crystallin from GST. Protein stability studies suggest that S-crystallin is stabilized by glutathione binding to prevent its aggregation; this contrasts with GST-σ, which do not possess this protection. We suggest that a tradeoff between enzyme activity and the stability of the lens protein might have been one of the major driving force behind lens evolution.

  12. Binding of human recombinant mutant soluble ectodomain of FGFR2IIIc to c subtype of FGFRs: implications for anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; He, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Shu-Shu; Wang, Yi; He, Wei-Yi; Cheng, Guo-Hua; Yang, Xuesong; Xu, Jun; Wang, Ju

    2016-01-01

    FGFRs are considered essential targets for cancer therapy. We previously reported that msFGFR2c, a Ser252Trp mutant soluble ectodomain of FGFR2IIIc, inhibited tumor growth by blocking FGF signaling pathway. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still obscure. In this study, we reported that msFGFR2c but not wild-type soluble ectodomain of FGFR2IIIc (wsFGFR2c) could selectively bind to c subtype of FGFRs in the presence of FGF-2. Thermodynamic analysis demonstrated that msFGFR2c bound to wsFGFR2c in the presence of FGF-2 with a K value of 6.61 × 105 M−1. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the mutated residue Trp252 of msFGFR2c preferred a π-π interaction with His254 of wsFGFR2c. Concomitantly, Arg255 of msFGFR2c and Glu250 of wsFGFR2c adjusted their conformations and formed three H-bonds. These two interactions therefore stabilized the final structure of wsFGFR2c and msFGFR2c heterocomplex. In FGFR2IIIc-positive/high FGF-2-secreted BT-549 cells, msFGFR2c significantly inhibited the proliferation and induced apoptosis by the blockage of FGF-2-activated FGFRs phosphorylation, also the growth and angiogenesis of its xenograft tumors implanted in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane model. While weaker the above inhibitory effects of msFGFR2c were observed on FGFR2IIIc-negative/low FGF-2-secreted MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, msFGFR2c significantly inhibited the proliferation of FGFR1IIIc-positive NCI-H1299 lung cancer cells by the suppression of FGF-2-induced FGFR1 activation and suppressed the growth of NCI-H1299 transplanted tumors in nude mice. In sum, msFGFR2c is a potential anti-tumor agent targeting FGFR2c/FGFR1c-positive tumor cells. These findings also provide a molecular basis for msFGFR2c to disrupt the activation of FGF signaling. PMID:28049184

  13. Differential apoptotic and proliferative activities of wild-type FOXL2 and blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES)-associated mutant FOXL2 proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Bae, Jeehyeon

    2014-03-07

    FOXL2 is an essential transcription factor that is required for proper development of the ovary and eyelid. Mutations in FOXL2 cause an autosomal dominant genetic disorder, blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES). BPES type I patients have eyelid malformation and premature ovarian failure leading to infertility, whereas women with type II BPES are fertile or subfertile. In the present study, we evaluated and compared apoptotic and antiproliferative activities of wild-type (WT) and mutant FOXL2 proteins found in BPES type I and II in human granulosa cell tumor-derived KGN cells. Ectopic expression of WT FOXL2 induced apoptosis and inhibited cell cycle progression in human granulosa cells. In contrast, mutated FOXL2s found in BPES type I significantly reduced these activities, whereas mutated FOXL2s in BPES type II showed intermediate activities. Furthermore, mutant FOX L2 proteins were defective in activating transcription of target genes including Caspase 8, TNF-R1, FAS, p21, and BMP4, which regulate apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation of granulosa cells. Thus, decreased apoptotic and antiproliferative activities caused by mutant forms of FOXL2 found in BPES patients may at least partially contribute to the pathophysiology of ovarian dysfunction.

  14. Differential Apoptotic and Proliferative Activities of Wild-type FOXL2 and Blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus Inversus Syndrome (BPES)-associated Mutant FOXL2 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Jae-Hong; BAE, Jeehyeon

    2013-01-01

    Abstract FOXL2 is an essential transcription factor that is required for proper development of the ovary and eyelid. Mutations in FOXL2 cause an autosomal dominant genetic disorder, blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES). BPES type I patients have eyelid malformation and premature ovarian failure leading to infertility, whereas women with type II BPES are fertile or subfertile. In the present study, we evaluated and compared apoptotic and antiproliferative activities of wild-type (WT) and mutant FOXL2 proteins found in BPES type I and II in human granulosa cell tumor-derived KGN cells. Ectopic expression of WT FOXL2 induced apoptosis and inhibited cell cycle progression in human granulosa cells. In contrast, mutated FOXL2s found in BPES type I significantly reduced these activities, whereas mutated FOXL2s in BPES type II showed intermediate activities. Furthermore, mutant FOX L2 proteins were defective in activating transcription of target genes including Caspase 8, TNF-R1, FAS, p21, and BMP4, which regulate apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation of granulosa cells. Thus, decreased apoptotic and antiproliferative activities caused by mutant forms of FOXL2 found in BPES patients may at least partially contribute to the pathophysiology of ovarian dysfunction. PMID:24240106

  15. Cooperative activity of noggin and gremlin 1 in axial skeleton development.

    PubMed

    Stafford, David A; Brunet, Lisa J; Khokha, Mustafa K; Economides, Aris N; Harland, Richard M

    2011-03-01

    Inductive signals from adjacent tissues initiate differentiation within the somite. In this study, we used mouse embryos mutant for the BMP antagonists noggin (Nog) and gremlin 1 (Grem1) to characterize the effects of BMP signaling on the specification of the sclerotome. We confirmed reduction of Pax1 and Pax9 expression in Nog mutants, but found that Nog;Grem1 double mutants completely fail to initiate sclerotome development. Furthermore, Nog mutants that also lack one allele of Grem1 exhibit a dramatic reduction in axial skeleton relative to animals mutant for Nog alone. By contrast, Pax3, Myf5 and Lbx1 expression indicates that dermomyotome induction occurs in Nog;Grem1 double mutants. Neither conditional Bmpr1a mutation nor treatment with the BMP type I receptor inhibitor dorsomorphin expands sclerotome marker expression, suggesting that BMP antagonists do not have an instructive function in sclerotome specification. Instead, we hypothesize that Nog- and Grem1-mediated inhibition of BMP is permissive for hedgehog (Hh) signal-mediated sclerotome specification. In support of this model, we found that culturing Nog;Grem1 double-mutant embryos with dorsomorphin restores sclerotome, whereas Pax1 expression in smoothened (Smo) mutants is not rescued, suggesting that inhibition of BMP is insufficient to induce sclerotome in the absence of Hh signaling. Confirming the dominant inhibitory effect of BMP signaling, Pax1 expression cannot be rescued in Nog;Grem1 double mutants by forced activation of Smo. We conclude that Nog and Grem1 cooperate to maintain a BMP signaling-free zone that is a crucial prerequisite for Hh-mediated sclerotome induction.

  16. Host range and cell cycle activation properties of polyomavirus large T-antigen mutants defective in pRB binding

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, R.; Bauer, P.H.; Benjamin, T.L.; Crissman, H.A.; Bradbury, E.M. |

    1994-11-01

    The authors have examined the growth properties of polyomavirus large T-antigen mutants that ar unable to bind pRB, the product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene. These mutants grow poorly on primary mouse cells yet grow well on NIH 3T3 and other established mouse cell lines. Preinfection of primary baby mouse kidney (BMK) epithelial cells with wild-type simian virus 40 renders these cells permissive to growth of pRB-binding polyomavirus mutants. Conversely, NIH 3T3 cells transfected by and expressing wild-type human pRB become nonpermissive. Primary fibroblasts for mouse embryos that carry a homozygous knockout of the RB gene are permissive, while those from normal littermates are nonpermissive. The host range of polyomavirus pRB-binding mutants is thus determined by expression or lack of expression of functional pRB by the host. These results demonstrate the importance of pRB binding by large T antigen for productive viral infection in primary cells. Failure of pRB-binding mutants to grow well in BMK cells correlates with their failure to induce progression from G{sub 0} or G{sub 1} through the S phase of the cell cycle. Time course studies show delayed synthesis and lower levels of accumulation of large T antigen, viral DNA, and VP1 in mutant compared with wild-type virus-infected BMK cells. These results support a model in which productive infection by polyomavirus in normal mouse cells is tightly coupled to the induction and progression of the cell cycle. 48 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Antimicrobial Activity of Fosfomycin-Tobramycin Combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Assessed by Time-Kill Assays and Mutant Prevention Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Morosini, María Isabel; Tedim, Ana P; Rodríguez, Irene; Aktaş, Zerrin; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosfomycin-tobramycin combination was studied by time-kill assay in eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to the fosfomycin wild-type population (MIC = 64 μg/ml) but with different tobramycin susceptibilities (MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml). The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) were determined in five of these strains (tobramycin MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions simulating environments that are present in biofilm-mediated infections. Fosfomycin-tobramycin was synergistic and bactericidal for the isolates with mutations in the mexZ repressor gene, with a tobramycin MIC of 4 μg/ml. This effect was not observed in strains displaying tobramycin MICs of 1 to 2 μg/ml due to the strong bactericidal effect of tobramycin alone. Fosfomycin presented higher MPC values (range, 2,048 to >2,048 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions than did tobramycin (range, 16 to 256 μg/ml). Interestingly, the association rendered narrow or even null MSWs in the two conditions. However, for isolates with high-level tobramycin resistance that harbored aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, time-kill assays showed no synergy, with wide MSWs in the two environments. glpT gene mutations responsible for fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa were determined in fosfomycin-susceptible wild-type strains and mutant derivatives recovered from MPC studies. All mutant derivatives had changes in the GlpT amino acid sequence, which resulted in a truncated permease responsible for fosfomycin resistance. These results suggest that fosfomycin-tobramycin can be an alternative for infections due to P. aeruginosa since it has demonstrated synergistic and bactericidal activity in susceptible isolates and those with low-level tobramycin resistance. It also prevents the emergence of resistant mutants in either aerobic or anaerobic environments.

  18. Antimicrobial Activity of Fosfomycin-Tobramycin Combination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Assessed by Time-Kill Assays and Mutant Prevention Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Tedim, Ana P.; Rodríguez, Irene; Aktaş, Zerrin; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of fosfomycin-tobramycin combination was studied by time-kill assay in eight Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates belonging to the fosfomycin wild-type population (MIC = 64 μg/ml) but with different tobramycin susceptibilities (MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml). The mutant prevention concentration (MPC) and mutant selection window (MSW) were determined in five of these strains (tobramycin MIC range, 1 to 64 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions simulating environments that are present in biofilm-mediated infections. Fosfomycin-tobramycin was synergistic and bactericidal for the isolates with mutations in the mexZ repressor gene, with a tobramycin MIC of 4 μg/ml. This effect was not observed in strains displaying tobramycin MICs of 1 to 2 μg/ml due to the strong bactericidal effect of tobramycin alone. Fosfomycin presented higher MPC values (range, 2,048 to >2,048 μg/ml) in aerobic and anaerobic conditions than did tobramycin (range, 16 to 256 μg/ml). Interestingly, the association rendered narrow or even null MSWs in the two conditions. However, for isolates with high-level tobramycin resistance that harbored aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, time-kill assays showed no synergy, with wide MSWs in the two environments. glpT gene mutations responsible for fosfomycin resistance in P. aeruginosa were determined in fosfomycin-susceptible wild-type strains and mutant derivatives recovered from MPC studies. All mutant derivatives had changes in the GlpT amino acid sequence, which resulted in a truncated permease responsible for fosfomycin resistance. These results suggest that fosfomycin-tobramycin can be an alternative for infections due to P. aeruginosa since it has demonstrated synergistic and bactericidal activity in susceptible isolates and those with low-level tobramycin resistance. It also prevents the emergence of resistant mutants in either aerobic or anaerobic environments. PMID:26195514

  19. Modulation of endotoxicity of Shigella generalized modules for membrane antigens (GMMA) by genetic lipid A modifications: relative activation of TLR4 and TLR2 pathways in different mutants.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Omar; Pesce, Isabella; Giannelli, Carlo; Aprea, Susanna; Caboni, Mariaelena; Citiulo, Francesco; Valentini, Sara; Ferlenghi, Ilaria; MacLennan, Calman Alexander; D'Oro, Ugo; Saul, Allan; Gerke, Christiane

    2014-09-05

    Outer membrane particles from Gram-negative bacteria are attractive vaccine candidates as they present surface antigens in their natural context. We previously developed a high yield production process for genetically derived particles, called generalized modules for membrane antigens (GMMA), from Shigella. As GMMA are derived from the outer membrane, they contain immunostimulatory components, especially lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We examined ways of reducing their reactogenicity by modifying lipid A, the endotoxic part of LPS, through deletion of late acyltransferase genes, msbB or htrB, in GMMA-producing Shigella sonnei and Shigella flexneri strains. GMMA with resulting penta-acylated lipid A from the msbB mutants showed a 600-fold reduced ability, and GMMA from the S. sonnei ΔhtrB mutant showed a 60,000-fold reduced ability compared with GMMA with wild-type lipid A to stimulate human Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in a reporter cell line. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A showed a marked reduction in induction of inflammatory cytokines (S. sonnei ΔhtrB, 800-fold; ΔmsbB mutants, 300-fold). We found that the residual activity of these GMMA is largely due to non-lipid A-related TLR2 activation. In contrast, in the S. flexneri ΔhtrB mutant, a compensatory lipid A palmitoleoylation resulted in GMMA with hexa-acylated lipid A with ∼10-fold higher activity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells than GMMA with penta-acylated lipid A, mostly due to retained TLR4 activity. Thus, for use as vaccines, GMMA will likely require lipid A penta-acylation. The results identify the relative contributions of TLR4 and TLR2 activation by GMMA, which need to be taken into consideration for GMMA vaccine development.

  20. Flavonol-induced changes in PIN2 polarity and auxin transport in the Arabidopsis thaliana rol1-2 mutant require phosphatase activity

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Benjamin M.; Nodzyński, Tomasz; Errafi, Sanae; Bucher, Rahel; Gupta, Shibu; Aryal, Bibek; Dobrev, Petre; Bigler, Laurent; Geisler, Markus; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, Jiří; Ringli, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is a major determinant and regulatory component important for plant development. Auxin transport between cells is mediated by a complex system of transporters such as AUX1/LAX, PIN, and ABCB proteins, and their localization and activity is thought to be influenced by phosphatases and kinases. Flavonols have been shown to alter auxin transport activity and changes in flavonol accumulation in the Arabidopsis thaliana rol1-2 mutant cause defects in auxin transport and seedling development. A new mutation in ROOTS CURL IN NPA 1 (RCN1), encoding a regulatory subunit of the phosphatase PP2A, was found to suppress the growth defects of rol1-2 without changing the flavonol content. rol1-2 rcn1-3 double mutants show wild type-like auxin transport activity while levels of free auxin are not affected by rcn1-3. In the rol1-2 mutant, PIN2 shows a flavonol-induced basal-to-apical shift in polar localization which is reversed in the rol1-2 rcn1-3 to basal localization. In vivo analysis of PINOID action, a kinase known to influence PIN protein localization in a PP2A-antagonistic manner, revealed a negative impact of flavonols on PINOID activity. Together, these data suggest that flavonols affect auxin transport by modifying the antagonistic kinase/phosphatase equilibrium. PMID:28165500

  1. How Y357F, Y276F mutants affect the methylation activity of PRDM9: QM/MM MD and free energy simulations.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yuzhuo; Sun, Lu; Zhong, Shijun

    2015-05-01

    Histone methyltransferase PRDM9 catalyzes the methylation of H3K4me2 (histone 3 dimethylated lysine 4) to H3K4me3 (histone 3 trimethylated lysine 4) by transferring the methyl group from S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet). PRDM9 is the major determinant of the meiotic recombination hotspot and the enrichment of H3K4me3 at the hotspot defines the initiation site of meiotic recombination. In PRDM9, two conserved tyrosine residues Tyr357 and Tyr276 surrounding the amino group of the substrate lysine may influence the methylation activity through hydrogen bond interactions with AdoMet or the substrate lysine. In this study, quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy simulations were performed to reveal the methylation processes catalyzed by wild type PRDM9, its Y357F, and Y276F mutants, respectively. The different roles of Tyr357 and Tyr276 in the methylation activity of PRDM9 were also investigated and compared. The calculated free energy barriers of the methyl transfers suggest that the Y276F mutation decreases the catalytic activity of the methyl transfer, while the Y357F mutation does not change the catalytic activity of the methyl transfer. The reactant complex conformations generated in the QM/MM MD simulations show that the reactive configuration can be formed in the Y357F mutant but not in the Y276F mutant.

  2. Analysis of a sugar response mutant of Arabidopsis identified a novel B3 domain protein that functions as an active transcriptional repressor.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Hironaka; Saijo, Takanori; Shibata, Daisuke; Morikami, Atsushi; Nakamura, Kenzo

    2005-06-01

    A recessive mutation hsi2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing luciferase (LUC) under control of a short promoter derived from a sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) sporamin gene (Spo(min)LUC) caused enhanced LUC expression under both low- and high-sugar conditions, which was not due to increased level of abscisic acid. The hsi2 mutant contained a nonsense mutation in a gene encoding a protein with B3 DNA-binding domain. HSI2 and two other Arabidopsis proteins appear to constitute a novel subfamily of B3 domain proteins distinct from ABI3, FUS3, and LEC2, which are transcription activators involved in seed development. The C-terminal part of HSI2 subfamily proteins contained a sequence similar to the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. Deletion of the C-terminal portion of HSI2 lost in the hsi2 mutant caused reduced nuclear targeting of HSI2. Null allele of HSI2 showed even higher Spo(min)LUC expression than the hsi2 mutant, whereas overexpression of HSI2 reduced the LUC expression. Transient coexpression of 35SHSI2 with Spo(min)LUC in protoplasts repressed the expression of LUC activity, and deletion or mutation of the EAR motif significantly reduced the repression activity of HSI2. These results indicate that HSI2 and related proteins are B3 domain-EAR motif active transcription repressors.

  3. Identification of photo-inactive phytochrome A in etiolated seedlings and photo-active phytochrome B in green leaves of the aurea mutant of tomato.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; López-Juez, E; Nagatani, A; Furuya, M

    1993-12-01

    The contents of spectrophotometrically measurable phytochrome A (PhyA) and phytochrome B (PhyB) and the corresponding immunochemically detectable apoproteins (PHYA and PHYB) were examined in dark- and light-grown tissues of the aurea mutant of tomato and its wild-type (WT). The amount of PHYA in etiolated aurea seedlings was found to be about 20% of that in the WT; this PHYA showed no photo-reversible changes in absorbance, no downregulation of the level of PHYA in light-grown seedlings, and no differential proteolysis of Pr and Pfr species in vitro which was seen in the case of the WT. By contrast, the amount of PHYB in aurea seedlings was not significantly different from that in WT seedlings. Phytochrome isolated from green leaves of the aurea mutant and purified by ion-exchange chromatography showed a red/far-red reversible spectral change, and its elution profile during chromatography was essentially similar to that of PHYB. The results indicate that aurea is a mutant that is deficient in photoactive PhyA at the etiolated stage, when it contains a spectrally inactive PHYA. However, the mutant contains spectrally active PhyB in its green tissue as does the WT.

  4. Histone deacetylase inhibition, but not a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone, attenuates atypical transcription by an activating mutant MR (MRS 810L ).

    PubMed

    Kang, Seol-Hee; Lee, Hae-Ahm; Lee, Eunjo; Kim, Mina; Kim, Inkyeom

    2016-10-01

    A mutation in the mineralocorticoid receptor (MRS 810L ) leads to early-onset hypertension, which is markedly exacerbated during pregnancy. The mutation causes progesterone and even the MR antagonist spironolactone to become potent agonists. Thus, it is hard to control hypertension in patients harbouring this mutation. We hypothesized that histone deacetylase inhibition (HDACi), but not the MR antagonist spironolactone, attenuates atypical transcriptional activity of activating mutant MR (MRS 810L ). We established HEK293T cells overexpressing wild-type MR (MRWT ) or MRS 810L and determined their transcriptional activities by luciferase assay. Expression of MR target genes was measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Treatment with aldosterone increased the expression of MR target genes as well as the transcriptional activities in HEK293T cells transfected either with MRWT or MRS 810L . Treatment with either spironolactone or progesterone also increased the expression of MR target genes as well as transcriptional activity, but only in HEK293T cells transfected with MRS 810L . Spironolactone abolished the promoter activity stimulated by aldosterone in HEK293T cells transfected with MRWT . Treatment with HDAC inhibitors attenuated the transcriptional activity as well as the expression of MR target genes induced by aldosterone, spironolactone, or progesterone whether HEK293T cells were transfected with either MRWT or MRS 810L . These results indicate that HDACi, but not an MR antagonist spironolactone, attenuates atypical transcriptional activity of an activating mutant MR (MRS 810L ).

  5. Steady state fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1) and its active site mutants.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Prashant; Vishwakarma, Rishi Kishore; Singh, Somesh; Gaikwad, Sushama; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-05-01

    Fluorescence quenching and time resolved fluorescence studies of wild type recombinant cinnamoyl CoA reductase (Ll-CCRH1), a multitryptophan protein from Leucaena leucocephala and 10 different active site mutants were carried out to investigate tryptophan environment. The enzyme showed highest affinity for feruloyl CoA (K(a)  = 3.72 × 10(5) M(-1)) over other CoA esters and cinnamaldehydes, as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy. Quenching of the fluorescence by acrylamide for wild type and active site mutants was collisional with almost 100% of the tryptophan fluorescence accessible under native condition and remained same after denaturation of protein with 6 M GdnHCl. In wild type Ll-CCRH1, the extent of quenching achieved with iodide (f(a) = 1.0) was significantly higher than cesium ions (f(a) = 0.33) suggesting more density of positive charge around surface of trp conformers under native conditions. Denaturation of wild type protein with 6 M GdnHCl led to significant increase in the quenching with cesium (f(a) = 0.54), whereas quenching with iodide ion was decreased (f(a) = 0.78), indicating reorientation of charge density around trp from positive to negative and heterogeneity in trp environment. The Stern-Volmer plots for wild type and mutants Ll-CCRH1 under native and denatured conditions, with cesium ion yielded biphasic quenching profiles. The extent of quenching for cesium and iodide ions under native and denatured conditions observed in active site mutants was significantly different from wild type Ll-CCRH1 under the same conditions. Thus, single substitution type mutations of active site residues showed heterogeneity in tryptophan microenvironment and differential degree of conformation of protein under native or denatured conditions.

  6. H11-H12 loop retinoic acid receptor mutants exhibit distinct trans-activating and trans-repressing activities in the presence of natural or synthetic retinoids.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, B; Mouchon, A; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1998-06-30

    Retinoids, such as the naturally occurring all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) and synthetic ligand CD367 modulate ligand-dependent transcription through retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Retinoid binding to RAR is believed to trigger structural transitions in the ligand-binding domain (LBD), leading to helix H1 and helix H12 repositioning and coactivator recruitment and corepressor release. Here, we carried out a detailed mutagenesis analysis of the H11-H12 loop (designated the L box) to study its contribution to hRARalpha activation process. Point mutations that reduced transactivation by atRA also reduced atRA-induced transrepression of AP1 transcription, correlating ligand-induced activation and repression. However, a correlation was not observed with these mutations when tested with another ligand CD367, a synthetic agonist with binding properties identical to those of atRA. Transcription was strongly inhibited in the presence of CD367 for some mutants, thus leading to an inverse agonist activity of this ligand. None of these mutations significantly altered binding affinity for either ligand, indicating that altered transcription was not caused by altered ligand binding by these mutations. Although simple correlations with transcriptional activities were not found, these mutations were also characterized by altered ligand-induced structural transitions, which were distinct for the atRA-hRARalpha or CD367-hRARalpha complexes. These results indicate that amino acids in the L box are involved in specifying trans-repressive and trans-activating properties of the hRARalpha, and support the notion that different agonists induce distinct conformations in the LBD of the receptor.

  7. Poliovirus RNA polymerase: in vitro enzymatic activities, fidelity of replication, and characterization of a temperature-sensitive RNA-negative mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, M.A.M.

    1985-01-01

    The in vitro activities of the purified poliovirus RNA polymerase were investigated in this study. The polymerase was shown to be a strict RNA dependent RNA polymerase. It only copied RNA templates but used either a DNA or RNA primer to initiate RNA synthesis. Partially purified polymerase has some DNA polymerase activities. Additional purification of the enzyme and studies with a mutant poliovirus RNA polymerase indicated that the DNA polymerase activities were due to a cellular polymerase. The fidelity of RNA replication in vitro by the purified poliovirus RNA polymerase was studied by measuring the rate of misincorporation of noncomplementary ribonucleotide monophosphates on synthetic homopolymeric RNA templates. The results showed that the ratio of noncomplementary to complementary ribonucleotides incorporated was 1-5 x 10/sup -3/. The viral polymerase of a poliovirus temperature sensitive RNA-negative mutant, Ts 10, was isolated. This study confirmed that the mutant was viable 33/sup 0/, but was RNA negative at 39/sup 0/. Characterization of the Ts 10 polymerase showed it was significantly more sensitive to heat inactivation than was the old-type polymerase. Highly purified poliovirions were found to contain several noncapsid proteins. At least two of these proteins were labeled by (/sup 35/S)methionine infected cells and appeared to be virally encoded proteins. One of these proteins was immunoprecipitated by anti-3B/sup vpg/ antiserum. This protein had the approximate Mr = 50,000 and appeared to be one of the previously identified 3B/sup vpg/ precursor proteins.

  8. Acquisition of pro-oxidant activity of fALS-linked SOD1 mutants as revealed using circular dichroism and UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimaki, Nobuhiro; Nishiya, Ken; Miura, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Takakazu

    2016-11-01

    The acquisition of pro-oxidant activity of the mutated form of human Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) has been investigated to clarify the relationship between mutations in SOD1 and the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Ala4 → Val (A4V) and Gly93 → Ala (G93A) mutants, which are representative ALS-linked SOD1 mutants, have been found to exhibit both the denaturation and the gain of pro-oxidant activity after incubation in the apo-form at a physiological condition of 37 °C and pH 7.4 and the rebinding of Cu2+. These characteristics are similar to those previously reported for the His43 → Arg (H43R) mutant. UV-resonance Raman spectra indicated that the coordination structure of the Cu-binding site catalyzing the oxidation reaction is the same among the denatured A4V, G93A, and H43R. Since wild-type SOD1 does not exhibit the denaturation in its apo-form at 37 °C and pH 7.4, the instability of the protein structure due to mutation can be considered as a significant factor that induces the denaturation and the subsequent pro-oxidant activity.

  9. Synergistic activity of Card11 mutant and Bcl6 in the development of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Taishi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Seto, Masao; Nakamura, Shigeo; Tsuzuki, Shinobu

    2016-11-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common subtype of malignant lymphoma; it derives from germinal center B cells. Although DLBCL harbors many genetic alterations, synergistic roles between such alterations in the development of lymphoma are largely undefined. We previously established a mouse model of lymphoma by transplanting gene-transduced germinal center B cells into mice. Here, we chose one of the frequently mutated genes in DLBCL, Card11 mutant, to explore its possible synergy with other genes, using our lymphoma model. Given that BCL6 and BCL2 expression and/or function are often deregulated in human lymphoma, we examined the possible synergy between Card11, Bcl6, and Bcl2. Germinal center B cells were induced in vitro, transduced with Card11 mutant, Bcl6, and Bcl2, and transplanted. Mice rapidly developed lymphomas, with exogenously transduced Bcl2 being dispensable. Although some mice developed lymphoma in the absence of transduced Bcl6, the absence was compensated by elevated expression of endogenous Bcl6. Additionally, the synergy between Card11 mutant and Bcl6 in the development of lymphoma was confirmed by the fact that the combination of Card11 mutant and Bcl6 caused lymphoma or death significantly earlier and with higher penetrance than Card11 mutant or Bcl6 alone. Lymphoma cells expressed interferon regulatory factor 4 and PR domain 1, indicating their differentiation toward plasmablasts, which characterize activated B cell-like DLBCL that represents a clinically aggressive subtype in humans. Thus, our mouse model provides a versatile tool for studying the synergistic roles of altered genes underlying lymphoma development.

  10. Structures of the G81A mutant form of the active chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and its complex with two of its substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Narayanasami; Dewanti, Asteriani; Merli, Angelo; Rossi, Gian Luigi; Mitra, Bharati; Mathews, F. Scott

    2009-06-01

    The crystal structure of the G81A mutant form of the chimera of (S)-mandelate dehydrogenase and of its complexes with two of its substrates reveal productive and non-productive modes of binding for the catalytic reaction. The structure also indicates the role of G81A in lowering the redox potential of the flavin co-factor leading to an ∼200-fold slower catalytic rate of substrate oxidation. (S)-Mandelate dehydrogenase (MDH) from Pseudomonas putida, a membrane-associated flavoenzyme, catalyzes the oxidation of (S)-mandelate to benzoylformate. Previously, the structure of a catalytically similar chimera, MDH-GOX2, rendered soluble by the replacement of its membrane-binding segment with the corresponding segment of glycolate oxidase (GOX), was determined and found to be highly similar to that of GOX except within the substituted segments. Subsequent attempts to cocrystallize MDH-GOX2 with substrate proved unsuccessful. However, the G81A mutants of MDH and of MDH-GOX2 displayed ∼100-fold lower reactivity with substrate and a modestly higher reactivity towards molecular oxygen. In order to understand the effect of the mutation and to identify the mode of substrate binding in MDH-GOX2, a crystallographic investigation of the G81A mutant of the MDH-GOX2 enzyme was initiated. The structures of ligand-free G81A mutant MDH-GOX2 and of its complexes with the substrates 2-hydroxyoctanoate and 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate were determined at 1.6, 2.5 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. In the ligand-free G81A mutant protein, a sulfate anion previously found at the active site is displaced by the alanine side chain introduced by the mutation. 2-Hydroxyoctanoate binds in an apparently productive mode for subsequent reaction, while 2-hydroxy-3-indolelactate is bound to the enzyme in an apparently unproductive mode. The results of this investigation suggest that a lowering of the polarity of the flavin environment resulting from the displacement of nearby water molecules caused by

  11. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  12. MiR-218 inhibits multidrug resistance (MDR) of gastric cancer cells by targeting Hedgehog/smoothened.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-Liang; Shi, Hui-Juan; Wang, Ji-Ping; Tang, Hong-Sheng; Cui, Shu-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is the main obstacle to successful chemotherapy for patients with gastric cancer. The microRNA miR-218 influences various pathobiological processes in gastric cancer, and its down-regulation in this disease raises the question of whether it normally inhibits MDR. In this study we observed that two MDR gastric cancer cell lines showed lower expression of miR-218 compared with their chemosensitive parental cell line. Overexpressing miR-218 chemosensitizes gastric cancer cells, slowed efflux of adriamycin, and accelerated drug-induced apoptosis. We identified the smoothened (SMO) gene as a functional target of miR-218, and found that SMO overexpression counteracts the chemosensitizing effects of miR-218. These findings suggest that miR-218 inhibits MDR of gastric cancer cells by down-regulating SMO expression.

  13. The R163K Mutant of Human Thymidylate Synthase Is Stabilized in an Active Conformation: Structural Asymmetry and Reactivity of Cysteine 195

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Lydia M.; Lovelace, Leslie L.; Lebioda, Lukasz

    2008-06-16

    Loop 181-197 of human thymidylate synthase (hTS) populates two conformational states. In the first state, Cys195, a residue crucial for catalytic activity, is in the active site (active conformer); in the other conformation, it is about 10 {angstrom} away, outside the active site (inactive conformer). We have designed and expressed an hTS variant, R163K, in which the inactive conformation is destabilized. The activity of this mutant is 33% higher than that of wt hTS, suggesting that at least one-third of hTS populates the inactive conformer. Crystal structures of R163K in two different crystal forms, with six and two subunits per asymmetric part of the unit cells, have been determined. All subunits of this mutant are in the active conformation while wt hTS crystallizes as the inactive conformer in similar mother liquors. The structures show differences in the environment of catalytic Cys195, which correlate with Cys195 thiol reactivity, as judged by its oxidation state. Calculations show that the molecular electrostatic potential at Cys195 differs between the subunits of the dimer. One of the dimers is asymmetric with a phosphate ion bound in only one of the subunits. In the absence of the phosphate ion, that is in the inhibitor-free enzyme, the tip of loop 47-53 is about 11 {angstrom} away from the active site.

  14. Arg156 in the AP2-Domain Exhibits the Highest Binding Activity among the 20 Individuals to the GCC Box in BnaERF-B3-hy15, a Mutant ERF Transcription Factor from Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Jing; Li, Meng-Yao; Wu, Bei; Liu, Yan-Jun; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    To develop mutants of the ERF factor with more binding activities to the GCC box, we performed in vitro directed evolution by using DNA shuffling and screened mutants through yeast one-hybrid assay. Here, a series of mutants were obtained and used to reveal key amino acids that induce changes in the DNA binding activity of the BnaERF-B3 protein. With the BnaERF-B3-hy15 as the template, we produced 12 mutants which host individual mutation of potential key residues. We found that amino acid 156 is the key site, and the other 18 mutants host the 18 corresponding individual amino acid residues at site 156. Among the 20 individuals comprising WT (Gly156), Mu3 (Arg156), and 18 mutants with other 18 amino acid residues, Arg156 in the AP2-domain is the amino acid residue with the highest binding activity to the GCC box. The structure of the α-helix in the AP2-domain affects the binding activity. Other residues within AP2-domain modulated binding activity of ERF protein, suggesting that these positions are important for binding activity. Comparison of the mutant and wild-type transcription factors revealed the relationship of protein function and sequence modification. Our result provides a potential useful resource for understanding the trans-activation of ERF proteins. PMID:27833627

  15. Activities of wildtype and mutant p53 in suppression of homologous recombination as measured by a retroviral vector system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiongbin; Lozano, Guillermina; Donehower, Lawrence A

    2003-01-28

    DNA repair of double strand breaks, interstrand DNA cross-links, and other types of DNA damage utilizes the processes of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining to repair the damage. Aberrant homologous recombination is likely to be responsible for a significant fraction of chromosomal deletions, duplications, and translocations that are observed in cancer cells. To facilitate measurement of homologous recombination frequencies in normal cells, mutant cells, and cancer cells, we have developed a high titer retroviral vector containing tandem repeats of mutant versions of a GFP-Zeocin resistance fusion gene and an intact neomycin resistance marker. Recombination between the tandem repeats regenerates a functional GFP-Zeo(R) marker that can be easily scored. This retroviral vector was used to assess homologous recombination frequencies in human cancer cells and rodent fibroblasts with differing dosages of wild type or mutant p53. Absence of wild type p53 stimulated spontaneous and ionizing radiation-induced homologous recombination, confirming previous studies. Moreover, p53(+/-) mouse fibroblasts show elevated levels of homologous recombination compared to their p53(+/+) counterparts following retroviral vector infection, indicating that p53 is haploinsufficient for suppression of homologous recombination. Transfection of vector-containing p53 null Saos-2 cells with various human cancer-associated p53 mutants revealed that these altered p53 proteins retain some recombination suppression function despite being totally inactive for transcriptional transactivation. The retroviral vector utilized in these studies may be useful in performing recombination assays on a wide array of cell types, including those not readily transfected by normal vectors.

  16. Free energy perturbation simulation on transition states and high-activity mutants of human butyrylcholinesterase for (-)-cocaine hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenchao; Pan, Yongmei; Fang, Lei; Gao, Daquan; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2010-08-26

    A unified computational approach based on free energy perturbation (FEP) simulations of transition states has been employed to calculate the mutation-caused shifts of the free energy change from the free enzyme to the rate-determining transition state for (-)-cocaine hydrolysis catalyzed by the currently most promising series of mutants of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) that contain the A199S/A328W/Y332G mutations. The FEP simulations were followed by Michaelis-Menten kinetics analysis determining the individual k(cat) and K(M) values missing for the A199S/F227A/A328W/Y332G mutant in this series. The calculated mutation-caused shifts of the free energy change from the free enzyme to the rate-determining transition state are in good agreement with the experimental kinetic data, demonstrating that the unified computational approach based on the FEP simulations of the transition states may be valuable for future computational design of new BChE mutants with a further improved catalytic efficiency against (-)-cocaine.

  17. Structure of solvation water around the active and inactive regions of a type III antifreeze protein and its mutants of lowered activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowska, Joanna; Kuffel, Anna; Zielkiewicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Water molecules from the solvation shell of the ice-binding surface are considered important for the antifreeze proteins to perform their function properly. Herein, we discuss the problem whether the extent of changes of the mean properties of solvation water can be connected with the antifreeze activity of the protein. To this aim, the structure of solvation water of a type III antifreeze protein from Macrozoarces americanus (eel pout) is investigated. A wild type of the protein is used, along with its three mutants, with antifreeze activities equal to 54% or 10% of the activity of the native form. The solvation water of the ice-binding surface and the rest of the protein are analyzed separately. To characterize the structure of solvation shell, parameters describing radial and angular characteristics of the mutual arrangement of the molecules were employed. They take into account short-distance (first hydration shell) or long-distance (two solvation shells) effects. The obtained results and the comparison with the results obtained previously for a hyperactive antifreeze protein from Choristoneura fumiferana lead to the conclusion that the structure and amino acid composition of the active region of the protein evolved to achieve two goals. The first one is the modification of the properties of the solvation water. The second one is the geometrical adjustment of the protein surface to the specific crystallographic plane of ice. Both of these goals have to be achieved simultaneously in order for the protein to perform its function properly. However, they seem to be independent from one another in a sense that very small antifreeze activity does not imply that properties of water become different from the ones observed for the wild type. The proteins with significantly lower activity still modify the mean properties of solvation water in a right direction, in spite of the fact that the accuracy of the geometrical match with the ice lattice is lost because of the

  18. A Novel fry1 Allele Reveals the Existence of a Mutant Phenotype Unrelated to 5′->3′ Exoribonuclease (XRN) Activities in Arabidopsis thaliana Roots

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Judith; Estavillo, Gonzalo M.; Javot, Hélène; Chiarenza, Serge; Mallory, Allison C.; Maizel, Alexis; Declerck, Marie; Pogson, Barry J.; Vaucheret, Hervé; Crespi, Martin; Desnos, Thierry; Thibaud, Marie-Christine; Nussaume, Laurent; Marin, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Background Mutations in the FRY1/SAL1 Arabidopsis locus are highly pleiotropic, affecting drought tolerance, leaf shape and root growth. FRY1 encodes a nucleotide phosphatase that in vitro has inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase and 3′,(2′),5′-bisphosphate nucleotide phosphatase activities. It is not clear which activity mediates each of the diverse biological functions of FRY1 in planta. Principal Findings A fry1 mutant was identified in a genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants deregulated in the expression of Pi High affinity Transporter 1;4 (PHT1;4). Histological analysis revealed that, in roots, FRY1 expression was restricted to the stele and meristems. The fry1 mutant displayed an altered root architecture phenotype and an increased drought tolerance. All of the phenotypes analyzed were complemented with the AHL gene encoding a protein that converts 3′-polyadenosine 5′-phosphate (PAP) into AMP and Pi. PAP is known to inhibit exoribonucleases (XRN) in vitro. Accordingly, an xrn triple mutant with mutations in all three XRNs shared the fry1 drought tolerance and root architecture phenotypes. Interestingly these two traits were also complemented by grafting, revealing that drought tolerance was primarily conferred by the rosette and that the root architecture can be complemented by long-distance regulation derived from leaves. By contrast, PHT1 expression was not altered in xrn mutants or in grafting experiments. Thus, PHT1 up-regulation probably resulted from a local depletion of Pi in the fry1 stele. This hypothesis is supported by the identification of other genes modulated by Pi deficiency in the stele, which are found induced in a fry1 background. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the 3′,(2′),5′-bisphosphate nucleotide phosphatase activity of FRY1 is involved in long-distance as well as local regulatory activities in roots. The local up-regulation of PHT1 genes transcription in roots likely results from local depletion of Pi

  19. Novel tryptophan metabolites, chromoazepinone A, B and C, produced by a blocked mutant of Chromobacterium violaceum, the biosynthetic implications and the biological activity of chromoazepinone A and B.

    PubMed

    Mizuoka, Takaaki; Toume, Kazufumi; Ishibashi, Masami; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2010-07-21

    Chromobacterium violaceum produces tryptophan metabolites, purple pigments of violacein and deoxyviolacein. A blocked mutant was prepared with N-methyl-N'-nitrosoguanidine to gain insights into the biosynthetic mechanisms of the pigments. Five tryptophan metabolites were isolated: three novel compounds, named chromoazepinone A, B and C and two known compounds, chromopyrrolic acid and arcyriarubin A. The structure determinations of the three novel compounds are described. The biosynthetic pathways of these metabolites are proposed on the basis of the findings about violacein biosynthesis. Chromoazepinone A and B were found to have an interesting effect of inhibition of Wnt signal transcriptional activity, which is implicated in the formation of numerous tumors when aberrantly activated.

  20. Molecular dynamics investigation on the poor sensitivity of A171T mutant NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) for MLN4924.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sharad; Singh, Amit; Mishra, Abha

    2014-01-01

    MLN4924 is an adenosine sulfamate analog that generates the inhibitory NEDD8-MLN4924 covalent complex. A single nucleotide transition that changes alanine 171 to threonine (A171T) of the NAE subunit UBA3 reduces the enzyme's sensitivity for MLN4924. Our molecular dynamics simulation study revealed that A171T transition brought remarkable conformational changes in enzyme structure (open ATP binding pocket), which reduced the interaction between MLN4924 and ATP binding pocket while wild form completely covered the MLN4924. A total difference of -49.75 kJ/mol was noticed in interaction energy (electrostatic and van der Waals) during simulation between mutant and wild form with MLN4924. Superimposition of final 20 ns mutant structure with reference structure showed significant change in native binding position as compared to wild form. Results were found in coherence with the recently reported in vitro studies which states that A171T transition leads to change in ATP binding pocket structure.

  1. Production of 5,8,11-Eicosatrienoic Acid (Mead Acid) by a (Delta)6 Desaturation Activity-Enhanced Mutant Derived from a (Delta)12 Desaturase-Defective Mutant of an Arachidonic Acid-Producing Fungus, Mortierella alpina 1S-4.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, H; Nishihara, M; Hirano, Y; Kamada, N; Akimoto, K; Konishi, K; Shimizu, S

    1997-05-01

    Enhanced production of 5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid (Mead acid, 20:3(omega)9) was attained by a mutant fungus, Mortierella alpina M209-7, derived from (Delta)12 desaturase-defective M. alpina Mut48. The 20:3(omega)9 production by M209-7 was 1.3 times greater than that by its parent strain, Mut48. This is thought to be due to its enhanced (Delta)6 desaturation activity, which was 1.4 times higher than that of Mut48. In both strains, 87 to 88% of the total lipids comprised triacylglycerol (TG) and 85% of 20:3(omega)9 was contained in TG. On optimization of the culture conditions for M209-7, earlier glucose feeding and shifting of the growth temperature from 28 to 19(deg)C on the second day were shown to be effective. Under the optimal conditions with a 10-liter jar fermentor, 20:3(omega)9 production reached 1.65 g/liter of culture medium (corresponding to 118 mg/g of dry mycelia and 28.9% of total fatty acids), which is about twice that reported previously (0.8 g/liter).

  2. Suppression of abnormal morphology and extracytoplasmic function sigma activity in Bacillus subtilis ugtP mutant cells by expression of heterologous glucolipid synthases from Acholeplasma laidlawii.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Satoshi; Seki, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Kouji; Hara, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Glucolipids in Bacillus subtilis are synthesized by UgtP processively transferring glucose from UDP-glucose to diacylglycerol. Here we conclude that the abnormal morphology of a ugtP mutant is caused by lack of glucolipids, since the same morphology arises after abolition of glucolipid production by disruption of pgcA and gtaB, which are involved in UDP-glucose synthesis. Conversely, expression of a monoglucosyldiacylglycerol (MGlcDG) produced by 1,2-diacylglycerol 3-glucosyltransferase from Acholeplasma laidlawii (alMGS) almost completely suppressed the ugtP disruptant phenotype. Activation of extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigmas (SigM, SigV, and SigX) in the ugtP mutant was decreased by alMGS expression, and was suppressed to low levels by MgSO4 addition. When alMGS and alDGS (A. laidlawii 1,2-diacylglycerol-3-glucose (1-2)-glucosyltransferase producing diglucosyldiacylglycerol (DGlcDG)) were simultaneously expressed, SigX activation was repressed to wild type level. These observations suggest that MGlcDG molecules are required for maintenance of B. subtilis cell shape and regulation of ECF sigmas, and DGlcDG regulates SigX activity.

  3. Caspase-3 activation downstream from reactive oxygen species in heat-induced apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells carrying a mutant p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, D; Sasaki, M; Watanabe, N

    2001-04-01

    In the present study we investigated the intracellular signaling pathway leading to p53-independent activation of caspase-3 during heat-induced apoptosis of pancreatic carcinoma cells. Induction of mutant p53 protein, but not p21/WAF-1, was observed after heat treatment of both heat-resistant (PANC-1) and heat-sensitive (MIAPaCa-2) cells. A specific inhibitor of caspase-3 (Ac-DMQD-CHO) caused 84% and 92% inhibition of apoptosis in MIAPaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells, respectively. Caspase-3 mRNA expression was increased in both cell lines after heat treatment. Further, heat-induced caspase-3 activity detected by fluorogenic assay in MIAPaCa-2 cells was almost completely inhibited by addition of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. In contrast, Ac-DMQD-CHO had no inhibitory effect on amounts of reactive oxygen species in heat-treated MIAPaCa-2 cells. These results suggest a possible pathway by which reactive oxygen species lead to caspase-3 activation to cause heat-induced death of pancreatic carcinoma cells carrying mutant p53.

  4. Escherichia coli UmuC active site mutants: effects on translesion DNA synthesis, mutagenesis and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Kuban, Wojciech; Vaisman, Alexandra; McDonald, John P.; Karata, Kiyonobu; Yang, Wei; Goodman, Myron F.; Woodgate, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli polymerase V (pol V/UmuD'2C) is a low-fidelity DNA polymerase that has recently been shown to avidly incorporate ribonucleotides (rNTPs) into undamaged DNA. The fidelity and sugar selectivity of pol V can be modified by missense mutations around the “steric gate” of UmuC. Here, we analyze the ability of three steric gate mutants of UmuC to facilitate translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) of a cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) in vitro, and to promote UV-induced mutagenesis and cell survival in vivo. The pol V (UmuC_F10L) mutant discriminates against rNTP and incorrect dNTP incorporation much better than wild-type pol V and although exhibiting a reduced ability to bypass a CPD in vitro, does so with high-fidelity and consequently produces minimal UV-induced mutagenesis in vivo. In contrast, pol V (UmuC_Y11A) readily misincorporates both rNTPs and dNTPs during efficient TLS of the CPD in vitro. However, cells expressing umuD'C (Y11A) were considerably more UV-sensitive and exhibited lower levels of UV-induced mutagenesis than cells expressing wild-type umuD'C or umuD'C (Y11F). We propose that the increased UV-sensitivity and reduced UV-mutability of umuD'C (Y11A) is due to excessive incorporation of rNTPs during TLS that are subsequently targeted for repair, rather than an inability to traverse UV-induced lesions. PMID:22784977

  5. Terminal oxidase mutants of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 show increased electrogenic activity in biological photo-voltaic systems.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Robert W; Bombelli, Paolo; Lea-Smith, David J; Howe, Christopher J

    2013-08-28

    Biological photo-voltaic systems are a type of microbial fuel cell employing photosynthetic microbes at the anode, enabling the direct transduction of light energy to electrical power. Unlike the anaerobic bacteria found in conventional microbial fuel cells that use metals in the environment as terminal electron acceptors, oxygenic photosynthetic organisms are poorly adapted for electron transfer out of the cell. Mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were created in which all combinations of the three respiratory terminal oxidase complexes had been inactivated. These strains were screened for the ability to reduce the membrane-impermeable soluble electron acceptor ferricyanide, and the results were compared to the performance of the mutants in a biological photo-voltaic system. Deletion of the two thylakoid-localised terminal oxidases, the bd-quinol oxidase and cytochrome c oxidase resulted in a 16-fold increase in ferricyanide reduction rate in the dark compared to the wild-type. A further improvement to a 24-fold increase was seen upon deletion of the remaining "alternative respiratory terminal oxidase". These increases were reflected in the peak power generated in the biological photo-voltaic systems. Inactivation of all three terminal oxidase complexes resulted in a substantial redirection of reducing power; in the dark the equivalent of 10% of the respiratory electron flux was channelled to ferricyanide, compared to less than 0.2% in the wild-type. Only minor improvements in ferricyanide reduction rates over the wild-type were seen in illuminated conditions, where carbon dioxide is preferentially used as an electron sink. This study demonstrates the potential for optimising photosynthetic microbes for direct electrical current production.

  6. Synergistic activity of vorinostat combined with gefitinib but not with sorafenib in mutant KRAS human non-small cell lung cancers and hepatocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jeannot, Victor; Busser, Benoit; Vanwonterghem, Laetitia; Michallet, Sophie; Ferroudj, Sana; Cokol, Murat; Coll, Jean-Luc; Ozturk, Mehmet; Hurbin, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    Development of drug resistance limits the efficacy of targeted therapies. Alternative approaches using different combinations of therapeutic agents to inhibit several pathways could be a more effective strategy for treating cancer. The effects of the approved epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (gefitinib) or a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor (sorafenib) in combination with a histone deacetylase inhibitor (vorinostat) on cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and signaling pathway activation in human lung adenocarcinoma and hepatocarcinoma cells with wild-type EGFR and mutant KRAS were investigated. The effects of the synergistic drug combinations were also studied in human lung adenocarcinoma and hepatocarcinoma cells in vivo. The combination of gefitinib and vorinostat synergistically reduced cell growth and strongly induced apoptosis through inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor/protein kinase B (IGF-1R/AKT)-dependent signaling pathway. Moreover, the gefitinib and vorinostat combination strongly inhibited tumor growth in mice with lung adenocarcinoma or hepatocarcinoma tumor xenografts. In contrast, the combination of sorafenib and vorinostat did not inhibit cell proliferation compared to a single treatment and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest without apoptosis. The sorafenib and vorinostat combination sustained the IGF-1R-, AKT-, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways. These results showed that there was synergistic cytotoxicity when vorinostat was combined with gefitinib for both lung adenocarcinoma and hepatocarcinoma with mutant KRAS in vitro and in vivo but that the combination of vorinostat with sorafenib did not show any benefit. These findings highlight the important role of the IGF-1R/AKT pathway in the resistance to targeted therapies and support the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors in combination with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, especially for treating

  7. A p53-independent apoptotic mechanism of adenoviral mutant E1A was involved in its selective antitumor activity for human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Zhao, Jingjing; Ge, Yan; Zhu, Qi; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-01-01

    The conserved regions (CR) of adenoviral E1A had been shown to be necessary for disruption of pRb-E2F transcription factor complexes and induction of the S phase. Here we constructed a mutant adenoviral E1A with Rb-binding ability absent (E1A 30-60aa and 120-127aa deletion, mE1A) and investigated its antitumor capacities in vitro and in vivo. The mE1A suppressed the viability of tumor cells as efficiently as the wild type E1A, and there was no cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Although the mE1A arrested tumor cell cycle with the same manner as E1A, the former played a different role on cell cycle regulation compared with E1A in normal cells, which might contribute to its selective antitumor activity. E1A and mE1A had accumulated inactive p53, decreased the expression of mdm2, Cdkn1a (also named p21), increased p21's nuclear distribution and induced tumor cell apoptosis in a p53-indenpent manner. Further, E1A or mE1A significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft models. Especially, tumor-bearing mice treated with mE1A had higher survival rate than those treated with E1A. Our data demonstrated that mutant adenoviral E1A significantly induced tumor cell apoptosis in a p53-indenpednt manner and had selective tumor suppressing ability. The observations of adenoviral E1A mutant had provided a novel mechanism for E1A's complex activities during infection. PMID:27340782

  8. Synthesis, Docking, In Vitro and In Vivo Antimalarial Activity of Hybrid 4-aminoquinoline-1,3,5-triazine Derivatives Against Wild and Mutant Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Hans Raj; Singh, Udaya Pratap; Gahtori, Prashant; Ghosh, Surajit Kumar; Gogoi, Kabita; Prakash, Anil; Singh, Ramendra K

    2015-09-01

    A new series of hybrid 4-aminoquinoline-1,3,5-triazine derivatives was synthesized by a four-step reaction. Target compounds were screened for in vitro antimalarial activity against chloroquine-sensitive (3D-7) and chloroquine-resistant (RKL-2) strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Compounds exhibited, by and large, good antimalarial activity against the resistant strain, while two of them, that is 8g and 8a, displayed higher activity against both the strains of P. falciparum. Additionally, docking study was performed on both wild (1J3I.pdb) and quadruple mutant (N51I, C59R, S108 N, I164L, 3QG2.pdb) type pf-DHFR-TS to highlight the structural features of hybrid molecules.

  9. [Heavy metal cation-induced increase in the antimicrobial activity of gramicidin S. Increased sensitivity of metal-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli B to the antibiotic].

    PubMed

    Kuzovnikova, T A; Fedorov, Iu I

    1990-04-01

    Gramicidin S response of metal resistant mutants of E. coli B and the effect of concentrations of Cu2+, Ag+, Co2+ and Cd2+ on the growth and sensitivity of E. coli B to cationic antibiotics, i.e. gramicidin S2+ and streptomycin2+, were studied. It was shown that the metal-cumulating mutants of E. coli B with two different mechanisms of cross resistance to Cu2+, Cd2+ and Ag+ had higher sensitivity to gramicidin S than the initial wild type strain of E. coli B. It was found that in the threshold or higher doses the salts of Cu, Ag, Co and Cd increased the gramicidin S antimicrobial action on actively metabolizing cells of E. coli B. Analysis of the experimental data as well as the literature ones suggested that the synergic action of gramicidin S and the heavy metals stemmed from an increase in the cationic conductivity of the cytoplasma membrane modified by the metals in the threshold doses which induced an increase in the transport and accumulation of the cations in the bacterial cells by the electric field gradient (with the negative sign inside). Withdrawal of Ca2+ and Mg2+ from the E. coli outer structures into the cytoplasm impaired the barrier properties of the outer membrane and promoted binding of the gramicidin S cations to the liberated anionic groups of the E. coli outer structures and potentiation of the gramicidin S antimicrobial activity as was shown in our experiments.

  10. Aspirin Suppresses Growth in PI3K-Mutant Breast Cancer by Activating AMPK and Inhibiting mTORC1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Henry, Whitney S; Laszewski, Tyler; Tsang, Tiffany; Beca, Francisco; Beck, Andrew H; McAllister, Sandra S; Toker, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Despite the high incidence of oncogenic mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of PI3K, PI3K inhibitors have yielded little clinical benefit for breast cancer patients. Recent epidemiologic studies have suggested a therapeutic benefit from aspirin intake in cancers harboring oncogenic PIK3CA Here, we show that mutant PIK3CA-expressing breast cancer cells have greater sensitivity to aspirin-mediated growth suppression than their wild-type counterparts. Aspirin decreased viability and anchorage-independent growth of mutant PIK3CA breast cancer cells independently of its effects on COX-2 and NF-κB. We ascribed the effects of aspirin to AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, mTORC1 inhibition, and autophagy induction. In vivo, oncogenic PIK3CA-driven mouse mammary tumors treated daily with aspirin resulted in decreased tumor growth kinetics, whereas combination therapy of aspirin and a PI3K inhibitor further attenuated tumor growth. Our study supports the evaluation of aspirin and PI3K pathway inhibitors as a combination therapy for targeting breast cancer. Cancer Res; 77(3); 790-801. ©2016 AACR.

  11. Alterations in grooming activity and syntax in heterozygous SERT and BDNF knockout mice: the utility of behavior-recognition tools to characterize mutant mouse phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pham, Mimi; Roth, Andrew; Cachat, Jonathan; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Kalueff, Allan V

    2012-12-01

    Serotonin transporter (SERT) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are key modulators of molecular signaling, cognition and behavior. Although SERT and BDNF mutant mouse phenotypes have been extensively characterized, little is known about their self-grooming behavior. Grooming represents an important behavioral domain sensitive to environmental stimuli and is increasingly used as a model for repetitive behavioral syndromes, such as autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The present study used heterozygous ((+/-)) SERT and BDNF male mutant mice on a C57BL/6J background and assessed their spontaneous self-grooming behavior applying both manual and automated techniques. Overall, SERT(+/-) mice displayed a general increase in grooming behavior, as indicated by more grooming bouts and more transitions between specific grooming stages. SERT(+/-) mice also aborted more grooming bouts, but showed generally unaltered activity levels in the observation chamber. In contrast, BDNF(+/-) mice displayed a global reduction in grooming activity, with fewer bouts and transitions between specific grooming stages, altered grooming syntax, as well as hypolocomotion and increased turning behavior. Finally, grooming data collected by manual and automated methods (HomeCageScan) significantly correlated in our experiments, confirming the utility of automated high-throughput quantification of grooming behaviors in various genetic mouse models with increased or decreased grooming phenotypes. Taken together, these findings indicate that mouse self-grooming behavior is a reliable behavioral biomarker of genetic deficits in SERT and BDNF pathways, and can be reliably measured using automated behavior-recognition technology.

  12. Target cell death triggered by cytotoxic T lymphocytes: a target cell mutant distinguishes passive pore formation and active cell suicide mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Ucker, D S; Wilson, J D; Hebshi, L D

    1994-01-01

    The role of the target cell in its own death mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) has been controversial. The ability of the pore-forming granule components of CTL to induce target cell death directly has been taken to suggest an essentially passive role for the target. This view of CTL-mediated killing ascribes to the target the single role of providing an antigenic stimulus to the CTL; this signal results in the vectoral degranulation and secretion of pore-forming elements onto the target. On the other hand, by a number of criteria, target cell death triggered by CTL appears fundamentally different from death resulting from membrane damage and osmotic lysis. CTL-triggered target cell death involves primary internal lesions of the target cell that reflect a physiological cell death process. Orderly nuclear disintegration, including lamin phosphorylation and solubilization, chromatin condensation, and genome digestion, are among the earliest events, preceding the loss of plasma membrane integrity. We have tested directly the involvement of the target cell in its own death by examining whether we could isolate mutants of target cells that have retained the ability to be recognized by and provide an antigenic stimulus to CTL while having lost the capacity to respond by dying. Here, we describe one such mutant, BW87. We have used this CTL-resistant mutant to analyze the mechanisms of CTL-triggered target cell death under a variety of conditions. The identification of a mutable target cell element essential for the cell death response to CTL provides genetic evidence that target cell death reflects an active cell suicide process similar to other physiological cell deaths. PMID:8264610

  13. Functional Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Points to Novel Roles for Glutathione in Coupling H2O2 to Activation of Salicylic Acid Accumulation and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yi; Chaouch, Sejir; Mhamdi, Amna; Queval, Guillaume; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Through its interaction with H2O2, glutathione is a candidate for transmission of signals in plant responses to pathogens, but identification of signaling roles is complicated by its antioxidant function. Using a genetic approach based on a conditional catalase-deficient Arabidopsis mutant, cat2, this study aimed at establishing whether GSH plays an important functional role in the transmission of signals downstream of H2O2. Results: Introducing the cad2 or allelic mutations in the glutathione synthesis pathway into cat2 blocked H2O2-triggered GSH oxidation and accumulation. While no effects on NADP(H) or ascorbate were observed, and H2O2-induced decreases in growth were maintained, blocking GSH modulation antagonized salicylic acid (SA) accumulation and SA-dependent responses. Other novel double and triple mutants were produced and compared with cat2 cad2 at the levels of phenotype, expression of marker genes, nontargeted metabolite profiling, accumulation of SA, and bacterial resistance. Most of the effects of the cad2 mutation on H2O2-triggered responses were distinct from those produced by mutations for GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE1 (GR1) or NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES 1 (NPR1), and were linked to compromised induction of ISOCHORISMATE SYNTHASE1 (ICS1) and ICS1-dependent SA accumulation. Innovation: A novel genetic approach was used in which GSH content or antioxidative capacity was independently modified in an H2O2 signaling background. Analysis of new double and triple mutants allowed us to infer previously undescribed regulatory roles for GSH. Conclusion: In parallel to its antioxidant role, GSH acts independently of NPR1 to allow increased intracellular H2O2 to activate SA signaling, a key defense response in plants. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 2106–2121. PMID:23148658

  14. Angelman syndrome-associated ubiquitin ligase UBE3A/E6AP mutants interfere with the proteolytic activity of the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Tomaić, V; Banks, L

    2015-01-29

    Angelman syndrome, a severe neurodevelopmental disease, occurs primarily due to genetic defects, which cause lack of expression or mutations in the wild-type E6AP/UBE3A protein. A proportion of the Angelman syndrome patients bear UBE3A point mutations, which do not interfere with the expression of the full-length protein, however, these individuals still develop physiological conditions of the disease. Interestingly, most of these mutations are catalytically defective, thereby indicating the importance of UBE3A enzymatic activity role in the Angelman syndrome pathology. In this study, we show that Angelman syndrome-associated mutants interact strongly with the proteasome via the S5a proteasomal subunit, resulting in an overall inhibitory effect on the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Our results suggest that mutated catalytically inactive forms of UBE3A may cause defects in overall proteasome function, which could have an important role in the Angelman syndrome pathology.

  15. Deletion mutants of Harvey ras p21 protein reveal the absolute requirement of at least two distant regions for GTP-binding and transforming activities.

    PubMed Central

    Lacal, J C; Anderson, P S; Aaronson, S A

    1986-01-01

    Deletions of small sequences from the viral Harvey ras gene have been generated, and resulting ras p21 mutants have been expressed in Escherichia coli. Purification of each deleted protein allowed the in vitro characterization of GTP-binding, GTPase and autokinase activity of the proteins. Microinjection of the highly purified proteins into quiescent NIH/3T3 cells, as well as transfection experiments utilizing a long terminal repeat (LTR)-containing vector, were utilized to analyze the biological activity of the deleted proteins. Two small regions located at 6-23 and 152-165 residues are shown to be absolutely required for in vitro and in vivo activities of the ras product. By contrast, the variable region comprising amino acids 165-184 was shown not to be necessary for either in vitro or in vivo activities. Thus, we demonstrate that: (i) amino acid sequences at positions 5-23 and 152-165 of ras p21 protein are probably directly involved in the GTP-binding activity; (ii) GTP-binding is required for the transforming activity of ras p21 and by extension for the normal function of the proto-oncogene product; and (iii) the variable region at the C-terminal end of the ras p21 molecule from amino acids 165 to 184 is not required for transformation. Images Fig.2. Fig.4. PMID:3011420

  16. Recombinant soluble human tissue factor secreted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and refolded from Escherichia coli inclusion bodies: glycosylation of mutants, activity and physical characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, M J; Ruf, W; Miles, D J; Edgington, T S; Wright, P E

    1995-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the cell-surface transmembrane receptor that initiates both the extrinsic and intrinsic blood coagulation cascades. The abilities of TF to associate with Factor VIIa and Factor X in a ternary complex and to enable proteolytic activation of Factor X by Factor VIIa reside in the extracellular domain of TF. We describe the expression of the surface domain of TF (truncated TF, tTF) in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli and the biochemical and physical characterization of the recombinant proteins. Wild-type tTF and several glycosylation-site mutants were secreted efficiently by S. cerevisiae under the control of the yeast prepro-alpha-signal sequence; the T13A,N137D double mutant was the most homogeneous variant expressed in milligram quantities. Wild-type tTF was expressed in a non-native state in E. coli inclusion bodies as a fusion protein with a poly(His) leader. The fusion protein could be fully renatured and the leader removed by proteolysis with thrombin; the correct molecular mass (24,729 Da) of the purified protein was confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry. Recombinant tTFs from yeast, E. coli and Chinese hamster ovary cells were identical in their abilities to bind Factor VIIa, to enhance the catalytic activity of Factor VIIa and to enhance the proteolytic activation of Factor X by Factor VIIa. Furthermore, CD, fluorescence emission and NMR spectra of the yeast and E. coli proteins indicated that these proteins are essentially identical structurally. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7654202

  17. Structure of the Constitutively Active Double Mutant CheY[superscript D13K Y106W] Alone and in Complex with a FliM Peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, Collin M.; Quillin, Michael L.; Campos, Andres; Lu, Justine; McEvoy, Megan M.; Hausrath, Andrew C.; Westbrook, Edwin M.; Matsumura, Philip; Matthews, Brian W.; Dahlquist, Frederick W.

    2010-11-16

    CheY is a member of the response regulator protein superfamily that controls the chemotactic swimming response of motile bacteria. The CheY double mutant D13K Y106W (CheY**) is resistant to phosphorylation, yet is a highly effective mimic of phosphorylated CheY in vivo and in vitro. The conformational attributes of this protein that enable it to signal in a phosphorylation-independent manner are unknown. We have solved the crystal structure of selenomethionine-substituted CheY** in the presence of its target, a peptide (FliM{sub 16}) derived from the flagellar motor switch, FliM, to 1.5 {angstrom} resolution with an R-factor of 19.6%. The asymmetric unit contains four CheY** molecules, two with FliM{sub 16} bound, and two without. The two CheY** molecules in the asymmetric unit that are bound to FliM{sub 16} adopt a conformation similar to BeF{sub 3}{sup -}-activated wild-type CheY, and also bind FliM{sub 16} in a nearly identical manner. The CheY** molecules that do not bind FliM{sub 16} are found in a conformation similar to unphosphorylated wild-type CheY, suggesting that the active phenotype of this mutant is enabled by a facile interconversion between the active and inactive conformations. Finally, we propose a ligand-binding model for CheY and CheY**, in which Ile95 changes conformation in a Tyr/Trp106-dependent manner to accommodate FliM.

  18. Mutant calreticulin requires both its mutant C-terminus and the thrombopoietin receptor for oncogenic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Elf, Shannon; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Chen, Edwin; Perales-Patón, Javier; Rosen, Emily A.; Ko, Amy; Peisker, Fabian; Florescu, Natalie; Giannini, Silvia; Wolach, Ofir; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Tothova, Zuzana; Losman, Julie-Aurore; Schneider, Rebekka K.; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Mullally, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Somatic mutations in calreticulin (CALR) are present in approximately 40% of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) but the mechanism by which mutant CALR is oncogenic remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that expression of mutant CALR alone is sufficient to engender MPN in mice and recapitulates the disease phenotype of CALR-mutant MPN patients. We further show that the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL is required for mutant CALR-driven transformation through JAK-STAT pathway activation, thus rendering mutant CALR-transformed hematopoietic cells sensitive to JAK2 inhibition. Finally, we demonstrate that the oncogenicity of mutant CALR is dependent on the positive electrostatic charge of the C-terminus of the mutant protein, which is necessary for physical interaction between mutant CALR and MPL. Together, our findings elucidate a novel paradigm of cancer pathogenesis and reveal how CALR mutations induce MPN. PMID:26951227

  19. Changes of alternative oxidase activity, capacity and protein content in leaves of Cucumis sativus wild-type and MSC16 mutant grown under different light intensities.

    PubMed

    Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Ostaszewska, Monika; Galle, Alexander; Flexas, Jaume; Rychter, Anna M; Ribas-Carbo, Miquel

    2009-12-01

    In vitro studies demonstrated that alternative oxidase (AOX) is biochemically regulated by a sulfhydryl-disulfide system, interaction with alpha-ketoacids, ubiquinone pool redox state and protein content among others. However, there is still scarce information about the in vivo regulation of the AOX. Cucumis sativus wild-type (WT) and MSC16 mutant plants were grown under two different light intensities and were used to analyze the relationship between the amount of leaf AOX protein and its in vivo capacity and activity at night and day periods. WT and MSC16 plants presented lower total respiration (V(t)), cytochrome oxidase pathway (COP) activity (v(cyt)) and alternative oxidase pathway (AOP) activity (v(alt)) when grown at low light (LL), although growth light intensity did not change the amount of cytochrome oxidase (COX) nor AOX protein. Changes of v(cyt) related to growing light conditions suggested a substrate availability and energy demand control. On the other hand, the total amount of AOX protein present in the tissue does not play a role in the regulation neither of the capacity nor of the activity of the AOP in vivo. Soluble carbohydrates were directly related to the activity of the AOP. However, although differences in soluble sugar contents mostly regulate the capacity of the AOP at different growth light intensities, additional regulatory mechanisms are necessary to fully explain the observed results.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of an active-site mutant of `loopless' family GH19 chitinase from Bryum coronatum in a complex with chitotetraose.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Takayuki; Umemoto, Naoyuki; Taira, Toki; Fukamizo, Tamo; Numata, Tomoyuki

    2013-12-01

    The catalytic mechanism of family GH19 chitinases is not well understood owing to insufficient information regarding the three-dimensional structures of enzyme-substrate complexes. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a selenomethionine-labelled active-site mutant of `loopless' family GH19 chitinase from the moss Bryum coronatum in complex with chitotetraose, (GlcNAc)4, are reported. The crystals were grown using the vapour-diffusion method. They diffracted to 1.58 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at the Photon Factory. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.5, b = 58.4, c = 48.1 Å, β = 115.6°. The asymmetric unit of the crystals is expected to contain one protein molecule, with a Matthews coefficient of 2.08 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 41%.

  1. Genetic and biochemical analysis of gonococcal IgA1 protease: cloning in Escherichia coli and construction of mutants of gonococci that fail to produce the activity.

    PubMed Central

    Koomey, J M; Gill, R E; Falkow, S

    1982-01-01

    The biological significance of bacterial extracellular proteases that specifically cleave human IgA1 is unknown. We have prepared a gene bank of gonococcal chromosomal DNA in Escherichia coli K-12 using a cosmid cloning system. Among these clones, we have identified and characterized an E. coli strain that elaborates an extracellular endopeptidase that is indistinguishable from gonococcal IgA1 protease in its substrate specificity and action on human IgA1. Analysis of recombinant plasmids and examination of plasmid-specific peptides in minicells have shown that the IgA1 protease activity in E. coli is associated with expression of a Mr 140,000 peptide. We have isolated IgA1 protease-deficient mutants of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by reintroduction of physically defined deletions of the cloned gene into the gonococcal chromosome by transformation. Images PMID:6818556

  2. Characterization of a stable spheroplast type L-form of Proteus mirabilis D 52 as cell envelope mutant. I. Isolation, growth characteristics, biochemical activities, and sensitivity to bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Gumpert, J; Taubeneck, U

    1975-01-01

    A stable spheroplast type L-form could be isolated by transferring 627 single colonies and 195 agar blocks with several colonies of unstable L-forms of Proteus mirabilis D 52 on agar media without supplements of penicillin. The L-form grows well on complex and synthetic agar media, however, it failed to grow in any of the liquid media which have been proved. With one exception (formation of acid from maltose) the L-form shows the same bioche mical activities like the parent rod-shaped bacterium. However, the insensitivity for various phages and the failure of DAP in the envelopes demonstrate that there are profound alterations in the biosynthesis and structure of the murein and of the outer wall layers. The results of these investigations and an ultrastructural analysis (Gumpert and Taubeneck 1975) show that the stable spheroplast type L-form LD 52 B of Proteus mirabilis must be considered as a true cell envelope mutant.

  3. Long-lived glycosyl-enzyme intermediate mimic produced by formate re-activation of a mutant endoglucanase lacking its catalytic nucleophile.

    PubMed Central

    Viladot, J L; Canals, F; Batllori, X; Planas, A

    2001-01-01

    The mutant E134A 1,3-1,4-beta-glucanase from Bacillus licheniformis, in which the catalytic nucleophilic residue has been removed by mutation to alanine, has its hydrolytic activity rescued by exogenous formate in a concentration-dependent manner. A long-lived alpha-glycosyl formate is detected and identified by (1)H-NMR and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight-MS. The intermediate is kinetically competent, since it is, at least partially, enzymically hydrolysed, and able to act as a glycosyl donor in transglycosylation reactions. This transient compound represents a true covalent glycosyl-enzyme intermediate mimic of the proposed covalent intermediate in the reaction mechanism of retaining glycosidases. PMID:11256951

  4. Molecular analysis of SUMF1 mutations: stability and residual activity of mutant formylglycine-generating enzyme determine disease severity in multiple sulfatase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schlotawa, Lars; Steinfeld, Robert; von Figura, Kurt; Dierks, Thomas; Gärtner, Jutta

    2008-01-01

    Multiple Sulfatase Deficiency (MSD) is a rare inborn autosomal-recessive disorder, which mainly combines clinical features of metachromatic leukodystrophy, mucopolysaccharidosis and X-linked ichthyosis. The clinical course ranges from neonatal severe to mild juvenile cases. MSD is caused by mutations in the SUMF1 gene encoding the formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE). FGE posttranslationally activates sulfatases by generating formylglycine in their catalytic sites. We analyzed the functional consequences of missense mutations p.A177P, p.W179S, p.A279V and p.R349W with regard to FGE's subcellular localization, enzymatic activity, protein stability, intracellular retention and resulting sulfatase activities. All four mutations did not affect localization of FGE in the endoplasmic reticulum of MSD fibroblasts. However, they decreased its specific enzymatic activity to less than 1% (p.A177P and p.R349W), 3% (p.W179S) or 23% (p.A279V). Protein stability was severely decreased for p.A279V and p.R349W, and almost comparable to wild type for p.A177P and p.W179S. The patient with the mildest clinical phenotype carries the mutation p.A279V leading to decreased FGE protein stability, but high residual enzymatic activity and only slightly reduced sulfatase activities. In contrast, the most severely affected patient carries the mutation p.R349W leading to drastically decreased protein stability, very low residual enzymatic activity and considerably reduced sulfatase activities. Our functional studies provide novel insight into the molecular defect underlying MSD and reveal that both residual enzyme activity and protein stability of FGE contribute to the clinical phenotype. The application of improved functional assays to determine these two molecular parameters of FGE mutants may enable the prediction of the clinical outcome in the future.

  5. A Novel Hsp90 Inhibitor Activates Compensatory Heat Shock Protein Responses and Autophagy and Alleviates Mutant A53T α-Synuclein Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Rui; Zhou, Wenbo; Siegel, David; Kitson, Russell R A; Freed, Curt R; Moody, Christopher J; Ross, David

    2015-12-01

    A potential cause of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD), is protein misfolding and aggregation that in turn leads to neurotoxicity. Targeting Hsp90 is an attractive strategy to halt neurodegenerative diseases, and benzoquinone ansamycin (BQA) Hsp90 inhibitors such as geldanamycin (GA) and 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin have been shown to be beneficial in mutant A53T α-synuclein PD models. However, current BQA inhibitors result in off-target toxicities via redox cycling and/or arylation of nucleophiles at the C19 position. We developed novel 19-substituted BQA (19BQA) as a means to prevent arylation. In this study, our data demonstrated that 19-phenyl-GA, a lead 19BQA in the GA series, was redox stable and exhibited little toxicity relative to its parent quinone GA in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells as examined by oxygen consumption, trypan blue, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), and apoptosis assays. Meanwhile, 19-phenyl-GA retained the ability to induce autophagy and potentially protective heat shock proteins (HSPs) such as Hsp70 and Hsp27. We found that transduction of A53T, but not wild type (WT) α-synuclein, induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. 19-Phenyl-GA decreased oligomer formation and toxicity of A53T α-synuclein in transduced cells. Mechanistic studies indicated that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 ribosomal S6 kinase signaling was activated by A53T but not WT α-synuclein, and 19-phenyl-GA decreased mTOR activation that may be associated with A53T α-synuclein toxicity. In summary, our results indicate that 19BQAs such as 19-phenyl-GA may provide a means to modulate protein-handling systems including HSPs and autophagy, thereby reducing the aggregation and toxicity of proteins such as mutant A53T α-synuclein.

  6. Molecular imaging of active mutant L858R EGF receptor (EGFR) kinase-expressing nonsmall cell lung carcinomas using PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hsin Hsien; Ogawa, Kazuma; Balatoni, Julius; Mukhapadhyay, Uday; Pal, Asutosh; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Shavrin, Aleksandr; Soghomonyan, Suren; Flores, Leo; Young, Daniel; Volgin, Andrei Y; Najjar, Amer M; Krasnykh, Victor; Tong, William; Alauddin, Mian M; Gelovani, Juri G

    2011-01-25

    The importance of the EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway in the development and progression of nonsmall cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) is widely recognized. Gene sequencing studies revealed that a majority of tumors responding to EGFR kinase inhibitors harbor activating mutations in the EGFR kinase domain. This underscores the need for novel biomarkers and diagnostic imaging approaches to identify patients who may benefit from particular therapeutic agents and approaches with improved efficacy and safety profiles. To this goal, we developed 4-[(3-iodophenyl)amino]-7-{2-[2-{2-(2-[2-{2-([(18)F]fluoroethoxy)-ethoxy}-ethoxy]-ethoxy)-ethoxy}-ethoxy]-quinazoline-6-yl-acrylamide ([(18)F]F-PEG6-IPQA), a radiotracer with increased selectivity and irreversible binding to the active mutant L858R EGFR kinase. We show that PET with [(18)F]F-PEG6-IPQA in tumor-bearing mice discriminates H3255 NSCLC xenografts expressing L858R mutant EGFR from H441 and PC14 xenografts expressing EGFR or H1975 xenografts with L858R/T790M dual mutation in EGFR kinase domain, which confers resistance to EGFR inhibitors (i.e., gefitinib). The T790M mutation precludes the [(18)F]F-PEG6-IPQA from irreversible binding to EGFR. These results suggest that PET with [(18)F]F-PEG6-IPQA could be used for the selection of NSCLC patients for individualized therapy with small molecular inhibitors of EGFR kinase that are currently used in the clinic and have a similar structure (i.e., iressa, gefitinib, and erlotinib).

  7. Activity of second-generation ALK inhibitors against crizotinib-resistant mutants in an NPM-ALK model compared to EML4-ALK

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Diletta; Ceccon, Monica; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Mologni, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a tyrosine kinase receptor involved in both solid and hematological tumors. About 80% of ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases are characterized by the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation, encoding for the aberrant fusion protein nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK, whereas 5% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients carry the inv(2)(p21;p23) rearrangement, encoding for the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusion. The ALK/c-MET/ROS inhibitor crizotinib successfully improved the treatment of ALK-driven diseases. However, several cases of resistance appeared in NSCLC patients, and ALK amino acid substitutions were identified as a leading cause of resistance to crizotinib. Second-generation ALK inhibitors have been developed in order to overcome crizotinib resistance. In this work, we profiled in vitro the activity of crizotinib, AP26113, ASP3026, alectinib, and ceritinib against six mutated forms of ALK associated with clinical resistance to crizotinib (C1156Y, L1196M, L1152R, G1202R, G1269A, and S1206Y) and provide a classification of mutants according to their level of sensitivity/resistance to the drugs. Since the biological activity of ALK mutations extends beyond the specific type of fusion, both NPM-ALK- and EML4-ALK-positive cellular models were used. Our data revealed that most mutants may be targeted by using different inhibitors. One relevant exception is represented by the G1202R substitution, which was highly resistant to all drugs (>10-fold increased IC50 compared to wild type) and may represent the most challenging mutation to overcome. These results provide a prediction of cross-resistance of known crizotinib-resistant mutations against all second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) clinically available, and therefore could be a useful tool to help clinicians in the management of crizotinib-resistance cases. PMID:25727400

  8. Restoration of catalytic activity beyond wild-type level in glucoamylase from Aspergillus awamori by oxidation of the Glu400-->Cys catalytic-base mutant to cysteinesulfinic acid.

    PubMed

    Fierobe, H P; Mirgorodskaya, E; McGuire, K A; Roepstorff, P; Svensson, B; Clarke, A J

    1998-03-17

    Glucoamylase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glucosidic bonds with inversion of the anomeric configuration. Site-directed mutagenesis and three-dimensional structure determination of the glucoamylase from Aspergillus awamori previously identified Glu179 and Glu400 as the general acid and base catalyst, respectively. The average distance between the two carboxyl groups was measured to be 9.2 A, which is typical for inverting glycosyl hydrolases. In the present study, this distance was increased by replacing the catalytic base Glu400 with cysteine which was then oxidized to cysteinesulfinic acid. Initially, this oxidation occurred during attempts to carboxyalkylate the Cys400 residue with iodoacetic acid, 3-iodopropionic acid, or 4-bromobutyric acid. However, endoproteinase Lys-C digestion of modified glucoamylase followed by high-pressure liquid chromatography in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry on purified peptide fragments demonstrated that all enzyme derivatives contained the cysteinesulfinic acid oxidation product of Cys400. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that treatment of Glu400-->Cys glucoamylase with potassium iodide in the presence of bromine resulted in complete conversion to the cysteinesulfinic acid product. As expected, the catalytic base mutant Glu400-->Cys glucoamylase had very low activity, i.e., 0.2% compared to wild-type. The oxidation of Cys400 to cysteinesulfinic acid, however, restored activity (kcat) on alpha-1,4-linked substrates to levels up to 160% of the wild-type glucoamylase which corresponded to approximately a 700-fold increase in the kcat of the Glu400-->Cys mutant glucoamylase. Whereas Glu400-->Cys glucoamylase was much less thermostable and more sensitive to guanidinium chloride than the wild-type enzyme, the oxidation to cysteinesulfinic acid was accompanied by partial recovery of the stability.

  9. The human Smoothened inhibitor PF-04449913 induces exit from quiescence and loss of multipotent Drosophila hematopoietic progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Giangrande, Angela; Martinelli, Giovanni; Guadagnuolo, Viviana; Simonetti, Giorgia; Perini, Giovanni; Bernardoni, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The efficient treatment of hematological malignancies as Acute Myeloid Leukemia, myelofibrosis and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, requires the elimination of cancer-initiating cells and the prevention of disease relapse through targeting pathways that stimulate generation and maintenance of these cells. In mammals, inhibition of Smoothened, the key mediator of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, reduces Chronic Myeloid Leukemia progression and propagation. These findings make Smo a candidate target to inhibit maintenance of leukemia-initiating cells. In Drosophila melanogaster the same pathway maintains the hematopoietic precursor cells of the lymph gland, the hematopoietic organ that develops in the larva. Using Drosophila as an in vivo model, we investigated the mode of action of PF-04449913, a small-molecule inhibitor of the human Smo protein. Drosophila larvae fed with PF-04449913 showed traits of altered hematopoietic homeostasis. These include the development of melanotic nodules, increase of circulating hemocytes, the size increase of the lymph gland and accelerated differentiation of blood cells likely due to the exit of multi-potent precursors from quiescence. Importantly, the Smo inhibition can lead to the complete loss of hematopoietic precursors. We conclude that PF-04449913 inhibits Drosophila Smo blocking the Hh signaling pathway and causing the loss of hematopoietic precursor cells. Interestingly, this is the effect expected in patients treated with PF-04449913: number decrease of cancer initiating cells in the bone marrow to reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. Altogether our results indicate that Drosophila comprises a model system for the in vivo study of molecules that target evolutionary conserved pathways implicated in human hematological malignancies. PMID:27486815

  10. Mutant Kras- and p16-regulated NOX4 activation overcomes metabolic checkpoints in development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Huai-Qiang; Ying, Haoqiang; Tian, Tian; Ling, Jianhua; Fu, Jie; Lu, Yu; Wu, Min; Yang, Lifeng; Achreja, Abhinav; Chen, Gang; Zhuang, Zhuonan; Wang, Huamin; Nagrath, Deepak; Yao, Jun; Hung, Mien-Chie; DePinho, Ronald A.; Huang, Peng; Xu, Rui-Hua; Chiao, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    Kras activation and p16 inactivation are required to develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the biochemical mechanisms underlying these double alterations remain unclear. Here we discover that NAD(P)H oxidase 4 (NOX4), an enzyme known to catalyse the oxidation of NAD(P)H, is upregulated when p16 is inactivated by looking at gene expression profiling studies. Activation of NOX4 requires catalytic subunit p22phox, which is upregulated following Kras activation. Both alterations are also detectable in PDAC cell lines and patient specimens. Furthermore, we show that elevated NOX4 activity accelerates oxidation of NADH and supports increased glycolysis by generating NAD+, a substrate for GAPDH-mediated glycolytic reaction, promoting PDAC cell growth. Mechanistically, NOX4 was induced through p16-Rb-regulated E2F and p22phox was induced by KrasG12V-activated NF-κB. In conclusion, we provide a biochemical explanation for the cooperation between p16 inactivation and Kras activation in PDAC development and suggest that NOX4 is a potential therapeutic target for PDAC. PMID:28232723

  11. Mutant Kras- and p16-regulated NOX4 activation overcomes metabolic checkpoints in development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ju, Huai-Qiang; Ying, Haoqiang; Tian, Tian; Ling, Jianhua; Fu, Jie; Lu, Yu; Wu, Min; Yang, Lifeng; Achreja, Abhinav; Chen, Gang; Zhuang, Zhuonan; Wang, Huamin; Nagrath, Deepak; Yao, Jun; Hung, Mien-Chie; DePinho, Ronald A; Huang, Peng; Xu, Rui-Hua; Chiao, Paul J

    2017-02-24

    Kras activation and p16 inactivation are required to develop pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the biochemical mechanisms underlying these double alterations remain unclear. Here we discover that NAD(P)H oxidase 4 (NOX4), an enzyme known to catalyse the oxidation of NAD(P)H, is upregulated when p16 is inactivated by looking at gene expression profiling studies. Activation of NOX4 requires catalytic subunit p22(phox), which is upregulated following Kras activation. Both alterations are also detectable in PDAC cell lines and patient specimens. Furthermore, we show that elevated NOX4 activity accelerates oxidation of NADH and supports increased glycolysis by generating NAD(+), a substrate for GAPDH-mediated glycolytic reaction, promoting PDAC cell growth. Mechanistically, NOX4 was induced through p16-Rb-regulated E2F and p22(phox) was induced by Kras(G12V)-activated NF-κB. In conclusion, we provide a biochemical explanation for the cooperation between p16 inactivation and Kras activation in PDAC development and suggest that NOX4 is a potential therapeutic target for PDAC.

  12. Latent and active polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in red clover (Trifolium pratense) and use of a low PPO mutant to study the role of PPO in proteolysis reduction.

    PubMed

    Winters, Ana L; Minchin, Frank R; Michaelson-Yeates, Terry P T; Lee, Michael R F; Morris, Phillip

    2008-04-23

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity in leaf extracts of wild type (WT) red clover and a mutant line expressing greatly reduced levels of PPO (LP red clover) has been characterized. Both latent and active forms of PPO were present, with the latent being the predominant form. PPO enzyme and substrate (phaselic acid) levels fluctuated over a growing season and were not correlated. Protease activation of latent PPO was demonstrated; however, the rate was too low to have an immediate effect following extraction. A novel, more rapid PPO activation mechanism by the enzyme's own substrate was identified. Rates of protein breakdown and amino acid release were significantly higher in LP red clover extracts compared with WT extracts, with 20 versus 6% breakdown of total protein and 1.9 versus 0.4 mg/g FW of free amino acids released over 24 h, respectively. Inclusion of ascorbic acid increased the extent of protein breakdown. Free phenol content decreased during a 24 h incubation of WT red clover extracts, whereas protein-bound phenol increased and high molecular weight protein species were formed. Inhibition of proteolysis occurred during wilting and ensilage of WT compared with LP forage (1.9 vs 5 and 17 vs 21 g/kg of DM free amino acids for 24 h wilted forage and 90 day silage, respectively). This study shows that whereas constitutive red clover PPO occurs predominantly in the latent form, this fraction can contribute to reducing protein breakdown in crude extracts and during ensilage.

  13. Citrate Accumulation-Related Gene Expression and/or Enzyme Activity Analysis Combined With Metabolomics Provide a Novel Insight for an Orange Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ling-Xia; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Ning, Dong-Yuan; Jing, Long-Fei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Yong-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    ‘Hong Anliu’ (HAL, Citrus sinensis cv. Hong Anliu) is a bud mutant of ‘Anliu’ (AL), characterized by a comprehensive metabolite alteration, such as lower accumulation of citrate, high accumulation of lycopene and soluble sugars in fruit juice sacs. Due to carboxylic acid metabolism connects other metabolite biosynthesis and/or catabolism networks, we therefore focused analyzing citrate accumulation-related gene expression profiles and/or enzyme activities, along with metabolic fingerprinting between ‘HAL’ and ‘AL’. Compared with ‘AL’, the transcript levels of citrate biosynthesis- and utilization-related genes and/or the activities of their respective enzymes such as citrate synthase, cytosol aconitase and ATP-citrate lyase were significantly higher in ‘HAL’. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial aconitase activity, the gene transcript levels of proton pumps, including vacuolar H+-ATPase, vacuolar H+-PPase, and the juice sac-predominant p-type proton pump gene (CsPH8) were significantly lower in ‘HAL’. These results implied that ‘HAL’ has higher abilities for citrate biosynthesis and utilization, but lower ability for the citrate uptake into vacuole compared with ‘AL’. Combined with the metabolites-analyzing results, a model was then established and suggested that the reduction in proton pump activity is the key factor for the low citrate accumulation and the comprehensive metabolite alterations as well in ‘HAL’. PMID:27385485

  14. Interactions of C4 subtype metabolic activities and transport in maize are revealed through the characterization of DCT2 mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    C4 photosynthesis is an elaborate set of metabolic pathways that utilize specialized anatomical and biochemical adaptations to concentrate CO2 around RuBisCO. The activities of the C4 pathways are coordinated between two specialized leaf cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS), and rely hea...

  15. Linear surface roughness growth and flow smoothening in a three-dimensional biofilm model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, D. A.

    2013-09-01

    The sessile microbial communities known as biofilms exhibit varying architectures as environmental factors are varied, which for immersed biofilms includes the shear rate of the surrounding flow. Here we modify an established agent-based biofilm model to include affine flow and employ it to analyze the growth of surface roughness of single-species, three-dimensional biofilms. We find linear growth laws for surface geometry in both horizontal and vertical directions and measure the thickness of the active surface layer, which is shown to anticorrelate with roughness. Flow is shown to monotonically reduce surface roughness without affecting the thickness of the active layer. We argue that the rapid roughening is due to nonlocal surface interactions mediated by the nutrient field, which are curtailed when advection competes with diffusion. We further argue the need for simplified models to elucidate the underlying mechanisms coupling flow to growth.

  16. Estimation of the receptor-state affinity constants of ligands in functional studies using wild type and constitutively active mutant receptors: Implications for estimation of agonist bias.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Frederick J; Stein, Richard S L

    We describe a method for estimating the affinities of ligands for active and inactive states of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Our protocol involves measuring agonist-induced signaling responses of a wild type GPCR and a constitutively active mutant of it under control conditions and after partial receptor inactivation or reduced receptor expression. Our subsequent analysis is based on the assumption that the activating mutation increases receptor isomerization into the active state without affecting the affinities of ligands for receptor states. A means of confirming this assumption is provided. Global nonlinear regression analysis yields estimates of 1) the active (Kact) and inactive (Kinact) receptor-state affinity constants, 2) the isomerization constant of the unoccupied receptor (Kq-obs), and 3) the sensitivity constant of the signaling pathway (KE-obs). The latter two parameters define the output response of the receptor, and hence, their ratio (Kq-obs/KE) is a useful measure of system bias. If the cellular system is reasonably stable and the Kq-obs and KE-obs values of the signaling pathway are known, the Kact and Kinact values of additional agonists can be estimated in subsequent experiments on cells expressing the wild type receptor. We validated our method through computer simulation, an analytical proof, and analysis of previously published data. Our approach provides 1) a more meaningful analysis of structure-activity relationships, 2) a means of validating in silico docking experiments on active and inactive receptor structures and 3) an absolute, in contrast to relative, measure of agonist bias.

  17. Allosteric mutants show that PrfA activation is dispensable for vacuole escape but required for efficient spread and Listeria survival in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Deshayes, Caroline; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Cain, Robert J; Scortti, Mariela; de las Heras, Aitor; Pietras, Zbigniew; Luisi, Ben F; Núñez Miguel, Ricardo; Vázquez-Boland, José A

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional regulator PrfA controls key virulence determinants of the facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. PrfA-dependent gene expression is strongly induced within host cells. While the basis of this activation is unknown, the structural homology of PrfA with the cAMP receptor protein (Crp) and the finding of constitutively activated PrfA* mutants suggests it may involve ligand-induced allostery. Here, we report the identification of a solvent-accessible cavity within the PrfA N-terminal domain that may accommodate an activating ligand. The pocket occupies a similar position to the cAMP binding site in Crp but lacks the cyclic nucleotide-anchoring motif and has its entrance on the opposite side of the β-barrel. Site-directed mutations in this pocket impaired intracellular PrfA-dependent gene activation without causing extensive structural/functional alterations to PrfA. Two substitutions, L48F and Y63W, almost completely abolished intracellular virulence gene induction and thus displayed the expected phenotype for allosteric activation-deficient PrfA mutations. Neither PrfAallo substitution affected vacuole escape and initial intracellular growth of L. monocytogenes in epithelial cells and macrophages but caused defective cell-to-cell spread and strong attenuation in mice. Our data support the hypothesis that PrfA is allosterically activated during intracellular infection and identify the probable binding site for the effector ligand. They also indicate that PrfA allosteric activation is not required for early intracellular survival but is essential for full Listeria virulence and colonization of host tissues. PMID:22646689

  18. p53 mutants induce transcription of NF-κB2 in H1299 cells through CBP and STAT binding on the NF-κB2 promoter and gain of function activity.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Catherine A; Singh, Shilpa; Windle, Brad; Sankala, Heidi M; Graves, Paul R; Andrew Yeudall, W; Deb, Swati P; Deb, Sumitra

    2012-02-01

    Cancer cells with p53 mutations, in general, grow more aggressively than those with wild-type p53 and show "gain of function" (GOF) phenotypes such as increased growth rate, enhanced resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, increased cell motility and tumorigenicity; although the mechanism for this function remains unknown. In this communication we report that p53-mediated NF-κB2 up-regulation significantly contributes to the aggressive oncogenic behavior of cancer cells. Lowering the level of mutant p53 in a number of cancer cell lines resulted in a loss of GOF phenotypes directly implicating p53 mutants in the process. RNAi against NF-κB2 in naturally occurring cancer cell lines also lowers GOF activities. In H1299 cells expressing mutant p53, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays indicate that mutant p53 induces histone acetylation at specific sites on the regulatory regions of its target genes. ChIP assays using antibodies against transcription factors putatively capable of interacting with the NF-κB2 promoter show increased interaction of CBP and STAT2 in the presence of mutant p53. Thus, we propose that in H1299 cells, mutant p53 elevates expression of genes capable of enhancing cell proliferation, motility, and tumorigenicity by inducing acetylation of histones via recruitment of CBP and STAT2 on the promoters causing CBP-mediated histone acetylation.

  19. Constitutive activation of stress-inducible genes in a brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 (bri1) mutant results in higher tolerance to cold.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Young; Kim, Beg Hab; Lim, Chan Ju; Lim, Chae Oh; Nam, Kyoung Hee

    2010-02-01

    Many plant hormones are involved in coordinating the growth responses of plants under stress. However, not many mechanistic studies have explored how plants maintain the balance between growth and stress responses. Brassinosteroids (BRs), plant-specific steroid hormones, affect many aspects of plant growth and development over a plant's lifetime. In this study we determined that exogenous treatment of BR helped the plant overcome the cold condition only when pretreated with less than 1 nM, and the brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 (bri1) mutation, which results in defective BR signaling and subsequent dwarfism, generates an increased tolerance to cold. In contrast, BRI1-overexpressing plants were more sensitive to the same stress than wild-type. We found that the bri1 mutant and BRI1-overexpressing transgenic plants contain higher basal level of expression of CBFs/DREB1s than wild-type. However, representative cold stress-related genes were regulated with the same pattern to cold in wild-type, bri1-9 and BRI1 overexpressing plants. To examine the global gene expression and compare the genes that show differential expression pattern in bri1-9 and BRI1-GFP plants other than CBFs/DREB1s, we analyzed differential mRNA expression using the cDNA microarray analysis in the absence of stress. Endogenous expression of both stress-inducible genes as well as genes encoding transcription factors that drive the expression of stress-inducible genes were maintained at higher levels in bri1-9 than either in wild-type or in BRI1 overexpressing plants. This suggests that the bri1-9 mutant could always be alert to stresses that might be exerted at any times by constitutive activation of subsets of defense.

  20. Synergic prodegradative activity of Bicalutamide and trehalose on the mutant androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Giorgetti, Elisa; Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Cristofani, Riccardo; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cicardi, Maria E; Galbiati, Mariarita; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease due to a CAG triplet-repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, which is translated into an elongated polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in AR protein (ARpolyQ). ARpolyQ toxicity is activated by the AR ligand testosterone (or dihydrotestosterone), and the polyQ triggers ARpolyQ misfolding and aggregation in spinal cord motoneurons and muscle cells. In motoneurons, testosterone triggers nuclear toxicity by inducing AR nuclear translocation. Thus, (i) prevention of ARpolyQ nuclear localization, combined with (ii) an increased ARpolyQ cytoplasmic clearance, should reduce its detrimental activity. Using the antiandrogen Bicalutamide (Casodex(®)), which slows down AR activation and nuclear translocation, and the disaccharide trehalose, an autophagy activator, we found that, in motoneurons, the two compounds together reduced ARpolyQ insoluble forms with higher efficiency than that obtained with single treatments. The ARpolyQ clearance was mediated by trehalose-induced autophagy combined with the longer cytoplasmic retention of ARpolyQ bound to Bicalutamide. This allows an increased recognition of misfolded species by the autophagic system prior to their migration into the nucleus. Interestingly, the combinatory use of trehalose and Bicalutamide was also efficient in the removal of insoluble species of AR with a very long polyQ (Q112) tract, which typically aggregates into the cell nuclei. Collectively, these data suggest that the combinatory use of Bicalutamide and trehalose is a novel approach to facilitate ARpolyQ clearance that has to be tested in other cell types target of SBMA (i.e. muscle cells) and in vivo in animal models of SBMA.

  1. Impact of membrane-associated hydrogenases on the F₀F₁-ATPase in Escherichia coli during glycerol and mixed carbon fermentation: ATPase activity and its inhibition by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide in the mutants lacking hydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Blbulyan, Syuzanna; Trchounian, Armen

    2015-08-01

    Escherichia coli is able to ferment glycerol and to produce molecular hydrogen (H2) by four membrane-associated hydrogenases (Hyd) changing activity in response to different conditions. In this study, overall ATPase activity of glycerol alone and mixed carbon sources (glucose and glycerol) fermented E. coli wild type and different Hyd mutants and its inhibition by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) were first investigated. ATPase activity was higher in glycerol fermented wild type cells at pH 7.5 compared to pH 6.5 and pH 5.5; DCCD inhibited markedly ATPase activity at pH 7.5. The ATPase activity at pH 7.5, compared with wild type, was lower in selC and less in hypF single mutants, suppressed in hyaB hybC selC triple mutant. Moreover, total ATPase activity of mixed carbon fermented wild type cells was maximal at pH 7.5 and lowered at pH 5.5. The ATPase activities of hypF and hyaB hybC selC mutants were higher at pH 5.5, compared with wild type; DCCD inhibited markedly ATPase activity of hypF mutant. These results demonstrate that in E. coli during glycerol fermentation the membrane proton-translocating FOF1-ATPase has major input in overall ATPase activity and alkaline pH is more optimal for the FOF1-ATPase operation. Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 are required for the FOF1-ATPase activity upon anaerobic fermentation of glycerol. The impact of Hyd-1 and Hyd-2 on the FOF1-ATPase is more obvious during mixed carbon fermentation at slightly acidic pH.

  2. Kinetics and crystal structure of a mutant Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (Asp-369-->Asn): a mechanism involving one zinc per active site.

    PubMed

    Tibbitts, T T; Xu, X; Kantrowitz, E R

    1994-11-01

    Using site-directed mutagenesis, an aspartate side chain involved in binding metal ions in the active site of Escherichia coli alkaline phosphatase (Asp-369) was replaced, alternately, by asparagine (D369N) and by alanine (D369A). The purified mutant enzymes showed reduced turnover rates (kcat) and increased Michaelis constants (Km). The kcat for the D369A enzyme was 5,000-fold lower than the value for the wild-type enzyme. The D369N enzyme required Zn2+ in millimolar concentrations to become fully active; even under these conditions the kcat measured for hydrolysis of p-nitrophenol phosphate was 2 orders of magnitude lower than for the wild-type enzyme. Thus the kcat/Km ratios showed that catalysis is 50 times less efficient when the carboxylate side chain of Asp-369 is replaced by the corresponding amide; and activity is reduced to near nonenzymic levels when the carboxylate is replaced by a methyl group. The crystal structure of D369N, solved to 2.5 A resolution with an R-factor of 0.189, showed vacancies at 2 of the 3 metal binding sites. On the basis of the kinetic results and the refined X-ray coordinates, a reaction mechanism is proposed for phosphate ester hydrolysis by the D369N enzyme involving only 1 metal with the possible assistance of a histidine side chain.

  3. Hydrophobic interactions as key determinants to the KCa3.1 channel closed configuration. An analysis of KCa3.1 mutants constitutively active in zero Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Garneau, Line; Klein, Hélène; Banderali, Umberto; Longpré-Lauzon, Ariane; Parent, Lucie; Sauvé, Rémy

    2009-01-02

    In this study we present evidence that residue Val282 in the S6 transmembrane segment of the calcium-activated KCa3.1 channel constitutes a key determinant of channel gating. A Gly scan of the S6 transmembrane segment first revealed that the substitutions A279G and V282G cause the channel to become constitutively active in zero Ca2+. Constitutive activity was not observed when residues extending from Cys276 to Ala286, other than Ala279 and Val282, were substituted to Gly. The accessibility of Cys engineered at Val275 deep in the channel cavity was next investigated for the ion-conducting V275C/V282G mutant and closed V275C channel in zero Ca2+ using Ag+ as probe. These experiments demonstrated that internal Ag+ ions have free access to the channel cavity independently of the channel conducting state, arguing against an activation gate located at the S6 segment C-terminal end. Experiments were also conducted where Val282 was substituted by residues differing in size and/or hydrophobicity. We found a strong correlation between constitutive activity in zero Ca2+ and the hydrophobic energy for side chain burial. Single channel recordings showed finally that constitutive activation in zero Ca2+ is better explained by a model where the channel is locked in a low conducting state with a high open probability rather than resulting from a change in the open/closed energy balance that would favor channel openings to a full conducting state in the absence of Ca2+. We conclude that hydrophobic interactions involving Val282 constitute key determinants to KCa3.1 gating by modulating the ion conducting state of the selectivity filter through an effect on the S6 transmembrane segment.

  4. A novel fluorescence-activated cell sorter-based screen for yeast endocytosis mutants identifies a yeast homologue of mammalian eps15

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of endocytosis requires the discovery and characterization of the protein machinery that mediates this aspect of membrane trafficking. A novel genetic screen was used to identify yeast mutants defective in internalization of bulk lipid. The fluorescent lipophilic styryl dye FM4-64 was used in conjunction with FACS to enrich for yeast mutants that exhibit internalization defects. Detailed characterization of two of these mutants, dim1-1 and dim2-1, revealed defects in the endocytic pathway. Like other yeast endocytosis mutants, the temperature-sensitive dim mutant were unable to endocytose FM4-64 or radiolabeled alpha-factor as efficiently as wild-type cells. In addition, double mutants with either dim1-delta or dim2-1 and the endocytosis mutants end4-1 or act1-1 displayed synthetic growth defects, indicating that the DIM gene products function in a common or parallel endocytic pathway. Complementation cloning of the DIM genes revealed identity of DIM1 to SHE4 and DIM2 to PAN1. Pan1p shares homology with the mammalian clathrin adaptor-associated protein, eps15. Both proteins contain multiple EH (eps15 homology) domains, a motif proposed to mediate protein-protein interactions. Phalloidin labeling of filamentous actin revealed profound defects in the actin cytoskeleton in both dim mutants. EM analysis revealed that the dim mutants accumulate vesicles and tubulo-vesicular structures reminiscent of mammalian early endosomes. In addition, the accumulation of novel plasma membrane invaginations where endocytosis is likely to occur were visualized in the mutants by electron microscopy using cationized ferritin as a marker for the endocytic pathway. This new screening strategy demonstrates a role for She4p and Pan1p in endocytosis, and provides a new general method for the identification of additional endocytosis mutants. PMID:8978817

  5. Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase activity of thymidine kinase-deficient Escherichia coli K-12 mutant transformed by hybrid plasmids.

    PubMed

    Kit, S; Otsuka, H; Qavi, H; Hazen, M

    1981-01-01

    A hybrid plasmid (pAGO) that contains the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (TK) gene in the form of a 2-kilobase-pair (kbp) Pvu II fragment inserted at the Pvu II site of plasmid pBR322 was used to transform TK- Escherichia coli K-12 strain KY895. pAGO-transformed KY895 cells exhibited partially restored ability to incorporate [3H]dThd into DNA and an HSv-1-specific TK activity. Bacteria cured of plasmid pAGO (or transformed by plasmid pBR322) did not show enhanced incorporation of [3H]dThd into DNA or HSV-1 TK activity. Plasmid pMH1A was derived from pAGO by deletion of 2067 bp of DNA sequence from pBR322 and 105 bp from the HSV-1 TK gene. E. coli K-12 strain KY895 cells transformed by pMH1A did not show enhanced incorporation of [3H]dThd into bacterial DNA, although pMH1A DNA isolated from transformed KY895 cells, like pAGO DNA, did transform TK- mouse fibroblast [LM(TK-)] cells to the TK+ phenotype. The expression of HSV-1 TK activity by E. coli K-12 suggests that intervening sequences may be absent from the coding region of HSV-1 tk or that the coding region of the gene possesses short intervening sequences which do not disrupt the translational reading frame.

  6. Synthetic lipid A with endotoxic and related biological activities comparable to those of a natural lipid A from an Escherichia coli re-mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, S; Takada, H; Tsujimoto, M; Ogawa, T; Takahashi, I; Ikeda, T; Otsuka, K; Shimauchi, H; Kasai, N; Mashimo, J

    1985-01-01

    A synthetic compound (506), beta (1-6) D-glucosamine disaccharide 1,4'-bisphosphate, which is acylated at 2'-amino and 3'-hydroxyl groups with (R)-3-dodecanoyloxytetradecanoyl and (R)-3-tetradecanoyloxytetradecanoyl groups, respectively, and has (R)-3-hydroxytetradecanoyl groups at 2-amino and 3-hydroxyl groups, exhibited full endotoxic activities identical to or sometimes stronger than those of a reference lipid A from an Escherichia coli Re-mutant (strain F515). Endotoxic activities tested include pyrogenicity and leukopenia-inducing activity in rabbits, body weight-decreasing toxicity in normal mice, lethal toxicity in galactosamine-sensitized mice and chicken embryos, and the preparation and provocation of the local Shwartzman reaction in rabbits. Compound 406, a synthetic counterpart of a biosynthetic precursor of lipid A molecule, showed by contrast only weak activities in all of the above assay systems except for the lethality in galactosamine-loaded mice. This finding strongly suggests that the presence of acyloxyacyl groups at the C-2' and C-3' positions of the disaccharide backbone is one of the most important determinant structures of the lipid A molecule for exhibition of strong biological activities characteristic of lipopolysaccharide and its lipid A moiety. The activities of the corresponding 4'-monophosphate (compound 504) and 1-monophosphate (505) analogs were considerably less than those of the parent molecule 506 and the reference F515 lipid A. Regarding other biological activities, not only compound 506 but also compounds 504, 505, and 406 showed definite activities, sometimes comparable to those of F515 lipid A and other reference natural products. These are the activation of Tachypleus tridentatus amoebocyte clotting enzyme cascade and human complement via the classical pathway, mitogenic and polyclonal B-cell activation of murine splenocytes, stimulation of peritoneal macrophages in a guinea pig, enhancement of migration of human blood

  7. Activation of mutant protein kinase C{gamma} leads to aberrant sequestration and impairment of its cellular function

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, Graeme; Davies, Kay E.; Talbot, Kevin

    2008-08-01

    Mutations in protein kinase C{gamma} (PKC{gamma}) cause the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14). In this study, expression of an extensive panel of known SCA14-associated PKC{gamma} mutations as fusion proteins in cell culture led to the consistent formation of cytoplasmic aggregates in response to purinoceptor stimulation. Aggregates co-stained with antibodies to phosphorylated PKC{gamma} and the early endosome marker EEA1 but failed to redistribute to the cell membrane under conditions of oxidative stress. These studies suggest that Purkinje cell damage in SCA14 may result from a reduction of PKC{gamma} activity due its aberrant sequestration in the early endosome compartment.

  8. Gap-junctional channel and hemichannel activity of two recently identified connexin 26 mutants associated with deafness.

    PubMed

    Dalamon, Viviana; Fiori, Mariana C; Figueroa, Vania A; Oliva, Carolina A; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Gonzalez, Wendy; Canan, Jonathan; Elgoyhen, Ana B; Altenberg, Guillermo A; Retamal, Mauricio A

    2016-05-01

    Gap-junction channels (GJCs) are formed by head-to-head association of two hemichannels (HCs, connexin hexamers). HCs and GJCs are permeable to ions and hydrophilic molecules of up to Mr ~1 kDa. Hearing impairment of genetic origin is common, and mutations of connexin 26 (Cx26) are its major cause. We recently identified two novel Cx26 mutations in hearing-impaired subjects, L10P and G109V. L10P forms functional GJCs with slightly altered voltage dependence and HCs with decrease ATP/cationic dye selectivity. G109V does not form functional GJCs, but forms functional HCs with enhanced extracellular Ca(2+) sensitivity and subtle alterations in voltage dependence and ATP/cationic dye selectivity. Deafness associated with G109V could result from decreased GJCs activity, whereas deafness associated to L10P may have a more complex mechanism that involves changes in HC permeability.

  9. In Vitro Activity of Simeprevir against Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1 Clinical Isolates and Its Correlation with NS3 Sequence and Site-Directed Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Fevery, Bart; Vijgen, Leen; Jacobs, Tom; De Meyer, Sandra; Lenz, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Simeprevir (TMC435) is a once-daily, single-pill, oral hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 protease inhibitor approved for the treatment of chronic HCV infection. Phenotypic characterization of baseline isolates and isolates from HCV genotype 1-infected patients failing with a simeprevir-based regimen was performed using chimeric replicons carrying patient-derived NS3 protease sequences. Cutoff values differentiating between full susceptibility to simeprevir (≤2.0-fold reduction in simeprevir activity) and low-level versus high-level resistance (≥50-fold reduction in simeprevir activity) were determined. The median simeprevir fold change in the 50% effective concentration (FC) of pretreatment genotype 1a isolates, with and without Q80K, and genotype 1b isolates was 11, 0.9, and 0.4, respectively. Naturally occurring NS3 polymorphisms that reduced simeprevir activity, other than Q80K, were uncommon in the simeprevir studies and generally conferred low-level resistance in vitro. Although the proportion of patients with failure differed by HCV geno/subtype and/or presence of baseline Q80K, the level of simeprevir resistance observed at failure was similarly high irrespective of type of failure, HCV genotype 1 subtype, and presence or absence of baseline Q80K. At the end of the study, simeprevir activity against isolates that lost the emerging amino acid substitution returned to pretreatment values. Activity of simeprevir against clinical isolates and site-directed mutant replicons harboring the corresponding single or double amino acid substitutions correlated well, showing that simeprevir resistance can be attributed to these substitutions. In conclusion, pretreatment NS3 isolates were generally fully susceptible (FC, ≤2.0) or conferred low-level resistance to simeprevir in vitro (FC, >2.0 and <50). Treatment failure with a simeprevir-based regimen was associated with emergence of high-level-resistance variants (FC, ≥50). PMID:26392483

  10. Crystal structures of amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea in complex with D-glucose and the active site mutant Glu328Gln in complex with the natural substrate sucrose.

    PubMed

    Mirza, O; Skov, L K; Remaud-Simeon, M; Potocki de Montalk, G; Albenne, C; Monsan, P; Gajhede, M

    2001-07-31

    The structure of amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea in complex with beta-D-glucose has been determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 1.66 A. Additionally, the structure of the inactive active site mutant Glu328Gln in complex with sucrose has been determined to a resolution of 2.0 A. The D-glucose complex shows two well-defined D-glucose molecules, one that binds very strongly in the bottom of a pocket that contains the proposed catalytic residues (at the subsite -1), in a nonstrained (4)C(1) conformation, and one that binds in the packing interface to a symmetry-related molecule. A third weaker D-glucose-binding site is located at the surface near the active site pocket entrance. The orientation of the D-glucose in the active site emphasizes the Glu328 role as the general acid/base. The binary sucrose complex shows one molecule bound in the active site, where the glucosyl moiety is located at the alpha-amylase -1 position and the fructosyl ring occupies subsite +1. Sucrose effectively blocks the only visible access channel to the active site. From analysis of the complex it appears that sucrose binding is primarily obtained through enzyme interactions with the glucosyl ring and that an important part of the enzyme function is a precise alignment of a lone pair of the linking O1 oxygen for hydrogen bond interaction with Glu328. The sucrose specificity appears to be determined primarily by residues Asp144, Asp394, Arg446, and Arg509. Both Asp394 and Arg446 are located in an insert connecting beta-strand 7 and alpha-helix 7 that is much longer in amylosucrase compared to other enzymes from the alpha-amylase family (family 13 of the glycoside hydrolases).

  11. Effects of Bio-Au Nanoparticles on Electrochemical Activity of Shewanella oneidensis Wild Type and ΔomcA/mtrC Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ranran; Cui, Li; Chen, Lixiang; Wang, Chao; Cao, Changli; Sheng, Guoping; Yu, Hanqing; Zhao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Both Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 wild type and its mutant ΔomcA/mtrC are capable of transforming AuIII into Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Cyclic voltammetry reveals a decrease in redox current after the wild type is exposed to AuIII but an increase in oxidation current for the mutant. The peak current of the wild type is much higher than that of the mutant before the exposure of AuIII, but lower than that of the mutant after the formation of AuNPs. This suggests that damage to the electron transfer chain in the mutant could be repaired by AuNPs to a certain extent. Spectroscopy and SDS-PAGE analysis indicate a decrease in cell protein content after the formation of AuNPs, which provides a convenient way to detect intracellular information on cells. PMID:24264440

  12. Interactions of C4 Subtype Metabolic Activities and Transport in Maize Are Revealed through the Characterization of DCT2 Mutants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Howard; Shao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis in grasses requires the coordinated movement of metabolites through two specialized leaf cell types, mesophyll (M) and bundle sheath (BS), to concentrate CO2 around Rubisco. Despite the importance of transporters in this process, few have been identified or rigorously characterized. In maize (Zea mays), DCT2 has been proposed to function as a plastid-localized malate transporter and is preferentially expressed in BS cells. Here, we characterized the role of DCT2 in maize leaves using Activator-tagged mutant alleles. Our results indicate that DCT2 enables the transport of malate into the BS chloroplast. Isotopic labeling experiments show that the loss of DCT2 results in markedly different metabolic network operation and dramatically reduced biomass production. In the absence of a functioning malate shuttle, dct2 lines survive through the enhanced use of the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase carbon shuttle pathway that in wild-type maize accounts for ∼25% of the photosynthetic activity. The results emphasize the importance of malate transport during C4 photosynthesis, define the role of a primary malate transporter in BS cells, and support a model for carbon exchange between BS and M cells in maize. PMID:26813621

  13. Comparison of the Exposure Time Dependence of the Activities of Synthetic Ozonide Antimalarials and Dihydroartemisinin against K13 Wild-Type and Mutant Plasmodium falciparum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tuo; Xie, Stanley C.; Cao, Pengxing; Giannangelo, Carlo; McCaw, James; Creek, Darren J.; Charman, Susan A.; Klonis, Nectarios

    2016-01-01

    Fully synthetic endoperoxide antimalarials, namely, OZ277 (RBx11160; also known as arterolane) and OZ439 (artefenomel), have been approved for marketing or are currently in clinical development. We undertook an analysis of the kinetics of the in vitro responses of Plasmodium falciparum to the new ozonide antimalarials. For these studies we used a K13 mutant (artemisinin resistant) isolate from a region in Cambodia and a genetically matched (artemisinin sensitive) K13 revertant. We used a pulsed-exposure assay format to interrogate the time dependence of the response. Because the ozonides have physicochemical properties different from those of the artemisinins, assay optimization was required to ensure that the drugs were completely removed following the pulsed exposure. Like that of artemisinins, ozonide activity requires active hemoglobin degradation. Short pulses of the ozonides were less effective than short pulses of dihydroartemisinin; however, when early-ring-stage parasites were exposed to drugs for periods relevant to their in vivo exposure, the ozonide antimalarials were markedly more effective. PMID:27161632

  14. Pharmacological Chaperones and Coenzyme Q10 Treatment Improves Mutant β-Glucocerebrosidase Activity and Mitochondrial Function in Neuronopathic Forms of Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    de la Mata, Mario; Cotán, David; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D.; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Delgado Pavón, Ana; Alcocer-Gómez, Elizabet; de Lavera, Isabel; Ybot-González, Patricia; Paula Zaderenko, Ana; Ortiz Mellet, Carmen; Fernández, José M. García; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by mutations in the GBA1 gene, which encodes lysosomal β-glucocerebrosidase. Homozygosity for the L444P mutation in GBA1 is associated with high risk of neurological manifestations which are not improved by enzyme replacement therapy. Alternatively, pharmacological chaperones (PCs) capable of restoring the correct folding and trafficking of the mutant enzyme represent promising alternative therapies.Here, we report on how the L444P mutation affects mitochondrial function in primary fibroblast derived from GD patients. Mitochondrial dysfunction was associated with reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitophagy activation and impaired autophagic flux.Both abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction and deficient β-glucocerebrosidase activity, were partially restored by supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) or a L-idonojirimycin derivative, N-[N’-(4-adamantan-1-ylcarboxamidobutyl)thiocarbamoyl]-1,6-anhydro-L-idonojirimycin (NAdBT-AIJ), and more markedly by the combination of both treatments. These data suggest that targeting both mitochondria function by CoQ and protein misfolding by PCs can be promising therapies in neurological forms of GD. PMID:26045184

  15. The temperature dependence of activity and structure for the most prevalent mutant aldolase B associated with hereditary fructose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Malay, Ali D; Procious, Sheri L; Tolan, Dean R

    2002-12-15

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an autosomal recessive disorder in humans which is caused by mutations in the aldolase B gene. The most common HFI allele encodes an enzyme with an A149P substitution (AP-aldolase). A lysis method suitable for aggregation-prone proteins overexpressed in bacteria was developed. The enzyme's structure and function is investigated as a function of temperature. Near-UV CD shows a qualitative difference in tertiary structure, whereas far-UV CD shows no difference in overall secondary structure, although both show increased temperature sensitivity for AP-aldolase compared to that seen with wild-type aldolase B. AP-aldolase exists as a dimer at all temperatures tested, unlike the tetrameric wild-type enzyme, thus providing a possible explanation for the loss in thermostability. AP-aldolase has sixfold lower activity than wild type at 10 degrees C, which decreases substantially at higher temperature. In addition to disruptions at the catalytic center, the kinetic constants toward different substrates suggest that there is a disruption at the C1-phosphate-binding site, which is not sensitive to temperature. The implications of these structural alterations are discussed with regard to the HFI disease.

  16. Moraxella catarrhalis activates murine macrophages through multiple toll like receptors and has reduced clearance in lungs from TLR4 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ferdaus; Ren, Dabin; Zhang, Wenhong; Merkel, Tod J; Gu, Xin-Xing

    2012-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a gram negative bacterium and a leading causative agent of otitis media (OM) in children. Several recent reports have provided strong evidence for an association between toll like receptors and OM. It has been found that both Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae activate host protective immune responses through toll like receptors (TLRs), however, the precise mechanism by which Moraxella catarrhalis initiates the host immune response is currently unknown. In this report, using murine macrophages generated from a series of knock-out mice, we have demonstrated that M. catarrhalis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) and either heat killed or live bacteria are recognized by one or more TLRs. LOS activates the host immune response through a membrane bound CD14-TLR4 complex, while both heat killed and live M.cat require recognition by multiple toll like receptors such as TLR2, TLR4 and TLR9 without the requirement of CD14. We have also shown that M.cat stimuli are capable of triggering the host innate immune response by both MyD88- and TRIF- dependent signaling pathways. We further showed that M.cat induced activation of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) is essential in order to achieve optimal secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α. We finally showed that TLR4 mutant C3H/HeJ mice produce significantly lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 in vivo, An increased bacterial loads at 12 and 24 hours (P<0.001) in their lungs upon challenge with live M.cat in an aerosol chamber compared to wild-type (WT) control mice. These data suggest that TLRs are crucial for an effective innate immune response induced by M.cat. The results of these studies contribute to an increased understanding of molecular mechanism and possible novel treatment strategies for diseases caused by M.cat by specifically targeting TLRs and their signaling pathways.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation on the low sensitivity of mutants of NEDD-8 activating enzyme for MLN4924 inhibitor as a cancer drug.

    PubMed

    Rashidieh, Behnam; Valizadeh, Mohharam; Assadollahi, Vahideh; Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    MLN4924 is an experimental cancer drug known as inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE). This anti-tumor candidate is a selective small-molecule inhibitor of NAE which is conjugated to cullin protein on Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs). This covalent modification actives cullin complex to recruit an ubiquitin-charged E2 and leads to downstream target protein polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. MLN4924, which can form a covalent adduct with NEDD8, and block NAE at the first step in this pathway, has shown anti-tumor activity in many kinds of cancer cell lines and also xenograft models, including lung cancer, colon cancer, melanoma and lymphoma. The anti-tumor activity of MLN4924 results from inactivation of CLRs, which causes DNA re-replication and inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling, thus leading to cancer cell death. A mutation can reduce the enzyme's sensitivity to MLN4924. Verma et al. in 2013 studied on molecular dynamics simulation of a mutant A171T and consequently found out that this mutation reduce MLN4924 interaction with DNA Binding site of enzyme as a result of reduction of enzyme affinity to ATP. One year later, in 2014, Wei Xu et al. carried out a research on inhibitor resistant cell lines and revealed that a couple of mutations so called Y352H and I310N leads to enzyme resistance to MLN4924 inhibitor, interestingly, the cause reported was the increase of enzyme affinity to ATP. As in Wei Xu et al. experiment the molecular dynamics simulation was not considered, present study is conducted to identify enzyme mutation mechanism by molecular dynamics approach using advantages of Gromacs software version 4.5.6.

  18. A Novel Hsp90 Inhibitor Activates Compensatory Heat Shock Protein Responses and Autophagy and Alleviates Mutant A53T α-Synuclein Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Rui; Zhou, Wenbo; Siegel, David; Kitson, Russell R. A.; Freed, Curt R.; Moody, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    A potential cause of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), is protein misfolding and aggregation that in turn leads to neurotoxicity. Targeting Hsp90 is an attractive strategy to halt neurodegenerative diseases, and benzoquinone ansamycin (BQA) Hsp90 inhibitors such as geldanamycin (GA) and 17-(allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin have been shown to be beneficial in mutant A53T α-synuclein PD models. However, current BQA inhibitors result in off-target toxicities via redox cycling and/or arylation of nucleophiles at the C19 position. We developed novel 19-substituted BQA (19BQA) as a means to prevent arylation. In this study, our data demonstrated that 19-phenyl-GA, a lead 19BQA in the GA series, was redox stable and exhibited little toxicity relative to its parent quinone GA in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells as examined by oxygen consumption, trypan blue, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), and apoptosis assays. Meanwhile, 19-phenyl-GA retained the ability to induce autophagy and potentially protective heat shock proteins (HSPs) such as Hsp70 and Hsp27. We found that transduction of A53T, but not wild type (WT) α-synuclein, induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. 19-Phenyl-GA decreased oligomer formation and toxicity of A53T α-synuclein in transduced cells. Mechanistic studies indicated that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 ribosomal S6 kinase signaling was activated by A53T but not WT α-synuclein, and 19-phenyl-GA decreased mTOR activation that may be associated with A53T α-synuclein toxicity. In summary, our results indicate that 19BQAs such as 19-phenyl-GA may provide a means to modulate protein-handling systems including HSPs and autophagy, thereby reducing the aggregation and toxicity of proteins such as mutant A53T α-synuclein. PMID:26405178

  19. Anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure assay in α2δ1 (R217A) and α2δ2 (R279A) mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Lotarski, Susan; Hain, Heather; Peterson, Jason; Galvin, Stacey; Strenkowski, Bryan; Donevan, Sean; Offord, James

    2014-07-01

    Pregabalin has been shown to have anticonvulsant, analgesic, and anxiolytic activity in animal models. Pregabalin binds with high affinity to the α2δ1 and α2δ2 subunits of voltage-gated calcium channels. In order to better understand the relative contribution that binding to either the α2δ1 or α2δ2 subunits confers on the anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin, we characterized the anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin in different wild-type (WT) and mutant mouse strains. Two targeted mouse mutants have been made in which either the α2δ1 subunit was mutated (arginine-to-alanine mutation at amino acid 217; R217A) or the α2δ2 subunit was mutated (arginine-to-alanine mutation at amino acid 279; R279A). These mutations in α2δ1 or α2δ2 render the subunits relatively insensitive to pregabalin binding. The anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin was assessed in these different mouse lines using the maximal electroshock-induced seizure (MES) model. Pregabalin reduced the percentage of seizures and increased the latency to seizure in the MES model in two parental mouse strains used to construct the mutants. Pregabalin also reduced the percentage of seizures and increased latency to seizure similarly in the α2δ2 (R279A) and WT littermate control mice. In contrast, pregabalin's anticonvulsant efficacy was significantly reduced in α2δ1 (R217A) mutants compared with WT littermate control mice. Phenytoin showed anticonvulsant activity across all WT and mutant mice. These data show that the anticonvulsant activity of pregabalin in the MES model requires binding to the α2δ1 subunit.

  20. Reduced Activity of Mutant Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 Is Compensated in Plasmodium falciparum through the Action of Protein Kinase G

    PubMed Central

    Ojo, Kayode K.; Mu, Jianbing; Maly, Dustin J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We used a sensitization approach that involves replacement of the gatekeeper residue in a protein kinase with one with a different side chain. The activity of the enzyme with a bulky gatekeeper residue, such as methionine, cannot be inhibited using bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs). Here, we have used this approach to study Plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (PfCDPK1). The methionine gatekeeper substitution, T145M, although it led to a 47% reduction in transphosphorylation, was successfully introduced into the CDPK1 locus using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9. As methionine is a bulky residue, BKI 1294 had a 10-fold-greater effect in vitro on the wild-type enzyme than on the methionine mutant. However, in contrast to in vitro data with recombinant enzymes, BKI 1294 had a slightly greater inhibition of the growth of CDPK1 T145M parasites than the wild type. Moreover, the CDPK1 T145M parasites were more sensitive to the action of compound 2 (C2), a specific inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). These results suggest that a reduction in the activity of CDPK1 due to methionine substitution at the gatekeeper position is compensated through the direct action of PKG or of another kinase under the regulation of PKG. The transcript levels of CDPK5 and CDPK6 were significantly upregulated in the CDPK1 T145M parasites. The increase in CDPK6 or some other kinase may compensate for decrease in CDPK1 activity during invasion. This study suggests that targeting two kinases may be more effective in chemotherapy to treat malaria so as not to select for mutations in one of the enzymes. PMID:27923926

  1. Structure-Function Analysis of Friedreich's Ataxia Mutants Reveals Determinants of Frataxin Binding and Activation of the Fe-S Assembly Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bridwell-Rabb, Jennifer; Winn, Andrew M; Barondeau, David P

    2012-08-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with the loss of function of the protein frataxin (FXN) that results from low FXN levels due to a GAA triplet repeat expansion or, occasionally, from missense mutations in the FXN gene. Here biochemical and structural properties of FXN variants, including three FRDA missense mutations (N146K, Q148R, and R165C) and three related mutants (N146A, Q148G, and Q153A), were determined in an effort to understand the structural basis for the loss of function. In vitro assays revealed that although the three FRDA missense mutations exhibited similar losses of cysteine desulfurase and Fe-S cluster assembly activities, the causes for these activation defects were distinct. The R165C variant exhibited a kcat/KM higher than that of native FXN but weak binding to the NFS1, ISD11, and ISCU2 (SDU) complex, whereas the Q148R variant exhibited the lowest kcat/KM of the six tested FXN variants and only a modest binding deficiency. The order of the FXN binding affinities for the SDU Fe-S assembly complex was as follows: FXN > Q148R > N146A > Q148G > N146K > Q153A > R165C. Four different classes of FXN variants were identified on the basis of their biochemical properties. Together, these structure-function studies reveal determinants for the binding and allosteric activation of the Fe-S assembly complex and provide insight into how FRDA missense mutations are functionally compromised.

  2. Mutant p53: One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand.

    PubMed

    Walerych, Dawid; Lisek, Kamil; Del Sal, Giannino

    2015-01-01

    Encoded by the mutated variants of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene, mutant p53 proteins are getting an increased experimental support as active oncoproteins promoting tumor growth and metastasis. p53 missense mutant proteins are losing their wild-type tumor suppressor activity and acquire oncogenic potential, possessing diverse transforming abilities in cell and mouse models. Whether various mutant p53s differ in their oncogenic potential has been a matter of debate. Recent discoveries are starting to uncover the existence of mutant p53 downstream programs that are common to different mutant p53 variants. In this review, we discuss a number of studies on mutant p53, underlining the advantages and disadvantages of alternative experimental approaches that have been used to describe the numerous mutant p53 gain-of-function activities. Therapeutic possibilities are also discussed, taking into account targeting either individual or multiple mutant p53 proteins in human cancer.

  3. Comparison of the Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide versus Ethanol Extracts from Leaves of Perilla frutescens Britt. Radiation Mutant.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chang Hyun; Park, Han Chul; So, Yangkang; Nam, Bomi; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Jin-Baek

    2017-02-17

    In this study, we aimed to compare supercritical carbon dioxide extraction and ethanol extraction for isoegomaketone (IK) content in perilla leaf extracts and to identify the optimal method. We measured the IK concentration using HPLC and inflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells from the extracts. The IK concentration was 10-fold higher in perilla leaf extracts by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SFE) compared with that in perilla leaf extracts by ethanol extraction (EE). When the extracts were treated in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells at 25 μg/mL, the SFE inhibited the expression of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleutkin-6 (IL-6), interferon-β (IFN-β), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to a much greater extent compared with EE. Taken together, supercritical carbon dioxide extraction is considered the optimal process for obtaining high IK content and anti-inflammatory activities in leaf extracts from the P. frutescens Britt. radiation mutant.

  4. Non-canonical NF-κB signalling and ETS1/2 cooperatively drive C250T mutant TERT promoter activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinghui; Zhou, Qi-Ling; Sun, Wenjie; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Cheng, Hui Shan; Ying, Zhe; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Raju, Anandhkumar; Tenen, Daniel G.; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Li, Jun; Prabhakar, Shyam; Li, Mengfeng; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional reactivation of TERT, the catalytic subunit of telomerase, is necessary for cancer progression in about 90% of human cancers. The recent discovery of two prevalent somatic mutations—C250T and C228T—in the TERT promoter in various cancers has provided insight into a plausible mechanism of TERT reactivation. Although the two hotspot mutations create a similar binding motif for E-twenty-six (ETS) transcription factors, we show that they are functionally distinct, in that the C250T unlike the C228T TERT promoter is driven by non-canonical NF-κB signalling. We demonstrate that binding of ETS to the mutant TERT promoter is insufficient in driving its transcription but this process requires non-canonical NF-κB signalling for stimulus responsiveness, sustained telomerase activity and hence cancer progression. Our findings highlight a previously unrecognized role of non-canonical NF-κB signalling in tumorigenesis and elucidate a fundamental mechanism for TERT reactivation in cancers, which if targeted could have immense therapeutic implications. PMID:26389665

  5. Versatile members of the DNAJ family show Hsp70 dependent anti-aggregation activity on RING1 mutant parkin C289G

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Vaishali; Kuiper, E. F. Elsiena; Pandey, Abhinav; Braakman, Ineke; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders and several mutations in different genes have been identified to contribute to the disease. A loss of function parkin RING1 domain mutant (C289G) is associated with autosomal-recessive juvenile-onset Parkinsonism (AR-JP) and displays altered solubility and sequesters into aggregates. Single overexpression of almost each individual member of the Hsp40 (DNAJ) family of chaperones efficiently reduces parkin C289G aggregation and requires interaction with and activity of endogenously expressed Hsp70 s. For DNAJB6 and DNAJB8, potent suppressors of aggregation of polyglutamine proteins for which they rely mainly on an S/T-rich region, it was found that the S/T-rich region was dispensable for suppression of parkin C289G aggregation. Our data implies that different disease-causing proteins pose different challenges to the protein homeostasis system and that DNAJB6 and DNAJB8 are highly versatile members of the DNAJ protein family with multiple partially non-overlapping modes of action with respect to handling disease-causing proteins, making them interesting potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27713507

  6. Non-canonical NF-κB signalling and ETS1/2 cooperatively drive C250T mutant TERT promoter activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghui; Zhou, Qi-Ling; Sun, Wenjie; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Cheng, Hui Shan; Ying, Zhe; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Raju, Anandhkumar; Tenen, Daniel G; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Li, Jun; Prabhakar, Shyam; Li, Mengfeng; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2015-10-01

    Transcriptional reactivation of TERT, the catalytic subunit of telomerase, is necessary for cancer progression in about 90% of human cancers. The recent discovery of two prevalent somatic mutations-C250T and C228T-in the TERT promoter in various cancers has provided insight into a plausible mechanism of TERT reactivation. Although the two hotspot mutations create a similar binding motif for E-twenty-six (ETS) transcription factors, we show that they are functionally distinct, in that the C250T unlike the C228T TERT promoter is driven by non-canonical NF-κB signalling. We demonstrate that binding of ETS to the mutant TERT promoter is insufficient in driving its transcription but this process requires non-canonical NF-κB signalling for stimulus responsiveness, sustained telomerase activity and hence cancer progression. Our findings highlight a previously unrecognized role of non-canonical NF-κB signalling in tumorigenesis and elucidate a fundamental mechanism for TERT reactivation in cancers, which if targeted could have immense therapeutic implications.

  7. Regulated expression of CXCR4 constitutive active mutants revealed the up-modulated chemotaxis and up-regulation of genes crucial for CXCR4 mediated homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M; Afrin, F; Tripathi, Rp; Gangenahalli, G

    2013-01-01

    SDF-1/CXCR4 axis plays a principle role in the homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), a process that defines cells ability to reach and seed recipient bone marrow niche following their intravenous infusion. However, the proper functioning of CXCR4 downstream signaling depends upon consistent optimal expression of both SDF-1 ligand and its receptor CXCR4, which in turn is variable and regulated by several factors. The constitutive active mutants of CXCR4 (N119A and N119S) being able to induce autonomous downstream signaling, overcome the limitation of ligand-receptor interaction for induction of CXCR4 signaling. Therefore, we intended to explore their potential in Chemotaxis; a key cellular process which crucially regulates cells homing to bone marrow. In present study, Tet-on inducible gene expression vector system was used for doxycycline inducible regulated transgene expression of CXCR4 active mutants in hematopoietic stem progenitor cell line K-562. Both of these mutants revealed significantly enhanced Chemotaxis to SDF-1 gradient as compared to wild type. Furthermore, gene expression profiling of these genetically engineered cells as assessed by microarray analysis revealed the up-regulation of group of genes that are known to play a crucial role in CXCR4 mediated cells homing and engraftment. Hence, this study suggest the potential prospects of CXCR4 active mutants in research and development aimed to improve the efficiency of cells in the mechanism of homing and engraftment process.

  8. Protein glycosylation in pmt mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Influence of heterologously expressed cellobiohydrolase II of Trichoderma reesei and elevated levels of GDP-mannose and cis-prenyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Górka-Nieć, Wioletta; Bańkowska, Renata; Palamarczyk, Grazyna; Krotkiewski, Hubert; Kruszewska, Joanna S

    2007-05-01

    Protein O-mannosylation has been postulated to be critical for production and secretion of glycoproteins in fungi. Therefore, understanding the regulation of this process and the influence of heterologous expression of glycoproteins on the activity of enzymes engaged in O-glycosylation are of considerable interest. In this study we expressed cellobiohydrolase II (CBHII) of T. reesei, which is normally highly O-mannosylated, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae pmt mutants partially blocked in O-mannosylation. We found that the lack of Pmt1 or Pmt2 protein O-mannosyltransferase activity limited the glycosylation of CBHII, but it did not affect its secretion. The S. cerevisiae pmt1Delta and pmt2Delta mutants expressing T. reesei cbh2 gene showed a decrease of GDP-mannose level and a very high activity of cis-prenyltransferase compared to untransformed strains. On the other hand, elevation of cis-prenyltransferase activity by overexpression of the S. cerevisiae RER2 gene in these mutants led to an increase of dolichyl phosphate mannose synthase activity, but it did not influence the activity of O-mannosyltransferases. Overexpression of the MPG1 gene increased the level of GDP-mannose and stimulated the activity of mannosyltransferases elongating O-linked sugar chains, leading to partial restoration of CBHII glycosylation.

  9. Structural and Biochemical Evidence That a TEM-1 [beta]-Lactamase N170G Active Site Mutant Acts via Substrate-assisted Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas G.; Shanker, Sreejesh; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram; Palzkill, Timothy

    2010-03-12

    TEM-1 {beta}-lactamase is the most common plasmid-encoded {beta}-lactamase in Gram-negative bacteria and is a model class A enzyme. The active site of class A {beta}-lactamases share several conserved residues including Ser{sup 70}, Glu{sup 166}, and Asn{sub 170} that coordinate a hydrolytic water involved in deacylation. Unlike Ser{sup 70} and Glu{sup 166}, the functional significance of residue Asn{sup 170} is not well understood even though it forms hydrogen bonds with both Glu{sup 166} and the hydrolytic water. The goal of this study was to examine the importance of Asn{sup 170} for catalysis and substrate specificity of {beta}-lactam antibiotic hydrolysis. The codon for position 170 was randomized to create a library containing all 20 possible amino acids. The random library was introduced into Escherichia coli, and functional clones were selected on agar plates containing ampicillin. DNA sequencing of the functional clones revealed that only asparagine (wild type) and glycine at this position are consistent with wild-type function. The determination of kinetic parameters for several substrates revealed that the N170G mutant is very efficient at hydrolyzing substrates that contain a primary amine in the antibiotic R-group that would be close to the Asn{sup 170} side chain in the acyl-intermediate. In addition, the x-ray structure of the N170G enzyme indicated that the position of an active site water important for deacylation is altered compared with the wild-type enzyme. Taken together, the results suggest the N170G TEM-1 enzyme hydrolyzes ampicillin efficiently because of substrate-assisted catalysis where the primary amine of the ampicillin R-group positions the hydrolytic water and allows for efficient deacylation.

  10. Aspergillus nidulans cell wall composition and function change in response to hosting several Aspergillus fumigatus UDP-galactopyranose mutase activity mutants.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Kausar; van Straaten, Karin E; Sanders, David A R; Kaminskyj, Susan G W

    2014-01-01

    Deletion or repression of Aspergillus nidulans ugmA (AnugmA), involved in galactofuranose biosynthesis, impairs growth and increases sensitivity to Caspofungin, a β-1,3-glucan synthesis antagonist. The A. fumigatus UgmA (AfUgmA) crystal structure has been determined. From that study, AfUgmA mutants with altered enzyme activity were transformed into AnugmA▵ to assess their effect on growth and wall composition in A. nidulans. The complemented (AnugmA::wild type AfugmA) strain had wild type phenotype, indicating these genes had functional homology. Consistent with in vitro studies, AfUgmA residues R182 and R327 were important for its function in vivo, with even conservative amino (RK) substitutions producing AnugmA? phenotype strains. Similarly, the conserved AfUgmA loop III histidine (H63) was important for Galf generation: the H63N strain had a partially rescued phenotype compared to AnugmA▵. Collectively, A. nidulans strains that hosted mutated AfUgmA constructs with low enzyme activity showed increased hyphal surface adhesion as assessed by binding fluorescent latex beads. Consistent with previous qPCR results, immunofluorescence and ELISA indicated that AnugmA▵ and AfugmA-mutated A. nidulans strains had increased α-glucan and decreased β-glucan in their cell walls compared to wild type and AfugmA-complemented strains. Like the AnugmA▵ strain, A. nidulans strains containing mutated AfugmA showed increased sensitivity to antifungal drugs, particularly Caspofungin. Reduced β-glucan content was correlated with increased Caspofungin sensitivity. Aspergillus nidulans wall Galf, α-glucan, and β-glucan content was correlated in A. nidulans hyphal walls, suggesting dynamic coordination between cell wall synthesis and cell wall integrity.

  11. O2 activation by non-heme diiron proteins: identification of a symmetric mu-1,2-peroxide in a mutant of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Moënne-Loccoz, P; Baldwin, J; Ley, B A; Loehr, T M; Bollinger, J M

    1998-10-20

    Non-heme diiron clusters occur in a number of enzymes (e.g., ribonucleotide reductase, methane monooxygenase, and Delta9-stearoyl-ACP desaturase) that activate O2 for chemically difficult oxidation reactions. In each case, a kinetically labile peroxo intermediate is believed to form when O2 reacts with the diferrous enzyme, followed by O-O bond cleavage and the formation of high-valent iron intermediates [formally Fe(IV)] that are thought to be the reactive oxidants. Greater kinetic stability of a peroxodiiron(III) intermediate in protein R2 of ribonucleotide reductase was achieved by the iron-ligand mutation Asp84 --> Glu and the surface mutation Trp48 --> Phe. Here, we present the first definitive evidence for a bridging, symmetrical peroxo adduct from vibrational spectroscopic studies of the freeze-trapped intermediate of this mutant R2. Isotope-sensitive bands are observed at 870, 499, and 458 cm-1 that are assigned to the intraligand peroxo stretching frequency and the asymmetric and symmetric Fe-O2-Fe stretching frequencies, respectively. Similar results have been obtained in the resonance Raman spectroscopic study of a peroxodiferric species of Delta9-stearoyl-ACP desaturase [Broadwater, J. A., Ai, J., Loehr, T. M., Sanders-Loehr, J., and Fox, B. G. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 14664-14671]. Similarities among these adducts and transient species detected during O2 activation by methane monooxygenase hydroxylase, ferritin, and wild-type protein R2 suggest the symmetrical peroxo adduct as a common intermediate in the diverse oxidation reactions mediated by members of this class.

  12. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in tumors is crucial for its oncogenic activities, while depletion of mutant p53 attenuates malignant properties of cancer cells. Thus, mutant p53 is an attractive druggable target for cancer therapy. Different approaches have been taken to develop small-molecule compounds that specifically target mutant p53. These include compounds that restore wild-type conformation and transcriptional activity of mutant p53, induce depletion of mutant p53, inhibit downstream pathways of oncogenic mutant p53, and induce synthetic lethality to mutant p53. In this review article, we comprehensively discuss the current strategies targeting oncogenic mutant p53 in cancers, with special focus on compounds that restore wild-type p53 transcriptional activity of mutant p53 and those reducing mutant p53 levels.

  13. Motor neuron cell death in wobbler mutant mice follows overexpression of the G-protein-coupled, protease-activated receptor for thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Festoff, B. W.; D'Andrea, M. R.; Citron, B. A.; Salcedo, R. M.; Smirnova, I. V.; Andrade-Gordon, P.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are actively sought for new therapeutic strategies. Transgenic, knockout and genetic mouse models greatly aid our understanding of the mechanisms for neuronal cell death. A naturally occurring, autosomal recessive mutant, known as wobbler, and mice transgenic for familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 mutations are available, but the molecular mechanisms remain equally unknown. Both phenotypes are detectable after birth. Wobbler is detectable in the third week of life, when homozygotes (wr/wr) exhibit prominent gliosis and significant motor neuron loss in the cervical, but not in lumbar, spinal cord segments. To address molecular mechanisms, we evaluated "death signals" associated with the multifunctional serine protease, thrombin, which leads to apoptotic motor neuronal cell death in culture by cleavage of a G-protein coupled, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thrombin activities were determined with chromogenic substrate assays, Western immunoblots and immunohistochemistry were performed with anti-PAR-1 to observe localizations of the receptor and anti-GFAP staining was used to monitor astrocytosis. PAR-1 mRNA levels and locations were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in situ hybridizations. Cell death was monitored with in situ DNA fragmentation assays. RESULTS: In preliminary studies we found a 5-fold increase in PAR-1 mRNA in cervical spinal cords from wr/wr, compared with wild-type (wt) littermates. Our current studies suggested that reactive astrocytosis and motor neuron cell death were causally linked with alterations in thrombin signaling. PAR-1 protein expression was increased, as demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and confirmed with in situ hybridization, in phenotypic wr/wr motor neurons, compared with wt, but not in astrocytes. This increase was much greater in cervical, compared with lumbar

  14. Characterization of the neutralizing activity of three anti-human TNF monoclonal antibodies and prediction of their TNF epitopes by molecular modeling and mutant protein approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cansheng; Liu, Xuesong; Feng, Jiannan; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Beifen; Ou'yang, Weiming; Cao, Yunxin; Jin, Boquan

    2006-02-15

    The neutralizing activity of three anti-human TNF monoclonal antibodies, designated D2, E6, and F6 were investigated by three experimental systems. The results from the systems showed that all the three mAbs could neutralize TNF-mediated cytotoxicity in L929 cells, TNF-induced NF-kappaB activation in ECV304 cells, and TNF-upregulated ICAM-1 surface expression on ECV304 cells in dose-dependent manners. D2 had the highest neutralizing activity of the three mAbs, and F6 had higher level of neutralizing activity than E6. We also cloned the VH and VL cDNAs and obtained their cDNA sequences. The sequences were used in molecular modeling to establish the complex structures of TNF with variable regions of the three mAbs, respectively. In the structures, the TNF epitopes of D2, E6, and F6 were predicted at amino acids of (A109, A111-A112, C19, C21-C29, C44-C46, C66-C75, C77, C79, C90, C101, C103, C105, C114, C134-C148), (C18-C19, C21-C30, C32, C37, C43-C47, C67-C75, C83, C105-C106, C131, C135-C141), and (C21-C32, C45-C47, C65, C67-C72, C74, C81, C83, C90-C95, C105-C113, C133-C147), respectively, and the affinities of D2, E6, and F6 to TNF were predicted as -252.69, -232.83, and -299.92 kcal, respectively. Moreover, we proved the binding ability of F6 to the epitopes of amino acids of 141-146 in TNF molecule was better than that of E6, and that of D2 was the best of the three mAbs by Western blot and ELISA, in which the mutant TNF deleted the amino acids of 141-146 in TNF molecule was employed. These results make a basic foundation for selecting candidate mAbs for various purposes, such as construction of chimeric or humanized mAbs for therapeutic purpose, establishment of ELISA kits for determination of TNF, and production of affinity columns to purify TNF.

  15. Reversal of clavulanate resistance conferred by a Ser-244 mutant of TEM-1 beta-lactamase as a result of a second mutation (Arg to Ser at position 164) that enhances activity against ceftazidime.

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, U; Manavathu, E K; Mobashery, S; Lerner, S A

    1994-01-01

    The mutation of Arg-244 to Ser (Arg-244-->Ser mutation) in the TEM-1 beta-lactamase has been shown to produce resistance to inactivation by clavulanate in the mutant enzyme and resistance to ampicillin plus clavulanate in a strain of Escherichia coli producing this enzyme. The Arg-164-->Ser mutation in the TEM-1 beta-lactamase (TEM-12 enzyme) is known to enhance the activity of the enzyme against ceftazidime, resulting in resistance to the drug in a strain producing the mutant enzyme (D. A. Weber, C. C. Sanders, J. S. Bakken, and J. P. Quinn, J. Infect. Dis. 162:460-465, 1990). The doubly mutated derivative of the TEM-1 enzyme (Ser-164/Ser-244) retains the characteristics of the Ser-164 mutant enzyme, i.e., enhanced activity against ceftazidime and sensitivity to inactivation by clavulanate. It also confers the same phenotype as the Ser-164 mutant enzyme, i.e., resistance to ceftazidime and ampicillin, with reversal of this resistance in the presence of clavulanate. Thus, the Arg-164-->Ser mutation in the TEM-1 beta-lactamase suppresses the effect of the Arg-244-->Ser mutation which, by itself, reduces the sensitivity of the enzyme to inactivation by clavulanate. PMID:8067751

  16. The Structures of the C185S and C185A Mutants of Sulfite Oxidase Reveal Rearrangement of the Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, James A.; Wilson, Heather L.; Pushie, M. Jake; Kisker, Caroline; George, Graham N.; Rajagopalan, K.V.

    2010-11-03

    Sulfite oxidase (SO) catalyzes the physiologically critical conversion of sulfite to sulfate. Enzymatic activity is dependent on the presence of the metal molybdenum complexed with a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor termed molybdopterin. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of SOs from a variety of sources has identified a single conserved Cys residue essential for catalytic activity. The crystal structure of chicken liver sulfite oxidase indicated that this residue, Cys185 in chicken SO, coordinates the Mo atom in the active site. To improve our understanding of the role of this residue in the catalytic mechanism of sulfite oxidase, serine and alanine variants at position 185 of recombinant chicken SO were generated. Spectroscopic and kinetic studies indicate that neither variant is capable of sulfite oxidation. The crystal structure of the C185S variant was determined to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution and to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution in the presence of sulfite, and the C185A variant to 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. The structures of the C185S and C185A variants revealed that neither the Ser or Ala side chains appeared to closely interact with the Mo atom and that a third oxo group replaced the usual cysteine sulfur ligand at the Mo center, confirming earlier extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) work on the human C207S mutant. An unexpected result was that in the C185S variant, in the absence of sulfite, the active site residue Tyr322 became disordered as did the loop region flanking it. In the C185S variant crystallized in the presence of sulfite, the Tyr322 residue relocalized to the active site. The C185A variant structure also indicated the presence of a third oxygen ligand; however, Tyr322 remained in the active site. EXAFS studies of the Mo coordination environment indicate the Mo atom is in the oxidized Mo{sup VI} state in both the C185S and C185A variants of chicken SO and show the expected trioxodithiolene active site. Density

  17. Novel Escherichia coli RF1 mutants with decreased translation termination activity and increased sensitivity to the cytotoxic effect of the bacterial toxins Kid and RelE.

    PubMed

    Diago-Navarro, Elizabeth; Mora, Liliana; Buckingham, Richard H; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; Lemonnier, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Novel mutations in prfA, the gene for the polypeptide release factor RF1 of Escherichia coli, were isolated using a positive genetic screen based on the parD (kis, kid) toxin-antitoxin system. This original approach allowed the direct selection of mutants with altered translational termination efficiency at UAG codons. The isolated prfA mutants displayed a approximately 10-fold decrease in UAG termination efficiency with no significant changes in RF1 stability in vivo. All three mutations, G121S, G301S and R303H, were situated close to the nonsense codon recognition site in RF1:ribosome complexes. The prfA mutants displayed increased sensitivity to the RelE toxin encoded by the relBE system of E. coli, thus providing in vivo support for the functional interaction between RF1 and RelE. The prfA mutants also showed increased sensitivity to the Kid toxin. Since this toxin can cleave RNA in a ribosome-independent manner, this result was not anticipated and provided first evidence for the involvement of RF1 in the pathway of Kid toxicity. The sensitivity of the prfA mutants to RelE and Kid was restored to normal levels upon overproduction of the wild-type RF1 protein. We discuss these results and their utility for the design of novel antibacterial strategies in the light of the recently reported structure of ribosome-bound RF1.

  18. Active photosynthesis in cyanobacterial mutants with directed modifications in the ligands for two iron-sulfur clusters on the PsaC protein of photosystem I.

    PubMed Central

    Mannan, R M; He, W Z; Metzger, S U; Whitmarsh, J; Malkin, R; Pakrasi, H B

    1996-01-01

    The PsaC protein of the Photosystem I (PSI) complex in thylakoid membranes coordinates two [4Fe-4S] clusters, FA and FB. Although it is known that PsaC participates in electron transfer to ferredoxin, the pathway of electrons through this protein is unknown. To elucidate the roles of FA and FB, we created two site-directed mutant strains of the cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413. In one mutant, cysteine 13, a ligand for FB was replaced by an aspartic acid (C13D); in the other mutant, cysteine 50, a ligand for FA was modified similarly (C50D). Low-temperature electron paramagnetic resonance studies demonstrated that the C50D mutant has a normal FB center and a modified FA center. In contrast, the C13D strain has normal FA, but failed to reveal any signal from FB. Room-temperature optical studies showed that C13D has only one functional electron acceptor in PsaC, whereas two such acceptors are functional in the C50D and wild-type strains. Although both mutants grow under photoautotrophic conditions, the rate of PSI-mediated electron transfer in C13D under low light levels is about half that of C50D or wild type. These data show that (i) FB is not essential for the assembly of the PsaC protein in PSI and (ii) FB is not absolutely required for electron transfer from the PSI reaction center to ferredoxin. PMID:8617228

  19. Filament-Producing Mutants of Influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) Virus Have Higher Neuraminidase Activities than the Spherical Wild-Type

    PubMed Central

    Seladi-Schulman, Jill; Campbell, Patricia J.; Suppiah, Suganthi; Steel, John; Lowen, Anice C.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus exhibits two morphologies – spherical and filamentous. Strains that have been grown extensively in laboratory substrates are comprised predominantly of spherical virions while clinical or low passage isolates produce a mixture of spheres and filamentous virions of varying lengths. The filamentous morphology can be lost upon continued passage in embryonated chicken eggs, a common laboratory substrate for influenza viruses. The fact that the filamentous morphology is maintained in nature but lost in favor of a spherical morphology in ovo suggests that filaments confer a selective advantage within the infected host that is not necessary for growth in laboratory substrates. Indeed, we have recently shown that filament-producing variant viruses are selected upon passage of the spherical laboratory strain A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) [PR8] in guinea pigs. Toward determining the nature of the selective advantage conferred by filaments, we sought to identify functional differences between spherical and filamentous particles. We compared the wild-type PR8 virus to two previously characterized recombinant PR8 viruses in which single point mutations within M1 confer a filamentous morphology. Our results indicate that these filamentous PR8 mutants have higher neuraminidase activities than the spherical PR8 virus. Conversely, no differences were observed in HAU:PFU or HAU:RNA ratios, binding avidity, sensitivity to immune serum in hemagglutination inhibition assays, or virion stability at elevated temperatures. Based on these results, we propose that the pleomorphic nature of influenza virus particles is important for the optimization of neuraminidase functions in vivo. PMID:25383873

  20. Ligand Stimulation of ErbB4 and A Constitutively-Active ErbB4 Mutant Result in Different Biological Responses In Human Pancreatic Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin1β. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression. PMID:21110957

  1. Simian virus 5 is a poor inducer of chemokine secretion from human lung epithelial cells: identification of viral mutants that activate interleukin-8 secretion by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Young, Virginia A; Parks, Griffith D

    2003-06-01

    We have compared chemokine secretion from human lung A549 cells infected with simian virus 5 (SV5) with other members of the Rubulavirus genus of paramyxoviruses. High levels of the chemokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were secreted from A549 cells infected with Human parainfluenza virus type 2 (HPIV-2) but not from cells infected with wild-type (WT) SV5. The lack of IL-8 secretion from SV5-infected cells was not due to a global block in all signal transduction pathways leading to IL-8 secretion, since SV5-infected A549 cells secreted IL-8 after stimulation with exogenously added tumor necrosis factor alpha or by coinfection with HPIV-2. A previously described, recombinant SV5 containing substitutions in the shared region of the P/V gene (rSV5-P/V-CPI-) induced IL-8 secretion by a mechanism that was dependent on viral gene expression. By contrast, an SV5 variant isolated from persistently infected cells (Wake Forest strain of Canine parainfluenza virus) induced IL-8 secretion by a mechanism that was largely not affected by inhibitors of viral gene expression. Together, these data demonstrate that SV5 is unusual compared to other closely related paramyxoviruses, since SV5 is a very poor inducer of the cytokines IL-8 and MCP-1. The isolation of two recombinant SV5 mutants that are defective in preventing chemokine induction will allow an identification of mechanisms utilized by WT SV5 to avoid activation of host cell innate immune responses to infection.

  2. Ligand stimulation of ErbB4 and a constitutively-active ErbB4 mutant result in different biological responses in human pancreatic tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2011-02-15

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin 1{beta}. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression.

  3. The activity of wild type and mutant phenylalanine hydroxylase with respect to the C-oxidation of phenylalanine and the S-oxidation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine.

    PubMed

    Steventon, Glyn B; Mitchell, Stephen C; Pérez, Belen; Desviat, Lourdes R; Ugarte, Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of the enzyme, phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH), in the S-oxidation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (SCMC) is now firmly established in man and rat. However, the underlying role of the molecular genetics of PAH in dictating and influencing the S-oxidation polymorphism of SCMC metabolism is as yet unknown. In this work we report that the S-oxidation of SCMC was dramatically reduced in the tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) responsive mutant PAH proteins (I65T, R68S, R261Q, V388M and Y414C) with these enzymes possessing between 1.2% and 2.0% of the wild type PAH activity when SCMC was used as substrate. These same mutant proteins express between 23% and 76% of the wild type PAH activity when phenylalanine was used as the substrate. The PAH mutant proteins (R158Q, I174T and R408W) that result in the classical phenylketonuria (PKU) phenotype expressing 0.2-1.8% of the wild type PAH activity when using phenylalanine as substrate were found to have <0.1% of the wild type PAH activity when SCMC was used as the substrate. Mutations that result in PAH proteins retaining some residual PAH activity with phenylalanine as substrate have <2.0% residual activity when SCMC was used as a substrate. This investigation has led to the hypothesis that the S-oxidation polymorphism in man is a consequence of an individual carrying one mutant PAH allele which has resulted in the loss of the ability of the residual PAH protein to undertake the S-oxidation of SCMC in vivo.

  4. Salmonella typhimurium mutants lacking NAD pyrophosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Park, U E; Roth, J R; Olivera, B M

    1988-01-01

    NAD can serve as both a purine and a pyridine source for Salmonella typhimurium. Exogenous NAD is rapidly broken down into nicotinamide mononucleotide and AMP by an NAD pyrophosphatase, the first step in the pathway for the assimilation of exogenous NAD. We isolated and characterized mutants of S. typhimurium lacking NAD pyrophosphatase activity; such mutants were identified by their failure to use exogenous NAD as a purine source. These mutants carry mutations that map at a new locus, designated pnuE, between 86 and 87 min on the Salmonella chromosome. PMID:2841298

  5. Markedly reduced activity of mutant calcium-sensing receptor with an inserted Alu element from a kindred with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Bai, M; Janicic, N; Trivedi, S; Quinn, S J; Cole, D E; Brown, E M; Hendy, G N

    1997-01-01

    Missense mutations have been identified in the coding region of the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene and cause human autosomal dominant hypo- and hypercalcemic disorders. The functional effects of several of these mutations have been characterized in either Xenopus laevis oocytes or in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. All of the mutations that have been examined to date, however, cause single putative amino acid substitutions. In this report, we studied a mutant CASR with an Alu-repetitive element inserted at codon 876, which was identified in affected members of families with the hypercalcemic disorders, familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) and neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT), to understand how this insertion affects CASR function. After cloning of the Alu-repetitive element into the wild-type CASR cDNA, we transiently expressed the mutant receptor in HEK293 cells. Expression of mutant and wild-type receptors was assessed by Western analysis, and the effects of the mutation on extracellular calcium (Ca2+(o)) and gadolinium (Gd3+(o)) elicited increases in the cytosolic calcium concentration (Ca2+(i)) were examined in fura-2-loaded cells using dual wavelength fluorimetry. The insertion resulted in truncated receptor species that had molecular masses some 30 kD less than that of the wild-type CASR and exhibited no Ca2+(i) responses to either Ca2+(o) or Gd3+(o). A similar result was observed with a mutated CASR truncated at residue 876. However, the Alu mutant receptor had no impact on the function of the coexpressed wild-type receptor. Interestingly, the Alu mutant receptor demonstrated decreased cell surface expression relative to the wild-type receptor, whereas the CASR (A877stop) mutant exhibited increased cell surface expression. Thus, like the missense mutations that have been characterized to date in families with FHH, the Alu insertion in this family is a loss-of-function mutation that produces hypercalcemia by

  6. Diet-derived 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 activates vitamin D receptor target gene expression and suppresses EGFR mutant non-small cell lung cancer growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Verone-Boyle, Alissa R.; Shoemaker, Suzanne; Attwood, Kristopher; Morrison, Carl D.; Makowski, Andrew J.; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Hershberger, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies implicate vitamin D status as a factor that influences growth of EGFR mutant lung cancers. However, laboratory based evidence of the biological effect of vitamin D in this disease is lacking. To fill this knowledge gap, we determined vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression in human lung tumors using a tissue microarray constructed of lung cancer cases from never-smokers (where EGFR gene mutations are prevalent). Nuclear VDR was detected in 19/19 EGFR mutant tumors. Expression tended to be higher in tumors with EGFR exon 19 deletions than those with EGFR L858R mutations. To study anti-proliferative activity and signaling, EGFR mutant lung cancer cells were treated with the circulating metabolite of vitamin D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D3). 25D3 inhibited clonogenic growth in a dose-dependent manner. CYP27B1 encodes the 1α-hydroxylase (1αOHase) that converts 25D3 to the active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3). Studies employing VDR siRNA, CYP27B1 zinc finger nucleases, and pharmacologic inhibitors of the vitamin D pathway indicate that 25D3 regulates gene expression in a VDR-dependent manner but does not strictly require 1αOHase-mediated conversion of 25D3 to 1,25D3. To determine the effects of modulating serum 25D3 levels on growth of EGFR mutant lung tumor xenografts, mice were fed diets containing 100 or 10,000 IU vitamin D3/kg. High dietary vitamin D3 intake resulted in elevated serum 25D3 and significant inhibition of tumor growth. No toxic effects of supplementation were observed. These results identify EGFR mutant lung cancer as a vitamin D-responsive disease and diet-derived 25D3 as a direct VDR agonist and therapeutic agent. PMID:26654942

  7. PDGFRA-mutant syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Cenci, Tonia; Carbone, Arnaldo; Lanza, Paola; Biondi, Alberto; Rindi, Guido; Cassano, Alessandra; Larghi, Alberto; Persiani, Roberto; Larocca, Luigi M

    2015-07-01

    Germline PDGFRA mutations cause multiple heterogeneous gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors. In its familial form this disease, which was formerly termed intestinal neurofibromatosis/neurofibromatosis 3b (INF/NF3b), has been included among familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) because of its genotype, described when GIST was the only known PDGFRA-mutant gastrointestinal tumor. Shortly afterwards, however, inflammatory fibroid polyps also revealed PDGFRA mutations. Subsequently, gastrointestinal CD34+ 'fibrous tumors' of uncertain classification were described in a germline PDGFRA-mutant context. Our aim was to characterize the syndrome produced by germline PDGFRA mutations and establish diagnostic criteria and management strategies for this hitherto puzzling disease. We studied a kindred displaying multiple gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors, comparing it with published families/individuals with possible analogous conditions. We identified a novel inherited PDGFRA mutation (P653L), constituting the third reported example of familial PDGFRA mutation. In adult mutants we detected inflammatory fibroid polyps, gastric GISTs and gastrointestinal fibrous tumors of uncertain nosology. We demonstrate that the syndrome formerly defined as INF/NF3b (exemplified by the family reported herein) is simplistically considered a form of familial GIST, because inflammatory fibroid polyps often prevail. Fibrous tumors appear variants of inflammatory fibroid polyps. 'INF/NF3b' and 'familial GIST' are misleading terms which we propose changing to 'PDGFRA-mutant syndrome'. In this condition, unlike KIT-dependent familial GIST syndromes, if present, GISTs are stomach-restricted and diffuse Cajal cell hyperplasia is not observed. This restriction of GISTs to the stomach in PDGFRA-mutant syndrome: (i) focuses oncological concern on gastric masses, as inflammatory fibroid polyps are benign; (ii) supports a selective role of gastric environment for PDGFRA mutations to elicit GISTs

  8. Agonistic induction of a covalent dimer in a mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A documents a juxtamembrane interaction that accompanies receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Deschênes, J; McNicoll, N; De Léan, A

    2001-03-16

    The natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is composed of an extracellular domain with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane-spanning domain, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. In response to agonists (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide), the kinase homology domain-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, which allows the production of cyclic GMP. Previous work from our laboratory strongly indicated that agonists are exerting their effects through the induction of a juxtamembrane dimeric contact. However, a direct demonstration of this mechanism remains to be provided. As a tool, we are now using the properties of a new mutation, D435C. It introduces a cysteine at a position in NPR-A corresponding to a supplementary cysteine found in NPR-C6, another receptor of this family (a disulfide-linked dimer). Although this D435C mutation only leads to trace levels of NPR-A disulfide-linked dimer at basal state, covalent dimerization can be induced by a treatment with rat ANP or with other agonists. The NPR-A(D435C) mutant has not been subjected to significant structural alterations, since it shares with the wild type receptor a similar dose-response pattern of cellular guanylyl cyclase activation. However, a persistent activation accompanies NPR-A(D435C) dimer formation after the removal of the inducer agonist. On the other hand, a construction where the intracellular domain of NPR-A(D435C) has been truncated (DeltaKC(D435C)) displays a spontaneous and complete covalent dimerization. In addition, the elimination of the intracellular domain in wild type DeltaKC and DeltaKC(D435C) is associated with an increase of agonist binding affinity, this effect being more pronounced with the weak agonist pBNP. Also, a D435C secreted extracellular domain remains unlinked even after incubation with rat ANP. In summary, these results demonstrate, in a dynamic fashion, the agonistic induction of a dimeric contact in the

  9. Endonuclease IV (nfo) mutant of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R P; Saporito, S M; Spitzer, S G; Weiss, B

    1986-01-01

    A cloned gene, designated nfo, caused overproduction of an EDTA-resistant endonuclease specific for apurinic-apyrimidinic sites in DNA. The sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme was similar to that of endonuclease IV. An insertion mutation was constructed in vitro and transferred from a plasmid to the Escherichia coli chromosome. nfo mutants had an increased sensitivity to the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C and to the oxidants tert-butyl hydroperoxide and bleomycin. The nfo mutation enhanced the killing of xth (exonuclease III) mutants by methyl methanesulfonate, H2O2, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, and gamma rays, and it enhanced their mutability by methyl methanesulfonate. It also increased the temperature sensitivity of an xth dut (dUTPase) mutant that is defective in the repair of uracil-containing DNA. These results are consistent with earlier findings that endonuclease IV and exonuclease III both cleave DNA 5' to an apurinic-apyrimidinic site and that exonuclease III is more active. However, nfo mutants were more sensitive to tert-butyl hydroperoxide and to bleomycin than were xth mutants, suggesting that endonuclease IV might recognize some lesions that exonuclease III does not. The mutants displayed no marked increase in sensitivity to 254-nm UV radiation, and the addition of an nth (endonuclease III) mutation to nfo or nfo xth mutants did not significantly increase their sensitivity to any of the agents tested. Images PMID:2430946

  10. Concurrent Cooperativity and Substrate Inhibition in the Epoxidation of Carbamazepine by Cytochrome P450 3A4 Active Site Mutants Inspired by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the major human P450 responsible for the metabolism of carbamazepine (CBZ). To explore the mechanisms of interactions of CYP3A4 with this anticonvulsive drug, we carried out multiple molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, starting with the complex of CYP3A4 manually docked with CBZ. On the basis of these simulations, we engineered CYP3A4 mutants I369F, I369L, A370V, and A370L, in which the productive binding orientation was expected to be stabilized, thus leading to increased turnover of CBZ to the 10,11-epoxide product. In addition, we generated CYP3A4 mutant S119A as a control construct with putative destabilization of the productive binding pose. Evaluation of the kinetics profiles of CBZ epoxidation demonstrate that CYP3A4-containing bacterial membranes (bactosomes) as well as purified CYP3A4 (wild-type and mutants I369L/F) exhibit substrate inhibition in reconstituted systems. In contrast, mutants S119A and A370V/L exhibit S-shaped profiles that are indicative of homotropic cooperativity. MD simulations with two to four CBZ molecules provide evidence that the substrate-binding pocket of CYP3A4 can accommodate more than one molecule of CBZ. Analysis of the kinetics profiles of CBZ metabolism with a model that combines the formalism of the Hill equation with an allowance for substrate inhibition demonstrates that the mechanism of interactions of CBZ with CYP3A4 involves multiple substrate-binding events (most likely three). Despite the retention of the multisite binding mechanism in the mutants, functional manifestations reveal an exquisite sensitivity to even minor structural changes in the binding pocket that are introduced by conservative substitutions such as I369F, I369L, and A370V. PMID:25545162

  11. Concurrent cooperativity and substrate inhibition in the epoxidation of carbamazepine by cytochrome P450 3A4 active site mutants inspired by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian S; Knehans, Tim; Davydov, Dmitri R; Bounds, Patricia L; von Mandach, Ursula; Halpert, James R; Caflisch, Amedeo; Koppenol, Willem H

    2015-01-27

    Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the major human P450 responsible for the metabolism of carbamazepine (CBZ). To explore the mechanisms of interactions of CYP3A4 with this anticonvulsive drug, we carried out multiple molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, starting with the complex of CYP3A4 manually docked with CBZ. On the basis of these simulations, we engineered CYP3A4 mutants I369F, I369L, A370V, and A370L, in which the productive binding orientation was expected to be stabilized, thus leading to increased turnover of CBZ to the 10,11-epoxide product. In addition, we generated CYP3A4 mutant S119A as a control construct with putative destabilization of the productive binding pose. Evaluation of the kinetics profiles of CBZ epoxidation demonstrate that CYP3A4-containing bacterial membranes (bactosomes) as well as purified CYP3A4 (wild-type and mutants I369L/F) exhibit substrate inhibition in reconstituted systems. In contrast, mutants S119A and A370V/L exhibit S-shaped profiles that are indicative of homotropic cooperativity. MD simulations with two to four CBZ molecules provide evidence that the substrate-binding pocket of CYP3A4 can accommodate more than one molecule of CBZ. Analysis of the kinetics profiles of CBZ metabolism with a model that combines the formalism of the Hill equation with an allowance for substrate inhibition demonstrates that the mechanism of interactions of CBZ with CYP3A4 involves multiple substrate-binding events (most likely three). Despite the retention of the multisite binding mechanism in the mutants, functional manifestations reveal an exquisite sensitivity to even minor structural changes in the binding pocket that are introduced by conservative substitutions such as I369F, I369L, and A370V.

  12. Cold-active DnaK of an Antarctic psychrotroph Shewanella sp. Ac10 supporting the growth of dnaK-null mutant of Escherichia coli at cold temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Galkin, Andrey; Kulakova, Ljudmila; Yoshimura, Tohru; Esaki, Nobuyoshi

    2005-04-01

    Shewanella sp. Ac10 is a psychrotrophic bacterium isolated from the Antarctica that actively grows at such low temperatures as 0 degrees C. Immunoblot analyses showed that a heat-shock protein DnaK is inducibly formed by the bacterium at 24 degrees C, which is much lower than the temperatures causing heat shock in mesophiles such as Escherichia coli. We found that the Shewanella DnaK (SheDnaK) shows much higher ATPase activity at low temperatures than the DnaK of E. coli (EcoDnaK): a characteristic of a cold-active enzyme. The recombinant SheDnaK gene supported neither the growth of a dnaK-null mutant of E. coli at 43 degrees C nor lambda phage propagation at an even lower temperature, 30 degrees C. However, the recombinant SheDnaK gene enabled the E. coli mutant to grow at 15 degrees C. This is the first report of a DnaK supporting the growth of a dnaK-null mutant at low temperatures.

  13. Activation of a GTP-binding protein and a GTP-binding-protein-coupled receptor kinase (beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1) by a muscarinic receptor m2 mutant lacking phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, K; Haga, K; Haga, T; Moro, O; Sadée, W

    1994-12-01

    A mutant of the human muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtype (m2 receptor), lacking a large part of the third intracellular loop, was expressed and purified using the baculovirus/insect cell culture system. The mutant was not phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, as expected from the previous assignment of phosphorylation sites to the central part of the third intracellular loop. However, the m2 receptor mutant was capable of stimulating beta-adrenergic-receptor-kinase-1-mediated phosphorylation of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing the m2 phosphorylation sites in an agonist-dependent manner. Both mutant and wild-type m2 receptors reconstituted with the guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G protein), G(o) and G(i)2, displayed guanine-nucleotide-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding, as assessed by displacement of [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding with carbamoylcholine, and both stimulated guanosine 5'-3-O-[35S]thiotriphosphate ([35S]GTP[S]) binding in the presence of carbamoylcholine and GDP. The Ki values of carbamoylcholine effects on [3H]quinuclidinyl-benzilate binding were indistinguishable for the mutant and wild-type m2 receptors. Moreover, the phosphorylation of the wild-type m2 receptor by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase-1 did not affect m2 interaction with G proteins as assessed by the binding of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate or [35S]GTP[S]. These results indicate that (a) the m2 receptor serves both as an activator and as a substrate of beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase, and (b) a large part of the third intracellular loop of the m2 receptor does not contribute to interaction with G proteins and its phosphorylation by beta-adrenergic-receptor kinase does not uncouple the receptor and G proteins in reconstituted lipid vesicles.

  14. An Exon-Specific U1snRNA Induces a Robust Factor IX Activity in Mice Expressing Multiple Human FIX Splicing Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Balestra, Dario; Scalet, Daniela; Pagani, Franco; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Mari, Rosella; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    In cellular models we have demonstrated that a unique U1snRNA targeting an intronic region downstream of a defective exon (Exon-specific U1snRNA, ExSpeU1) can rescue multiple exon-skipping mutations, a relevant cause of genetic disease. Here, we explored in mice the ExSpeU1 U1fix9 toward two model Hemophilia B-causing mutations at the 5′ (c.519A > G) or 3′ (c.392-8T > G) splice sites of F9 exon 5. Hydrodynamic injection of wt-BALB/C mice with plasmids expressing the wt and mutant (hFIX-2G5′ss and hFIX-8G3′ss) splicing-competent human factor IX (hFIX) cassettes resulted in the expression of hFIX transcripts lacking exon 5 in liver, and in low plasma levels of inactive hFIX. Coinjection of U1fix9, but not of U1wt, restored exon inclusion of variants and in the intrinsically weak FIXwt context. This resulted in appreciable circulating hFIX levels (mean ± SD; hFIX-2G5′ss, 1.0 ± 0.5 µg/ml; hFIX-8G3′ss, 1.2 ± 0.3 µg/ml; and hFIXwt, 1.9 ± 0.6 µg/ml), leading to a striking shortening (from ~100 seconds of untreated mice to ~80 seconds) of FIX-dependent coagulation times, indicating a hFIX with normal specific activity. This is the first proof-of-concept in vivo that a unique ExSpeU1 can efficiently rescue gene expression impaired by distinct exon-skipping variants, which extends the applicability of ExSpeU1s to panels of mutations and thus cohort of patients. PMID:27701399

  15. An excretory function for the Escherichia coli outer membrane pore TolC: upregulation of marA and soxS transcription and Rob activity due to metabolites accumulated in tolC mutants.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Judah L; Martin, Robert G

    2009-08-01

    Efflux pumps function to rid bacteria of xenobiotics, including antibiotics, bile salts, and organic solvents. TolC, which forms an outer membrane channel, is an essential component of several efflux pumps in Escherichia coli. We asked whether TolC has a role during growth in the absence of xenobiotics. Because tolC transcription is activated by three paralogous activators, MarA, SoxS, and Rob, we examined the regulation of these activators in tolC mutants. Using transcriptional fusions, we detected significant upregulation of marRAB and soxS transcription and Rob protein activity in tolC mutants. Three mechanisms could be distinguished: (i) activation of marRAB transcription was independent of marRAB, soxR, and rob functions; (ii) activation of soxS transcription required SoxR, a sensor of oxidants; and (iii) Rob protein was activated posttranscriptionally. This mechanism is similar to the mechanisms of upregulation of marRAB, soxS, and Rob by treatment with certain phenolics, superoxides, and bile salts, respectively. The transcription of other marA/soxS/rob regulon promoters, including tolC itself, was also elevated in tolC mutants. We propose that TolC is involved in the efflux of certain cellular metabolites, not only xenobiotics. As these metabolites accumulate during growth, they trigger the upregulation of MarA, SoxS, and Rob, which in turn upregulate tolC and help rid the bacteria of these metabolites, thereby restoring homeostasis.

  16. Glycosyltransfer in mutants of putative catalytic residue Glu303 of the human ABO(H) A and B blood group glycosyltransferases GTA and GTB proceeds through a labile active site.

    PubMed

    Blackler, Ryan J; Gagnon, Susannah M L; Polakowski, Robert; Rose, Natisha L; Zheng, Ruixiang B; Letts, James A; Johal, Asha R; Schuman, Brock; Borisova, Svetlana N; Palcic, Monica M; Evans, Stephen V

    2016-11-22

    The homologous glycosyltransferases α-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase (GTA) and α-1,3-galactosyltransferase (GTB) carry out the final synthetic step of the closely related human ABO(H) blood group A and B antigens. The catalytic mechanism of these model retaining enzymes remains under debate, where Glu303 has been suggested to act as a putative nucleophile in a double displacement mechanism, a local dipole stabilizing the intermediate in an orthogonal associative mechanism or a general base to stabilize the reactive oxocarbenium ion-like intermediate in an S N i-like mechanism. Kinetic analysis of GTA and GTB point mutants E303C, E303D, E303Q and E303A shows that despite the enzymes having nearly identical sequences, the corresponding mutants of GTA/GTB have up to a 13-fold difference in their residual activities relative to wild type. High-resolution single crystal X-ray diffraction studies reveal, surprisingly, that the mutated Cys, Asp and Gln functional groups are no more than 0.8 Å further from the anomeric carbon of donor substrate compared to wild type. However, complicating the analysis is the observation that Glu303 itself plays a critical role in maintaining the stability of a strained "double-turn" in the active site through several hydrogen bonds, and any mutation other than E303Q leads to significantly higher thermal motion or even disorder in the substrate recognition pockets. Thus, there is a remarkable juxtaposition of the mutants E303C and E303D, which retain significant activity despite disrupted active site architecture, with GTB/E303Q, which maintains active site architecture but exhibits zero activity. These findings indicate that nucleophilicity at position 303 is more catalytically valuable than active site stability and highlight the mechanistic elasticity of these enzymes.

  17. Isolation and characterization of unusual gin mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Klippel, A; Cloppenborg, K; Kahmann, R

    1988-01-01

    Site-specific inversion of the G segment in phage Mu DNA is promoted by two proteins, the DNA invertase Gin and the host factor FIS. Recombination occurs if the recombination sites (IR) are arranged as inverted repeats and a recombinational enhancer sequence is present in cis. Intermolecular reactions as well as deletions between direct repeats of the IRs rarely occur. Making use of a fis- mutant of Escherichia coli we have devised a scheme to isolate gin mutants that have a FIS independent phenotype. This mutant phenotype is caused by single amino acid changes at five different positions of gin. The mutant proteins display a whole set of new properties in vivo: they promote inversions, deletions and intermolecular recombination in an enhancer- and FIS-independent manner. The mutants differ in recombination activity. The most active mutant protein was analysed in vitro. The loss of site orientation specificity was accompanied with the ability to recombine even linear substrates. We discuss these results in connection with the role of the enhancer and FIS protein in the wild-type situation. Images PMID:2974801

  18. Constitutive expression and enzymatic activity of Tan protein in brain and epidermis of Ceratitis capitata and of Drosophila melanogaster wild-type and tan mutants.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M M; Sabio, G; Badaracco, A; Quesada-Allué, L A

    2011-09-01

    The present report shows a partial biochemical characterization and life cycle expression of N-β-alanyldopamine hydrolase (Tan protein) in Ceratitis capitata and Drosophila melanogaster. This enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of N-β-alanyldopamine (NBAD), the main tanning precursor of insect brown cuticles. It also plays an important role in the metabolism of brain neurotransmitters, recycling dopamine and histamine. In contrast to NBAD-synthase, Tan is expressed constitutively in epidermis and does not respond directly to microbial challenge. Immunodetection experiments showed the novel localization of NBAD-hydrolase in the embryo central neural system and in different regions of the adult brain, in addition to optic lobes. We sequenced and characterized Drosophila mutants tan¹ and tan³. The latter appears to be a mutant with normal expression in neural tissue but weak one in epidermis.

  19. Quenching of the antibacterial activity of chlorhexidine and benzalkonium by Letheen broth and Letheen agar in relation to wild-type and envelope mutant strains of gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    el-Falaha, B M; Furr, J R; Russell, A D

    1987-01-01

    Letheen broth and Letheen agar have been investigated for their ability to act as neutralising and recovery media for wild-type and envelope mutants exposed to chlorhexidine diacetate and benzalkonium chloride. At high dilutions, untreated cells of the envelope mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 799/61 were unable to produce colonies on Letheen agar. As a result of various procedures, it was concluded that dilution in Letheen broth and plating in Isosensitest agar was a suitable method for quenching cationic bactericides without harming the test strains, and that the increasing use of Gram-negative bacteria with outer membrane defects means that considerable care may be necessary in selecting media for evaluating bactericidal activity.

  20. Acquired resistance to BRAF inhibition induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in BRAF (V600E) mutant thyroid cancer by c-Met-mediated AKT activation

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Na, Hwi Jung; Yang, Yeon Ju; Ko, Sooah; Yoon, Sun Och; Ku, Minhee; Yang, Jaemoon; Kim, Jae Wook; Ban, Myung Jin; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Da Hee; Kim, Jung Min; Choi, Eun Chang; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Yoon, Joo-Heon; Koh, Yoon Woo

    2017-01-01

    Previously, the authors have identified that c-Met mediates reactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway following BRAF inhibitor treatment in BRAF (V600E) mutant anaplastic thyroid cancer, thereby contributing to the acquired drug resistance. Therefore dual inhibition of BRAF and c-Met led to sustained treatment response, thereby maximizing the specific anti-tumor effect of targeted therapy. The present study goes one step further and aims to investigate the effect of acquired resistance of BRAF inhibitor on epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in BRAF mutant thyroid cancer cells and the effect of dual inhibition from combinatorial therapy. Two thyroid cancer cell lines, 8505C and BCPAP were selected and treated with BRAF inhibitor, PLX4032 and its effect on EMT were examined and compared. Further investigation was carried out in orthotopic xenograft mouse models. Unlike BCPAP cells, the BRAF inhibitor resistant 8505C cells showed increased expressions of EMT related markers such as vimentin, β-catenin, and CD44. The combinatorial treatment of PLX4032 and PHA665752, a c-Met inhibitor reversed EMT. Similar results were confirmed in vivo. c-Met-mediated reactivation of the PI3K/AKT pathway contributes to the drug resistance to PLX4032 in BRAF (V600E) mutant anaplastic thyroid cancer cells and further promotes tumor cell migration and invasion by upregulated EMT mechanism. Dual inhibition of BRAF and c-Met leads to reversal of EMT, suggesting a maximal therapeutic response. PMID:27880942

  1. Computationally-predicted CB1 cannabinoid receptor mutants show distinct patterns of salt-bridges that correlate with their level of constitutive activity reflected in G protein coupling levels, thermal stability, and ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kwang H; Scott, Caitlin E; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William A; Kendall, Debra A

    2013-08-01

    The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1), a member of the class A G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, possesses an observable level of constitutive activity. Its activation mechanism, however, has yet to be elucidated. Previously we discovered dramatic changes in CB1 activity due to single mutations; T3.46A, which made the receptor inactive, and T3.46I and L3.43A, which made it essentially fully constitutively active. Our subsequent prediction of the structures of these mutant receptors indicated that these changes in activity are explained in terms of the pattern of salt-bridges in the receptor region involving transmembrane domains 2, 3, 5, and 6. Here we identified key salt-bridges, R2.37 + D6.30 and D2.63 + K3.28, critical for CB1 inactive and active states, respectively, and generated new mutant receptors that we predicted would change CB1 activity by either precluding or promoting these interactions. We find that breaking the R2.37 + D6.30 salt-bridge resulted in substantial increase in G-protein coupling activity and reduced thermal stability relative to the wild-type reflecting the changes in constitutive activity from inactive to active. In contrast, breaking the D2.63 + K3.28 salt-bridge produced the opposite profile suggesting this interaction is critical for the receptor activation. Thus, we demonstrate an excellent correlation with the predicted pattern of key salt-bridges and experimental levels of activity and conformational flexibility. These results are also consistent with the extended ternary complex model with respect to shifts in agonist and inverse agonist affinity and provide a powerful framework for understanding the molecular basis for the multiple stages of CB1 activation and that of other GPCRs in general.

  2. Transgenic evaluation of activated mutant alleles of SOS2 reveals a critical requirement for its kinase activity and C-terminal regulatory domain for salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Jian-Kang; Quintero-Toscano, Francisco Javier; Pardo-Prieto, Jose Manuel; Qiu, Quansheng; Schumaker, Karen Sue; Ohta, Masaru; Zhang, Changqing; Guo, Yan

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides a method of increasing salt tolerance in a plant by overexpressing a gene encoding a mutant SOS2 protein in at least one cell type in the plant. The present invention also provides for transgenic plants expressing the mutant SOS2 proteins.

  3. The clinical development candidate CCT245737 is an orally active CHK1 inhibitor with preclinical activity in RAS mutant NSCLC and Eµ-MYC driven B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Walton, Mike I; Eve, Paul D; Hayes, Angela; Henley, Alan T; Valenti, Melanie R; De Haven Brandon, Alexis K; Box, Gary; Boxall, Kathy J; Tall, Matthew; Swales, Karen; Matthews, Thomas P; McHardy, Tatiana; Lainchbury, Michael; Osborne, James; Hunter, Jill E; Perkins, Neil D; Aherne, G Wynne; Reader, John C; Raynaud, Florence I; Eccles, Suzanne A; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D

    2016-01-19

    CCT245737 is the first orally active, clinical development candidate CHK1 inhibitor to be described. The IC50 was 1.4 nM against CHK1 enzyme and it exhibited>1,000-fold selectivity against CHK2 and CDK1. CCT245737 potently inhibited cellular CHK1 activity (IC50 30-220 nM) and enhanced gemcitabine and SN38 cytotoxicity in multiple human tumor cell lines and human tumor xenograft models. Mouse oral bioavailability was complete (100%) with extensive tumor exposure. Genotoxic-induced CHK1 activity (pS296 CHK1) and cell cycle arrest (pY15 CDK1) were inhibited both in vitro and in human tumor xenografts by CCT245737, causing increased DNA damage and apoptosis. Uniquely, we show CCT245737 enhanced gemcitabine antitumor activity to a greater degree than for higher doses of either agent alone, without increasing toxicity, indicating a true therapeutic advantage for this combination. Furthermore, development of a novel ELISA assay for pS296 CHK1 autophosphorylation, allowed the quantitative measurement of target inhibition in a RAS mutant human tumor xenograft of NSCLC at efficacious doses of CCT245737. Finally, CCT245737 also showed significant single-agent activity against a MYC-driven mouse model of B-cell lymphoma. In conclusion, CCT245737 is a new CHK1 inhibitor clinical development candidate scheduled for a first in man Phase I clinical trial, that will use the novel pS296 CHK1 ELISA to monitor target inhibition.

  4. The clinical development candidate CCT245737 is an orally active CHK1 inhibitor with preclinical activity in RAS mutant NSCLC and Eμ-MYC driven B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Mike I.; Eve, Paul D.; Hayes, Angela; Henley, Alan T.; Valenti, Melanie R.; De Haven Brandon, Alexis K.; Box, Gary; Boxall, Kathy J.; Tall, Matthew; Swales, Karen; Matthews, Thomas P.; McHardy, Tatiana; Lainchbury, Michael; Osborne, James; Hunter, Jill E.; Perkins, Neil D.; Aherne, G. Wynne; Reader, John C.; Raynaud, Florence I.; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D.

    2016-01-01

    CCT245737 is the first orally active, clinical development candidate CHK1 inhibitor to be described. The IC50 was 1.4nM against CHK1 enzyme and it exhibited>1,000-fold selectivity against CHK2 and CDK1. CCT245737 potently inhibited cellular CHK1 activity (IC50 30-220nM) and enhanced gemcitabine and SN38 cytotoxicity in multiple human tumor cell lines and human tumor xenograft models. Mouse oral bioavailability was complete (100%) with extensive tumor exposure. Genotoxic-induced CHK1 activity (pS296 CHK1) and cell cycle arrest (pY15 CDK1) were inhibited both in vitro and in human tumor xenografts by CCT245737, causing increased DNA damage and apoptosis. Uniquely, we show CCT245737 enhanced gemcitabine antitumor activity to a greater degree than for higher doses of either agent alone, without increasing toxicity, indicating a true therapeutic advantage for this combination. Furthermore, development of a novel ELISA assay for pS296 CHK1 autophosphorylation, allowed the quantitative measurement of target inhibition in a RAS mutant human tumor xenograft of NSCLC at efficacious doses of CCT245737. Finally, CCT245737 also showed significant single-agent activity against a MYC-driven mouse model of B-cell lymphoma. In conclusion, CCT245737 is a new CHK1 inhibitor clinical development candidate scheduled for a first in man Phase I clinical trial, that will use the novel pS296 CHK1 ELISA to monitor target inhibition. PMID:26295308

  5. Anxiolytic-like activity of pregabalin in the Vogel conflict test in α2δ-1 (R217A) and α2δ-2 (R279A) mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Lotarski, Susan M; Donevan, Sean; El-Kattan, Ayman; Osgood, Sarah; Poe, Julie; Taylor, Charles P; Offord, James

    2011-08-01

    The α(2)δ auxiliary subunits (α(2)δ-1 and α(2)δ-2) of voltage-sensitive calcium channels are thought to be the site of action of pregabalin (Lyrica), a drug that has been shown to be anxiolytic in clinical trials for generalized anxiety disorder. Pregabalin and the chemically related drug gabapentin have similar binding and pharmacology profiles, demonstrating high-affinity, in vitro binding to both α(2)δ-1 and α(2)δ-2 subunits. Two independent point mutant mouse strains were generated in which either the α(2)δ-1 subunit (arginine-to-alanine mutation at amino acid 217; R217A) or the α(2)δ-2 subunit (arginine-to-alanine mutation at amino acid 279; R279A) were rendered insensitive to gabapentin or pregabalin binding. These strains were used to characterize the activity of pregabalin in the Vogel conflict test, a measure of anxiolytic-like activity. Pregabalin showed robust anticonflict activity in wild-type littermates from each strain at a dose of 10 mg/kg but was inactive in the α(2)δ-1 (R217A) mutants up to a dose of 320 mg/kg. In contrast, pregabalin was active in the α(2)δ-2 (R279A) point mutants at 10 and 32 mg/kg. The positive control phenobarbital was active in mice carrying either mutation. These data suggest that the anxiolytic-like effects of pregabalin are mediated by binding of the drug to the α(2)δ-1 subunit.

  6. Expression of val-12 mutant ras p21 in an IL-3-dependent murine myeloid cell line is associated with loss of serum-dependence and increases in membrane PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, M T; Boswell, H S; English, D; Gabig, T G

    1991-01-01

    We previously showed that the proliferative response of a serum- and interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent murine myeloid cell line, NFS/N1-H7, was partially inhibited by pertussis toxin as a result of toxin-induced increased adenylate cyclase activity. In the present studies, we examined the role of the phosphoinositide cycle in the proliferative response of these cells and demonstrated that there was no change in PIP (phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate)-specific phospholipase C activity in response to IL-3 alone. However, serum caused a pertussis toxin-insensitive increase in PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity as reflected by decreased cellular levels of 32P-labelled PIP2. Proliferation of a subline selected from val-12-mutant H-ras-transfected NFS-H7 cells, clone E5, was insensitive to pertussis toxin, occurred in the absence of serum but remained serum-stimulatable and absolutely dependent on IL-3. This val-12 mutant ras-expressing cell line showed an increase in 32P-labelled PIP (phosphatidylinositol phosphate) in response to serum whereas the parent cell line did not. Membrane fractions from 32P-labelled ras-transfected cells displayed higher GTP gamma S-, GTP-, or F(-)-stimulated PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity compared to membranes from the parent cell line. Thus serum-dependence and adenylate cyclase-mediated pertussis toxin-sensitivity of the parent cell line was bypassed by val-12 mutant ras p21, possibly as a result of increased PIP2-specific phospholipase C activity.

  7. Characterization of rag1 mutant zebrafish leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Petrie-Hanson, Lora; Hohn, Claudia; Hanson, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background Zebrafish may prove to be one of the best vertebrate models for innate immunology. These fish have sophisticated immune components, yet rely heavily on innate immune mechanisms. Thus, the development and characterization of mutant and/or knock out zebrafish are critical to help define immune cell and immune gene functions in the zebrafish model. The use of Severe Combined Immunodeficient (SCID) and recombination activation gene 1 and 2 mutant mice has allowed the investigation of the specific contribution of innate defenses in many infectious diseases. Similar zebrafish mutants are now being used in biomedical and fish immunology related research. This report describes the leukocyte populations in a unique model, recombination activation gene 1-/- mutant zebrafish (rag1 mutants). Results Differential counts of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) showed that rag1 mutants had significantly decreased lymphocyte-like cell populations (34.7%) compared to wild-types (70.5%), and significantly increased granulocyte populations (52.7%) compared to wild-types (17.6%). Monocyte/macrophage populations were similar between mutants and wild-types, 12.6% and 11.3%, respectively. Differential leukocyte counts of rag1 mutant kidney hematopoietic tissue showed a significantly reduced lymphocyte-like cell population (8%), a significantly increased myelomonocyte population (57%), 34.8% precursor cells, and 0.2% thrombocytes, while wild-type hematopoietic kidney tissue showed 29.4% lymphocytes/lymphocyte-like cells, 36.4% myelomonocytes, 33.8% precursors and 0.5% thrombocytes. Flow cytometric analyses of kidney hematopoietic tissue revealed three leukocyte populations. Population A was monocytes and granulocytes and comprised 34.7% of the gated cells in rag1 mutants and 17.6% in wild-types. Population B consisted of hematopoietic precursors, and comprised 50% of the gated cells for rag1 mutants and 53% for wild-types. Population C consisted of lymphocytes and lymphocyte

  8. Novel 1,5-diphenylpyrazole nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors with enhanced activity versus the delavirdine-resistant P236L mutant: lead identification and SAR of 3- and 4-substituted derivatives.

    PubMed

    Genin, M J; Biles, C; Keiser, B J; Poppe, S M; Swaney, S M; Tarpley, W G; Yagi, Y; Romero, D L

    2000-03-09

    Through computationally directed broad screening, a novel 1, 5-diphenylpyrazole (DPP) class of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) has been discovered. Compound 2 (PNU-32945) was found to have good activity versus wild-type (IC(50) = 2.3 microM) and delavirdine-resistant P236L (IC(50) = 1.1 microM) reverse transcriptase (RT). Also, PNU-32945 has an ED(50) for inhibition of viral replication in cell cultures of 0.1 microM and was shown to be noncytotoxic with a CC(50) > 10 microM. Structure-activity relationship studies on the 3- and 4-positions of PNU-32945 led to interesting selectivity and activity within the class. In particular, the 3-hydroxyethyl-4-ethyl congener 29 is a potent inhibitor of the P236L mutant (IC(50) = 0.65 microM), whereas it is essentially inactive versus the wild-type enzyme (IC(50) > 50 microM). Furthermore, this compound was significantly more active versus the P236L mutant than delavirdine. The synthesis and RT inhibitory activity of various 3- and 4-substituted analogues are discussed.

  9. Mutant IDH1 and thrombosis in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Dusten; Schwarze, Steven R; Khoury, Laith; Thomas, Cheddhi; Wu, Meijing; Chen, Li; Chen, Rui; Liu, Yinxing; Schwartz, Margaret A; Amidei, Christina; Kumthekar, Priya; Benjamin, Carolina G; Song, Kristine; Dawson, Caleb; Rispoli, Joanne M; Fatterpekar, Girish; Golfinos, John G; Kondziolka, Douglas; Karajannis, Matthias; Pacione, Donato; Zagzag, David; McIntyre, Thomas; Snuderl, Matija; Horbinski, Craig

    2016-12-01

    Mutant isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is common in gliomas, and produces D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2-HG). The full effects of IDH1 mutations on glioma biology and tumor microenvironment are unknown. We analyzed a discovery cohort of 169 World Health Organization (WHO) grade II-IV gliomas, followed by a validation cohort of 148 cases, for IDH1 mutations, intratumoral microthrombi, and venous thromboemboli (VTE). 430 gliomas from The Cancer Genome Atlas were analyzed for mRNAs associated with coagulation, and 95 gliomas in a tissue microarray were assessed for tissue factor (TF) protein. In vitro and in vivo assays evaluated platelet aggregation and clotting time in the presence of mutant IDH1 or D-2-HG. VTE occurred in 26-30 % of patients with wild-type IDH1 gliomas, but not in patients with mutant IDH1 gliomas (0 %). IDH1 mutation status was the most powerful predictive marker for VTE, independent of variables such as GBM diagnosis and prolonged hospital stay. Microthrombi were far less common within mutant IDH1 gliomas regardless of WHO grade (85-90 % in wild-type versus 2-6 % in mutant), and were an independent predictor of IDH1 wild-type status. Among all 35 coagulation-associated genes, F3 mRNA, encoding TF, showed the strongest inverse relationship with IDH1 mutations. Mutant IDH1 gliomas had F3 gene promoter hypermethylation, with lower TF protein expression. D-2-HG rapidly inhibited platelet aggregation and blood clotting via a novel calcium-dependent, methylation-independent mechanism. Mutant IDH1 glioma engraftment in mice significantly prolonged bleeding time. Our data suggest that mutant IDH1 has potent antithrombotic activity within gliomas and throughout the peripheral circulation. These findings have implications for the pathologic evaluation of gliomas, the effect of altered isocitrate metabolism on tumor microenvironment, and risk assessment of glioma patients for VTE.

  10. Isolation of Lactococcus lactis Mutants Simultaneously Resistant to the Cell Wall-Active Bacteriocin Lcn972, Lysozyme, Nisin, and Bacteriophage c2

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Clara; Courtin, Pascal; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Rodríguez, Ana; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Lactococcin 972 (Lcn972) is a nonlantibiotic bacteriocin that inhibits cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. In this work, two mutants resistant to Lcn972, Lactococcus lactis D1 and D1-20, with high (>320 arbitrary units [AU]/ml) and low (80 AU/ml) susceptibilities, respectively, have been isolated. Resistance to Lcn972 did not impose a burden to growth under laboratory conditions, nor did it substantially alter the physicochemical properties of the cell surface. However, the peptidoglycan of the mutants featured a higher content of muropeptides with tripeptide side chains than the wild-type strain, linking for the first time peptidoglycan remodelling to bacteriocin resistance. Moreover, L. lactis lacking a functional d,d-carboxypeptidase DacA (i.e., with a high content of pentapeptide side chain muropeptides) was shown to be more susceptible to Lcn972. Cross-resistance to lysozyme and nisin and enhanced susceptibility to penicillin G and bacitracin was also observed. Intriguingly, the Lcn972-resistant mutants were not infected by the lytic phage c2 and less efficiently infected by phage sk1. Lack of c2 infectivity was linked to a 22.6-kbp chromosomal deletion encompassing the phage receptor protein gene pip. The deletion also included maltose metabolic genes and the two-component system (TCS) F. However, a clear correlation between these genes and resistance to Lcn972 could not be clearly established, pointing to the presence of as-yet-unidentified mutations that account for Lcn972 resistance. PMID:22504807

  11. Sulphate metabolism of selenate-resistant Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants.

    PubMed

    Bánszky, Luca; Simonics, Tibor; Maráz, Anna

    2003-10-01

    Selenate-resistant mutants were obtained from several strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The obtained mutants all belonged to the same genetic complementation group. They were low in sulphate uptake activity and in ATP sulphurylase activity. They grew on medium containing sulphite, thiosulphate, cysteine or glutathione but not methionine as the sole source of sulphur. From these results, the mutants were concluded to carry mutations in the ATP sulphurylase gene. Inability of the mutants to utilize methionine as a sulphur source is rationalized by the absence of the reverse transsulphurylation pathway in this organism; wild type strains must utilize methionine as a sulphur source after it is degraded to give rise to sulphate.

  12. Selective disruption of disulphide bonds lowered activation energy and improved catalytic efficiency in TALipB from Trichosporon asahii MSR54: MD simulations revealed flexible lid and extended substrate binding area in the mutant.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yogesh; Gupta, Namita; Verma, Ved Vrat; Goel, Manisha; Gupta, Rani

    2016-03-25

    TALipB (33 kDa) is a solvent stable, enantioselective lipase from Trichosporon asahii MSR54. It is cysteine-rich and shows activation in presence of thiol reducing agents. DIANNA server predicted three disulphide bridges C53-C195 (S1), C89-C228 (S2) and C164-C254 (S3) in the enzyme. Selective disruption of disulphide bonds by cysteine to alanine mutations at Cys53 and Cys89 of S1 and S2 bonds resulted in enzyme activation. Mutant mTALipB (S1+S2) showed increase in specific activity by ∼4-fold (834 mM/mg) and improved Vmax of 6.27 μmol/ml/min at 40 °Con pNP caprate. Temperature optima of mTALipB shifted from 50 to 40 °C and activation energy decreased by 0.7 kcal mol(-1). However, the mutant was less thermostable with a t1/2 of 18 min at 60 °C as compared to t1/2 of 38 min for the native enzyme. Mutant also displayed an improved activity on all pNP esters and higher enantiomeric excess (61%) during esterification of (±) 1-phenylethanol. Far-UV CD analysis showed significant changes in secondary structure after S-S bridge disruption with 7.16% decrease in α-helices and 1.31% increase in β-sheets. In silico analysis predicted two lids (α5 and α9) in TALipB. Molecular dynamic simulations at 40 °C and 50 °C revealed that in the mTALipB, both the lids opened at 40 °C with clockwise and anticlockwise rotations in Lid1 and Lid2, respectively. In the native protein, however, the lid was only partially open even at 50 °C. Concomitant to lid flexibility, there was an extension of accessible catalytic triad surface area resulting in improved catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzyme.

  13. Activity-Based Proteomics Reveals Heterogeneous Kinome and ATP-Binding Proteome Responses to MEK Inhibition in KRAS Mutant Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Young; Stewart, Paul A; Borne, Adam L; Fang, Bin; Welsh, Eric A; Chen, Yian Ann; Eschrich, Steven A; Koomen, John M; Haura, Eric B

    2016-06-01

    One way cancer cells can escape from targeted agents is through their ability to evade drug effects by rapidly rewiring signaling networks. Many protein classes, such as kinases and metabolic enzymes, are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis. We hypothesized that a system-level profiling of drug-induced alterations in ATP-binding proteomes could offer novel insights into adaptive responses. Here, we mapped global ATP-binding proteomes perturbed by two clinical MEK inhibitors, AZD6244 and MEK162, in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells as a model system harnessing a desthiobiotin-ATP probe coupled with LC-MS/MS. We observed strikingly unique ATP-binding proteome responses to MEK inhibition, which revealed heterogeneous drug-induced pathway signatures in each cell line. We also identified diverse kinome responses, indicating each cell adapts to MEK inhibition in unique ways. Despite the heterogeneity of kinome responses, decreased probe labeling of mitotic kinases and an increase of kinases linked to autophagy were identified to be common responses. Taken together, our study revealed a diversity of adaptive ATP-binding proteome and kinome responses to MEK inhibition in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells, and our study further demonstrated the utility of our approach to identify potential candidates of targetable ATP-binding enzymes involved in adaptive resistance and to develop rational drug combinations.

  14. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mu