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Sample records for active soil ventilation

  1. Residential construction demonstration project, Cycle II: Active ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report documents the analysis of the performance of natural and mechanical ventilation in Pacific Northwest homes. The analysis was part of Cycle II of the Residential Construction Demonstration Project, sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Since 1986, the Residential Construction Demonstration Project (RCDP) has sponsored the collection of data on energy efficient homes in the Pacific Northwest that comply with these new standards and requirements. Cycle II of RCDP was conducted between September 1987 and April 1990. It concentrated on energy innovations in homes built to the Super Good Cents specification. All of the test homes have electric heat and mechanical ventilation systems. Seven different types of active ventilation systems are represented in the homes. Three of these system types are equipped with heat recovery devices, and are represented in approximately a quarter of the test homes. The potential for both natural and mechanical ventilation was measured. Potential structural leakage was measured by blower door testing. Flow rate and operating time of mechanical ventilation systems were measured with flow hoods and hour meters. Actual ventilation was measured by using a passive tracer gas technique for several weeks during the heating season and at times of normal occupancy.

  2. Residential construction demonstration project, Cycle II: Active ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    This report documents the analysis of the performance of natural and mechanical ventilation in Pacific Northwest homes. The analysis was part of Cycle II of the Residential Construction Demonstration Project, sponsored by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Since 1986, the Residential Construction Demonstration Project (RCDP) has sponsored the collection of data on energy efficient homes in the Pacific Northwest that comply with these new standards and requirements. Cycle II of RCDP was conducted between September 1987 and April 1990. It concentrated on energy innovations in homes built to the Super Good Cents specification. All of the test homes have electric heat and mechanical ventilation systems. Seven different types of active ventilation systems are represented in the homes. Three of these system types are equipped with heat recovery devices, and are represented in approximately a quarter of the test homes. The potential for both natural and mechanical ventilation was measured. Potential structural leakage was measured by blower door testing. Flow rate and operating time of mechanical ventilation systems were measured with flow hoods and hour meters. Actual ventilation was measured by using a passive tracer gas technique for several weeks during the heating season and at times of normal occupancy.

  3. Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

    2006-05-01

    Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

  4. Assisted Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Dries, David J

    2016-01-01

    Controlled Mechanical Ventilation may be essential in the setting of severe respiratory failure but consequences to the patient including increased use of sedation and neuromuscular blockade may contribute to delirium, atelectasis, and diaphragm dysfunction. Assisted ventilation allows spontaneous breathing activity to restore physiological displacement of the diaphragm and recruit better perfused lung regions. Pressure Support Ventilation is the most frequently used mode of assisted mechanical ventilation. However, this mode continues to provide a monotonous pattern of support for respiration which is normally a dynamic process. Noisy Pressure Support Ventilation where tidal volume is varied randomly by the ventilator may improve ventilation and perfusion matching but the degree of support is still determined by the ventilator. Two more recent modes of ventilation, Proportional Assist Ventilation and Neurally Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (NAVA), allow patient determination of the pattern and depth of ventilation. Proposed advantages of Proportional Assist Ventilation and NAVA include decrease in patient ventilator asynchrony and improved adaptation of ventilator support to changing patient demand. Work of breathing can be normalized with these modes as well. To date, however, a clear pattern of clinical benefit has not been demonstrated. Existing challenges for both of the newer assist modes include monitoring patients with dynamic hyperinflation (auto-positive end expiratory pressure), obstructive lung disease, and air leaks in the ventilator system. NAVA is dependent on consistent transduction of diaphragm activity by an electrode system placed in the esophagus. Longevity of effective support with this technique is unclear. PMID:25501776

  5. Should soil testing services measure soil biological activity?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Health of agricultural soils depends largely on conservation management to promote soil organic C accumulation. Total soil organic C changes slowly, but active fractions are more dynamic. A key indicator of healthy soil is potential biological activity, which could be measured rapidly with soil te...

  6. Measurement of toluene bioconversion during ventilation in a bench-scale soil column

    SciTech Connect

    Malina, G.; Grotenhuis, T.; Cuypers, C.; Rulkens, W.

    1995-12-31

    The ratio between ventilation and biodegradation of toluene in the vadose zone during bioventing was studied by bench-scale soil column experiments, using gas chromatography headspace analysis. Biodegradation batch tests showed that toluene vapor concentrations above 75% of the saturation concentration completely retarded the bioconversion rate. To determine the role of bioconversion and physical removal of toluene from soil, CO{sub 2}-free air and N{sub 2} were used, respectively, as flushing gases, with a flowrate of 1.0 L/h or 39.5 cm{sup 3}/(cm{sup 2}{center_dot}h). In a column with ca. 4 kg of sandy soil, at a water content of 15% w/w, i.e., 75% of field capacity , and temperature 20 C, the initial concentration of toluene, 4,000 mg/kg, was reduced within 11 days to between 0.5 and 0.2 mg/kg during bioventing, and to between 60 and 70 mg/kg when bioconversion was not involved. Soil extraction after 24 days of venting showed a residual toluene concentration of 1.4 mg/kg. Mass balance analysis of toluene and CO{sub 2} indicated that about 90% of toluene was evaporated and 10% was biodegraded. Time constants for volatilization and bioconversion were comparable at the flowrate applied. These results enable determination of the optimum airflow for venting and oxygen supply required for toluene biodegradation, and design of an optimum bioventing strategy for toluene removal.

  7. Active synthetic soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Henninger, Donald L. (Inventor); Allen, Earl R. (Inventor); Golden, Dadigamuwage C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A synthetic soil/fertilizer for horticultural application having all the agronutrients essential for plant growth is disclosed. The soil comprises a synthetic apatite fertilizer having sulfur, magnesium and micronutrients dispersed in a calcium phosphate matrix, a zeolite cation exchange medium saturated with a charge of potassium and nitrogen cations, and an optional pH buffer. Moisture dissolves the apatite and mobilizes the nutrient elements from the apatite matrix and the zeolite charge sites.

  8. Active synthetic soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ming, Douglas W. (Inventor); Henninger, Donald L. (Inventor); Allen, Earl R. (Inventor); Golden, Dadigamuwage C. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A synthetic soil/fertilizer for horticultural application having all the agronutrients essential for plant growth is disclosed. The soil comprises a synthetic apatite fertilizer having sulfur, magnesium, and micronutrients dispersed in a calcium phosphate matrix, a zeolite cation exchange medium saturated with a charge of potassium and nitrogen cations, and an optional pH buffer. Moisture dissolves the apatite and mobilizes the nutrient elements from the apatite matrix and the zeolite charge sites.

  9. The effect of local exhaust ventilation controls on dust exposures during concrete cutting and grinding activities.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Gerry A; Guffey, Steven E; Flanagan, Mary Ellen; Seixas, Noah S

    2002-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of commercially available local exhaust ventilation (LEV) systems for controlling respirable dust and crystalline silica exposures during concrete cutting and grinding activities. Work activities were performed by union-sponsored apprentices and included tuck-point grinding, surface grinding, paver block and brick cutting (masonry saw), and concrete block cutting (hand-held saw). In a randomized block design, implemented under controlled field conditions, three ventilation rates (0, 30, and 75 cfm) were tested for each tool. Each ventilation treatment was replicated three times in random order for a total of nine 15-min work sessions per study subject. With the exception of the hand-held saw, the use of LEV resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in respirable dust exposure. Mean exposure levels for the 75 cfm treatments were less than that of the 30 cfm treatments; however, differences between these two treatments were only significant for paver block cutting (p < 0.01). Although exposure reduction was significant (70-90% at the low ventilation rate and 80-95% reduction at the high ventilation rate), personal respirable dust [corrected] exposures remained very high: 1.4-2.8 x PEL (permissible exposure limit) at the low ventilation rate and 0.9-1.7 x PEL at the high ventilation rate. Exposure levels found under actual field conditions would likely be lower due to the intermittent nature of most job tasks. Despite incomplete control LEV has merit, as it would reduce the risk of workers developing disease, allow workers to use a lower level of respiratory protection, protect workers during short duration work episodes reduce exposure to nearby workers, and reduce clean-up associated dust exposures. PMID:12486779

  10. Soil disturbance increases soil microbial enzymatic activity in arid ecoregion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional diversity of the soil microbial community is commonly used in the assessment of soil health as it relates to the activity of soil microflora involved in carbon cycling. Soil microbes in different microenvironments will have varying responses to different substrates, thus catabolic fingerp...

  11. Abdominal Muscle Activity during Mechanical Ventilation Increases Lung Injury in Severe Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianming; Wu, Weiliang; Zhu, Yongcheng; Jiang, Ying; Du, Juan; Chen, Rongchang

    2016-01-01

    Objective It has proved that muscle paralysis was more protective for injured lung in severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the precise mechanism is not clear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation increases lung injury in severe ARDS. Methods Eighteen male Beagles were studied under mechanical ventilation with anesthesia. Severe ARDS was induced by repetitive oleic acid infusion. After lung injury, Beagles were randomly assigned into spontaneous breathing group (BIPAPSB) and abdominal muscle paralysis group (BIPAPAP). All groups were ventilated with BIPAP model for 8h, and the high pressure titrated to reached a tidal volume of 6ml/kg, the low pressure was set at 10 cmH2O, with I:E ratio 1:1, and respiratory rate adjusted to a PaCO2 of 35–60 mmHg. Six Beagles without ventilator support comprised the control group. Respiratory variables, end-expiratory volume (EELV) and gas exchange were assessed during mechanical ventilation. The levels of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 in lung tissue and plasma were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Lung injury scores were determined at end of the experiment. Results For the comparable ventilator setting, as compared with BIPAPSB group, the BIPAPAP group presented higher EELV (427±47 vs. 366±38 ml) and oxygenation index (293±36 vs. 226±31 mmHg), lower levels of IL-6(216.6±48.0 vs. 297.5±71.2 pg/ml) and IL-8(246.8±78.2 vs. 357.5±69.3 pg/ml) in plasma, and lower express levels of IL-6 mRNA (15.0±3.8 vs. 21.2±3.7) and IL-8 mRNA (18.9±6.8 vs. 29.5±7.9) in lung tissues. In addition, less lung histopathology injury were revealed in the BIPAPAP group (22.5±2.0 vs. 25.2±2.1). Conclusion Abdominal muscle activity during mechanically ventilation is one of the injurious factors in severe ARDS, so abdominal muscle paralysis might be an effective strategy to minimize ventilator-induce lung injury. PMID:26745868

  12. Characterization of Soil Samples of Enzyme Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    Described are nine enzyme essays for distinguishing soil samples. Colorimetric methods are used to compare enzyme levels in soils from different sites. Each soil tested had its own spectrum of activity. Attention is drawn to applications of this technique in forensic science and in studies of soil fertility. (Author/AJ)

  13. Ventilation and ventilators.

    PubMed

    Hayes, B

    1982-01-01

    The history of ventilation is reviewed briefly and recent developments in techniques of ventilation are discussed. Operating features of ventilators have changed in the past few years, partly as the result of clinical progress; yet, technology appears to have outstripped the clinician's ability to harness it most effectively. Clinical discipline and training of medical staff in the use of ventilators could be improved. The future is promising if clinician and designer can work together closely. Ergonomics of ventilators and their controls and the provision of alarms need special attention. Microprocessors are likely to feature prominently in the next generation of designs. PMID:6754938

  14. Ventilator-induced endothelial activation and inflammation in the lung and distal organs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Results from clinical studies have provided evidence for the importance of leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the pathogenesis of pulmonary diseases such as acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), as well as in systemic events like sepsis and multiple organ failure (MOF). The present study was designed to investigate whether alveolar stretch due to mechanical ventilation (MV) may evoke endothelial activation and inflammation in healthy mice, not only in the lung but also in organs distal to the lung. Methods Healthy male C3H/HeN mice were anesthetized, tracheotomized and mechanically ventilated for either 1, 2 or 4 hours. To study the effects of alveolar stretch in vivo, we applied a MV strategy that causes overstretch of pulmonary tissue i.e. 20 cmH2O peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) and 0 cmH20 positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP). Non-ventilated, sham-operated animals served as a reference group (non-ventilated controls, NVC). Results Alveolar stretch imposed by MV did not only induce de novo synthesis of adhesion molecules in the lung but also in organs distal to the lung, like liver and kidney. No activation was observed in the brain. In addition, we demonstrated elevated cytokine and chemokine expression in pulmonary, hepatic and renal tissue after MV which was accompanied by enhanced recruitment of granulocytes to these organs. Conclusions Our data implicate that MV causes endothelial activation and inflammation in mice without pre-existing pulmonary injury, both in the lung and distal organs. PMID:19917112

  15. Coordinated ventilation and spiracle activity produce unidirectional airflow in the hissing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Erica C; McHenry, Matthew J; Bradley, Timothy J

    2013-12-01

    Insects exchange respiratory gases via an extensive network of tracheal vessels that open to the surface of the body through spiracular valves. Although gas exchange is known to increase with the opening of these spiracles, it is not clear how this event relates to gas flow through the tracheal system. We examined the relationship between respiratory airflow and spiracle activity in a ventilating insect, the hissing cockroach, Gromphadorhina portentosa, to better understand the complexity of insect respiratory function. Using simultaneous video recordings of multiple spiracular valves, we found that abdominal spiracles open and close in unison during periods of ventilation. Additionally, independent recordings of CO2 release from the abdominal and thoracic regions and observations of hyperoxic tracer gas movement indicate that air is drawn into the thoracic spiracles and expelled from the abdominal spiracles. Our video recordings suggest that this unidirectional flow is driven by abdominal contractions that occur when the abdominal spiracles open. The spiracles then close as the abdomen relaxes and fills with air from the thorax. Therefore, the respiratory system of the hissing cockroach functions as a unidirectional pump through the coordinated action of the spiracles and abdominal musculature. This mechanism may be employed by a broad diversity of large insects that respire by active ventilation. PMID:24031063

  16. Plant diversity increases soil microbial activity and soil carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Lange, Markus; Eisenhauer, Nico; Sierra, Carlos A; Bessler, Holger; Engels, Christoph; Griffiths, Robert I; Mellado-Vázquez, Perla G; Malik, Ashish A; Roy, Jacques; Scheu, Stefan; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Thomson, Bruce C; Trumbore, Susan E; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Plant diversity strongly influences ecosystem functions and services, such as soil carbon storage. However, the mechanisms underlying the positive plant diversity effects on soil carbon storage are poorly understood. We explored this relationship using long-term data from a grassland biodiversity experiment (The Jena Experiment) and radiocarbon ((14)C) modelling. Here we show that higher plant diversity increases rhizosphere carbon inputs into the microbial community resulting in both increased microbial activity and carbon storage. Increases in soil carbon were related to the enhanced accumulation of recently fixed carbon in high-diversity plots, while plant diversity had less pronounced effects on the decomposition rate of existing carbon. The present study shows that elevated carbon storage at high plant diversity is a direct function of the soil microbial community, indicating that the increase in carbon storage is mainly limited by the integration of new carbon into soil and less by the decomposition of existing soil carbon. PMID:25848862

  17. Evaluation-of soil enzyme activities as soil quality indicators in sludge-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Dindar, Efsun; Şağban, Fatma Olcay Topaç; Başkaya, Hüseyin Savaş

    2015-07-01

    Soil enzymatic activities are commonly used as biomarkers of soil quality. Several organic and inorganic compounds found in municipal wastewater sludges can possibly be used as fertilizers. Monitoring and evaluating the quality of sludge amended soils with enzyme activities accepted as a beneficial practice with respect to sustainable soil management. In the present study, variation of some enzyme activities (Alkaline phosphatase, dehydrogenase, urease and beta-glucosidase activities) in soils amended with municipal wastewater sludge at different application rates (50, 100 and 200 t ha(-1) dry sludge) was evaluated. Air dried sludge samples were applied to soil pots and sludge-soil mixtures were incubated during a period of three months at 28 degrees C. The results of the study showed that municipal wastewater sludge amendment apparently increased urease, dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase and P-glucosidase activities in soil by 48-70%, 14-47%, 33-66% and 9-14%, respectively. The maximum activity was generally observed in sludge amended soil with dose of 200 t ha(-1). Urease activity appeared to be a better indicator of soil enhancement with wastewater sludge, as its activity was more strongly increased by sludge amendment. Accordingly, urease activity is suggested to be soil quality indicator best suited for measuring existing conditions and potential changes in sludge-amended soil. PMID:26364470

  18. FORCED AIR VENTILATION FOR REMEDIATION OF UNSATURATED SOILS CONTAMINATED BY VOC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Parameters which were expected to control the removal process of VOCs from contaminated soil during the SVE operation were studied by means of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments in this project. Experimental results of SVE with soil columns in the laboratory indicat...

  19. Pesticide influence on soil enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Sannino, F; Gianfreda, L

    2001-11-01

    The influence of four pesticides, e.g. glyphosate, paraquat, atrazine, and carbaryl, on the activities of invertase, urease and phosphatase of twenty-two soils, numbered as 1-22, was investigated. Soils displayed a general variability of enzyme activities with invertase being more abundant than urease and phosphatase in the order listed. The addition of glyphosate and paraquat activated invertase and urease activities in several soils. Increments of invertase activity ranged from a very low increase (+4%) up to +204% in soils 11 and 14, respectively. Smaller increases were measured for urease. A general inhibitory effect (from 5% to 98%) was observed for phosphatase in the presence of glyphosate. The effects of atrazine and carbaryl on the three soil enzymes were evaluated against that exhibited by methanol, the solvent used for their solubilization. In almost all soils, atrazine further inhibited invertase activity with respect to the inhibitory effect shown by methanol. By contrast, consistent activation effects (from 61% to 10217%) were measured for urease with methanol alone and/or methanol-pesticide mixtures. Contradictory results were observed with phosphatase. Similarities found between the results obtained with enzymes in soils and those measured with synthetic enzyme complexes (e.g. free enzymes and/or clay-, organo-, and organo-clay-enzyme complexes) exposed to the same pesticides allowed some relationships between responses of soil enzymes to pesticides and soil properties to be hypothesized. PMID:11680737

  20. An Overview of Residential Ventilation Activities in the Building America Program (Phase I)

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, D.

    2001-05-21

    This report provides an overview of issues involved in residential ventilation; provides an overview of the various ventilation strategies being evaluated by the five teams, or consortia, currently involved in the Building America Program; and identifies unresolved technical issues.

  1. Anaesthesia ventilators

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajnish K; Swaminathan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bellows ventilators, ascending bellows design is safer than descending bellows. Piston ventilators have the advantage of delivering accurate tidal volume. They work with electricity as their driving force and do not require a driving gas. To enable improved patient safety, several modifications were done in circle system with the different types of anaesthesia ventilators. Fresh gas decoupling is a modification done in piston ventilators and in descending bellows ventilator to reduce th incidence of ventilator induced volutrauma. In addition to the conventional volume control mode, modern anaesthesia ventilators also provide newer modes of ventilation such as synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure-control ventilation and pressure-support ventilation (PSV). PSV mode is particularly useful for patients maintained on spontaneous respiration with laryngeal mask airway. Along with the innumerable benefits provided by these machines, there are various inherent hazards associated with the use of the ventilators in the operating room. To use these workstations safely, it is important for every Anaesthesiologist to have a basic understanding of the mechanics of these ventilators and breathing circuits. PMID:24249886

  2. A novel preterm respiratory mechanics active simulator to test the performances of neonatal pulmonary ventilators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, Paolo; Sciuto, Salvatore Andrea; Silvestri, Sergio

    2002-06-01

    A patient active simulator is proposed which is capable of reproducing values of the parameters of pulmonary mechanics of healthy newborns and preterm pathological infants. The implemented prototype is able to: (a) let the operator choose the respiratory pattern, times of apnea, episodes of cough, sobs, etc., (b) continuously regulate and control the parameters characterizing the pulmonary system; and, finally, (c) reproduce the attempt of breathing of a preterm infant. Taking into account both the limitation due to the chosen application field and the preliminary autocalibration phase automatically carried out by the proposed device, accuracy and reliability on the order of 1% is estimated. The previously indicated value has to be considered satisfactory in light of the field of application and the small values of the simulated parameters. Finally, the achieved metrological characteristics allow the described neonatal simulator to be adopted as a reference device to test performances of neonatal ventilators and, more specifically, to measure the time elapsed between the occurrence of a potentially dangerous condition to the patient and the activation of the corresponding alarm of the tested ventilator.

  3. Platelet-activating factor causes ventilation-perfusion mismatch in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Roisin, R; Félez, M A; Chung, K F; Barberà, J A; Wagner, P D; Cobos, A; Barnes, P J; Roca, J

    1994-01-01

    We hypothesized that platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory mediator, could induce gas exchange abnormalities in normal humans. To this end, the effect of aerosolized PAF (2 mg/ml solution; 24 micrograms) on ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) relationships, hemodynamics, and resistance of the respiratory system was studied in 14 healthy, nonatopic, and nonsmoking individuals (23 +/- 1 [SEM]yr) before and at 2, 4, 6, 8, 15, and 45 min after inhalation, and compared to that of inhaled lyso-PAF in 10 other healthy individuals (24 +/- 2 yr). PAF induced, compared to lyso-PAF, immediate leukopenia (P < 0.001) followed by a rebound leukocytosis (P < 0.002), increased minute ventilation (P < 0.05) and resistance of the respiratory system (P < 0.01), and decreased systemic arterial pressure (P < 0.05). Similarly, compared to lyso-PAF, PaO2 showed a trend to fall (by 12.2 +/- 4.3 mmHg, mean +/- SEM maximum change from baseline), and arterial-alveolar O2 gradient increased (by 16.7 +/- 4.3 mmHg) (P < 0.02) after PAF, because of VA/Q mismatch: the dispersion of pulmonary blood flow and that of ventilation increased by 0.45 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.01) and 0.29 +/- 0.1 (P < 0.04), respectively. We conclude that in normal subjects, inhaled PAF results in considerable immediate VA/Q inequality and gas exchange impairment. These results reinforce the notion that PAF may play a major role as a mediator of inflammation in the human lung. Images PMID:8282786

  4. Test Plan for Measuring Ventilation Rates and Combustible Gas Levels in TWRS Active Catch Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    1999-10-25

    The purpose of this sampling activity is to obtain data to support an initial evaluation of potential hazards due to the presence of combustible gas in catch tanks that are currently operated by the River Protection Project (RPP). Results of the hazard analysis will be used to support closure of the flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities. The data collection will be conducted in accordance with the Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (Dukelow et al. 1995). Combustible gas, ammonia, and organic vapor levels in the headspace of the catch tanks will be field-measured using hand-held instruments. If a combustible gas level measurement in a tank exceeds an established threshold, gas samples will he collected in SUMMA' canisters for more extensive laboratory analysis. In addition, ventilation rates of some catch tanks will be measured to evaluate removal of flammable gas by air flowing through the tanks. This test plan identifies the sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance, and reporting objectives for this data collection effort. The plan also provides the procedures for field measurement of combustible gas concentrations and ventilation rates.

  5. Test Plan for Measuring Ventilation Rates and Combustible Gas Levels in TWRS Active Catch Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    2000-02-01

    The purpose of this data collection activity is to obtain data for a screening of combustible gases in catch tanks that are currently operated by the River Protection Project (RPP). The results will be used to support closure of the flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities. The data collection will be conducted in accordance with the ''Tank Safety Screening Data Quality Objective'' (Dukelow et a1 1995). Combustible gas, ammonia, and organic vapor levels in the headspace of the catch tanks will be field-measured using hand-held instruments. If a combustible gas level measurement in a tank exceeds an established threshold, vapor grab samples will be collected for laboratory analysis. In addition, ventilation rates of some catch tanks will be determined using the tracer gas injection method to evaluate removal of flammable gas by air flowing through the tanks. This test plan identifies the field tests, sample collection, laboratory analysis, quality assurance, and reporting objectives for this data collection effort. The plan also provides step by-step direction for field measurement of combustible gas concentrations and determination of ventilation rates.

  6. Fracture ventilation by surface winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachshon, U.; Dragila, M. I.; Weisbrod, N.

    2011-12-01

    Gas exchange between the Earth subsurface and the atmosphere is an important mechanism, affecting hydrological, agricultural and environmental processes. From a hydrological aspect, water vapor transport is the most important process related to Earth-atmosphere gas exchange. In respect to agriculture, gas transport in the upper soil profile is important for soil aeration. From an environmental aspect, emission of volatile radionuclides, such as 3H, 14C and Rd from radioactive waste disposal facilities; volatile organic components from industrial sources and Rn from natural sources, all found in the upper vadose zone, can greatly affect public health when emissions occur in populated areas. Thus, it is vital to better understand gas exchange processes between the Earth's upper crust and atmosphere. Four major mechanisms are known to transfer gases between ground surface and atmosphere: (1) Diffusion; (2) Pressure gradients between ground pores and atmosphere due to changes in barometric pressure; (3) Density-driven gas flow in respond to thermal gradients in the ground; and (4) Winds above the ground surface. Herein, the wind ventilation mechanism is studied. Whereas the wind's impact on ground ventilation was explored in several studies, the physical mechanisms governing this process were hardly quantified or characterized. In this work the physical properties of fracture ventilation due to wind blowing along land surface were explored and quantified. Both field measurements and Hele-Shaw experiments under controlled conditions in the laboratory were used to study this process. It was found that winds in the range of 0.3 m/s result in fracture ventilation down to a depth of 0.2 m. As wind velocity increases, the depth of the ventilation inside the fracture increases respectively, in a linear manner. In addition, the fracture aperture also affects the depth of ventilation, which grows as fracture aperture increases. For the maximal examined aperture of 2 cm and wind

  7. Metatranscriptomic census of active protists in soils.

    PubMed

    Geisen, Stefan; Tveit, Alexander T; Clark, Ian M; Richter, Andreas; Svenning, Mette M; Bonkowski, Michael; Urich, Tim

    2015-10-01

    The high numbers and diversity of protists in soil systems have long been presumed, but their true diversity and community composition have remained largely concealed. Traditional cultivation-based methods miss a majority of taxa, whereas molecular barcoding approaches employing PCR introduce significant biases in reported community composition of soil protists. Here, we applied a metatranscriptomic approach to assess the protist community in 12 mineral and organic soil samples from different vegetation types and climatic zones using small subunit ribosomal RNA transcripts as marker. We detected a broad diversity of soil protists spanning across all known eukaryotic supergroups and revealed a strikingly different community composition than shown before. Protist communities differed strongly between sites, with Rhizaria and Amoebozoa dominating in forest and grassland soils, while Alveolata were most abundant in peat soils. The Amoebozoa were comprised of Tubulinea, followed with decreasing abundance by Discosea, Variosea and Mycetozoa. Transcripts of Oomycetes, Apicomplexa and Ichthyosporea suggest soil as reservoir of parasitic protist taxa. Further, Foraminifera and Choanoflagellida were ubiquitously detected, showing that these typically marine and freshwater protists are autochthonous members of the soil microbiota. To the best of our knowledge, this metatranscriptomic study provides the most comprehensive picture of active protist communities in soils to date, which is essential to target the ecological roles of protists in the complex soil system. PMID:25822483

  8. Modular feed-forward active noise control units for ventilation ducts.

    PubMed

    Gardonio, P; Rohlfing, J

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents theoretical and experimental work on feed-forward active noise control for a ventilation duct. In particular three single channel control arrangements are investigated: (a) A classical widespread-mid-span configuration, where the control loudspeakers are located approximately half way through the duct and the reference and error microphones are placed close to inlet and outlet duct sections, respectively; (b) a compact-mid-span configuration, where both the reference and error microphones are moved close to the control loudspeakers to form a self-contained control unit, and (c) a compact-outlet configuration where the self-contained control unit is moved to the duct outlet. The two compact configurations offer self-evident practical installation and operation advantages. Moreover, the paper shows that they are characterized by much simpler control filters, which can be effectively implemented on modern audio digital signal processing boards and produce similar control performance to the classical widespread configuration. PMID:25480054

  9. Oxidative stress is required for mechanical ventilation-induced protease activation in the diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Smuder, Ashley J.; Wu, Min; Hudson, Matthew B.; Nelson, W. Bradley; Powers, Scott K.

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) results in diaphragmatic weakness due to fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Recent work reveals that activation of the proteases calpain and caspase-3 is required for MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for activation of these proteases remains unknown. To address this issue, we tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress is essential for the activation of calpain and caspase-3 in the diaphragm during MV. Cause-and-effect was established by prevention of MV-induced diaphragmatic oxidative stress using the antioxidant Trolox. Treatment of animals with Trolox prevented MV-induced protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation in the diaphragm. Importantly, the Trolox-mediated protection from MV-induced oxidative stress prevented the activation of calpain and caspase-3 in the diaphragm during MV. Furthermore, the avoidance of MV-induced oxidative stress not only averted the activation of these proteases but also rescued the diaphragm from MV-induced diaphragmatic myofiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Collectively, these findings support the prediction that oxidative stress is required for MV-induced activation of calpain and caspase-3 in the diaphragm and are consistent with the concept that antioxidant therapy can retard MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness. PMID:20203072

  10. Protective garment ventilation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A method and apparatus for ventilating a protective garment, space suit system, and/or pressure suits to maintain a comfortable and nontoxic atmosphere within is described. The direction of flow of a ventilating and purging gas in portions of the garment may be reversed in order to compensate for changes in environment and activity of the wearer. The entire flow of the ventilating gas can also be directed first to the helmet associated with the garment.

  11. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-1 Modulates Regional Effects of Injurious Mechanical Ventilation in Rodent Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Moo Suk; Edwards, Michael G.; Sergew, Amen; Riches, David W. H.; Albert, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Mechanical ventilation induces heterogeneous lung injury by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB. Mechanisms regulating regional injury and protective effects of prone positioning are unclear. Objectives: To determine the key regulators of the lung regional protective effects of prone positioning in rodent lungs exposed to injurious ventilation. Methods: Adult rats were ventilated with high (18 ml/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP] 0) or low Vt (6 ml/kg; PEEP 3 cm H2O; 3 h) in supine or prone position. Dorsal–caudal lung mRNA was analyzed by microarray and MAPK phosphatases (MKP)-1 quantitative polymerase chain reaction. MKP-1−/− or wild-type mice were ventilated with very high (24 ml/kg; PEEP 0) or low Vt (6–7 ml/kg; PEEP 3 cm H2O). The MKP-1 regulator PG490-88 (MRx-108; 0.75 mg/kg) or phosphate-buffered saline was administered preventilation. Injury was assessed by lung mechanics, bronchioalveolar lavage cell counts, protein content, and lung injury scoring. Immunoblotting for MKP-1, and IκBα and cytokine ELISAs were performed on lung lysates. Measurements and Main Results: Prone positioning was protective against injurious ventilation in rats. Expression profiling demonstrated MKP-1 20-fold higher in rats ventilated prone rather than supine and regional reduction in p38 and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation. MKP-1−/− mice experienced amplified injury. PG490-88 improved static lung compliance and injury scores, reduced bronchioalveolar lavage cell counts and cytokine levels, and induced MKP-1 and IκBα. Conclusions: Injurious ventilation induces MAPK in an MKP-1–dependent fashion. Prone positioning is protective and induces MKP-1. PG490-88 induced MKP-1 and was protective against high Vt in a nuclear factor-κB–dependent manner. MKP-1 is a potential target for modulating regional effects of injurious ventilation. PMID:22582160

  12. Real-Time Assessment of Autonomic Nerve Activity During Adaptive Servo-Ventilation Support or Waon Therapy.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Nitta, Daisuke; Komuro, Issei

    2016-07-27

    Adaptive servo-ventilation support and Waon therapy are recently developed non-pharmacological and noninvasive therapies for patients with heart failure refractory to guideline-directed medical therapy. These therapies decrease both preload and afterload, increase cardiac output, and appear to ameliorate autonomic nerve activity. However, the time course of autonomic nerve activity during these therapies remains unclear. We performed heart rate variability analysis using the MemCalc power spectral density method (MemCalc system; Suwa Trust Co, Tokyo) to assess autonomic nerve activity during adaptive servo-ventilation support and Waon therapy in two different cases and determined the time course of autonomic nerve activity during these therapies. During both therapies, we found a drastic increase in parasympathetic nerve activity and continuous suppression of sympathetic nerve activity. Heart rate variability analysis using the MemCalc method may be promising for the assessment of the efficacy of various treatments, including adaptive servo-ventilation support and Waon therapy, from the viewpoint of autonomic nerve activity. PMID:27385607

  13. Antibacterial activity of soil-bound antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Chander, Yogesh; Kumar, Kuldip; Goyal, Sagar M; Gupta, Satish C

    2005-01-01

    There is some concern that antibiotic residues in land-applied manure may promote the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment. The goal of this study was to determine whether or not soil bound antibiotics are still active against bacteria. The procedure involved sorbing various amounts of tetracycline or tylosin on two different textured soils (Webster clay loam [fine-loamy, mixed, superactive, mesic Typic Endoaquolls] and Hubbard loamy sand [sandy, mixed, frigid Entic Hapludolls]), incubating these soils with three different bacterial cultures (an antibiotic resistant strain of Salmonella sp. [Salmonella(R)], an antibiotic sensitive strain of Salmonella sp. [Salmonella(S)], and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922), and then enumerating the number of colony forming units relative to the control. Incubation was done under both static and dynamic conditions. Soil-adsorbed antibiotics were found to retain their antimicrobial properties since both antibiotics inhibited the growth of all three bacterial species. Averaged over all other factors, soil adsorbed antimicrobial activity was higher for Hubbard loamy sand than Webster clay loam, most likely due to higher affinity (higher clay content) of the Webster soil for antibiotics. Similarly, there was a greater decline in bacterial growth with tetracycline than tylsoin, likely due to greater amounts of soil-adsorbed tetracycline and also due to lower minimum inhibitory concentration of most bacteria for tetracycline than tylosin. The antimicrobial effect of tetracycline was also greater under dynamic than static growth conditions, possibly because agitation under dynamic growth conditions helped increase tetracycline desorption and/or increase contact between soil adsorbed tetracycline and bacteria. We conclude that even though antibiotics are tightly adsorbed by clay particles, they are still biologically active and may influence the selection of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the terrestrial environment

  14. Sphenopalatine Ganglion Acupuncture Improves Nasal Ventilation and Modulates Autonomic Nervous Activity in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kuiji; Chen, Luquan; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chengshuo; Zhang, Luo

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the effects of Sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) acupuncture on nasal ventilation function and autonomic nervous system in health volunteers. 39 healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either active SPG acupuncture group (AA group) or sham-SPG acupuncture group (SA group). All subjects were assessed for self-reported nasal ventilation, nasal patency (nasal airway resistance (NAR) and nasal cavity volume (NCV), exhaled nasal nitric oxide (nNO), and neuropeptides (substance P(SP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY)) in nasal secretions at baseline, 30 minutes, 2 hours, and 24 hours after acupuncture. Significantly more subjects in AA group reported improvements in nasal ventilation at all time points after acupuncture, compared to SA group. NAR and NCV were also significantly lower in AA group than SA group. The level of nNO in AA group was significantly decreased after 24 hours compared to SA group. The level of NPY was significantly increased in AA group at 30 minutes and 2 hours compared to baseline and SA group. The levels of SP and VIP were not significantly different in the two groups. We concluded that SPG acupuncture could help to improve nasal ventilation by increasing sympathetic nerve excitability in healthy volunteers. PMID:27425415

  15. Sphenopalatine Ganglion Acupuncture Improves Nasal Ventilation and Modulates Autonomic Nervous Activity in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuiji; Chen, Luquan; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chengshuo; Zhang, Luo

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the effects of Sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) acupuncture on nasal ventilation function and autonomic nervous system in health volunteers. 39 healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either active SPG acupuncture group (AA group) or sham-SPG acupuncture group (SA group). All subjects were assessed for self-reported nasal ventilation, nasal patency (nasal airway resistance (NAR) and nasal cavity volume (NCV), exhaled nasal nitric oxide (nNO), and neuropeptides (substance P(SP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY)) in nasal secretions at baseline, 30 minutes, 2 hours, and 24 hours after acupuncture. Significantly more subjects in AA group reported improvements in nasal ventilation at all time points after acupuncture, compared to SA group. NAR and NCV were also significantly lower in AA group than SA group. The level of nNO in AA group was significantly decreased after 24 hours compared to SA group. The level of NPY was significantly increased in AA group at 30 minutes and 2 hours compared to baseline and SA group. The levels of SP and VIP were not significantly different in the two groups. We concluded that SPG acupuncture could help to improve nasal ventilation by increasing sympathetic nerve excitability in healthy volunteers. PMID:27425415

  16. Wissler Simulations of a Liquid Cooled and Ventilation Garment (LCVG) for Extravehicular Activity (EVA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesterson, Matthew; Bue, Grant; Trevino, Luis

    2006-01-01

    In order to provide effective cooling for astronauts during extravehicular activities (EVAs), a liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) is used to remove heat by a series off tubes through which cooling water is circulated. To better predict the effectiveness of the LCG and determine possible modifications to improve performance, computer simulations dealing with the interaction of the cooling garment with the human body have been run using the Wissler Human Model. Simulations have been conducted to predict the heat removal rate for various liquid cooled garment configurations. The current LCVG uses 48 cooling tubes woven into a fabric with cooling water flowing through the tubes. The purpose of the current project is to decrease the overall weight of the LCVG system. In order to achieve this weight reduction, advances in the garment heat removal rates need to be obtained. Currently, increasing the fabric s thermal conductivity along with also examining an increase in the cooling tube conductivity to more efficiently remove the excess heat generated during EVA is being simulated. Initial trials varied cooling water temperature, water flow rate, garment conductivity, tube conductivity, and total number of cooling tubes in the LCVG. Results indicate that the total number of cooling tubes could be reduced to 22 and still achieve the desired heat removal rate of 361 W. Further improvements are being made to the garment network used in the model to account for temperature gradients associated with the spacing of the cooling tubes over the surface of the garment

  17. Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2008 (SMAPVEX08) was conducted to address specific issues identified by the SMAP satellite mission (launch 2013). SMAP is currently addressing issues related to the development and selection of retrieval algorithms as well as refining the mission de...

  18. Soil and Water Conservation Activities for Scouts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    The purpose of the learning activities outlined in this booklet is to help Scouts understand some conservation principles which hopefully will lead to the development of an attitude of concern for the environment and a commitment to help with the task of using and managing soil, water, and other natural resources for long range needs as well as…

  19. Enzyme activities by indicator of quality in organic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raigon Jiménez, Mo; Fita, Ana Delores; Rodriguez Burruezo, Adrián

    2016-04-01

    The analytical determination of biochemical parameters, as soil enzyme activities and those related to the microbial biomass is growing importance by biological indicator in soil science studies. The metabolic activity in soil is responsible of important processes such as mineralization and humification of organic matter. These biological reactions will affect other key processes involved with elements like carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus , and all transformations related in soil microbial biomass. The determination of biochemical parameters is useful in studies carried out on organic soil where microbial processes that are key to their conservation can be analyzed through parameters of the metabolic activity of these soils. The main objective of this work is to apply analytical methodologies of enzyme activities in soil collections of different physicochemical characteristics. There have been selective sampling of natural soils, organic farming soils, conventional farming soils and urban soils. The soils have been properly identified conserved at 4 ° C until analysis. The enzyme activities determinations have been: catalase, urease, cellulase, dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase, which bring together a representative group of biological transformations that occur in the soil environment. The results indicate that for natural and agronomic soil collections, the values of the enzymatic activities are within the ranges established for forestry and agricultural soils. Organic soils are generally higher level of enzymatic, regardless activity of the enzyme involved. Soil near an urban area, levels of activities have been significantly reduced. The vegetation cover applied to organic soils, results in greater enzymatic activity. So the quality of these soils, defined as the ability to maintain their biological productivity is increased with the use of cover crops, whether or spontaneous species. The practice of cover based on legumes could be used as an ideal choice

  20. [Collateral ventilation].

    PubMed

    Voshaar, Th H

    2008-06-01

    The phenomenon of collateral ventilation is defined as ventilation of alveolar structures through passages or channels that bypass the normal airways. Such bypassing structures can be interalveolar, bronchiole-alveolar, interbronchiole, and interlobar. Collateral ventilation structures seem to be prominent in human lungs with trapped air and emphysema. In healthy human lungs normally no relevant collateral ventilation can be detected. In emphysematic lungs the ventilation through collateral channels can probably improve gas exchange mechanisms. The phenomenon of collateral ventilation explains several clinical observations in human lungs such as the absence of atalectasis following complete bronchial obstruction, e. g. after foreign body aspiration or tumour. The various results after bronchoscopic implantation of one-way endobronchial valves as a new technique for treating emphysema can also be explained by collateral ventilation. Understanding collateral ventilation is of high importance for clinicians, those working in the field of physiology of emphysema in human lungs and may be central to planning new bronchoscopic techniques for treating emphysema. The paper offers an overview of history, physiology and the relevance for lung volume reduction methods. Moreover, a new imaging technique to demonstrate collateral ventilation in vivo is described. PMID:18535980

  1. Biochemical activities in soil overlying Paraho processed oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, D.L.

    1982-01-01

    Microbial activity development in soil materials placed over processed oil shale is vital to the plant litter decomposition, cycling of nutrients, and soil organic matter accumulation and maintenance. Samples collected in the summers of 1979, 1980, and 1981 from revegetated soil 30-, 61-, and 91-cm deep overlying spent oil shale in the Piceance Basin of northwestern Colorado were assayed for dehydrogenease activity with glucose and without glucose, for phosphatase activity, and for acetylene reduction activity. Initial ammonium and nitrite nitrogen oxidation rates and potential denitrification rates were determined in 1981. Zymogenous dehydrogenase activity, phosphatase activity, nitrogenase activity, potential denitrification rates, and direct microscopic counts were lower in surface soil 30 cm deep, and were frequently lower in surface soil 61 cm deep over processed shale than in a surface-disturbed control area soil. Apparently, microbial activities are stressed in these more shallow replaced soils. Soil 61 cm deep over a coarse-rock capillary barrier separating the soil from the spent shale, frequently had improved biochemical activity. Initial ammonium and nitrite nitrogen oxidation rates were lower in all replaced soils than in the disturbed control soil. Soil core samples taken in 1981 were assayed for dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities, viable bacteria, and viable fungal propagules. In general, microbial activity decreased quickly below the surface. At depths greater than 45 cm, microbial activities were similar in buried spent shale and surface-disturbed control soil.

  2. 78 FR 70578 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Ventilation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ...The Department of Labor (DOL) is submitting the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) sponsored information collection request (ICR) titled, ``Ventilation Plan and Main Fan Maintenance Record,'' to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval for continued use, without change, in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA), 44 U.S.C. 3501 et...

  3. Ventilation Model

    SciTech Connect

    H. Yang

    1999-11-04

    The purpose of this analysis and model report (AMR) for the Ventilation Model is to analyze the effects of pre-closure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts and provide heat removal data to support EBS design. It will also provide input data (initial conditions, and time varying boundary conditions) for the EBS post-closure performance assessment and the EBS Water Distribution and Removal Process Model. The objective of the analysis is to develop, describe, and apply calculation methods and models that can be used to predict thermal conditions within emplacement drifts under forced ventilation during the pre-closure period. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Provide a general description of effects and heat transfer process of emplacement drift ventilation. (2) Develop a modeling approach to simulate the impacts of pre-closure ventilation on the thermal conditions in emplacement drifts. (3) Identify and document inputs to be used for modeling emplacement ventilation. (4) Perform calculations of temperatures and heat removal in the emplacement drift. (5) Address general considerations of the effect of water/moisture removal by ventilation on the repository thermal conditions. The numerical modeling in this document will be limited to heat-only modeling and calculations. Only a preliminary assessment of the heat/moisture ventilation effects and modeling method will be performed in this revision. Modeling of moisture effects on heat removal and emplacement drift temperature may be performed in the future.

  4. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) applications activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first-tier satellite missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. The SMAP mission 1 is under development by NASA and is scheduled for launch late in 2014. The SMAP mea...

  5. Hydrazine degradation and its effect on microbial activity in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, L.T.; Street, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Considerable information has been accumulated on the toxicity of hydrazine to soil bacterial cultures and on the degradation of hydrazne by soil bacterial cultures. The activities of the autotrophic nitrifiers Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter and of denitrifying bacteria, and the growth of Enterobacter cloacae, were all inhibited by hydrazine. An enzyme system has been found in heterotrophic N/sub 2/-fixing bacteria capable of degrading hydrazine. Information concerning the effect of hydrazine on microbial activity in soils is not available, however. Accidental spills to soil can occur during transportation and storage. Therefore, this study was initiated to determine degradation rates of hydrazine in soils and its effect on soil microbial activity.

  6. Development of an air-bearing fan for space extravehicular activity (EVA) suit ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumoto, Paul; Allen, Norman; Stonesifer, Greg

    1992-01-01

    A high-speed/variable flow fan has been developed for EVA suit ventilation which combines air bearings with a two-pole, toothless permanent-magnet motor. The fan has demonstrated quiet and vibration-free operation and a 2:1 range in flow rate variation. System weight is 0.9 kg, and input powers range from 12.4 to 42 W.

  7. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, Barron; Moran, M. Susan; Escobar, Vanessa; Brown, Molly E.

    2014-05-01

    The launch of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission in 2014 will provide global soil moisture and freeze-thaw measurements at moderate resolution (9 km) with latency as short as 24 hours. The resolution, latency and global coverage of SMAP products will enable new applications in the fields of weather, climate, drought, flood, agricultural production, human health and national security. To prepare for launch, the SMAP mission has engaged more than 25 Early Adopters. Early Adopters are users who have a need for SMAP-like soil moisture or freeze-thaw data, and who agreed to apply their own resources to demonstrate the utility of SMAP data for their particular system or model. In turn, the SMAP mission agreed to provide Early Adopters with simulated SMAP data products and pre-launch calibration and validation data from SMAP field campaigns, modeling, and synergistic studies. The applied research underway by Early Adopters has provided fundamental knowledge of how SMAP data products can be scaled and integrated into users' policy, business and management activities to improve decision-making efforts. This presentation will cover SMAP applications including weather and climate forecasting, vehicle mobility estimation, quantification of greenhouse gas emissions, management of urban potable water supply, and prediction of crop yield. The presentation will end with a discussion of potential international applications with focus on the ESA/CEOS TIGER Initiative entitled "looking for water in Africa", the United Nations (UN) Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) which carries a specific mandate focused on Africa, the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) which lists soil moisture as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV), and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which reported a food and nutrition crisis in the Sahel.

  8. Ventilation Model

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-05

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. The purposes of Revision 01 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of the discretization (Section 6.2.3.1), and the downstream applicability of the model results (i.e. wall heat fractions) to initialize post

  9. Soil microbial activity as influenced by compaction and straw mulching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siczek, A.; Frąc, M.

    2012-02-01

    Field study was performed on Haplic Luvisol soil to determine the effects of soil compaction and straw mulching on microbial parameters of soil under soybean. Treatments with different compaction were established on unmulched and mulched with straw soil. The effect of soil compaction and straw mulching on the total bacteria number and activities of dehydrogenases, protease, alkaline and acid phosphatases was studied. The results of study indicated the decrease of enzymes activities in strongly compacted soil and their increase in medium compacted soil as compared to no-compacted treatment. Mulch application caused stimulation of the bacteria total number and enzymatic activity in the soil under all compaction levels. Compaction and mulch effects were significant for all analyzed microbial parameters (P<0.001).

  10. Effects of soil type and farm management on soil ecological functional genes and microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Jennifer R; Schadt, Christopher W; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynne; Kang, Sanghoon; Zhou, Jizhong; Reganold, John P

    2010-09-01

    Relationships between soil microbial diversity and soil function are the subject of much debate. Process-level analyses have shown that microbial function varies with soil type and responds to soil management. However, such measurements cannot determine the role of community structure and diversity in soil function. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of gene frequency and diversity, measured by microarray analysis, on soil processes. The study was conducted in an agro-ecosystem characterized by contrasting management practices and soil types. Eight pairs of adjacent commercial organic and conventional strawberry fields were matched for soil type, strawberry variety, and all other environmental conditions. Soil physical, chemical and biological analyses were conducted including functional gene microarrays (FGA). Soil physical and chemical characteristics were primarily determined by soil textural type (coarse vs fine-textured), but biological and FGA measures were more influenced by management (organic vs conventional). Organically managed soils consistently showed greater functional activity as well as FGA signal intensity (SI) and diversity. Overall FGA SI and diversity were correlated to total soil microbial biomass. Functional gene group SI and/or diversity were correlated to related soil chemical and biological measures such as microbial biomass, cellulose, dehydrogenase, ammonium and sulfur. Management was the dominant determinant of soil biology as measured by microbial gene frequency and diversity, which paralleled measured microbial processes. PMID:20376100

  11. Effects of soil type and farm management on soil ecological functional genes and microbial activities

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, Jennifer; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynne; Kang, S.; Zhou, Jizhong; Reganold, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Relationships between soil microbial diversity and soil function are the subject of much debate. Process-level analyses have shown that microbial function varies with soil type and responds to soil management. However, such measurements cannot determine the role of community structure and diversity in soil function. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of gene frequency and diversity, measured by microarray analysis, on soil processes. The study was conducted in an agro-ecosystem characterized by contrasting management practices and soil types. Eight pairs of adjacent commercial organic and conventional strawberry fields were matched for soil type, strawberry variety, and all other environmental conditions. Soil physical, chemical and biological analyses were conducted including functional gene microarrays (FGA). Soil physical and chemical characteristics were primarily determined by soil textural type (coarse vs fine-textured), but biological and FGA measures were more influenced by management (organic vs conventional). Organically managed soils consistently showed greater functional activity as well as FGA signal intensity (SI) and diversity. Overall FGA SI and diversity were correlated to total soil microbial biomass. Functional gene group SI and/or diversity were correlated to related soil chemical and biological measures such as microbial biomass, cellulose, dehydrogenase, ammonium and sulfur. Management was the dominant determinant of soil biology as measured by microbial gene frequency and diversity, which paralleled measured microbial processes.

  12. The soil moisture active passive experiments (SMAPEx): Towards soil moisture retrieval from the SMAP mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, scheduled for launch in 2014, will carry the first combined L-band radar and radiometer system with the objective of mapping near surface soil moisture and freeze/thaw state globally at near-daily time step (2-3 days). SMAP will provide three soil ...

  13. Effects of organic dairy manure amendment on soil phosphatase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic dairy production is increasing in the U.S. due to concerns over environmental, human, and animal health. It is well known that the application of livestock manure to soil can influence enzyme activities involved in nutrient cycling and soil fertility, such as soil phosphatases; however, orga...

  14. Variation in Soil Enzyme Activities in a Temperate Agroforestry Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Integration of agroforestry and grass buffers into row crop watersheds improves overall environmental quality, including soil quality. The objective of this study was to examine management and landscape effects on soil carbon, soil nitrogen, microbial diversity, enzyme activity, and DNA concentrati...

  15. Accommodating Students with Disabilities in Soil Science Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley-Turnbaugh, S. J.; Murphy, Kate; Levin, E.

    2004-01-01

    Soil science education is lacking in terms of accommodations for persons with disabilities. Individuals with disabilities are often excluded from soil science activities in school, and from soil science careers. GLOBE (Global Learning Observations to Benefit the Environment) is a worldwide, hands-on primary and secondary school-based education and…

  16. Test plan for measuring ventilation rates and combustible gas levels in RPP active catch tanks

    SciTech Connect

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    1999-06-03

    The purpose of this test is to provide an initial screening of combustible gas concentrations in catch tanks that currently are operated by River Protection Project (RPP). The data will be used to determine whether or not additional data will be needed for closure of the flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities. This test will involve field measurements of ammonia, organic vapor, and total combustible gas levels in the headspace of the catch tanks. If combustible gas level in a tank exceeds an established threshold, gas samples will be collected in SUMMA canisters for more extensive laboratory analysis. In addition, ventilation rates of some catch tanks will be measured to evaluate removal of flammable gas by air flow through the tanks.

  17. Test plan for measuring ventilation rates and combustible gas levels in TWRS active catch tanks

    SciTech Connect

    NGUYEN, D.M.

    1999-05-20

    The purpose of this test is to provide an initial screening of combustible gas concentrations in catch tanks that currently are operated by Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The data will be used to determine whether or not additional data will be needed for closure of the flammable gas unreviewed safety question for these facilities. This test will involve field measurements of ammonia, organic vapor, and total combustible gas levels in the headspace of the catch tanks. If combustible gas level in a tank exceeds an established threshold, gas samples will be collected in SUMMA canisters for more extensive laboratory analysis. In addition, ventilation rates of some catch tanks will be measured to evaluate removal of flammable gas by air flow through the tanks.

  18. Nasal ventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Simonds, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation is likely to have an increasing role in the management of acute ventilatory failure, weaning, and chronic ventilatory problems. Further improvements in ventilator and mask design will be seen. Appropriate application is likely to reduce both mortality and admissions to intensive care, while domiciliary use can improve life expectancy and/or quality of life in chronic ventilatory disorders. As with any new technique, enthusiasm should not outweigh clear outcome information, and possible new indications should always be subject to careful assessment. Images Figure 2 PMID:9799887

  19. Effects of biochar amendments on soil microbial biomass and activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Voroney, R P; Price, G W

    2014-11-01

    Environmental benefits reported in the literature of using biochar as a soil amendment are generally increased microbial activity and reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This study determined the effects of amendment with biomass feedstocks (spent coffee grounds, wood pellets, and horse bedding compost) and that of biochars (700°C) produced from these feedstocks on soil microbial biomass (C and N) and activity. Soils were amended with these substrates at 0.75% by weight and incubated for up to 175 d under laboratory conditions. Biochar residual effects on soil microbial activity were also studied by amending these soils with either ammonium nitrate (NHNO, 35 mg N kg) or with glucose (864 mg C kg) plus NHNO. Soil microbial biomass C and N, net N mineralization, and CO, NO, and CH emissions were measured. Amendment with biomass feedstocks significantly increased soil microbial biomass and activity, whereas amendment with the biochars had no significant effect. Also, biochar amendment had no significant effect on either net N mineralization or NO and CH emissions from soil. These results indicate that production of biochars at this high temperature eliminated potential substrates. Microbial biomass C in biochar-amended and unamended soils was not significantly different following additions of NHNO or glucose plus NHNO, suggesting that microbial access to otherwise labile C and N was not affected. This study shows that biochars produced at 700°C, regardless of feedstock source, do not enhance soil microbial biomass or activity. PMID:25602227

  20. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Applications Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly E.; Moran, Susan; Escobar, Vanessa; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Njoku, Eni

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first-tier satellite missions recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. The SMAP mission 1 is under development by NASA and is scheduled for launch late in 2014. The SMAP measurements will allow global and high-resolution mapping of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state at resolutions from 3-40 km. These measurements will have high value for a wide range of environmental applications that underpin many weather-related decisions including drought and flood guidance, agricultural productivity estimation, weather forecasting, climate predictions, and human health risk. In 2007, NASA was tasked by The National Academies to ensure that emerging scientific knowledge is actively applied to obtain societal benefits by broadening community participation and improving means for use of information. SMAP is one of the first missions to come out of this new charge, and its Applications Plan forms the basis for ensuring its commitment to its users. The purpose of this paper is to outline the methods and approaches of the SMAP applications activity, which is designed to increase and sustain the interaction between users and scientists involved in mission development.

  1. Mechanical Ventilation

    MedlinePlus

    ... or husband or next of kin). It is important that you talk with your family members and your doctors about using a ventilator and what you would like to happen in different situations. The more clearly you explain your values and choices to friends, loved ones and doctors, ...

  2. Stoichiometry of soil enzyme activity at global scale.

    PubMed

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L; Lauber, Christian L; Weintraub, Michael N; Ahmed, Bony; Allison, Steven D; Crenshaw, Chelsea; Contosta, Alexandra R; Cusack, Daniela; Frey, Serita; Gallo, Marcy E; Gartner, Tracy B; Hobbie, Sarah E; Holland, Keri; Keeler, Bonnie L; Powers, Jennifer S; Stursova, Martina; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina; Waldrop, Mark P; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Zak, Donald R; Zeglin, Lydia H

    2008-11-01

    Extracellular enzymes are the proximate agents of organic matter decomposition and measures of these activities can be used as indicators of microbial nutrient demand. We conducted a global-scale meta-analysis of the seven-most widely measured soil enzyme activities, using data from 40 ecosystems. The activities of beta-1,4-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase and phosphatase g(-1) soil increased with organic matter concentration; leucine aminopeptidase, phenol oxidase and peroxidase activities showed no relationship. All activities were significantly related to soil pH. Specific activities, i.e. activity g(-1) soil organic matter, also varied in relation to soil pH for all enzymes. Relationships with mean annual temperature (MAT) and precipitation (MAP) were generally weak. For hydrolases, ratios of specific C, N and P acquisition activities converged on 1 : 1 : 1 but across ecosystems, the ratio of C : P acquisition was inversely related to MAP and MAT while the ratio of C : N acquisition increased with MAP. Oxidative activities were more variable than hydrolytic activities and increased with soil pH. Our analyses indicate that the enzymatic potential for hydrolyzing the labile components of soil organic matter is tied to substrate availability, soil pH and the stoichiometry of microbial nutrient demand. The enzymatic potential for oxidizing the recalcitrant fractions of soil organic material, which is a proximate control on soil organic matter accumulation, is most strongly related to soil pH. These trends provide insight into the biogeochemical processes that create global patterns in ecological stoichiometry and organic matter storage. PMID:18823393

  3. Hydrogen inhalation reduced epithelial apoptosis in ventilator-induced lung injury via a mechanism involving nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chien-Sheng; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Peng, Ximei; Tochigi, Naobumi; Shigemura, Norihisa; Billiar, Timothy R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Toyoda, Yoshiya

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} Hydrogen is a regulatory molecule with antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic protective effects. {yields} There is very limited information on the pathways regulated in vivo by the hydrogen. {yields} Antiapoptotic abilities of hydrogen were explained by upregulation of the antiapoptotic gene. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated antiapoptotic protein. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation associated with increase Bcl-2 may contribute to cytoprotection of hydrogen. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated the inhalation of hydrogen gas, a novel medical therapeutic gas, ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI); however, the molecular mechanisms by which hydrogen ameliorates VILI remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether inhaled hydrogen gas modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF{kappa}B) signaling pathway. VILI was generated in male C57BL6 mice by performing a tracheostomy and placing the mice on a mechanical ventilator (tidal volume of 30 ml/kg or 10 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure). The ventilator delivered either 2% nitrogen or 2% hydrogen in balanced air. NF{kappa}B activation, as indicated by NF{kappa}B DNA binding, was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hydrogen gas inhalation increased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 1 h of ventilation and decreased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 2 h of ventilation, as compared with controls. The early activation of NF{kappa}B during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased levels of Bax. Hydrogen inhalation increased oxygen tension, decreased lung edema, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory mediators. Chemical inhibition of early NF{kappa}B activation using SN50 reversed these protective effects. NF{kappa}B activation and an associated increase in the expression of Bcl-2 may contribute, in part, to the

  4. [Effect of fertilization levels on soil microorganism amount and soil enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Ling; Du, Jun-Bo; Xu, Fu-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Hu

    2013-11-01

    Field experiments were conducted in Shangluo pharmaceutical base in Shaanxi province to study the effect of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in different fertilization levels on Platycodon grandiflorum soil microorganism and activities of soil enzyme, using three-factor D-saturation optimal design with random block design. The results showed that N0P2K2, N2P2K0, N3P1K3 and N3P3K1 increased the amount of bacteria in 0-20 cm of soil compared with N0P0K0 by 144.34%, 39.25%, 37.17%, 53.58%, respectively. The amount of bacteria in 2040 cm of soil of N3P1K3 increased by 163.77%, N0P0K3 increased the amount of soil actinomycetes significantly by 192.11%, while other treatments had no significant effect. N2P0K2 and N3P1K3 increased the amounts of fungus significantly in 0-20 cm of soil compared with N0P0K0, increased by 35.27% and 92.21%, respectively. N3P0K0 increased the amounts of fungus significantly in 20-40 cm of soil by 165.35%, while other treatments had no significant effect. All treatments decrease soil catalase activity significantly in 0-20 cm of soil except for N2P0K2, and while N2P2K0 and NPK increased catalase activity significantly in 2040 cm of soil. Fertilization regime increased invertase activity significantly in 2040 cm of soil, and decreased phosphatase activity inordinately in 0-20 cm of soil, while increased phosphatase activity in 2040 cm of soil other than N1P3K3. N3P0K0, N0P0K3, N2P0K2, N2P2K0 and NPK increased soil urease activity significantly in 0-20 cm of soil compared with N0P0K0 by 18.22%, 14.87%,17.84%, 27.88%, 24.54%, respectively. Fertilization regime increased soil urease activity significantly in 2040 cm of soil other than N0P2K2. PMID:24558863

  5. Initial clinical experience with a new dual sensor SSIR pacemaker controlled by body activity and minute ventilation.

    PubMed

    Alt, E; Combs, W; Fotuhi, P; Bambl, E; Wahlstrand, J; Willhaus, R

    1995-08-01

    Fourteen patients were implanted with a single chamber dual sensor pacemaker (Legend Plus) that measures minute ventilation (VE) via variations in impedance between a bipolar lead and the pacemaker case, and activity via a piezoelectric crystal bonded to the pacemaker case. Chronotropic incompetent patients were exercised on a treadmill and a bicycle in dual sensor mode. Activity only indicated pacing rate was measured using a strap-on pacemaker. Both implanted and strap-on pacemakers were adjusted to yield a steady-state pacing rate of 100 beats/min during hall walk. Pacing rate, VE, and oxygen uptake (VO2) were measured continuously. Linear curve fit analysis slopes for plots of VE versus pacing rate during exercise (1.33-1.49) compared favorably to values reported in normals. Peak pacing rates achieved for treadmill and bicycle testing for dual sensor mode were higher than activity mode alone. Slopes of heart rate to VE or VO2 were not significantly different (P < 0.05) for dual sensor mode in contrast to activity alone. In conclusion, the Legend Plus dual sensor rate adaptive pacing therapy delivered pacing rates more proportional to VE and VO2 under different types of exercise than rates indicated by a strap-on pacemaker in activity mode. PMID:7479170

  6. Activated carbons from end-products of tree nut and tree fruit production as sorbents for removing methyl bromide in ventilation effluent from postharvest chamber fumigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    End-products of tree nuts and tree fruits grown in California, USA were evaluated for the ability to remove methyl bromide from the ventilation effluent of postharvest chamber fumigations. Activated carbon sorbents from walnut and almond shells as well as peach and prune pits were prepared using dif...

  7. Decommissioning of Active Ventilation Systems in a Nuclear R and D Facility to Prepare for Building Demolition (Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Project, Canada) - 13073

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, Brian; May, Doug; Howlett, Don; Bilinsky, Dennis

    2013-07-01

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research establishment owned by the Canadian government and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) since the early 1960's. WL is currently under a decommissioning license and the mandate is to remediate the nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner. The WL Project is the first major nuclear decommissioning project in Canada. A major initiative underway is to decommission and demolish the main R and D Laboratory complex. The Building 300 R and D complex was constructed to accommodate laboratories and offices which were mainly used for research and development associated with organic-cooled reactors, nuclear fuel waste management, reactor safety, advanced fuel cycles and other applications of nuclear energy. Building 300 is a three storey structure of approximately 16,000 m{sup 2}. In order to proceed with building demolition, the contaminated systems inside the building have to be characterized, removed, and the waste managed. There is a significant focus on volume reduction of radioactive waste for the WL project. The active ventilation system is one of the significant contaminated systems in Building 300 that requires decommissioning and removal. The active ventilation system was designed to manage hazardous fumes and radioactivity from ventilation devices (e.g., fume hoods, snorkels and glove boxes) and to prevent the escape of airborne hazardous material outside of the laboratory boundary in the event of an upset condition. The system includes over 200 ventilation devices and 32 active exhaust fan units and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The strategy to remove the ventilation system was to work from the laboratory end back to the fan/filter system. Each ventilation duct was radiologically characterized. Fogging was used to minimize loose contamination. Sections of the duct were removed by various cutting methods and bagged for temporary storage prior to disposition

  8. Effects of organic carbon sequestration strategies on soil enzymatic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, E.; Suciu, N.; Botteri, L.; Ferrari, T.; Coppolecchia, D.; Trevisan, M.; Piccolo, A.

    2009-04-01

    Greenhouse gases emissions can be counterbalanced with proper agronomical strategies aimed at sequestering carbon in soils. These strategies must be tested not only for their ability in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, but also for their impact on soil quality: enzymatic activities are related to main soil ecological quality, and can be used as early and sensitive indicators of alteration events. Three different strategies for soil carbon sequestration were studied: minimum tillage, protection of biodegradable organic fraction by compost amendment and oxidative polimerization of soil organic matter catalyzed by biometic porfirins. All strategies were compared with a traditional agricultural management based on tillage and mineral fertilization. Experiments were carried out in three Italian soils from different pedo-climatic regions located respectively in Piacenza, Turin and Naples and cultivated with maize or wheat. Soil samples were taken for three consecutive years after harvest and analyzed for their content in phosphates, ß-glucosidase, urease and invertase. An alteration index based on these enzymatic activities levels was applied as well. The biomimetic porfirin application didn't cause changes in enzymatic activities compared to the control at any treatment or location. Enzymatic activities were generally higher in the minimum tillage and compost treatment, while differences between location and date of samplings were limited. Application of the soil alteration index based on enzymatic activities showed that soils treated with compost or subjected to minimum tillage generally have a higher biological quality. The work confirms the environmental sustainability of the carbon sequestering agronomical practices studied.

  9. Microbial Community Structure and Enzyme Activities in Semiarid Agricultural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta-Martinez, V. A.; Zobeck, T. M.; Gill, T. E.; Kennedy, A. C.

    2002-12-01

    The effect of agricultural management practices on the microbial community structure and enzyme activities of semiarid soils of different textures in the Southern High Plains of Texas were investigated. The soils (sandy clay loam, fine sandy loam and loam) were under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) or in rotations with peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) or wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and had different water management (irrigated or dryland) and tillage (conservation or conventional). Microbial community structure was investigated using fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis by gas chromatography and enzyme activities, involved in C, N, P and S cycling of soils, were measured (mg product released per kg soil per h). The activities of b-glucosidase, b-glucosaminidase, alkaline phosphatase, and arylsulfatase were significantly (P<0.05) increased in soils under cotton rotated with sorghum or wheat, and due to conservation tillage in comparison to continuous cotton under conventional tillage. Principal component analysis showed FAME profiles of these soils separated distinctly along PC1 (20 %) and PC2 (13 %) due to their differences in soil texture and management. No significant differences were detected in FAME profiles due to management practices for the same soils in this sampling period. Enzyme activities provide early indications of the benefits in microbial populations and activities and soil organic matter under crop rotations and conservation tillage in comparison to the typical practices in semiarid regions of continuous cotton and conventional tillage.

  10. Assimilation of Passive and Active Microwave Soil Moisture Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, C. S.; Reichle, R. H.; DeLannoy, G. J. M.; Liu, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Root-zone soil moisture is an important control over the partition of land surface energy and moisture, and the assimilation of remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture has been shown to improve model profile soil moisture [1]. To date, efforts to assimilate remotely sensed near-surface soil moisture at large scales have focused on soil moisture derived from the passive microwave Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) and the active Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT; together with its predecessor on the European Remote Sensing satellites (ERS. The assimilation of passive and active microwave soil moisture observations has not yet been directly compared, and so this study compares the impact of assimilating ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture data, both separately and together. Since the soil moisture retrieval skill from active and passive microwave data is thought to differ according to surface characteristics [2], the impact of each assimilation on the model soil moisture skill is assessed according to land cover type, by comparison to in situ soil moisture observations.

  11. Soil surface disturbances in cold deserts: Effects on nitrogenase activity in cyanobacterial-lichen soil crusts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne

    1996-01-01

    CyanobacteriaMichen soil crusts can be a dominant source of nitrogen for cold-desert ecosystems. Effects of surface disturbance from footprints, bike and vehicle tracks on the nitrogenase activity in these crusts was investigated. Surface disturbances reduced nitrogenase activity by 30-100%. Crusts dominated by the cyanobacterium Microcoleus vaginatus on sandy soils were the most susceptible to disruption; crusts on gypsiferous soils were the least susceptible. Crusts where the soil lichen Collema tenax was present showed less immediate effects; however, nitrogenase activity still declined over time. Levels of nitrogenase activity reduction were affected by the degree of soil disruption and whether sites were dominated by cyanobacteria with or without heterocysts. Consequently, anthropogenic surface disturbances may have serious implications for nitrogen budgets in these ecosystems.

  12. Pinworm detection in mice with immunodeficient (NOD SCID) and immunocompetent (CD-1 and Swiss) soiled bedding sentinels in individually ventilated cage systems.

    PubMed

    Eguíluz, C; Rossi, M; Viguera, E

    2015-10-01

    Sentinel exposure to soiled bedding is frequently used for health monitoring of mice housed in individually ventilated cage systems (IVCS). Despite its advantages, the use of soiled bedding sentinels (SBSs) is far for being a reliable method. Two studies were conducted to evaluate the sensitivity of immunodeficient SBSs NOD.CB17-Prkdc(scid)/NCrHsd (NOD SCID) against two immunocompetent outbred strains, Hsd:ICR (CD-1) and RjOr1:Swiss (Swiss) to pinworm detection in IVCS-housing. Four different diagnostic methods were used: perianal tape test, fecal flotation, plate method and histology. Positivity was considered if at least one of the techniques used was positive. In the first study NOD SCID were more sensitive than CD-1 SBSs (P < 0.05), and except for the fecal flotation test performed at week 6, all the diagnostic methods were more sensitive with NOD SCID mice (P < 0.05). In the second study differences between the Swiss and NOD SCID mice were less obvious (P = 0.08). When compared separately, the different diagnostic methods, except for the fecal flotation test, were all more sensitive in the NOD SCID mice (P < 0.05). In addition, the anal tape test in the Swiss SBSs was more sensitive at week 7 than at week 15 (P < 0.05). In conclusion, combining various diagnostic techniques and samplings at week 7 post-exposure with non-invasive methods increases the rate of pinworm detection. Immunodeficient SBSs showed higher sensitivity than immunocompetent ones. Thus, use of immunodeficient SBSs is highly recommended in health control protocols. PMID:25667226

  13. Soil organic components distribution in a podzol and the possible relations with the biological soil activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Romero, Marta; Papa, Stefania; Verstraeten, Arne; Curcio, Elena; Cools, Nathalie; Lozano-Garcia, Beatriz; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Coppola, Elio

    2016-04-01

    This research reports the preliminary results of a study based on the SOC (Soil Organic Carbon) fractionation in a pine forest soil (Pinus nigra). Hyperskeletic Albic Podzol soil (P113005, World Reference Base, 2014), described by the following sequence O-Ah-E-Bh-Bs-Cg, was investigated at Zoniën, Belgium. Total (TOC) and extractable (TEC) soil contents were determined by Italian official method of soil analysis. Different soil C fractions were also determined: Humic Acid Carbon (HAC) and Fulvic Acid Carbon (FAC). Not Humic Carbon (NHC) and Humin Carbon (Huc) fractions were obtained by difference. Along the mineral soil profile, therefore, were also tested some enzymatic activities, such as cellulase, xylanase, laccase and peroxidase, involved in the degradation of the main organic substance components, and dehydrogenase activity, like soil microbial biomass index. The results shows a differential TEC fractions distribution in the soil profile along three fronts of progress: (i) An E leaching horizon of TEC; Bh horizon (humic) of humic acids preferential accumulation, morphologically and analytically recognizable, in which humic are more insoluble that fulvic acids, and predominate over the latter; (ii) horizon Bs (spodic) in which fulvic acids are more soluble that humic acid, and predominate in their turn. All enzyme activities appear to be highest in the most superficial part of the mineral profile and decrease towards the deeper layers with different patterns. It is known that the enzymes production in a soil profile reflects the organic substrates availability, which in turn influences the density and the composition of the microbial population. The deeper soil horizons contain microbial communities adapted and specialized to their environment and, therefore, different from those present on the surface The results suggest that the fractionation technique of TEC is appropriate to interpret the podsolisation phenomenon that is the preferential distribution of

  14. Ventilator-driven xenon ventilation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, R.T.; Thomas, F.D.; Gerson, J.I.

    1984-07-01

    A modification of a common commerical Xe-133 ventilation device is described for mechanically assisted ventilation imaging. The patient's standard ventilator serves as the power source controlling the ventilator rate and volume during the xenon study, but the gases in the two systems are not intermixed. This avoids contamination of the ventilator with radioactive xenon. Supplemental oxygen and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) are provided if needed. The system can be converted quickly for conventional studies with spontaneous respiration.

  15. Persistence of biologically active compounds in soil: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.E.

    1987-02-01

    This document describes the long-term effects of soil-applied oil shale process water on the VA fungi and Rhizobium bacteria in a native soil. Techniques include assessing the VA fungal activity at field treatment plots and using treated field soils in a bioassay to determine VA infection and Rhizobium-nodulation potentials four years after process water application. 52 refs., 32 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Arid soil microbial enzymatic activity profile as affected by geographical location and soil degradation status

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluating soil health is critical for any successful remediation effort. Arid lands, with their minimal carbon and water contents, low nutritional status and restricted, seasonal microbial activity pose specific challenges to soil health restoration and by extension, restoration of ecosystem repr...

  17. NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, Kent; Thurman, Sam; Edelstein, Wendy; Spencer, Michael; Chen, Gun-Shing; Underwood, Mark; Njoku, Eni; Goodman, Shawn; Jai, Benhan

    2013-01-01

    The SMAP mission will produce high-resolution and accurate global maps of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state using data from a non-imaging synthetic aperture radar and a radiometer, both operating at L-band.

  18. Studying the Activities of Microorganisms in Soil Using Slides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullimore, D. Roy; Pipe, Annette E.

    1980-01-01

    Two implanted slide techniques are described by which activity of proteolylic bacteria and the growth of algae in the soil can be readily studied by school students using simple apparatus and methods. Variations are suggested for studying the effects of agricultural practices and environmental conditions on the soil bacteria and algae. (Author/DS)

  19. Activation energies and temperature effects from electrical spectra of soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apparent permittivity often has soil-specific temperature responses as well as soil water responses. These variations affect dielectric sensors, often requiring site-specific calibrations. Variations of permittivity as a function of frequency and temperature can be used to calculate activation energ...

  20. The Soil Moisture Active/Passive Mission (SMAP)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission will deliver global views of soil moisture content and its freeze/thaw state that are critical terrestrial water cycle state variables. Polarized measurements obtained with a shared antenna L-band radar and radiometer system will allow accurate estima...

  1. MICROBIAL COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND ENZYME ACTIVITIES IN SEMIARID AGRICULTURAL SOILS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of management on the microbial community structure and enzyme activities of three semiarid soils from Southern High Plains of Texas were investigated. The soils (sandy clay loam, fine sandy loam and loam) were under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) or in cotton -peanut (Arachis h...

  2. Measurements of microbial community activities in individual soil macroaggregates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The functional potential of single soil aggregates may provide insights into the localized distribution of microbial activities better than traditional assays conducted on bulk quantities of soil. Thus, we scaled down enzyme assays for ß-glucosidase, N-acetyl-ß-D-glucosaminidase, lipase, and leucine...

  3. Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2008 (SMAPVEX08)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP) is currently addressing issues related to the development and selection of soil moisture retrieval algorithms. Several forums have identified a number of specific questions that require supporting field experiments. Addressing these issues as soon as p...

  4. ACID RAIN AND SOIL MICROBIAL ACTIVITY: EFFECTS AND THEIR MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the investigation, our aim was to determine if acid rain affects soil microbial activity and to identify possible mechanisms of observed effects. A Sierran forest soil (pH 6.4) planted with Ponderosa pine seedlings was exposed to simulated rain (pH 2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.6) with ...

  5. Remediation of hexachlorobenzene contaminated soils by rhamnolipid enhanced soil washing coupled with activated carbon selective adsorption.

    PubMed

    Wan, Jinzhong; Chai, Lina; Lu, Xiaohua; Lin, Yusuo; Zhang, Shengtian

    2011-05-15

    The present study investigates the selective adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) from rhamnolipid solution by a powdered activated carbon (PAC). A combined soil washing-PAC adsorption technique is further evaluated on the removal of HCB from two soils, a spiked kaolin and a contaminated real soil. PAC at a dosage of 10 g L(-1) could achieve a HCB removal of 80-99% with initial HCB and rhamnolipid concentrations of 1 mg L(-1) and 3.3-25 g L(-1), respectively. The corresponding adsorptive loss of rhamnolipid was 8-19%. Successive soil washing-PAC adsorption tests (new soil sample was subjected to washing for each cycle) showed encouraging leaching and adsorption performances for HCB. When 25 g L(-1) rhamnolipid solution was applied, HCB leaching from soils was 55-71% for three cycles of washing, and HCB removal by PAC was nearly 90%. An overall 86% and 88% removal of HCB were obtained for kaolin and real soil, respectively, by using the combined process to wash one soil sample for twice. Our investigation suggests that coupling AC adsorption with biosurfactant-enhanced soil washing is a promising alternative to remove hydrophobic organic compounds from soils. PMID:21397398

  6. Soil biological activity at European scale - two calculation concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Janine; Rühlmann, Jörg

    2014-05-01

    The CATCH-C project aims to identify and improve the farm-compatibility of Soil Management Practices including to promote productivity, climate change mitigation and soil quality. The focus of this work concentrates on turnover conditions for soil organic matter (SOM). SOM is fundamental for the maintenance of quality and functions of soils while SOM storage is attributed a great importance in terms of climate change mitigation. The turnover conditions depend on soil biological activity characterized by climate and soil properties. To assess the turnover conditions two model concepts are applied: (I) Biological active time (BAT) regression approach derived from CANDY model (Franko & Oelschlägel 1995) expresses the variation of air temperature, precipitation and soil texture as a timescale and an indicator of biological activity for soil organic matter (SOM) turnover. (II) Re_clim parameter within the Introductory Carbon Balance Model (Andrén & Kätterer 1997) states the soil temperature and soil water to estimate soil biological activity. The modelling includes two strategies to cover the European scale and conditions. BAT was calculated on a 20x20 km grid basis. The European data sets of precipitation and air temperature (time period 1901-2000, monthly resolution), (Mitchell et al. 2004) were used to derive long-term averages. As we focus on agricultural areas we included CORINE data (2006) to extract arable land. The resulting BATs under co-consideration of the main soil textures (clay, silt, sand and loam) were investigated per environmental zone (ENZs, Metzger et al. 2005) that represents similar conditions for precipitation, temperature and relief to identify BAT ranges and hence turnover conditions for each ENZ. Re_clim was quantified by climatic time series of more than 250 weather stations across Europe presented by Klein Tank et al. (2002). Daily temperature, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (maximal thermal extent) were used to calculate

  7. SMOS Soil moisture Cal val activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Y.; Mialon, A.; Bitar, A. Al; Leroux, D.; Richaume, P.; Gruhier, C.; Berthon, L.; Novello, N.; Rudiger, C.; Bircher, S.; Wigneron, J. P.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Rahmoune, R.

    2012-04-01

    SMOS, successfully launched on November 2, 2009, uses an L Band radiometer with aperture synthesis to achieve a good spatial resolution.. It was developed and made under the leadership of the European Space Agency (ESA) as an Earth Explorer Opportunity mission. It is a joint program with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France and the Centro para el Desarrollo Tecnologico Industrial (CDTI) in Spain. SMOS carries a single payload, an L band 2D interferometric,radiometer in the 1400-1427 MHz protected band. This wavelength penetrates well through the vegetation and with the atmosphere being almost transparent, it enables us to infer both soil moisture and vegetation water content. SMOS achieves an unprecedented spatial resolution of 50 km at L-band maximum (43 km on average) with multi angular-dual polarized (or fully polarized) brightness temperatures over the globe and with a revisit time smaller than 3 days. SMOS is now acquiring data and has undergone the commissioning phase. The data quality exceeds what was expected, showing very good sensitivity and stability. The data is however very much impaired by man made emission in the protected band, leading to degraded measurements in several areas including parts of Europe and China. Many different international teams are now performing cal val activities in various parts of the world, with notably large field campaigns either on the long time scale or over specific targets to address the specific issues. These campaigns take place in various parts of the world and in different environments, from the Antarctic plateau to the deserts, from rain forests to deep oceans. SMOS is a new sensor, making new measurements and paving the way for new applications. It requires a detailed analysis of the data so as to validate both the approach and the quality of the retrievals, and allow for monitoring and the evolution of the sensor. To achieve such goals it is very important to link efficiently ground

  8. Wii, Kinect, and Move. Heart Rate, Oxygen Consumption, Energy Expenditure, and Ventilation due to Different Physically Active Video Game Systems in College Students

    PubMed Central

    SCHEER, KRISTA S.; SIEBRANT, SARAH M.; BROWN, GREGORY A.; SHAW, BRANDON S.; SHAW, INA

    2014-01-01

    Nintendo Wii, Sony Playstation Move, and Microsoft XBOX Kinect are home video gaming systems that involve player movement to control on-screen game play. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that playing Wii is moderate physical activity at best, but Move and Kinect have not been as thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare heart rate, oxygen consumption, and ventilation while playing the games Wii Boxing, Kinect Boxing, and Move Gladiatorial Combat. Heart rate, oxygen consumption, and ventilation were measured at rest and during a graded exercise test in 10 males and 9 females (19.8 ± 0.33 y, 175.4 ± 2.0 cm, 80.2 ± 7.7 kg,). On another day, in a randomized order, the participants played Wii Boxing, Kinect Boxing, and Move Gladiatorial Combat while heart rate, ventilation, and oxygen consumption were measured. There were no differences in heart rate (116.0 ± 18.3 vs. 119.3 ± 17.6 vs. 120.1 ± 17.6 beats/min), oxygen consumption (9.2 ± 3.0 vs. 10.6 ± 2.4 vs. 9.6 ± 2.4 ml/kg/min), or minute ventilation (18.9 ± 5.7 vs. 20.8 ± 8.0 vs. 19.7 ± 6.4 L/min) when playing Wii boxing, Kinect boxing, or Move Gladiatorial Combat (respectively). Playing Nintendo Wii Boxing, XBOX Kinect Boxing, and Sony PlayStation Move Gladiatorial Combat all increase heart rate, oxygen consumption, and ventilation above resting levels but there were no significant differences between gaming systems. Overall, playing a “physically active” home video game system does not meet the minimal threshold for moderate intensity physical activity, regardless of gaming system. PMID:27182399

  9. Effects of water-misting sprays with forced ventilation on post mortem glycolysis, AMP-activated protein kinase and meat quality of broilers after transport during summer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nannan; Xing, Tong; Han, Minyi; Deng, Shaolin; Xu, Xinglian

    2016-05-01

    Effects of water-misting sprays with forced ventilation on post mortem glycolysis, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and meat quality of broilers after transport during summer were investigated in the present paper. A total of 105 mixed-sex Arbor Acres broilers were divided into three treatment groups: (i) 45 min transport without rest (T); (ii) 45 min transport with 1 h rest (TR); and (iii) 45 min transport with 15 min water-misting sprays with forced ventilation and 45 min rest (TWFR). Each treatment consisted of five replicates with seven birds each. The results indicated that the water-misting sprays with forced ventilation could mitigate the stress caused by transport under high temperature conditions during summer, which reduced the energy depletion in post mortem Pectoralis major (PM) muscle. This resulted in a higher energy status compared to the T group, which would decrease the expression of phosphorylation of AMPK (p-AMPK). Furthermore, decreased the expression of p-AMPK then slowed down the rate of glycolysis in post mortem PM muscle during the early post mortem period, which in turn lessened the negative effects caused by transport on meat quality. In conclusion, water-misting sprays with forced ventilation may be a better method to control the incidence of the pale, soft and exudative meat in broilers. PMID:26712455

  10. Soil Properties, Nutrient Dynamics, and Soil Enzyme Activities Associated with Garlic Stalk Decomposition under Various Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xu; Cheng, Zhihui; Meng, Huanwen

    2012-01-01

    The garlic stalk is a byproduct of garlic production and normally abandoned or burned, both of which cause environmental pollution. It is therefore appropriate to determine the conditions of efficient decomposition, and equally appropriate to determine the impact of this decomposition on soil properties. In this study, the soil properties, enzyme activities and nutrient dynamics associated with the decomposition of garlic stalk at different temperatures, concentrations and durations were investigated. Stalk decomposition significantly increased the values of soil pH and electrical conductivity. In addition, total nitrogen and organic carbon concentration were significantly increased by decomposing stalks at 40°C, with a 5∶100 ratio and for 10 or 60 days. The highest activities of sucrase, urease and alkaline phosphatase in soil were detected when stalk decomposition was performed at the lowest temperature (10°C), highest concentration (5∶100), and shortest duration (10 or 20 days). The evidence presented here suggests that garlic stalk decomposition improves the quality of soil by altering the value of soil pH and electrical conductivity and by changing nutrient dynamics and soil enzyme activity, compared to the soil decomposition without garlic stalks. PMID:23226411

  11. Dynamics of soil organic carbon and microbial activity in treated wastewater irrigated agricultural soils along soil profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jüschke, Elisabeth; Marschner, Bernd; Chen, Yona; Tarchitzky, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    Treated wastewater (TWW) is an important source for irrigation water in arid and semiarid regions and already serves as an important water source in Jordan, the Palestinian Territories and Israel. Reclaimed water still contains organic matter (OM) and various compounds that may effect microbial activity and soil quality (Feigin et al. 1991). Natural soil organic carbon (SOC) may be altered by interactions between these compounds and the soil microorganisms. This study evaluates the effects of TWW irrigation on the quality, dynamics and microbial transformations of natural SOC. Priming effects (PE) and SOC mineralization were determined to estimate the influence of TWW irrigation on SOC along soil profiles of agricultural soils in Israel and the Westbank. The used soil material derived from three different sampling sites allocated in Israel and The Palestinian Authority. Soil samples were taken always from TWW irrigated sites and control fields from 6 different depths (0-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-50, 50-70, 70-100 cm). Soil carbon content and microbiological parameters (microbial biomass, microbial activities and enzyme activities) were investigated. In several sites, subsoils (50-160 cm) from TWW irrigated plots were depleted in soil organic matter with the largest differences occurring in sites with the longest TWW irrigation history. Laboratory incubation experiments with additions of 14C-labelled compounds to the soils showed that microbial activity in freshwater irrigated soils was much more stimulated by sugars or amino acids than in TWW irrigated soils. The lack of such "priming effects" (Hamer & Marschner 2005) in the TWW irrigated soils indicates that here the microorganisms are already operating at their optimal metabolic activity due to the continuous substrate inputs with soluble organic compounds from the TWW. The fact that PE are triggered continuously due to TWW irrigation may result in a decrease of SOC over long term irrigation. Already now this could be

  12. Expiratory activation of abdominal muscle is associated with improved respiratory stability and an increase in minute ventilation in REM epochs of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Colin G; Pagliardini, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Breathing is more vulnerable to apneas and irregular breathing patterns during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in both humans and rodents. We previously reported that robust and recurrent recruitment of expiratory abdominal (ABD) muscle activity is present in rats during REM epochs despite ongoing REM-induced muscle atonia in skeletal musculature. To develop a further understanding of the characteristics of ABD recruitment during REM epochs and their relationship with breathing patterns and irregularities, we sought to compare REM epochs that displayed ABD muscle recruitment with those that did not, within the same rats. Specifically, we investigated respiratory characteristics that preceded and followed recruitment. We hypothesized that ABD muscle recruitment would be likely to occur following respiratory irregularities and would subsequently contribute to respiratory stability and the maintenance of good ventilation following recruitment. Our data demonstrate that epochs of REM sleep containing ABD recruitments (REM(ABD+)) were characterized by increased respiratory rate variability and increased presence of spontaneous brief central apneas. Within these epochs, respiratory events that displayed ABD muscle activation were preceded by periods of increased respiratory rate variability. Onset of ABD muscle activity increased tidal volume, amplitude of diaphragmatic contractions, and minute ventilation compared with the periods preceding ABD muscle activation. These results show that expiratory muscle activity is more likely recruited when respiration is irregular and its recruitment is subsequently associated with an increase in minute ventilation and a more regular respiratory rhythm. PMID:26338455

  13. ACTIVE SOIL DEPRESSURIZATION (ASD) DEMONSTRATION IN A LARGE BUILDING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of the feasibility of implementing radon resistant construction techniques -- especially active soil depressurization (ASD) -- in new large buildings in Florida. Indoor radon concentrations and radon entry were monitored in a finished bui...

  14. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System is an integrated technology used for attacking all phases of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in soil and groundwater. The SVVS technology promotes insitu remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with or-ga...

  15. Effect of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation and soil microbial activities in tropical rice soil.

    PubMed

    Adak, Totan; Munda, Sushmita; Kumar, Upendra; Berliner, J; Pokhare, Somnath S; Jambhulkar, N N; Jena, M

    2016-02-01

    Impact of elevated CO2 on chlorpyriphos degradation, microbial biomass carbon, and enzymatic activities in rice soil was investigated. Rice (variety Naveen, Indica type) was grown under four conditions, namely, chambered control, elevated CO2 (550 ppm), elevated CO2 (700 ppm) in open-top chambers and open field. Chlorpyriphos was sprayed at 500 g a.i. ha(-1) at maximum tillering stage. Chlorpyriphos degraded rapidly from rice soils, and 88.4% of initially applied chlorpyriphos was lost from the rice soil maintained under elevated CO2 (700 ppm) by day 5 of spray, whereas the loss was 80.7% from open field rice soil. Half-life values of chlorpyriphos under different conditions ranged from 2.4 to 1.7 days with minimum half-life recorded with two elevated CO2 treatments. Increased CO2 concentration led to increase in temperature (1.2 to 1.8 °C) that played a critical role in chlorpyriphos persistence. Microbial biomass carbon and soil enzymatic activities specifically, dehydrogenase, fluorescien diacetate hydrolase, urease, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phosphatase responded positively to elevated CO2 concentrations. Generally, the enzyme activities were highly correlated with each other. Irrespective of the level of CO2, short-term negative influence of chlorpyriphos was observed on soil enzymes till day 7 of spray. Knowledge obtained from this study highlights that the elevated CO2 may negatively influence persistence of pesticide but will have positive effects on soil enzyme activities. PMID:26790432

  16. Soil microbial activities beneath Stipa tenacissima L. and in surrounding bare soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosadová, I.; Ruiz Sinoga, J. D.; Záhora, J.; Fišerová, H.

    2010-05-01

    Open steppes dominated by Stipa tenacissima L. constitute one of the most representative ecosystems of the semi-arid zones of Eastern Mediterranean Basin (Iberian Peninsula, North of Africa). These steppes show a higher degree of variability in composition and structure. Ecosystem functioning is strongly related to the spatial pattern of grass tussocks. Soils beneath S. tenacissima grass show higher fertility and improved microclimatic conditions, favouring the formation of "resource islands" (Maestre et al., 2007). On the other hand in "resource islands" and in surrounding bare soil exists the belowground zone of influence. The competition for water and resources between plants and microorganisms is strong and mediated trough an enormous variety of exudates and resource depletion intended to regulate soil microbial communities in the rhizosphere, control herbivory, encourage beneficial symbioses, and change chemical and physical properties in soil (Pugnaire et Armas, 2008). Secondary compounds and allelopathy restrict other species growth and contribute to patchy plant distribution. Active root segregation affects not only neighbourś growth but also soil microbial activities. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of Stipa tenacissima on the key soil microbial activities under controlled incubation conditions (basal and potential respiration; net nitrogen mineralization). The experimental plots were located in the province Almería in Sierra de los Filabres Mountains near the village Gérgal (southeast Spain) in the small catchment which is situated between 1090 - 1165 m a.s.l. The area with extent of 82 000 m2 is affected by soil degradation. The climate is semiarid Mediterranean. The mean annual rainfall is of about 240 mm mostly concentrated in autumn and spring. The mean annual temperature is 13.9° C. The studied soil has a loam to sandy clay texture and is classified as Lithosol (FAO-ISRIC and ISSS, 1998). The vegetation of these areas is an

  17. Spatial Variations of Soil Microbial Activities in Saline Groundwater-Irrigated Soil Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Juan; Feng, Qi; Li, Chang-Sheng; Song, You-Xi; Liu, Wei; Si, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Bao-Gui

    2016-05-01

    Spatial variations of soil microbial activities and its relationship with environmental factors are very important for estimating regional soil ecosystem function. Based on field samplings in a typical saline groundwater-irrigated region, spatial variations of soil microbial metabolic activities were investigated. Combined with groundwater quality analysis, the relationship between microbial activities and water salinity was also studied. The results demonstrated that moderate spatial heterogeneity of soil microbial activities presented under the total dissolved solids (TDS) of groundwater ranging from 0.23 to 12.24 g L-1. Groundwater salinity and microbial activities had almost opposite distribution characteristics: slight saline water was mainly distributed in west Baqu and south Quanshan, while severe saline and briny water were dominant in east Baqu and west Huqu; however, total AWCD was higher in the east-center and southwest of Baqu and east Huqu, while it was lower in east Baqu and northwest Huqu. The results of correlation analyses demonstrated that high-salinity groundwater irrigation had significantly adverse effects on soil microbial activities. Major ions Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl_, and SO4 2- in groundwater decisively influenced the results. Three carbon sources, carbohydrates, amines, and phenols, which had minor utilization rates in all irrigation districts, were extremely significantly affected by high-salinity groundwater irrigation. The results presented here offer an approach for diagnosing regional soil ecosystem function changes under saline water irrigation.

  18. Spatial Variations of Soil Microbial Activities in Saline Groundwater-Irrigated Soil Ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Juan; Feng, Qi; Li, Chang-Sheng; Song, You-Xi; Liu, Wei; Si, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Bao-Gui

    2016-05-01

    Spatial variations of soil microbial activities and its relationship with environmental factors are very important for estimating regional soil ecosystem function. Based on field samplings in a typical saline groundwater-irrigated region, spatial variations of soil microbial metabolic activities were investigated. Combined with groundwater quality analysis, the relationship between microbial activities and water salinity was also studied. The results demonstrated that moderate spatial heterogeneity of soil microbial activities presented under the total dissolved solids (TDS) of groundwater ranging from 0.23 to 12.24 g L(-1). Groundwater salinity and microbial activities had almost opposite distribution characteristics: slight saline water was mainly distributed in west Baqu and south Quanshan, while severe saline and briny water were dominant in east Baqu and west Huqu; however, total AWCD was higher in the east-center and southwest of Baqu and east Huqu, while it was lower in east Baqu and northwest Huqu. The results of correlation analyses demonstrated that high-salinity groundwater irrigation had significantly adverse effects on soil microbial activities. Major ions Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cl(_), and SO4 (2-) in groundwater decisively influenced the results. Three carbon sources, carbohydrates, amines, and phenols, which had minor utilization rates in all irrigation districts, were extremely significantly affected by high-salinity groundwater irrigation. The results presented here offer an approach for diagnosing regional soil ecosystem function changes under saline water irrigation. PMID:26872886

  19. Fate and activity of microorganisms introduced into soil.

    PubMed Central

    van Veen, J A; van Overbeek, L S; van Elsas, J D

    1997-01-01

    Introduced microorganisms are potentially powerful agents for manipulation of processes and/or components in soil. Fields of application include enhancement of crop growth, protection of crops against plant-pathogenic organisms, stimulation of biodegradation of xenobiotic compounds (bioaugmentation), and improvement of soil structure. Inoculation of soils has already been applied for decades, but it has often yielded inconsistent or disappointing results. This is caused mainly by a commonly observed rapid decline in inoculant population activity following introduction into soil, i.e., a decline of the numbers of inoculant cells and/or a decline of the (average) activity per cell. In this review, we discuss the available information on the effects of key factors that determine the fate and activity of microorganisms introduced into soil, with emphasis on bacteria. The factors addressed include the physiological status of the inoculant cells, the biotic and abiotic interactions in soil, soil properties, and substrate availability. Finally, we address the possibilities available to effectively manipulate the fate and activity of introduced microorganisms in relation to the main areas of their application. PMID:9184007

  20. Active and total prokaryotic communities in dryland soils.

    PubMed

    Angel, Roey; Pasternak, Zohar; Soares, M Ines M; Conrad, Ralf; Gillor, Osnat

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between total and metabolically active soil microbial communities can change drastically with environment. In dry lands, water availability is a key factor limiting cells' activity. We surveyed the diversity of total and active Archaea and Bacteria in soils ranging from arid desert to Mediterranean forests. Thirty composited soil samples were retrieved from five sites along a precipitation gradient, collected from patches located between and under the dominant perennial plant at each site. Molecular fingerprinting was used to site-sort the communities according of their 16S rRNA genes (total community) and their rRNA (active community) amplified by PCR or RT-PCR from directly extracted soil nucleic acids. The differences between soil samples were much higher in total rather than active microbial communities: differences in DNA fingerprints between sites were 1.2 and 2.5 times higher than RNA differences (for Archaea and Bacteria, respectively). Patch-type discrepancies between DNA fingerprints were on average 2.7-19.7 times greater than RNA differences. Moreover, RNA-based community patterns were highly correlated with soil moisture but did not necessarily follow spatial distribution pattern. Our results suggest that in water-limited environments, the spatial patterns obtained by the analysis of active communities are not as robust as those drawn from total communities. PMID:23730745

  1. [Effects of different fertilizer application on soil active organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Gui-Long; Ji, Yan-Yan; Li, Gang; Chang, Hong; Yang, Dian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The variation characteristics of the content and components of soil active organic carbon under different fertilizer application were investigated in samples of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil from a field experiment growing winter wheat and summer maize in rotation in the North China Plain. The results showed that RF (recommended fertilization), CF (conventional fertilization) and NPK (mineral fertilizer alone) significantly increased the content of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon by 24.92-38.63 mg x kg(-1) and 0.94-0.58 mg x kg(-1) respectively compared to CK (unfertilized control). The soil dissolved organic carbon content under OM (organic manure) increased greater than those under NPK and single fertilization, soil easily oxidized organic carbon content under OM and NPK increased greater than that under single chemical fertilization. OM and NPK showed no significant role in promoting the soil microbial biomass carbon, but combined application of OM and NPK significantly increased the soil microbial biomass carbon content by 36.06% and 20.69%, respectively. Soil easily oxidized organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon accounted for 8.41% - 14.83%, 0.47% - 0.70% and 0.89% - 1.20% of the total organic carbon (TOC), respectively. According to the results, the fertilizer application significantly increased the proportion of soil dissolved organic carbon and easily oxidized organic carbon, but there was no significant difference in the increasing extent of dissolved organic carbon. The RF and CF increased the proportion of soil easily oxidized organic carbon greater than OM or NPK, and significantly increased the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. OM or RF had no significant effect on the proportion of microbial biomass carbon. Therefore, in the field experiment, appropriate application of organic manure and chemical fertilizers played an important role for the increase of soil active organic carbon

  2. ASSESSMENT OF GENOTOXIC ACTIVITY OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBON-BIOREMEDIATED SOIL

    SciTech Connect

    BRIGMON, ROBIN

    2004-10-20

    The relationship between toxicity and soil contamination must be understood to develop reliable indicators of environmental restoration for bioremediation. Two bacterial rapid bioassays: SOS chromotest and umu-test with and without metabolic activation (S-9 mixture) were used to evaluate genotoxicity of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil following bioremediation treatment. The soil was taken from an engineered biopile at the Czor Polish oil refinery. The bioremediation process in the biopile lasted 4 years, and the toxicity measurements were done after this treatment. Carcinogens detected in the soil, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were reduced to low concentrations (2 mg/kg dry wt) by the bioremediation process. Genotoxicity was not observed for soils tested with and without metabolic activation by a liver homogenate (S-9 mixture). However, umu-test was more sensitive than SOS-chromotest in the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbon-bioremediated soil. Analytical results of soil used in the bioassays confirmed that the bioremediation process reduced 81 percent of the petroleum hydrocarbons including PAHs. We conclude that the combined test systems employed in this study are useful tools for the genotoxic examination of remediated petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated soil.

  3. Ventilator-driven xenon ventilation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcoat, R.T.; Thomas, F.D.; Gerson, J.I.

    1984-07-01

    A modification of a common commercial Xe-133 ventilation device is described for mechanically assisted ventilation imaging. The patient's standard ventilator serves as the power source controlling the ventilatory rate and volume during the xenon study, but the gases in the two systems are not intermixed. This avoids contamination of the ventilator with radioactive xenon. Supplemental oxygen and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) are provided if needed. The system can be converted quickly for conventional studies with spontaneous respiration.

  4. Breakpoints in ventilation, cerebral and muscle oxygenation, and muscle activity during an incremental cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Racinais, Sebastien; Buchheit, Martin; Girard, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the breakpoints of cerebral and muscle oxygenation and muscle electrical activity during a ramp exercise in reference to the first and second ventilatory thresholds. Twenty-five cyclists completed a maximal ramp test on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 25 W/min. Expired gazes (breath-by-breath), prefrontal cortex and vastus lateralis (VL) oxygenation [Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)] together with electromyographic (EMG) Root Mean Square (RMS) activity for the VL, rectus femoris (RF), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles were continuously assessed. There was a non-linear increase in both cerebral deoxyhemoglobin (at 56 ± 13% of the exercise) and oxyhemoglobin (56 ± 8% of exercise) concomitantly to the first ventilatory threshold (57 ± 6% of exercise, p > 0.86, Cohen's d < 0.1). Cerebral deoxyhemoglobin further increased (87 ± 10% of exercise) while oxyhemoglobin reached a plateau/decreased (86 ± 8% of exercise) after the second ventilatory threshold (81 ± 6% of exercise, p < 0.05, d > 0.8). We identified one threshold only for muscle parameters with a non-linear decrease in muscle oxyhemoglobin (78 ± 9% of exercise), attenuation in muscle deoxyhemoglobin (80 ± 8% of exercise), and increase in EMG activity of VL (89 ± 5% of exercise), RF (82 ± 14% of exercise), and BF (85 ± 9% of exercise). The thresholds in BF and VL EMG activity occurred after the second ventilatory threshold (p < 0.05, d > 0.6). Our results suggest that the metabolic and ventilatory events characterizing this latter cardiopulmonary threshold may affect both cerebral and muscle oxygenation levels, and in turn, muscle recruitment responses. PMID:24782786

  5. Dehydrogenase activity of forest soils depends on the assay used

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszek, Kazimierz; Długa, Joanna; Socha, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrogenases are exclusively intracellular enzymes, which play an important role in the initial stages of oxidation of soil organic matter. One of the most frequently used methods to estimate dehydrogenase activity in soil is based on the use of triphenyltetrazolium chloride as an artificial electron acceptor. The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of dehydrogenases of forest soils with varied physicochemical properties using different triphenyltetrazolium chloride assays. The determination was carried out using the original procedure by Casida et al., a modification of the procedure which involves the use of Ca(OH)2 instead of CaCO3, the Thalmann method, and the assay by Casida et al. without addition of buffer or any salt. Soil dehydrogenase activity depended on the assay used. Dehydrogenase determined by the Casida et al. method without addition of buffer or any salt correlated with the pH values of soils. The autoclaved strongly acidic samples of control soils showed high concentrations of triphenylformazan, probably due to chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride. There is, therefore, a need for a sterilization method other than autoclaving, ie a process that results in significant changes in soil properties, thus helping to increase the chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride.

  6. Soil microbial activity and functional diversity changed by compaction, poultry litter and cropping in a claypan soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in soil physical characteristics induced by soil compaction may alter soil microhabitats and, therefore, play a significant role in governing soil microorganisms and their activities. Laboratory incubation and field experiments were conducted in 2001 and 2002 to investigate the effects of so...

  7. Bacterial communities and enzyme activities of PAHs polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Andreoni, V; Cavalca, L; Rao, M A; Nocerino, G; Bernasconi, S; Dell'Amico, E; Colombo, M; Gianfreda, L

    2004-11-01

    Three soils (i.e. a Belgian soil, B-BT, a German soil, G, and an Italian agricultural soil, I-BT) with different properties and hydrocarbon-pollution history with regard to their potential to degrade phenanthrene were investigated. A chemical and microbiological evaluation of soils was done using measurements of routine chemical properties, bacterial counts and several enzyme activities. The three soils showed different levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), being their contamination strictly associated to their pollution history. High values of enzyme activities and culturable heterotrophic bacteria were detected in the soil with no or negligible presence of organic pollutants. Genetic diversity of soil samples and enrichment cultures was measured as bands on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of amplified 16S rDNA sequences from the soil and enrichment community DNAs. When analysed by Shannon index (H'), the highest genetic biodiversity (H'=2.87) was found in the Belgian soil B-BT with a medium-term exposition to PAHs and the poorest biodiversity (H'=0.85) in the German soil with a long-term exposition to alkanes and PAHs and where absence, or lower levels of enzyme activities were measured. For the Italian agricultural soil I-BT, containing negligible amounts of organic pollutants but the highest Cu content, a Shannon index=2.13 was found. The enrichment of four mixed cultures capable of degrading solid phenanthrene in batch liquid systems was also studied. Phenanthrene degradation rates in batch systems were culture-dependent, and simple (one-slope) and complex (two-slope) kinetic behaviours were observed. The presence of common bands of microbial species in the cultures and in the native soil DNA indicated that those strains could be potential in situ phenanthrene degraders. Consistent with this assumption are the decrease of PAH and phenanthrene contents of Belgian soil B-BT and the isolation of phenanthrene-degrading bacteria. From

  8. Diversity and Activity of Methanotrophic Bacteria in Different Upland Soils

    PubMed Central

    Knief, Claudia; Lipski, André; Dunfield, Peter F.

    2003-01-01

    Samples from diverse upland soils that oxidize atmospheric methane were characterized with regard to methane oxidation activity and the community composition of methanotrophic bacteria (MB). MB were identified on the basis of the detection and comparative sequence analysis of the pmoA gene, which encodes a subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase. MB commonly detected in soils were closely related to Methylocaldum spp., Methylosinus spp., Methylocystis spp., or the “forest sequence cluster” (USC α), which has previously been detected in upland soils and is related to pmoA sequences of type II MB (Alphaproteobacteria). As well, a novel group of sequences distantly related (<75% derived amino acid identity) to those of known type I MB (Gammaproteobacteria) was often detected. This novel “upland soil cluster γ” (USC γ) was significantly more likely to be detected in soils with pH values of greater than 6.0 than in more acidic soils. To identify active MB, four selected soils were incubated with 13CH4 at low mixing ratios (<50 ppm of volume), and extracted methylated phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) were analyzed by gas chromatography-online combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Incorporation of 13C into PLFAs characteristic for methanotrophic Gammaproteobacteria was observed in all soils in which USC γ sequences were detected, suggesting that the bacteria possessing these sequences were active methanotrophs. A pattern of labeled PLFAs typical for methanotrophic Alphaproteobacteria was obtained for a sample in which only USC α sequences were detected. The data indicate that different MB are present and active in different soils that oxidize atmospheric methane. PMID:14602631

  9. Activation Energy of Extracellular Enzymes in Soils from Different Biomes

    PubMed Central

    Steinweg, J. Megan; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Frerichs, Joshua; Mayes, Melanie A.

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme dynamics are being incorporated into soil carbon cycling models and accurate representation of enzyme kinetics is an important step in predicting belowground nutrient dynamics. A scarce number of studies have measured activation energy (Ea) in soils and fewer studies have measured Ea in arctic and tropical soils, or in subsurface soils. We determined the Ea for four typical lignocellulose degrading enzymes in the A and B horizons of seven soils covering six different soil orders. We also elucidated which soil properties predicted any measurable differences in Ea. β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, phenol oxidase and peroxidase activities were measured at five temperatures, 4, 21, 30, 40, and 60°C. Ea was calculated using the Arrhenius equation. β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase Ea values for both A and B horizons in this study were similar to previously reported values, however we could not make a direct comparison for B horizon soils because of the lack of data. There was no consistent relationship between hydrolase enzyme Ea and the environmental variables we measured. Phenol oxidase was the only enzyme that had a consistent positive relationship between Ea and pH in both horizons. The Ea in the arctic and subarctic zones for peroxidase was lower than the hydrolases and phenol oxidase values, indicating peroxidase may be a rate limited enzyme in environments under warming conditions. By including these six soil types we have increased the number of soil oxidative enzyme Ea values reported in the literature by 50%. This study is a step towards better quantifying enzyme kinetics in different climate zones. PMID:23536898

  10. Metal Toxicity Affects Fungal and Bacterial Activities in Soil Differently

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksha, R. M. C. P.; Tobor-Kapłon, M. A; Bååth, E.

    2004-01-01

    Although the toxic effect of heavy metals on soil microorganism activity is well known, little is known about the effects on different organism groups. The influence of heavy metal addition on total, bacterial, and fungal activities was therefore studied for up to 60 days in a laboratory experiment using forest soil contaminated with different concentrations of Zn or Cu. The effects of the metals differed between the different activity measurements. During the first week after metal addition, the total activity (respiration rate) decreased by 30% at the highest level of contamination and then remained stable during the 60 days of incubation. The bacterial activity (thymidine incorporation rate) decreased during the first days with the level of metal contamination, resulting in a 90% decrease at the highest level of contamination. Bacterial activity then slowly recovered to values similar to those of the control soil. The recovery was faster when soil pH, which had decreased due to metal addition, was restored to control values by liming. Fungal activity (acetate-in-ergosterol incorporation rate) initially increased with the level of metal contamination, being up to 3 and 7 times higher than that in the control samples during the first week at the highest levels of Zn and Cu addition, respectively. The positive effect of metal addition on fungal activity then decreased, but fungal activity was still higher in contaminated than in control soil after 35 days. This is the first direct evidence that fungal and bacterial activities in soil are differently affected by heavy metals. The different responses of bacteria and fungi to heavy metals were reflected in an increase in the relative fungal/bacterial ratio (estimated using phospholipid fatty acid analysis) with increased metal load. PMID:15128558

  11. Metal toxicity affects fungal and bacterial activities in soil differently.

    PubMed

    Rajapaksha, R M C P; Tobor-Kapłon, M A; Bååth, E

    2004-05-01

    Although the toxic effect of heavy metals on soil microorganism activity is well known, little is known about the effects on different organism groups. The influence of heavy metal addition on total, bacterial, and fungal activities was therefore studied for up to 60 days in a laboratory experiment using forest soil contaminated with different concentrations of Zn or Cu. The effects of the metals differed between the different activity measurements. During the first week after metal addition, the total activity (respiration rate) decreased by 30% at the highest level of contamination and then remained stable during the 60 days of incubation. The bacterial activity (thymidine incorporation rate) decreased during the first days with the level of metal contamination, resulting in a 90% decrease at the highest level of contamination. Bacterial activity then slowly recovered to values similar to those of the control soil. The recovery was faster when soil pH, which had decreased due to metal addition, was restored to control values by liming. Fungal activity (acetate-in-ergosterol incorporation rate) initially increased with the level of metal contamination, being up to 3 and 7 times higher than that in the control samples during the first week at the highest levels of Zn and Cu addition, respectively. The positive effect of metal addition on fungal activity then decreased, but fungal activity was still higher in contaminated than in control soil after 35 days. This is the first direct evidence that fungal and bacterial activities in soil are differently affected by heavy metals. The different responses of bacteria and fungi to heavy metals were reflected in an increase in the relative fungal/bacterial ratio (estimated using phospholipid fatty acid analysis) with increased metal load. PMID:15128558

  12. Active Layer Soil Carbon and Nutrient Mineralization, Barrow, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stan D. Wullschleger; Holly M. Vander Stel; Colleen Iversen; Victoria L. Sloan; Richard J. Norby; Mallory P. Ladd; Jason K. Keller; Ariane Jong; Joanne Childs; Deanne J. Brice

    2015-10-29

    This data set consists of bulk soil characteristics as well as carbon and nutrient mineralization rates of active layer soils manually collected from the field in August, 2012, frozen, and then thawed and incubated across a range of temperatures in the laboratory for 28 day periods in 2013-2015. The soils were collected from four replicate polygons in each of the four Areas (A, B, C, and D) of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Soil samples were coincident with the established Vegetation Plots that are located in center, edge, and trough microtopography in each polygon. Data included are 1) bulk soil characteristics including carbon, nitrogen, gravimetric water content, bulk density, and pH in 5-cm depth increments and also by soil horizon, 2) carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus mineralization rates for soil horizons incubated aerobically (and in one case both aerobically and anaerobically) for 28 days at temperatures that included 2, 4, 8, and 12 degrees C. Additional soil and incubation data are forthcoming. They will be available when published as part of another paper that includes additional replicate analyses.

  13. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Peggy; Entekhabi, Dara; Njoku, Eni; Kellogg, Kent

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council?s Decadal Survey [1]. Its mission design consists of L-band radiometer and radar instruments sharing a rotating 6-m mesh reflector antenna to provide high-resolution and high-accuracy global maps of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every 2-3 days. The combined active/passive microwave soil moisture product will have a spatial resolution of 10 km and a mean latency of 24 hours. In addition, the SMAP surface observations will be combined with advanced modeling and data assimilation to provide deeper root zone soil moisture and net ecosystem exchange of carbon. SMAP is expected to launch in the late 2014 - early 2015 time frame.

  14. ASHRAE and residential ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.

    2003-10-01

    logical place to provide leadership. This leadership has been demonstrated most recently by the publication of the first nationally recognized standard on ventilation in homes, ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2003, which builds on work that has been part of ASHRAE for many years and will presumably continue. Homeowners and occupants, which includes virtually all of us, will benefit from the application of Standard 62.2 and use of the top ten list. This activity is exactly the kind of benefit to society that the founders of ASHRAE envisioned and is consistent with ASHRAE's mission and vision. ASHRAE members should be proud of their Society for taking leadership in residential ventilation.

  15. Rhizosphere activity and methane oxidation in a temperate forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Catherine S.; Subke, Jens-Arne; Voke, Naomi R.; Holden, Robert D.; Ineson, Phil; Arn Teh, Yit

    2010-05-01

    Methane (CH4) concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere have increased dramatically over recent decades. An abundance of studies indicate that the magnitude of natural methane efflux from wetlands is likely to increase due to climate change. However, the role of vegetation and soils in upland methane oxidation are less well understood. Well-aerated soils are known to be sites of methane oxidation, and amongst a range of abiotic environmental parameters, soil moisture has been identified as critical regulator of the methane oxidation rates. However, the role of microbial activity within the soil, particularly C turnover in the plant rhizosphere, has not been investigated as a means for regulating methanotrophy. We combined a continuous soil CO2 efflux system (Li-Cor Biosciences, LI-8100) with a Cavity-Ringdown-Spectroscopy Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyser (Los Gatos Research Inc.) to measure soil CH4 oxidation in a pine forest in NE England. The soil has a shallow organic layer overlaying a well-draining sandy gley soil. Fluxes were measured from three different collar treatments: (1) excluding both root and ectomycorrhizal (EM) hyphae by trenching using deep collars, (2) excluding roots but allowing access by EM hyphae, and (3) unmodified forest soil (i.e. including both roots and EM hyphae). All collars were protected from natural throughfall, and received weekly-averaged amounts of throughfall based on collections in the stand. Data from two months in early summer 2009 indicate that CH4 oxidation in collars with an intact rhizosphere is more than twice that of either of the exclusion treatments (averaging approx. 90 g ha-1 d-1 in that period). We observed higher fluxes when soils were dryer (i.e. with increasing time since watering), indicating a significant influence of moisture. Despite the confounding effects of soil moisture associated with root water uptake in the unmodified soil collars, we argue that rhizosphere activity is an overlooked component in

  16. Biofuel intercropping effects on soil carbon and microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Michael S; Leggett, Zakiya H; Sucre, Eric B; Bradford, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Biofuels will help meet rising demands for energy and, ideally, limit climate change associated with carbon losses from the biosphere to atmosphere. Biofuel management must therefore maximize energy production and maintain ecosystem carbon stocks. Increasingly, there is interest in intercropping biofuels with other crops, partly because biofuel production on arable land might reduce availability and increase the price of food. One intercropping approach involves growing biofuel grasses in forest plantations. Grasses differ from trees in both their organic inputs to soils and microbial associations. These differences are associated with losses of soil carbon when grasses become abundant in forests. We investigated how intercropping switchgrass (Panicum virgalum), a major candidate for cellulosic biomass production, in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) plantations affects soil carbon, nitrogen, and microbial dynamics. Our design involved four treatments: two pine management regimes where harvest residues (i.e., biomass) were left in place or removed, and two switchgrass regimes where the grass was grown with pine under the same two biomass scenarios (left or removed). Soil variables were measured in four 1-ha replicate plots in the first and second year following switchgrass planting. Under switchgrass intercropping, pools of mineralizable and particulate organic matter carbon were 42% and 33% lower, respectively. These declines translated into a 21% decrease in total soil carbon in the upper 15 cm of the soil profile, during early stand development. The switchgrass effect, however, was isolated to the interbed region where switchgrass is planted. In these regions, switchgrass-induced reductions in soil carbon pools with 29%, 43%, and 24% declines in mineralizable, particulate, and total soil carbon, respectively. Our results support the idea that grass inputs to forests can prime the activity of soil organic carbon degrading microbes, leading to net reductions in stocks

  17. Microbiological activity of soils populated by Lasius niger ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golichenkov, M. V.; Neimatov, A. L.; Kiryushin, A. V.

    2009-07-01

    Ants are the most widespread colonial insects assigned to the Hymenoptera order. They actively use soil as a habitat; being numerous, they create a specific microrelief. It is shown that ants affect microbiological processes of the carbon and nitrogen cycles. The carbon content in anthills remains stable throughout the growing season, and the respiration intensity is about three times higher as compared with that in the control soil. The highest methane production (0.08 nmol of CH4/g per day) in the anthill is observed at the beginning of the growing season and exceeds that in the control soil by four times. The most active nitrogen fixation (about 4 nmol of C2H4/g per h) in the anthill takes place in the early growing season, whereas, in the control soil, it is observed in the middle of the growing season. At the same time, the diazotrophic activity is higher in the control soil. The lowest denitrification in the anthill is observed at the beginning and end of the growing season. The dynamics of the denitrification in the anthill are opposite to the dynamics of the diazotrophic activity. We suppose that these regularities of the biological activity in the anthill are related to the ecology of the ants and the changes in their food preferences during the growing season.

  18. Acid-activated biochar increased sulfamethazine retention in soils.

    PubMed

    Vithanage, Meththika; Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Zhang, Ming; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Lee, Sang Soo; Ok, Yong Sik

    2015-02-01

    Sulfamethazine (SMZ) is an ionizable and highly mobile antibiotic which is frequently found in soil and water environments. We investigated the sorption of SMZ onto soils amended with biochars (BCs) at varying pH and contact time. Invasive plants were pyrolyzed at 700 °C and were further activated with 30 % sulfuric (SBBC) and oxalic (OBBC) acids. The sorption rate of SMZ onto SBBC and OBBC was pronouncedly pH dependent and was decreased significantly when the values of soil pH increased from 3 to 5. Modeled effective sorption coefficients (K D,eff) values indicated excellent sorption on SBBC-treated loamy sand and sandy loam soils for 229 and 183 L/kg, respectively. On the other hand, the low sorption values were determined for OBBC- and BBC700-treated loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Kinetic modeling demonstrated that the pseudo second order model was the best followed by intra-particle diffusion and the Elovich model, indicating that multiple processes govern SMZ sorption. These findings were also supported by sorption edge experiments based on BC characteristics. Chemisorption onto protonated and ligand containing functional groups of the BC surface, and diffusion in macro-, meso-, and micro-pores of the acid-activated BCs are the proposed mechanisms of SMZ retention in soils. Calculated and experimental q e (amount adsorbed per kg of the adsorbent at equilibrium) values were well fitted to the pseudo second order model, and the predicted maximum equilibrium concentration of SBBC for loamy sand soils was 182 mg/kg. Overall, SBBC represents a suitable soil amendment because of its high sorption rate of SMZ in soils. PMID:25172460

  19. Combined Passive Active Soil Moisture Observations During CLASIC

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An important issue in advancing higher spatial resolution and better accuracy in soil moisture remote sensing is the integration of active and passive observations. In an effort to address these questions an airborne passive/active L-band system (PALS) was flown as part of CLASIC in Oklahoma over th...

  20. VENTILATION NEEDS DURING CONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Gorrell

    1998-07-23

    The purpose of this analysis is to determine ventilation needs during construction and development of the subsurface repository and develop systems to satisfy those needs. For this analysis, construction is defined as pre-emplacement excavation and development is excavation that takes place simultaneously with emplacement. The three options presented in the ''Overall Development and Emplacement Ventilation Systems'' analysis (Reference 5.5) for development ventilation will be applied to construction ventilation in this analysis as well as adding new and updated ventilation factors to each option for both construction and development. The objective of this analysis is to develop a preferred ventilation system to support License Application Design. The scope of this analysis includes: (1) Description of ventilation conditions; (2) Ventilation factors (fire hazards, dust control, construction logistics, and monitoring and control systems); (3) Local ventilation alternatives; (4) Global ventilation options; and (5) Evaluation of options.

  1. Climate effect on soil enzyme activities and dissolved organic carbon in mountain calcareous soils: a soil-transplant experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puissant, Jérémy; Cécillon, Lauric; Mills, Robert T. E.; Gavazov, Konstantin; Robroek, Bjorn J. M.; Spiegelberger, Thomas; Buttler, Alexandre; Brun, Jean-Jacques

    2013-04-01

    Mountain soils store huge amounts of carbon as soil organic matter (SOM) which may be highly vulnerable to the strong climate changes that mountain areas currently experience worldwide. Climate modifications are expected to impact microbial activity which could change the rate of SOM decomposition/accumulation, thereby questioning the net C source/sink character of mountain soils. To simulate future climate change expected in the 21st century in the calcareous pre-Alps, 15 blocks (30 cm deep) of undisturbed soil were taken from a mountain pasture located at 1400 m a.s.l. (Marchairuz, Jura, Switzerland) and transplanted into lysimeters at the same site (control) and at two other sites located at 1000 m a.s.l. and 600 m a.s.l. (5 replicates per site). This transplantation experiment which started in 2009 simulates a climate warming with a temperature increase of 4° C and a decreased humidity of 40 % at the lowest site. In this study, we used soil extracellular enzyme activities (EEA) as functional indicators of SOM decomposition to evaluate the effect of climate change on microbial activity and SOM dynamics along the seasons. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was also measured to quantify the assimilable carbon for microorganism. In autumn 2012, a first sampling step out of four (winter, spring and summer 2013) has been realized. We extracted 15 cm deep soil cores from each transplant (x15) and measured (i) DOC and (ii) the activities of nine different enzymes. Enzymes were chosen to represent the degradation of the most common classes of biogeochemical compounds in SOM. β-glucosidase, β-D-cellubiosidase, β-Xylosidase, N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, leucine aminopeptidase, lipase, phenoloxidase respectively represented the degradation of sugar, cellulose, hemicellulose, chitin, protein, lipid and lignin. Moreover, the fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis was used to provide an estimate of global microbial activity and phosphatase was used to estimate phosphorus

  2. Land Data Assimilation Activities in Preparation of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slated for launch in 2013, the NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive mission represents a generational advance in our ability to globally observe time and space variations in surface soil moisture fields. The SMAP mission concept is based on the integrated use of L-band active radar and passive radiome...

  3. Land Data Assimilation Activities in Preparation of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP)Mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Slated for launch in 2013, the NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive mission represents a significant advance in our ability to globally observe time and space variations in surface soil moisture fields. The SMAP mission concept is based on the integrated use of L-band active radar and passive radiomet...

  4. Spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity (DH) in forest soils using geostatistics. We have studied variability soil dehydrogenase and their relationship with variability of some physic-chemical properties. Two study areas (A and B) were set up in southern Poland in the Zlotoryja Forest District. Study areas were covered by different types of vegetation (A- broadleaf forest with beech, ash and sycamore), B- coniferous forest with Norway spruce). The soils were classified as Dystric Cambisols (WRB 2006). The samples for laboratory testing were collected from 49 places on each areas. 15 cm of surface horizon of soil were taken (with previously removed litter). Dehydrogenase activity was marked with Lenhard's method according to the Casida procedure. Soil pH, nitrogen (N) and soil organic carbon (C) content (by LECO CNS 2000 carbon analyzer) was marked. C/N ratio was calculated. Particle size composition was determined using laser diffraction. Statistical analysis were performed using STATISTICA 10 software. Geostatistical analysis and mapping were done by application of GS 9+ (Gamma Design) and Surfer 11 (Golden Software). The activity of DH ranged between 5,02 and 71,20 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1 on the A area and between 0,94 and 16,47 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1. Differences in spatial variability of the analised features were noted. The variability of dehydrogenase activity on the A study area was described by an exponential model, whereas on the B study area the spatial correlation has not been noted. The relationship of dehydrogenase activity with the remaining parameters of soil was noted only in the case of A study area. The variability of organic carbon content on the A and B study areas were described by an exponential model. The variability of nitrogen content on both areas were described by an spherical model.

  5. Modeling in situ soil enzyme activity using continuous field soil moisture and temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinweg, J. M.; Wallenstein, M. D.

    2010-12-01

    Moisture and temperature are key drivers of soil organic matter decomposition, but there is little consensus on how climate change will affect the degradation of specific soil compounds under field conditions. Soil enzyme activities are a useful metric of soil community microbial function because they are they are the direct agents of decomposition for specific substrates in soil. However, current standard enzyme assays are conducted under optimized conditions in the laboratory and do not accurately reflect in situ enzyme activity, where diffusion and substrate availability may limit reaction rates. The Arrhenius equation, k= A*e(-Ea/RT), can be used to predict enzyme activity (k), collision frequency (A) or activation energy (Ea), but is difficult to parameterize when activities are measured under artificial conditions without diffusion or substrate limitation. We developed a modifed equation to estimate collision frequency and activation energy based on soil moisture to model in-situ enzyme activites. Our model was parameterized using data we collected from the Boston Area Climate Experiment (BACE) in Massachusetts; a multi-factor climate change experiment that provides an opportunity to assess how changes in moisture availability and temperature may impact enzyme activity. Soils were collected from three precipitation treatments and four temperature treatments arranged in a full-factorial design at the BACE site in June 2008, August 2008, January 2009 and June 2009. Enzyme assays were performed at four temperatures (4, 15, 25 and 35°C) to calculate temperature sensitivity and activation energy over the different treatments and seasons. Enzymes activities were measured for six common enzymes involved in carbon (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, xylosidase), phosphorus (phosphatase) and nitrogen cycling (N-acetyl glucosaminidase, and leucine amino peptidase). Potential enzyme activity was not significantly affected by precipitation, warming or the interaction of

  6. Effect of elevated CO2 on degradation of azoxystrobin and soil microbial activity in rice soil.

    PubMed

    Manna, Suman; Singh, Neera; Singh, V P

    2013-04-01

    An experiment was conducted in open-top chambers (OTC) to study the effect of elevated CO2 (580 ± 20 μmol mol(-1)) on azoxystrobin degradation and soil microbial activities. Results indicated that elevated CO2 did not have any significant effect on the persistence of azoxystrobin in rice-planted soil. The half-life values for the azoxystrobin in rice soils were 20.3 days in control (rice grown at ambient CO2 outdoors), 19.3 days in rice grown under ambient CO2 atmosphere in OTC, and 17.5 days in rice grown under elevated CO2 atmosphere in OTC. Azoxystrobin acid was recovered as the only metabolite of azoxystrobin, but it did not accumulate in the soil/water and was further metabolized. Elevated CO2 enhanced soil microbial biomass (MBC) and alkaline phosphatase activity of soil. Compared with rice grown at ambient CO2 (both outdoors and in OTC), the soil MBC at elevated CO2 increased by twofold. Elevated CO2 did not affect dehydrogenase, fluorescein diacetate, and acid phosphatase activity. Azoxystrobin application to soils, both ambient and elevated CO2, inhibited alkaline phosphates activity, while no effect was observed on other enzymes. Slight increase (1.8-2 °C) in temperature inside OTC did not affect microbial parameters, as similar activities were recorded in rice grown outdoors and in OTC at ambient CO2. Higher MBC in soil at elevated CO2 could be attributed to increased carbon availability in the rhizosphere via plant metabolism and root secretion; however, it did not significantly increase azoxystrobin degradation, suggesting that pesticide degradation was not the result of soil MBC alone. Study suggested that increased CO2 levels following global warming might not adversely affect azoxystrobin degradation. However, global warming is a continuous and cumulative process, therefore, long-term studies are necessary to get more realistic assessment of global warming on fate of pesticide. PMID:22773147

  7. Ice Nucleation Activity in the Widespread Soil Fungus Mortierella alpina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Hill, T. C. J.; Pummer, B. G.; Franc, G. D.; Pöschl, U.

    2014-08-01

    Biological residues in soil dust are a potentially strong source of atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). So far, however, the abundance, diversity, sources, seasonality, and role of biological - in particular, fungal - IN in soil dust have not been characterized. By analysis of the culturable fungi in topsoils, from a range of different land use and ecosystem types in south-east Wyoming, we found ice nucleation active (INA) fungi to be both widespread and abundant, particularly in soils with recent inputs of decomposable organic matter. Across all investigated soils, 8% of fungal isolates were INA. All INA isolates initiated freezing at -5 to -6 °C, and belonged to a single zygomycotic species, Mortierella alpina (Mortierellales, Mortierellomycotina). By contrast, the handful of fungal species so far reported as INA all belong within the Ascomycota or Basidiomycota phyla. M. alpina is known to be saprobic, widespread in soil and present in air and rain. Sequencing of the ITS region and the gene for γ-linolenic-elongase revealed four distinct clades, affiliated to different soil types. The IN produced by M. alpina seem to be proteinaceous, <300 kDa in size, and can be easily washed off the mycelium. Ice nucleating fungal mycelium will ramify topsoils and probably also release cell-free IN into it. If these IN survive decomposition or are adsorbed onto mineral surfaces, their contribution might accumulate over time, perhaps to be transported with soil dust and influencing its ice nucleating properties.

  8. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'–based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  9. Diversity and Activity of Lysobacter Species from Disease Suppressive Soils.

    PubMed

    Gómez Expósito, Ruth; Postma, Joeke; Raaijmakers, Jos M; De Bruijn, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The genus Lysobacter includes several species that produce a range of extracellular enzymes and other metabolites with activity against bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, and nematodes. Lysobacter species were found to be more abundant in soil suppressive against the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani, but their actual role in disease suppression is still unclear. Here, the antifungal and plant growth-promoting activities of 18 Lysobacter strains, including 11 strains from Rhizoctonia-suppressive soils, were studied both in vitro and in vivo. Based on 16S rRNA sequencing, the Lysobacter strains from the Rhizoctonia-suppressive soil belonged to the four species Lysobacter antibioticus, Lysobacter capsici, Lysobacter enzymogenes, and Lysobacter gummosus. Most strains showed strong in vitro activity against R. solani and several other pathogens, including Pythium ultimum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium oxysporum, and Xanthomonas campestris. When the Lysobacter strains were introduced into soil, however, no significant and consistent suppression of R. solani damping-off disease of sugar beet and cauliflower was observed. Subsequent bioassays further revealed that none of the Lysobacter strains was able to promote growth of sugar beet, cauliflower, onion, and Arabidopsis thaliana, either directly or via volatile compounds. The lack of in vivo activity is most likely attributed to poor colonization of the rhizosphere by the introduced Lysobacter strains. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that Lysobacter species have strong antagonistic activities against a range of pathogens, making them an important source for putative new enzymes and antimicrobial compounds. However, their potential role in R. solani disease suppressive soil could not be confirmed. In-depth omics'-based analyses will be needed to shed more light on the potential contribution of Lysobacter species to the collective activities of microbial consortia in disease suppressive soils. PMID:26635735

  10. Application of mesotrione at different doses in an amended soil: Dissipation and effect on the soil microbial biomass and activity.

    PubMed

    Pose-Juan, Eva; Sánchez-Martín, María Jesús; Herrero-Hernández, Eliseo; Rodríguez-Cruz, María Sonia

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate the dissipation of mesotrione applied at three doses (2, 10 and 50 mg kg(-1) dw) in an unamended agricultural soil, and this same soil amended with two organic residues (green compost (C) and sewage sludge (SS)). The effects of herbicide and organic residue on the abundance and activity of soil microbial communities were also assessed by determining soil microbial parameters such as biomass, dehydrogenase activity (DHA), and respiration. Lower dissipation rates were observed for a higher herbicide dose. The highest half-life (DT50) values were observed in the SS-amended soil for the three herbicide doses applied. Biomass values increased in the amended soils compared to the unamended one in all the cases studied, and increased over the incubation period in the SS-amended soil. DHA mean values significantly decreased in the SS-amended soil, and increased in the C-amended soil compared to the unamended ones, under all conditions. At time 0 days, respiration values were significantly higher in SS-amended soils (untreated and treated with mesotrione) than in the unamended and C-amended soils. The effect of mesotrione on soil biomass, DHA and respiration was different depending on incubation time and soil amendment and herbicide dose applied. The results support the need to consider the possible non-target effects of pesticides and organic amendments simultaneously applied on soil microbial communities to prevent negative impacts on soil quality. PMID:26188530

  11. Activities of N-mineralization enzymes associated with soil aggregates in three different tillage systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil enzymes released by microorganisms play a significant role in N mineralization process that determines N availability for plant growth. Soil aggregates of different sizes provide diverse microhabitats for microorganisms and therefore influence soil enzyme activities. We hypothesize that enzyme ...

  12. Soil hydrological and soil property changes resulting from termite activity on agricultural fields in Burkina Faso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettrop, I.; Cammeraat, L. H.; Verbeeten, E.

    2009-04-01

    Termites are important ecosystem-engineers in subtropical and tropical regions. The effect of termite activity affecting soil infiltration is well documented in the Sahelian region. Most studies find increased infiltration rates on surfaces that are affected by termite activity in comparison to crusted areas showing non-termite presence. Crusted agricultural fields in the Sanmatenga region in Burkina Faso with clear termite activity were compared to control fields without visual ground dwelling termite activity. Fine scale rainfall simulations were carried out on crusted termite affected and control sites. Furthermore soil moisture change, bulk density, soil organic matter as well as general soil characteristics were studied. The top soils in the study area were strongly crusted (structural crust) after the summer rainfall and harvest of millet. They have a loamy sand texture underlain by a shallow sandy loam Bt horizon. The initial soil moisture conditions were significantly higher on the termite plots when compared to control sites. It was found that the amount of runoff produced on the termite plots was significantly higher, and also the volumetric soil moisture content after the experiments was significantly lower if compared to the control plots. Bulk density showed no difference whereas soil organic matter was significantly higher under termite affected areas, in comparison to the control plots. Lab tests showed no significant difference in hydrophobic behavior of the topsoil and crust material. Micro and macro-structural properties of the topsoil did not differ significantly between the termite sites and the control sites. The texture of the top 5 cm of the soil was also found to be not significantly different. The infiltration results are contradictory to the general literature, which reports increased infiltration rates after prolonged termite activity although mostly under different initial conditions. The number of nest entrances was clearly higher in

  13. Biological activity of soil contaminated with cobalt, tin, and molybdenum.

    PubMed

    Zaborowska, Magdalena; Kucharski, Jan; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga

    2016-07-01

    In this age of intensive industrialization and urbanization, mankind's highest concern should be to analyze the effect of all metals accumulating in the environment, both those considered toxic and trace elements. With this aim in mind, a unique study was conducted to determine the potentially negative impact of Sn(2+), Co(2+), and Mo(5+) in optimal and increased doses on soil biological properties. These metals were applied in the form of aqueous solutions of Sn(2+) (SnCl2 (.)2H2O), Co(2+) (CoCl2 · 6H2O), and Mo(5+) (MoCl5), each in the doses of 0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400, and 800 mg kg(-1) soil DM. The activity of dehydrogenases, urease, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, arylsulfatase, and catalase and the counts of twelve microorganism groups were determined on the 25th and 50th day of experiment duration. Moreover, to present the studied problem comprehensively, changes in the biochemical activity and yield of spring barley were shown using soil and plant resistance indices-RS. The study shows that Sn(2+), Co(2+), and Mo(5+) disturb the state of soil homeostasis. Co(2+) and Mo(5+) proved the greatest soil biological activity inhibitors. The residence of these metals in soil, particularly Co(2+), also generated a drastic decrease in the value of spring barley resistance. Only Sn(2+) did not disrupt its yielding. The studied enzymes can be arranged as follows for their sensitivity to Sn(2+), Co(2+), Mo(5+): Deh > Ure > Aryl > Pal > Pac > Cat. Dehydrogenases and urease may be reliable soil health indicators. PMID:27277093

  14. Phenol oxidase activity in secondary transformed peat-moorsh soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styła, K.; Szajdak, L.

    2009-04-01

    The chemical composition of peat depends on the geobotanical conditions of its formation and on the depth of sampling. The evolution of hydrogenic peat soils is closely related to the genesis of peat and to the changes in water conditions. Due to a number of factors including oscillation of ground water level, different redox potential, changes of aerobic conditions, different plant communities, and root exudes, and products of the degradation of plant remains, peat-moorsh soils may undergo a process of secondary transformation conditions (Sokolowska et al. 2005; Szajdak et al. 2007). Phenol oxidase is one of the few enzymes able to degrade recalcitrant phenolic materials as lignin (Freeman et al. 2004). Phenol oxidase enzymes catalyze polyphenol oxidation in the presence of oxygen (O2) by removing phenolic hydrogen or hydrogenes to from radicals or quinines. These products undergo nucleophilic addition reactions in the presence or absence of free - NH2 group with the eventual production of humic acid-like polymers. The presence of phenol oxidase in soil environments is important in the formation of humic substances a desirable process because the carbon is stored in a stable form (Matocha et al. 2004). The investigations were carried out on the transect of peatland 4.5 km long, located in the Agroecological Landscape Park host D. Chlapowski in Turew (40 km South-West of Poznań, West Polish Lowland). The sites of investigation were located along Wyskoć ditch. The following material was taken from four chosen sites marked as Zbechy, Bridge, Shelterbelt and Hirudo in two layers: cartel (0-50cm) and cattle (50-100cm). The object of this study was to characterize the biochemical properties by the determination of the phenol oxidize activity in two layers of the four different peat-moors soils used as meadow. The phenol oxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring quinone formation at λmax=525 nm with catechol as substrate by method of Perucci

  15. The subzero microbiome: microbial activity in frozen and thawing soils.

    PubMed

    Nikrad, Mrinalini P; Kerkhof, Lee J; Häggblom, Max M

    2016-06-01

    Most of the Earth's biosphere is characterized by low temperatures (<5°C) and cold-adapted microorganisms are widespread. These psychrophiles have evolved a complex range of adaptations of all cellular constituents to counteract the potentially deleterious effects of low kinetic energy environments and the freezing of water. Microbial life continues into the subzero temperature range, and this activity contributes to carbon and nitrogen flux in and out of ecosystems, ultimately affecting global processes. Microbial responses to climate warming and, in particular, thawing of frozen soils are not yet well understood, although the threat of microbial contribution to positive feedback of carbon flux is substantial. To date, several studies have examined microbial community dynamics in frozen soils and permafrost due to changing environmental conditions, and some have undertaken the complicated task of characterizing microbial functional groups and how their activity changes with changing conditions, either in situ or by isolating and characterizing macromolecules. With increasing temperature and wetter conditions microbial activity of key microbes and subsequent efflux of greenhouse gases also increase. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of microbial activity in seasonally frozen soils and permafrost. With a more detailed understanding of the microbiological activities in these vulnerable soil ecosystems, we can begin to predict and model future expectations for carbon release and climate change. PMID:27106051

  16. RESPONSE OF SOIL MICROBIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES TO CD, PB, AND ZN SALT AMENDMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heavy metal pollution of soil has been recognized as a major factor impeding soil microbial processes. We studied responses of the soil biological activities to metal stress simulated by soil amendment with Zn, Pb and Cd chlorides. The amounts of heavy metal salts added to five metal polluted soils ...

  17. Effects of Soil Property Uncertainty on Projected Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, D. R.; Atchley, A. L.; Coon, E.; Painter, S. L.; Wilson, C. J.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Liljedahl, A.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainty in future climate is often assumed to contribute the largest uncertainty to active layer thickness (ALT) projections. However, the impact of soil property uncertainty on these projections may be significant. In this research, we evaluate the contribution of soil property uncertainty on ALT projections at the Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska. The effect of variations in porosity, thermal conductivity, saturation, and water retention properties of peat and mineral soil are evaluated. The micro-topography of ice wedge polygons present at the site is included in the analysis using three 1D column models to represent polygon center, rim and trough features. The Arctic Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) is used to model multiphase thermal and hydrological processes in the subsurface. We apply the Null-Space Monte Carlo (NSMC) algorithm to identify an ensemble of soil property combinations that produce simulated temperature profiles that are consistent with temperature measurements available from the site. ALT is simulated for the ensemble of soil property combinations for four climate scenarios. The uncertainty in ALT due to soil properties within and across climate scenarios is evaluated. This work was supported by LANL Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project LDRD201200068DR and by the The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project. NGEE-Arctic is supported by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the DOE Office of Science.

  18. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Nijoku, Eni G.; ONeill, Peggy E.; Kellogg, Kent H.; Crow, Wade T.; Edelstein, Wendy N.; Entin, Jared K.; Goodman, Shawn D.; Jackson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Joel; Kimball, John; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Koster, Randal D.; McDonald, Kyle C.; Moghaddam, Mahta; Moran, Susan; Reichle, Rolf; Shi, J. C.; Spencer, Michael W.; Thurman, Samuel W.; Tsang, Leung; VanZyl, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council s Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of the moisture present at Earth's land surface and will distinguish frozen from thawed land surfaces. Direct observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state from space will allow significantly improved estimates of water, energy and carbon transfers between land and atmosphere. Soil moisture measurements are also of great importance in assessing flooding and monitoring drought. SMAP observations can help mitigate these natural hazards, resulting in potentially great economic and social benefits. SMAP soil moisture and freeze/thaw timing observations will also reduce a major uncertainty in quantifying the global carbon balance by helping to resolve an apparent missing carbon sink on land over the boreal latitudes. The SMAP mission concept would utilize an L-band radar and radiometer. These instruments will share a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna to provide high-resolution and high-accuracy global maps of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every two to three days. The SMAP instruments provide direct measurements of surface conditions. In addition, the SMAP project will use these observations with advanced modeling and data assimilation to provide deeper root-zone soil moisture and estimates of land surface-atmosphere exchanges of water, energy and carbon. SMAP is scheduled for a 2014 launch date

  19. Ice Nucleation Activity of Various Agricultural Soil Dust Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Thea; Höhler, Kristina; Funk, Roger; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Nadolny, Jens; Steinke, Isabelle; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; Ullrich, Romy; Wagner, Robert; Weber, Ines; DeMott, Paul J.; Möhler, Ottmar

    2016-04-01

    Recent investigations at the cloud simulation chamber AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) suggest that agricultural soil dust has an ice nucleation ability that is enhanced up to a factor of 10 compared to desert dust, especially at temperatures above -26 °C (Steinke et al., in preparation for submission). This enhancement might be caused by the contribution of very ice-active biological particles. In addition, soil dust aerosol particles often contain a considerably higher amount of organic matter compared to desert dust particles. To test agricultural soil dust as a source of ice nucleating particles, especially for ice formation in warm clouds, we conducted a series of laboratory measurements with different soil dust samples to extend the existing AIDA dataset. The AIDA has a volume of 84 m3 and operates under atmospherically relevant conditions over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and humidity. By controlled adiabatic expansions, the ascent of an air parcel in the troposphere can be simulated. As a supplement to the AIDA facility, we use the INKA (Ice Nucleation Instrument of the KArlsruhe Institute of Technology) continuous flow diffusion chamber based on the design by Rogers (1988) to expose the sampled aerosol particles to a continuously increasing saturation ratio by keeping the aerosol temperature constant. For our experiments, soil dust was dry dispersed into the AIDA vessel. First, fast saturation ratio scans at different temperatures were performed with INKA, sampling soil dust aerosol particles directly from the AIDA vessel. Then, we conducted the AIDA expansion experiment starting at a preset temperature. The combination of these two different methods provides a robust data set on the temperature-dependent ice activity of various agriculture soil dust aerosol particles with a special focus on relatively high temperatures. In addition, to extend the data set, we investigated the role of biological and organic matter in more

  20. Activity and structure of methanotrophic communities in landfill cover soils.

    PubMed

    Gebert, Julia; Singh, Brajesh Kumar; Pan, Yao; Bodrossy, Levente

    2009-10-01

    The composition of the methanotrophic community in soil covers on five landfills in Northern and Eastern Germany was investigated by means of diagnostic microarray and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), both targeting the pmoA gene of methanotrophs. Physical and chemical properties of the 15 sampled soil profiles varied greatly, thus providing for very different environmental conditions. The potential methane oxidation activity, assessed using undisturbed soil cores, varied between 0.2 and 28 µg CH4 gdw (-1)  h(-1) , the latter amounting to 426 g CH4 m(-2)  h(-1) . Total nitrogen was found to be the soil variable correlating most strongly with methanotrophic activity. Explaining close to 50% of the observed variability, this indicates that on the investigated sites activity and thus abundance of methanotrophs may have been nitrogen-limited. Variables that enhance organic matter and thus nitrogen accumulation, such as field capacity, also positively impacted methanotrophic activity. In spite of the great variability of soil properties and different geographic landfill location, both microarray and T-RFLP analysis suggested that the composition of the methanotrophic community on all five sites, in all profiles and across all depths was similar. Methylocystis, Methylobacter and Methylococcus species, including Methylococcus-related uncultivated methanotrophs, were predominantly detected among type II, Ia and Ib methanotrophs, respectively. This indicates that the high methane fluxes typical for landfill environments may be the most influential driver governing the community composition, or other variables not analysed in this study. Principal component analysis suggested that community diversity is most influenced by the site from which the samples were taken and second, from the location on the individual sites, i.e. the soil profile. Landfill and individual profiles reflect the combined impact of all effective variables, including

  1. Ice nucleation activity in the widespread soil fungus Mortierella alpina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Hill, T. C. J.; Pummer, B. G.; Yordanova, P.; Franc, G. D.; Pöschl, U.

    2015-02-01

    Biological residues in soil dust are a potentially strong source of atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). So far, however, the abundance, diversity, sources, seasonality, and role of biological - in particular, fungal - IN in soil dust have not been characterized. By analysis of the culturable fungi in topsoils, from a range of different land use and ecosystem types in southeast Wyoming, we found ice-nucleation-active (INA) fungi to be both widespread and abundant, particularly in soils with recent inputs of decomposable organic matter. Across all investigated soils, 8% of fungal isolates were INA. All INA isolates initiated freezing at -5 to -6 °C, and belonged to a single zygomycotic species, Mortierella alpina (Mortierellales, Mortierellomycotina). To our knowledge this is the first report of ice nucleation activity in a zygomycotic fungi because the few known INA fungi all belong to the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. M. alpina is known to be saprobic and widespread in soil, and Mortierella spores are present in air and rain. Sequencing of the ITS region and the gene for γ-linolenic elongase revealed four distinct clades, affiliated to different soil types. The IN produced by M. alpina seem to be proteinaceous, < 300 kDa in size, and can be easily washed off the mycelium. Ice nucleating fungal mycelium will ramify topsoils and probably also release cell-free IN into it. If these IN survive decomposition or are adsorbed onto mineral surfaces, their contribution might accumulate over time, perhaps to be transported with soil dust and influencing its ice nucleating properties.

  2. Microbial and enzymatic activity of soil contaminated with azoxystrobin.

    PubMed

    Baćmaga, Małgorzata; Kucharski, Jan; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga

    2015-10-01

    The use of fungicides in crop protection still effectively eliminates fungal pathogens of plants. However, fungicides may dissipate to various elements of the environment and cause irreversible changes. Considering this problem, the aim of the presented study was to evaluate changes in soil biological activity in response to contamination with azoxystrobin. The study was carried out in the laboratory on samples of sandy loam with a pH of 7.0 in 1 Mol KCl dm(-3). Soil samples were treated with azoxystrobin in one of four doses: 0.075 (dose recommended by the manufacturer), 2.250, 11.25 and 22.50 mg kg(-1) soil DM (dry matter of soil). The control soil sample did not contain fungicide. Bacteria were identified based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and fungi were identified by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequencing. The study revealed that increased doses of azoxystrobin inhibited the growth of organotrophic bacteria, actinomycetes and fungi. The fungicide also caused changes in microbial biodiversity. The lowest values of the colony development (CD) index were recorded for fungi and the ecophysiological (EP) index for organotrophic bacteria. Azoxystrobin had an inhibitory effect on the activity of dehydrogenases, catalase, urease, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase. Dehydrogenases were found to be most resistant to the effects of the fungicide, while alkaline phosphatase in the soil recovered the balance in the shortest time. Four species of bacteria from the genus Bacillus and two species of fungi from the genus Aphanoascus were isolated from the soil contaminated with the highest dose of azoxystrobin (22.50 mg kg(-1)). PMID:26343782

  3. Soil moisture active/passive (SMAP) mission concept

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of the moisture present at Earth's land surface and will distinguish frozen from thawed land surfaces. ...

  4. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council’s Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of the moisture present at Earth's land surface and will distinguish frozen f...

  5. Aminocyclopyrachlor sorption in biochar and activated charcoal amended soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminocyclopyrachlor is a new herbicide active ingredient, classified as a member of the new chemical class “pyrimidine carboxylic acids”. It is used for control of broadleaf weeds and brush on non-cropland. Due to its potential mobility in some soils, there is interest in whether aminocyclopyrachlor...

  6. Overview of the NASA soil moisture active/passive mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is currently in design Phase C and scheduled for launch in October 2014. Its mission concept is based on combined L-band radar and radiometry measurements obtained from a shared, rotating 6-meter antennae. These measurements will be used to retrie...

  7. SMAPVEX08: Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP) is currently addressing issues related to the development and selection of retrieval algorithms as well as refining the mission design and instruments. Some of these issues require resolution as soon as possible. Several forums had identified specific ...

  8. Preparing for NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council’s Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of the moisture present at Earth's land surface and will distinguish frozen from thawed land surfaces. ...

  9. The soil moisture active passive (SMAP) mission and validation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will be launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in October 2014. This satellite is the culmination of basic research and applications development over the past thirty years. During most of this period, research and development o...

  10. Soil Moisture Active Passive Satellite Status and Recent Validation Results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission was launched in January, 2015 and began its calibration and validation (cal/val) phase in May, 2015. Cal/Val will begin with a focus on instrument measurements, brightness temperature and backscatter, and evolve to the geophysical products that include...

  11. Microbial activity and soil organic matter decay in roadside soils polluted with petroleum hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhailova, Larysa; Fischer, Thomas; Iurchenko, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    positively correlated with the carbohydrate fraction and negatively correlated with the aliphatic fraction of the soil C, while carbohydrate-C and alkyl-C increased and decreased with distance from the road, respectively. It is proposed that petroleum hydrocarbons supress soil biological activity at concentrations above 1500 mg kg-1, and that soil organic matter priming primarily affects the carbohydrate fraction of soil organic matter. It can be concluded that the abundance of solid carbohydrates (O-alkyl C) is of paramount importance for the hydrocarbon mineralization under natural conditions, compared to more recalcitrant SOM fractions (mainly aromatic and alkyl C). References Mykhailova, L., Fischer, T., Iurchenko, V. (2013) Distribution and fractional composition of petroleum hydrocarbons in roadside soils. Applied and Environmental Soil Science, vol. 2013, Article ID 938703, 6 pages, DOI 10.1155/2013/938703 Mykhailova, L., Fischer, T., Iurchenko, V. (2014) Deposition of petroleum hydrocarbons with sediment trapped in snow in roadside areas. Journal of Environmental Engineering and Landscape Management 22(3):237-244, DOI 10.3846/16486897.2014.889698 Nelson P.N. and Baldock J.A. (2005) Estimating the molecular composition of a diverse range of natural organic materials from solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses, 2005, Biogeochemistry (2005) 72: 1-34, DOI 10.1007/s10533-004-0076-3 Zyakun, A., Nii-Annang, S., Franke, G., Fischer, T., Buegger, F., Dilly, O. (2011) Microbial Actvity and 13C/12C Ratio as Evidence of N-Hexadecane and N-Hexadecanoic Acid Biodegradation in Agricultural and Forest Soils. Geomicrobiology Journal 28:632-647, DOI 10.1080/01490451.2010.489922

  12. Amazing Soil Stories: Adventure and Activity Book [and] Teacher's Guide to the Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Association of Resource Conservation Districts, Sacramento.

    The student activity book offers a variety of written exercises and "hands on" experiments and demonstrations for students at the fourth grade level. The book begins with a cartoon story that follows the adventures of a student investigating a soil erosion crisis and what her community can do to prevent soil erosion. Interspersed within the story…

  13. Influence of Environmental Factors on Feammox Activity in Soil Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation of ammonium (NH4+) under iron reducing conditions, referred to as Feammox, has been described in recent years by several investigators. The environmental characteristics in which the Feammox process occurs need to be understood in order to determine its contribution to the nitrogen cycle. In this study, a total of 66 locations were selected covering 4 different types of soils/sediments: wetland soils (W), river sediments (R), forest soils (F), and paddy soils (P) from several locations in central New Jersey, at Tims Branch at Savannah River in South Carolina, both in the Unities States, and at several locations in the Guangdong province in China. Though soil chemical analyses, serial culturing experiments, analysis of microbial communities, and using a canonical correspondence analysis, the occurrence of the Feammox reaction and the presence of Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6, which plays a key role in the Feammox process(1), were found in 17 samples. Analyses showed that the soil pH, as well as its Fe(III) and NH4+ content were the most important factors controlling the distribution of these Feammox microorganisms. Based on the results, soils in the subtropical forests and soils that are near agricultural areas could be Feammox hotspot. Under the conditions that favor the presence and activity of Feammox microorganisms and their oxidation of NH4+, denitrification bacteria were also active. However, the presence of nitrous oxide (N2O) reducers was limited under these conditions, implying that at locations where the Feammox process is active, conditions are favoring a higher ratio of N2O: N2 as the nitrogen (N) end products. Incubations of soils where the presence of Acidimicrobiaceae bacterium A6 was detected, were conducted for 120 days under two different DO levels (DO < 0.02 mg/L and DO = 0.8~1.0 mg/L) showing comparable amounts of NH4+ oxidation. In the incubations with DO < 0.02 mg/L, the proportion of Acidimicrobiaceae bacteria increased and

  14. Soils Activity Mobility Study: Methodology and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Silvas, Alissa; Yucel, Vefa

    2014-09-29

    This report presents a three-level approach for estimation of sediment transport to provide an assessment of potential erosion risk for sites at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) that are posted for radiological purposes and where migration is suspected or known to occur due to storm runoff. Based on the assessed risk, the appropriate level of effort can be determined for analysis of radiological surveys, field experiments to quantify erosion and transport rates, and long-term monitoring. The method is demonstrated at contaminated sites, including Plutonium Valley, Shasta, Smoky, and T-1. The Pacific Southwest Interagency Committee (PSIAC) procedure is selected as the Level 1 analysis tool. The PSIAC method provides an estimation of the total annual sediment yield based on factors derived from the climatic and physical characteristics of a watershed. If the results indicate low risk, then further analysis is not warranted. If the Level 1 analysis indicates high risk or is deemed uncertain, a Level 2 analysis using the Modified Universal Soil Loss Equation (MUSLE) is proposed. In addition, if a sediment yield for a storm event rather than an annual sediment yield is needed, then the proposed Level 2 analysis should be performed. MUSLE only provides sheet and rill erosion estimates. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Hydrologic Engineering Center-Hydrologic Modeling System (HEC-HMS) provides storm peak runoff rate and storm volumes, the inputs necessary for MUSLE. Channel Sediment Transport (CHAN-SED) I and II models are proposed for estimating sediment deposition or erosion in a channel reach from a storm event. These models require storm hydrograph associated sediment concentration and bed load particle size distribution data. When the Level 2 analysis indicates high risk for sediment yield and associated contaminant migration or when there is high uncertainty in the Level 2 results, the sites can be further evaluated with a Level 3 analysis using more complex

  15. Seasonal Dynamics of Enzymatic Activities and Functional Diversity in Soils under Different Organic Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil microbial activity and diversity fluctuate seasonally under annual organic amendment for improving soil quality. We investigated the effects of municipal compost (MC), poultry litter (PL), and cover crops of spring oats and red clover (RC) on soil enzyme activities, and soil bacterial community...

  16. VENTILATION MODEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman

    2002-10-31

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their postclosure analyses.

  17. Activated carbons from end-products of tree nut and tree fruit production as sorbents for removing methyl bromide in ventilation effluent following postharvest chamber fumigation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Wiley A; Bellamy, David E; Walse, Spencer S

    2015-04-01

    End-products of tree nuts and tree fruits grown in California, USA were evaluated for the ability to remove methyl bromide (MB) from ventilation effluent following postharvest chamber fumigation. Activated carbon sorbents from walnut and almond shells as well as peach and prune pits were prepared using different methods of pyrolysis, activation, and quenching. Each source and preparation was evaluated for yield from starting material (%, m/m) and performance on tests where MB-containing airstreams were directed through a columnar bed of the activated carbon in an experimental apparatus, termed a parallel adsorbent column tester, which was constructed as a scaled-down model of a chamber ventilation system. We report the number of doses needed to first observe the breakthrough of MB downstream of the bed and the capacity of the activated carbon for MB (%, m/m) based on a fractional percentage of MB mass sorbed at breakthrough relative to mass of the bed prior to testing. Results were based on a novel application of solid-phase microextraction with time-weighted averaging sampling of MB concentration in airstreams, which was quantitative across the range of fumigation-relevant conditions and statistically unaffected by relative humidity. Activated carbons from prune pits, prepared either by steam activation or carbon dioxide activation coupled to water quenching, received the greatest number of doses prior to breakthrough and had the highest capacity, approximately 12-14%, outperforming a commercially marketed activated carbon derived from coconut shells. Experimental evidence is presented that links discrepancy in performance to the relative potential for activated carbons to preferentially sorb water vapor relative to MB. PMID:25758836

  18. County-Scale Spatial Distribution of Soil Enzyme Activities and Enzyme Activity Indices in Agricultural Land: Implications for Soil Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Baoni; Wang, Junxing; He, Wenxiang; Wang, Xudong; Wei, Gehong

    2014-01-01

    Here the spatial distribution of soil enzymatic properties in agricultural land was evaluated on a county-wide (567 km2) scale in Changwu, Shaanxi Province, China. The spatial variations in activities of five hydrolytic enzymes were examined using geostatistical methods. The relationships between soil enzyme activities and other soil properties were evaluated using both an integrated total enzyme activity index (TEI) and the geometric mean of enzyme activities (GME). At the county scale, soil invertase, phosphatase, and catalase activities were moderately spatially correlated, whereas urease and dehydrogenase activities were weakly spatially correlated. Correlation analysis showed that both TEI and GME were better correlated with selected soil physicochemical properties than single enzyme activities. Multivariate regression analysis showed that soil OM content had the strongest positive effect while soil pH had a negative effect on the two enzyme activity indices. In addition, total phosphorous content had a positive effect on TEI and GME in orchard soils, whereas alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen and available potassium contents, respectively, had negative and positive effects on these two enzyme indices in cropland soils. The results indicate that land use changes strongly affect soil enzyme activities in agricultural land, where TEI provides a sensitive biological indicator for soil quality. PMID:25610908

  19. Influence of altered precipitation pattern on greenhouse gas emissions and soil enzyme activities in Pannonian soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forstner, Stefan Johannes; Michel, Kerstin; Berthold, Helene; Baumgarten, Andreas; Wanek, Wolfgang; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Kitzler, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation patterns are likely to be altered due to climate change. Recent models predict a reduction of mean precipitation during summer accompanied by a change in short-term precipitation variability for central Europe. Correspondingly, the risk for summer drought is likely to increase. This may especially be valid for regions which already have the potential for rare, but strong precipitation events like eastern Austria. Given that these projections hold true, soils in this area will receive water irregularly in few, heavy rainfall events and be subjected to long-lasting dry periods in between. This pattern of drying/rewetting can alter soil greenhouse gas fluxes, creating a potential feedback mechanism for climate change. Microorganisms are the key players in most soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) transformation processes including greenhouse gas exchange. A conceptual model proposed by Schimel and colleagues (2007) links microbial stress-response physiology to ecosystem-scale biogeochemical processes: In order to cope with decreasing soil water potential, microbes modify resource allocation patterns from growth to survival. However, it remains unclear how microbial resource acquisition via extracellular enzymes and microbial-controlled greenhouse gas fluxes respond to water stress induced by soil drying/rewetting. We designed a laboratory experiment to test for effects of multiple drying/rewetting cycles on soil greenhouse gas fluxes (CO2, CH4, N2O, NO), microbial biomass and extracellular enzyme activity. Three soils representing the main soil types of eastern Austria were collected in June 2012 at the Lysimeter Research Station of the Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES) in Vienna. Soils were sieved to 2mm, filled in steel cylinders and equilibrated for one week at 50% water holding capacity (WHC) for each soil. Then soils were separated into two groups: One group received water several times per week (C=control), the other group received

  20. Quantification of Microbial Activities in Near-Surface Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Nauer, P.; Zeyer, J.

    2007-12-01

    Microbial processes in near-surface soils play an important role in carbon and nutrient cycling, and specifically in the turnover of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4. We modified a recently developed technique, the gas push-pull test (GPPT), to allow for the in-situ quantification of microbial activities in near-surface soils. A GPPT consists of the controlled injection of a gas mixture containing reactive gases (e.g., CH4, O2, CO2) and nonreactive tracer gases (e.g., Ar, Ne) into the soil, followed by the extraction of the gas mixture/soil-air blend from the same location. Rates of microbial activities are computed from the gases" breakthrough curves obtained during the GPPT's extraction phase. For a GPPT to be applied successfully, it is important that sufficient mass of the injected gases can be recovered during the test, even after prolonged incubation in soil. But this may be difficult to achieve during GPPTs performed in near- surface soils, where gas loss to the atmosphere can be substantial. Our modification consisted of performing GPPTs within a steel cylinder (8.4-cm radius), which was previously driven into the soil to a depth of 50 cm. During the GPPTs, the cylinder was temporarily closed with a removable lid to minimize gas loss to the atmosphere. We performed a series of numerical simulations as well as laboratory experiments to test the usefulness of this modification. Numerical simulations confirmed that without use of the cylinder, typical near- surface GPPTs (e.g., injection/extraction depth 20 cm below soil surface) are subject to extensive gas loss to the atmosphere (mass recovery < 20% for most gases), whereas mass recovery of injected gases increased dramatically when the cylinder was employed (mass recovery > 90% for most gases). Results from laboratory experiments confirmed this observation. We will also present results of a first field application, in which a near- surface GPPT was successfully conducted in a sandy soil to quantify in

  1. Ice nucleation activity in the widespread soil fungus Mortierella alpina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Pummer, Bernhard G.; Yordanova, Petya; Franc, Gary D.; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Biological residues in soil dust are a potentially strong source of atmospheric ice nucleators (IN). However, the sources and characteristics of biological - in particular, fungal - IN in soil dust have not been characterized. By analysis of the culturable fungi in topsoils, from a range of different land use and ecosystem types in south-east Wyoming, we found ice nucleation active (INA, i.e., inducing ice formation in the probed range of temperature and concentration) fungi to be both widespread and abundant, particularly in soils with recent inputs of decomposable organic matter. For example, in harvested and ploughed sugar beet and potato fields, and in the organic horizon beneath Lodgepole pine forest, their relative abundances and concentrations among the cultivable fungi were 25% (8 x 103 CFU g-1), 17% (4.8 x 103 CFU g-1) and 17% (4 x 103 CFU g-1), respectively. Across all investigated soils, 8% (2.9 x 103 CFU g-1) of fungal isolates were INA. All INA isolates initiated freezing at -5° C to -6° C and all belonged to a single zygomycotic species, Mortierella alpina (Mortierellales, Mortierellomycotina). By contrast, the handful of fungal species so far reported as INA all belong within the Ascomycota or Basidiomycota phyla. Mortierella alpina is known to be saprobic (utilizing non-living organic matter), widespread in soil and present in air and rain. Sequencing of the ITS region and the gene for γ-linolenic elongase revealed four distinct clades, affiliated to different soil types. The IN produced by M. alpina seem to be extracellular proteins of 100-300 kDa in size which are not anchored in the fungal cell wall. Ice nucleating fungal mycelium will ramify topsoils and probably also release cell-free IN into it. If these IN survive decomposition or are adsorbed onto mineral surfaces, these small cell-free IN might contribute to the as yet uncharacterized pool of atmospheric IN released by soils as dusts.

  2. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Njoku, Eni; ONeill, Peggy; Kellogg, Kent; Entin, Jared

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being formulated by NASA in response to the 2007 National Research Council s Earth Science Decadal Survey [1]. SMAP s measurement objectives are high-resolution global measurements of near-surface soil moisture and its freeze-thaw state. These measurements would allow significantly improved estimates of water, energy and carbon transfers between the land and atmosphere. The soil moisture control of these fluxes is a key factor in the performance of atmospheric models used for weather forecasts and climate projections. Soil moisture measurements are also of great importance in assessing flooding and monitoring drought. Knowledge gained from SMAP s planned observations can help mitigate these natural hazards, resulting in potentially great economic and societal benefits. SMAP measurements would also yield high resolution spatial and temporal mapping of the frozen or thawed condition of the surface soil and vegetation. Observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw timing over the boreal latitudes will contribute to reducing a major uncertainty in quantifying the global carbon balance and help resolve an apparent missing carbon sink over land. The SMAP mission would utilize an L-band radar and radiometer sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna (see Figure 1) [2]. The radar and radiometer instruments would be carried onboard a 3-axis stabilized spacecraft in a 680 km polar orbit with an 8-day repeating ground track. The instruments are planned to provide high-resolution and high-accuracy global maps of soil moisture at 10 km resolution and freeze/thaw at 3 km resolution, every two to three days (see Table 1 for a list of science data products). The mission is adopting a number of approaches to identify and mitigate potential terrestrial radio frequency interference (RFI). These approaches are being incorporated into the radiometer and radar flight hardware and

  3. Determination of urease activity in soils by carbon dioxide release for ecotoxicological evaluation of contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Guettes, Ralf; Dott, Wolfgang; Eisentraeger, Adolf

    2002-10-01

    A method for the quantification of urease enzyme activity has been set up, which is based on the quantification of carbon dioxide set free into the head space of gastight vessels. The method can be applied for ecotoxicological characterisation of contaminated soil samples besides other methods like soil respiration measurements or nitrification inhibition tests. The sieved soil sample can be incubated under nearly natural conditions with an adjusted water content of about 50% of the water holding capacity. Ammonia or urea do not need to be extracted, since carbon dioxide release is correlated to urease activity. Thus carbon dioxide release is a direct result of urease activity which can be measured in the head space using gastight syringes and gaschromatographic equipment. The urease activity is determined by comparing the carbon dioxide release of incubation vessels with and without urea supply. The applicability of this method has been demonstrated by experiments with N-(n-butyl)phosphoric triamide (NBPT), copper ions and zinc ions as known inhibitors of urease activity. PMID:12463682

  4. VENTILATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a project to develop a systems analysis of ventilation technology and provide a state-of-the-art assessment of ventilation and indoor air quality (IAQ) research needs. (NOTE: Ventilation technology is defined as the hardware necessary to bring outdoor ...

  5. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  6. Measurements of Microbial Community Activities in Individual Soil Macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Fansler, Sarah J.; McCue, Lee Ann; Smith, Jeff L.; Konopka, Allan

    2012-05-01

    The functional potential of single soil aggregates may provide insights into the localized distribution of microbial activities better than traditional assays conducted on bulk quantities of soil. Thus, we scaled down enzyme assays for {beta}-glucosidase, N-acetyl-{beta}-D-glucosaminidase, lipase, and leucine aminopeptidase to measure of the enzyme potential of individual aggregates (250-1000 {mu}m diameter). Across all enzymes, the smallest aggregates had the greatest activity and the range of enzyme activities observed in all aggregates supports the hypothesis that functional potential in soil may be distributed in a patchy fashion. Paired analyses of ATP as a surrogate for active microbial biomass and {beta}-glucosidase on the same aggregates suggest the presence of both extracellular {beta}-glucosidase functioning in aggregates with no detectable ATP and also of relatively active microbial communities (high ATP) that have low {beta}-glucosidase potentials. Studying function at a scale more consistent with microbial habitat presents greater opportunity to link microbial community structure to microbial community function.

  7. Meclofenamate increases ventilation in lambs.

    PubMed

    Guerra, F A; Savich, R D; Clyman, R I; Kitterman, J A

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the effects of the prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, meclofenamate, on postnatal ventilation, we studied 11 unanaesthetised, spontaneously-breathing lambs at an average age of 7.9 +/- 1.1 days (SEM; range 5-14 days) and an average weight of 4.9 +/- 0.5 kg (range 3.0-7.0 kg). After a 30-min control period we infused 4.23 mg/kg meclofenamate over 10 min and then gave 0.23 mg/h per kg for the remainder of the 4 h. Ventilation increased progressively from a control value of 515 +/- 72 ml/min per kg to a maximum of 753 +/- 100 ml/min per kg after 3h of infusion (P less than 0.05) due to an increased breathing rate; the effects were similar during both high- and low-voltage electrocortical activity. There were no significant changes in tidal volume, heart rate, blood pressure, arterial pH or PaCO2, the increased ventilation resulted from either an increase in dead space ventilation or an increase in CO2 production. This study indicates that meclofenamate causes an increase in ventilation in lambs but no changes in pH of PaCO2. The mechanism and site of action remain to be defined. PMID:2507622

  8. Assessing microbial activities in metal contaminated agricultural volcanic soils - An integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Parelho, C; Rodrigues, A S; Barreto, M C; Ferreira, N G C; Garcia, P

    2016-07-01

    Volcanic soils are unique naturally fertile resources, extensively used for agricultural purposes and with particular physicochemical properties that may result in accumulation of toxic substances, such as trace metals. Trace metal contaminated soils have significant effects on soil microbial activities and hence on soil quality. The aim of this study is to determine the soil microbial responses to metal contamination in volcanic soils under different agricultural land use practices (conventional, traditional and organic), based on a three-tier approach: Tier 1 - assess soil microbial activities, Tier 2 - link the microbial activity to soil trace metal contamination and, Tier 3 - integrate the microbial activity in an effect-based soil index (Integrative Biological Response) to score soil health status in metal contaminated agricultural soils. Our results showed that microbial biomass C levels and soil enzymes activities were decreased in all agricultural soils. Dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase activities, soil basal respiration and microbial biomass C were the most sensitive responses to trace metal soil contamination. The Integrative Biological Response value indicated that soil health was ranked as: organic>traditional>conventional, highlighting the importance of integrative biomarker-based strategies for the development of the trace metal "footprint" in Andosols. PMID:27057992

  9. Soil organic matter dynamics under Beech and Hornbeam as affected by soil biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooijman, A. M.; Cammeraat, L. H.

    2009-04-01

    Organic matter dynamics are highly affected both the soil fauna as well as the source of organic matter, having important consequences for the spatial heterogeneity of organic matter storage and conversion. We studied oldgrowth mixed deciduous forests in Central-Luxemburg on decalcified dolomitic marl, dominated by high-degradable hornbeam (Carpinus betulus L.) or low-degradable beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). Decomposition was measured both in the laboratory and in the field. Litter decomposition was higher for hornbeam than for beech under laboratory conditions, but especially in the field, which is mainly to be attributed to macro-fauna activity, specifically to earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris and Allolobophora species). We also investigated differences between beech and hornbeam with regard to litter input and habitat conditions. Total litter input was the same, but contribution of beech and hornbeam litter clearly differed between the two species. Also, mass of the ectorganic horizon and soil C:N ratio were significantly higher for beech, which was reflected in clear differences in the development of ectorganic profiles on top of the soil. Under beech a mull-moder was clearly present with a well developed fermentation and litter horizon, whereas under hornbeam all litter is incorporated into the soil, leaving the mineral soil surface bear in late summer (mull-type of horizon). In addition to litter quality, litter decomposition was affected by pH and soil moisture. Both pH and soil moisture were higher under hornbeam than under beech, which may reflect differences in soil development and litter quality effects over longer time scales. Under beech, dense layers of low-degradable litter may prevent erosion, and increase clay eluviation and leaching of base cations, leading to acid and dry conditions, which further decrease litter decay. Under hornbeam, the soil is not protected by a litter layer, and clay eluviation and acidification may be counteracted by erosion

  10. [Effects of forest type on soil organic matter, microbial biomass, and enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shun-bao; Zhou, Xiao-qi; Rui, Yi-chao; Chen, Cheng-rong; Xu, Zhi-hong; Guo, Xiao-min

    2011-10-01

    Taking the typical forest types Pinus elliottii var. elliotttii, Araucaria cunninghamii, and Agathis australis in southern Queensland of Australia as test objects, an investigation was made on the soil soluble organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (SON), microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN), and enzyme activities, aimed to understand the effects of forest type on soil quality. In the three forests, soil SOC content was 552-1154 mg kg(-1), soil SON content was 20.11-57.32 mg kg(-1), soil MBC was 42-149 mg kg(-1), soil MBN was 7-35 mg kg(-1), soil chitinase (CAS) activity was 2.96-7.63 microg g(-1) h(-1), soil leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) activity was 0.18-0.46 microg g(-1) d(-1), soil acid phosphatase (ACP) activity was 16.5-29.6 microg g(-1) h(-1), soil alkaline phosphatase (AKP) activity was 0.79-3.42 microg g(-1) h(-1), and soil beta-glucosidase (BG) activity was 3.71-9.93 microg g(-1) h(-1). There was a significant correlation between soil MBC and MBN. Soil SOC content and soil CAS and LAP activities decreased in the order of P. elliottii > A. cunninghamii > A. australis, soil SON content decreased in the order of A. cunninghamii > A. australis > P. elliottii and was significantly higher in A. cunninghamii than in P. elliottii forest (P < 0.05), soil MBC and MBN and AKP activity decreased in the order of A. australis > P. elliottii > A. cunninghamii, and soil ACP and BG activities decreased in the order of P. elliottii > A. australis > A. cunninghamii. Among the test soil biochemical factors, soil MBC, MBN, SON, and LAP had greater effects on the soil quality under the test forest types. PMID:22263459

  11. Automated analysis of Xe-133 pulmonary ventilation (AAPV) in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xinhua; Treves, S. Ted

    2011-03-01

    In this study, an automated analysis of pulmonary ventilation (AAPV) was developed to visualize the ventilation in pediatric lungs using dynamic Xe-133 scintigraphy. AAPV is a software algorithm that converts a dynamic series of Xe- 133 images into four functional images: equilibrium, washout halftime, residual, and clearance rate by analyzing pixelbased activity. Compared to conventional methods of calculating global or regional ventilation parameters, AAPV provides a visual representation of pulmonary ventilation functions.

  12. Effect of invariant natural killer T cells with IL-5 and activated IL-6 receptor in ventilator-associated lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Yuka; Sugamata, Ryuichi; Iwamura, Chiaki; Nagao, Tomokazu; Zao, Jun; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Kawachi, Shoji; Nakayama, Toshinori; Suzuki, Kazuo

    2014-02-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is well known to potentially cause ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI). It has also been reported recently that activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells is involved in the onset/progression of airway inflammation. We analyzed the roles of inflammatory cells, including iNKT cells, and cytokines/chemokines in a mouse model of VALI. C57BL/6 and Vα14(+)NKT cell-deficient (Jα18KO) female mice were subjected to MV for 5 hours. The MV induced lung injury in the mice, with severe histological abnormalities, elevation in the percentages of neutrophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and increase in the number of iNKT cells in the lung. Jα18KO mice subjected to MV for 5 hours also showed lung injury, with decrease of the PaO2/FiO2 ratio (P/F ratio) and elevation of the levels of total protein, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12p40, and keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC) in the BALF. Intranasal administration of anti-IL-5 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or anti-IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) mAb into the Jα18KO mice prior to the start of MV resulted in significant improvement in the blood oxygenation. In addition, the anti-IL-5 mAb administration was associated with a decrease in the levels of IL-5, IL-9, and IL-6R in the BALF, and anti-IL-6R mAb administration suppressed the mRNA expressions of IL-5, IL-6, IL-6R, and KC. These results suggest that iNKT cells may play a role in attenuating the inflammatory caused by ventilation through IL-5 and IL-6R. PMID:24246030

  13. Effects of petroleum contamination on soil microbial numbers, metabolic activity and urease activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huan; Yao, Jun; Cai, Minmin; Qian, Yiguang; Guo, Yue; Richnow, Hans H; Blake, Ruth E; Doni, Serena; Ceccanti, Brunello

    2012-06-01

    The influence of petroleum contamination on soil microbial activities was investigated in 13 soil samples from sites around an injection water well (Iw-1, 2, 3, 4) (total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH): 7.5-78 mg kg(-1)), an oil production well (Op-1, 2, 3, 4, 5) (TPH: 149-1110 mg kg(-1)), and an oil spill accident well (Os-1, 2, 3, 4) (TPH: 4500-34600 mg kg(-1)). The growth rate constant (μ) of glucose stimulated organisms, determined by microcalorimetry, was higher in Iw soil samples than in Op and Os samples. Total cultivable bacteria and fungi and urease activity also decreased with increasing concentration of TPH. Total heat produced demonstrated that TPH at concentrations less than about 1 g kg(-1) soil stimulated anaerobic respiration. A positive correlation between TPH and soil organic matter (OM) and stimulation of fungi-bacteria-urease at low TPH doses suggested that TPH is bound to soil OM and slowly metabolized in Iw soils during OM consumption. These methods can be used to evaluate the potential of polluted soils to carry out self-bioremediation by metabolizing TPH. PMID:22336736

  14. Humic substances biological activity at the plant-soil interface

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Sara; Francioso, Ornella; Nardi, Serenella

    2010-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) represent the organic material mainly widespread in nature. HS have positive effects on plant physiology by improving soil structure and fertility and by influencing nutrient uptake and root architecture. The biochemical and molecular mechanisms underlying these events are only partially known. HS have been shown to contain auxin and an “auxin-like” activity of humic substances has been proposed, but support to this hypothesis is fragmentary. In this review article, we are giving an overview of available data concerning molecular structures and biological activities of humic substances, with special emphasis on their hormone-like activities. PMID:20495384

  15. DEMAND CONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Mendell, Mark J.; Davies, Molly; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Faulkner, David; Hong, Tienzen; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2014-01-06

    This document summarizes a research effort on demand controlled ventilation and classroom ventilation. The research on demand controlled ventilation included field studies and building energy modeling. Major findings included: ? The single-location carbon dioxide sensors widely used for demand controlled ventilation frequently have large errors and will fail to effectively control ventilation rates (VRs).? Multi-location carbon dioxide measurement systems with more expensive sensors connected to multi-location sampling systems may measure carbon dioxide more accurately.? Currently-available optical people counting systems work well much of the time but have large counting errors in some situations. ? In meeting rooms, measurements of carbon dioxide at return-air grilles appear to be a better choice than wall-mounted sensors.? In California, demand controlled ventilation in general office spaces is projected to save significant energy and be cost effective only if typical VRs without demand controlled ventilation are very high relative to VRs in codes. Based on the research, several recommendations were developed for demand controlled ventilation specifications in the California Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.The research on classroom ventilation collected data over two years on California elementary school classrooms to investigate associations between VRs and student illness absence (IA). Major findings included: ? Median classroom VRs in all studied climate zones were below the California guideline, and 40percent lower in portable than permanent buildings.? Overall, one additional L/s per person of VR was associated with 1.6percent less IA. ? Increasing average VRs in California K-12 classrooms from the current average to the required level is estimated to decrease IA by 3.4percent, increasing State attendance-based funding to school districts by $33M, with $6.2 M in increased energy costs. Further VR increases would provide additional benefits

  16. Preparing for NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, T.; Entekhabi, D.; Njoku, E.; O'Neill, P.; Entin, J.

    2009-04-01

    Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first satellites being developed by NASA in response to the National Research Council's Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of the moisture present at Earth's land surface and will distinguish frozen from thawed land surfaces. Direct observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state from space will allow better estimates of water and energy transfers between Earth's surface and atmosphere, which are primary driving factors for weather and climate. Soil moisture measurements are also of great importance in assessing flooding potential and as input to flood prediction models. Conversely, observations of widespread low soil moisture levels can provide early warning of drought conditions, reduced water supply and crop loss. SMAP observations can help mitigate these natural hazards, resulting in potentially great economic and social benefits. SMAP freeze/thaw timing observations will also reduce a major uncertainty in quantifying the global carbon balance and will help resolve the problem of the missing carbon sink. The SMAP mission concept would utilize L-band radar and radiometry. These instruments will share a rotating 6-meter mesh antenna to provide high-resolution and high-accuracy global maps of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every two to three days. Soil moisture products at 3, 10 and 40 km resolutions will be derived. These will both complement and extend the records of the ESA SMOS mission and offer an order of magnitude improvement in spatial resolution. SMAP is currently in Phase A and scheduled for a 2013 launch. The science teams will be focusing on algorithm development and validation over the next few years. These efforts will be described.

  17. Effect of Rice Plants on Nitrogenase Activity of Flooded Soils

    PubMed Central

    Habte, Mitiku; Alexander, Martin

    1980-01-01

    In samples of flooded soil containing blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), the presence of rice plants did not influence the nitrogenase activity of the algae. Nitrogenase activity of heterotrophic bacteria was enhanced by the presence of rice plants, but this activity was not affected by changes in plant density. The rate of nitrogen fixation in the rhizosphere, however, varied significantly among the 16 rice varieties tested. A simple method was devised to test the nitrogen-fixing activity in the root zone of rice varieties, and data were obtained showing marked differences in the activities of the 16 varieties. In tests of two varieties with dissimilar rates of nitrogen fixation in their rhizospheres, the variety which had the greater root weight and lesser shoot weight and which supported greater methane formation had the greater nitrogenase activity. PMID:16345630

  18. Effect of rice plants on nitrogenase activity of flooded soils.

    PubMed

    Habte, M; Alexander, M

    1980-09-01

    In samples of flooded soil containing blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), the presence of rice plants did not influence the nitrogenase activity of the algae. Nitrogenase activity of heterotrophic bacteria was enhanced by the presence of rice plants, but this activity was not affected by changes in plant density. The rate of nitrogen fixation in the rhizosphere, however, varied significantly among the 16 rice varieties tested. A simple method was devised to test the nitrogen-fixing activity in the root zone of rice varieties, and data were obtained showing marked differences in the activities of the 16 varieties. In tests of two varieties with dissimilar rates of nitrogen fixation in their rhizospheres, the variety which had the greater root weight and lesser shoot weight and which supported greater methane formation had the greater nitrogenase activity. PMID:16345630

  19. Behaviour of mesotrione in maize and soil system and its influence on soil dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Kaczynski, Piotr; Lozowicka, Bozena; Hrynko, Izabela; Wolejko, Elzbieta

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dissipation of mesotrione and effect on dehydrogenase activity (DHA) in maize and soil system. The paper for the first time describes behaviour of this herbicide applied at various doses (separately or in mixture with other herbicide) in acidic and alkaline environment. The experiments were conducted using the method randomized blocks in four repetition cycles. Chemical application in seven variants at recommended doses of herbicide were performed. The sample preparation was performed by a modified QuEChERS method and the concentrations of mesotrione in maize and soil were determined by the liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The limit of detection was 0.0005mgkg(-1) and quantification 0.001mgkg(-1). The dissipation of mesotrione were described according to first-order (FO) kinetics equation with R(2) were between 0.8794 and 0.9934. The initial deposit of herbicide in soil and maize was higher in an acidic environment (0.06-0.18mgkg(-1)). A positive correlation between an alkaline pH and the rate of dissipation in soil was observed. The results showed that the time after which 50% (DT50) of substance has been degraded was different for both plant and soil. DT50 for soil was within the range 3.2-6.0days and 2.9-4.4days, for the maize 3.9-4.8days and 3.4-4.5days in an alkaline and an acidic environment, respectively. Concentration of mesotrione at applicable MRL level of 0.05mgkg(-1) in maize was achieved at 0.5-5.9days and at proposed MRL of 0.01mgkg(-1) at 8.8-15.8days. The results indicate that the application of mesotrione affected on DHA in the soil. One day after application this herbicide, concentration of DHA in soil was lower than in control plots, but after 21days was observed trend of increasing DHA. PMID:27492351

  20. Mineral exploration and soil analysis using in situ neutron activation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Hoyte, A.F.

    1966-01-01

    A feasibility study has been made to operate by remote control an unshielded portable positive-ion accelerator type neutron source to induce activities in the ground or rock by "in situ" neutron irradiation. Selective activation techniques make it possible to detect some thirty or more elements by irradiating the ground for periods of a few minutes with either 3-MeV or 14-MeV neutrons. The depth of penetration of neutrons, the effect of water content of the soil on neutron moderation, gamma ray attenuation in the soil and other problems are considered. The analysis shows that, when exploring for most elements of economic interest, the reaction 2H(d,n)3He yielding ??? 3-MeV neutrons is most practical to produce a relatively uniform flux of neutrons of less than 1 keV to a depth of 19???-20???. Irradiation with high energy neutrons (??? 14 MeV) can also be used and may be better suited for certain problems. However, due to higher background and lower sensitivity for the heavy minerals, it is not a recommended neutron source for general exploration use. Preliminary experiments have been made which indicate that neutron activation in situ is feasible for a mineral exploration or qualititative soil analysis. ?? 1976.

  1. Soil Enzyme Activities as Affected by Manure Types, Application Rates and Management Practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The application of manure can restore soil ecosystem services related to nutrient cycling and soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics through biochemical transformations mediated by soil enzymes. Enzyme activities are very crucial in soil metabolic functioning as they drive the decomposition of organic r...

  2. VARIATIONS IN SOIL AGGREGATE STABILITY AND ENZYME ACTIVITIES IN A TEMPERATE AGROFORESTRY PRACTICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agroforestry and grass buffers have been shown to improve soil properties and overall environmental quality. The objective of this study was to examine management and landscape effects on water stable soil aggregates (WSA), soil carbon, soil nitrogen, enzyme activity, and microbial community DNA co...

  3. Effect of steam activated biochar application to industrially contaminated soils on bioavailability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and ecotoxicity of soils.

    PubMed

    Kołtowski, Michał; Hilber, Isabel; Bucheli, Thomas D; Oleszczuk, Patryk

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of steam activation of biochars on the immobilization of freely dissolved (Cfree) and bioaccessible fraction (Cbioacc) of PAHs in soils. Additionally, the toxicity to various organisms like Vibrio fischeri, Lepidium sativum and Folsomia candida was measured before and after the amendment of biochars to soils. Three biochars produced from willow, coconut and wheat straw were steam activated and added to three different soils with varying content and origin of PAHs (coke vs. bitumen). The soils with the addition of the biochars (activated and non-activated) were incubated for a period of 60days. Steam activation of the biochars resulted in more pronounced reduction of both Cfree and Cbioacc. The range of the increase in effectiveness was from 10 to 84% for Cfree and from 50 to 99% for Cbioacc. In contrast, the effect of activation on the toxicity of the soils studied varied greatly and was specific to a particular test and soil type. Essentially, biochar activation did not result in a change of phytotoxicity, but it increased or decreased (depending on the parameter, type of biochar, contaminant source, and soil and soil type) the toxic effect to F. candida, and decreased the toxicity of leachates to V. fischeri. PMID:27267727

  4. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Njoku, Eni; ONeill, Peggy; Kellogg, Kent; Entin, Jared

    2011-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of the first-tier projects recommended by the U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. The SMAP mission is in formulation phase and it is scheduled for launch in 2014. The SMAP mission is designed to produce high-resolution and accurate global mapping of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state using an instrument architecture that incorporates an L-band (1.26 GHz) radar and an L-band (1.41 GHz) radiometer. The simultaneous radar and radiometer measurements will be combined to derive global soil moisture mapping at 9 [km] resolution with a 2 to 3 days revisit and 0.04 [cm3 cm-3] (1 sigma) soil water content accuracy. The radar measurements also allow the binary detection of surface freeze/thaw state. The project science goals address in water, energy and carbon cycle science as well as provide improved capabilities in natural hazards applications.

  5. The affect of industrial activities on zinc in alluvial Egyptian soil determined using neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Sabour, M F; Abdel-Basset, N

    2002-07-01

    Thirty-two surface (0-20 cm) soil samples were collected from different locations in Egypt representing non-polluted, moderately and highly polluted soils. The aim of this study was to evaluate total Zn content in alluvial soils of Nile Delta in Egypt by using the delayed neutron activation analysis technique (DNAA), in the irradiation facilities of the first Egyptian research reactor (ET-RR-1). The gamma-ray spectra were recorded with a hyper pure germanium detection system. The well resolved gamma-ray peak at 1116.0 keV was efficiently used for 65Zn content determination. Zn content in non-polluted soil samples ranged between 74.1 and 103.8 ppm with an average of 98.5 +/- 5.1 ppm. Zn content in moderately polluted soils ranged between 136.0 and 232.5 ppm with an average of 180.1 +/- 32.6 ppm. The highest Zn levels ranging from 240.0 and 733.0 ppm with an average of 410.3 +/- 54.4 ppm, were observed in soil samples collected from, either highly polluted agricultural soils exposed to prolonged irrigation with industrial wastewater or surface soil samples from industrial sites. PMID:12211982

  6. Diverse effects of arsenic on selected enzyme activities in soil-plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Lyubun, Yelena V; Pleshakova, Ekaterina V; Mkandawire, Martin; Turkovskaya, Olga V

    2013-11-15

    Under the influence of pollutants, enzyme activities in plant-microbe-soil systems undergo changes of great importance in predicting soil-plant-microbe interactions, regulation of metal and nutrient uptake, and, ultimately, improvement of soil health and fertility. We evaluated the influence of As on soil enzyme activities and the effectiveness of five field crops for As phytoextraction. The initial As concentration in soil was 50mg As kg(-1) soil; planted clean soil, unplanted polluted soil, and unplanted clean soil served as controls. After 10 weeks, the growth of the plants elevated soil dehydrogenase activity relative to polluted but unplanted control soils by 2.4- and 2.5-fold for sorghum and sunflower (respectively), by 3-fold for ryegrass and sudangrass, and by 5.2-fold for spring rape. Soil peroxidase activity increased by 33% with ryegrass and rape, while soil phosphatase activity was directly correlated with residual As (correlation coefficient R(2)=0.7045). We conclude that soil enzyme activities should be taken into account when selecting plants for phytoremediation. PMID:24121674

  7. Comparative resistance and resilience of soil microbial communities and enzyme activities in adjacent native forest and agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Chaer, Guilherme; Fernandes, Marcelo; Myrold, David; Bottomley, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Degradation of soil properties following deforestation and long-term soil cultivation may lead to decreases in soil microbial diversity and functional stability. In this study, we investigated the differences in the stability (resistance and resilience) of microbial community composition and enzyme activities in adjacent soils under either native tropical forest (FST) or in agricultural cropping use for 14 years (AGR). Mineral soil samples (0 to 5 cm) from both areas were incubated at 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C, 60 degrees C, or 70 degrees C for 15 min in order to successively reduce the microbial biomass. Three and 30 days after the heat shocks, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis, cellulase and laccase activities, and phospholipid-derived fatty acids-based microbial community composition were measured. Microbial biomass was reduced up to 25% in both soils 3 days after the heat shocks. The higher initial values of microbial biomass, enzyme activity, total and particulate soil organic carbon, and aggregate stability in the FST soil coincided with higher enzymatic stability after heat shocks. FDA hydrolysis activity was less affected (more resistance) and cellulase and laccase activities recovered more rapidly (more resilience) in the FST soil relative to the AGR counterpart. In the AGR soil, laccase activity did not show resilience to any heat shock level up to 30 days after the disturbance. Within each soil type, the microbial community composition did not differ between heat shock and control samples at day 3. However, at day 30, FST soil samples treated at 60 degrees C and 70 degrees C contained a microbial community significantly different from the control and with lower biomass regardless of high enzyme resilience. Results of this study show that deforestation followed by long-term cultivation changed microbial community composition and had differential effects on microbial functional stability. Both soils displayed similar resilience to FDA hydrolysis, a

  8. Long-term rice cultivation stabilizes soil organic carbon and promotes soil microbial activity in a salt marsh derived soil chronosequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Yalong; Li, Lianqing; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Joseph, Stephen; Pan, Genxing

    2015-10-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration with enhanced stable carbon storage has been widely accepted as a very important ecosystem property. Yet, the link between carbon stability and bio-activity for ecosystem functioning with OC accumulation in field soils has not been characterized. We assessed the changes in microbial activity versus carbon stability along a paddy soil chronosequence shifting from salt marsh in East China. We used mean weight diameter, normalized enzyme activity (NEA) and carbon gain from straw amendment for addressing soil aggregation, microbial biochemical activity and potential C sequestration, respectively. In addition, a response ratio was employed to infer the changes in all analyzed parameters with prolonged rice cultivation. While stable carbon pools varied with total SOC accumulation, soil respiration and both bacterial and fungal diversity were relatively constant in the rice soils. Bacterial abundance and NEA were positively but highly correlated to total SOC accumulation, indicating an enhanced bio-activity with carbon stabilization. This could be linked to an enhancement of particulate organic carbon pool due to physical protection with enhanced soil aggregation in the rice soils under long-term rice cultivation. However, the mechanism underpinning these changes should be explored in future studies in rice soils where dynamic redox conditions exist.

  9. Long-term rice cultivation stabilizes soil organic carbon and promotes soil microbial activity in a salt marsh derived soil chronosequence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Yalong; Li, Lianqing; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Joseph, Stephen; Pan, Genxing

    2015-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration with enhanced stable carbon storage has been widely accepted as a very important ecosystem property. Yet, the link between carbon stability and bio-activity for ecosystem functioning with OC accumulation in field soils has not been characterized. We assessed the changes in microbial activity versus carbon stability along a paddy soil chronosequence shifting from salt marsh in East China. We used mean weight diameter, normalized enzyme activity (NEA) and carbon gain from straw amendment for addressing soil aggregation, microbial biochemical activity and potential C sequestration, respectively. In addition, a response ratio was employed to infer the changes in all analyzed parameters with prolonged rice cultivation. While stable carbon pools varied with total SOC accumulation, soil respiration and both bacterial and fungal diversity were relatively constant in the rice soils. Bacterial abundance and NEA were positively but highly correlated to total SOC accumulation, indicating an enhanced bio-activity with carbon stabilization. This could be linked to an enhancement of particulate organic carbon pool due to physical protection with enhanced soil aggregation in the rice soils under long-term rice cultivation. However, the mechanism underpinning these changes should be explored in future studies in rice soils where dynamic redox conditions exist. PMID:26503629

  10. Long-term rice cultivation stabilizes soil organic carbon and promotes soil microbial activity in a salt marsh derived soil chronosequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Yalong; Li, Lianqing; Cheng, Kun; Zheng, Jufeng; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jinwei; Joseph, Stephen; Pan, Genxing

    2015-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration with enhanced stable carbon storage has been widely accepted as a very important ecosystem property. Yet, the link between carbon stability and bio-activity for ecosystem functioning with OC accumulation in field soils has not been characterized. We assessed the changes in microbial activity versus carbon stability along a paddy soil chronosequence shifting from salt marsh in East China. We used mean weight diameter, normalized enzyme activity (NEA) and carbon gain from straw amendment for addressing soil aggregation, microbial biochemical activity and potential C sequestration, respectively. In addition, a response ratio was employed to infer the changes in all analyzed parameters with prolonged rice cultivation. While stable carbon pools varied with total SOC accumulation, soil respiration and both bacterial and fungal diversity were relatively constant in the rice soils. Bacterial abundance and NEA were positively but highly correlated to total SOC accumulation, indicating an enhanced bio-activity with carbon stabilization. This could be linked to an enhancement of particulate organic carbon pool due to physical protection with enhanced soil aggregation in the rice soils under long-term rice cultivation. However, the mechanism underpinning these changes should be explored in future studies in rice soils where dynamic redox conditions exist. PMID:26503629

  11. Optimization on Emergency Longitudinal Ventilation Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Se, Camby M. K.; Yuen, Richard K. K.; Cheung, Sherman C. P.; Tu, Jiyuan

    2010-05-01

    Emergency ventilation design in longitudinally ventilated vehicular tunnels is vital to provide safe egress route for tunnel user under fire situations. In this study, the influences of the location of active fan groups on the upstream velocity are investigated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The numeric model was firstly validated again the experimental data from Memorial Tunnel Fire Ventilation Test Program (MTFVTP). Based on the validated model, parametric studies were then preformed attempting to establish a semi-empirical correlation between the location of fan groups and the upstream velocity. In the presence of solid fire, it was found that the buoyant force by the fire source and inertial force by the fans interact with each other and resulted in a "leveling-off" characteristic when the inertial force is no longer dominating. Such interaction re-distributed the ventilation flow direction and sequentially reduces the magnitude of the upstream velocity. In other word, the industrial practice of activating furthest fan group may not be able to prevent the backlayering as a consequence of solid fires. Fans closer to the fire source are recommended to be activated for preventing the hazard of backlayering. Furthermore, through the parametric study, location of ventilation fans is found to have significant effect on the upstream velocity. Such finding suggests that other geometrical parameters could also impose adverse effects to the ventilation system. Existing empirical equation could be insufficient to cover all possible ventilation design scenarios.

  12. Chemical properties and toxicity of soils contaminated by mining activity.

    PubMed

    Agnieszka, Baran; Tomasz, Czech; Jerzy, Wieczorek

    2014-09-01

    This research is aimed at assessing the total content and soluble forms of metals (zinc, lead and cadmium) and toxicity of soils subjected to strong human pressure associated with mining of zinc and lead ores. The research area lay in the neighbourhood of the Bolesław Mine and Metallurgical Plant in Bukowno (Poland). The study obtained total cadmium concentration between 0.29 and 51.91 mg, zinc between 7.90 and 3,614 mg, and that of lead between 28.4 and 6844 mg kg(-1) of soil d.m. The solubility of the heavy metals in 1 mol dm(-3) NH4NO3 was 1-49% for zinc, 5-45% for cadmium, and <1-10% for lead. In 1 mol HCl dm(-3), the solubility of the studied metals was much higher and obtained values depending on the collection site, from 45 to 92% for zinc, from 74 to 99%, and from 79 to 99% for lead. The lower solubility of the heavy metals in 1 mol dm(-3) NH4NO3 than 1 mol HCl dm(-3) is connected with that, the ammonium nitrate has low extraction power, and it is used in determining the bioavailable (active) form of heavy metals. Toxicity assessment of the soil samples was performed using two tests, Phytotoxkit and Microtox(®). Germination index values were between 22 and 75% for Sinapis alba, between 28 and 100% for Lepidium sativum, and between 10 and 28% for Sorghum saccharatum. Depending on the studied soil sample, Vibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition was 20-96%. The sensitivity of the test organisms formed the following series: S. saccharatum > S. alba = V. fischeri > L. sativum. Significant positive correlations (p ≤ 0.05) of the total and soluble contents of the metals with luminescence inhibition in V. fischeri and root growth inhibition in S. saccharatum were found. The general trend observed was an increase in metal toxicity measured by the biotest with increasing available metal contents in soils. All the soil samples were classified into toxicity class III, which means that they are toxic and present severe danger. Biotest are a good complement to

  13. [Heidaigou Opencast Coal Mine: Soil Enzyme Activities and Soil Physical and Chemical Properties Under Different Vegetation Restoration].

    PubMed

    Fang, Ying; Ma, Ren-tian; An, Shao-shan; Zhao, Jun-feng; Xiao, Li

    2016-03-15

    Choosing the soils under different vegetation recovery of Heidaigou dump as the research objects, we mainly analyzed their basic physical and chemical properties and enzyme activities with the method of Analysis of Variance as well as their relations using Pearson correlation analysis and path analysis hoping to uncover the driving factors of the differences between soil enzyme activities under different vegetation restoration, and provide scientific suggestions for the plant selection as well as make a better evaluation to the reclamation effect. The results showed that: (1) Although the artificial vegetation restoration improved the basic physical and chemical properties of the soils while increasing their enzyme activities to a certain extent, the soil conditions still did not reach the level of the natural grassland; (2) Contents of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil total nitrogen (TN) of the seabuckthorns were the nearest to those of the grassland, which reached 54. 22% and 70. 00% of those of the grassland. In addition, the soil bulk density of the seabuckthorns stand was 17. 09% lower than the maximum value of the amorpha fruitcosa land. The SOC and TN contents as well as the bulk density showed that seabuckthorns had advantages as the species for land reclamation of this dump; Compared with the seabuckthorn, the pure poplar forest had lower contents of SOC and TN respectively by 35.64% and 32.14% and displayed a 16.79% higher value of soil bulk density; (3) The activities of alkaline phosphotase under different types of vegetation rehabilitation had little variation. But soil urease activities was more sensitive to reflect the effects of vegetation restoration on soil properties; (4) Elevation of the SOC and TN turned out to be the main cause for soil fertility restoration and increased biological activities of the dump. PMID:27337909

  14. Ventilation Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    V. Chipman; J. Case

    2002-12-20

    The purpose of the Ventilation Model is to simulate the heat transfer processes in and around waste emplacement drifts during periods of forced ventilation. The model evaluates the effects of emplacement drift ventilation on the thermal conditions in the emplacement drifts and surrounding rock mass, and calculates the heat removal by ventilation as a measure of the viability of ventilation to delay the onset of peak repository temperature and reduce its magnitude. The heat removal by ventilation is temporally and spatially dependent, and is expressed as the fraction of heat carried away by the ventilation air compared to the fraction of heat produced by radionuclide decay. One minus the heat removal is called the wall heat fraction, or the remaining amount of heat that is transferred via conduction to the surrounding rock mass. Downstream models, such as the ''Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model'' (BSC 2001), use the wall heat fractions as outputted from the Ventilation Model to initialize their post-closure analyses. The Ventilation Model report was initially developed to analyze the effects of preclosure continuous ventilation in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) emplacement drifts, and to provide heat removal data to support EBS design. Revision 00 of the Ventilation Model included documentation of the modeling results from the ANSYS-based heat transfer model. Revision 01 ICN 01 included the results of the unqualified software code MULTIFLUX to assess the influence of moisture on the ventilation efficiency. The purposes of Revision 02 of the Ventilation Model are: (1) To validate the conceptual model for preclosure ventilation of emplacement drifts and verify its numerical application in accordance with new procedural requirements as outlined in AP-SIII-10Q, Models (Section 7.0). (2) To satisfy technical issues posed in KTI agreement RDTME 3.14 (Reamer and Williams 2001a). Specifically to demonstrate, with respect to the ANSYS ventilation model, the adequacy of

  15. Evaluation of the Effects of Tillage on Selected Soil Enzyme Activities and Soil Microbial Diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The number, diversity and distribution of microorganisms in the soil and their ability to function within an ecosystem may refelct on the quality of the soil. Research shows that tillage systems, minimum and no-till (NT) or conventionally tilled (CT) soils may affect the properties of soil. Soil en...

  16. Spacecraft Environmental Testing SMAP (Soil, Moisture, Active, Passive)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fields, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Testing a complete full up spacecraft to verify it will survive the environment, in which it will be exposed to during its mission, is a formidable task in itself. However, the ''test like you fly'' philosophy sometimes gets compromised because of cost, design and or time. This paper describes the thermal-vacuum and mass properties testing of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) earth orbiting satellite. SMAP will provide global observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state (the hydrosphere state). SMAP hydrosphere state measurements will be used to enhance understanding of processes that link the water, energy, and carbon cycles, and to extend the capabilities of weather and climate prediction models. It will explain the problems encountered, and the solutions developed, which minimized the risk typically associated with such an arduous process. Also discussed, the future of testing on expensive long lead-time spacecraft. Will we ever reach the ''build and shoot" scenario with minimal or no verification testing?

  17. Effects of long term irrigation with polluted water and sludge amendment on some soil enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    Topac, F.O.; Baskaya, H.S.; Alkan, U.; Katkat, A.V.

    2008-01-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of wastewater sludge-fly ash mixtures on urease, dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase and beta-glucosidase activities in soils. In order to evaluate the probable effects of previous soil management practices (irrigation with polluted water) on soil enzymes, two different soil samples which were similar in physical properties, but different in irrigation practice were used. The application of wastewater sludges supplemented with varying doses of fly ash increased potential enzyme activities for a short period of time (3 months) in comparison to unamended soils. However, the activity levels generally showed a decreasing trend with increasing ash ratios indicating the inhibitory effect of fly ash. The urease and dehydrogenase activities were particularly lower in soils irrigated from a polluted stream, indicating the negative effects of the previous soil management on soil microbial activity.

  18. [Effects of different cropping patterns on soil enzyme activities and soil microbial community diversity in oasis farmland].

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Liu, Yu; Chu, Gui-xin

    2015-02-01

    Effects of long-term cropping patterns on the activities of peroxidase, invertase, arylsulfatase, dehydrogenase and protease were investigated in this paper. Four long-term cropping patterns included (1) 10 years continuous cropping of corn, (2) 8 years continuous cropping of wheat followed by 10 years continuous cropping of cotton, (3) 15 years continuous cropping of cotton, and (4) 6 years continuous cropping of cotton followed by 6 years of wheat/sunflower rotation. The responses of soil bacteria, fungi, ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) , and the ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) to different copping patterns were analyzed. The results showed that cropping patterns significantly affected the activities of soil peroxidase, arylsulfatase, dehydrogenase and protease, while had no significant effect on soil invertase activity. The cropping patterns significantly influenced the diversity index of AOA, but had no significant influence on that of soil bacteria, fungi and AOB. The community structures of soil fungi and AOB were more sensitive to cropping patterns than soil bacteria and AOA. In conclusion, long-term continuous cropping of cotton decreased the activities of soil enzymes activities and soil microbial diversity in oasis farmland, while crop rotation could alleviate the negative influence. PMID:26094465

  19. Potential enzyme activities in cryoturbated organic matter of arctic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnecker, J.; Wild, B.; Rusalimova, O.; Mikutta, R.; Guggenberger, G.; Richter, A.

    2012-12-01

    An estimated 581 Gt organic carbon is stored in arctic soils that are affected by cryoturbtion, more than in today's atmosphere (450 Gt). The high amount of organic carbon is, amongst other factors, due to topsoil organic matter (OM) that has been subducted by freeze-thaw processes. This cryoturbated OM is usually hundreds to thousands of years old, while the chemical composition remains largely unaltered. It has therefore been suggested, that the retarded decomposition rates cannot be explained by unfavourable abiotic conditions in deeper soil layers alone. Since decomposition of soil organic material is dependent on extracellular enzymes, we measured potential and actual extracellular enzyme activities in organic topsoil, mineral subsoil and cryoturbated material from three different tundra sites, in Zackenberg (Greenland) and Cherskii (North-East Siberia). In addition we analysed the microbial community structure by PLFAs. Hydrolytic enzyme activities, calculated on a per gram dry mass basis, were higher in organic topsoil horizons than in cryoturbated horizons, which in turn were higher than in mineral horizons. When calculated on per gram carbon basis, the activity of the carbon acquiring enzyme exoglucanase was not significantly different between cryoturbated and topsoil organic horizons in any of the three sites. Oxidative enzymes, i.e. phenoloxidase and peroxidase, responsible for degradation of complex organic substances, showed higher activities in topsoil organic and cryoturbated horizons than in mineral horizons, when calculated per gram dry mass. Specific activities (per g C) however were highest in mineral horizons. We also measured actual cellulase activities (by inhibiting microbial uptake of products and without substrate addition): calculated per g C, the activities were up to ten times as high in organic topsoil compared to cryoturbated and mineral horizons, the latter not being significantly different. The total amount of PLFAs, as a proxy for

  20. [Effects of the Vital Activity of Soil Insect Larvae on Microbial Processes in the Soil].

    PubMed

    Samoilova, E S; Kostina, N V; Striganova, B R

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Elateridae larvae (wireworms) on the structure, functional diversity, and tolerance of the soil microbial population in steppe ecosystems have been investigated. The trophic and locomotor activity of wireworms leads to an appreciable increase in bacterial abundance and suppression of fungal activity. The fungal hyphae in the presence of wireworms are significantly damaged, which can be related to the feeding activity of Elateridae. The increase of bacterial abundance on the background of exclusion of the fungal component shifts the microbial succession to the acceleration of organic matter mineralization. The microbial consumption of mono- and oligosaccharides, alcohols, and water-soluble compounds increases in the presence of wireworms (multisubstrate test). The effect of Elateridae larvae on the microorganisms transforming nitrogen compounds is species-specific. Agriotes obscurus activity decreases their consumption of urea and creatinine by 2.1-2.5 times, and Selatosomus aeneus increases it by 1.3 and 2.5 times, respectively. The intensity of actual nitrogen fixation in the soil increases in the presence of wireworms by almost 4 times, but the losses of gaseous nitrogen do not increase because of the decrease in both the denitrification and methanogenesis rates PMID:26852485

  1. Early results of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosh, M. H.; Jackson, T. J.; Colliander, A.; Goodrich, D. C.; Holifield Collins, C.; McKee, L.; Kim, S.; Yueh, S. H.

    2015-12-01

    In August of 2015, the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15) was conducted to provide a high resolution soil moisture dataset for the calibration/validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP). The Upper San Pedro River Basin and the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch LTAR Watershed provides the infrastructure for the experiment with its extensive soil moisture and soil temperature network. A total of seven aircraft flights are planned for the Passive Active L-Band Scanning instrument (PALS) to provide a high resolution soil moisture map for a variety of soil moisture conditions across the domain. Extensive surface roughness, vegetation and soil rock fraction mapping was conducted to provide a ground truth estimate of the many ancillary datasets used in the SMAP soil moisture algorithms. A review of the methodologies employed in the experiment, as well as initial findings will be discussed.

  2. 77 FR 35323 - National Environmental Policy Act: Categorical Exclusions for Soil and Water Restoration Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... for Soil and Water Restoration Activities AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of proposed... effects of soil and water restoration projects that are intended to restore the flow of waters into... activities that achieve soil and water restoration objectives. The Forest Service's proposed...

  3. Early results of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In August of 2015, the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment (SMAPVEX15) was conducted to provide a high resolution soil moisture dataset for the calibration/validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP). The Upper San Pedro River Basin and the USDA-ARS Walnut Gulch LTAR...

  4. Mechanical ventilation in children.

    PubMed

    Kendirli, Tanil; Kavaz, Asli; Yalaki, Zahide; Oztürk Hişmi, Burcu; Derelli, Emel; Ince, Erdal

    2006-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation can be lifesaving, but > 50% of complications in conditions that require intensive care are related to ventilatory support, particularly if it is prolonged. We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of patients who had mechanical ventilation in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) during a follow-up period between January 2002-May 2005. Medical records of 407 patients were reviewed. Ninety-one patients (22.3%) were treated with mechanical ventilation. Ages of all patients were between 1-180 (median: 8) months. The mechanical ventilation time was 18.8 +/- 14.1 days. Indication of mechanical ventilation could be divided into four groups as respiratory failure (64.8%), cardiovascular failure (19.7%), central nervous system disease (9.8%) and safety airway (5.4%). Tracheostomy was performed in four patients. The complication ratio of mechanically ventilated children was 42.8%, and diversity of complications was as follows: 26.3% atelectasia, 17.5% ventilator-associated pneumonia, 13.1% pneumothorax, 5.4% bleeding, 4.3% tracheal edema, and 2.1% chronic lung disease. The mortality rate of mechanically ventilated patients was 58.3%, but the overall mortality rate in the PICU was 12.2%. In conclusion, there are few published epidemiological data on the follow-up results and mortality in infants and children who are mechanically ventilated. PMID:17290566

  5. Noninvasive ventilation in trauma.

    PubMed

    Karcz, Marcin K; Papadakos, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Trauma patients are a diverse population with heterogeneous needs for ventilatory support. This requirement depends mainly on the severity of their ventilatory dysfunction, degree of deterioration in gaseous exchange, any associated injuries, and the individual feasibility of potentially using a noninvasive ventilation approach. Noninvasive ventilation may reduce the need to intubate patients with trauma-related hypoxemia. It is well-known that these patients are at increased risk to develop hypoxemic respiratory failure which may or may not be associated with hypercapnia. Hypoxemia in these patients is due to ventilation perfusion mismatching and right to left shunt because of lung contusion, atelectasis, an inability to clear secretions as well as pneumothorax and/or hemothorax, all of which are common in trauma patients. Noninvasive ventilation has been tried in these patients in order to avoid the complications related to endotracheal intubation, mainly ventilator-associated pneumonia. The potential usefulness of noninvasive ventilation in the ventilatory management of trauma patients, though reported in various studies, has not been sufficiently investigated on a large scale. According to the British Thoracic Society guidelines, the indications and efficacy of noninvasive ventilation treatment in respiratory distress induced by trauma have thus far been inconsistent and merely received a low grade recommendation. In this review paper, we analyse and compare the results of various studies in which noninvasive ventilation was applied and discuss the role and efficacy of this ventilator modality in trauma. PMID:25685722

  6. The Potential of Soft Soil Improvement Through a Coupled Technique Between Electro Kinetic and Alkaline Activation of Soft Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, G. E.; Ismail, H. B.; Huat, B. K.; Afshin, A.; Azhar, A. T. S.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization techniques have been in development for decades with different rates of success. Alkaline activation of soft soil is one of those techniques that has proved to deliver some of the best shear strength values with minor drawbacks in comparison with conventional soil stabilization methods. However, environmental considerations have not been taken into account, as major mineral glassy phase activators are poisoning alkaline solutions, such as sodium-, potassium-hydroxide, and sodium-, potassium-silicate, which poses serious hazards to man and environment. This paper addresses the ways of discarding the involvement of the aforementioned alkaline solutions in soft soil stabilization by investigating the potential of a coupled electro kinetic alkaline activation technique for soft soil strengthening, through which the provision of alkaline pH is governed by electro kinetic potential. Uncertainties in regard to the dissolution of aluminosilicate as well as the dominance of acidic front are challenges that need to be overcome.

  7. Mechanical ventilation and mobilization: comparison between genders.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Christiane Riedi; Alessandra de Matos, Carla; Barbosa de Meneses, Jessica; Bucoski, Suzane Chaves Machado; Fréz, Andersom Ricardo; Mora, Cintia Teixeira Rossato; Ruaro, João Afonso

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the impact of gender on mobilization and mechanical ventilation in hospitalized patients in an intensive care unit. [Subjects and Methods] A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted of the medical records of 105 patients admitted to a general intensive care unit. The length of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay, weaning, time to sitting out of bed, time to performing active exercises, and withdrawal of sedation exercises were evaluated in addition to the characteristics of individuals, reasons for admission and risk scores. [Results] Women had significantly lower values APACHE II scores, duration of mechanical ventilation, time to withdrawal of sedation and time to onset of active exercises. [Conclusion] Women have a better functional response when admitted to the intensive care unit, spending less time ventilated and performing active exercises earlier. PMID:25995558

  8. Geophysical Monitoring of Microbial Activity within a Wetland Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, M.; Zhang, C.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.

    2007-05-01

    We performed Induced Polarization (IP) and Self Potential (SP) measurements to record the geoelectrical signatures of microbial activity within a wetland soil. The experiment was conducted in laboratory, utilizing an open flow column set up. Soil samples from Kearny Marsh (KM), a shallow water wetland, were collected and stored at 4o Celsius prior to the start of the experiment. Two columns were dry packed with a mix of KM soil and sterile Ottawa sand (50% by weight). One column was sterilized and used as a control while the other column retained the biologically active soil sample. Both columns were saturated with a minimal salts medium capable of supporting microbial life; after saturation, a steady flow rate of one pore volume per day was maintained throughout the experiment. Ambient temperature and pressure changes (at the inflow and outflow of each column) were continuously monitored throughout the experiment. Common geochemical parameters, such as Eh, pH, and fluid conductivity were measured at the inflow and outflow of each column at regular intervals. IP and SP responses were continuously recorded on both columns utilizing a series of electrodes along the column length; additionally for the SP measurements we used a reference electrode at the inflow tube. Strong SP anomalies were observed for all the locations along the active column. Black visible mineral precipitant also formed in the active column. The observed precipitation coincided with the times that SP anomalies developed at each electrode position. These responses are associated with microbial induced sulfide mineralization. We interpret the SP signal as the result of redox processes associated with this mineralization driven by gradients in ionic concentration and mobility within the column, similar to a galvanic cell mechanism. IP measurements show no correlation with these visual and SP responses. Destructive analysis of the samples followed the termination of the experiment. Scanning electron

  9. In vitro activity of ceftazidime/avibactam against Gram-negative pathogens isolated from pneumonia in hospitalised patients, including ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Flamm, Robert K; Nichols, Wright W; Sader, Helio S; Farrell, David J; Jones, Ronald N

    2016-03-01

    The activities of the novel β-lactam/non-β-lactam β-lactamase inhibitor combination ceftazidime/avibactam and comparators were evaluated against isolates from pneumonia in hospitalised patients including ventilated patients (PHP, pneumonia not designated as VABP; VABP, pneumonia in ventilated patients). Isolates were from the European-Mediterranean region (EuM), China and the USA collected in the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program between 2009 and 2011 inclusive. A total of 2393 organisms from PHP were from the EuM, 888 from China and 3213 from the USA; from VABP patients there were 918, 97 and 692 organisms collected, respectively. Among Enterobacteriaceae from PHP, ceftazidime/avibactam MIC90 values against Escherichia coli ranged from 0.25-0.5mg/L and Klebsiella spp. MIC90 values were 0.5mg/L in each region. Among VABP isolates, MIC90 values for ceftazidime/avibactam against E. coli were 0.25mg/L; for Klebsiella spp. from VABP patients, MIC90 values were similar to those obtained against PHP isolates. The MIC of ceftazidime/avibactam was ≤8mg/L against 92-96% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from PHP patients. Isolates of P. aeruginosa from VABP patients were of lower susceptibility to all antibacterial agents (e.g. depending on region, meropenem susceptibilities were 51.2-69.4% in contrast to 68.3-76.7% among PHP patients). However, ceftazidime/avibactam inhibited 79.2-95.4% of VABP isolates at an MIC of ≤8mg/L. Acinetobacter spp. were resistant to many agents and only rates of susceptibility to colistin were >90% across all regions both for PHP and VABP isolates. Ceftazidime/avibactam was generally active against a high proportion of isolates resistant to ceftazidime from PHP and VAPB patients. PMID:26920105

  10. Expression of allelopathy in the soil environment: Soil concentration and activity of benzoxazinoid compounds released by rye cover crop residue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The activity of allelopathic compounds is often reduced in the soil environment where processes involving release from donor plant material, soil adsorption and degradation, and uptake by receptor plants naturally result in complex interactions. Rye (Secale cereale L.) cover crops are known to supp...

  11. Effect of Trigger Sensitivity on Redistribution of Ventilation During Pressure Support Ventilation Detected by Electrical Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Oliver C.; Schneider, Thomas; Vogel, Elisabeth; Koch, Thea

    2015-01-01

    Background: In supine position, pressure support ventilation causes a redistribution of ventilation towards the ventral regions of the lung. Theoretically, a less sensitive support trigger would cause the patient to breathe more actively, potentially attenuating the effect of positive pressure ventilation. Objectives: To quantify the effect of trigger setting, we assessed redistribution of ventilation during pressure support ventilation (PSV) using electrical impedance tomography (EIT). Patients and Methods: With approval from the local ethics committee, six orthopedic patients were enrolled. All patients had general anesthesia with a laryngeal mask airway and a standardized anesthetic regimen (sufentanil, propofol and sevoflurane). Pressure support trigger settings varied between 2 and 15 L/minute and compared to unassisted spontaneous breathing. From EIT data, the center of ventilation (COV), the fraction of the total ventilation per region of interest (ROI) and intratidal gas distribution were calculated. Results: At all trigger settings, pressure support ventilation caused a significant ventral shift of the center of ventilation compared with during spontaneous breathing, confirmed by the analysis by regions of interest. During spontaneous breathing, COV was not different from baseline values obtained before induction of anesthesia. During PSV, the intratidal regional gas distribution (ITV-analysis) revealed subtle changes during the early inspiratory phase not detected by the COV-analysis. Conclusions: Pressure support ventilation, but not spontaneous breathing, induces a significant redistribution of ventilation towards the ventral region. The sensitivity of the support trigger appears to influence the distribution of ventilation only during the early phase of inspiration. PMID:26478865

  12. Ventilatory failure, ventilator support, and ventilator weaning.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Martin J; Laghi, Franco; Jubran, Amal

    2012-10-01

    The development of acute ventilatory failure represents an inability of the respiratory control system to maintain a level of respiratory motor output to cope with the metabolic demands of the body. The level of respiratory motor output is also the main determinant of the degree of respiratory distress experienced by such patients. As ventilatory failure progresses and patient distress increases, mechanical ventilation is instituted to help the respiratory muscles cope with the heightened workload. While a patient is connected to a ventilator, a physician's ability to align the rhythm of the machine with the rhythm of the patient's respiratory centers becomes the primary determinant of the level of rest accorded to the respiratory muscles. Problems of alignment are manifested as failure to trigger, double triggering, an inflationary gas-flow that fails to match inspiratory demands, and an inflation phase that persists after a patient's respiratory centers have switched to expiration. With recovery from disorders that precipitated the initial bout of acute ventilatory failure, attempts are made to discontinue the ventilator (weaning). About 20% of weaning attempts fail, ultimately, because the respiratory controller is unable to sustain ventilation and this failure is signaled by development of rapid shallow breathing. Substantial advances in the medical management of acute ventilatory failure that requires ventilator assistance are most likely to result from research yielding novel insights into the operation of the respiratory control system. PMID:23720268

  13. Pretest Predictions for Phase II Ventilation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Yiming Sun

    2001-09-19

    The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, and concrete pipe walls that will be developed during the Phase II ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as inputs to validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation, and be used to support the repository subsurface design. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the Phase II ventilation tests, and describe numerical methods that are used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only. This engineering work activity is conducted in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Subsurface Performance Testing for License Application (LA) for Fiscal Year 2001'' (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This technical work plan (TWP) includes an AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', activity evaluation (CRWMS M&O 2000d, Addendum A) that has determined this activity is subject to the YMP quality assurance (QA) program. The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12Q procedure, ''Calculations''. Additional background information regarding this activity is contained in the ''Development Plan for Ventilation Pretest Predictive Calculation'' (DP) (CRWMS M&O 2000a).

  14. Effect of cassava mill effluent on biological activity of soil microbial community.

    PubMed

    Igbinosa, Etinosa O

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed the effect of cassava effluent on soil microbiological characteristics and enzymatic activities were investigated in soil samples. Soil properties and heavy metal concentrations were evaluated using standard soil analytical and spectroscopic methods, respectively. The microbiological parameters measured include microbial biomass carbon, basal soil respiration, catalase, urease, dehydrogenase activities and number of culturable aerobic bacteria, fungi and actinomycetes. The pH and temperature regime vary significantly (p < 0.05) throughout the study period. All other physicochemical parameters studied were significantly different (p < 0.05) higher than the control site. Soil organic carbon content gave significant positive correlations with microbial biomass carbon, basal soil respiration, catalase activity and dehydrogenase activity (r = 0.450, 0.461, 0.574 and 0.591 at p < 0.01), respectively. The quantitative analysis of soil microbial density demonstrates a marked decrease in total culturable numbers of the different microbial groups of the polluted soil samples. Soil contamination decreased catalase, urease and dehydrogenase activities. The findings revealed that soil enzymes can be used as indices of soil contamination and bio-indicator of soil quality. PMID:26055654

  15. Soil Microbial Biomass, Basal Respiration and Enzyme Activity of Main Forest Types in the Qinling Mountains

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Fei; Peng, Xiaobang; Zhao, Peng; Yuan, Jie; Zhong, Chonggao; Cheng, Yalong; Cui, Cui; Zhang, Shuoxin

    2013-01-01

    Different forest types exert essential impacts on soil physical-chemical characteristics by dominant tree species producing diverse litters and root exudates, thereby further regulating size and activity of soil microbial communities. However, the study accuracy is usually restricted by differences in climate, soil type and forest age. Our objective is to precisely quantify soil microbial biomass, basal respiration and enzyme activity of five natural secondary forest (NSF) types with the same stand age and soil type in a small climate region and to evaluate relationship between soil microbial and physical-chemical characters. We determined soil physical-chemical indices and used the chloroform fumigation-extraction method, alkali absorption method and titration or colorimetry to obtain the microbial data. Our results showed that soil physical-chemical characters remarkably differed among the NSFs. Microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) was the highest in wilson spruce soils, while microbial biomass nitrogen (Nmic) was the highest in sharptooth oak soils. Moreover, the highest basal respiration was found in the spruce soils, but mixed, Chinese pine and spruce stands exhibited a higher soil qCO2. The spruce soils had the highest Cmic/Nmic ratio, the greatest Nmic/TN and Cmic/Corg ratios were found in the oak soils. Additionally, the spruce soils had the maximum invertase activity and the minimum urease and catalase activities, but the maximum urease and catalase activities were found in the mixed stand. The Pearson correlation and principle component analyses revealed that the soils of spruce and oak stands obviously discriminated from other NSFs, whereas the others were similar. This suggested that the forest types affected soil microbial properties significantly due to differences in soil physical-chemical features. PMID:23840671

  16. Soil microbial biomass, basal respiration and enzyme activity of main forest types in the Qinling Mountains.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fei; Peng, Xiaobang; Zhao, Peng; Yuan, Jie; Zhong, Chonggao; Cheng, Yalong; Cui, Cui; Zhang, Shuoxin

    2013-01-01

    Different forest types exert essential impacts on soil physical-chemical characteristics by dominant tree species producing diverse litters and root exudates, thereby further regulating size and activity of soil microbial communities. However, the study accuracy is usually restricted by differences in climate, soil type and forest age. Our objective is to precisely quantify soil microbial biomass, basal respiration and enzyme activity of five natural secondary forest (NSF) types with the same stand age and soil type in a small climate region and to evaluate relationship between soil microbial and physical-chemical characters. We determined soil physical-chemical indices and used the chloroform fumigation-extraction method, alkali absorption method and titration or colorimetry to obtain the microbial data. Our results showed that soil physical-chemical characters remarkably differed among the NSFs. Microbial biomass carbon (Cmic) was the highest in wilson spruce soils, while microbial biomass nitrogen (Nmic) was the highest in sharptooth oak soils. Moreover, the highest basal respiration was found in the spruce soils, but mixed, Chinese pine and spruce stands exhibited a higher soil qCO2. The spruce soils had the highest Cmic/Nmic ratio, the greatest Nmic/TN and Cmic/Corg ratios were found in the oak soils. Additionally, the spruce soils had the maximum invertase activity and the minimum urease and catalase activities, but the maximum urease and catalase activities were found in the mixed stand. The Pearson correlation and principle component analyses revealed that the soils of spruce and oak stands obviously discriminated from other NSFs, whereas the others were similar. This suggested that the forest types affected soil microbial properties significantly due to differences in soil physical-chemical features. PMID:23840671

  17. Effects of Fertilization on Tomato Growth and Soil Enzyme Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Zhen; Hu, Xue-Feng; Cheng, Chang; Luo, Zhi-qing

    2015-04-01

    To study the effects of different fertilizer applications on soil enzyme activity, tomato plant growth and tomato yield and quality, a field experiment on tomato cultivation was carried out in the suburb of Shanghai. Three fertilizer treatments, chemical fertilizer (CF) (N, 260 g/kg; P, 25.71g/kg; K, 83.00g/kg), rapeseed cake manure (CM) (N, 37.4 g/kg; P, 9.0 g/kg; K, 8.46 g/kg), crop-leaf fermenting manure (FM) (N, 23.67 g/kg; P, 6.39 g/kg; K 44.32 g/kg), and a control without using any fertilizers (CK), were designed. The total amounts of fertilizer application to each plot for the CF, CM, FM and CK were 0.6 kg, 1.35 kg, 3.75 kg and 0 kg, respectively, 50% of which were applied as base fertilizer, and another 50% were applied after the first fruit picking as top dressing. Each experimental plot was 9 m2 (1 m × 9 m) in area. Each treatment was replicated for three times. No any pesticides and herbicides were applied during the entire period of tomato growth to prevent their disturbance to soil microbial activities. Soil enzyme activities at each plot were constantly tested during the growing period; the tomato fruit quality was also constantly analyzed and the tomato yield was calculated after the final harvesting. The results were as follows: (1) Urease activity in the soils treated with the CF, CM and FM increased quickly after applying base fertilizer. That with the CF reached the highest level. Sucrase activity was inhibited by the CF and CM to some extent, which was 32.4% and 11.2% lower than that with the CK, respectively; while that with the FM was 15.7% higher than that with the CK. Likewise, catalase activity with the CF increased by 12.3% - 28.6%; that with the CM increased by 87.8% - 95.1%; that with the FM increased by 86.4% - 93.0%. Phosphatase activity with the CF increased rapidly and reached a maximum 44 days after base fertilizer application, and then declined quickly. In comparison, that with the CM and FM increased slowly and reached a maximum

  18. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Armin Rudd

    2005-08-30

    This paper reviews current and potential ventilation technologies for residential buildings, including a variety of mechanical systems, natural ventilation, and passive ventilation. with particular emphasis on North American climates and construction.

  19. Pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan

    MedlinePlus

    V/Q scan; Ventilation/perfusion scan; Lung ventilation/perfusion scan ... A pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan is actually two tests. They may be done separately or together. During the perfusion scan, a health ...

  20. Closed-loop control of respiratory drive using pressure-support ventilation: target drive ventilation.

    PubMed

    Spahija, Jadranka; Beck, Jennifer; de Marchie, Michel; Comtois, Alain; Sinderby, Christer

    2005-05-01

    By using diaphragm electrical activity (multiple-array esophageal electrode) as an index of respiratory drive, and allowing such activity above or below a preset target range to indicate an increased or reduced demand for ventilatory assistance (target drive ventilation), we evaluated whether the level of pressure-support ventilation can be automatically adjusted in response to exercise-induced changes in ventilatory demand. Eleven healthy individuals breathed through a circuit (18 cm H2O/L/second inspiratory resistance at 1 L/second flow; 0.5-1.0 L/second expiratory flow limitation) connected to a modified ventilator. Subjects breathed for 6-minute periods at rest and during 20 and 40 W of bicycle exercise, with and without target drive ventilation (the target was set to 60% of the increase in diaphragm electrical activity observed between rest and 20 W of unassisted exercise). With target drive ventilation during exercise, the level of pressure-support ventilation was automatically increased, reaching 13.3 +/- 4.0 and 20.3 +/- 2.8 cm H2O during 20- and 40-W exercise, respectively, whereas diaphragm electrical activity was reduced to a level within the target range. Both diaphragmatic pressure-time product and end-tidal CO2 were significantly reduced with target drive ventilation at the end of the 20- (p < 0.01) and 40-W (p < 0.001) exercise periods. Minute ventilation was not altered. These results demonstrate that target drive ventilation can automatically adjust pressure-support ventilation, maintaining a constant neural drive and compensating for changes in respiratory demand. PMID:15665323

  1. Soil CO2 constrain and distinction of root respiration and microbial activity by soil CO2 and CH4 profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, S.; Breecker, D.; Nie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Profiles of soil pore space CO2 and CH4 concentrations are rarely reported, especially from the same soils, yet are important for a number of applications. First, quantifying the component of respired CO2 in the soil pore spaces improves paleosol-based paleo-atmospheric CO2 estimates. Second, profiles can be used to estimate the average depth of biological activity (e.g. respiration and CH4 oxidation). Third, CH4 profiles, by identifying microbial activity, may help distinguish root/rhizosphere respiration from microbial decomposition. Here, we report soil CO2 and CH4 profiles measured at the Semi-Arid Climate Observatory and Laboratory (SACOL) on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) at Lanzhou University, Gansu, China. Soil parent material on the site is mainly Quaternary aeolian loess and classifies as an Entisol. Soil respired CO2 (S(z) = soil CO2 - atmospheric CO2) is the most uncertain variable required to reconstruct ancient atmospheric CO2 concentrations from paleosol carbonates. Our direct soil pore space CO2 measurements show that S(z) values varied from ~100ppmV during the spring to ~2200ppmV during the summer. S(z) average 390 ± 30ppmV during May before the summer monsoon begins when soil temperature is increasing, soil water content is at a minimum and pedogenic carbonate may be forming. This value lies in the range of S(z) values previously estimated for surface Inceptisols (300 ± 100ppmV, Breecker 2013) and is lower than Pleistocene CLP paleosols (Da et al.,2015) in similar parent material. Our direct measurements of soil pore space CO2 thus support these previous independent S(z) estimates. We also investigate the average depth of CH4 oxidation and soil respiration, which range from 3-10cm and at least 20cm, respectively, using the shapes of soil gas profiles. Fitting observed soil CO2 and CH4 profiles with a production-diffusion model show that the average depth of CH4 oxidation was always at least 10 cm shallower than the average depth of respiration

  2. Combined effects of cadmium and butachlor on soil enzyme activities and microbial community structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinhua; Lu, Yitong; Shen, Guoqing

    2007-02-01

    The combined effects of cadmium (Cd, 10 mg/kg of soil) and butachlor (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg of soil) on enzyme activities and microbial community structure were assessed in phaeozem soil. The result showed that phosphatase activities were decreased in soils with Cd (10 mg/kg of soil) alone whereas urease acitivities were unaffected by Cd. Urease and phosphatase activities were significantly reduced by high butachlor concentration (50 mg/kg of soil). When Cd and butachlor concentrations in soils were added at milligram ratio of 2:1 or 1:2, urease and phosphatase activities were decreased, while enzyme activities were greatly improved at the ratio of 1:5. This study indicates that the combined effects of Cd and butachlor on soil urease and phosphatase activities depend largely on the addition concentration ratios to soils. The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis showed that the changes occurring in RAPD profiles of different treated samples included variation in loss of normal bands and appearance of new bands compared with the control soil. The RAPD fingerprints showed substantial differences between the control and treated soil samples, with apparent changes in the number and size of amplified DNA fragments. The results showed that the addition of high concentration butachlor and the combined applied Cd and butachlor significantly affected the diversity of microbial community. The present results suggest that RAPD analysis in conjunction with other biomarkers such as soil enzyme parameter etc. would prove a powerful ecotoxicological tool.

  3. Effect of oil and oil products on lipase activity in gray forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireeva, N. A.; Tarasenko, E. M.; Shamaeva, A. A.; Novoselova, E. I.

    2006-08-01

    The effect of different rates of oil and oil products on the lipase activity in gray forest soil was studied under field and laboratory conditions. It was found that hydrocarbons activate the lipolytic activity of the soil. Along with the activation of lipolysis, an increase in the number of hydrocarbon-oxidizing microorganisms and a decrease in the content of oil products were observed.

  4. Multifamily Ventilation Retrofit Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.; Bergey, D.

    2012-12-01

    In multifamily buildings, central ventilation systems often have poor performance, overventilating some portions of the building (causing excess energy use), while simultaneously underventilating other portions (causing diminished indoor air quality). BSC and Innova Services Corporation performed a series of field tests at a mid-rise test building undergoing a major energy audit and retrofit, which included ventilation system upgrades.

  5. Guide to Home Ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    A fact sheet from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Ventilation refers to the exchange of indoor and outdoor air. Without proper ventilation, an otherwise insulated and airtight house will seal in harmful pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, and moisture that can damage a house.

  6. Impact of different tillage treatments on soil respiration and microbial activity for different agricultural used soils in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klik, Andreas; Scholl, Gerlinde; Baatar, Undrakh-Od

    2015-04-01

    Soils can act as a net sink for sequestering carbon and thus attenuating the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide if appropriate soil and crop management is applied. Adapted soil management strategies like less intensive or even no tillage treatments may result in slower mineralization of soil organic carbon and enhanced carbon sequestration. In order to assess the impact of different soil tillage systems on carbon dioxide emissions due to soil respiration and on soil biological activity parameters, a field study of three years duration (2007-2010)has been performed at different sites in Austria. Following tillage treatments were compared: 1) conventional tillage (CT) with plough with and without cover crop during winter period, 2) reduced tillage (RT) with cultivator with cover crop, and 3) no-till (NT) with cover crop. Each treatment was replicated three times. At two sites with similar climatic conditions but different soil textures soil CO2 efflux was measured during the growing seasons in intervals of one to two weeks using a portable soil respiration system consisting of a soil respiration chamber attached to an infrared gas analyzer. Additionally, concurrent soil temperature and soil water contents of the top layer (0-5 cm)were measured. For these and additional three other sites with different soil and climatic conditions soil samples were taken to assess the impact of tillage treatment on soil biological activity parameters. In spring, summer and autumn samples were taken from each plot at the soil depth of 0-10, 10-20, and 20-30 cm to analyze soil microbial respiration (MR), substrate induced respiration (SIR), beta-glucasidase activity (GLU) and dehydrogenase (BHY). Samples were sieved (2 mm) and stored at 4 °C in a refrigerator. Analyses of were performed within one month after sampling. The measurements show a high spatial variability of soil respiration data even within one plot. Nevertheless, the level of soil carbon dioxide efflux was similar for

  7. Soil moisture active passive (SMAP) satellite status and cal/val activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will be launched by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in November 2014. This satellite is the culmination of basic research and applications development over the past thirty years. During most of this period, research and development ...

  8. Building ventilation and indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Hollowell, C.D.; Berk, J.V.; Boegel, M.L.; Miksch, R.R.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Traynor, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    Rising energy prices, among other factors, have generated an incentive to reduce ventilation rates and thereby reduce the cost of heating and cooling buildings. Reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings may significantly increase exposure to indoor contaminants and perhaps have adverse effects on occupant health and comfort. Four indoor air contaminants - carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide from gas appliances; formaldehyde from particleboard, plywood, urea-formaldehyde foam insulation, and gas appliances; and radon from building materials, soil, and ground water - are currently receiving considerable attention in the context of potential health risks associated with reduced infiltration and ventilation rates. These air contaminants in conventional and energy efficient buildings were measured and analyzed with a view to assessing their potential health risks and various control strategies capable of lowering pollutant concentrations. Preliminary findings suggest that further intensive studies are needed in order to develop criteria for maintaining acceptable indoor air quality without compromising energy efficiency.

  9. Effect of cadmium on microbial activity and a ryegrass crop in two semiarid soils.

    PubMed

    Moreno, José L; Sanchez-Marín, Antonio; Hernández, Teresa; García, Carlos

    2006-05-01

    Soil pollution with Cd is an environmental problem common in the world, and it is necessary to establish what Cd concentrations in soil could be dangerous to its fertility from toxicity effects and the risk of transference of this element to plants and other organisms of the food chain. In this study, we assessed Cd toxicity on soil microorganisms and plants in two semiarid soils (uncultivated and cultivated). Soil ATP content, dehydrogenase activity, and plant growth were measured in the two soils spiked with concentrations ranging from 3 to 8000 mg Cd/kg soil and incubated for 3 h, 20 days, and 60 days. The Cd concentrations that produced 5% 10%, and 50% inhibition of each of the two soil microbiological parameter studied (ecological dose, ED, values) were calculated using two different mathematical models. Also, the effect of Cd concentration on plant growth of ryegrass (Lolium perenne, L.) was studied in the two soils. The Cd ED values calculated for soil dehydrogenase activity and ATP content were higher in the agricultural soils than in the bare soil. For ATP inhibition, higher ED values were calculated than for dehydrogenase activity inhibition. The average yields of ryegrass were reduced from 5.03 to 3.56 g in abandoned soil and from 4.21 to 1.15 g in agricultural soil with increasing concentrations of Cd in the soil. Plant growth was totally inhibited in abandoned and agricultural soils at Cd concentrations above 2000 and 5000 mg/kg soil, respectively. There was a positive correlation between the concentration of Cd in the plants and the total or DTPA-extractable concentrations of Cd in the soil. PMID:16485164

  10. Effect of short-duration physical activity and ventilation threshold on subjective appetite and short-term energy intake in boys.

    PubMed

    Bellissimo, Nick; Thomas, Scott G; Goode, Robert C; Anderson, G Harvey

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was twofold: (1) to examine the role of low- to moderate-intensity, short-duration physical activity on subjective appetite and (2) to identify the role of and associations between ventilation threshold (VeT) and energy intake at a pizza lunch 30 min after glucose and whey protein drinks in normal weight boys. In 14 boys (age: 12.5+/-0.4 years) subjective appetite was measured before and after a 12 min walking protocol designed to determine physical fitness based on the VeT. On a separate occasion food intake (FI) and subjective appetite were measured in response to sweetened preloads of either a SPLENDA Sucralose control, glucose or whey protein made up to 250 ml with water, given in random order to each boy, 2h after a standardized breakfast. Subjective average appetite and prospective food consumption scores increased after physical activity. VeT was positively associated with FI at a pizza lunch consumed 30 min after glucose and whey protein drinks. Glucose and whey protein reduced FI similarly at lunch compared with control. In conclusion, appetite is increased by low- to moderate-intensity, short-duration physical activity and FI following glucose and protein preloads is positively associated with fitness levels in boys. PMID:17537539

  11. Calibration and validation of the soil moisture active passive mission with USDA-ARS experimental watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP) is a new NASA mission scheduled for 2014 that will provide a number of soil moisture and freeze/thaw products. The soil moisture products will span spatial resolutions from 3 to 36 km. Key to the validation and calibration of the satellite products are...

  12. Effect of Municipal Wastewater as a Wetland Water Source on Soil Microbial Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial activity, as determined by CO2 evolution, was compared between two soils irrigated with either municipal wastewater effluent or Missouri River water. Irrigation of soils was conducted in greenhouse microcosms with irrigation timing and quantity designed to simulate wetland moist-soil mana...

  13. Reconciling apparent variability in effects of biochar amendment on soil enzyme activities by assay optimization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied the effects of a biochar made from switchgrass on four soil enzymes (ß- glucosidase, ß-N-acetylglucosaminidase, lipase, and leucine aminopeptidase) to determine if biochar would consistently modify soil biological activities. Inconsistent results from enzyme assays of char-amended soils s...

  14. Assessing the biological activity of oil-contaminated soddy-podzolic soils with different textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vershinin, A. A.; Petrov, A. M.; Akaikin, D. V.; Ignat'ev, Yu. A.

    2014-02-01

    The respiratory activity features in oil-contaminated soddy-podzolic soils of different textures have been studied. Unidirectional processes occur in contaminated loamy and loamy sandy soddy-podzolic soils; their intensities depend on the soil parameters. The mineralization rates of the oil products and the activity of the microflora in loamy soils exceed the corresponding parameters for loamy sandy soils. The long-term impact of oil and its transformation products results in more important disturbances of the microbial community in light soils. It has been shown that light soils containing 9% oil require longer time periods or more intensive remediation measures for the restoration of soil microbial cenoses disturbed by the pollutant.

  15. Exogenous IAA treatment enhances phytoremediation of soil contaminated with phenanthrene by promoting soil enzyme activity and increasing microbial biomass.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiming; Wang, Dongsheng; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin; Ma, Lili; Xu, Li

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we aimed to confirm that indole-3-acetic acid promotes plant uptake of phenanthrene (PHE), stimulates the activity of soil enzymes or microflora, and thereby accelerates the dissipation of PHE in soil. Four treatments were evaluated: PHE-contaminated soil planted with (1) ryegrass (T0), (2) ryegrass and supplemented with 1 mg kg(-1) indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) (T1), (3) ryegrass and supplemented with 5 mg kg(-1) IAA (T5), and (4) ryegrass and supplemented with 10 mg kg(-1) IAA (T10). After 30 days, PHE concentrations were lower for all treatments and the removal rate was 70.19, 89.17, 91.26, and 97.07 % for T0, T1, T5, and T10, respectively. PHE was only detected in the roots and not in the shoots. IAA facilitated the accumulation of PHE in the roots, and plants subjected to the T10 treatment had the highest levels. Exogenous IAA stimulated soil peroxidase activity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas soil polyphenoloxidase activity was not significantly increased, except in T10. Soil microbial biomass also increased in response to IAA treatment, particularly in T10. Furthermore, phospholipid fatty acid analysis showed that IAA treatment increased microbial biomass and alleviated environmental stress. Gram-positive bacteria are largely responsible for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation, and we found that the ratio of gram-positive to gram-negative bacteria in the soil significantly increased as the IAA concentrations increased (P < 0.05). Correlation analysis indicated that the increase in soil microbial biomass, enzyme activity, and plant uptake of PHE promotes removal of PHE from the soil. PMID:26884240

  16. Developments in longwall ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, J.F.; Aman, J.P.; Kotch, M.

    1999-07-01

    Rapid development in longwall mining technology has brought significant changes in panel layout and geometry. These changes require adaptations in the ventilation system to provide sufficient air quantities in longwall face and bleeder areas. At CONSOL, various longwall bleeder systems in the Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam have been studied with detailed ventilation surveys. Computer model network simulations were conducted from these surveys to study the effects of different bleeder configurations and ventilation adjustments. This paper examines the relationships between the longwall face air quantity and the convergence in the tailgate-to-bleeder entries, number of development entries, bleeder fan pressure and the tailgate ventilation scheme. It shows that, using conventional ventilation patterns, the face air quantity may be limited if the gob caves tightly. In such cases, modification of the ventilation pattern to an internal bleeder system, combined with appropriate tailgate ventilation and higher bleeder fan pressure may be required. Experience in CONSOL's operations has proven this method successful especially in mines that changed from four-entry to three-entry longwall development.

  17. Soil microbial biomass nitrogen and Beta-Glucosaminidase activity response to compaction, poultry litter application and cropping in a claypan soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Compaction-induced changes in soil physical properties may significantly affect soil microbial activity, especially nitrogen-cycling processes, in many agroecosystems. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of soil compaction on soil microbiological properties related to N in a clay...

  18. Carbon Flux and Isotopic Character of Soil and Soil Gas in Stabilized and Active Thaw Slumps in Northwest Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, A.; Crosby, B. T.; Mora, C. I.; Lohse, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Permafrost soils store nearly half the world's global carbon. Warming of arctic landscape results in permafrost thaw which causes ground subsidence or thermokarst. On hillslopes, these features rapidly and dramatically alter soil structure, temperature, and moisture, as well as the content and quality of soil organic matter. These changes alter both the rate and mechanism of carbon cycling in permafrost soils, making frozen soils available to both anaerobic and aerobic decomposition. In order to improve our predictive capabilities, we use a chronosequence thaw slumps to examine how fluxes from active and stabilized features differ. Our study site is along the Selawik River in northwest Alaska where a retrogressive thaw slump initiated in the spring of 2004. It has grown to a surface area of 50,000 m2. Products of the erosion are stored on the floor of the feature, trapped on a fan or flushed into the Selawik River. North of slump is undisturbed tundra and adjacent to the west is a slump feature that stabilized and is now covered with a second generation of spruce trees. In this 2 year study, we use measurements of CO2 efflux, δC13 in soil profiles and CO2 and CH4 abundance to constrain the response of belowground carbon emissions. We also focused on constraining which environmental factors govern C emissions within each of the above ecosystems. To this end, we measured soil temperature, and moisture, abundance and quality of soil organic carbon (SOC), water content, and bulk carbon compositions. Preliminary data from the summer of 2011 suggest that vegetation composition and soil temperature exert the strong control on CO2 efflux. The floor of the active slump and fan are bare mineral soils and are generally 10 to 15°C warmer than the tundra and stabilized slump. Consistently decreasing δC13 soil gas profiles in the recovered slump confirm that this region is a well-drained soil dominated by C3 vegetation. The δC13 gas profiles for the tundra, active slump

  19. Ventilator-patient dyssynchrony induced by change in ventilation mode.

    PubMed

    Lydon, A M; Doyle, M; Donnelly, M B

    2001-06-01

    Patient-ventilator interactions may be coordinated (synchronous) or uncoordinated (dyssynchronous). Ventilator-patient dyssynchrony increases the work of breathing by imposing a respiratory muscle workload. Respiratory centre output responds to feedback from respiratory muscle loading. Mismatching of respiratory centre output and mechanical assistance results in dyssynchrony. We describe a case of severe patient-ventilator dyssynchrony and hypothesize that dyssynchrony was induced by a change in mode of ventilation from pressure-cycled to volume-cycled ventilation, due to both ventilator settings and by the patient's own respiratory centre adaptation to mechanical ventilation. The causes, management and clinical implications of dyssynchrony are discussed. PMID:11439799

  20. Effects of biochar and elevated soil temperature on soil microbial activity and abundance in an agricultural system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamminger, Chris; Poll, Christian; Marhan, Sven

    2014-05-01

    As a consequence of Global Warming, rising surface temperatures will likely cause increased soil temperatures. Soil warming has already been shown to, at least temporarily, increase microbial activity and, therefore, the emissions of greenhouse gases like CO2 and N2O. This underlines the need for methods to stabilize soil organic matter and to prevent further boost of the greenhouse gas effect. Plant-derived biochar as a soil amendment could be a valuable tool to capture CO2 from the atmosphere and sequestrate it in soil on the long-term. During the process of pyrolysis, plant biomass is heated in an oxygen-low atmosphere producing the highly stable solid matter biochar. Biochar is generally stable against microbial degradation due to its chemical structure and it, therefore, persists in soil for long periods. Previous experiments indicated that biochar improves or changes several physical or chemical soil traits such as water holding capacity, cation exchange capacity or soil structure, but also biotic properties like microbial activity/abundance, greenhouse gas emissions and plant growth. Changes in the soil microbial abundance and community composition alter their metabolism, but likely also affect plant productivity. The interaction of biochar addition and soil temperature increase on soil microbial properties and plant growth was yet not investigated on the field scale. To investigate whether warming could change biochar effects in soil, we conducted a field experiment attached to a soil warming experiment on an agricultural experimental site near the University of Hohenheim, already running since July 2008. The biochar field experiment was set up as two-factorial randomized block design (n=4) with the factors biochar amendment (0, 30 t ha-1) and soil temperature (ambient, elevated=ambient +2.5° C) starting from August 2013. Each plot has a dimension of 1x1m and is equipped with combined soil temperature and moisture sensors. Slow pyrolysis biochar from the C

  1. Fibroblast activation in cancer: when seed fertilizes soil.

    PubMed

    Kuzet, Sanya-Eduarda; Gaggioli, Cedric

    2016-09-01

    In solid cancers, activated fibroblasts acquire the capacity to provide fertile soil for tumor progression. Specifically, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) establish a strong relationship with cancer cells. This provides advantages to both cell types: whereas cancer cells initiate and sustain CAF activation, CAFs support cancer cell growth, motility and invasion. This results in tumor progression, metastasis and chemoresistance. Numerous studies have detailed the mechanisms involved in fibroblast activation and cancer progression, some of which are reviewed in this article. Cancer cells and CAFs are "partners in crime", and their interaction is supported by inflammation. An understanding of the enemy, the cancer cell population and its "allies" should provide novel opportunities for targeted-drug development. Graphical Abstract Molecular mechanism of fibroblast activation. a Normal fibroblasts are the most common cell type in the extracellular matrix and are responsible for the synthesis of collagens and fibrilar proteins. Under normal conditions, fibroblasts maintain tissue homeostasis and contribute to proper cell communication and function. Fibroblasts can be activated by a diverse set of factors secreted from cancer or immune cells. Not only growth factors such as TGF-β, PDGF, HGF and FGF but also interleukins, metalloproteinases and reactive oxygen species can promote activation. Likewise, transcriptional factors such as NF-κB and HSF-1 play an important role, as do the gene family of metalloproteinase inhibitors, Timp and the NF-κB subunit, p62. Interestingly, fibroblasts themselves can stimulate cancer cells to support activation further. b Once activated, fibroblasts undergo a phenotype switch and become cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) expressing various markers such as α-SMA, FSP1, vimentin and periostatin. c Recently, the LIF/GP130/IL6-R pathway has been identified as a signaling cascade involved in fibroblast activation. Upon LIF stimulation

  2. Degradation of Biochemical Activity in Soil Sterilized by Dry Heat and Gamma Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, K. L.; Souza, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of soil sterilization by dry heat (0.08% relative humidity), gamma radiation, or both on soil phosphatase, urease, and decarboxylase activity was studied. Soil sterilized by a long exposure to dry heat at relatively low temperatures (eight weeks at 100.5 C) retained higher activities than did soil exposed to a higher temperature (two weeks at 124.5 C), while all activity was destroyed by four days at 148.5 C. Sterilization with 7.5 Mrads destroyed less activity than did heat sterilization. The effect of several individually nonsterizing doses of heat radiation is described.

  3. Ventilating Air-Conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinh, Khanh

    1994-01-01

    Air-conditioner provides ventilation designed to be used alone or incorporated into cooling or heating system operates efficiently only by recirculating stale air within building. Energy needed to operate overall ventilating cooling or heating system slightly greater than operating nonventilating cooling or heating system. Helps to preserve energy efficiency while satisfying need for increased forced ventilation to prevent accumulation of undesired gases like radon and formaldehyde. Provides fresh treated air to variety of confined spaces: hospital surgeries, laboratories, clean rooms, and printing shops and other places where solvents used. In mobile homes and portable classrooms, eliminates irritant chemicals exuded by carpets, panels, and other materials, ensuring healthy indoor environment for occupants.

  4. High-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Crawford, M R

    1986-08-01

    Over the last six years high-frequency ventilation has been extensively evaluated both in the clinical and laboratory settings. It is now no longer the great mystery it once was, and it is now no longer believed (as many had hoped), that it will solve all the problems associated with mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Although the technique is safe and appears to cause no harm even in the long term, it has not yet been shown to offer any major advantages over conventional mechanical ventilation. PMID:3530042

  5. Impacts of Activated Carbon Amendment on Hg Methylation, Demethylation and Microbial Activity in Marsh Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, C. C.; Ghosh, U.; Santillan, E. F. U.; Soren, A.; Bell, J. T.; Butera, D.; McBurney, A. W.; Brown, S.; Henry, E.; Vlassopoulos, D.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ sorbent amendments are a low-impact approach for remediation of contaminants in sediments, particular in habitats like wetlands that provide important ecosystem services. Laboratory microcosm trials (Gilmour et al. 2013) and early field trials show that activated carbon (AC) can effectively increase partitioning of both inorganic Hg and methylmercury to the solid phase. Sediment-water partitioning can serve as a proxy for Hg and MeHg bioavailability in soils. One consideration in using AC in remediation is its potential impact on organisms. For mercury, a critical consideration is the potential impact on net MeHg accumulation and bioavailability. In this study, we specifically evaluated the impact of AC on rates of methylmercury production and degradation, and on overall microbial activity, in 4 different Hg-contaminated salt marsh soils. The study was done over 28 days in anaerobic, sulfate-reducing slurries. A double label of enriched mercury isotopes (Me199Hg and inorganic 201Hg) was used to separately follow de novo Me201Hg production and Me199Hg degradation. AC amendments decreased both methylation and demethylation rate constants relative to un-amended controls, but the impact on demethylation was stronger. The addition of 5% (dry weight) regenerated AC to soil slurries drove demethylation rate constants to nearly zero; i.e. MeHg sorption to AC almost totally blocked its degradation. The net impact was increased solid phase MeHg concentrations in some of the soil slurries with the highest methylation rate constants. However, the net impact of AC amendments was to increase MeHg (and inorganic Hg) partitioning to the soil phase and decrease concentrations in the aqueous phase. AC significantly decreased aqueous phase inorganic Hg and MeHg concentrations after 28 days. Overall, the efficacy of AC in reducing aqueous MeHg was highest in the soils with the highest MeHg concentrations. The AC addition did not significantly impact microbial activity, as

  6. NASA's Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, Kent; Njoku, Eni; Thurman, Sam; Edelstein, Wendy; Jai, Ben; Spencer, Mike; Chen, Gun-Shing; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Brown, Molly; Savinell, Chris; Entin, Jared; Ianson, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) Mission is one of the first Earth observation satellites being formulated by NASA in response to the 2007 National Research Council s Decadal Survey. SMAP will make global measurements of soil moisture at the Earth's land surface and its freeze-thaw state. These measurements will allow significantly improved estimates of water, energy and carbon transfers between the land and atmosphere. Soil moisture measurements are also of great importance in assessing flooding and monitoring drought. Knowledge gained from SMAP observations can help mitigate these natural hazards, resulting in potentially great economic and social benefits. SMAP observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw timing over the boreal latitudes will also reduce a major uncertainty in quantifying the global carbon balance and help to resolve an apparent missing carbon sink over land. The SMAP mission concept will utilize an L-band radar and radiometer sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna flying in a 680 km polar orbit with an 8-day exact ground track repeat aboard a 3-axis stabilized spacecraft to provide high-resolution and high-accuracy global maps of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state every two to three days. In addition, the SMAP project will use these surface observations with advanced modeling and data assimilation to provide estimates of deeper root-zone soil moisture and net ecosystem exchange of carbon. SMAP recently completed its Phase A Mission Concept Study Phase for NASA and transitioned into Phase B (Formulation and Detailed Design). A number of significant accomplishments occurred during this initial phase of mission development. The SMAP project held several open meetings to solicit community feedback on possible science algorithms, prepared preliminary draft Algorithm Theoretical Basis Documents (ATBDs) for each mission science product, and established a prototype algorithm testbed to enable testing and evaluation of the

  7. Enzyme activity in terrestrial soil in relation to exploration of the Martian surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardakani, M. S.; Mclaren, A. D.; Pukite, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    An exploration was made of enzyme activities in soil, including abundance, persistence and localization of these activities. An attempt was made to develop procedures for the detection and assaying of enzymes in soils suitable for presumptive tests for life in planetary soils. A suitable extraction procedure for soil enzymes was developed and measurements were made of activities in extracts in order to study how urease is complexed in soil organic matter. Mathematical models were developed, based on enzyme action and microbial growth in soil, for rates of oxidation of nitrogen as nitrogen compounds are moved downward in soil by water flow. These biogeochemical models should be applicable to any percolating system, with suitable modification for special features, such as oxygen concetrations, and types of hydrodynamic flow.

  8. Biochar addition rate controls soil microbial abundance and activity in temperate soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar amendment to temperate soils is being suggested as a strategy to improve soil fertility and mitigate climate change. Yet, before this can become a recommended management practice, a better understanding of the impacts of biochar on the soil biota is needed. We determined the effect of additi...

  9. Influence of the activity of Allobophora molleri in microbial activity and metal availability of arsenic-polluted soils.

    PubMed

    Tejada, Manuel; Gómez, Isidoro; Hernández, Teresa; García, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the use of Allolobophora molleri as a biomarker of arsenic (As)-polluted soils and study the influence of A. molleri on the metabolic activity and microbial biodiversity of soil polluted with As. Because there are no experimental data available regarding the effect of the pollutant rate of As on A. molleri, we determined the LC₅₀ that was 143.5 mg As kg(-1). Sodium arsenite was added at two rates, equivalent to 143.5 and 71.8 mg As kg(-1) soil, to a soil that was then maintained with and without worms for 120 days. In addition, a nonpolluted soil without and with earthworms was used as the control. The As concentration in the soil was measured after 7 and 120 and the worm weight and As concentration after 120 days of exposure. Soil enzymatic activities and the structure of the soil microbial community, by analysis of phospholipid fatty acids, were determined. At the end of the experiment, the highest earthworm As contents were found in soils polluted with the highest rate of As. Earthworm weights significantly decreased in soil polluted with 143.5 or 71.8 mg As kg(-1), by 49.9 and 29.8% of initial weight, because the worm consumption rate decreased. These results suggest that A. molleri can be used as a good biomarker of the As toxicity. The As available fraction decreased in polluted soil with worms because the metal was accumulated in worm tissues. However, this assimilation was lower than other worms such as L. rubbellus or L. terrestris. Soil enzymatic activities were decreased in As-polluted soils but were increased significantly by the presence of earthworms. The earthworms modified the soil microbial diversity. In this respect, A. molleri significantly increased (p < 0.05) the bacterial and fungal populations. Soil As pollution decreased microbial biodiversity but to a lesser extent in the presence of A. molleri. PMID:23703122

  10. Activity of antibiotics in contaminated wounds containing clay soil.

    PubMed

    Roberts, A H; Rye, D G; Edgerton, M T; Rodeheaver, G T; Edlich, R F

    1979-03-01

    Most traumatic wounds are contaminated to some degree by soil and run a high risk of infection. The presence of soil in wounds interferes with natural tissue defenses, which include phagocytosis and serum bactericidal capacity. The experimental studies reported herein clearly demonstrate that soil also limits the antibacterial effects of specific antibiotics. This inactivation appears to be the result of a chemical reaction between the charged antibiotics and the soil particles. PMID:434335

  11. Structural role of Fe in the soil active glasses.

    PubMed

    Wacławska, I; Szumera, M; Stoch, P; Sitarz, M

    2011-08-15

    Glasses of the SiO(2)-P(2)O(5)-K(2)O-MgO-CaO-Fe(2)O(3) system acting as slow release fertilizers were synthesized by the melt-quenching technique. The influence of iron addition on the structure of glasses was evaluated by FTIR spectroscopy (with spectra decomposition) and (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The chemical activity of glasses in the 2 mass% citric acid solutions was measured by the ICP-AES method. It has been found that the formation of domains with structure similar to phosphates with chemically stable P-O-Fe(3+) and P-O-Fe(2+) bonds decreases the glass solubility under conditions simulating the soil environment. PMID:20875769

  12. Structural role of Fe in the soil active glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacławska, I.; Szumera, M.; Stoch, P.; Sitarz, M.

    2011-08-01

    Glasses of the SiO 2-P 2O 5-K 2O-MgO-CaO-Fe 2O 3 system acting as slow release fertilizers were synthesized by the melt-quenching technique. The influence of iron addition on the structure of glasses was evaluated by FTIR spectroscopy (with spectra decomposition) and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The chemical activity of glasses in the 2 mass% citric acid solutions was measured by the ICP-AES method. It has been found that the formation of domains with structure similar to phosphates with chemically stable P-O-Fe 3+ and P-O-Fe 2+ bonds decreases the glass solubility under conditions simulating the soil environment.

  13. Soil Eenzyme Activities and Physical Properties in a Watershed Managed Under Agrogorestry and Row-Crop Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil aggregate stability and diverse microbial activity influence soil quality, crop growth, nutrient retention, water infiltration, and surface runoff. The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that permanent vegetative buffers improve selected soil physical properties, which contribu...

  14. On quantifying active soil carbon using mid-infrared spectroscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is derived from plant or animal residues deposited to soil and is in various stages of decomposition and mineralization. Total SOM is a common measure of soil quality, although due to its heterogeneous composition SOM can vary dramatically in terms of i...

  15. On quantifying active soil carbon using mid-infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is derived from plant or animal residues deposited on or in soil and is in various stages of decomposition and mineralization. Total SOM is a common measure of soil quality, although due to its heterogeneous composition SOM can vary dramatically in terms of its biochemical...

  16. Combining agricultural practices key to elevating soil microbial activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of soil health is an emerging topic in applied ecology, specifically as it pertains to the agriculture, which utilizes approximately 40% of earth’s land. However, rigorous quantification of soil health and the services provided by soil organisms to support agriculture production (e.g., n...

  17. Effect of metals and other inorganic ions on soil microbial activity: soil dehydrogenase assay as a simple toxicity test

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.E.; Li, S.W.

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to illustrate the utility of the soil dehydrogenase assay as an effective primary test for assessing the potential toxicity of chemicals to soil microbial activity. In this manuscript the authors describe their use of the soil dehydrogenase assay in determining the effects of a number of potential toxic inorganic ions on soil microbial activity. The ions include Cu/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, Ni/sup 2 +/, Zn/sup 2 +/, NH/sub 4//sup +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, Cr/sup 32/, F/sup -/, AsO/sub 4//sup 3 -/, BO/sub 3//sup 3 -/, and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/.

  18. Temporal and spatial variability of soil biological activity at European scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallast, Janine; Rühlmann, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    The CATCH-C project aims to identify and improve the farm-compatibility of Soil Management Practices including to promote productivity, climate change mitigation and soil quality. The focus of this work concentrates on turnover conditions for soil organic matter (SOM). SOM is fundamental for the maintenance of quality and functions of soils while SOM storage is attributed a great importance in terms of climate change mitigation. The turnover conditions depend on soil biological activity characterized by climate and soil properties. Soil biological activity was investigated using two model concepts: a) Re_clim parameter within the ICBM (Introductory Carbon Balance Model) (Andrén & Kätterer 1997) states a climatic factor summarizing soil water storage and soil temperature and its influence on soil biological activity. b) BAT (biological active time) approach derived from model CANDY (CArbon and Nitrogen Dynamic) (Franko & Oelschlägel 1995) expresses the variation of soil moisture, soil temperature and soil aeration as a time scale and an indicator of biological activity for soil organic matter (SOM) turnover. During an earlier stage both model concepts, Re_clim and BAT, were applied based on a monthly data to assess spatial variability of turnover conditions across Europe. This hampers the investigation of temporal variability (e.g. intra-annual). The improved stage integrates daily data of more than 350 weather stations across Europe presented by Klein Tank et al. (2002). All time series data (temperature, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration and soil texture derived from the European Soil Database (JRC 2006)), are used to calculate soil biological activity in the arable layer. The resulting BAT and Re_clim values were spatio-temporal investigated. While "temporal" refers to a long-term trend analysis, "spatial" includes the investigation of soil biological activity variability per environmental zone (ENZ, Metzger et al. 2005 representing similar

  19. Primary succession of soil enzyme activity and heterotrophic microbial communities along the chronosequence of Tianshan Mountains No. 1 Glacier, China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jun; Wang, Xiao-Xia; Lou, Kai; Eusufzai, Moniruzzaman Khan; Zhang, Tao; Lin, Qing; Shi, Ying-Wu; Yang, Hong-Mei; Li, Zhong-Qing

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the primary successions of soil enzyme activity and heterotrophic microbial communities at the forefields of the Tianshan Mountains No. 1 Glacier by investigating soil microbial processes (microbial biomass and nitrogen mineralization), enzyme activity and community-level physiological profiling. Soils deglaciated between 1959 and 2008 (0, 5, 17, 31 and 44 years) were collected. Soils >1,500 years in age were used as a reference (alpine meadow soils). Soil enzyme activity and carbon-source utilization ability significantly increased with successional time. Amino-acid utilization rates were relatively higher in early, unvegetated soils (0 and 5 years), but carbohydrate utilization was higher in later stages (from 31 years to the reference soil). Discriminant analysis, including data on microbial processes and soil enzyme activities, revealed that newly exposed soils (0-5 years) and older soils (17-44 years) were well-separated from each other and obviously different from the reference soil. Correlation analysis revealed that soil organic carbon, was the primary factor influencing soil enzyme activity and heterotrophic microbial community succession. Redundancy analysis suggested that soil pH and available P were also affect microbial activity to a considerable degree. Our results indicated that glacier foreland soils have continued to develop over 44 years and soils were significantly affected by the geographic location of the glacier and the local topography. Soil enzyme activities and heterotrophic microbial communities were also significantly influenced by these variables. PMID:25472706

  20. Creating Common Ground: Activities of the Soil Health Dialog Workgroup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindbo, David L.; Moebius-Clune, Bianca; Hatfield, Jerry; Buckner, William; Conklin, Neil; McMahon, Sean; Haney, Richard; Muller, Paul; Martin, Larkin; Shaw, Richard; Eyrich, Ted; Martens, Klaas; Archuleta, Ray; Thompson, Mary

    2014-05-01

    The concept of Soil Health has come to forefront as a soil management concept for soil scientists, agronomists, producers, land-use planners, and environmental advocates. Although many see this simply as a way to increase organic matter in the soil it is much more than that and has implications to a broader management decisions. A diverse group of stake holders ranging from scientists to consultants, conventional to organic farmers, governmental to NGOs met to start a dialog about soil health with an overarching goal to adopt practices that will improve soil health across a wide area and for a wide variety of land uses. The group recognized the critical need for using soil health as a cornerstone of sustainable soil management. The group also realized that a consistent and coherent message about soil health needed to be developed that would be inclusive to all stake holders. Furthermore the group recognized that if soil health is to be promoted we all need to know and agree on how to measure it and interpret the results. The first outcome from the meeting was the creation of several teams comprised of individuals with the diverse interests as list above. The first was tasked to review and develop a definition of soil health. The first group, after much debate, decided on the adoption of the USDA-NRCS definition of Soil Health as the most effective way to begin. This definition was presented as a press release from the Farm Foundation in early December 2013 in conjunction with World Soil Day. The second group was tasked to review, develop or recommend standard measurement techniques to assess soil health. The methods group is in the process of reviewing methods and hopes to have a preliminary list out for broader review by mid-year. This presentation reviews current progress and asks for input from the Soil Science community at large.

  1. Why We Ventilate

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Sherman, Max H.; Price, Phil N.; Singer, Brett C.

    2011-09-01

    It is widely accepted that ventilation is critical for providing good indoor air quality (IAQ) in homes. However, the definition of"good" IAQ, and the most effective, energy efficient methods for delivering it are still matters of research and debate. This paper presents the results of work done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab to identify the air pollutants that drive the need for ventilation as part of a larger effort to develop a health-based ventilation standard. First, we present results of a hazard analysis that identified the pollutants that most commonly reach concentrations in homes that exceed health-based standards or guidelines for chronic or acute exposures. Second, we present results of an impact assessment that identified the air pollutants that cause the most harm to the U.S. population from chronic inhalation in residences. Lastly, we describe the implications of our findings for developing effective ventilation standards.

  2. Soil enzyme activities as affected by anthropogenic alterations: intensive agricultural practices and organic pollution.

    PubMed

    Gianfreda, Liliana; Antonietta Rao, Maria; Piotrowska, Anna; Palumbo, Giuseppe; Colombo, Claudio

    2005-04-01

    The activity of a range of enzymes related to the cycling of the main biologically important nutrients C, N, P and S was investigated in cultivated and non-cultivated soils from various parts of Europe. Two agricultural sites from North Italy under continuous corn (Zea mays L.) with and without organic fertilization were compared. Two other agricultural sites from South Italy under hazel (Corylus avellana L.) never flooded or repeatedly flooded over by uncontrolled urban and industrial wastes were investigated. The non-cultivated soils were from Middle and South Europe with different pollution history such as no-pollution and pollution with organic contaminants, which is phenanthrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Agricultural soils showed significant differences in some of physical-chemical properties (i.e. organic C, total and labile phosphate contents, available Ca and Mg) between the two sites studied. Enzyme activities of hazel sites periodically flooded by wastes were mainly higher than in the hazel sites never flooded. Sites under many years of continuous corn showed dehydrogenase, invertase, arylsulphatase and beta-glucosidase activities generally lower than the soils under hazel either flooded or not by wastes. As compared to agricultural soils, non-cultivated soils heavily or moderately polluted by organic contaminants displayed much lower values or complete absence of enzymatic activities. Dissimilar, contradictory correlations between soil enzyme activities and the majority of soil properties were observed separately in the two groups of soils. When the whole set of enzyme activities and soil properties were considered, all significant correlations found separately for the groups of soils were lost. The overall results seem to confirm that no direct cause-effect relationships can be derived between the changes of a soil in response to a given factor and both the variations of the activity and the behaviour of the enzymes in soil

  3. 78 FR 68814 - Subzone 41L; Authorization of Production Activity; Broan-NuTone, LLC (Home Ventilation Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... FR 42929-42930, 7-18-2013). The FTZ Board has determined that no further review of the activity is... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Subzone 41L; Authorization of Production Activity; Broan-NuTone, LLC...

  4. [Effects of stereoscopic cultivation on soil microorganism, enzyme activity and the agronomic characters of Panax notoginseng].

    PubMed

    Liao, Pei-ran; Cui, Xiu-ming; Lan, Lei; Chen, Wei-dong; Wang, Cheng-xiao; Yang, Xiao-yan; Liu, Da-hui; Yang, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Compartments of soil microorganism and enzymes between stereoscopic cultivation (three storeys) and field cultivation (CK) of Panax notoginseng were carried out, and the effects on P. notoginseng agronomic characters were also studied. Results show that concentration of soil microorganism of stereoscopic cultivation was lower than field cultivation; the activity of soil urea enzyme, saccharase and neutral phosphatase increased from lower storey to upper storey; the activity of soil urea enzyme and saccharase of lower and upper storeys were significantly lower than CK; agronomic characters of stereoscopic cultivated P. notoginsengin were inferior to field cultivation, the middle storey with the best agronomic characters among the three storeys. The correlation analysis showed that fungi, actinomycetes and neutral phosphatase were significantly correlated with P. notoginseng agronomic characters; concentration of soil fungi and bacteria were significantly correlated with the soil relative water content; actinomycete and neutral phosphatase were significantly correlated with soil pH and relative water content, respectively; the activities of soil urea enzyme and saccharase were significantly correlated with the soil daily maximum temperature difference. Inconclusion, The current research shows that the imbalance of soil microorganism and the acutely changing of soil enzyme activity were the main reasons that caused the agronomic characters of stereoscopic cultivated P. notoginseng were worse than field cultivation. Thus improves the concentration of soil microorganism and enzyme activity near to field soil by improving the structure of stereoscopic cultivation is very important. And it was the direction which we are endeavoring that built better soil ecological environment for P. notoginseng of stereoscopic cultivation. PMID:26677687

  5. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I; Abdel Bar, Fatma M; El-Mahdy, Areej M; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1-V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  6. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I.; Abdel Bar, Fatma M.; El-Mahdy, Areej M.; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1–V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  7. Microbial activity promotes carbon storage in temperate soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Markus; Eisenhauer, Nico; Sierra, Carlos; Gleixner, Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Soils are one of the most important carbon sink and sources. Soils contain up to 3/4 of all terrestrial carbon. Beside physical aspects of soil properties (e.g. soil moisture and texture) plants play an important role in carbon sequestration. The positive effect of plant diversity on carbon storage is already known, though the underlying mechanisms remain still unclear. In the frame of the Jena Experiment, a long term biodiversity experiment, we are able to identify these processes. Nine years after an land use change from an arable field to managed grassland the mean soil carbon concentrations increased towards the concentrations of permanent meadows. The increase was positively linked to a plant diversity gradient. High diverse plant communities produce more biomass, which in turn results in higher amounts of litter inputs. The plant litter is transferred to the soil organic matter by the soil microbial community. However, higher plant diversity also causes changes in micro-climatic condition. For instance, more diverse plant communities have a more dense vegetation structure, which reduced the evaporation of soils surface and thus, increases soil moisture in the top layer. Higher inputs and higher soil moisture lead to an enlarged respiration of the soil microbial community. Most interestingly, the carbon storage in the Jena Experiment was much more related to microbial respiration than to plant root inputs. Moreover, using radiocarbon, we found a significant younger carbon age in soils of more diverse plant communities than in soils of lower diversity, indicating that more fresh carbon is integrated into the carbon pool. Putting these findings together, we could show, that the positive link between plant diversity and carbon storage is due to a higher microbial decomposition of plant litter, pointing out that carbon storage in soils is a function of the microbial community.

  8. Ventilator-induced lung injury upregulates and activates gelatinases and EMMPRIN: attenuation by the synthetic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, Prinomastat (AG3340).

    PubMed

    Foda, H D; Rollo, E E; Drews, M; Conner, C; Appelt, K; Shalinsky, D R; Zucker, S

    2001-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation has become an indispensable therapeutic modality for patients with respiratory failure. However, a serious potential complication of MV is the newly recognized ventilator-induced acute lung injury. There is strong evidence suggesting that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in the development of acute lung injury. Another factor to be considered is extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN). EMMPRIN is responsible for inducing fibroblasts to produce/secrete MMPs. In this report we sought to determine: (1) the role played by MMPs and EMMPRIN in the development of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) in an in vivo rat model of high volume ventilation; and (2) whether the synthetic MMP inhibitor Prinomastat (AG3340) could prevent this type of lung injury. We have demonstrated that high volume ventilation caused acute lung injury. This was accompanied by an upregulation of gelatinase A, gelatinase B, MT1-MMP, and EMMPRIN mRNA demonstrated by in situ hybridization. Pretreatment with the MMP inhibitor Prinomastat attenuated the lung injury caused by high volume ventilation. Our results suggest that MMPs play an important role in the development of VILI in rat lungs and that the MMP-inhibitor Prinomastat is effective in attenuating this type of lung injury. PMID:11726397

  9. Application of activated sludge to purify urban soils of Baku city from oil contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, M. P.; Nadzhafova, S. I.; Ibragimov, A. G.

    2015-07-01

    A biopreparation inducing oil destruction and increasing the biological activity of soils was developed on the basis of activated sludge. Its oxidative activity towards hydrocarbons was studied. The application of this biopreparation to oil-contaminated soil increased the population density of microorganisms, including destroyers of hydrocarbons, and accelerated oil decomposition. The degree of destruction of oil and oil products in the case of a single treatment of the soil with this biopreparation comprised 30 to 50% within 60 days. The presence of cellulose-decomposing microorganisms in this biopreparation also favored an accelerated decomposition of plant substances, including plant litter and sawdust applied to the urban soils as an adsorbent.

  10. Impact of warming and drying on microbial activity in subarctic tundra soils: inferences from patterns in extracellular enzyme activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, J. D.; Natali, S.; Spawn, S.; Sistla, S.; Schuur, E. A. G.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost contains a large pool of carbon that has accumulated for thousands of years, and remains frozen in organic form. As climate warms, permafrost thaw will increase rates of microbial breakdown of old soil organic matter (SOM), accelerating release of carbon to the atmosphere. Higher rates of microbial decomposition may also release reactive nitrogen, which may increase plant production and carbon fixation. The net effect on atmospheric carbon, and the strength of climate feedback, depends on the balance between direct and indirect effects of increased microbial activity, which depends on changes in soil conditions and microbial responses to them. In particular, soil moisture and availability of C and N for microbes strongly influence soil respiration and primary production. Current understanding of changes in these factors as climate warms is limited. We present results from analysis of soil extracellular enzyme activities (EEA) from a long-term warming and drying experiment in subarctic Alaskan tundra (the CiPEHR experiment) as an indicator of changes in soil microbial activity and relative availability of C and N for microbes. We collected soil samples from control (C), warming (W), and warming + drying (WD) treatments and used fluorometric methods to estimate EEA in shallow (0-5 cm) and deep (5-15) soils. We measured soil moisture, SOM, and C:N, and plant tissue C:N as an indicator of N availability. Activity of N-acquiring enzymes was higher in WD soils at both depths. Carbon EEA in W soils was lower in surface, but higher in deeper soils. We also found significantly lower soil C:N in both W and WD in deeper soils, where C:N was generally lower than surface. In general, EEA results suggest drying leads to increased C availability relative to N. This may be due to lower soil moisture leading to greater aeration of soils in WD plots relative to W plots, which may be saturated due to significant land subsidence. Greater aeration may increase efficiency of

  11. Methodology for ventilation/perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Bajc, Marika; Neilly, Brian; Miniati, Massimo; Mortensen, Jan; Jonson, Björn

    2010-11-01

    Ventilation/perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (V/Q SPECT) is the scintigraphic technique of choice for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and many other disorders that affect lung function. Data from recent ventilation studies show that the theoretic advantages of Technegas over radiolabeled liquid aerosols are not restricted to the presence of obstructive lung disease. Radiolabeled macroaggregated human albumin is the imaging agent of choice for perfusion scintigraphy. An optimal combination of nuclide activities and acquisition times for ventilation and perfusion, collimators, and imaging matrix yields an adequate V/Q SPECT study in approximately 20 minutes of imaging time. The recommended protocol based on the patient remaining in an unchanged position during the initial ventilation study and the perfusion study allows presentation of matching ventilation and perfusion slices in all projections as well as in rotating volume images based upon maximum intensity projections. Probabilistic interpretation of V/Q SPECT should be replaced by a holistic interpretation strategy on the basis of all relevant information about the patient and all ventilation/perfusion patterns. PE is diagnosed when there is more than one subsegment showing a V/Q mismatch representing an anatomic lung unit. Apart from pulmonary embolism, other pathologies should be identified and reported, for example, obstructive disease, heart failure, and pneumonia. Pitfalls exist both with respect to imaging technique and scan interpretation. PMID:20920632

  12. [Effect of fibrous root extract of Coptis chinensis on soil microbes and enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Li, Yang-Bo; He, Lin-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Ye-Kuan; Yuan, Ling; Huang, Jian-Guo

    2014-11-01

    Coptis chinensis is widely used as Chinese medicine herbs and serious soil problems occur after continual cultivation of this medicinal plant. In the preset experiment, fibrous root extract of C. chinensis (REC) was added into soil to study the effect of REC on microbes and enzyme activity in soil. The results showed that both bacteria and actinomycetes decreased by about 2 times in contrast to fungi, which increased by about 3 folds. Phosphorus bacteria, potassium bacteria, azotobacter, ammonia bacteria, and nitrifying bacteria were also reduced significantly by REC, suggesting the inhibition of nitrogen biofixation and supply, mobilization of phosphorus and potassium, ad plant growth promotion as REC added into soil. There were multiple influences of REC on soil enzyme activities. Invertase activity was stimulated, while urease was inhibited and dehydrogenase unchanged by REC, indicating the interference of biochemical reactions in soil. In addition, type and total content of phosphorus lipid fatty acids (PLFAs) , the signature of microbes, decreased while the ratio of bacterium to fungus PLFAs increased as REC increased in soil, which suggested that fungi increased relatively with bacteria decreased thereby leading to easy occurrence of crop fungus diseases following cultivation of C. chinensis. The decrease in diversity and evenness indexes of microbial community in soil by REC indicated soil ecosystem deterioration and reduction of microbial groups and densities in soil. Therefore, allelopathic chemicals released from the roots of C. chinensis could change microbial community structure and resulted in serious soil problems by continual cropping of this medicinal plant. PMID:25775794

  13. The role of noninvasive ventilation in the management and mitigation of exacerbations and hospital admissions/readmissions for the patient with moderate to severe COPD (multimedia activity).

    PubMed

    White, David P; Criner, Gerard J; Dreher, Michael; Hart, Nicholas; Peyerl, Fred W; Wolfe, Lisa F; Chin, Suzette A

    2015-06-01

    As seen in this CME online activity (available at http://journal.cme.chestnet.org/home-niv-copd), COPD is a common and debilitating disease and is currently the third leading cause of death in the United States. The role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in the management of severe, hypercapnic COPD has been controversial. However, it was concluded that current data would support the following recommendations. Patients with COPD with a waking Paco2 > 50 to 52 mm Hg, an overnight Paco2 > 55 mm Hg, or both who are symptomatic and compliant with other therapies should be eligible for NIV. In addition, multiple previous hospital admissions for COPD exacerbation, requiring noninvasive/invasive mechanical ventilation, strongly suggest a need for chronic NIV. Patients with COPD with a BMI > 30 kg/m2 respond particularly well to this therapy. When the decision is made to start NIV, this treatment is probably best initiated during a short hospitalization, although this can be accomplished in the clinic, home, or sleep laboratory if well-trained clinicians are available. Newer modes of NIV such as volume-assured pressure support, particularly with autotitrating expiratory positive airway pressure (EPAP), may create the opportunity for home NIV initiation easier for less experienced physicians. Regardless of the mode selected, inspiratory pressures must be in the 20 to 25 cm H2O range to meaningfully increase tidal volume, reduce work of breathing, and, importantly, reduce waking arterial Paco2. EPAP is currently set at 4 to 5 cm H2O, although future technologies may allow this to be individualized to maximally reduce auto-positive end expiratory pressure. The NIV device should have a backup rate although it is controversial as to whether this should be set at a high (18-20 breaths/min) vs a low (8-10 breaths/min) rate. The proper use of NIV in appropriately chosen patients with COPD can improve quality of life and increase survival. Ongoing studies are assessing

  14. Confined space ventilation by shipyard welders: observed use and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Pouzou, Jane G; Warner, Chris; Neitzel, Richard L; Croteau, Gerry A; Yost, Michael G; Seixas, Noah S

    2015-01-01

    Shipbuilding involves intensive welding activities within enclosed and confined spaces, and although ventilation is commonly used in the industry, its use and effectiveness has not been adequately documented. Workers engaged in welding in enclosed or confined spaces in two shipyards were observed for their use of ventilation and monitored for their exposure to particulate matter. The type of ventilation in use, its placement and face velocity, the movement of air within the space, and other ventilation-related parameters were recorded, along with task characteristics such as the type of welding, the welder's position, and the configuration of the space. Mechanical ventilation was present in about two-thirds of the 65 welding scenarios observed, with exhaust ventilation used predominantly in one shipyard and supply blowers predominantly in the other. Welders were observed working in apparent dead-spaces within the room in 53% of the cases, even where ventilation was in use. Respiratory protection was common in the two shipyards, observed in use in 77 and 100% of the cases. Welding method, the proximity of the welder's head to the fume, and air mixing were found to be significantly associated with the welder's exposure, while other characteristics of dilution ventilation did not produce appreciable differences in exposure level. These parameters associated with exposure reduction can be assessed subjectively and are thus good candidates for training on effective ventilation use during hot work in confined spaces. Ventilation used in confined space welding is often inadequate for controlling exposure to welding fume. PMID:25245587

  15. Confined space ventilation by shipyard welders: Observed use and effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Pouzou, Jane; Warner, Chris; Neitzel, Rick; Croteau, Gerry; Yost, Michael; Seixas, Noah

    2016-01-01

    Shipbuilding involves intensive welding activities within enclosed and confined spaces and, although ventilation is commonly used in the industry, its use and effectiveness has not been adequately documented. Workers engaged in welding in enclosed or confined space in two shipyards were observed for their use of ventilation and monitored for their exposure to particulate matter. The type of ventilation in use, its placement and face velocity, the movement of air within the space, and other ventilation-related parameters were recorded, along with task characteristics such as the type of welding, the welder’s position, and the configuration of the space. Mechanical ventilation was present in about two thirds of the 65 welding scenarios observed, with exhaust ventilation used predominantly in one shipyard and supply blowers predominantly in the other. Welders were frequently observed working in apparent dead-spaces within the room, even where ventilation was in use. Respiratory protection was common in the two shipyards, observed in use in 77% and 100% of the cases. Welding method, the proximity of the welder’s head to the fume, and air mixing were found to be associated with the welder’s exposure, while other characteristics of the dilution ventilation did not produce appreciable differences in exposure level. These parameters associated with exposure reduction can be assessed subjectively and are thus good candidates for training on effective ventilation use during hot work in confined spaces. Ventilation used in confined space welding is often inadequate for controlling exposure to welding fume. PMID:25245587

  16. Effects of mechanical ventilation on diaphragm function and biology.

    PubMed

    Gayan-Ramirez, G; Decramer, M

    2002-12-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of weaning from mechanical ventilation are not fully known, but there is accumulating evidence that mechanical ventilation induces inspiratory muscle dysfunction. Recently, several animal models have provided potential mechanisms for mechanical ventilation-induced effects on muscle function. In patients, weaning difficulties are associated with inspiratory muscle weakness and reduced endurance capacity. Animal studies demonstrated that diaphragm force was already decreased after 12 h of controlled mechanical ventilation and this worsened with time spent on the ventilator. Diaphragmatic myofibril damage observed after 3-days controlled mechanical ventilation was inversely correlated with maximal diaphragmatic force. Downregulation of the diaphragm insulin-like growth factor-I and MyoD/myogenin messenger ribonucleic acid occurred after 24 h and diaphragmatic oxidative stress and increased protease activity after 18 h. In keeping with these findings, diaphragm fibre atrophy was shown after 12 h and reduced diaphragm mass was reported after 48 h of controlled mechanical ventilation. These animal studies show that early alterations in diaphragm function develop after short-term mechanical ventilation. These alterations may contribute to the difficulties in weaning from mechanical ventilation seen in patients. Strategies to preserve respiratory muscle mass and function during mechanical ventilation should be developed. These may include: adaptation of medication, training of the diaphragm, stabilisation of the catabolic state and pharmacotherapy. PMID:12503720

  17. Temperature and Microbial Activity Effects on Soil Carbon Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissore, C.; van Diepen, L.; Wixon, D.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Giardina, C. P.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainties on the importance of environmental controls on soil C stabilization and turnover limit accurate predictions of the rate and magnitude of the response of soils to climate change. Here we report results from a study of interactions among vegetation and soil microbial communities in North American forests across a highly constrained, 22OC gradient mean annual temperature (MAT) as a proxy for understanding changes with climate. Previous work indicated that turnover and amount of labile SOC responded negatively to MAT, whereas stable SOC was insensitive to temperature variation. Hardwood forests stored a larger amount of stable SOC, but with shorter mean residence times than paired pine forests. Our findings suggest that the interaction between vegetation composition and microbial communities may affect SOC accumulation and stabilization responses to rising temperature. To investigate these relationships, we characterized the microbial communities with Phospholipid Fatty Acid (PLFA) analysis. PLFA analyses indicate complex microbial responses to increased MAT and vegetation composition. Microbial biomass declined with MAT in conifer forests and increased in hardwood forests. Relative abundance of actinomycetes increased with MAT for both forest types, and was correlated with amount and turnover of active SOC. The relative abundance of fungi decreased with increasing MAT, while gram+ bacteria increased, such that fungi:bacteria ratio decreased with MAT, with this trend being more pronounced for hardwood cover type. These results are consistent with a long-term warming experiment in a hardwood forest at the Harvard Forest LTER site, where after 12 years of warming the relative abundance of gram positive bacteria and actinomycetes increased, while fungal biomass decreased. In contrast, relationships between microbial groups and the stable fraction of SOC along the gradient were only observed in conifers. Increases in mean residence time of stable SOC were

  18. Soil activity and persistence of sulcotrione and mesotrione.

    PubMed

    Maeghe, L; Desmet, E M; Bulcke, R

    2004-01-01

    clearly sensitive to mesotrione and sulcotrione whereas sugar beet, red clover and lettuce are extremely sensitive to both herbicides in both experiment types. Bioassays and field experiments provide a detailed and complete information about soil activity and persistence of both herbicides. PMID:15759393

  19. [Effects of brackish water irrigation on soil enzyme activity, soil CO2 flux and organic matter decomposition].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian-qian; Wang, Fei; Liu, Tao; Chu, Gui-xin

    2015-09-01

    Brackish water irrigation utilization is an important way to alleviate water resource shortage in arid region. A field-plot experiment was set up to study the impact of the salinity level (0.31, 3.0 or 5.0 g · L(-1) NaCl) of irrigated water on activities of soil catalase, invertase, β-glucosidase, cellulase and polyphenoloxidase in drip irrigation condition, and the responses of soil CO2 flux and organic matter decomposition were also determined by soil carbon dioxide flux instrument (LI-8100) and nylon net bag method. The results showed that in contrast with fresh water irrigation treatment (CK), the activities of invertase, β-glucosidase and cellulase in the brackish water (3.0 g · L(-1)) irrigation treatment declined by 31.7%-32.4%, 29.7%-31.6%, 20.8%-24.3%, respectively, while soil polyphenoloxidase activity was obviously enhanced with increasing the salinity level of irrigated water. Compared to CK, polyphenoloxidase activity increased by 2.4% and 20.5%, respectively, in the brackish water and saline water irrigation treatments. Both soil microbial biomass carbon and microbial quotient decreased with increasing the salinity level, whereas, microbial metabolic quotient showed an increasing tendency with increasing the salinity level. Soil CO2 fluxes in the different treatments were in the order of CK (0.31 g · L(-1)) > brackish water irrigation (3.0 g · L(-1)) ≥ saline water irrigation (5.0 g · L(-1)). Moreover, CO2 flux from plastic film mulched soil was always much higher than that from no plastic film mulched soil, regardless the salinity of irrigated water. Compared with CK, soil CO2 fluxes in the saline water and brackish water treatments decreased by 29.8% and 28.2% respectively in the boll opening period. The decomposition of either cotton straw or alfalfa straw in the different treatments was in the sequence of CK (0.31 g · L(-1)) > brackish water irrigation (3.0 g · L(-1)) > saline water treatment (5.0 g · L(-1)). The organic matter

  20. Resistance of Undisturbed Soil Microbiomes to Ceftriaxone Indicates Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gatica, Joao; Yang, Kun; Pagaling, Eulyn; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Yan, Tao; Cytryn, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    Emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance, and specifically resistance to third generation cephalosporins associated with extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) activity, is one of the greatest epidemiological challenges of our time. In this study we addressed the impact of the third generation cephalosporin ceftriaxone on microbial activity and bacterial community composition of two physically and chemically distinct undisturbed soils in highly regulated microcosm experiments. Surprisingly, periodical irrigation of the soils with clinical doses of ceftriaxone did not affect their microbial activity; and only moderately impacted the microbial diversity (α and β) of the two soils. Corresponding slurry experiments demonstrated that the antibiotic capacity of ceftriaxone rapidly diminished in the presence of soil, and ∼70% of this inactivation could be explained by biological activity. The biological nature of ceftriaxone degradation in soil was supported by microcosm experiments that amended model Escherichia coli strains to sterile and non-sterile soils in the presence and absence of ceftriaxone and by the ubiquitous presence of ESBL genes (blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaOXA) in soil DNA extracts. Collectively, these results suggest that the resistance of soil microbiomes to ceftriaxone stems from biological activity and even more, from broad-spectrum β-lactamase activity; raising questions regarding the scope and clinical implications of ESBLs in soil microbiomes. PMID:26617578

  1. Effects of Deep Tillage and Straw Returning on Soil Microorganism and Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Baoyi; Hu, Hao; Zhao, Yali; Mu, Xinyuan; Liu, Kui; Li, Chaohai

    2014-01-01

    Two field experiments were conducted for two years with the aim of studying the effects of deep tillage and straw returning on soil microorganism and enzyme activity in clay and loam soil. Three treatments, (1) conventional tillage (CT), shallow tillage and straw returning; (2) deep tillage (DT), deep tillage and straw returning; and (3) deep tillage with no straw returning (DNT), were carried out in clay and loam soil. The results showed that deep tillage and straw returning increased the abundance of soil microorganism and most enzyme activities. Deep tillage was more effective for increasing enzyme activities in clay, while straw returning was more effective in loam. Soil microorganism abundance and most enzyme activities decreased with the increase of soil depth. Deep tillage mainly affected soil enzyme activities in loam at the soil depth of 20–30 cm and in clay at the depth of 0–40 cm. Straw returning mainly affected soil microorganism and enzyme activities at the depths of 0–30 cm and 0–40 cm, respectively. PMID:24982955

  2. Impact of Fungicide Mancozeb at Different Application Rates on Soil Microbial Populations, Soil Biological Processes, and Enzyme Activities in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Preeti; Guleria, Shiwani; Chauhan, Anjali; Shirkot, C. K.

    2014-01-01

    The use of fungicides is the continuous exercise particularly in orchard crops where fungal diseases, such as white root rot, have the potential to destroy horticultural crops rendering them unsaleable. In view of above problem, the present study examines the effect of different concentrations of mancozeb (0–2000 ppm) at different incubation periods for their harmful side effects on various microbiological processes, soil microflora, and soil enzymes in alluvial soil (pH 6.8) collected from apple orchards of Shimla in Himachal Pradesh (India). Low concentrations of mancozeb were found to be deleterious towards fungal and actinomycetes population while higher concentrations (1000 and 2000 ppm) were found to be detrimental to soil bacteria. Mancozeb impaired the process of ammonification and nitrification. Similar results were observed for nitrifying and ammonifying bacteria. Phosphorus solubilization was increased by higher concentration of mancozeb, that is, 250 ppm and above. In unamended soil, microbial biomass carbon and carbon mineralization were adversely affected by mancozeb. Soil enzymes, that is, amylase, invertase, and phosphatase showed adverse and disruptive effect when mancozeb used was above 10 ppm in unamended soil. These results conclude that, to lessen the harmful effects in soil biological processes caused by this fungicide, addition of higher amount of nitrogen based fertilizers is required. PMID:25478598

  3. Effect of activated carbon on microbial bioavailability of phenanthrene in soils

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y.; Hunter, W.; Tao, S.; Crowley, D.; Gan, J.

    2009-11-15

    Bioavailability is a governing factor that controls the rate of biological degradation of hydrophobic organic contaminants in soil. Among the solid phases that can adsorb hydrophobic organic contaminants in soil, black carbon (BC) exerts a particularly significant effect on phase distribution. However, knowledge on the effect of BC on the microbial availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soil is still limited. In the present study, the effect of a coal-derived activated carbon on the bioavailability of phenanthrene (PHE) during its degradation by Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 was measured in three soils. The freely dissolved concentration of PHE was concurrently determined in soil solutions using disposable polydimethylsiloxane fibers. The results showed that PHE mineralization was significantly inhibited after addition of activated carbon in all test soils. After 216 h, only 5.20, 5.83, and 6.85% of PHE was degraded in the 0.5% BC-amended soils initially containing organic carbon at 0.23, 2.1, and 7.1%, respectively. Significant correlation was found between PHE degradability and freely dissolved concentration, suggesting that BC affected PHE bioavailability by decreasing chemical activity. The effect of activated carbon in the amended soils was attributed to its enhancement of soil surface areas and pore volumes. Results from the present study clearly highlighted the importance of BC for influencing the microbial availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils.

  4. Enhancing Potato System Sustainability: Crop Rotation Impacts on Soil Phosphatase Activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is a species with a low efficiency of acquiring soil P. Rotation crops may potentially influence P uptake by potato by increasing soil organic acids, phosphatase activity, and microbial biomass. However, this kind of information is very limited. We measured the activities of acid phosphatase,...

  5. SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION PROJECTS AND ACTIVITIES, A GUIDE FOR 4-H CLUB LEADERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOSTER, ALBERT B.; FOX, ADRIAN C.

    THIS PUBLICATION WAS PREPARED BY THE SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE FOR USE WITH YOUTH GROUPS. VARIOUS ACTIVITIES AND PROJECTS ARE PRESENTED WHICH CAN BE USED TO DEVELOP CONCEPTS ABOUT SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION. IN ORDER TO SIMPLIFY THE PROCESS OF DEMONSTRATING THESE ACTIVITIES, MANY OF THE CONCEPTS ARE PICTORIALLY ILLUSTRATED. THE ACTIVITIES…

  6. Organic matter mineralization in frozen boreal soils-environmental constraints on catabolic and anabolic microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oquist, Mats G.; Sparrman, Tobias; Schleucher, Jürgen; Nilsson, Mats B.

    2014-05-01

    Heterotrophic microbial mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) and associated production and emission of atmospheric trace gases proceed during the winter months in the frozen soils of high latitude ecosystems. However, in what ways this microbial activity is constrained by the environmental conditions prevailing in a frozen soil matrix is uncertain. This presentation will address how temperature, water availability and substrate availability combine to regulate rates of microbial activity at below freezing temperatures and the implications of this activity for SOM mineralization in the surface layers of boreal forest soils experiencing seasonal freezing. We show that the amount and availability of liquid water is an integral factor regulating rates of microbial activity in the frozen soil matrix and can also explain frequently observed deviations in the temperature responses of biogenic CO2 production in frozen soils, as compared to unfrozen soils. Using stable isotope labeling (13C) we also show that the partitioning of substrate carbon, in the form of monomeric sugar (glucose), for catabolic and anabolic metabolism remain constant in the temperature range of -4C to 9C. This confirms that microbial growth may proceed even when soils are frozen. In addition we present corresponding data for organisms metabolizing polymeric substrates (cellulose) requiring exoenzymatic activity prior to substrate uptake. We conclude that the metabolic response of soil microorganism to controlling factors may change substantially across the freezing point of soil water, and also the patterns of interaction among controlling factors are affected. Thus, it is evident that metabolic response functions derived from investigations of unfrozen soils cannot be superimposed on frozen soils. Nonetheless, the soil microbial population appear very adapted to seasonal freezing with respect to their metabolic performance.

  7. Spatiotemporal analysis of soil moisture in using active and passive remotely sensed data and ground observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract: Soil moisture plays a vital role in ecosystem, biological processes, climate, weather and agriculture. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) improves data by combining the advantages and avoiding the limitation of passive microwave remote sensing (low resolution), and active microwave (challenge of soil moisture retrieval). This study will advance the knowledge of the application of soil moisture by using the Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) data as well as data collected at Walnut Gulch Arizona in August 2015 during SMAPVEX15. Specifically, we will analyze the 5m radar data from Unmanned Airborne Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) to study spatial variability within the PALS radiometer pixel. SMAPVEX12/15 and SMAP data will also be analyzed to evaluate disaggregation algorithms. The analytical findings will provide valuable information for policy-makers to initiate and adjust protocols and regulations for protecting land resources and improving environmental conditions. Keywords: soil moisture, Remote Sensing (RS), spatial statistic

  8. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  9. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  10. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  11. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  12. 14 CFR 25.831 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Ventilation and Heating § 25.831 Ventilation... probable failures or malfunctioning of the ventilating, heating, pressurization, or other systems...

  13. Ventilation rates and activity levels of juvenile jumbo squid under metabolic suppression in the oxygen minimum zone.

    PubMed

    Trübenbach, Katja; Pegado, Maria R; Seibel, Brad A; Rosa, Rui

    2013-02-01

    The Humboldt (jumbo) squid, Dosidicus gigas, is a part-time resident of the permanent oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the Eastern Tropical Pacific and, thereby, it encounters oxygen levels below its critical oxygen partial pressure. To better understand the ventilatory mechanisms that accompany the process of metabolic suppression in these top oceanic predators, we exposed juvenile D. gigas to the oxygen levels found in the OMZ (1% O(2), 1 kPa, 10 °C) and measured metabolic rate, activity cycling patterns, swimming mode, escape jet (burst) frequency, mantle contraction frequency and strength, stroke volume and oxygen extraction efficiency. In normoxia, metabolic rate varied between 14 and 29 μmol O(2) g(-1) wet mass h(-1), depending on the level of activity. The mantle contraction frequency and strength were linearly correlated and increased significantly with activity level. Additionally, an increase in stroke volume and ventilatory volume per minute was observed, followed by a mantle hyperinflation process during high activity periods. Squid metabolic rate dropped more than 75% during exposure to hypoxia. Maximum metabolic rate was not achieved under such conditions and the metabolic scope was significantly decreased. Hypoxia changed the relationship between mantle contraction strength and frequency from linear to polynomial with increasing activity, indicating that, under hypoxic conditions, the jumbo squid primarily increases the strength of mantle contraction and does not regulate its frequency. Under hypoxia, jumbo squid also showed a larger inflation period (reduced contraction frequency) and decreased relaxed mantle diameter (shortened diffusion pathway), which optimize oxygen extraction efficiency (up to 82%/34%, without/with consideration of 60% potential skin respiration). Additionally, they breathe 'deeply', with more powerful contractions and enhanced stroke volume. This deep-breathing behavior allows them to display a stable ventilatory volume per

  14. Clinical challenges in mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Goligher, Ewan C; Ferguson, Niall D; Brochard, Laurent J

    2016-04-30

    Mechanical ventilation supports gas exchange and alleviates the work of breathing when the respiratory muscles are overwhelmed by an acute pulmonary or systemic insult. Although mechanical ventilation is not generally considered a treatment for acute respiratory failure per se, ventilator management warrants close attention because inappropriate ventilation can result in injury to the lungs or respiratory muscles and worsen morbidity and mortality. Key clinical challenges include averting intubation in patients with respiratory failure with non-invasive techniques for respiratory support; delivering lung-protective ventilation to prevent ventilator-induced lung injury; maintaining adequate gas exchange in severely hypoxaemic patients; avoiding the development of ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction; and diagnosing and treating the many pathophysiological mechanisms that impair liberation from mechanical ventilation. Personalisation of mechanical ventilation based on individual physiological characteristics and responses to therapy can further improve outcomes. PMID:27203509

  15. Limited recovery of soil microbial activity after transient exposure to gasoline vapors.

    PubMed

    Modrzyński, Jakub J; Christensen, Jan H; Mayer, Philipp; Brandt, Kristian K

    2016-09-01

    During gasoline spills complex mixtures of toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released to terrestrial environments. Gasoline VOCs exert baseline toxicity (narcosis) and may thus broadly affect soil biota. We assessed the functional resilience (i.e. resistance and recovery of microbial functions) in soil microbial communities transiently exposed to gasoline vapors by passive dosing via headspace for 40 days followed by a recovery phase of 84 days. Chemical exposure was characterized with GC-MS, whereas microbial activity was monitored as soil respiration (CO2 release) and soil bacterial growth ([(3)H]leucine incorporation). Microbial activity was strongly stimulated and inhibited at low and high exposure levels, respectively. Microbial growth efficiency decreased with increasing exposure, but rebounded during the recovery phase for low-dose treatments. Although benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) concentrations decreased by 83-97% during the recovery phase, microbial activity in high-dose treatments did not recover and numbers of viable bacteria were 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than in control soil. Re-inoculation with active soil microorganisms failed to restore microbial activity indicating residual soil toxicity, which could not be attributed to BTEX, but rather to mixture toxicity of more persistent gasoline constituents or degradation products. Our results indicate a limited potential for functional recovery of soil microbial communities after transient exposure to high, but environmentally relevant, levels of gasoline VOCs which therefore may compromise ecosystem services provided by microorganisms even after extensive soil VOC dissipation. PMID:27376993

  16. The impact of mesotrione on several microbiological activity of chernozem soil.

    PubMed

    Radivojevic, L; Gasic, S; Krsmanovic, M Saric; Marisavljevic, D; Santric, L; Pavlovic, D; Umiljendic, J Gajic

    2013-01-01

    The effect of mesotrione on microbiological activity in soil was investigated. Trials were set up in laboratory on chernozem soil (pH 7.0, organic matter 3.5%, sand 26%, silt 45%, clay 29%) at Surcin, Serbia. Mesotrione was added at rates 0.5 (field rate), 5, 25 i 50 mg/kg soil. Untreated soil served as control. Samples were collected for analysis 5, 20, 40 and 60 days after mesotrione application. The effects were assessed on bacteria abundance, fungi abundance, and dehydrogenase activity. Mesotrione was found to cause different effects on the soil microbial activity in soil and its influence depended on the rate of application and duration of activity. Mesotrione applied at 0.5 and 5 mg/kg soil did not have any effect on microbial activity. The higher herbicide doses (25 and 50 mg/kg) induced increasing activity from the 5th to 60th day. These experimental data indicated that mesotrione affected soil microbial activity, but the effects were only detected at higher doses far exceeding the recommended field rate. PMID:25145236

  17. Dynamics of tidal volume and ventilation heterogeneity under pressure-controlled ventilation during bronchoconstriction: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Tilo; Harris, R. Scott; Venegas, Jose G.

    2010-01-01

    The difference in effectiveness between volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) and pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) on mechanically ventilated patients during bronchoconstriction is not totally clear. PCV is thought to deliver a more uniform distribution of ventilation than VCV, but the delivered tidal volume could be unstable and affected by changes in the degree of constriction. To explore the magnitude of these effects, we ran numerical simulations with both modes of ventilation in a network model of the lung in which we incorporated not only the pressure and flow dynamics along the airways but also the effect of cycling pressures and tissue tethering forces during breathing on the dynamic equilibrium of the airway smooth muscle (ASM) (Venegas et al., Nature 434: 777–782). These simulations provided an illustration of changes in airway radii, the total delivered tidal volume stability, and distribution of ventilation following a transition from VCV to PCV and during progressively increasing ASM activation level. These simulations yielded three major results. First, the ventilation heterogeneity and patchiness in ventilation during steady-state VCV were substantially reduced after the transition to PCV. Second, airway radius, tidal volume, and the distribution of ventilation under severe bronchoconstriction were highly sensitive to the setting of inspiratory pressure selected for PCV and to the degree of activation of the ASM. Third, the dynamic equilibrium of active ASM exposed to cycling forces is the major contributor to these effects. These insights may provide a theoretical framework to guide the selection of ventilation mode, the adjustment of ventilator settings, and the interpretation of clinical observations in mechanically ventilated asthmatic patients. PMID:20671035

  18. Effects of gentle remediation technologies on soil biological and biochemical activities - a review.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, B.; Haag, R.; Renella, G.

    2009-04-01

    Remediation technologies for contaminated sites are generally designed to reduce risks for human health, groundwater or plant quality. While some drastic remediation measures such as soil excavation, thermal treatment or soil washing eliminate or strongly reduce soil life, in-situ treatments involving plants or immobilizing additives may also restore soil functionality by establishing or promoting a well structured and active community of soil organisms. Biological parameters that are sensitive to contaminants and other pedo-environmental conditions and which contribute to biogeochemical nutrient cycles, can be used as synthetic indicators of the progress and also the efficiency of given remediation approaches. Data from long-term studies on re-vegetated mine spoils show that biological and biochemical activity is enhanced with increasing plant density and diversity. Among the soil amendments, most measures that introduce organic matter or alkalinity to the contaminated soils also improve microbial or faunal parameters. Only few amendments, such as phosphates and chelators have deleterious effects on soil biota. In this review, soil microbial biomass and the activity of the enzymes phosphatase and arylsulphatase are identified as suitable and sensitive biological indicators for soil health. The results and future research needs are are summarized.

  19. Silent play in a loud theatre - soil development in a geomorphically active proglacial area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlaar, Piet; Temme, Arnaud; Heckmann, Tobias

    2015-04-01

    Proglacial areas are scientifically famous for two sets of processes: first, the tumultuous geomorphic response to glacial retreat including enhanced fluvial activity and mass movements such as debris flows, rock fall and landslides. Second, the slow and somewhat regular development of soil and vegetation. These two sets of processes have usually been studied in isolation: soil development is best observed in wide, flat proglacial areas where not much geomorphic work is done. This has left questions unanswered that relate to the effect of geomorphic disturbance on high mountain soil formation, and vice versa. We attempted to characterize these interactions in the geomorphically active proglacial area of the Gepatsch Ferner in the Kaunertal in Austria. Geomorphic activity in this area is intensively studied in the PROSA project. In our study, several dozen soils were sampled in order to describe soil properties. Sampling locations were selected with Latin Hypercube sampling to best cover the variation in soil-forming factors. Results clearly showed that soil properties were not only a function of age, but also of erosion-deposition amounts and geomorphic regime. In contrast to what is reported in literature, soil pH in very young soils rose before it dropped as soils became older. The early pH rise probably reflects the leaching of pyrite in the parent material.

  20. Non-destructive measurement of carbonic anhydrase activity and the oxygen isotope composition of soil water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Sam; Sauze, Joana; Ogée, Jérôme; Wohl, Steven; Bosc, Alexandre; Wingate, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrases are a group of metalloenzymes that catalyse the hydration of aqueous carbon dioxide (CO2). The expression of carbonic anhydrase by bacteria, archaea and eukarya has been linked to a variety of important biological processes including pH regulation, substrate supply and biomineralisation. As oxygen isotopes are exchanged between CO2 and water during hydration, the presence of carbonic anhydrase in plants and soil organisms also influences the oxygen isotope budget of atmospheric CO2. Leaf and soil water pools have distinct oxygen isotope compositions, owing to differences in pool sizes and evaporation rates, which are imparted on CO2during hydration. These differences in the isotopic signature of CO2 interacting with leaves and soil can be used to partition the contribution of photosynthesis and soil respiration to net terrestrial CO2 exchange. However, this relies on our knowledge of soil carbonic anhydrase activity and currently, the prevalence and function of these enzymes in soils is poorly understood. Isotopic approaches used to estimate soil carbonic anhydrase activity typically involve the inversion of models describing the oxygen isotope composition of CO2 fluxes to solve for the apparent, potentially catalysed, rate of oxygen exchange during hydration. This requires information about the composition of CO2 in isotopic equilibrium with soil water obtained from destructive, depth-resolved soil water sampling. This can represent a significant challenge in data collection given the considerable potential for spatial and temporal variability in the isotopic composition of soil water and limited a priori information with respect to the appropriate sampling resolution and depth. We investigated whether we could circumvent this requirement by constraining carbonic anhydrase activity and the composition of soil water in isotopic equilibrium with CO2 by solving simultaneously the mass balance for two soil CO2 steady states differing only in the

  1. Metformin attenuates ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic patients may develop acute lung injury less often than non-diabetics; a fact that could be partially ascribed to the usage of antidiabetic drugs, including metformin. Metformin exhibits pleiotropic properties which make it potentially beneficial against lung injury. We hypothesized that pretreatment with metformin preserves alveolar capillary permeability and, thus, prevents ventilator-induced lung injury. Methods Twenty-four rabbits were randomly assigned to pretreatment with metformin (250 mg/Kg body weight/day per os) or no medication for two days. Explanted lungs were perfused at constant flow rate (300 mL/min) and ventilated with injurious (peak airway pressure 23 cmH2O, tidal volume ≈17 mL/Kg) or protective (peak airway pressure 11 cmH2O, tidal volume ≈7 mL/Kg) settings for 1 hour. Alveolar capillary permeability was assessed by ultrafiltration coefficient, total protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity in BALF. Results High-pressure ventilation of the ex-vivo lung preparation resulted in increased microvascular permeability, edema formation and microhemorrhage compared to protective ventilation. Compared to no medication, pretreatment with metformin was associated with a 2.9-fold reduction in ultrafiltration coefficient, a 2.5-fold reduction in pulmonary edema formation, lower protein concentration in BALF, lower ACE activity in BALF, and fewer histological lesions upon challenge of the lung preparation with injurious ventilation. In contrast, no differences regarding pulmonary artery pressure and BALF total cell number were noted. Administration of metformin did not impact on outcomes of lungs subjected to protective ventilation. Conclusions Pretreatment with metformin preserves alveolar capillary permeability and, thus, decreases the severity of ventilator-induced lung injury in this model. PMID:22827994

  2. Spatial and temporal variability in microbial activities of coastal acid saline soils of Goa, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, G. R.; Manjunath, B. L.; Latare, A. M.; D'Souza, R.; Vishwakarma, S.; Singh, N. P.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the spatio-temporal variability of the microbial activities in coastal saline soils (locally called Khazan) of Goa, India (west coast region). The coastal soil salinity is a major constraint for reduced crop yields and abandonment of farming in these areas. Three replicated global positioning based soil samples (0-0.20 m depth) from each of four salinity groups i.e. non-saline (EC=0.08±0.06 dS m-1), weakly saline (EC=2.04±0.06 dS m-1), moderately saline (EC=3.50±0.57 dS m-1) and strongly saline (EC=5.49±0.49 dS m-1) during three seasons-monsoon, post-monsoon and pre-monsoon were collected. Soil microbial activity in terms of soil microbial carbon (MBC), MBC as a fraction of soil organic carbon (SOC) (MBC/SOC), basal soil respiration (BSR), metabolic quotient (qCO2) and soil enzyme activities-dehydrogenase, phosphatase and urease was tested. In all the seasons, the soil cationic composition depended significantly (p<0.01) on salinity levels and the exchangeable sodium (Na) was the second most dominant among the tested cations. The MBC, MBC/SOC and BSR reduced significantly with increasing salinity, whereas qCO2 increased with increased salinity levels. In general, MBC, MBC/SOC and BSR and soil enzyme activities were observed as: salinity levels-strongly saline < moderately saline < weakly saline < non-saline and season-post-monsoon > monsoon > during pre-monsoon season. The mean MBC and MBC/SOC of non-saline soils were 1.61 and 2.28 times higher than that of strongly saline soils, whereas qCO2 of strongly saline soils was 2.4 times higher than that of non-saline soils. This indirectly indicates the salinity stress on the soil microorganisms. Irrespective of season, the soil enzyme activities decreased significantly (p<0.05) with increasing salinity levels. Suitable countermeasures needs to be taken up to alleviate the depressive salinity effect on the microbial and activity for the sustainable crop production in

  3. High-throughput Fluorometric Measurement of Potential Soil Extracellular Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Colin W.; Fricks, Barbara E.; Rocca, Jennifer D.; Steinweg, Jessica M.; McMahon, Shawna K.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Microbes in soils and other environments produce extracellular enzymes to depolymerize and hydrolyze organic macromolecules so that they can be assimilated for energy and nutrients. Measuring soil microbial enzyme activity is crucial in understanding soil ecosystem functional dynamics. The general concept of the fluorescence enzyme assay is that synthetic C-, N-, or P-rich substrates bound with a fluorescent dye are added to soil samples. When intact, the labeled substrates do not fluoresce. Enzyme activity is measured as the increase in fluorescence as the fluorescent dyes are cleaved from their substrates, which allows them to fluoresce. Enzyme measurements can be expressed in units of molarity or activity. To perform this assay, soil slurries are prepared by combining soil with a pH buffer. The pH buffer (typically a 50 mM sodium acetate or 50 mM Tris buffer), is chosen for the buffer's particular acid dissociation constant (pKa) to best match the soil sample pH. The soil slurries are inoculated with a nonlimiting amount of fluorescently labeled (i.e. C-, N-, or P-rich) substrate. Using soil slurries in the assay serves to minimize limitations on enzyme and substrate diffusion. Therefore, this assay controls for differences in substrate limitation, diffusion rates, and soil pH conditions; thus detecting potential enzyme activity rates as a function of the difference in enzyme concentrations (per sample). Fluorescence enzyme assays are typically more sensitive than spectrophotometric (i.e. colorimetric) assays, but can suffer from interference caused by impurities and the instability of many fluorescent compounds when exposed to light; so caution is required when handling fluorescent substrates. Likewise, this method only assesses potential enzyme activities under laboratory conditions when substrates are not limiting. Caution should be used when interpreting the data representing cross-site comparisons with differing temperatures or soil types, as in situ soil

  4. Effect of electrokinetic remediation on indigenous microbial activity and community within diesel contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Hye; Han, Hyo-Yeol; Lee, You-Jin; Kim, Chul Woong; Yang, Ji-Won

    2010-07-15

    Electrokinetic remediation has been successfully used to remove organic contaminants and heavy metals within soil. The electrokinetic process changes basic soil properties, but little is known about the impact of this remediation technology on indigenous soil microbial activities. This study reports on the effects of electrokinetic remediation on indigenous microbial activity and community within diesel contaminated soil. The main removal mechanism of diesel was electroosmosis and most of the bacteria were transported by electroosmosis. After 25 days of electrokinetic remediation (0.63 mA cm(-2)), soil pH developed from pH 3.5 near the anode to pH 10.8 near the cathode. The soil pH change by electrokinetics reduced microbial cell number and microbial diversity. Especially the number of culturable bacteria decreased significantly and only Bacillus and strains in Bacillales were found as culturable bacteria. The use of EDTA as an electrolyte seemed to have detrimental effects on the soil microbial activity, particularly in the soil near the cathode. On the other hand, the soil dehydrogenase activity was enhanced close to the anode and the analysis of microbial community structure showed the increase of several microbial populations after electrokinetics. It is thought that the main causes of changes in microbial activities were soil pH and direct electric current. The results described here suggest that the application of electrokinetics can be a promising soil remediation technology if soil parameters, electric current, and electrolyte are suitably controlled based on the understanding of interaction between electrokinetics, contaminants, and indigenous microbial community. PMID:20452646

  5. The effect of biochar in soil enzyme activities: Latest advances and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Méndez, Ana; Gascó, Gabriel

    2014-05-01

    In the last years there has been an increasing interest in biochar research. Soil biological and biochemical properties have a preeminent role driving nutrient cycling and can be considered as indicators of soil quality. The information on the effects of biochar addition in soil biological activities in still scarce, although an influential number of articles have appeared lately. The aim of this work is to provide an overview of those articles dealing with the biological impact of biochar addition to soil. Studies conducted in soils in different countries differing in forming factors and fertility status are presented. The focus of this work is on how biochar interacts with soil fauna, on changes in soil biological and biochemical properties following heavy metal immobilization after biochar addition and on how these changes are important in relation to global change. Priority areas were research is needed are identified.

  6. Adaptation of soil microbial activity will accelerate the climate change induced release of C from the world's soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karhu, K.; Auffret, M.; Dungait, J.; Fraser, F.; Hopkins, D.; Prosser, J.; Singh, B.; Subke, J.; Wookey, P.; Ågren, G.; Hartley, I. P.

    2013-12-01

    There are concerns that global warming may stimulate decomposition rates in soils, with the extra CO2 released representing a positive feedback to climate change. However, there is growing recognition that adaptation of soil microbial communities to temperature changes may alter the potential rate of carbon release. Critically, recent studies have produced conflicting results in terms of whether the medium-term soil microbial community response to temperature reduces (thermal acclimation) or enhances (enhancement) the instantaneous direct effects of temperature on decomposition rates. This lack of understanding adds considerably to uncertainty in predictions of the magnitude and direction of carbon-cycle feedbacks to climate change. Here we present results from one of the most extensive investigations ever undertaken into the role that acclimatory or enhancing responses play in controlling the temperature sensitivity of decomposition in soils collected from the Arctic to the Amazon, and representing a range of ecosystem types. Investigating the impacts of adaptation to temperature is currently only possible in controlled laboratory experiments, in which fluctuations in substrate availability can be minimized. In our novel approach, soils are incubated at 3°C above mean annual temperature (MAT), until respiration rates stabilize, then cooled by 6°C (MAT -3 °C) and the potential for respiration rates to recover during extended exposure to lower temperatures is determined. Our approach avoids the issues associated with substrate depletion in warming studies, but still tests whether adaptation enhances or reduces the direct impact of temperature on microbial activity. We also investigated the mechanisms underlying changes in microbial respiration by quantifying how microbial community structure, microbial biomass, mass-specific activity, carbon-use efficiency, and enzyme activities responded to our temperature treatments. Our results indicate that compensatory

  7. LOCALLY LED CONSERVATION ACTIVITIES: DEVELOPING A SOIL QUALITY ASSESSMENT TOOL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers base many management decisions on a variety of personal observations of their crops and soils. However, there was no soil assessment procedure applicable to farms across the country to help farmers record these observations and to use them to guide their future management decisions. To add...

  8. The influence of the earthworm Lampito mauritii (Kinberg) on the activity of selected soil enzymes in cadmium-amended soil.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, S; Prabha, D; Barathi, S; Nityanandi, D; Subbhuraam, C V; Lakshmipriya, T; Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Jang, S H; Yi, P I

    2015-03-01

    The effects of cadmium (CdCl2·7H2O) on cellulase, urease, amylase, invertase and phosphatase were assessed for a period of 45 days in the presence and absence of earthworms [Lampito mauritii (Kinberg)] in alfisol soil. The activities of all enzymes significantly increased with longer incubation times (45 days) under laboratory conditions in both control and Cd-amended soils (both with and without earthworm incubation). However, the activities of all enzymes decreased with increasing Cd concentrations under laboratory conditions, both in the presence and absence of earthworms. In the presence of earthworms, cellulase, urease, invertase and amylase activities increased. However, phosphatase activity was lower in most of the Cd-amended soils in the presence of earthworms compared to its activity levels in soils lacking earthworms. These results show that earthworms modulated the stress imposed by Cd by providing suitable substrates, which in turn acted as stimulants for extracellular enzyme secretion by microbes, and by removing Cd through its accumulation in the tissues of the earthworms. PMID:25647789

  9. Recent Developments in Active and Passive Distributed Temperature Sensing for Soil Moisture Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Dong, J.; Hoes, O.; Van De Giesen, N.; Sayde, C.; Ochsner, T. E.; Selker, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we will review recent developments in both active and passive Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) for soil moisture monitoring. DTS involves using fiber-optic cables to measure temperature at sub-meter resolution along cables up to several kilometers in length. Soil thermal properties depend on soil moisture. Hence, temperature variations either in response to externally-applied heating (active) or the response to net radiation (passive) can be monitored and used to infer soil moisture. DTS occupies a unique measurement niche, potentially providing soil moisture information at sub-meter resolution over extents on the order of km at sub-daily time steps. It complements observations from point sensors to other innovative measurement techniques like cosmic ray neutron detection methods and GPS reflectometry. DTS is being developed as a tool for the validation of soil moisture observations from remote sensing and for hydrological field investigations. Here, we will discuss both technological and theoretical advances in active and passive DTS for soil moisture monitoring. We will present data from new installations in the Netherlands and the USA to illustrate recent developments. In particular, we will focus on the value of combining temperature observations from DTS with physical models using data assimilation. In addition to yielding improved soil moisture and temperature profile estimates, recent research has shown the potential to also derive information on the soil thermal and hydraulic properties. We will conclude by outlining the current challenges, with particular emphasis on combining active and passive DTS.

  10. The effect of biological activity on soil water retention and diffusivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Burhan U.; Ferraris, Stefano; Ashton, Rhys W.; Powlson, David S.; Whalley, William R.

    2016-04-01

    Root exudates of both living and artificial origins are known to affect various rhizosphere microbial and micro-faunal activities. However, information on effects on root exudates on soil hydraulic properties responsible for water transmission and distribution in the vadose zone is inadequate, especially in dry soils. To study the effect of artificial root exudates (carbohydrate, amino acids and organic acids mixture) on soil water retention and diffusion process, a laboratory experiment was carried out using soil cores filled with air dried 2-mm sieved loamy sand soils of Cambric Arenosol subclass. Root exudates at three concentrations (1.25, 2.5 & 5.0 g C kg‑1 dry soil) were added and the soil cores were saturated in distilled water for 48 hours at 20 oC together with a control. To determine whether microbes have any influence on diffusivity, two additional treatments with sterilization of microbes using mercuric chloride solution (0.10%) in root exudates (2.5 g C kg‑1 dry soil) and distilled water saturated soil cores were studied. The water in the soil cores was allowed to evaporate at constant temperature (20 ± 1oC) and at a relative humidity of 0.3. The evaporation loss in terms of volumetric water content in the core was measured regularly until the water content was constant with time. Soil water diffusivity was determined numerically. To determine the water retention properties, soils were saturated and incubated for 14 days at 20 oC with the same six treatments and retention curves were generated for 8 different suctions, ranging from 0.01 bars to 15 bars. Results revealed that evaporation from soil cores, initially at a uniform moisture content of saturation, initially decreased linearly with the square root of time. The rate of decrease was gradual in the root exudate treated soils but more rapid in soils treated to stop microbial activity. Addition of root exudates considerably decreased the diffusivity compared to a control treatment. By stopping

  11. Inducing in situ, nonlinear soil response applying an active source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, P.A.; Bodin, P.; Gomberg, J.; Pearce, F.; Lawrence, Z.; Menq, F.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    [1] It is well known that soil sites have a profound effect on ground motion during large earthquakes. The complex structure of soil deposits and the highly nonlinear constitutive behavior of soils largely control nonlinear site response at soil sites. Measurements of nonlinear soil response under natural conditions are critical to advancing our understanding of soil behavior during earthquakes. Many factors limit the use of earthquake observations to estimate nonlinear site response such that quantitative characterization of nonlinear behavior relies almost exclusively on laboratory experiments and modeling of wave propagation. Here we introduce a new method for in situ characterization of the nonlinear behavior of a natural soil formation using measurements obtained immediately adjacent to a large vibrator source. To our knowledge, we are the first group to propose and test such an approach. Employing a large, surface vibrator as a source, we measure the nonlinear behavior of the soil by incrementally increasing the source amplitude over a range of frequencies and monitoring changes in the output spectra. We apply a homodyne algorithm for measuring spectral amplitudes, which provides robust signal-to-noise ratios at the frequencies of interest. Spectral ratios are computed between the receivers and the source as well as receiver pairs located in an array adjacent to the source, providing the means to separate source and near-source nonlinearity from pervasive nonlinearity in the soil column. We find clear evidence of nonlinearity in significant decreases in the frequency of peak spectral ratios, corresponding to material softening with amplitude, observed across the array as the source amplitude is increased. The observed peak shifts are consistent with laboratory measurements of soil nonlinearity. Our results provide constraints for future numerical modeling studies of strong ground motion during earthquakes.

  12. Chemical composition of soils in the areas of volcanic ashfalls around active volcanoes in Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharikhina, L. V.; Litvinenko, Yu. S.

    2016-03-01

    The geochemical features of volcanic soils (Andosols) in the northern soil province of Kamchatka are identified. The background regional concentrations ( Cb r ) of most of chemical elements in the studied soils are lower than their average concentrations in soils of the world and in the European volcanic soils. Only Na, Ca, and Mg are present in elevated concentrations in all the studied soils in the north of Kamchatka. Regional background concentrations of elements are exceeded by 1.6 times in the area of active ashfalls of the Tolbachik volcano and by 1.3 times in the area of active ashfalls of the Shiveluch volcano. The concentrations of mobile forms of elements in these areas exceed their regional background concentrations by 2.1 and 2.6 times, respectively.

  13. Ventilation technologies scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-09-30

    This document presents the findings of a scoping study commissioned by the Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program of the California Energy Commission to determine what research is necessary to develop new residential ventilation requirements for California. This study is one of three companion efforts needed to complete the job of determining the needs of California, determining residential ventilation requirements, and determining appropriate ventilation technologies to meet these needs and requirements in an energy efficient manner. Rather than providing research results, this scoping study identifies important research questions along with the level of effort necessary to address these questions and the costs, risks, and benefits of pursuing alternative research questions. In approaching these questions and level of effort, feasibility and timing were important considerations. The Commission has specified Summer 2005 as the latest date for completing this research in time to update the 2008 version of California's Energy Code (Title 24).

  14. Trichoderma reesei FS10-C enhances phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soil by Sedum plumbizincicola and associated soil microbial activities

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Ying; Luo, Yang; Ma, Wenting; Zhu, Lingjia; Ren, Wenjie; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter; Li, Zhengao

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of Trichoderma reesei FS10-C on the phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soil by the hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola and on soil fertility. The Cd tolerance of T. reesei FS10-C was characterized and then a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the growth and Cd uptake of S. plumbizincicola with the addition of inoculation agents in the presence and absence of T. reesei FS10-C. The results indicated that FS10-C possessed high Cd resistance (up to 300 mg L-1). All inoculation agents investigated enhanced plant shoot biomass by 6–53% of fresh weight and 16–61% of dry weight and Cd uptake by the shoots by 10–53% compared with the control. All inoculation agents also played critical roles in increasing soil microbial biomass and microbial activities (such as biomass C, dehydrogenase activity and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis activity). Two inoculation agents accompanied by FS10-C were also superior to the inoculation agents, indicating that T. reesei FS10-C was effective in enhancing both Cd phytoremediation by S. plumbizincicola and soil fertility. Furthermore, solid fermentation powder of FS10-C showed the greatest capacity to enhance plant growth, Cd uptake, nutrient release, microbial biomass and activities, as indicated by its superior ability to promote colonization by Trichoderma. The solid fermentation powder of FS10-C might serve as a suitable inoculation agent for T. reesei FS10-C to enhance both the phytoremediation efficiency of Cd-contaminated soil and soil fertility. PMID:26113858

  15. Trichoderma reesei FS10-C enhances phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soil by Sedum plumbizincicola and associated soil microbial activities.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ying; Luo, Yang; Ma, Wenting; Zhu, Lingjia; Ren, Wenjie; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter; Li, Zhengao

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of Trichoderma reesei FS10-C on the phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soil by the hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola and on soil fertility. The Cd tolerance of T. reesei FS10-C was characterized and then a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the growth and Cd uptake of S. plumbizincicola with the addition of inoculation agents in the presence and absence of T. reesei FS10-C. The results indicated that FS10-C possessed high Cd resistance (up to 300 mg L(-1)). All inoculation agents investigated enhanced plant shoot biomass by 6-53% of fresh weight and 16-61% of dry weight and Cd uptake by the shoots by 10-53% compared with the control. All inoculation agents also played critical roles in increasing soil microbial biomass and microbial activities (such as biomass C, dehydrogenase activity and fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis activity). Two inoculation agents accompanied by FS10-C were also superior to the inoculation agents, indicating that T. reesei FS10-C was effective in enhancing both Cd phytoremediation by S. plumbizincicola and soil fertility. Furthermore, solid fermentation powder of FS10-C showed the greatest capacity to enhance plant growth, Cd uptake, nutrient release, microbial biomass and activities, as indicated by its superior ability to promote colonization by Trichoderma. The solid fermentation powder of FS10-C might serve as a suitable inoculation agent for T. reesei FS10-C to enhance both the phytoremediation efficiency of Cd-contaminated soil and soil fertility. PMID:26113858

  16. Earthworm-induced carboxylesterase activity in soil: Assessing the potential for detoxification and monitoring organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C; Notario del Pino, J; Domínguez, Jorge

    2015-12-01

    Soil enzyme activities are attracting widespread interest due to its potential use in contaminant breakdown, and as indicators of soil deterioration. However, given the multiple environmental and methodological factors affecting their activity levels, assessment of soil pollution using these biochemical endpoints is still complex. Taking advantage of the well-known stimulatory effect of earthworms on soil microbes, and their associated enzyme activities, we explored some toxicological features of carboxylesterases (CbEs) in soils inoculated with Lumbricus terrestris. A microplate-scale spectrophotometric assay using soil-water suspensions was first optimized, in which kinetic assay parameters (Km, Vmax, dilution of soil homogenate, and duration of soil homogenization) were established for further CbE determinations. Optimal conditions included a soil-to-water ratio of 1:50 (w/v), 30-min of shaking, and 2.5mM of substrate concentration. As expected, CbE activity increased significantly in soils treated with L. terrestris. This bioturbed soil was used for exploring the role of CbE activity as a bioscavenger for organophosphorus (OP) pesticides. Soil treated with two formulations of chlorpyrifos revealed that CbE activity was a significant molecular sink for this pesticide, reducing its impact on soil microbial activity as shown by the unchanged dehydrogenase activity. Dose-dependent curves were adjusted to an exponential kinetic model, and the median ecological dose (ED50) for both pesticide formulations was calculated. ED50 values decreased as the time of pesticide exposure increased (14 d-ED50s=20.4-26.7 mg kg(-1), and 28 d-ED50s=1.8-2.3 mg kg(-1)), which suggested that chlorpyrifos was progressively transformed into its highly toxic metabolite chlorpyrifos-oxon, but simultaneously was inactivated by CbEs. These results were confirmed by in vitro assays that showed chlorpyrifos-oxon was a more potent CbE inhibitor (IC50=35.5-4.67 nM) than chlorpyrifos (0.41-0.84

  17. Improving government decision making in response to floods using soil moisture observations from Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, V. M.; Schumann, G.; Torak, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission, due to launch January 2015, will provide global observations of the Earth's surface soil moisture, providing high accuracy, resolution and continuous global coverage. This paper seeks to show how SMAP data can be used in flood applications to improve flood warning/planning operations for the Upper Mississippi River basin. The Mississippi River ranks as the fourth longest and tenth largest river in the world and is noted as one of the most altered rivers in the United States. The Mississippi River has a very long track record of flood events, with the 2011 event being a unique event due to large volumes of snow melt and heavy spring rain in the Upper Mississippi basin. Understanding and modeling these processes and combining them with relevant satellite observations such as soil moisture conditions could help alleviate some of the risk to flooding by identifying when infiltration to soils is cut off causing excessive runoff. The objective of the analysis is to improve our understanding of how satellite-derived soil moisture will impact basin scaled/multi state decision processes linked to emergency planning and preparedness, such as FEMA FloodSMART. Using the snow hydrology model SNOW-17 (NWS) coupled to a large-scale two-dimensional floodplain inundation model LISFLOOD-FP, the study evaluates how different soil moisture states can be captured by satellites to enable a multi-state decision process focused on flood risk and planning. The study develops a scenario that applies historical soil moisture data from past events to monitor basin soil moisture conditions and yields a percent value of the saturation status. Scenario analysis is particularly important for decision makers such as emergency responders and insurers as their operations depend on their ability to gauge and appropriately assess risk. This analysis will enables insurers to develop mitigation strategies and contingency plans for such events.

  18. Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2011-04-01

    Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

  19. Impacts of land-applying class B municipal biosolids on soil microbial activity and soil nutrient and metal concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impacts of land-applying Class B biosolids on microbial activities and nutrient and metal concentrations in surface soils (0-10 cm) of coastal bermudagrass fields were measured during a 112-day incubation. Application rates were: control, 22, 45, and 67 dry Mg biosolids ha-1 y-1 for 8 years and 22 ...

  20. Soil erosion increases soil microbial activity at the depositional position of eroding slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xu; Cardenas, Laura M.; Donovan, Neil; Zhang, Junling; Murray, Phil; Zhang, Fusuo; Dungait, Jennifer A. J.

    2016-04-01

    Soil erosion is the most widespread form of soil degradation. Estimation of the impact of agricultural soil erosion on global carbon cycle is a topic of scientific debate, with opposing yet similar magnitude estimates of erosion as a net source or sink of atmospheric carbon. The transport and deposition of eroded agricultural soils affects not only the carbon cycle but other nutrient cycles as well. It has been estimated that erosion-induced lateral fluxes of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) could be similar in magnitude to those from fertilizer application and crop removal (Quinton et al., 2010). In particular, the dynamics of soil N in eroding slopes need to be considered because the management of soil N has profound influences on the functioning of soil microorganisms, which are generally considered as the main biotic driver of soil C efflux. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions tend to increase in deposition positions of eroded slopes, diminishing the sink potential of eroded soils C (. As the global warming potential of nitrous oxide (N2O) is 310 times relative to that of CO2, the sink potential of agricultural erosion could easily be negated with a small increase in N2O emissions. Therefore, an investigation of the potential emissions of greenhouse gases, and especially N2O from soils affected by agricultural erosion, are required. In the present study, a field experiment was established with contrasting cultivation techniques of a C4 crop (Zea mays; δ13C = -12.2‰) to introduce 13C-enriched SOC to a soil previously cropped with C3 plants (δ13C = -29.3‰). Soils sampled from the top, middle, bottom and foot slope positions along a distinct erosion pathway were analyzed using 13C-phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis and incubated to investigate the responses of microorganisms and associated potential emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG). The total C and N contents were greatest in soils at the top slope position, whereas soil mineral N (NO3--N and NH4+-N

  1. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm biopores by in situ soil zymography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thu Duyen Hoang, Thi; Razavi, Bahar. S.; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Earthworms can strongly activate microorganisms, increase microbial and enzyme activities and consequently the turnover of native soil organic matter. In extremely dynamic microhabitats and hotspots as biopores made by earthworms, the in situ enzyme activities are a footprint of complex biotic interactions. The effect of earthworms on the alteration of enzyme activities inside biopores and the difference between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil was visualized by in situ soil zymography (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2014). For the first time, we prepared quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in biopores. Furthermore, we developed the zymography technique by direct application of a substrate saturated membrane to the soil to obtain better spatial resolution. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). Simultaneously, maize seed was sown in the soil. Control soil box with maize and without earthworm was prepared in the same way. After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworm, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine aminopeptidase) and phosphatase. Followed by non-destructive zymography, biopore samples and control soil were destructively collected to assay enzyme kinetics by fluorogenically labeled substrates method. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. These differences were further confirmed by fluorimetric microplate enzyme assay detected significant difference of Vmax in four above mentioned enzymes. Vmax of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores is 68%, 108%, 50% and 49% higher than that of control soil. However, no difference in cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase kinetics between biopores and control soil were detected. This indicated little effect of earthworms on protein and cellulose transformation in soil

  2. Coupling aboveground and belowground activities using short term fluctuations in 13C composition of soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, D.; Parent, F.; Grossiord, C.; Plain, C.; Longdoz, B.; Granier, A.

    2011-12-01

    There is a growing amount of evidence that belowground processes in forest ecosystems are tightly coupled to aboveground activities. Soil CO2 efflux, the largest flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, is dominated by root respiration and by respiration of microorganisms that find the carbohydrates required to fulfil their energetic costs in the rhizosphere. A close coupling between aboveground photosynthetic activity and soil CO2 efflux is therefore expected. The isotopic signature of photosynthates varies with time because photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination is dynamically controlled by environmental factors. This temporal variation of δ13C of photosynthate is thought to be transferred along the tree-soil continuum and it will be retrieved in soil CO2 efflux after a time lag that reflects the velocity of carbon transport from canopy to belowground. However, isotopic signature of soil CO2 efflux is not solely affected by photosynthetic carbon discrimination, bur also by post photosynthetic fractionation, and especially by fractionation processes affecting CO2 during the transport from soil layers to surface. Tunable diode laser spectrometry is a useful tool to quantify short-term variation in δ13C of soil CO2 efflux and of CO2 in the soil atmosphere. We set up hydrophobic tubes to measure the vertical profile of soil CO2 concentration and its δ13C composition in a temperate beech forest, and we monitored simultaneously δ13C of trunk and soil CO2 efflux, δ13C of phloem exudate and δ13C of leaf sugars. We evidenced that temporal changes in δ13C of soil CO2 and soil CO2 efflux reflected changes in environmental conditions that affect photosynthetic discrimination and that soil CO2 was 4.4% enriched compared to soil CO2 efflux according to diffusion fractionation. However, this close coupling can be disrupted when advective transport of CO2 took place. We also reported evidences that temporal variations in the isotopic composition of soil CO2 efflux reflect

  3. Central Fan Integrated Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-12

    This information sheet describes one example of a ventilation system design, a central fan integrated supply (CFIS) system, a mechanical ventilation and pollutant source control to ensure that there is reasonable indoor air quality inside the house.

  4. Enzyme activity and microorganisms diversity in soil contaminated with the Boreal 58 WG herbicide.

    PubMed

    Kucharski, Jan; Tomkiel, Monika; Baćmaga, Małgorzata; Borowik, Agata; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga

    2016-07-01

    Next-generation herbicides are relatively safe when used properly, but the recommended rates are relatively low, which can lead to overdosing. This study evaluated the responses of soil-dwelling microorganisms and soil enzymes to contamination with the Boreal 58 WG herbicide. The analyzed product contains active ingredients flufenacet and isoxaflutole. All tests were performed under laboratory conditions. The analyzed material was sandy clay. Boreal 58 WG was introduced to soil in four doses. Soil without the addition of the herbicide served as the control. The soil was mixed with the tested herbicide, and its moisture content was maintained at 50% of capillary water capacity. Biochemical and microbiological analyses were performed on experimental days 0, 20, 40, 80 and 160. Accidental contamination of soil with the Boreal 58 WG herbicide led to a relatively minor imbalance in the soil microbiological and biochemical profile. The herbicide dose influenced dehydrogenase activity in only 0.84%, urease activity in 2.04%, β-glucosidase activity in 8.26%, catalase activity in 12.40%, arylsulfatase activity in 12.54%, acid phosphatase activity in 42.11%, numbers of organotrophic bacteria in 18.29%, actinomyces counts in 1.31% and fungi counts in 6.86%. PMID:27050595

  5. In vitro activity of colistin in antimicrobial combination against carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Le Minh, Vien; Thi Khanh Nhu, Nguyen; Vinh Phat, Voong; Thompson, Corinne; Huong Lan, Nguyen Phu; Thieu Nga, Tran Vu; Thanh Tam, Pham Thi; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Hoang Nhu, Tran Do; Van Hao, Nguyen; Thi Loan, Huynh; Minh Yen, Lam; Parry, Christopher M; Trung Nghia, Ho Dang; Campbell, James I; Hien, Tran Tinh; Thwaites, Louise; Thwaites, Guy; Van Vinh Chau, Nguyen; Baker, Stephen

    2015-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has become one of the major infection threats in intensive care units (ICUs) globally. Since 2008, A. baumannii has been the leading cause of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in our ICU at an infectious disease hospital in southern Vietnam. The emergence of this pathogen in our setting is consistent with the persistence of a specific clone exhibiting resistance to carbapenems. Antimicrobial combinations may be a strategy to treat infections caused by these carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii. Therefore, we assessed potential antimicrobial combinations against local carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii by measuring in vitro interactions of colistin with four antimicrobials that are locally certified for treating VAP. We first performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing and multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) genotyping on 74 A. baumannii isolated from quantitative tracheal aspirates from patients with VAP over an 18-month period. These 74 isolates could be subdivided into 21 main clusters by MLVA and >80 % were resistant to carbapenems. We selected 56 representative isolates for in vitro combination synergy testing. Synergy was observed in four (7 %), seven (13 %), 20 (36 %) and 38 (68 %) isolates with combinations of colistin with ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, imipenem and meropenem, respectively. Notably, more carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates (36/43; 84 %) exhibited synergistic activity with a combination of colistin and meropenem than carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii isolates (2/13; 15 %) (P = 0.023; Fisher's exact test). Our findings suggest that combinations of colistin and meropenem should be considered when treating carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii infections in Vietnam, and we advocate clinical trials investigating combination therapy for VAP. PMID:26297024

  6. Passive/Active Microwave Soil Moisture Disaggregation Using SMAPVEX12 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, B.; Lakshmi, V.; Bindlish, R.; Jackson, T. J.; Colliander, A.

    2015-12-01

    The SMAPVEX12 experiment was conducted during June-July 2012 in Manitoba, Canada with the goal of collecting remote sensing data and ground measurements for the development and testing of soil moisture retrieval algorithms under different vegetation and soil conditions for the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) satellite launched in January 2015. The aircraft based soil moisture data provided by the passive/active microwave sensor PALS (Passive and Active L and S band System) has a nominal spatial resolution of 1500 m. In this study, a change detection algorithm is used for disaggregation of coarse passive microwave soil moisture retrievals with radar backscatter coefficients obtained with the higher spatial resolution UAVSAR (Unmanned Air Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar). The accuracy of the disaggregated change in soil moisture was evaluated using ground based soil moisture measurements. Results show that the disaggregation products are well correlated to in situ measurements. Based on the R2, the highest resolution disaggregated product at 5 m exhibits soil moisture heterogeneity that reflects the distribution of the crops. The difference of spatial standard deviation between the disaggregated and in situ soil moisture ranges from <0.001-0.131 m3/m3 also proves the spatial capability of the change detection algorithm at 5 m scale.

  7. Phosphorus resorption by young beech trees and soil phosphatase activity as dependent on phosphorus availability.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Kerstin; Heuck, Christine; Spohn, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Motivated by decreasing foliar phosphorus (P) concentrations in Fagus sylvatica L. forests, we studied P recycling depending on P fertilization in mesocosms with juvenile trees and soils of two contrasting F. sylvatica L. forests in a greenhouse. We hypothesized that forests with low soil P availability are better adapted to recycle P than forests with high soil P availability. The P resorption efficiency from senesced leaves was significantly higher at the P-poor site (70 %) than at the P-rich site (48 %). P fertilization decreased the resorption efficiency significantly at the P-poor site to 41 %, while it had no effect at the P-rich site. Both acid and alkaline phosphatase activity were higher in the rhizosphere of the P-poor than of the P-rich site by 53 and 27 %, respectively, while the activities did not differ in the bulk soil. Fertilization decreased acid phosphatase activity significantly at the P-poor site in the rhizosphere, but had no effect on the alkaline, i.e., microbial, phosphatase activity at any site. Acid phosphatase activity in the P-poor soil was highest in the rhizosphere, while in the P-rich soil, it was highest in the bulk soil. We conclude that F. sylvatica resorbed P more efficiently from senescent leaves at low soil P availability than at high P availability and that acid phosphatase activity in the rhizosphere but not in the bulk soil was increased at low P availability. Moreover, we conclude that in the P-rich soil, microbial phosphatases contributed more strongly to total phosphatase activity than plant phosphatases. PMID:26875186

  8. Comparison of methods for measuring soil microbial activity using cotton strips and a respirometer.

    PubMed

    Nachimuthu, Gunasekhar; King, Kathleen; Kristiansen, Paul; Lockwood, Peter; Guppy, Chris

    2007-05-01

    In order to develop a method of measuring the level of microbial activity in soil that is suitable for use by farmers, land managers, and other non-scientists, a simple method for determining soil microbial activity was evaluated and compared with two standard techniques. Soils sampled from vegetable farms in south east Queensland were incubated in the laboratory under controlled moisture and temperature conditions. Three methods were used to measure soil microbial activity, a respirometry method and two methods using the cotton strip assay (CSA) technique (image analysis and tensometer). The standard CSA method measured loss of tensile strength over a 35 day incubation period of buried cotton strips using a tensometer. The new CSA technique measured the intensity of staining by microbes using a flatbed scanner to create an image of the cotton strip whose staining percentage was determined using Photoshop software. The respirometry method used the substrate induced respiration rate (SIR) to determine microbial biomass in the soil at day 12 of incubation. The strong correlation between the image analysis method and the tensometer method (r(2)=0.81), a technique used by scientific researchers, suggests that the image analysis method could be used to monitor aspects of soil biological health by general community land-care groups and farmers. The image analysis method uses equipment which is readily available and, while not strongly correlated with more precise measurements of soil biological activity such as microbial biomass (r(2)=0.26), it can detect gross trends in biological health in a soil monitoring program. The CSA method using image analysis was the cheapest technique to measure soil microbial activity. CSA using image analysis can be a valuable tool in conjunction with other simple indicators of soil physical and chemical health such as slaking and pH to monitor soil amelioration or rehabilitation programs. PMID:17376552

  9. Environmental forcing does not induce diel or synoptic variation in the carbon isotope content of forest soil respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowling, D. R.; Egan, J. E.; Hall, S. J.; Risk, D. A.

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies have examined temporal fluctuations in the amount and carbon isotope content (δ13C) of CO2 produced by the respiration of roots and soil organisms. These changes have been correlated with diel cycles of environmental forcing (e.g., sunlight and soil temperature) and with synoptic-scale atmospheric motion (e.g., rain events and pressure-induced ventilation). We used an extensive suite of measurements to examine soil respiration over 2 months in a subalpine forest in Colorado, USA (the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux forest). Observations included automated measurements of CO2 and δ13C of CO2 in the soil efflux, the soil gas profile, and forest air. There was strong diel variability in soil efflux but no diel change in the δ13C of the soil efflux (δR) or the CO2 produced by biological activity in the soil (δJ). Following rain, soil efflux increased significantly, but δR and δJ did not change. Temporal variation in the δ13C of the soil efflux was unrelated to measured environmental variables, and we failed to find an explanation for this unexpected result. Measurements of the δ13C of the soil efflux with chambers agreed closely with independent observations of the isotopic composition of soil CO2 production derived from soil gas well measurements. Deeper in the soil profile and at the soil surface, results confirmed established theory regarding diffusive soil gas transport and isotopic fractionation. Deviation from best-fit diffusion model results at the shallower depths illuminated a pump-induced ventilation artifact that should be anticipated and avoided in future studies. There was no evidence of natural pressure-induced ventilation of the deep soil. However, higher variability in δ13C of the soil efflux relative to δ13C of production derived from soil profile measurements was likely caused by transient pressure-induced transport with small horizontal length scales.

  10. Advances in downscaling soil moisture for use in drought and flood assessments: Implications for data from the Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi, V.; Fang, B.; Narayan, U.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrological hazards, namely droughts and floods are dependent on the deficit and excess of soil moisture. With the launch of the Soil Moisture Active and Passive Mission (SMAP) in January 2015 we will have twice a day global observations of soil moisture. However the spatial resolution of soil moisture retrieved from the SMAP radiometer is 10s of km and the SMAP radar will provide backscatter observations 100m-1km. High spatial resolution of soil moisture helps to monitor floods and droughts in a spatially distributed fashion. The current focus is finding the best way to obtain high spatial resolution soil moisture using the radar and radiometer observations. In this presentation we will deal with downscaling by couple of methods - (a) Use of the thermal inertia relation between soil moisture and surface temperature modulated by vegetation (b) Relationship between soil moisture and evaporation (c) Change detection using high spatial resolution active radar data.

  11. Solid/solution Cu fractionations/speciation of a Cu contaminated soil after pilot-scale electrokinetic remediation and their relationships with soil microbial and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan-Ying; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Cang, Long; Li, Lian-Zhen; Wang, Peng

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the detailed metal speciation/fractionations of a Cu contaminated soil before and after electrokinetic remediation as well as their relationships with the soil microbial and enzyme activities. Significant changes in the exchangeable and adsorbed-Cu fractionations occurred after electrokinetic treatment, while labile soil Cu in the solution had a tendency to decrease from the anode to the cathode, and the soil free Cu(2+) ions were mainly accumulated in the sections close to the cathode. The results of regression analyses revealed that both the soil Cu speciation in solution phase and the Cu fractionations in solid phase could play important roles in the changes of the soil microbial and enzyme activities. Our findings suggest that the bioavailability of soil heavy metals and their ecotoxicological effects on the soil biota before and after electroremediation can be better understood in terms of their chemical speciation and fractionations. PMID:19427727

  12. Soil zymography - A novel technique for mapping enzyme activity in the rhizosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, Marie

    2014-05-01

    The effect plant roots on microbial activity in soil at the millimeter scale is poorly understood. One reason for this is that spatially explicit methods for the study of microbial activity in soil are limited. Here we present a quantitative in situ technique for mapping the distribution of exoenzymes in soil along with some results about the effects of roots on exoenzyme activity in soil. In the first study we showed that both acid and alkaline phosphatase activity were up to 5.4-times larger in the rhizosphere of Lupinus albus than in the bulk soil. While acid phosphatase activity (produced by roots and microorganisms) was closely associated with roots, alkaline phosphatase activity (produced only by microorganisms) was more widely distributed, leading to a 2.5-times larger area of activity of alkaline than of acid phosphatase. These results indicate a spatial differentiation of different ecophysiological groups of organic phosphorus mineralizing organisms in the rhizosphere which might alleviate a potential competition for phosphorus between them. In a second study cellulase, chitinase and phosphatase activities were analyzed in the presence of living Lupinus polyphyllus roots and dead/dying roots (in the same soils 10, 20 and 30 days after cutting the L. polyphyllus shoots). The activity of all three enzymes was 9.0 to 13.9-times higher at the living roots compared to the bulk soil. Microhotspots of cellulase, chitinase and phosphatase activity in the soil were found up to 60 mm away from the living roots. 10 days after shoot cutting, the areas of high activities of cellulase and phosphatase activity were extend up to 55 mm away from the next root, while the extension of the area of chitinase activity did not change significantly. At the root, cellulase and chitinase activity increased first at the root tips after shoot cutting and showed maximal activity 20 days after shoot cutting. The number and activity of microhotspots of chitinase activity was maximal 10

  13. [Seasonal dynamics of soil active carbon pool in a purple paddy soil in southwest China].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Jiang, Chang-sheng; Hao, Qing-ju

    2012-08-01

    The seasonal dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC), readily oxidized carbon (ROC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in a purple paddy soil were studied in a long-term field experimental station in Chongqing, China. The results showed that the seasonal variations of the contents of SOC, ROC and MBC had similar trends in the rape growing season. The contents were much higher in the early and late stages than in the middle stage of the rape growth. SOC, ROC and MBC all achieved the highest values of 16.20 g x kg(-1), 3.58 g x kg(-1) and 309.70 mg x kg(-1) at the end of the growing period, respectively. The seasonal change of DOC content presented as a single peak and reached to the highest value of 37.64 mg x kg(-1) at the middle stage of the rape growth. The temporal dynamics of the allocation ratios of ROC, MBC and DOC were similar to that of their contents. The allocation ratios of ROC, MBC and DOC were 15.49%-23.93%, 1.44%-2.06% and 0.11%-0.32% during the rape growing season, respectively. The influencing factors of SOC and ROC contents were the soil temperature at 5 cm soil depth, soil total nitrogen content and pH. MBC content was jointly impacted by the soil temperature at 5 cm soil depth, root biomass and its C and N contents. DOC content was mainly affected by soil moisture. PMID:23213908

  14. Effect of biochar or activated carbon amendment on the volatilisation and biodegradation of organic soil pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, David; Meynet, Paola; Bushnaf, Khaled

    2013-04-01

    Biochar or activated carbon added to contaminated soil may temporarily reduce the volatilisation of organic pollutants by enhanced sorption. The long-term effect of sorbent amendments on the fate of volatile petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures (VPHs) will depend on the responses of the soil bacterial community members, especially those which may utilize VPHs as carbon substrates. We investigated the volatilisation and biodegradation of VPHs emanating from NAPL sources and migrating through one meter long columns containing unsaturated sandy soil with and without 2% biochar or activated carbon amendment. After 420 days, VPH volatilisation from AC amended soil was less than 10 percent of the cumulative VPH volatilisation flux from unamended soil. The cumulative CO2 volatilisation flux increased more slowly in AC amended soil, but was comparable to the untreated soil after 420 days. This indicated that the pollution attenuation over a 1 meter distance was improved by the AC amendment. Biochar was a weaker VPH sorbent than AC and had a lesser effect on the cumulative VPH and CO2 fluxes. We also investgated the predominant bacterial community responses in sandy soil to biochar and/or VPH addition with a factorially designed batch study, and by analyzing preserved soil samples. Biochar addition alone had only weak effects on soil bacterial communities, while VPH addition was a strong community structure shaping factor. The bacterial community effects of biochar-enhanced VPH sorption were moderated by the limited biomass carrying capacity of the sandy soil investigated which contained only low amounts of inorganic nitrogen. Several Pseudomonas spp., including Pseudomonas putida strains, became dominant in VPH polluted soil with and without biochar. The ability of these versatile VPH degraders to effectively regulate their metabolic pathways according to substrate availabilities may additionally have moderated bacterial community structure responses to the presence of biochar

  15. Can subterranean cave systems affect soil CO2 fluxes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnc, Bor; Ferlan, Mitja; Ogrinc, Nives

    2015-04-01

    Main factors affecting soil CO2 fluxes in most ecosystems are soil temperature and soil moisture. Nevertheless occasionally high soil CO2 fluxes were observed at carst areas, which could result from ventilation of subterranean cavities (Ferlan et al., 2011). The aim of this work was to determine the influence of cave ventilation to soil CO2 fluxes. Research was done in a dead-end passage of Postojna cave (Pisani rov) and on the surface area above the passage (Velika Jeršanova dolina) in south-western Slovenia. Inside the cave we measured CO2 concentrations, its carbon (13C) stable isotope composition, 222Rn activity concentrations, temperatures and air pressure. At the surface we had chosen two sampling plots; test plot above the cave and control. At both plots we measured soil CO2 fluxes with automatic chambers, CO2 concentrations, temperatures and carbon stable isotope composition of soil air at three different depths (0.2 m, 0.5 m and 0.8 m) and different meteorological parameters such as: air temperature, air pressure, wind speed an precipitation. To detect the cave influence, we compared two surface CO2 flux measurements with air temperatures and changes of CO2 concentrations in the cave atmosphere. Our results on CO2 concentrations in the gallery of the cave indicated that the ventilation of this particular gallery also depends on outside air temperatures. Outside temperature increased and corresponded to higher CO2 concentrations, whereas at lower temperatures (T < 9 oC) cave started to ventilate and exhaled CO2 reach air through unknown fissures and cracks. At the control plot the soil CO2 fluxes were in a good correlation with soil temperatures (r = 0.789, p =0.01), where greater soil temperatures correspond to greater soil CO2 fluxes. Soil CO2 fluxes at the plot above the cave did not show statistically significant correlations with soil temperatures or soil moisture indicating that other factors possibly cave ventilation could influence it. References

  16. Role of native and exotic woody vegetation in soil restoration in active gully systems (southern Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borja Ramon, Pablo; Alvarado Moncayo, Dario; Vanacker, Veerle; Cisneros, Pedro; Molina, Armando; Govers, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Revegetation projects in degraded lands have the potential to recover essential soil functions. If vegetation restoration is combined with bioengineering techniques, such as the construction of retention dams in active gully systems, soil restoration could be enhanced. One important aspect of this process is the role of vegetation on restoration of soil chemical and physical properties. There is currently a lack of knowledge on the potential of soil restoration in active badland systems, as most studies have concentrated on the direct and visible effect of revegetation on erosion control. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of revegetation and bioengineering works on the restoration of soil physical and chemical properties. The analyses are realized in a highly degraded area of 3 km2, located in the lower part of the Loreto catchment (Southern Ecuadorian Andes). First, the soil physical and/or chemical parameters that are most sensitive to track environmental change were evaluated. Second, the role of vegetation on soil restoration was quantified. . Soil samples were taken in sites with different vegetation cover, land use and physiographic position. The following physical and chemical parameters were measured: volumetric water content (θsat, θact), bulk density, pH, texture, organic matter, C and N content. Our first results do not show a clear relationship between volumetric water content at saturation (θsat), bulk density, or C content. The saturation water content does not vary significantly between different sites, or land use types. However, significant differences are found between sites at different stages of restoration; and this for most chemical and physical soil properties. Vegetation cover (%) appears to exert a strong control on the C content in the mineral soils. The highest C values are found in soils of forest plantations with Eucalyptus and Pinus species. These plantations are located in areas that were previously affected by active

  17. Microbial quantities and enzyme activity in soil irrigated with sewage for different lengths of time.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoming; Ma, Teng; Chen, Liuzhu; Cui, Yahui; Du, Peng; Liao, Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Sewage is widely used on agricultural soils in peri-urban areas of developing countries to meet shortages of water resource. Although sewage is a good source of plant nutrients, it also increases the heavy metals loads to soils. Microbial responses to these contaminants may serve as early warning indicators of adverse effects of sewage irrigation on soil quality. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of time of sewage irrigation on soil microbial indicators. Soil samples were collected from seven soil sites (S1-S7) irrigated with 0 years, 16 years, 23 years, 25 years, 27 years, 32 years and 52 years, respectively in Shijiazhuang of China and analyzed. For each soil sample, we determined the quantities of bacteria, fungi and actinomycete, and enzyme activities of urease, sucrase, phosphatase, dehydrogenase and catalase. Our results showed that the soils of S2-S7 irrigated with sewage effluents for different times (ranged between 16 and 52 years) exhibited higher densities of bacteria, actinomycete, urease, sucrase and phosphatase but lower densities of fungi when compared with S1 irrigated with sewage effluents for 0 years. The soil S7 irrigated with sewage effluents for longest times (52 years) contained lowest activities of catalase when compared with the soils of S1-S6. The densities of bacteria (R = 0.877, p < 0.01), actinomycete (R = 0.875, p < 0.01), sucrase (R = 0.858, p < 0.01) and phosphatase (R = 0.804, p < 0.05) were significantly correlated in a positive manner with time of sewage irrigation. Soil fungi quantities and urease, dehydrogenase and catalase activities did not change significantly with irrigation time. This study confirms that sewage irrigation had negative effects on microbial properties including fungi, catalase and dehydrogenase in the long term, so there is a need for continuous monitoring for sustainable soil health. PMID:25190356

  18. Land spreading of olive mill wastewater: effects on soil microbial activity and potential phytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Ibrahim; Laor, Yael; Raviv, Michael; Medina, Shlomit

    2007-01-01

    Extremely high organic load and the toxic nature of olive mill wastewater (OMW) prevent their direct discharge into domestic wastewater treatment systems. In addition to the various treatment schemes designed for such wastewater, controlled land spreading of untreated OMW has been suggested as an alternative mean of disposal. A field study was conducted between October 2004 and September 2005 to assess possible effects of OMW on soil microbial activity and potential phytotoxicity. The experiment was carried out in an organic orchard located on a Vertisol-type soil (Jezre'el Valley, Israel) and included two application levels of OMW (36 and 72m(3)ha(-1)). Total microbial counts, and to less extent the hydrolytic activity and soil respiration were increased following the high OMW application level. A bench-scale lab experiment showed that the rate of OMW mineralization was mainly dependent on the general status of soil activity and was not related to previous acclimatization of the soil microflora to OMW. Soil phytotoxicity (% germination and root elongation) was assessed in soil extracts of samples collected before and after each OMW application, using germinating cress (Lepidium sativum L.) seeds. We found direct short-term effect of OMW application on soil phytotoxicity. However, the soil was partly or completely recovered between successive applications. No further phytotoxicity was observed in treated soils as compared with control soil, 3 months after OMW application. Such short-term phytotoxicity was not in correlation with measured EC and total polyphenols in the soil extracts. Overall, the results of this study further support a safe controlled OMW spreading on lands that are not associated with sensitive aquifers. PMID:16814841

  19. Michaelis-Menten Kinetics and the Activation Energy Relate Soil Peroxidase Kinetics to the Lignin Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triebwasser-Freese, D.; Tharayil, N.; Preston, C. M.; Gerard, P.

    2013-12-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that lignin exhibit a turnover rate of less than 6 years, suggesting that the enzymatic mechanisms mediating the decay of lignin are less understood. One factor that could be affecting the mean residence time of lignin in the soil is the catalytic efficiency of soil oxidoreductase enzymes. We characterized the spatial and seasonal transitions in the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and activation energy of the soil oxidoreductase enzyme, peroxidase, across three ecosystems of differing litter chemistries- pine, deciduous forest, and a cultivated field- and associate it to the soil lignin chemistries. To interpret the combined effect of Vmax and Km, the two parameters were integrated into one term which we defined as the catalytic efficiency. Generally, the peroxidases in pine soils exhibited the highest Vmax and Km, resulting in the lowest catalytic efficiency, followed by that in the deciduous soils. Meanwhile, the agricultural soils which exhibited the lowest Vmax and Km contained the highest catalytic efficiency of peroxidase. Through linear regression analysis of the kinetic parameters to the soil lignin chemistry, we discerned that the catalytic efficiency term best associated to the lignin monomer ratios (C/V, P/V, and SCV/V). The Activation Energy of peroxidase varied by depth, and seasons across the ecosystems. However, the Activation Energy of peroxidase did not relate to the lignin chemistry or quantity. Collectively, our results show that although the peroxidase Vmax and Km in the phenolic-poor soils are low, the degradation efficiency of peroxidases in this soils can be equivalent or exceed that of phenolic-rich soils. This study, through the characterization of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, provides a new insight into the mechanisms that could moderate the decomposition of lignin in soils.

  20. Extraction of an urease-active organo-complex from soil.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, R. G.; El-Sayed, M. H.; Mclaren, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Description of an extraction from a Dublin clay loam soil of a colloidal organic matter complex that is urease active and, by X-ray analysis, free of clays. Urease activity in the clay-free precipitates, as in the soil, was not destroyed by the activity of an added proteolytic enzyme, pronase. This is attributed to the circumstance that native soil urease resides in organic colloidal particles with pores large enough for water, urea, ammonia, and carbon dioxide to pass freely, but nevertheless small enough to exclude pronase.

  1. How to Plan Ventilation Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, John H.

    1963-01-01

    Ventilation systems for factory safety demand careful planning. The increased heat loads and new processes of industry have introduced complex ventilation problems in--(1) ventilation supply, (2) duct work design, (3) space requirements, (4) hood face velocities, (5) discharge stacks, and (6) building eddies. This article describes and diagrams…

  2. Soil Moisture Active and Passive Microwave Products: Intercomparison and Evaluation over a Sahelian Site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a comparison and an evaluation of five soil moisture products based on satellite-based passive and active microwave measurements. Products are evaluated for 2005-2006 against ground measurements obtained from the soil moisture network deployed in Mali (Sahel) in the framework of ...

  3. Phosphatase activities in soil after repeated untreated and alum-treated poultry litter applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Repeated additions of untreated and aluminum sulfate (alum)-treated poultry litter to soil affect ecology and consequent nutrient dynamics. The objective of this study was to determine how repeated annual poultry litter additions affected phosphatase activities in concert with changes in soil phosph...

  4. Fostering Application Opportunites for the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, M. Susan; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Entekhabi, Dara; Njoku, Eni G.; Kellogg, Kent H.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission will provide global observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state from space. We outline how priority applications contributed to the SMAP mission measurement requirements and how the SMAP mission plans to foster applications and applied science.

  5. Enzyme activity in terrestrial soil in relation to exploration of the Martian surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclaren, A. D.

    1974-01-01

    Sensitive tests for the detection of extracellular enzyme activity in Martian soil was investigated using simulated Martian soil. Enzyme action at solid-liquid water interfaces and at low humidity were studied, and a kinetic scheme was devised and tested based on the growth of microorganisms and the oxidation of ammonium nitrite.

  6. Effect of three typical sulfide mineral flotation collectors on soil microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zunwei; Yao, Jun; Wang, Fei; Yuan, Zhimin; Bararunyeretse, P; Zhao, Yue

    2016-04-01

    The sulfide mineral flotation collectors are wildly used in China, whereas their toxic effect on soil microbial activity remains largely unexplored. In this study, isothermal microcalorimetric technique and soil enzyme assay techniques were employed to investigate the toxic effect of typical sulfide mineral flotation collectors on soil microbial activity. Soil samples were treated with different concentrations (0-100 μg•g - 1 soil) of butyl xanthate, butyl dithiophosphate, and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate. Results showed a significant adverse effect of butyl xanthate (p < 0.05), butyl dithiophosphate, and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (p < 0.01) on soil microbial activity. The growth rate constants k decreased along with the increase of flotation collectors concentration from 20.0 to 100.0 μg•g(-1). However, the adverse effects of these three floatation collectors showed significant difference. The IC 20 of the investigated flotation reagents followed such an order: IC 20 (butyl xanthate) > IC 20 (sodium diethyldithiocarbamate) > IC 20 (butyl dithiophosphate) with their respective inhibitory concentration as 47.03, 38.36, and 33.34 μg•g(-1). Besides, soil enzyme activities revealed that these three flotation collectors had an obvious effect on fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDA) enzyme and catalase (CAT) enzyme. The proposed methods can provide meaningful toxicological information of flotation reagents to soil microbes in the view of metabolism and biochemistry, which are consistent and correlated to each other. PMID:26695417

  7. Soil microbial communities and activities under different orchard floor management systems in Oregan Sweet Cherry Orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the importance of microorganisms in nutrient cycling and productivity is well recognized in annual cropping systems, specific information regarding the size, composition and activity of soil microbes in orchard systems is lacking. This study assessed the soil microbial community structure (...

  8. Soil Microbial Communities and Activities Under Different Orchard Floor Management Systems in Oregon Sweet Cherry Orchards

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although the importance of microorganisms in nutrient cycling and productivity is well recognized in annual cropping systems, specific information regarding the size, composition and activity of soil microbes in orchard systems is lacking. This study assessed the soil microbial community structure (...

  9. NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission and opportunities for applications users

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space. Set to launch in 2014, SMAP soil moisture and freeze/thaw measurements will have an accuracy, resolution, and glob...

  10. Relationship between phosphorus forms and phosphatase activity in soils amended with poultry manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Up to 80% of the phosphorus (P) in poultry manure (PM) can be present in organic forms that require mineralization via phosphatase enzymes prior to plant utilization. To determine the correlation between soil P distribution and phosphatase activity we sequentially extracted two Maine soils amended...

  11. RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES FOR EXISTING DETACHED HOUSES - TECHNICAL GUIDANCE (THIRD EDITION) FOR ACTIVE SOIL DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This technical guidance document is designed to aid in the selection, design, installation and operation of indoor radon reduction techniques using soil depressurization in existing houses. Its emphasis is on active soil depressurization; i.e., on systems that use a fan to depre...

  12. Initial validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission using USDA-ARS watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission was launched in January 2015 to measure global surface soil moisture. The calibration and validation program of SMAP relies upon an international cooperative of in situ networks to provide ground truth references across a variety of landscapes. The U...

  13. Contrasting effects of biochar versus manure on soil microbial communities and enzyme activities in an Aridisol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar has been shown to increase microbial activity, alter microbial community structure, and increase soil fertility in arid and semi-arid soils, but at relatively high rates that may be impractical for large-scale field studies. This contrasts with organic amendments such as manure, which can be...

  14. Scaling and calibration of a core validation site for the soil moisture active passive mission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The calibration and validation of soil moisture remote sensing products is complicated due to the logistics of installing a long term soil moisture monitoring network in an active landscape. It is more efficient to locate these stations along agricultural field boundaries, but unfortunately this oft...

  15. Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) Mitigation for the Soil, Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Damon; Brambora, Cliff; Wong, Mark Englin; Miles, Lynn; Durachka, David; Farmer, Brian; Mohammed, Priscilla; Piepmier, Jeff; Medeiros, Jim; Martin Neil; Garcia, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    The presence of anthropogenic RFI is expected to adversely impact soil moisture measurement by NASA s Soil Moisture Active Passive mission. The digital signal processing approach and preliminary design for detecting and mitigating this RFI is presented in this paper. This approach is largely based upon the work of Johnson and Ruf.

  16. Detection and Investigation of Soil Biological Activity against Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Bent, E.; Loffredo, A.; McKenry, M. V.; Becker, J. O.; Borneman, J.

    2008-01-01

    Greenhouse experiments with two susceptible hosts of Meloidogyne incognita, a dwarf tomato and wheat, led to the identification of a soil in which the root-knot nematode population was reduced 5- to 16-fold compared to identical but pasteurized soil two months after infestation with 280 M. incognita J2/100 cm3 soil. This suppressive soil was subjected to various temperature, fumigation and dilution treatments, planted with tomato, and infested with 1,000 eggs of M. incognita/100 cm3 soil. Eight weeks after nematode infestation, distinct differences in nematode population densities were observed among the soil treatments, suggesting the suppressiveness had a biological nature. A fungal rRNA gene analysis (OFRG) performed on M. incognita egg masses collected at the end of the greenhouse experiments identified 11 fungal phylotypes, several of which exhibited associations with one or more of the nematode population density measurements (egg masses, eggs or J2). The phylotype containing rRNA genes with high sequence identity to Pochonia chlamydosporia exhibited the strongest negative associations. The negative correlation between the densities of the P. chlamydosporia genes and the nematodes was corroborated by an analysis using a P. chlamydosporia-selective qPCR assay. PMID:19259527

  17. Identification of active oxalotrophic bacteria by Bromodeoxyuridine DNA labeling in a microcosm soil experiments.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Daniel; Martin, Gaëtan; David, Maude M; Cailleau, Guillaume; Verrecchia, Eric; Junier, Pilar

    2013-11-01

    The oxalate-carbonate pathway (OCP) leads to a potential carbon sink in terrestrial environments. This process is linked to the activity of oxalotrophic bacteria. Although isolation and molecular characterizations are used to study oxalotrophic bacteria, these approaches do not give information on the active oxalotrophs present in soil undergoing the OCP. The aim of this study was to assess the diversity of active oxalotrophic bacteria in soil microcosms using the Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) DNA labeling technique. Soil was collected near an oxalogenic tree (Milicia excelsa). Different concentrations of calcium oxalate (0.5%, 1%, and 4% w/w) were added to the soil microcosms and compared with an untreated control. After 12 days of incubation, a maximal pH of 7.7 was measured for microcosms with oxalate (initial pH 6.4). At this time point, a DGGE profile of the frc gene was performed from BrdU-labeled soil DNA and unlabeled soil DNA. Actinobacteria (Streptomyces- and Kribbella-like sequences), Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were found as the main active oxalotrophic bacterial groups. This study highlights the relevance of Actinobacteria as members of the active bacterial community and the identification of novel uncultured oxalotrophic groups (i.e. Kribbella) active in soils. PMID:24033776

  18. Electrokinetic delivery of persulfate to remediate PCBs polluted soils: Effect of different activation methods.

    PubMed

    Fan, Guangping; Cang, Long; Gomes, Helena I; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-02-01

    Persulfate-based in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) for the remediation of organic polluted soils has gained much interest in last decade. However, the transportation of persulfate in low-permeability soil is very low, which limits its efficiency in degrading soil pollutants. Additionally, the oxidation-reduction process of persulfate with organic contaminants takes place slowly, while, the reaction will be greatly accelerated by the production of more powerful radicals once it is activated. Electrokinetic remediation (EK) is a good way for transporting persulfate in low-permeability soil. In this study, different activation methods, using zero-valent iron, citric acid chelated Fe(2+), iron electrode, alkaline pH and peroxide, were evaluated to enhance the activity of persulfate delivered by EK. All the activators and the persulfate were added in the anolyte. The results indicated that zero-valent iron, alkaline, and peroxide enhanced the transportation of persulfate at the first stage of EK test, and the longest delivery distance reached sections S4 or S5 (near the cathode) on the 6th day. The addition of activators accelerated decomposition of persulfate, which resulted in the decreasing soil pH. The mass of persulfate delivered into the soil declined with the continuous decomposition of persulfate by activation. The removal efficiency of PCBs in soil followed the order of alkaline activation > peroxide activation > citric acid chelated Fe(2+) activation > zero-valent iron activation > without activation > iron electrode activation, and the values were 40.5%, 35.6%, 34.1%, 32.4%, 30.8% and 30.5%, respectively. The activation effect was highly dependent on the ratio of activator and persulfate. PMID:26347936

  19. Laboratory Ventilation and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steere, Norman V.

    1965-01-01

    In order to meet the needs of both safety and economy, laboratory ventilation systems must effectively remove air-borne toxic and flammable materials and at the same time exhaust a minimum volume of air. Laboratory hoods are the most commonly used means of removing gases, dusts, mists, vapors, and fumed from laboratory operations. To be effective,…

  20. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  1. RESIDENTIAL VENTILATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project evaluated the effectiveness, first costs and operational costs of various types of residential ventilation systems in three different climates in the U.S. The Agency, through its Energy Star Program, recommends that builders construct homes that are energy efficient ...

  2. Space station ventilation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Allen, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    A ventilation system design and selection method which is applicable to any manned vehicle were developed. The method was used to generate design options for the NASA 33-foot diameter space station, all of which meet the ventilation system design requirements. System characteristics such as weight, volume, and power were normalized to dollar costs for each option. Total system costs for the various options ranged from a worst case $8 million to a group of four which were all approximately $2 million. A system design was then chosen from the $2 million group and is presented in detail. A ventilation system layout was designed for the MSFC space station mockup which provided comfortable, efficient ventilation of the mockup. A conditioned air distribution system design for the 14-foot diameter modular space station, using the same techniques, is also presented. The tradeoff study resulted in the selection of a system which costs $1.9 million, as compared to the alternate configuration which would have cost $2.6 million.

  3. Microbial activity, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and inoculation of woody plants in lead contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Gattai, Graziella S; Pereira, Sônia V; Costa, Cynthia M C; Lima, Cláudia E P; Maia, Leonor C

    2011-07-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the microbial activity, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and inoculation of woody plants (Caesalpinia ferrea, Mimosa tenuiflora and Erythrina velutina) in lead contaminated soil from the semi-arid region of northeastern of Brazil (Belo Jardim, Pernambuco). Dilutions were prepared by adding lead contaminated soil (270 mg Kg(-1)) to uncontaminated soil (37 mg Pb Kg soil(-1)) in the proportions of 7.5%, 15%, and 30% (v:v). The increase of lead contamination in the soil negatively influenced the amount of carbon in the microbial biomass of the samples from both the dry and rainy seasons and the metabolic quotient only differed between the collection seasons in the 30% contaminated soil. The average value of the acid phosphatase activity in the dry season was 2.3 times higher than observed during the rainy season. There was no significant difference in the number of glomerospores observed between soils and periods studied. The most probable number of infective propagules was reduced for both seasons due to the excess lead in soil. The mycorrhizal colonization rate was reduced for the three plant species assayed. The inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi benefited the growth of Erythrina velutina in lead contaminated soil. PMID:24031701

  4. Microbial activity, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and inoculation of woody plants in lead contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    Gattai, Graziella S.; Pereira, Sônia V.; Costa, Cynthia M. C.; Lima, Cláudia E. P.; Maia, Leonor C.

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the microbial activity, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and inoculation of woody plants (Caesalpinia ferrea, Mimosa tenuiflora and Erythrina velutina) in lead contaminated soil from the semi-arid region of northeastern of Brazil (Belo Jardim, Pernambuco). Dilutions were prepared by adding lead contaminated soil (270 mg Kg-1) to uncontaminated soil (37 mg Pb Kg soil-1) in the proportions of 7.5%, 15%, and 30% (v:v). The increase of lead contamination in the soil negatively influenced the amount of carbon in the microbial biomass of the samples from both the dry and rainy seasons and the metabolic quotient only differed between the collection seasons in the 30% contaminated soil. The average value of the acid phosphatase activity in the dry season was 2.3 times higher than observed during the rainy season. There was no significant difference in the number of glomerospores observed between soils and periods studied. The most probable number of infective propagules was reduced for both seasons due to the excess lead in soil. The mycorrhizal colonization rate was reduced for the three plant species assayed. The inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi benefited the growth of Erythrina velutina in lead contaminated soil. PMID:24031701

  5. Dyspnea in the ventilator-assisted patient.

    PubMed

    Lush, M T; Janson-Bjerklie, S; Carrieri, V K; Lovejoy, N

    1988-09-01

    Our purpose in this study was to investigate the factors coincident with the occurrence of dyspnea in ventilator-assisted patients. Five alert and oriented patients with pulmonary disease that was restrictive, obstructive, or both, who were receiving mechanical ventilation, participated in this descriptive study. At 4-hour intervals and at complaint of dyspnea, patients quantified the severity of their dyspnea using the visual analogue and modified Borg scales. At each measurement of dyspnea, nurses observed concomitant physiologic and environmental variables. A moderate correlation (r = 0.51, p less than 0.001) was found between the number of events and activities occurring in the intensive care unit environment and the occurrence and severity of dyspnea. The visual analogue scale and modified Borg scale measures of dyspnea were highly correlated (r = 0.92, p less than 0.001) and may be useful tools for assessing dyspnea in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. PMID:3417463

  6. MODELING VENTILATION SYSTEM RESPONSE TO FIRE

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-04-17

    Fires in facilities containing nuclear material have the potential to transport radioactive contamination throughout buildings and may lead to widespread downwind dispersal threatening both worker and public safety. Development and implementation of control strategies capable of providing adequate protection from fire requires realistic characterization of ventilation system response which, in turn, depends on an understanding of fire development timing and suppression system response. This paper discusses work in which published HEPA filter data was combined with CFAST fire modeling predictions to evaluate protective control strategies for a hypothetical DOE non-reactor nuclear facility. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate when safety significant active ventilation coupled with safety class passive ventilation might be a viable control strategy.

  7. Increased winter soil temperature variability enhances nitrogen cycling and soil biotic activity in temperate heathland and grassland mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerings, J.; Jentsch, A.; Hammerl, V.; Lenz, K.; Henry, H. A. L.; Malyshev, A. V.; Kreyling, J.

    2014-12-01

    Winter air temperatures are projected to increase in the temperate zone, whereas snow cover is projected to decrease, leading to increased soil temperature variability, and potentially to changes in nutrient cycling. Here, we experimentally evaluated the effects of increased winter soil temperature variability on selected aspects of the N-cycle in mesocosms containing different plant community compositions. The experiment was replicated at two sites, a colder mountainous upland site with high snow accumulation and a warmer and drier lowland site. Increased soil temperature variability enhanced soil biotic activity for both sites during winter, as indicated by 35% higher nitrogen (N) availability in the soil solution, 40% higher belowground decomposition and a 25% increase in the potential activity of the enzyme cellobiohydrolase. The mobilization of N differed between sites, and the 15N signal in leaves was reduced by 31% in response to winter warming pulses, but only at the cold site, with significant reductions occurring for three of four tested plant species at this site. Furthermore, there was a trend of increased N leaching in response to the recurrent winter warming pulses. Overall, projected winter climate change in the temperate zone, with less snow and more variable soil temperatures, appears important for shifts in ecosystem functioning (i.e. nutrient cycling). While the effects of warming pulses on plant N mobilization did not differ among sites, reduced plant 15N incorporation at the colder temperate site suggests that frost damage may reduce plant N uptake in a warmer world, with important implications for nitrogen cycling and nitrogen losses from ecosystems.

  8. Arsenic mobility in the amended mine tailings and its impact on soil enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Koo, Namin; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Jeong-Gyu

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to elucidate the effects of soil amendments [Ferrous sulfate (Fe(II)), red mud, Fe(II) with calcium carbonate (Fe(II)/L) or red mud (RM/F), zero-valent iron (ZVI), furnace slag, spent mushroom waste and by-product fertilizer] on arsenic (As) stabilization and to establish relationships between soil properties, As fractions and soil enzyme activities in amended As-rich gold mine tailings (Kangwon and Keumkey). Following the application of amendments, a sequential extraction test and evaluation of the soil enzyme activities (dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase) were conducted. Weak and negative relationships were observed between water-soluble As fractions (As(WS)) and oxalate extractable iron, while As(WS) was mainly affected by dissolved organic carbon in alkaline tailings sample (Kangwon) and by soil pH in acidic tailings sample (Keumkey). The soil enzyme activities in both tailings were mainly associated with As(WS). Principal component and multiple regression analyses confirmed that As(WS) was the most important factor to soil enzyme activities. However, with some of the treatments in Keumkey, contrary results were observed due to increased water-soluble heavy metals and carbon sources. In conclusion, our results suggest that to simultaneously achieve decreased As(WS) and increased soil enzyme activities, Kangwon tailings should be amended with Fe(II), Fe(II)/L or ZVI, while only ZVI or RM/F would be suitable for Keumkey tailings. Despite the limitations of specific soil samples, this result can be expected to provide useful information on developing a successful remediation strategy of As-contaminated soils. PMID:21850414

  9. Comparison of effectiveness of sub-slab ventilation systems for indoor radon mitigation: A numerical study; Comparaison a l`aide d`un outil numerique de l`efficacite des systemes de ventilation active du sol limitant la penetration du radon dans l`habitat

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefous, Y.C. |; Gadgil, A.J.; Allard, F.

    1992-04-01

    The functioning of an active sub-slab ventilation system (SVS) has been studied successfully with the help of a previously evaluated numerical model. The parameters explored are the permeability of the sub-slab and the gravel placed beneath it, the amplitude of applied pressure at the installation point of the system and the functioning method: depressurization or pressurization. The mechanisms contributing to the success of the two systems are identified. This numerical study shows that the presence of a layer of gravel beneath the sub-slab considerably improves the performance of the SVS. Considered separately from the extremely permeable sub-slabs, the depressurization systems perform better than the pressurization systems. 17 refs. [Francais] Le fonctionnement des Systemes de Ventilation active du Sol (SVS) a ete etudie a l`aide d`un outil numerique precedemment evalue avec succes. Les parametres explores sont les permeabilites du sol et du gravier place sous plancher bas, l`amplitude de la pression appliquee au point d`installation du systeme, et le mode de fonctionnement: Depressurisation ou Pressurisation. Les mecanismes contribuant au succes des deux systemes sont identifies. Cette etude numerique montre que la presence d`une couche de gravier sous plancher bas ameliore de facon considerable les performances des SVS. Mis a part le cas des sols extremement permeables, les systemes de Depressurisation ont de meilleures performances que les systemes de Pressurisation. 17 refs.

  10. Effects of plastic film residues on occurrence of phthalates and microbial activity in soils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Lv, Shenghong; Zhang, Manyun; Chen, Gangcai; Zhu, Tongbin; Zhang, Shen; Teng, Ying; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yongming

    2016-05-01

    Plastic film mulching has played an important role in Chinese agriculture, especially in vegetable production, but large amounts of film residues can accumulate in the soil. The present study investigated the effects of plastic film residues on the occurrence of soil PAEs and microbial activities using a batch pot experiment. PAE concentrations increased with increasing plastic film residues but the soil microbial carbon and nitrogen, enzyme activities and microbial diversity decreased significantly. At the end of the experiment the PAE concentrations were 0-2.02 mg kg(-1) in the different treatments. Soil microbial C and N, enzyme activities, AWCD value, and Shannon-Weaver and Simpson indices declined by about 28.9-76.2%, 14.9-59.0%, 4.9-22.7%, 23.0-42.0% and 1.8-18.7%, respectively. Soil microbial activity was positively correlated with soil PAE concentration, and soil PAE concentrations were impacted by plastic color and residue volume. Correlations among, and molecular mechanisms of, plastic film residues, PAE occurrence and microbial activity require further study. PMID:26938679

  11. Impact of Fungicides Chlorothalonil and Propiconazole on Microbial Activities in Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Soils

    PubMed Central

    Ramudu, A. C.; Mohiddin, G. Jaffer; Srinivasulu, M.; Madakka, M.; Rangaswamy, V.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction of agrochemicals (fungicides) into soil may have lasting effects on soil microbial activities and thus affect soil health. In order to determine the changes in microbial activity in a black clay and red sandy loam soils of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) cultivated fields, a case study was conducted with propiconazole and chlorothalonil to evaluate its effects on soil enzymes (cellulase and invertase) throughout 40 days of incubation under laboratory conditions with different concentrations (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 kg ha−1). Individual application of the two fungicides at 1.0, 2.5, and 5.0 kg ha−1 to the soil distinctly enhanced the activities of cellulase and invertase but at higher concentrations of 7.5 and 10 kg ha−1 was toxic or innocuous to both cellulase and invertase activities. In soil samples receiving 2.5–5.0 kg ha−1 of the fungicides, the accumulation of reducing sugar was pronounced more at 20 days, and the activity of the cellulase and invertase was drastically decreased with increasing period of incubation up to 30 and 40 days. PMID:23724306

  12. WASTE HANDLING BUILDING VENTILATION SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    P.A. Kumar

    2000-06-21

    The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System provides heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) for the contaminated, potentially contaminated, and uncontaminated areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository's (MGR) Waste Handling Building (WHB). In the uncontaminated areas, the non-confinement area ventilation system maintains the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort. In the contaminated and potentially contaminated areas, in addition to maintaining the proper environmental conditions for equipment operation and personnel comfort, the contamination confinement area ventilation system directs potentially contaminated air away from personnel in the WHB and confines the contamination within high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration units. The contamination confinement areas ventilation system creates airflow paths and pressure zones to minimize the potential for spreading contamination within the building. The contamination confinement ventilation system also protects the environment and the public by limiting airborne releases of radioactive or other hazardous contaminants from the WHB. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System is designed to perform its safety functions under accident conditions and other Design Basis Events (DBEs) (such as earthquakes, tornadoes, fires, and loss of the primary electric power). Additional system design features (such as compartmentalization with independent subsystems) limit the potential for cross-contamination within the WHB. The system provides status of important system parameters and equipment operation, and provides audible and/or visual indication of off-normal conditions and equipment failures. The Waste Handling Building Ventilation System confines the radioactive and hazardous material within the building such that the release rates comply with regulatory limits. The system design, operations, and maintenance activities incorporate ALARA (as low as is

  13. Priming effects and enzymatic activity in Israeli soils under treated wastewater and freshwater irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anissimova, Marina; Heinze, Stefanie; Chen, Yona; Tarchitzky, Jorge; Marschner, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Irrigation of soils with treated wastewater (TWW) directly influences microbial processes of soil. TWW contains easily decomposable organic material, which can stimulate the activity of soil microorganisms and, as a result, lead to the excessive consumption of soil organic carbon pool. We investigated the effects of irrigation with TWW relative to those of irrigation with freshwater (FW) on the microbial parameters in soils with low (7%) and medium (13%) clay content in a lysimeter experiment. The objectives of our study were to (i) determine the impact of water quality on soil respiration and enzymatic activity influenced by clay content and depth, and (ii) work out the changes in the turnover of soil organic matter (PE, priming effects). Samples were taken from three soil depths (0-10, 10-20, and 40-60 cm). Soil respiration and PE were determined in a 21-days incubation experiment after addition of uniformly 14C-labeled fructose. Activity of 10 extracellular enzymes (EEA, from C-, N-, P-, and S-cycle), phenol oxidase and peroxidase activity (PO+PE), and dehydrogenase activity (DHA) were assayed. Microbial Community-Level Physiological Profiles (CLPP) using four substrates, and microbial biomass were determined. The results showed that the clay content acted as the main determinative factor. In the soil with low clay content the water quality had a greater impact: the highest PE (56%) was observed in the upper layer (0-10cm) under FW irrigation; EEA of C-, P-, and S-cycles was significantly higher in the upper soil layer under TWW irrigation. Microbial biomass was higher in the soil under TWW irrigation and decreased with increasing of depth (50 μg/g soil in the upper layer, 15 μg/g soil in the lowest layer). This tendency was also observed for DHA. Contrary to the low clay content, in the soil with medium clay content both irrigation types caused the highest PE in the lowest layer (65% under FW irrigation, 48% under TWW irrigation); the higher substrate

  14. Charcoal produced by prescribed fire increases dissolved organic carbon and soil microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Cheryl; Jenkins, Meaghan; Bell, Tina; Adams, Mark

    2014-05-01

    In Australian forests fire is an important driver of carbon (C) storage. When biomass C is combusted it is transformed into vegetation residue (charcoal) and deposited in varying amounts and forms onto soil surfaces. The C content of charcoal is high but is largely in a chemically stable form of C, which is highly resistance to microbial decomposition. We conducted two laboratory incubations to examine the influence of charcoal on soil microbial activity as indicated by microbial respiration. Seven sites were chosen in mixed species eucalypt forest in Victoria, Australia. Soil was sampled prior to burning to minimise the effects of heating or addition of charcoal during the prescribed burn. Charcoal samples were collected from each site after the burn, homogenised and divided into two size fractions. Prior to incubation, soils were amended with the two size fractions (<1 and 1-4.75 mm) and at two rates of amount (2.5 and 5% by soil dry weight). Charcoal-amended soils were incubated in the laboratory for 86 d, microbial respiration was measured nine times at day 1, 3, 8, 15, 23, 30, 45, 59 and 86 d. We found that addition of charcoal resulted in faster rates of microbial respiration compared to unamended soil. Fastest rates of microbial respiration in all four treatments were measured 1 d after addition of charcoal (up to 12 times greater than unamended soil). From 3 to 8 d, respiration rates in all four treatments decreased and only treatments with greater charcoal addition (5%) remained significantly faster than unamended soil. From 15 d to 86 d, all treatments had respiration rates similar to unamended soil. Overall, adding greater amount of charcoal (5%) resulted in a larger cumulative amount of CO2 released over the incubation period when compared to unamended soil. The second laboratory incubation focused on the initial changes in soil nutrient and microbial respiration after addition of charcoal over a 72 h period. Charcoal (<2 mm) was added at rate of 5% to

  15. Community Level Physiological Profiles (CLPP), Characterization and Microbial Activity of Soil Amended with Dairy Sewage Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Frąc, Magdalena; Oszust, Karolina; Lipiec, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to assess the influence of organic amendment applications compared to mineral fertilization on soil microbial activity and functional diversity. The field experiment was set up on a soil classified as an Eutric Cambisol developed from loess (South-East Poland). Two doses of both dairy sewage sludge (20 Mg·ha−1 and 26 Mg·ha−1) and of mineral fertilizers containing the same amount of nutrients were applied. The same soil without any amendment was used as a control. The soil under undisturbed native vegetation was also included in the study as a representative background sample. The functional diversity (catabolic potential) was assessed using such indices as Average Well Color Development (AWCD), Richness (R) and Shannon–Weaver index (H). These indices were calculated, following the community level physiological profiling (CLPP) using Biolog Eco Plates. Soil dehydrogenase and respiratory activity were also evaluated. The indices were sensitive enough to reveal changes in community level physiological profiles due to treatment effects. It was shown that dairy sewage amended soil was characterized by greater AWCD, R, H and dehydrogenase and respiratory activity as compared to control or mineral fertilized soil. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to depict the differences of the soil bacterial functional diversity between the treatments. PMID:22737006

  16. Effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on soil enzymatic activities and wheat grass nutrients uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Biting; Chen, Yirui; Bai, Lingyun; Jacobson, Astrid; Darnault, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    The US National Science Foundation estimated that the use of nanomaterials and nanotechnology would reach a global market value of 1 million this year. Concomitant with the wide applications of nanoparticles is an increasing risk of adverse effects to the environment and human health. As a common nanomaterial used as a fuel catalyst and polish material, cerium (IV) oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NP) were tested for their potential impact on soil health and plant growth. Through exposure by air, water, and solid deposition, nanoparticles may accumulate in soils and impact agricultural systems. The objectives of this research were to determine whether CeO2 NPs affect the growth of wheat grass and selected soil enzyme activities chose as indicators of soil health. Wheat grass was grown in plant boxes containing CeO2 NPs mixed with agricultural soil at different concentrations. Two control groups were included: one consisting of soil with plants but no CeO2 NPs, and one containing only soil, i.e., no NP or wheat plants added. The plants were grown for 10 weeks and harvested every two weeks in a laboratory under sodium growth lights. At the end of the each growing period, two weeks, soils were assayed for phosphatase, β-glucosidase, and urease activities, and NPK values. Spectrophotometer analyses were used to assess enzyme activities, and NPK values were tested by Clemson Agricultural Center. Wheat yields were estimated by shoot and root lengths and weights.

  17. Effect of leather industry effluents on soil microbial and protease activity.

    PubMed

    Pradeep, M Reddi; Narasimha, G

    2012-01-01

    Release of leather industry effluents into the agricultural fields causes indicative changes in nutrient cycling and organic matter processing. In the present study, leather industry effluent discharged soil (test) and undischarged soil(control) were collected from the surrounding areas of industry. The physico-chemical, biological properties and soil protease activity were examined. The study reflected the average mean value of pH, electrical conductivity and water holding capacity of the test soil was found to be 7.94, 0.89 microMhos cm(-1) and 0.51 ml g(-1), respectively. In chemical parameters, organic matter, total nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium has the mean of 6.73%, 0.23 g kg(-1), 4.28 mg g(-1) and 28 microg g(-1), respectively. In all the respects, the test soil showed higher values than the control. The soil protease enzyme activity was determined by using substrate casein and the activity was found to be higher (180 microg TE g(-1) 24 hr(-1)) in test soil than the control soil (63 microg TE g(-1) 24 hr(-1)). PMID:23033641

  18. Effects of six selected antibiotics on plant growth and soil microbial and enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Ying, Guang-Guo; Tao, Ran; Zhao, Jian-Liang; Yang, Ji-Feng; Zhao, Lan-Feng

    2009-05-01

    The potential impact of six antibiotics (chlortetracycline, tetracycline and tylosin; sulfamethoxazole, sulfamethazine and trimethoprim) on plant growth and soil quality was studied by using seed germination test on filter paper and plant growth test in soil, soil respiration and phosphatase activity tests. The phytotoxic effects varied between the antibiotics and between plant species (sweet oat, rice and cucumber). Rice was most sensitive to sulfamethoxazole with the EC10 value of 0.1 mg/L. The antibiotics tested inhibited soil phosphatase activity during the 22 days' incubation. Significant effects on soil respiration were found for the two sulfonamides (sulfamethoxazole and sulfamethazine) and trimethoprim, whereas little effects were observed for the two tetracyclines and tylosin. The effective concentrations (EC10 values) for soil respiration in the first 2 days were 7 mg/kg for sulfamethoxazole, 13 mg/kg for sulfamethazine and 20 mg/kg for trimethoprim. Antibiotic residues in manure and soils may affect soil microbial and enzyme activities. PMID:19157661

  19. Seasonal variation in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity in temperate forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostek, Edward R.; Finzi, Adrien C.

    2012-03-01

    Increasing soil temperature has the potential to alter the activity of the extracellular enzymes that mobilize nitrogen (N) from soil organic matter (SOM) and ultimately the availability of N for primary production. Proteolytic enzymes depolymerize N from proteinaceous components of SOM into amino acids, and their activity is a principal driver of the within-system cycle of soil N. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether the soils of temperate forest tree species differ in the temperature sensitivity of proteolytic enzyme activity over the growing season and the role of substrate limitation in regulating temperature sensitivity. Across species and sampling dates, proteolytic enzyme activity had relatively low sensitivity to temperature with a mean activation energy (Ea) of 33.5 kJ mol-1. Ea declined in white ash, American beech, and eastern hemlock soils across the growing season as soils warmed. By contrast, Eain sugar maple soil increased across the growing season. We used these data to develop a species-specific empirical model of proteolytic enzyme activity for the 2009 calendar year and studied the interactive effects of soil temperature (ambient or +5°C) and substrate limitation (ambient or elevated protein) on enzyme activity. Declines in substrate limitation had a larger single-factor effect on proteolytic enzyme activity than temperature, particularly in the spring. There was, however, a large synergistic effect of increasing temperature and substrate supply on proteolytic enzyme activity. Our results suggest limited increases in N availability with climate warming unless there is a parallel increase in the availability of protein substrates.

  20. Actively Heated Fiber Optics for Distributed Soil Moisture Measurements: Addressing Field Calibration and Spatial Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayde, C.; Moreno, D.; Benitez-buelga, J.; Dong, J.; Ochsner, T. E.; Steele-Dunne, S. C.; Rodriguez-Sinobas, L.; Selker, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Actively Heated Fiber Optics (AHFO) method has the potential to measure soil water content at high temporal (<1hr) and spatial (every 0.25 m) resolutions along buried fiber optics (FO) cables multiple kilometers in length. This game-changing method can capture soil water dynamics over four orders of magnitude in spatial scale (0.1-1000 m). However, many challenges remain to resolve for the practical applicability of the AHFO at the field scale. In particular, cost effective distributed calibration method that accounts for the spatial variability of the soil thermal properties is still lacking. In fact, AHFO infers soil water content from observing the thermal response of the soil to a heat pulse injected along the fiber optic cable. For a particular location, the temporal variation of the soil thermal response depends mainly on the soil moisture content. Across the field the variability of thermal response will also be a function of the soil thermal properties which change with the soil mineralogy and bulk density. Here we present various strategies for distributed calibration of the AHFO method based on numerical simulation, direct field observation, and/or laboratory experimentation. In particular we will present a novel approach for mapping the soil thermal behavior by conducting AHFO measurements at strategic soil water conditions such as near saturation and dry conditions. We will show results from a large scale deployment at the MOISST site in Stillwater, Oklahoma where 4900 m of fiber optic soil moisture sensing cables are providing daily soil moisture measurements at >39,000 locations in the field. The material is based upon work supported by NASA under award NNX12AP58G, with equipment and assistance also provided by CTEMPs.org with support from the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1129003. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views

  1. Soil microbial activity and structure in mineralized terranes of the Western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecker, S. W.; Stillings, L. L.; Decrappeo, N.; Ippolito, J.

    2009-12-01

    Mineralized terranes (areas enriched in metal-bearing minerals) occur throughout the Western US, and are characterized by highly variable soil trace metal concentrations across small spatial scales. Assuming that non-lithologic (extrinsic) soil forming factors are relatively constant between mineralized and unmineralized zones, these mineralized areas allowed us to evaluate the effect of lithology on soil microbial activity. We established the following study sites: 1) sage-grassland on a Mo/Cu deposit (Battle Mountain, NV); 2) pine-chaparral on Ni/Cr bearing rocks (Chinese Camp, CA); and 3) two pine woodland sites on acid-sulfate altered rocks (Reno, NV; Bridgeport, CA). Microbial, physical and chemical measurements were performed on soils from undisturbed mineralized areas and adjacent unmineralized areas to determine baseline conditions for comparison to sites disturbed by mining. A host of abiotic soil parameters, along with bioavailable (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-extractable) and total metals, were measured to examine their correlation with the following measures of microbial activity: enzyme assays (arylsulfatase, phosphatase, fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis), C/N mineralization potential, C substrate utilization (Biolog Ecoplate), and microbial biomass and community structure (phospholipid fatty acid analysis). Within the Battle Mountain study area, both microbial activity and structure were statistically similar between mineralized and unmineralized soils. Nutrient and metal concentrations were also similar; the only differences being higher Cu and lower P in the mineralized soils. Within the Chinese Camp study area, soil organic carbon and total nitrogen concentrations were similar between the serpentine (Ni/Cr bearing) and adjacent andesite soils, while differences were noted for other nutrients (S, P, Ca, Mg). For the serpentine soils, Co, Fe, Mn, and Ni showed the strongest correlations with microbial activity, where Cr, Mn showed the

  2. Impact of activated carbon, biochar and compost on the desorption and mineralization of phenanthrene in soil.

    PubMed

    Marchal, Geoffrey; Smith, Kilian E C; Rein, Arno; Winding, Anne; Wollensen de Jonge, Lis; Trapp, Stefan; Karlson, Ulrich G

    2013-10-01

    Sorption of PAHs to carbonaceous soil amendments reduces their dissolved concentrations, limiting toxicity but also potentially biodegradation. Therefore, the maximum abiotic desorption of freshly sorbed phenanthrene (≤5 mg kg(-1)) was measured in three soils amended with activated carbon (AC), biochar or compost. Total amounts of phenanthrene desorbed were similar between the different soils, but the amendment type had a large influence. Complete desorption was observed in the unamended and compost amended soils, but this reduced for biochar (41% desorbed) and AC (8% desorbed). Cumulative amounts mineralized were 28% for the unamended control, 19% for compost, 13% for biochar and 4% for AC. Therefore, the effects of the amendments in soil in reducing desorption were also reflected in the extents of mineralization. Modeling was used to analyze key processes, indicating that for the AC and charcoal treatments bacterial activity did not limit mineralization, but rather desorption into the dissolved phase. PMID:23871817

  3. Microbial enzyme activities of peatland soils in south central Alaska lowlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial enzyme activities related to carbon and nutrient acquisition were measured on Alaskan peatland soils as indicators of nutrient limitation and biochemical sustainability. Peat decomposition is mediated by microorganisms and enzymes that in turn are limited by various ph...

  4. Optimizing patient-ventilator synchrony.

    PubMed

    Epstein, S K

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation assumes the work of breathing, improves gas exchange, and unloads the respiratory muscles, all of which require good synchronization between the patient and the ventilator. Causes for patient-ventilator dyssynchrony include both patient factors (abnormalities of respiratory drive and abnormal respiratory mechanics) and ventilator factors (triggering, flow delivery, breath termination criteria, the level and mode of ventilator support, and imposed work of breathing). Although patient-ventilator dyssynchrony can often be detected on physical exam, careful analysis of ventilator waveforms (pressure-time, flow-time) allows for more precise definition of the underlying cause. Patient-ventilator interaction can be improved by reversing patient factors that alter respiratory drive or elevate patient ventilatory requirements and by correcting factors that contribute to dynamic hyperinflation. Proper setting of the ventilator using sensitive triggering mechanisms, satisfactory flow rates, adequate delivered minute ventilation, matching machine T(I) to neural T(I), and applying modes that overcome the imposed work of breathing, further optimize patient-ventilator synchrony. PMID:16088669

  5. Mineralogical impact on long-term patterns of soil nitrogen and phosphorus enzyme activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Robert; Turner, Stephanie; Meyer-Stüve, Sandra; Guggenberger, Georg; Dohrmann, Reiner; Schippers, Axel

    2014-05-01

    Soil chronosequences provide a unique opportunity to study microbial activity over time in mineralogical diverse soils of different ages. The main objective of this study was to test the effect of mineralogical properties, nutrient and organic matter availability over whole soil pro-files on the abundance and activity of the microbial communities. We focused on microbio-logical processes involved in nitrogen and phosphorus cycling at the 120,000-year Franz Josef soil chronosequence. Microbial abundances (microbial biomass and total cell counts) and enzyme activities (protease, urease, aminopeptidase, and phosphatase) were determined and related to nutrient contents and mineralogical soil properties. Both, microbial abundances and enzyme activities decreased with soil depth at all sites. In the organic layers, microbial biomass and the activities of N-hydrolyzing enzymes showed their maximum at the intermediate-aged sites, corresponding to a high aboveground biomass. In contrast, the phosphatase activity increased with site age. The activities of N-hydrolyzing enzymes were positively correlated with total carbon and nitrogen contents, whereas the phosphatase activity was negatively correlated with the phosphorus content. In the mineral soil, the enzyme activities were generally low, thus reflecting the presence of strongly sorbing minerals. Sub-strate-normalized enzyme activities correlated negatively to clay content as well as poorly crystalline Al and Fe oxyhydroxides, supporting the view that the evolution of reactive sec-ondary mineral phases alters the activity of the microbial communities by constraining sub-strate availability. Our data suggest a strong mineralogical influence on nutrient cycling par-ticularly in subsoil environments.

  6. Phosphatase activity in relation to key litter and soil properties in mature subtropical forests in China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Enqing; Chen, Chengrong; Wen, Dazhi; Liu, Xian

    2015-05-15

    Phosphatase-mediated phosphorus (P) mineralization is one of the critical processes in biogeochemical cycling of P and determines soil P availability in forest ecosystems; however, the regulation of soil phosphatase activity remains elusive. This study investigated the potential extracellular activities of acid phosphomonoesterase (AcPME) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) and how they were related to key edaphic properties in the L horizon (undecomposed litter) and F/H horizon (fermented and humified litter) and the underlying mineral soil at the 0-15cm depth in eight mature subtropical forests in China. AcPME activity decreased significantly in the order of F/H horizon>L horizon>mineral soil horizon, while the order for PDE activity was L horizon=F/H horizon>mineral soil horizon. AcPME (X axis) and PDE (Y axis) activities were positively correlated in all horizons with significantly higher slope in the L and F/H horizons than in the mineral soil horizon. Both AcPME and PDE activities were positively related to microbial biomass C, moisture content and water-holding capacity in the L horizon, and were positively related to soil C:P, N:P and C:N ratios and fine root (diameter≤2mm) biomass in the mineral soil horizon. Both enzyme activities were also interactively affected by forest and horizon, partly due to the interactive effect of forest and horizon on microbial biomass. Our results suggest that modulator(s) of the potential extracellular activity of phosphatases vary with horizon, depending on the relative C, P and water availability of the horizon. PMID:25700362

  7. [Effects of simulated nitrogen deposition on soil enzyme activities in a Betula luminifera plantation in Rainy Area of West China].

    PubMed

    Tu, Li-Hua; Hu, Hong-Ling; Hu, Ting-Xing; Zhang, Jian; Xiao, Yin-Long; Luo, Shou-Hua; Li, Ren-Hong; Dai, Hong-Zhong

    2012-08-01

    From January 2008 to January 2009, a field experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of simulated nitrogen (N) deposition (0, 5, 15, and 30 g N x m(-2) x a(-1)) on the soil enzyme activities in a Betula luminifera plantation in Rainy Area of West China. As compared with the control (0 g N x m(-2) x a(-1)), simulated N deposition stimulated the activities of soil hydrolases (beta-fructofuranosidase, cellulase, acid phosphatase, and urease) significantly, but depressed the activities of soil oxidases (polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase). These results suggested that the increased exogenous inorganic N could stimulate soil microbial activity and increase the demands of both B. luminifera and soil microbes for C and P, whereas the depress of soil polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase activities under N addition could inhibit the degradation of litter and promote its accumulation in soil, leading to the increase of soil C storage in the B. luminifera plantation ecosystem. PMID:23189689

  8. [Dynamics of soil enzyme activity and nutrient content in intercropped cotton rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere].

    PubMed

    Meng, Yali; Wang, Liguo; Zhou, Zhiguo; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Lizhen; Bian, Haiyun; Zhang, Siping; Chen, Binglin

    2005-11-01

    The study with high yield cotton-wheat double cropping system showed that soil urease, invertase, protease and catalase activities in intercropped cotton field had the same changing trends with those in mono-cultured cotton field, but were significantly higher in intercropped than in mono-cultured cotton rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere at all development stages of cotton. During the intergrowth period of wheat and cotton, soil nutrient contents in intercropped cotton rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere were lower than or had little difference with those in mono-cultured cotton rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere, but became significantly higher after wheat harvested. The changing trends of soil nutrient contents in intercropped cotton field had little difference from those in mono-cultured cotton field, but the nutrient absorption peak appeared late. The soil enzyme activities and nutrient contents were generally higher in rhizosphere than in non-rhizosphere of both intercropped and mono-cultured cotton. Soil nutrient contents had significant (P < 0.05, n = 32) or very significant (P < 0.01, n = 32) correlation with the activities of soil urease, invertase and protease, but had little correlation with soil catalase activity. PMID:16471342

  9. Ventilator-associated lung injury during assisted mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Saddy, Felipe; Sutherasan, Yuda; Rocco, Patricia R M; Pelosi, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    Assisted mechanical ventilation (MV) may be a favorable alternative to controlled MV at the early phase of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), since it requires less sedation, no paralysis and is associated with less hemodynamic deterioration, better distal organ perfusion, and lung protection, thus reducing the risk of ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI). In the present review, we discuss VALI in relation to assisted MV strategies, such as volume assist-control ventilation, pressure assist-control ventilation, pressure support ventilation (PSV), airway pressure release ventilation (APRV), APRV with PSV, proportional assist ventilation (PAV), noisy ventilation, and neurally adjusted ventilatory assistance (NAVA). In summary, we suggest that assisted MV can be used in ARDS patients in the following situations: (1) Pao(2)/Fio(2) >150 mm Hg and positive end-expiratory pressure ≥ 5 cm H(2)O and (2) with modalities of pressure-targeted and time-cycled breaths including more or less spontaneous or supported breaths (A-PCV [assisted pressure-controlled ventilation] or APRV). Furthermore, during assisted MV, the following parameters should be monitored: inspiratory drive, transpulmonary pressure, and tidal volume (6 mL/kg). Further studies are required to determine the impact of novel modalities of assisted ventilation such as PAV, noisy pressure support, and NAVA on VALI. PMID:25105820

  10. Regulation of assimilatory nitrate reductase activity in soil by microbial assimilation of ammonium.

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, G W; Bremner, J M

    1992-01-01

    It is well established that assimilatory nitrate reductase (ANR) activity in soil is inhibited by ammonium (NH4+). To elucidate the mechanism of this inhibition, we studied the effect of L-methionine sulfoximine (MSX), an inhibitor of NH4+ assimilation by microorganisms, on assimilatory reduction of nitrate (NO3-) in aerated soil slurries treated with NH4+. We found that NH4+ strongly inhibited ANR activity in these slurries and that MSX eliminated this inhibition. We also found that MSX induced dissimilatory reduction of NO3- to NH4+ in soil and that the NH4+ thus formed had no effect on the rate of NO-3 reduction. We concluded from these observations that the inhibition of ANR activity by NH4+ is due not to NH4+ per se but to products formed by microbial assimilation of NH4+. This conclusion was supported by a study of the effects of early products of NH4+ assimilation (L amino acids) on ANR activity in soil, because this study showed that the biologically active, L isomers of glutamine and asparagine strongly inhibited ANR activity, whereas the D isomers of these amino acids had little effect on ANR activity. Evidence that ANR activity is regulated by the glutamine formed by NH4+ assimilation was provided by studies showing that inhibitors of glutamine metabolism (azaserine, albizziin, and aminooxyacetate) inhibited ANR activity in soil treated with NO3- but did not do so in the presence of MSX. PMID:11607250

  11. Soil Microbial Activity Provides Insight to Carbon Cycling in Shrub Ecotones of Sub-Arctic Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, E.; Kashi, N. N.; Chen, J.; Hobbie, E. A.; Schwan, M. R.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Shrubs are expanding in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions due to rising atmospheric temperatures. Microbial activity increases as growing temperatures cause permafrost warming and subsequent thaw, leading to a greater resource of soil nutrients enabling shrub growth. Increased carbon inputs from shrubs is predicted to result in faster carbon turnover by microbial decomposition. Further understanding of microbial activity underneath shrubs could uncover how microbes and soil processes interact to promote shrub expansion and carbon cycling. To address how higher soil carbon input from shrubs influences decomposition, soil samples were taken across a heath, shrub, and forest ecotone gradient at two sites near Abikso, Sweden. Samples were analyzed for soluble carbon and nitrogen, microbial abundance, and microbial activity of chitinase, glucosidase, and phosphatase to reflect organic matter decomposition and availability of nitrogen, carbon, and phosphate respectively. Chitinase activity positively correlated with shrub cover, suggesting microbial demands for nitrogen increase with higher shrub cover. Glucosidase activity negatively correlated with shrub cover and soluble carbon, suggesting decreased microbial demand for carbon as shrub cover and carbon stores increase. Lower glucosidase activity in areas with high carbon input from shrubs implies that microbes are decomposing carbon less readily than carbon is being put into the soil. Increasing soil carbon stores in shrub covered areas can lead to shrubs becoming a net carbon sink and a negative feedback to changing climate.

  12. Field measurement of dermal soil loadings in occupational and recreational activities

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, K.K. Jr.; Shirai, J.H.; Richter, K.Y.; Kissel, J.C.

    1999-02-01

    Risks associated with dermal exposure to contaminated soil are not well-characterized, but nevertheless must be estimated to define endpoints for remedial strategies. Among the parameters contributing to the uncertainty of these estimates is soil adherence to skin. Pre- and postactivity soil loadings have been obtained from hands, forearms, lower legs, faces, and/or feet of volunteers engaged in various occupational and recreational activities. These data are distinguished from other sources of estimates of soil adherence by the manner of their collection. Soil loads were obtained directly from multiple body parts before and after uncontrived exposure scenarios. Data presented for the first time here supplement prior results and roughly double the available data base. This expanded data base provides a useful perspective on types of behavior likely to lead to soil contact falling within general classes of activity. Prior conclusions supported by the additional data include the following: (1) post-activity loadings are typically higher than preactivity levels, demonstrating that exposure is episodic; (2) hand loadings are dependent upon class of activity; (3) hand loadings generally provide conservative estimates of loadings on nonhand body parts within activity classes; and (4) hand loadings do not provide conservative estimates of nonhand loadings across activity classes. Finally quantitative estimates of relative loads on unclothed nonhand body parts are presented.

  13. Soil type determines response of soil microbial activity to an atmospheric CO2 gradient

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising atmospheric CO2 will have direct effects on ecosystems in addition to consequences for climate. We investigated belowground response of a prairie ecosystem to a preindustrial-to-future (250-500ppm) gradient of CO2. Three soil types are represented throughout the gradient, allowing us to ask...

  14. Soil microbial communties and enzyme activities in soils during historically extreme drought conditions in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Southern High Plains region of Texas experienced a significant reduction in 2011 crop production due a record drought as it experienced the hottest summer since 1911 (> 48 days of temperatures above 37.7oC and only 37.8 mm precipitation). Soil microbial communities and their associated enzymatic...

  15. Toxicity of perfluorooctanoic acid towards earthworm and enzymatic activities in soil.

    PubMed

    He, Wenxiang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a widespread persistent organic contaminant in the environment that has recently raised much of regulatory and public concern. Therefore, assessment of its ecological risk is a top priority research. Hence, this study investigated the toxicity of PFOA to beneficial microbial processes in the soil such as activities of dehydrogenase, urease and potential nitrification in addition to earthworm survival, weight loss and PFOA bioaccumulation in two contrasting soils. In general, PFOA caused inhibition of all the measured microbial processes in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibition was higher in Williamtown (WT) soil than Edinburgh (EB) soil. Thus, WT soil being sandy in nature with low clay content showed higher PFOA bioavailability and hence showed higher toxicity. There was no mortality in earthworms exposed up to 100 mg PFOA/kilogram soil in both the soils; however, there was a significant weight loss from 25 mg/kg onwards. This study clearly demonstrates that soil contamination of PFOA can lead to adverse effects on soil health. PMID:27329475

  16. Hydrodynamic Voltammetry as a Rapid and Simple Method for Evaluating Soil Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Sazawa, Kazuto; Kuramitz, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Soil enzymes play essential roles in catalyzing reactions necessary for nutrient cycling in the biosphere. They are also sensitive indicators of ecosystem stress, therefore their evaluation is very important in assessing soil health and quality. The standard soil enzyme assay method based on spectroscopic detection is a complicated operation that requires the removal of soil particles. The purpose of this study was to develop a new soil enzyme assay based on hydrodynamic electrochemical detection using a rotating disk electrode in a microliter droplet. The activities of enzymes were determined by measuring the electrochemical oxidation of p-aminophenol (PAP), following the enzymatic conversion of substrate-conjugated PAP. The calibration curves of β-galactosidase (β-gal), β-glucosidase (β-glu) and acid phosphatase (AcP) showed good linear correlation after being spiked in soils using chronoamperometry. We also performed electrochemical detection using real soils. Hydrodynamic chronoamperometry can be used to assess the AcP in soils, with a detection time of only 90 s. Linear sweep voltammetry was used to measure the amount of PAP released from β-gal and β-glu by enzymatic reaction after 60 min. For the assessment of soil enzymes, the results of hydrodynamic voltammetry assay compared favorably to those using a standard assay procedure, but this new procedure is more user-friendly, rapid and simple. PMID:25746097

  17. Amidase activity in soils. IV. Effects of trace elements and pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Frankenberger, W.T., Jr.; Tabatabai, M.A.

    1981-11-01

    Amidase was recently detected in soils, and this study was carried out to assess the effects of 21 trace elements, 12 herbicides, 2 fungicides, and 2 insecticides on the activity of this enzyme. Results showed that most of the trace elements and pesticides studied inhibited amidase activity in soils. The degree of inhibition varied among the soils used. When the trace elements were compared by using 5 ..mu..mol/g of soil, the average inhibition of amidase in three soils showed that Ag(I), Hg(I), As(III), and Se(IV) were the most effective inhibitors, but only Ag(I) and As(III) showed average inhibition > 50%. The least effective inhibitors (average inhibition < 3%) included Cu(I), Ba(II), Cu(II), Fe(II), Ni(II), Al(III), Fe(III), Ti(IV), V(IV), As(V), Mo(VI), and W(VI). Other elements that inhibited amidase activity in soils were Cd(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Pb(II), Sn(II), Zn(II), B(III), and Cr(III). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that As(III) was a competitive inhibitor of amidase, whereas Ag(I), Hg(II), and Se(IV) were noncompetitive inhibitors. When the pesticides studied were compared by using 10 ..mu..g of active ingredient per gram of soil, the average inhibition of amidase in three soils ranged from 2% with dinitroamine, EPTC plus R-25788, and captan to 10% with butylate. Other pesticides that inhibited amidase activity in soils were atrazine, naptalam, chloramben, dicamba, cyanazine, 2,4-D, alachlor, paraquat, trifluralin, maneb, diazinon, and malathion. The inhibition of amidase by diazinon, alachlor, and butylate followed noncompetitive kinetics.

  18. Sub-soil microbial activity under rotational cotton crops in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polain, Katherine; Knox, Oliver; Wilson, Brian; Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    Soil microbial communities contribute significantly to soil organic matter formation, stabilisation and destabilisation, through nutrient cycling and biodegradation. The majority of soil microbial research examines the processes occurring in the top 0 cm to 30 cm of the soil, where organic nutrients are easily accessible. In soils such as Vertosols, the high clay content causes swelling and cracking. When soil cracking is coupled with rain or an irrigation event, a flush of organic nutrients can move down the soil profile, becoming available for subsoil microbial community use and potentially making a significant contribution to nutrient cycling and biodegradation in soils. At present, the mechanisms and rates of soil nutrient turnover (such as carbon and nitrogen) at depth under cotton rotations are mostly speculative and the process-response relationships remain unclear, although they are undoubtedly underpinned by microbial activity. Our research aims to determine the contribution and role of soil microbiota to the accumulation, cycling and mineralisation of carbon and nitrogen through the whole root profile under continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and cotton-maize rotations in regional New South Wales, Australia. Through seasonal work, we have established both baseline and potential microbial activity rates from 0 cm to 100 cm down the Vertosol profile, using respiration and colourimetric methods. Further whole soil profile analyses will include determination of microbial biomass and isotopic carbon signatures using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) methodology, identification of microbial communities (sequencing) and novel experiments to investigate potential rates of nitrogen mineralisation and quantification of associated genes. Our preliminary observations and the hypotheses tested in this three-year study will be presented.

  19. Microbial biomass and activity in soils with different moisture content heated at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro, Ana; Lombao, Alba; Martin, Angela; Cancelo-González, Javier; Carballas, Tarsy; Díaz-Raviña, Montserrat

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that soil properties determining the thermal transmissivity (moisture, texture, organic matter, etc.) and the duration and temperatures reached during soil heating are key factors driving the fire-induced changes in soil microbial communities. However, despite its interest, the information about this topic is scarce. The aim of the present study is to analyze, under laboratory conditions, the impact of the thermal shock (infrared lamps reaching temperatures of 100 °C, 200 °C and 400 °C) on microbial communities of three acid soils under different moisture level (0 %, 25 % and 50 % per soil volume). Soil temperature was measured with thermocouples and the impact of soil heating was evaluated by means of the analysis of the temperature-time curves calculating the maximum temperature reached (Tmax) and the degree-hours (GH) as an estimation of the amount of heat supplied to the samples (fire severity). The bacterial growth (leucine incorporation) and the total microbial biomass (PLFA) were measured immediately after the heating and one month after the incubation of reinoculated soils. The results showed clearly the importance of moisture level in the transmission of heat through the soil and hence in the further direct impact of high temperatures on microorganisms living in soil. In general, the values of microbial parameters analyzed were low, particularly immediately after soil heating at higher temperatures; the bacterial activity measurements (leucine incorporation technique) being more sensitive to detect the thermal shock showed than total biomass measurements (PLFA). After 1 month incubation, soil microbial communities tend to recover due to the proliferation of surviving population using as substrate the dead microorganisms (soil sterilization). Thus, time elapsed after the heating was found to be decisive when examining the relationships between the microbial properties and the soil heating parameters (GH, Tmax). Analysis of results also

  20. Seasonal Variation in Soil Microbial Biomass, Bacterial Community Composition and Extracellular Enzyme Activity in Relation to Soil Respiration in a Northern Great Plains Grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilton, E.; Flanagan, L. B.

    2014-12-01

    Soil respiration rate is affected by seasonal changes in temperature and moisture, but is this a direct effect on soil metabolism or an indirect effect caused by changes in microbial biomass, bacterial community composition and substrate availability? In order to address this question, we compared continuous measurements of soil and plant CO2 exchange made with an automatic chamber system to analyses conducted on replicate soil samples collected on four dates during June-August. Microbial biomass was estimated from substrate-induced respiration rate, bacterial community composition was determined by 16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing, and β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGase) and phenol oxidase enzyme activities were assayed fluorometrically or by absorbance measurements, respectively. Soil microbial biomass declined from June to August in strong correlation with a progressive decline in soil moisture during this time period. Soil bacterial species richness and alpha diversity showed no significant seasonal change. However, bacterial community composition showed a progressive shift over time as measured by Bray-Curtis dissimilarity. In particular, the change in community composition was associated with increasing relative abundance in the alpha and delta classes, and declining abundance of the beta and gamma classes of the Proteobacteria phylum during June-August. NAGase showed a progressive seasonal decline in potential activity that was correlated with microbial biomass and seasonal changes in soil moisture. In contrast, phenol oxidase showed highest potential activity in mid-July near the time of peak soil respiration and ecosystem photosynthesis, which may represent a time of high input of carbon exudates into the soil from plant roots. This input of exudates may stimulate the activity of phenol oxidase, a lignolytic enzyme involved in the breakdown of soil organic matter. These analyses indicated that seasonal change in soil respiration is a complex

  1. Short-Term Responses of Soil Respiration and C-Cycle Enzyme Activities to Additions of Biochar and Urea in a Calcareous Soil.

    PubMed

    Song, Dali; Xi, Xiangyin; Huang, Shaomin; Liang, Guoqing; Sun, Jingwen; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xiubin

    2016-01-01

    Biochar (BC) addition to soil is a proposed strategy to enhance soil fertility and crop productivity. However, there is limited knowledge regarding responses of soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities to BC and nitrogen (N) additions in a calcareous soil. A 56-day incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the combined effects of BC addition rates (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0% by mass) and urea (U) application on soil nutrients, soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities in a calcareous soil in the North China Plain. Our results showed soil pH values in both U-only and U plus BC treatments significantly decreased within the first 14 days and then stabilized, and CO2emission rate in all U plus BC soils decreased exponentially, while there was no significant difference in the contents of soil total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and C/N ratio in each treatment over time. At each incubation time, soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), TOC, TN, C/N ratio, DOC and cumulative CO2 emission significantly increased with increasing BC addition rate, while soil potential activities of the four hydrolytic enzymes increased first and then decreased with increasing BC addition rate, with the largest values in the U + 1.0%BC treatment. However, phenol oxidase activity in all U plus BC soils showed a decreasing trend with the increase of BC addition rate. Our results suggest that U plus BC application at a rate of 1% promotes increases in hydrolytic enzymes, does not highly increase C/N and C mineralization, and can improve in soil fertility. PMID:27589265

  2. Soil-Borne Bacterial Structure and Diversity Does Not Reflect Community Activity in Pampa Biome

    PubMed Central

    Lupatini, Manoeli; Suleiman, Afnan Khalil Ahmad; Jacques, Rodrigo Josemar Seminoti; Antoniolli, Zaida Inês; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya; de Oliveira Camargo, Flávio Anastácio; Roesch, Luiz Fernando Würdig

    2013-01-01

    The Pampa biome is considered one of the main hotspots of the world’s biodiversity and it is estimated that half of its original vegetation was removed and converted to agricultural land and tree plantations. Although an increasing amount of knowledge is being assembled regarding the response of soil bacterial communities to land use change, to the associated plant community and to soil properties, our understanding about how these interactions affect the microbial community from the Brazilian Pampa is still poor and incomplete. In this study, we hypothesized that the same soil type from the same geographic region but under distinct land use present dissimilar soil bacterial communities. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the soil bacterial communities from four land-uses within the same soil type by 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene and by soil microbial activity analyzes. We found that the same soil type under different land uses harbor similar (but not equal) bacterial communities and the differences were controlled by many microbial taxa. No differences regarding diversity and richness between natural areas and areas under anthropogenic disturbance were detected. However, the measures of microbial activity did not converge with the 16S rRNA data supporting the idea that the coupling between functioning and composition of bacterial communities is not necessarily correlated. PMID:24146873

  3. Effect of pyrene and cadmium on microbial activity and community structure in soil.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mang; Xu, Kui; Chen, Jun

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a greenhouse experiment was conducted to investigate interactive effects of cadmium (Cd) × pyrene × plant treatments on soil microbial activity and community structure. The results demonstrated that the basal respiration, microbial biomass carbon and metabolic quotient in both unplanted and rhizosphere soil were significantly influenced by interaction of Cd and pyrene. The combined application of Cd and pyrene caused a significantly greater biocidal influence on the soil microorganisms than the single spiking of Cd or pyrene. The soil basal respiration increased with the spiking of 2.5 mg kg(-1) Cd in both unplanted and rhizosphere soil. The eco-physiological index of Cd-tolerant populations was significantly different among the unplanted soil, rhizoplane and rhizosphere soil of tall fescue, indicating a slightly uneven distribution of fast- and slow-growing tolerant bacteria. Obvious differences in microbial activity were observed among treatments due to different physicochemical characteristics of the rhizosphere soils depending on the plant species. PMID:23290945

  4. Distribution of active organic matter in the soil profiles of natural and agricultural ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodzhaeva, A. K.; Semenov, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    The amount of active (potentially mineralizable) organic carbon (C0) in the 1-m-deep layer of typical chernozem, dark-gray forest soil, and gray forest soil was estimated for virgin plots and arable land. It was shown that C0 is mainly found in the topsoil (0-20 cm), where its pool reaches 32-60% of the total amount of C0 in the layer of 0-100 cm. The C0 content and its portion in the total organic carbon decrease down the soil profiles. The disturbance of the structure of the pool of active organic carbon—the loss of the moderately mineralizable (0.1 > k 2 > 0.1 day-1) fraction—takes place in the upper horizon of plowed soils. The total pool of C0 in the upper meter of typical chernozem under cropland and under meadow-steppe cenosis comprises 2.8 and 5.2 t/ha, respectively; for the dark gray forest soil under cropland and forest, it reaches 5.5 and 9.8 t/ha, respectively; and for the gray forest soil under cropland and forest, 2.4 and 3.4 t/ha, respectively. The pools of C0 in the typical chernozem. dark gray forest, and gray forest soils are comparable with the values of the annual C-CO2 emission from the soils of these zones.

  5. A Coexisting Fungal-Bacterial Community Stabilizes Soil Decomposition Activity in a Microcosm Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ushio, Masayuki; Miki, Takeshi; Balser, Teri C.

    2013-01-01

    How diversity influences the stability of a community function is a major question in ecology. However, only limited empirical investigations of the diversity–stability relationship in soil microbial communities have been undertaken, despite the fundamental role of microbial communities in driving carbon and nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we conducted a microcosm experiment to investigate the relationship between microbial diversity and stability of soil decomposition activities against changes in decomposition substrate quality by manipulating microbial community using selective biocides. We found that soil respiration rates and degradation enzyme activities by a coexisting fungal and bacterial community (a taxonomically diverse community) are more stable against changes in substrate quality (plant leaf materials) than those of a fungi-dominated or a bacteria-dominated community (less diverse community). Flexible changes in the microbial community composition and/or physiological state in the coexisting community against changes in substrate quality, as inferred by the soil lipid profile, may be the mechanism underlying this positive diversity–stability relationship. Our experiment demonstrated that the previously found positive diversity–stability relationship could also be valid in the soil microbial community. Our results also imply that the functional/taxonomic diversity and community ecology of soil microbes should be incorporated into the context of climate–ecosystem feedbacks. Changes in substrate quality, which could be induced by climate change, have impacts on decomposition process and carbon dioxide emission from soils, but such impacts may be attenuated by the functional diversity of soil microbial communities. PMID:24260368

  6. Activity and community structure of methane-oxidising bacteria in a wet meadow soil.

    PubMed

    Horz, Hans-Peter; Raghubanshi, Akhilesh S; Heyer, Jürgen; Kammann, Claudia; Conrad, Ralf; Dunfield, Peter F

    2002-09-01

    The structure and activity of the methane-oxidising microbial community in a wet meadow soil in Germany were investigated using biogeochemical, cultivation, and molecular fingerprinting techniques. Both methane from the atmosphere and methane produced in anaerobic subsurface soil were oxidised. The specific affinity (first-order rate constant) for methane consumption was highest in the top 20 cm of soil and the apparent half-saturation constant was 137-300 nM CH(4), a value intermediate to measured values in wetland soils versus well-aerated upland soils. Most-probable-number (MPN) counting of methane-oxidising bacteria followed by isolation and characterisation of strains from the highest positive dilution steps suggested that the most abundant member of the methane-oxidising community was a Methylocystis strain (10(5)-10(7) cells g(-1) d.w. soil). Calculations based on kinetic data suggested that this cell density was sufficient to account for the observed methane oxidation activity in the soil. DNA extraction directly from the same soil samples, followed by PCR amplification and comparative sequence analyses of the pmoA gene, also detected Methylocystis. However, molecular community fingerprinting analyses revealed a more diverse and dynamic picture of the methane-oxidising community. Retrieved pmoA sequences included, besides those closely related to Methylocystis spp., others related to the genera Methylomicrobium and Methylocapsa, and there were differences across samples which were not evident in MPN analyses. PMID:19709259

  7. Soil Aggregation and Enzyme Activities as affected by Management Practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The predominant cropping system in the Central Great Plains, winter Wheat-Fallow (W-F) rotation, is associated with decreases in Soil Organic Matter (SOM) primarily because of tillage during the fallow period. Intensive cropping with reduced tillage and fallow are practices that provide more residue...

  8. Does Gray-Tailed Vole Activity Affect Soil Quality?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Voles are well-known crop pests, especially when peak populations are present, but their role in soil fertility and impacts on agricultural sustainability are not well understood. Five months after the abrupt disappearance of a peak in a gray-tailed vole (Microtus canicaudus) population, we examined...

  9. Analysis of Satellite Retreived Active-Passive Merged Soil Moisture Distribution: A Case Study Over India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravorty, A.; Chahar, B. R.; Sharma, O. P.; Dhanya, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Soil moisture is the source of water for evapotranspiration over the continents and it participates in both energy and water balance of the earth. Soil moisture participates in the energy cycle by managing the partitioning of the energy budget into latent and sensible heat, there by influencing the hydrological cycle. But to better understand the influence of soil moisture on the hydrological cycle, large scale monitoring is required. The objective of this study is to qualitatively analyze the active-passive merged soil moisture distribution, prepared under the ESA_CCI programme, against two AMSR-E soil moisture distributions, AMSR-E/NSIDC (National Snow and Ice Data Center) and AMSR-E/VUA(Virje Universiet Amstradam) and GLDAS_NOAH model simulations. The ESA_CCI soil moisture distribution is also compared with the GPCC monthly precipitation distribution to observe the representativeness of the precipitation seasonality in the satellite retrieved soil moisture. India has been selected as the study area, esp. the Central Indian region, as it has shown to be a soil moisture hot-spot for land-surface atmosphere interaction. The preliminary study show that both ESA_CCI and AMSR-E/VUA soil moisture distributions capture similar seasonal patterns in addition to processes like rainfall events and inter-annual variations. In addition to this it was also observed that the soil moisture distribution of ESA_CCI and AMSR-E/VUA are linearly related to each other for more than 50% of the land points. In case of ESA_CCI and AMSR-E/NSIDC, the soil moisture distributions are able to capture similar seasonal patterns but not the random events and they also do not show a strong linear relationship. We also analyze the effect of topography and vegetation distribution on the error charactristics of the satellite retrieved soil moisture distributions.

  10. Synthetic fuel oil effects on microbial activity and nitrogen transformations in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, M.H.; Saylor, G.S.; Luxmoore, R.J.

    1984-12-01

    The effects of a solvent refined coal oil (SRC-II) on microbial processes in a Captina silt loam soil were examined. The soil samples were maintained under environmental conditions favorable for most aerobic microbial activities. Soil was treated with four oil concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 8.6% (wt/wt). Oxygen uptake rates, total viable cell counts, numbers of nitrifying bacteria, and inorganic nitrogen concentrations were monitored before oil addition and at regular intervals for three months thereafter. Organic carbon, total nitrogen, and soil pH were also measured before and after application of the oil. The SRC-II coal oil effected soil processes at all treatment levels. The lowest oil concentration (0.2%) decreased numbers of nitrifying bacteria while increasing total viable cell numbers and net nitrogen mineralization. The higher oil concentrations reduced oxygen uptake rates and total viable cells as well as nitrifier numbers. Soil treated with a 1.7% oil concentration showed significant increases in respiration rates and cell densities after two months, while no significant increases were observed at oil levels of 3.4 and 8.6%. The application of the coal oil to soil samples raised the carbon to nitrogen ratio of the soil. The sum of nitrate and ammonium nitrogen in the oil-treated soils was never significantly lower than the control soil levels, indicating that nitrogen was not limiting to decomposition. However, the toxicity of the oil toward the nitrifying bacteria resulted in an accumulation of ammonium in treated soils. This may affect plant establishment on soils contaminated with a synthetic fuel oil. 104 references, 7 figures, 15 tables.

  11. Spatial distribution of ventilation and perfusion: mechanisms and regulation.

    PubMed

    Glenny, Robb W; Robertson, H Thomas

    2011-01-01

    With increasing spatial resolution of regional ventilation and perfusion, it has become more apparent that ventilation and blood flow are quite heterogeneous in the lung. A number of mechanisms contribute to this regional variability, including hydrostatic gradients, pleural pressure gradients, lung compressibility, and the geometry of the airway and vascular trees. Despite this marked heterogeneity in both ventilation and perfusion, efficient gas exchange is possible through the close regional matching of the two. Passive mechanisms, such as the shared effect of gravity and the matched branching of vascular and airway trees, create efficient gas exchange through the strong correlation between ventilation and perfusion. Active mechanisms that match local ventilation and perfusion play little if no role in the normal healthy lung but are important under pathologic conditions. PMID:23737178

  12. Dilution ventilation to accommodate smoking: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Sterling, E.; Collett, C.; Ross, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    The principal consensus standard on ventilation to control indoor air quality in the US is ASHRAE Standard 62-1989, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality. Table 2 of this standard prescribes outside air ventilation requirements to maintain acceptable air quality in a variety of commercial and institutional facilities. A footnote to this table states that the ventilation rates were chosen to control carbon dioxide and other contaminants with an adequate margin of safety and to account for health variations among people, varied activity levels, and a moderate amount of smoking. The research reported here was designed to assess the effectiveness of the dilution ventilation provisions in ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 in controlling environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) in the office workplace.

  13. Modern non-invasive mechanical ventilation turns 25.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lobato, Salvador; Mayoralas Alises, Sagrario

    2013-11-01

    The history of non-invasive mechanical ventilation goes back more than 100 years, but it was not until 1987 when what we could call "modern" non-invasive mechanical ventilation was developed. The description of Delaubier and Rideau of a patient with Duchenne's disease who had been effectively ventilated through a nasal mask marked the start of a new era in the history of non-invasive mechanical ventilation. Over these last 25years, we have witnessed exponential growth in its use, field of activity and technological advances on an exciting fast-paced track. We believe that it is time to review the main milestones that have marked the development of non-invasive mechanical ventilation to date, while paying homage to this therapeutic method that has contributed so much to the advancement of respiratory medicine in the last 25years. PMID:23347549

  14. Does the different mowing regime affect soil biological activity and floristic composition of thermophilous Pieniny meadow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Józefowska, Agnieszka; Zaleski, Tomasz; Zarzycki, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The study area was located in the Pieniny National Park in the Carpathian Mountain (Southern Poland). About 30% of Park's area is covered by meadows. The climax stage of this area is forest. Therefore extensive use is indispensable action to keep semi-natural grassland such as termophilous Pieniny meadows, which are characterized by a very high biodiversity. The purpose of this research was to answer the question, how the different way of mowing: traditional scything (H), and mechanical mowing (M) or abandonment of mowing (N) effect on the biological activity of soil. Soil biological activity has been expressed by microbial and soil fauna activity. Microbial activity was described directly by count of microorganisms and indirectly by enzymatic activity (dehydrogenase - DHA) and the microbial biomass carbon content (MBC). Enchytraeidae and Lumbricidae were chosen as representatives of soil fauna. Density and species diversity of this Oligochaeta was determined. Samples were collected twice in June (before mowing) and in September (after mowing). Basic soil properties, such as pH value, organic carbon and nitrogen content, moisture and temperature, were determined. Mean count of vegetative bacteria forms, fungi and Actinobacteria was higher in H than M and N. Amount of bacteria connected with nitrification and denitrification process and Clostridium pasteurianum was the highest in soil where mowing was discontinued 11 years ago. The microbial activity measured indirectly by MBC and DHA indicated that the M had the highest activity. The soil biological activity in second term of sampling had generally higher activity than soil collected in June. That was probably connected with highest organic carbon content in soil resulting from mowing and the end of growing season. Higher earthworm density was in mowing soil (220 and 208 individuals m‑2 in H and M respectively) compare to non-mowing one (77 ind. m‑2). The density of Enchytraeidae was inversely, the higher

  15. Evaluation of ventilator alarms.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation of ventilator alarms is being carried out for the DHSS within the Welsh National School of Medicine. The technical performance and safety assessments are being made within the Department of Anaesthetics and clinical trials within the South Glamorgan Area Health Authority. For this evaluation (published in 'Health Equipment Information' ['HEI'] No. 124 [June 1984]) one example of each model was assessed (Penlon IDP, Draeger, Medix Ventimonitor 101, BOC Medishield, East Ventilarm, Cape TTL) and the conclusions are based on the assumption that the sample was typical of normal production. This is a continuing programme and the next report will evaluate a group of infant ventilators. For full details of the evaluation findings, readers should consult 'HEI' 124. The following are extracts from the report. PMID:6398368

  16. The influence of vegetation and soil characteristics on active-layer thickness of permafrost soils in boreal forest.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P; Estop-Aragonés, Cristian; Thierry, Aaron; Charman, Dan J; Wolfe, Stephen A; Hartley, Iain P; Murton, Julian B; Williams, Mathew; Phoenix, Gareth K

    2016-09-01

    Carbon release from thawing permafrost soils could significantly exacerbate global warming as the active-layer deepens, exposing more carbon to decay. Plant community and soil properties provide a major control on this by influencing the maximum depth of thaw each summer (active-layer thickness; ALT), but a quantitative understanding of the relative importance of plant and soil characteristics, and their interactions in determine ALTs, is currently lacking. To address this, we undertook an extensive survey of multiple vegetation and edaphic characteristics and ALTs across multiple plots in four field sites within boreal forest in the discontinuous permafrost zone (NWT, Canada). Our sites included mature black spruce, burned black spruce and paper birch, allowing us to determine vegetation and edaphic drivers that emerge as the most important and broadly applicable across these key vegetation and disturbance gradients, as well as providing insight into site-specific differences. Across sites, the most important vegetation characteristics limiting thaw (shallower ALTs) were tree leaf area index (LAI), moss layer thickness and understory LAI in that order. Thicker soil organic layers also reduced ALTs, though were less influential than moss thickness. Surface moisture (0-6 cm) promoted increased ALTs, whereas deeper soil moisture (11-16 cm) acted to modify the impact of the vegetation, in particular increasing the importance of understory or tree canopy shading in reducing thaw. These direct and indirect effects of moisture indicate that future changes in precipitation and evapotranspiration may have large influences on ALTs. Our work also suggests that forest fires cause greater ALTs by simultaneously decreasing multiple ecosystem characteristics which otherwise protect permafrost. Given that vegetation and edaphic characteristics have such clear and large influences on ALTs, our data provide a key benchmark against which to evaluate process models used to predict

  17. Influence of hexaconazole, carbofuran and ethion on soil microflora and dehydrogenase activities in soil and intact cell.

    PubMed

    Kalam, A; Mukherjee, A K

    2001-01-01

    Total microbial count was highly affected (up to 61% at 1000 micrograms level) in presence of hexaconazole and persisted up to 21 days. Bacteria were more susceptible than actinomycetes. Carbofuran and ethion were moderately toxic to soil microflora. Inhibitory effects of all the three pesticides gradually decreased after 21 days as was evident by increase in total microbial count except in carbofuran. GDH activity in soil was also affected initially (up to 14 days) by all the three pesticides (60.3% in hexaconazole at 1000 micrograms level) and inhibition gradually decreased to zero except in carbofuran (15-20% toxicity persisted up to 35 days). GDH and LDH activity in presence of hexaconazole was strongly affected in intact cells of some standard culture of bacteria like Rhizobium sp. (host Dolichos sp., 32.1 and 72.5%), Bacillus subtilis Cohn (86.75 and 76.5%), Azotobacter sp. (36.9 and 55.4%) and B. sphaericus (67.6% GDH) respectively. Carbofuran inhibited the enzyme activity in B. subtilis (55.55 and 35.3%) and to some extent in B. sphaericus. Ethion moderately inhibited LDH activity in Rhodococcus sp. AK1 (17.1 and 33.3%), Rhizobium (27.6% LDH), E. coli HB 101 (34.2% LDH) as evidenced by formazan formation. From the result, it might be concluded that among the above three pesticides tested hexaconazole strongly inhibited the dehydrogenase system in bacteria including nitrogen fixing bacteria of soil and thus may affect soil fertility. It was concluded that hexaconazole was more toxic than ethion to dehydrogenase enzymes. PMID:11349536

  18. Harnessing natural ventilation benefits.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, John

    2013-04-01

    Making sure that a healthcare establishment has a good supply of clean fresh air is an important factor in keeping patients, staff, and visitors, free from the negative effects of CO2 and other contaminants. John O'Leary of Trend Controls, a major international supplier of building energy management solutions (BEMS), examines the growing use of natural ventilation, and the health, energy-saving, and financial benefits, that it offers. PMID:23678661

  19. Oven ventilation system

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, D.E.

    1987-02-17

    A ventilation system is described for venting an oven with external surfaces, the oven being located within an enclosed space, the system comprising: intake means for collecting air from the external environment of the enclosed space; means for forming a sheet of the air and passing the sheet across the external surfaces of the oven; and exhaust means for exhausting the sheet of the air to the external environment of the enclosed space after the air has been passed across the external surfaces.

  20. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM - BROWN & ROOT ENVIRONMENTAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System (SVVS*) is an in-situ vacuum extraction/air sparging and bioremediation technology for the treatment of subsurface organic contamination in soil and groundwater. The technology, developed by Billings and Associates, Inc., and o...

  1. [Soil biological activities at maize seedling stage under application of slow/controlled release nitrogen fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Li, Dongpo; Wu, Zhijie; Chen, Lijun; Liang, Chenghua; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Weicheng; Yang, Defu

    2006-06-01

    With pot experiment and simulating field ecological environment, this paper studied the effects of different slow/ controlled release N fertilizers on the soil nitrate - reductase and urease activities and microbial biomass C and N at maize seedling stage. The results showed that granular urea amended with dicyandiamide (DCD) and N-(n-bultyl) thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT) induced the highest soil nitrate-reductase activity, granular urea brought about the highest soil urease activity and microbial biomass C and N, while starch acetate (SA)-coated granular urea, SA-coated granular urea amended with DCD, methyl methacrylate (MMA) -coated granular urea amended with DCD, and no N fertilization gave a higher soil urease activity. Soil microbial C and N had a similar variation trend after applying various kinds of test slow/controlled release N fertilizers, and were the lowest after applying SA-coated granular urea amended with DCD and NBPT. Coated granular urea amended with inhibitors had a stronger effect on soil biological activities than coated granular urea, and MMA-coating had a better effect than SA-coating. PMID:16964940

  2. [Effects of Different Reclaimed Scenarios on Soil Microbe and Enzyme Activities in Mining Areas].

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-jian; Liu, Feng; Zhou, Xiao-mei

    2015-05-01

    Abstract: Ecological degradation in the mining areas is greatly aggravated in recent several decades, and ecological restoration has become the primary measure for the sustainable development. Soil microbe and enzyme activity are sensitive indices to evaluate soil quality. Ecological reconstruction was initiated in Antaibao mining area, and we tested soil physicochemical properties, microbial populations of azotobacteria, nitrifying-bacteria and denitrifying-bacteria, and enzyme activities (including sucrose, polyphenol oxidase, dehydrogenase and urease) under different regeneration scenarios. Regeneration scenarios had significant effects on soil physicochemical properties, microbial population and enzyme activities. Total nitrogen was strongly correlated with azotobacteria and nitrifying-bacteria, however, total nitrogen was not correlated with denitrifying-bacteria. Phenol oxidase activity was negatively correlated with soil organic carbon and total nitrogen, but other enzyme activities were positively correlated with soil organic carbon and total nitrogen. Principal Component Analysis ( PCA) was applied to analyze the integrated fertility index (IFI). The highest and lowest IFIs were in Robinia pseudoacacia-Pinus tabuliformis mixed forests and un-reclaimed area, respectively. R. pseudoacacia-P. tabuliformis mixed forests were feasible for reclaimed mining areas in semi-arid region Northwest Shanxi. PMID:26314137

  3. Multisubstrate Isotope Labeling and Metagenomic Analysis of Active Soil Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Verastegui, Y.; Cheng, J.; Engel, K.; Kolczynski, D.; Mortimer, S.; Lavigne, J.; Montalibet, J.; Romantsov, T.; Hall, M.; McConkey, B. J.; Rose, D. R.; Tomashek, J. J.; Scott, B. R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soil microbial diversity represents the largest global reservoir of novel microorganisms and enzymes. In this study, we coupled functional metagenomics and DNA stable-isotope probing (DNA-SIP) using multiple plant-derived carbon substrates and diverse soils to characterize active soil bacterial communities and their glycoside hydrolase genes, which have value for industrial applications. We incubated samples from three disparate Canadian soils (tundra, temperate rainforest, and agricultural) with five native carbon (12C) or stable-isotope-labeled (13C) carbohydrates (glucose, cellobiose, xylose, arabinose, and cellulose). Indicator species analysis revealed high specificity and fidelity for many uncultured and unclassified bacterial taxa in the heavy DNA for all soils and substrates. Among characterized taxa, Actinomycetales (Salinibacterium), Rhizobiales (Devosia), Rhodospirillales (Telmatospirillum), and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium and Asticcacaulis) were bacterial indicator species for the heavy substrates and soils tested. Both Actinomycetales and Caulobacterales (Phenylobacterium) were associated with metabolism of cellulose, and Alphaproteobacteria were associated with the metabolism of arabinose; members of the order Rhizobiales were strongly associated with the metabolism of xylose. Annotated metagenomic data suggested diverse glycoside hydrolase gene representation within the pooled heavy DNA. By screening 2,876 cloned fragments derived from the 13C-labeled DNA isolated from soils incubated with cellulose, we demonstrate the power of combining DNA-SIP, multiple-displacement amplification (MDA), and functional metagenomics by efficiently isolating multiple clones with activity on carboxymethyl cellulose and fluorogenic proxy substrates for carbohydrate-active enzymes. PMID:25028422

  4. Effect of petrochemical sludge concentrations of changes in mutagenic activity during soil bioremediation process.

    PubMed

    Morelli, I S; Vecchioli, G I; Del Panno, M T; Painceira, M T

    2001-10-01

    The present study was performed to assess the effect of the petrochemical sludge application rate on the mutagenic activity (Ames test) of soil and the persistence of mutagenic activity during laboratory soil bioremediation process. Sludge-soil systems were prepared at four different sludge application rates (1.25, 2.5, 5, and 10% w/w). Unamended soil was used as a control. Immediately following sludge application, in the absence or presence of S9, a linear correlation between sludge application rates and mutagenicity was found but differed significantly (p < 0.05) from the control system only at higher application rates (5 and 10% w/w). The direct mutagenicity of all systems decreases during the bioremediation process, and after a year of treatment only the 10% system induced a mutagenic response that was significantly different from the control system. On the other hand, an initial increase of the indirect mutagenicity was observed at all application rates. The time required for observing this increase was inversely proportional to the initial sludge concentration. After a year of treatment, the indirect mutagenicity of all sludge-amended soils was not significantly different but was significantly different from the unamended soils. The persistence of the direct mutagenic activity of the sludge-amended soils was related to the sludge concentration, whereas the indirect mutagenic persistence was related to the relationship between easily degradable hydrocarbons and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons concentration and independent from the initial application rate. PMID:11596747

  5. Ventilator-associated lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kuchnicka, Katarzyna; Maciejewski, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation of disease-affected lungs, as well as being an inadequate mode of ventilation for initially healthy lungs, can cause significant changes in their structure and function. In order to differentiate these processes, two terms are used: ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI) and ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). In both cases, lung injury primarily results from differences in transpulmonary pressure - a consequence of an imbalance between lung stress and strain. This paper focuses on changes in lung structure and function due to this imbalance. Moreover, in this context, barotrauma, volutrauma and atelectrauma are interpreted, and the importance of signal transduction as a process inducing local and systemic inflammatory responses (biotrauma), is determined. None of the assessed methods of reducing VALI and VILI has been found to be entirely satisfactory, yet studies evaluating oscillatory ventilation, liquid ventilation, early ECMO, super-protective ventilation or noisy ventilation and administration of certain drugs are under way. Low tidal volume ventilation and adequately adjusted PEEP appear to be the best preventive measures of mechanical ventilation in any setting, including the operating theatre. Furthermore, this paper highlights the advances in VILI/VALI prevention resulting from better understanding of pathophysiological phenomena. PMID:24092514

  6. Carbon-Degrading Enzyme Activities Stimulated by Increased Nutrient Availability in Arctic Tundra Soils

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Akihiro; Wallenstein, Matthew D.; Simpson, Rodney T.; Moore, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Climate-induced warming of the Arctic tundra is expected to increase nutrient availability to soil microbes, which in turn may accelerate soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. We increased nutrient availability via fertilization to investigate the microbial response via soil enzyme activities. Specifically, we measured potential activities of seven enzymes at four temperatures in three soil profiles (organic, organic/mineral interface, and mineral) from untreated native soils and from soils which had been fertilized with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) since 1989 (23 years) and 2006 (six years). Fertilized plots within the 1989 site received annual additions of 10 g N⋅m-2⋅year-1 and 5 g P⋅m-2⋅year-1. Within the 2006 site, two fertilizer regimes were established – one in which plots received 5 g N⋅m-2⋅year-1 and 2.5 g P⋅m-2⋅year-1 and one in which plots received 10 g N⋅m-2⋅year-1 and 5 g P⋅m-2⋅year-1. The fertilization treatments increased activities of enzymes hydrolyzing carbon (C)-rich compounds but decreased phosphatase activities, especially in the organic soils. Activities of two enzymes that degrade N-rich compounds were not affected by the fertilization treatments. The fertilization treatments increased ratios of enzyme activities degrading C-rich compounds to those for N-rich compounds or phosphate, which could lead to changes in SOM chemistry over the long term and to losses of soil C. Accelerated SOM decomposition caused by increased nutrient availability could significantly offset predicted increased C fixation via stimulated net primary productivity in Arctic tundra ecosystems. PMID:24204773

  7. Effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity in three successional forests in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Liu, J.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, D.; Deng, Q.

    2011-07-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient for plant growth in tropical and subtropical forests. Global climate change has led to alterations in precipitation in the recent years, which inevitably influences P cycling. Soil acid phosphatase plays a vital role in controlling P mineralization, and its activity reflects the capacity of organic P mineralization potential in soils. In order to study the effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity, an experiment with precipitation treatments (no precipitation, natural precipitation and doubled precipitation) in three successional forests in southern China was carried out. The three forests include Masson pine forest (MPF), coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest (MF) and monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest (MEBF). Results showed that driven by seasonality of precipitation, changes in soil acid phosphatase activities coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with significantly higher values in the wet season than in the dry season. Soil acid phosphatase activities were closely linked to forest successional stages, with enhanced values in the later stages of forest succession. In the dry season, soil acid phosphatase activities in the three forests showed a rising trend with increasing precipitation treatments. In the wet season, soil acid phosphatase activity was depressed by no precipitation treatment in the three forests. However, doubled precipitation treatment exerted a significantly negative effect on it only in MEBF. These results indicate that the potential transformation rate of organic P might be more dependent on water in the dry season than in the wet season. A decrease in organic P turnover would occur in the three forests if there was a drought in a whole year in the future. More rainfall in the wet season would also be adverse to organic P turnover in MEBF due to its high soil moisture.

  8. Effects of different types of N deposition on the fungal decomposition activities of temperate forest soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Shushan; Du, Yuhan; Guo, Peng; Guo, Lida; Qu, Kaiyue; He, Jianping

    2014-11-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition significantly affects soil microbial activities and litter decomposition processes in forest ecosystems. However, the changes in soil fungi during litter decomposition remain unclear. In this study, ammonium nitrate was selected as inorganic N (IN), whereas urea and glycine were selected as organic N (ON). N fertilizer with different IN-to-ON ratios (1:4, 2:3, 3:2, 4:1, and 5:0) was mixed in equal amounts and then added to temperate forest soils. Half of each treatment was simultaneously added with streptomycin to inhibit soil bacteria. The activities of enzymes involved in litter decomposition (invertase, β-glucosidase, cellulase, polyphenol oxidase, and phosphatase) were assayed after a three-year field experiment. The results showed that enzymatic activities were inhibited by IN addition but accelerated by ON addition in the non-antibiotic addition treatments. An increase in ON in the mixed N fertilizer also shifted enzymatic activities from N inhibition to N stimulation. Similarly, in the antibiotic addition treatments, fungal activities revealed the same trends, but they were seriously inhibited by IN and significantly accelerated by ON. These results indicated that soil fungi were more sensitive to N deposition, particularly to ON. A large amount of ON may convert soil microbial communities into a fungi-dominated system. However, excessive ON deposition (20% IN+80% ON) caused N saturation and repressed fungal activities. These results suggested that soil fungi were sensitive to N type and that different IN-to-ON ratios may induce diverse ecological effects on soil fungi. PMID:25127443

  9. Carbon-degrading enzyme activities stimulated by increased nutrient availability in Arctic tundra soils.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Akihiro; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Simpson, Rodney T; Moore, John C

    2013-01-01

    Climate-induced warming of the Arctic tundra is expected to increase nutrient availability to soil microbes, which in turn may accelerate soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition. We increased nutrient availability via fertilization to investigate the microbial response via soil enzyme activities. Specifically, we measured potential activities of seven enzymes at four temperatures in three soil profiles (organic, organic/mineral interface, and mineral) from untreated native soils and from soils which had been fertilized with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) since 1989 (23 years) and 2006 (six years). Fertilized plots within the 1989 site received annual additions of 10 g N · m(-2) · year(-1) and 5 g P · m(-2) · year(-1). Within the 2006 site, two fertilizer regimes were established--one in which plots received 5 g N · m(-2) · year(-1) and 2.5 g P · m(-2) · year(-1) and one in which plots received 10 g N · m(-2) · year(-1) and 5 g P · m(-2) · year(-1). The fertilization treatments increased activities of enzymes hydrolyzing carbon (C)-rich compounds but decreased phosphatase activities, especially in the organic soils. Activities of two enzymes that degrade N-rich compounds were not affected by the fertilization treatments. The fertilization treatments increased ratios of enzyme activities degrading C-rich compounds to those for N-rich compounds or phosphate, which could lead to changes in SOM chemistry over the long term and to losses of soil C. Accelerated SOM decomposition caused by increased nutrient availability could significantly offset predicted increased C fixation via stimulated net primary productivity in Arctic tundra ecosystems. PMID:24204773

  10. Potential Carbon Transport: Linking Soil Aggregate Stability and Sediment Enrichment for Updating the Soil Active Layer within Intensely Managed Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacha, K.; Papanicolaou, T.; Abban, B. K.; Wilson, C. G.

    2014-12-01

    Currently, many biogeochemical models lack the mechanistic capacity to accurately simulate soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics, especially within intensely managed landscapes (IMLs) such as those found in the U.S. Midwest. These modeling limitations originate by not accounting for downslope connectivity of flowpathways initiated and governed by landscape processes and hydrologic forcing, which induce dynamic updates to the soil active layer (generally top 20-30cm of soil) with various sediment size fractions and aggregates being transported and deposited along the downslope. These hydro-geomorphic processes, often amplified in IMLs by tillage events and seasonal canopy, can greatly impact biogeochemical cycles (e.g., enhanced mineralization during aggregate breakdown) and in turn, have huge implications/uncertainty when determining SOC budgets. In this study, some of these limitations were addressed through a new concept, Potential Carbon Transport (PCT), a term which quantifies a maximum amount of material available for transport at various positions of the landscape, which was used to further refine a coupled modeling framework focused on SOC redistribution through downslope/lateral connectivity. Specifically, the size fractions slaked from large and small aggregates during raindrop-induced aggregate stability tests were used in conjunction with rainfall-simulated sediment enrichment ratio (ER) experiments to quantify the PCT under various management practices, soil types and landscape positions. Field samples used in determining aggregate stability and the ER experiments were collected/performed within the historic Clear Creek Watershed, home of the IML Critical Zone Observatory, located in Southeastern Iowa.

  11. Light piping driven photosynthesis in the soil: Low-light adapted active photosynthetic apparatus in the under-soil hypocotyl segments of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Kakuszi, Andrea; Sárvári, Éva; Solti, Ádám; Czégény, Gyula; Hideg, Éva; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Bóka, Károly; Böddi, Béla

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic activity was identified in the under-soil hypocotyl part of 14-day-old soil-grown bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Magnum) cultivated in pots under natural light-dark cycles. Electron microscopic, proteomic and fluorescence kinetic and imaging methods were used to study the photosynthetic apparatus and its activity. Under-soil shoots at 0-2cm soil depth featured chloroplasts with low grana and starch grains and with pigment-protein compositions similar to those of the above-soil green shoot parts. However, the relative amounts of photosystem II (PSII) supercomplexes were higher; in addition a PIP-type aquaporin protein was identified in the under-soil thylakoids. Chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction measurements showed that the above- and under-soil hypocotyl segments had similar photochemical yields at low (10-55μmolphotonsm(-2)s(-1)) light intensities. However, at higher photon flux densities the electron transport rate decreased in the under-soil shoot parts due to inactivation of the PSII reaction centers. These properties show the development of a low-light adapted photosynthetic apparatus driven by light piping of the above-soil shoot. The results of this paper demonstrate that the classic model assigning source and sink functions to above- and under-soil tissues is to be refined, and a low-light adapted photosynthetic apparatus in under-soil bean hypocotyls is capable of contributing to its own carbon supply. PMID:27318297

  12. Changes of microbial activities and soil aggregation in rhizosphere soil of lettuce plants by drought and the possible influence of inoculation with AM fungi and/or PGPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, J.; Caravaca, F.; Roldán, A.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of different arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, Glomus intraradices (Schenk & Smith) or Glomus mosseae (Nicol & Gerd.) Gerd. & Trappe, and plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) (Pseudomonas mendocina Palleroni), alone or in combination, on structural stability and microbial activity in the rhizosphere soil of Lactuca sativa L. was assessed under well-watered conditions and two levels of drought. Desiccation caused an increase in aggregate stability and water-soluble and total carbohydrates but there were no significant differences among treated soils and the control soil. The glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) levels in both the <2 mm and 0.2-4 mm soil fractions increased with medium water stress, whereas under severe water stress they did not differ with respect to those of well-watered soils. The values of GRSP in soils inoculated with PGPR and AM fungi were higher than in the control or fertilised soil under well-watered and severe-drought conditions, while under medium-drought conditions all soils showed similar GRSP values. Soils inoculated with AM fungi and PGPR generally presented higher dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities than the control soil, independent of the water regime.

  13. Assessment of the biological activity of soils in the subtropical zone of Azerbaijan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaev, M. P.; Orujova, N. I.

    2009-10-01

    The enzymatic activity; the microbial population; and the intensities of the nitrification, ammonification, CO2emission, and cellulose decomposition were studied in gray-brown, meadow-sierozemic, meadow-forest alluvial, and yellow (zheltozem) gley soils in the subtropical zone of Azerbaijan under natural vegetation, crop rotation systems with vegetables, and permanent vegetable crops. On this basis, the biological diagnostics of these soils were suggested and the soil ecological health was evaluated. It was shown that properly chosen crop rotation systems on irrigated lands make it possible to preserve the fertility of the meadow-forest alluvial and zheltozem-gley soils and to improve the fertility of the gray-brown and meadow-sierozemic soils.

  14. Temperature dependence of the activity of polyphenol peroxidases and polyphenol oxidases in modern and buried soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushev, A. V.; Kuznetsova, I. N.; Blagodatskaya, E. V.; Blagodatsky, S. A.

    2014-05-01

    Under conditions of the global climate warming, the changes in the reserves of soil humus depend on the temperature sensitivities of polyphenol peroxidases (PPPOs) and polyphenol oxidases (PPOs). They play an important role in lignin decomposition, mineralization, and humus formation. The temperature dependence of the potential enzyme activity in modern and buried soils has been studied during incubation at 10 or 20°C. The experimental results indicate that it depends on the availability of the substrate and the presence of oxygen. The activity of PPOs during incubation in the absence of oxygen for two months decreases by 2-2.5 times, which is balanced by an increase in the activity of PPPOs by 2-3 times. The increase in the incubation temperature to 20°C and the addition of glucose accelerates this transition due to the more abrupt decrease in the activity of PPOs. The preincubation of the soil with glucose doubles the activity of PPPOs but has no significant effect on the activity of PPOs. The different effects of temperature on two groups of the studied oxidases and the possibility of substituting enzymes by those of another type under changing aeration conditions should be taken into consideration in predicting the effect of the climate warming on the mineralization of the soil organic matter. The absence of statistically significant differences in the enzymatic activity between the buried and modern soil horizons indicates the retention by the buried soil of some of its properties (soil memory) and the rapid restoration of high enzymatic activity during the preincubation.

  15. Effects of Soil Organic Matter Properties and Microbial Community Composition on Enzyme Activities in Cryoturbated Arctic Soils

    PubMed Central

    Schnecker, Jörg; Wild, Birgit; Hofhansl, Florian; Eloy Alves, Ricardo J.; Bárta, Jiří; Čapek, Petr; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Gentsch, Norman; Gittel, Antje; Guggenberger, Georg; Hofer, Angelika; Kienzl, Sandra; Knoltsch, Anna; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Mikutta, Robert; Šantrůčková, Hana; Shibistova, Olga; Takriti, Mounir; Urich, Tim; Weltin, Georg; Richter, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-mediated decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) is controlled, amongst other factors, by organic matter properties and by the microbial decomposer community present. Since microbial community composition and SOM properties are often interrelated and both change with soil depth, the drivers of enzymatic decomposition are hard to dissect. We investigated soils from three regions in the Siberian Arctic, where carbon rich topsoil material has been incorporated into the subsoil (cryoturbation). We took advantage of this subduction to test if SOM properties shape microbial community composition, and to identify controls of both on enzyme activities. We found that microbial community composition (estimated by phospholipid fatty acid analysis), was similar in cryoturbated material and in surrounding subsoil, although carbon and nitrogen contents were similar in cryoturbated material and topsoils. This suggests that the microbial community in cryoturbated material was not well adapted to SOM properties. We also measured three potential enzyme activities (cellobiohydrolase, leucine-amino-peptidase and phenoloxidase) and used structural equation models (SEMs) to identify direct and indirect drivers of the three enzyme activities. The models included microbial community composition, carbon and nitrogen contents, clay content, water content, and pH. Models for regular horizons, excluding cryoturbated material, showed that all enzyme activities were mainly controlled by carbon or nitrogen. Microbial community composition had no effect. In contrast, models for cryoturbated material showed that enzyme activities were also related to microbial community composition. The additional control of microbial community composition could have restrained enzyme activities and furthermore decomposition in general. The functional decoupling of SOM properties and microbial community composition might thus be one of the reasons for low decomposition rates and the persistence of 400 Gt

  16. Active and passive microwave measurements of soil moisture in FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J. R.; Gogineni, S. P.; Ampe, J.

    1992-01-01

    During the intensive field campaigns of the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) in May-October of 1987, several nearly simultaneous measurements were made with low-altitude flights of the L-band radiometer and C- and X-band scatterometers over two transects in the Konza Prairie Natural Research Area, some 8 km south of Manhattan, Kansas. These measurements showed that although the scatterometers were sensitive to soil moisture variations in most regions under the flight path, the L-band radiometer lost most of its sensitivity in regions unburned for many years. The correlation coefficient derived from the regression between the radar backscattering coefficient and the soil moisture was found to improve with the increase in antenna incidence angle. This is attributed to a steeper falloff of the backscattering coefficient as a function of local incidence at angles near nadir than at angles greater than 30 deg.

  17. Ventilators for noninvasive ventilation to treat acute respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele; Naldi, Mario

    2008-08-01

    The application of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) to treat acute respiratory failure has increased tremendously both inside and outside the intensive care unit. The choice of ventilator is crucial for success of NIV in the acute setting, because poor tolerance and excessive air leaks are significantly correlated with NIV failure. Patient-ventilator asynchrony and discomfort can occur if the physician or respiratory therapist fails to adequately set NIV to respond to the patient's ventilatory demand, so clinicians need to fully understood the ventilator's technical peculiarities (eg, efficiency of trigger and cycle systems, speed of pressurization, air-leak compensation, CO(2) rebreathing, reliability of fraction of inspired oxygen reading, monitoring accuracy). A wide range of ventilators of different complexity have been introduced into clinical practice to noninvasively support patients in acute respiratory failure, but the numerous commercially available ventilators (bi-level, intermediate, and intensive care unit ventilators) have substantial differences that can influence patient comfort, patient-ventilator interaction, and, thus, the chance of NIV clinical success. This report examines the most relevant aspects of the historical evolution, the equipment, and the acute-respiratory-failure clinical application of NIV ventilators. PMID:18655744

  18. Daily dynamics of cellulase activity in arable soils depending on management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrent'eva, E. V.; Semenov, A. M.; Zelenev, V. V.; Chzhun, Yu.; Semenova, E. V.; Semenov, V. M.; Namsaraev, B. B.; van Bruggen, A. H. C.

    2009-08-01

    The daily dynamics of cellulase activity was studied during 27 days by the cellophane membrane method on soils managed using the conventional high-input farming system (application of mineral fertilizers and pesticides) and the biological conservation farming system (application of organic fertilizers alone) in a microfield experiment. The regular oscillatory dynamics of the cellulase activity were revealed and confirmed by the harmonic (Fourier) analysis. The oscillatory dynamics of the cellulase activity had a self-oscillatory nature and was not directly caused by the disturbing impacts of both the uncontrolled (natural) changes in the temperature and moisture (rainfall) and the controlled ones (the application of different fertilizers). The disturbing impacts affected the oscillation amplitude of the cellulase activity but not the frequency (periods) of the oscillations. The periodic oscillations of the cellulase activity were more significant in the soil under the high-input management compared to the soil under the biological farming system.

  19. Influence of vegetation spatial heterogeneity on soil enzyme activity in burned Mediterranean areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Á. G.; Goirán, S.; Bautista, S.

    2009-04-01

    Mediterranean ecosystems are commonly considered resilient to wildfires. However, depending on fire severity and recurrence, post-fire climatic conditions and plant community type, the recovery rate of the vegetation can greatly vary. Often, the post-fire vegetation cover remains low and sparsely distributed many years after the wildfire, which could have profound impacts on ecosystem functioning. In this work, we studied the influence of vegetation patchiness on soil enzyme activity (acid phosphatase, β-glucosidase and urease), at the patch and landscape scales, in degraded dry Mediterranean shrublands affected by wildfires. At the patch scale, we assessed the variation in soil enzyme between bare soils and vegetation patches. At the landscape scale, we studied the relationships between soil enzyme activity and various landscape metrics (total patch cover, average interpatch length, average patch width, and patch density). The study was conducted in 19 sites in the Valencia Region (eastern Spain), which had been affected by large wildfires in 1991. Site selection aimed at capturing a wide range of the variability of post-fire plant recovery rates in Mediterranean areas. The activities of the three enzymes were significantly higher in soils under the vegetation canopies than in adjacent bare areas, which we attributed to the effect of plants on the soil amount of both enzyme substrates and enzymes. The differences between bare and plant microsites were larger in the case of the acid phosphatase and less marked for urease. The activity of acid phosphatase was also higher under patches of resprouter species than under patches of seeder species, probably due to the faster post-fire recovery and older age of resprouter patches in fire-prone ecosystems. Soil enzyme activities of β-glucosidase and urease in both bare soils and vegetation patches showed no relationships with any of the landscape metrics analysed. However, the activity of acid phosphatase increased

  20. Active Distributed Temperature Sensing to Characterise Soil Moisture and Heat Dynamics of a Vegetated Hillslope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocca, F.; Krause, S.; Chalari, A.; Hannah, D. M.; Mondanos, M.

    2015-12-01

    Complex correlated water and heat dynamics characterise the land surface and shallow subsurface, as consequence of the concurrent action of multiple transport processes. Point sensors and/or remote techniques show limitations in providing precise measurements of key indicators of soil heat and water transport such as soil temperature and moisture, at both high spatiotemporal resolution and large areal coverage. Fibre optics Distributed Temperature Sensors (DTS) allow for precise temperature measurement along optical cables of up to several kilometres, sampling at resolutions of up to few centimetres in space and seconds in time. The optical cable is the sensor and can be buried in the soil with minimum disturbance, to construct soil temperature profiles, over large surveying areas. Soil moisture can be obtained from the analysis of both heating and cooling rates measured by the DTS, when copper conductors embedded in the optical cable are electrically heated (technique known as Active DTS). In July 2015, three loops of optical cable of 500m each have been buried in the soil at different depths (0.05m, 0.25m and 0.40m), along an inclined recently vegetated field in the Birmingham area, UK. Active DTS tests have been set with the aim to characterize the soil temperature and moisture regimes of the field at high spatial resolution, in response to both sporadic events such as showers or scheduled irrigation, and diurnal fluctuations induced by atmospheric forcing. Spatiotemporal variations of the aforementioned regimes will be used to trace vertical and horizontal soil heat and water movements. Finally, assumptions on the possibility to correlate soil heat and water dynamics to a specific process such as precipitation, evapotranspiration, soil inclination, will be discussed. This research is part of the Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN) INTERFACES project and is realised in the context of the Free Air Carbon Enrichment (FACE) experiment, in collaboration with

  1. Mutagenic activity of heavy metals in soils of wayside slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorova, A. I.; Kalaev, V. N.; Prosvirina, Yu. G.; Goryainova, S. A.

    2007-08-01

    The genotoxic properties of soils polluted with heavy metals were studied on two wayside slopes covered with trees in the city of Voronezh. The nucleolar test in cells of the apical meristem of Zebrina pendula Schnizl. roots was used. The genotoxic effect of the soils was revealed according to the increased number of 2-and 3-nucleolar cells (from 41 to 54% and from 19 to 23% in the upper part of the first and second slopes, respectively; in the control, their number was 18 and 7%). The mean number of nucleoli per cell increased from 1.7 to 1.95 in the experiment and 1.31 in the control. The increased vehicle emissions, especially when cars go up the slopes (mainly in the upper and middle parts), correlated with the elevated heavy metal (Pb, Cu, Cd, and Zn) contents in the soil. The mutagenic substances may be removed to the Voronezh Reservoir, where they may be accumulated in some living organisms.

  2. Pretest Predictions for Ventilation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Sun; H. Yang; H.N. Kalia

    2007-01-17

    The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, concrete pipe walls, and insulation that will be developed during the ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as input to the following three areas: (1) Decisions regarding testing set-up and performance. (2) Assessing how best to scale the test phenomena measured. (3) Validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the ventilation tests, and develop and describe numerical methods that can be used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. Sensitivity studies to assess the impact of variation of linear power densities (linear heat loads) and ventilation air flow rates are included. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only.

  3. Effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity in three successional forests in Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Liu, J.; Zhou, G.; Zhang, D.; Deng, Q.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting nutrient for plant growth in tropical and subtropical forests. Global climate change has led to alterations in precipitation in the recent years, which inevitably influences P cycling. Soil acid phosphatase plays a vital role in controlling P mineralization, and its activity reflects the capacity of P supply to ecosystems. In order to study the effects of precipitation on soil acid phosphatase activity, an experiment of precipitation treatments (no precipitation, natural precipitation and doubled precipitation) in three forests of early-, mid- and advanced-successional stages in Southern China was carried out. Results showed that driven by seasonality of precipitation, changes in soil acid phosphatase activities coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with significantly higher values in the wet season than in the dry season. Soil acid phosphatase activities were closely linked to forest successional stages, with enhanced values in the later stages of forest succession. In the dry season, soil acid phosphatase activities in the three forests showed a rising trend with increasing precipitation treatments. In the wet season, no precipitation treatment depressed soil acid phosphatase activity, while doubled precipitation treatment exerted no positive effects on it, and even significantly lowered it in the advanced forest. These indicate the potential transformation rate of organic P might be more dependent on water in the dry season than in the wet season. The negative responses of soil acid phosphatase activity to precipitation suggest that P supply in subtropical ecosystems might be reduced if there was a drought in a whole year or more rainfall in the wet season in the future. NP, no precipitation; Control, natural precipitation; DP, double precipitation.

  4. The influence comparing of activated biochar and conventional biochar on the soil biological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořáčková, Helena; Mykajlo, Irina; Záhora, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    In our experiment we have used biochar. This material is the product of the pyrolysis that has shown a positive effect on numerous physical and chemical soil properties. However, its influence on the biological component of the soil is very variable. A number of toxic substances that inhibit the soil productivity may be produced during pyrolysis process. The experiment dealt with the hypothesis concerning biochar toxicity reduction by simulating natural processes in the soil. Biochar has been exposed to aeration in the aquatic environment, enriched with nutrients and a source of native soil microflora. It has been created 6 variants in total, each with four replications. The soils samples have been placed in a phytotron for 90 days. Variants consisted of the soil with fertilizers adding (compost, biochar, activated biochar) and have been prepared as well as variants containing compost and biochar and activated biochar optionally. The highest aboveground biomass production has been estimated in variants containing compost, while the lowest production - in the variants containing conventional biochar. During production comparing of the variants with the conventional biochar, activated biochar and control samples it has been evident that activated biochar promotes plant growth, and in contradiction conventional biochar inhibits it. We will approach to the same conclusions when comparing variants with a combination of conventional biochar + compost and activated biochar + compost. Mineral nitrogen leaching has been another investigated parameter. The highest leaching has occurred in the control variant, while the lowest - in the variant with activated biochar (the leaching of nitrate nitrogen has been negligeable). Our results suggest that activated biochar has the potential; however, it is necessary to carry out similar experiments in the field conditions.

  5. Dynamics of PCB removal and detoxification in historically contaminated soils amended with activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Vasilyeva, Galina K; Strijakova, Elena R; Nikolaeva, Svetlana N; Lebedev, Albert T; Shea, Patrick J

    2010-03-01

    Activated carbon (AC) can help overcome toxicity of pollutants to microbes and facilitate soil bioremediation. We used this approach to treat a Histosol and an Alluvial soil historically contaminated with PCB (4190 and 1585 mg kg(-1), respectively; primarily tri-, tetra- and pentachlorinated congeners). Results confirmed PCB persistence; reductions in PCB extractable from control and AC-amended soils were mostly due to a decrease in tri- and to some extent tetrachlorinated congeners as well as formation of a bound fraction. Mechanisms of PCB binding by soil and AC were different. In addition to microbial degradation of less chlorinated congeners, we postulate AC catalyzed dechlorination of higher chlorinated congeners. A large decrease in bioavailable PCB in AC-amended soils was demonstrated by greater clover germination and biomass. Phytotoxicity was low in treated soils but remained high in untreated soils for the duration of a 39-month experiment. These observations indicate the utility of AC for remediation of soils historically contaminated with PCB. PMID:19897290

  6. No tillage combined with crop rotation improves soil microbial community composition and metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bingjie; Jia, Shuxia; Zhang, Shixiu; McLaughlin, Neil B; Liang, Aizhen; Chen, Xuewen; Liu, Siyi; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-04-01

    Soil microbial community can vary with different agricultural managements, which in turn can affect soil quality. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of long-term tillage practice (no tillage (NT) and conventional tillage (CT)) and crop rotation (maize-soybean (MS) rotation and monoculture maize (MM)) on soil microbial community composition and metabolic capacity in different soil layers. Long-term NT increased the soil organic carbon (SOC) and total nitrogen (TN) mainly at the 0-5 cm depth which was accompanied with a greater microbial abundance. The greater fungi-to-bacteria (F/B) ratio was found in NTMS at the 0-5 cm depth. Both tillage and crop rotation had a significant effect on the metabolic activity, with the greatest average well color development (AWCD) value in NTMS soil at all three soil depths. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that the shift in microbial community composition was accompanied with the changes in capacity of utilizing different carbon substrates. Therefore, no tillage combined with crop rotation could improve soil biological quality and make agricultural systems more sustainable. PMID:26631020

  7. Sensing technologies to measure metabolic activities in soil and assess its health conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, Fabrizio; Macagnano, Antonella

    2013-04-01

    Soil is a complex ecosystem comprised of several and mutually interacting components, both abiotic (organo-mineral associations) and biotic (microbial and pedofaunal populations and plants), where a single parameter depends on other factors and affects the same and other factors, so that a network of influences among organisms coexists with the reciprocal actions between organisms and their environment. Therefore, it is difficult to undoubtedly determine what is the cause and what the effect within relationships between factors and processes. Soil is commonly studied through the evaluation and measurement of single parameters (e.g. the content of soil organic matter (SOM), microbial biomass, enzyme activities, pH, etc.), events (e.g. soil erosion, compaction, etc.) and processes (e.g. soil respiration, carbon fluxes, nitrification/denitrification, etc.), often carried out in laboratory conditions in order to limit the number of factors acting within the ecosystem under study, but missing the information about the global soil environment that way. In the last decade, several scientists have proposed and suggested the need for a holistic approach to soil ecosystems in different contexts. Recently, we have applied a sensing system developed in the last decades and capable of analysing complex mixtures of gases and volatiles (odours or aromas) in atmospheres, namely called electronic nose (EN). Typically, ENs are devices consisting of an array of differentially and partially specific, despite selective, sensors upon diverse coatings of sensitive films, i.e. interacting with single analytes of the same chemical class, despite not highly specific for a single substance, only, but showing also lower extent of cross-selectivity towards compounds of other chemical classes. ENs can be used in the classifications of odours by processing the collected responses of all sensors in the array through pattern recognition analyses, in order to obtain a chemical fingerprint

  8. A review on soil carbon accumulation due to the management change of major Brazilian agricultural activities.

    PubMed

    La Scala jr, N; De Figueiredo, E B; Panosso, A R

    2012-08-01

    Agricultural areas deal with enormous CO2 intake fluxes offering an opportunity for greenhouse effect mitigation. In this work we studied the potential of soil carbon sequestration due to the management conversion in major agricultural activities in Brazil. Data from several studies indicate that in soybean/maize, and related rotation systems, a significant soil carbon sequestration was observed over the year of conversion from conventional to no-till practices, with a mean rate of 0.41 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1). The same effect was observed in sugarcane fields, but with a much higher accumulation of carbon in soil stocks, when sugarcane fields are converted from burned to mechanised based harvest, where large amounts of sugarcane residues remain on the soil surface (1.8 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1)). The higher sequestration potential of sugarcane crops, when compared to the others, has a direct relation to the primary production of this crop. Nevertheless, much of this mitigation potential of soil carbon accumulation in sugarcane fields is lost once areas are reformed, or intensive tillage is applied. Pasture lands have shown soil carbon depletion once natural areas are converted to livestock use, while integration of those areas with agriculture use has shown an improvement in soil carbon stocks. Those works have shown that the main crop systems of Brazil have a huge mitigation potential, especially in soil carbon form, being an opportunity for future mitigation strategies. PMID:23011303

  9. Phosphatase activity in the surface and buried chestnut soils of the Volga-Don interfluve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomutova, T. E.; Demkina, T. S.; Kashirskaya, N. N.; Demkin, V. A.

    2012-04-01

    The phosphatase activity (PA) was studied in the chestnut paleosols buried in 1718-1720 under the Anna Ivanovna rampart in the southern part of the Privolzhskaya Upland and in the middle of the third millennium BC under the burial mound of the Bronze Age on the Northern Yergeni Upland; the background analogues of these soils were also examined. The PA values in the fresh soil samples varied from 2.5 to 37 mg of P2O5/10 g of soil per h with maximums in the A1 horizon of the surface soils and in the B1 horizon of the paleosols. The PA values depended on the time of storage of the samples: with time, they increased by 2.6-2.9 times in the A1 horizon of the background surface soil and decreased by 20-60% in the other soil samples. The specific distribution patterns of the PA values in the soil profiles remained the same independently of the time of storage of the samples. Relatively small amounts of the soil samples were sufficient for the reliable determination of the PA: 1-2 g for the A1 horizon and 3-5 g for the B1 and B2 horizons. The time of incubation with the substrate had to be increased up to 4 h for the long-stored samples.

  10. The effect of composition on stability ((14)C activity) of soil organic matter fractions from the albic and black soils.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jie; Sun, Ke; Wang, Ziying; Han, Lanfang; Wu, Fengchang; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-01-15

    The importance of the composition of soil organic matter (SOM) for carbon (C) cycling is still under debate. Here a single soil source was used to examine the specific influence of its composition on stability ((14)C activity) of SOM fractions while constraining other influential C turnover factors such as mineral, climate and plant input. The following SOM fractions were isolated from two soil samples: four humic acids, two humins, non-hydrolyzable carbon, and the demineralized fraction. We examined the isotope ratios of SOM fractions in relation to composition (such as aliphatic and aromatic C content) using solid state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and thermal analysis. The Δ(14)C values of the fractions isolated from both an albic soil (SOMs-A) and a black soil (SOMs-B) correlated negatively with their peak temperature of decomposition and the temperature where half of the total heat of reaction was evolved, implying a potential link between thermal and biogeochemical stability of SOM fractions. Aryl C contents of SOMs-A determined using (13)C NMR varied inversely with δ(15)N values and directly with δ(13)C values, suggesting that part of aryl C of SOMs-A might be fire-derived. The Δ(14)C values of SOMs-A correlated positively with aliphatic C content and negatively with aromatic C content. We therefore concluded that fire-derived aromatic C in SOMs-A appeared to be more stable than microbially-derived aliphatic C. The greater decomposition of SOMs-B fractions weakened the relationship of their Δ(14)C values with alkyl and aryl C contents. Hence, the role of the composition of SOM fractions in regulating stability might be dependent on the source of specific C forms and their stage of decomposition. PMID:26402480

  11. Impact of reclamation treatment on the biological activity of soils of the solonetz complex in Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, L. V.; Khamova, O. F.; Paderina, E. V.; Gindemit, A. M.

    2014-11-01

    The abundance and activity of the soil microflora were studied in a field experiment with the use of green manure crops to assess the impact of reclamation measures on the biological activity of soils of the solonetz complex. The number of microorganisms in the plow soil horizon increased in the background of the green fallows as compared to the black ones. Coefficients of mineralization, immobilization, and transformation of organic compounds were calculated for different variants of the soil treatment. The value of the mineralization coefficient indicates the intense decomposition of the green manure that entered the soil. In the first year, peas were actively decomposed, while oats, in the second year (aftereffect). The activity of the soil enzymes (invertase, urease, and catalase) was determined. A close relationship between the catalase activity and the intensity of the microbiological processes in the soils was revealed.

  12. Kresoxim methyl dissipation kinetics and its residue effect on soil extra-cellular and intra-cellular enzymatic activity in four different soils of India.

    PubMed

    Sabale, Rupali P; Shabeer T P, Ahammed; Utture, Sagar C; Banerjee, Kaushik; Oulkar, Dasharath P; Adsule, Pandurang G; Deshmukh, Madhukar B

    2015-01-01

    The rate of degradation of kresoxim methyl and its effect on soil extra-cellular (acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and β-glucosidase) and intra-cellular (dehydrogenase) enzymes were explored in four different soils of India. In all the tested soils, the degradation rate was faster at the beginning, which slowed down with time indicating a non-linear pattern of degradation. Rate of degradation in black soil was fastest followed by saline, brown and red soils, respectively and followed 1st or 1st + 1st order kinetics with half-life ranging between 1-6 days for natural soil and 1-19 days for sterile soils. The rate of degradation in natural against sterilized soils suggests that microbial degradation might be the major pathway of residue dissipation. Although small changes in enzyme activities were observed, kresoxim methyl did not have any significant deleterious effect on the enzymatic activity of the various test soils in long run. Simple correlation studies between degradation percentage and individual enzyme activities did not establish any significant relationships. The pattern and change of enzyme activity was primarily due to the effect of the incubation period rather than the effect of kresoxim methyl itself. PMID:25587778

  13. 46 CFR 111.105-21 - Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation. 111.105-21 Section 111.105-21 Shipping... REQUIREMENTS Hazardous Locations § 111.105-21 Ventilation. A ventilation duct which ventilates a hazardous location has the classification of that location. Each fan for ventilation of a hazardous location must...

  14. Biochar amendment to lead-contaminated soil: Effects on fluorescein diacetate hydrolytic activity and phytotoxicity to rice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaofei; Liu, Yunguo; Gu, Yanling; Zeng, Guangming; Hu, Xinjiang; Wang, Xin; Hu, Xi; Guo, Yiming; Zeng, Xiaoxia; Sun, Zhichao

    2015-09-01

    The amendment effects of biochar on total microbial activity was measured by fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolytic activity, and phytotoxicity in Pb(II)-contaminated soils was examined by the application of 4 different biochars to soil, with rice as a test plant. The FDA hydrolytic activities of biochar-amended soils were much higher than that of the control. The survival rate of rice in lead-contaminated biochar-amended soils showed significant improvement over the control, especially for bamboo biochar-amended soil (93.3%). In addition, rice grown in lead-contaminated control sediment displayed lower biomass production than that in biochar-amended soil. The immobilization of Pb(II) and the positive effects of biochar amendment on soil microorganisms may account for these effects. The results suggest that biochar may have an excellent ability to mitigate the toxic effects of Pb(II) on soil microorganisms and rice. PMID:25900615

  15. Field measurement of ventilation rates.

    PubMed

    Persily, A K

    2016-02-01

    Ventilation rates have significant impacts on building energy use and indoor contaminant concentrations, making them key parameters in building performance. Ventilation rates have been measured in buildings for many decades, and there are mature measurement approaches available to researchers and others who need to know actual ventilation rates in buildings. Despite the fact that ventilation rates are critical in interpreting indoor concentration measurements, it is disconcerting how few Indoor Air Quality field studies measure ventilation rates or otherwise characterize the ventilation design of the study building(s). This paper summarizes parameters of interest in characterizing building ventilation, available methods for quantifying these parameters, and challenges in applying these methods to different types of buildings and ventilation systems. These parameters include whole-building air change rates, system outdoor air intake rates, and building infiltration rates. Tracer gas methods are reviewed as well as system airflow rate measurements using, for example, duct traverses. Several field studies of ventilation rates conducted over the past 75 years are described to highlight the approaches employed and the findings obtained. PMID:25689218

  16. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product Specification Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will enhance the accuracy and the resolution of space-based measurements of terrestrial soil moisture and freeze-thaw state. SMAP data products will have a noteworthy impact on multiple relevant and current Earth Science endeavors. These include: Understanding of the processes that link the terrestrial water, the energy and the carbon cycles, Estimations of global water and energy fluxes over the land surfaces, Quantification of the net carbon flux in boreal landscapes Forecast skill of both weather and climate, Predictions and monitoring of natural disasters including floods, landslides and droughts, and Predictions of agricultural productivity. To provide these data, the SMAP mission will deploy a satellite observatory in a near polar, sun synchronous orbit. The observatory will house an L-band radiometer that operates at 1.40 GHz and an L-band radar that operates at 1.26 GHz. The instruments will share a rotating reflector antenna with a 6 meter aperture that scans over a 1000 km swath.

  17. Synergism of active and passive microwave data for estimating bare surface soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Njoku, Eni G.; Wegmueller, Urs

    1993-01-01

    Active and passive microwave sensors were applied effectively to the problem of estimating the surface soil moisture in a variety of environmental conditions. Research to date has shown that both types of sensors are also sensitive to the surface roughness and the vegetation cover. In estimating the soil moisture, the effect of the vegetation and roughness are often corrected either by acquiring multi-configuration (frequency and polarization) data or by adjusting the surface parameters in order to match the model predictions to the measured data. Due to the limitations on multi-configuration spaceborne data and the lack of a priori knowledge of the surface characteristics for parameter adjustments, it was suggested that the synergistic use of the sensors may improve the estimation of the soil moisture over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil and vegetation conditions. To investigate this problem, the backscattering and emission from a bare soil surface using the classical rough surface scattering theory were modeled. The model combines the small perturbation and the Kirchhoff approximations in conjunction with the Peak formulation to cover a wide range of surface roughness parameters with respect to frequency for both active and passive measurements. In this approach, the same analytical method was used to calculate the backscattering and emissivity. Therefore, the active and passive simulations can be combined at various polarizations and frequencies in order to estimate the soil moisture more actively. As a result, it is shown that (1) the emissivity is less dependent on the surface correlation length, (2) the ratio of the backscattering coefficient (HH) over the surface reflectivity (H) is almost independent of the soil moisture for a wide range of surface roughness, and (3) this ratio can be approximated as a linear function of the surface rms height. The results were compared with the data obtained by a multi-frequency radiometer

  18. Sensitivity of Active and Passive Microwave Observations to Soil Moisture during Growing Corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, J.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Liu, P.; De Roo, R. D.; England, A. W.; Nagarajan, K.

    2011-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) in the root zone is a key factor governing water and energy fluxes at the land surface and its accurate knowledge is critical to predictions of weather and near-term climate, nutrient cycles, crop-yield, and ecosystem productivity. Microwave observations, such as those at L-band, are highly sensitive to soil moisture in the upper few centimeters (near-surface). The two satellite-based missions dedicated to soil moisture estimation include, the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) [4] mission. The SMAP mission will include active and passive sensors at L-band to provide global observations of SM, with a repeat coverage of every 2-3 days. These observations can significantly improve root zone soil moisture estimates through data assimilation into land surface models (LSMs). Both the active (radar) and passive (radiometer) microwave sensors measure radiation quantities that are functions of soil dielectric constant and exhibit similar sensitivities to SM. In addition to the SM sensitivity, radar backscatter is highly sensitive to roughness of soil surface and scattering within the vegetation. These effects may produce a much larger dynamic range in backscatter than that produced due to SM changes alone. In this study, we discuss the field observations of active and passive signatures of growing corn at L-band from several seasons during the tenth Microwave, Water and Energy Balance Experiment (MicroWEX-10) conducted in North Central Florida, and to understand the sensitivity of these signatures to soil moisture under dynamic vegetation conditions. The MicroWEXs are a series of season-long field experiments conducted during the growing seasons of sweet corn, cotton, and energy cane over the past six years (for example, [22]). The corn was planted on July 5 and harvested on September 23, 2011 during MicroWEX-10. The size of the field was 0.04 km2 and the soils

  19. An Active Region Model for Capturing Fractal Flow Patterns inUnsaturated Soils: Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hui-Hai; Zhang, R.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-06-11

    Preferential flow commonly observed in unsaturated soils allows rapid movement of solute from the soil surface or vadose zone to the groundwater, bypassing a significant volume of unsaturated soil and increasing the risk of groundwater contamination. A variety of evidence indicates that complex preferential patterns observed from fields are fractals. In this study, we developed a relatively simple active region model to incorporate the fractal flow pattern into the continuum approach. In the model, the flow domain is divided into active and inactive regions. Flow occurs preferentially in the active region (characterized by fractals), and inactive region is simply bypassed. A new constitutive relationship (the portion of the active region as a function of saturation) was derived. The validity of the proposed model is demonstrated by the consistency between field observations and the new constitutive relationship.

  20. Neutron Activation Analysis of Soil Samples from Different Parts of Edirne in Turkey*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaim, N.; Dogan, C.; Camtakan, Z.

    2016-05-01

    The concentrations of constituent elements were determined in soil samples collected from different parts of the Maritza Basin, Edirne, Turkey. Neutron activation analysis, an extremely accurate technique, and the comparator method (using a standard) were applied for the first time in this region. After preparing the soil samples for neutron activation analysis, they were activated with thermal neutrons in a nuclear reactor, TRIGA-MARK II, at Istanbul Technical University. The activated samples were analyzed using a high-efficiency high-purity germanium detector, and gamma spectrometry was employed to determine the elemental concentration in the samples. Eight elements (chromium, manganese, cobalt, zinc, arsenic, molybdenum, cadmium, and barium) were qualitatively and quantitatively identified in 36 samples. The concentrations of some elements in the soil samples were high compared with values reported in the literature.

  1. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system must have: (a) A control to stop the ventilation that is: (1) Outside the space ventilated; and (2)...

  2. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system must have: (a) A control to stop the ventilation that is: (1) Outside the space ventilated; and (2)...

  3. 46 CFR 111.103-1 - Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power ventilation systems except machinery space... Power ventilation systems except machinery space ventilation systems. Each power ventilation system must have: (a) A control to stop the ventilation that is: (1) Outside the space ventilated; and (2)...

  4. Microbial activity in Alaskan taiga soils contaminated by crude oil in 1976

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, E.M.; Lindstrom, J.E.; Brown, E.J.; Raddock, J.F. |

    1995-12-31

    Biodegradation, often measured via microbial activity, includes destruction of environmental pollutants by living microorganisms and is dependent upon many physical and chemical factors. Effects of mineral nutrients and organic matter on biodegradation of Prudhoe Bay crude oil were investigated at a nineteen-year-old oil spill site in Alaskan taiga. Microcosms of two different soil types from the spill site; one undeveloped soil with forest litter and detritus (O horizon) and one more developed with lower organic content (A horizon), were treated with various nitrogen and phosphorus amendments, and incubated for up to six weeks. Each microcosm was sampled periodically and assayed for hydrocarbon mineralization potential using radiorespirometry, for total carbon dioxide respired using gas chromatography, and for numbers of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and heterotrophic bacteria using most probable number counting techniques. Organic matter in the O horizon soil along with combinations of mineral nutrients were found to stimulate microbial activity. No combination of mineral nutrient additions to the A horizon soil stimulated any of the parameters above those measured in control microcosms. The results of this study indicate that adding mineral nutrients and tilling the O horizon into the A horizon of subarctic soils contaminated with crude oil, would stimulate microbial activity, and therefore the biodegradation potential, ultimately increasing the rate of destruction of crude oil in these soils.

  5. The effect of compost on carbon cycling and the active soil microbiota

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Esther; Woyke, Tanja; Ryals, Rebecca; Silver, Whendee

    2014-09-02

    Rangelands cover an estimated 40-70percent of global landmass, approximately one-third of the landmass of the United States and half of California. The soils of this vast land area has high carbon (C) storage capacity, which makes it an important target ecosystem for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emission and effects on climate change, in particular under land management techniques that favor increased C sequestration rates. While microbial communities are key players in the processes responsible for C storage and loss in soils, we have barely shed light on these highly complex processes in part due to the tremendous and seemingly intractable diversity of microbes, largely uncultured, that inhabit soil ecosystems. In our study, we compare Mediterranean grassland soil plots that were amended with greenwaste compost in a single event 6 years ago. Subsampling of control and amended plots was performed in depth increments of 0-10 cm. We present data on greenhouse gas emissions and budgets of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and micronutrients in dependence of compost amendment. Changes in the active members of the soil microbial community were assessed using a novel approach combining flow cytometry and 16S tag sequencing disclosing who is active. This is the first study revealing the nature of actively metabolizing microbial community members linked to the geochemical characteristics of compost-amended soil.

  6. [Environmental activity of earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris L.) and the spatial organization of soil communities].

    PubMed

    Tiunov, A V; Kuznetsova, N A

    2000-01-01

    The effect of feeding and burrowing activities of anecic earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) on abiotic characteristics of the soil, biomass and activity of soil microorganisms, and the spatial distribution of Collembola and Lumbricidae species was studied in a Iinden forest near Moscow. The results showed that organic carbon content, nitrogen content, pH, and microbial biomass and basal respiration are considerably higher around L. terrestris burrows than in the surrounding soil. The total density of springtails near the burrows was 1.6-1.7 as high as at the control sites. The most pronounced preference for earthworm burrows was observed in the species dominating in the soils of undisturbed deciduous forests (Isotomiella minor and Isotoma notabilis). The number and biomass of epigeic and endogeic earthworms also increased significantly in the zone of L. terrestris burrows. However, some springtail (Isotoma viridis, Protaphorura cf. nemorata, Lepidocyrtus lignorum) and earthworm species (Aporrectodea rosea) did not accumulate near L. terrestris burrows and even avoided them. Thus, L. terrestris activities create a mosaic of soil microhabitats, which provides for the coexistence of different microcommunities of soil organisms. PMID:11042967

  7. Effect of land use on microbial biomass and enzyme activities in tropical soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharjan, Menuka; Sanaullah, Muhammad; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-04-01

    Land use change especially from forest to intensive agriculture for sustaining livelihood causing severe consequence on soil quality. Soil microbial biomass and enzyme activities are very sensitive to change in environment. The objective was to assess effects of three land uses i.e. forest, organic and conventional farming on microbial biomass C and N and enzymes involved in C-cycle (β-glucosidase), N-cycle (leucine-aminopeptidase), P-cycle (Phosphatase) and S-cycle (Sulphatase) at different depth (0-100 cm with 10 cm in interval) of soil in Chitwan, Nepal. The result showed that both carbon and nitrogen content (%) was significantly higher in organic farming than conventional farming and forest. However, the trend decreased in lower depth. Significantly high microbial biomass C and N (μg C and N g-1 soil) were found in organic farming than conventional farming and forest at 0-10 cm but the trend was inconsistent in lower depth. β-glucosidase, leucine-aminopeptidase and sulphatase (nmol g-1 soil) activities were higher in organic and conventional farming compared to forest at 0-20 cm. Phosphatase activity was higher in conventional farming than forest and organic farming at 0-20cm. The activities were inconsistent below 20 cm. Application of farmyard manure and organic matter from the vegetation contributes the higher microbial biomass and enzyme activities in organic farming.

  8. Above- and below-ground methane fluxes and methanotrophic activity in a landfill-cover soil.

    PubMed

    Schroth, M H; Eugster, W; Gómez, K E; Gonzalez-Gil, G; Niklaus, P A; Oester, P

    2012-05-01

    Landfills are a major anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH(4)). However, much of the CH(4) produced during the anaerobic degradation of organic waste is consumed by methanotrophic microorganisms during passage through the landfill-cover soil. On a section of a closed landfill near Liestal, Switzerland, we performed experiments to compare CH(4) fluxes obtained by different methods at or above the cover-soil surface with below-ground fluxes, and to link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH(4) ingress (loading) from the waste body at selected locations. Fluxes of CH(4) into or out of the cover soil were quantified by eddy-covariance and static flux-chamber measurements. In addition, CH(4) concentrations at the soil surface were monitored using a field-portable FID detector. Near-surface CH(4) fluxes and CH(4) loading were estimated from soil-gas concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements, and gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) were performed to quantify rates of microbial CH(4) oxidation. Eddy-covariance measurements yielded by far the largest and probably most representative estimates of overall CH(4) emissions from the test section (daily mean up to ∼91,500μmolm(-2)d(-1)), whereas flux-chamber measurements and CH(4) concentration profiles indicated that at the majority of locations the cover soil was a net sink for atmospheric CH(4) (uptake up to -380μmolm(-2)d(-1)) during the experimental period. Methane concentration profiles also indicated strong variability in CH(4) loading over short distances in the cover soil, while potential methanotrophic activity derived from GPPTs was high (v(max)∼13mmolL(-1)(soil air)h(-1)) at a location with substantial CH(4) loading. Our results provide a basis to assess spatial and temporal variability of CH(4) dynamics in the complex terrain of a landfill-cover soil. PMID:22143049

  9. Long-term Observation of Soil Creep Activity around a Landslide Scar

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rate of sediment infilling into landslide scars by soil creep is needed to estimate the timing of subsequent landslide activity at a particular site. However, knowledge about the spatial distribution of its activity around the landslide scar is scarce. Additionally, there are few...

  10. Methanotrophic activity and bacterial diversity in volcanic-geothermal soils at Pantelleria island (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, A. L.; D'Alessandro, W.; Tagliavia, M.; Parello, F.; Quatrini, P.

    2014-04-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems emit endogenous gases by widespread degassing from soils, including CH4, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times as potent as CO2. Recently, it has been demonstrated that volcanic/geothermal soils are source of methane, but also sites of methanotrophic activity. Methanotrophs are able to consume 10-40 Tg of CH4 a-1 and to trap more than 50% of the methane degassing through the soils. We report on methane microbial oxidation in the geothermally most active site of Pantelleria island (Italy), Favara Grande, whose total methane emission was previously estimated in about 2.5 t a-1. Laboratory incubation experiments with three top-soil samples from Favara Grande indicated methane consumption values up to 950 ng g-1 dry soil h-1. One of the three sites, FAV2, where the highest oxidation rate was detected, was further analysed on a vertical soil profile and the maximum methane consumption was measured in the top-soil layer but values > 100 ng g-1 h-1 were maintained up to a depth of 15 cm. The highest consumption rate was measured at 37 °C, but a still recognizable consumption at 80 °C (> 20 ng g-1 h-1) was recorded. In order to estimate the bacterial diversity, total soil DNA was extracted from Favara Grande and analysed using a Temporal Temperature Gradient gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) analysis of the amplified bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The three soil samples were probed by PCR using standard proteobacterial primers and newly designed verrucomicrobial primers targeting the unique methane monooxygenase gene pmoA; the presence of methanotrophs was detected in sites FAV2 and FAV3, but not in FAV1, where harsher chemical-physical conditions and negligible methane oxidation were detected. The pmoA gene libraries from the most active site FAV2 pointed out a high diversity of gammaproteobacterial methanotrophs distantly related to Methylococcus/Methylothermus genera and the presence of the newly discovered acido-thermophilic methanotrophs

  11. Ventilation best practices guide

    SciTech Connect

    Dorgan, C.B.; Dorgan, C.E.

    1996-07-01

    The intent of this Guide is to provide utility marketing and engineering personnel with information on how to identify indoor air quality (IAQ) problems, the current standards relating to IAQ and examples of what typically causes IAQ problems in commercial buildings. The Guide is written assuming that the reader has limited knowledge of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems and that they are new to the IAQ arena. Also included in the Guide is a discussion of new electric technologies which are energy efficient and maintain a high level of IAQ.

  12. Laboratory and Industrial Ventilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This handbook supplements the Facilities Engineering Handbook (NHB 7320.1) and provides additional policies and criteria for uniform application to ventilation systems. It expands basic requirements, provides additional design and construction guidance, and places emphasis on those design considerations which will provide for greater effectiveness in the use of these systems. The provisions of this handbook are applicable to all NASA field installations and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Since supply of this handbook is limited, abstracts of the portion or portions applicable to a given requirement will be made for the individual specific needs encountered rather than supplying copies of the handbook as has been past practice.

  13. Effect of citrate on Aspergillus niger phytase adsorption and catalytic activity in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezeli, Malika; Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Zhang, Hao; Giles, Courtney; George, Timothy; Shand, Charlie; Lumsdon, David; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Stutter, Marc; Blackwell, Martin; Darch, Tegan; Wearing, Catherine; Haygarth, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Current developments in cropping systems that promote mobilisation of phytate in agricultural soils, by exploiting plant-root exudation of phytase and organic acids, offer potential for developments in sustainable phosphorus use. However, phytase adsorption to soil particles and phytate complexion has been shown to inhibit phytate dephosphorylation, thereby inhibiting plant P uptake, increasing the risk of this pool contributing to diffuse pollution and reducing the potential benefits of biotechnologies and management strategies aimed to utilise this abundant reserve of 'legacy' phosphorus. Citrate has been seen to increase phytase catalytic efficiency towards complexed forms of phytate, but the mechanisms by which citrate promotes phytase remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated phytase (from Aspergillus niger) inactivation, and change in catalytic properties upon addition to soil and the effect citrate had on adsorption of phytase and hydrolysis towards free, precipitated and adsorbed phytate. A Langmuir model was fitted to phytase adsorption isotherms showing a maximum adsorption of 0.23 nKat g-1 (19 mg protein g-1) and affinity constant of 435 nKat gˉ1 (8.5 mg protein g-1 ), demonstrating that phytase from A.niger showed a relatively low affinity for our test soil (Tayport). Phytases were partially inhibited upon adsorption and the specific activity was of 40.44 nKat mgˉ1 protein for the free enzyme and 25.35 nKat mgˉ1 protein when immobilised. The kinetics of adsorption detailed that most of the adsorption occurred within the first 20 min upon addition to soil. Citrate had no effect on the rate or total amount of phytase adsorption or loss of activity, within the studied citrate concentrations (0-4mM). Free phytases in soil solution and phytase immobilised on soil particles showed optimum activity (>80%) at pH 4.5-5.5. Immobilised phytase showed greater loss of activity at pH levels over 5.5 and lower activities at the secondary peak at pH 2

  14. Vertical patterns of ecoenzyme activities in forest soils after 20 years of simulated nitrogen deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forstner, Stefan J.; Kloss, Stefanie; Keiblinger, Katharina M.; Schleppi, Patrick; Hagedorn, Frank; Gundersen, Per; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gerzabek, Martin H.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    The below-ground part of terrestrial carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycles are controlled by soil microorganisms. In order to meet their energy and nutrient requirements, soil microbes produce enzymes which catalyze the release of smaller molecules from decomposing organic matter. Recent work has shown that the potential activities of commonly measured enzymes for C-, N-, and P-acquisition can be related to microbial demand of these elements and link stoichiometry of soil microbes and their resources. Regulation of enzyme production might therefore be an important mechanism for microbes to adapt to different resource regimes. To investigate links between ecoenzyme activities, soil depth and N availability we make use of two long-term experiments where N has been added to two temperate forest stands for over 20 years. At both sites Norway spruce is the dominating tree whereas other site characteristics like soil type, climate, parent material and morphology differ. Increased N deposition was simulated by regularly applying NH4NO3 in the range of 35 kg N ha-1 y-1 (Klosterhede, Denmark; since 1992) and 25 kg N ha-1 y-1 (Alptal, Switzerland; since 1995), respectively. We hypothesize that ecoenzyme activities will decline exponentially with depth reflecting well-established similar trends in organic matter and microbial biomass. However, when normalized to microbial biomass we further hypothesize that activities will not change or even increase down the soil profile. Concerning microbial nutrient limitation, we expect to see a shift from N- to C-limitation with depth which should be reflected in increasing ratios of C- to N-acquiring enzymes. Preliminary results suggest that activity of hydrolytic enzymes generally decreases with depth, although this drop in activity is not so pronounced when normalized to microbial biomass. Oxidative enzymes, on the other hand, do not follow this pattern, often showing increased activities with depth. We further see site

  15. Towards a Soil Moisture Climate Record from Active and Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipal, K.; de Jeu, R.; Dorigo, W.; Su, B.

    2009-04-01

    The latest IPCC assessment report identified soil moisture as an emerging essential climate variable and stressed the need to fosters activities to "assemble, quality check reprocess, and re-analyse" respective datasets "relevant to decadal prediction" Satellite remote sensing can be a powerful data source to fulfil those needs. Unfortunately, methodological problems, lack of validation and limitations in computing have frequently delayed the research process to retrieve soil moisture from space observations. But research in these fields evolved, resulting in several global soil moisture datasets. Today validated global soil moisture data sets are publicly available from active (ERS-1/2, METOP) and passive (SMMR, SSM/I, TMI, AMSR-E) microwave remote sensing instruments. These data sets reach back for more than 30 years. In addition, in the near future dedicated soil moisture sensors such as the SMOS mission will provide experimental soil moisture products in an unprecedented quality. The available data sets are based on different sensors and retrieval concepts. It is now the time to harmonize these different sets to create one long term consistent global soil moisture dataset. Within the ESA project WACMOS (Water Cycle Multi-mission Observation Strategy) respective activities are reinforced. More specifically the objective of the WACMOS soil moisture observatory is to establish a solid scientific basis for the development of long-term coherent soil moisture products. To this end we exploit the triple collocation error estimation technique to assess the error and systematic biases between the different data sets and use a cumulative distribution function matching approach to harmonise the observations. The proposed methodology has the advantage that it can easily be adapted to a new observation record such as observations of the SMOS mission. In this paper we will present first results based on data records from the ERS-1/2 and the AMSR-E missions. We will discuss