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Sample records for active solute transport

  1. Chill activation of compatible solute transporters in Corynebacterium glutamicum at the level of transport activity.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Nuran; Krämer, Reinhard; Morbach, Susanne

    2005-07-01

    The gram-positive soil bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum harbors four osmoregulated secondary uptake systems for compatible solutes, BetP, EctP, LcoP, and ProP. When reconstituted in proteoliposomes, BetP was shown to sense hyperosmotic conditions via the increase in luminal K(+) and to respond by instant activation. To study further putative ways of stimulus perception and signal transduction, we have investigated the responses of EctP, LcoP, and BetP, all belonging to the betaine-carnitine-choline transporter family, to chill stress at the level of activity. When fully activated by hyperosmotic stress, they showed the expected increase of activity at increasing temperature. In the absence of osmotic stress, EctP was not activated by chill and LcoP to only a very low extent, whereas BetP was significantly stimulated at low temperature. BetP was maximally activated at 10 degrees C, reaching the same transport rate as that observed under hyperosmotic conditions at this temperature. A role of cytoplasmic K(+) in chill-dependent activation of BetP was ruled out, since (i) the cytoplasmic K(+) concentration did not change significantly at lower temperatures and (ii) a mutant BetP lacking the C-terminal 25 amino acids, which was previously shown to have lost the ability to be activated by luminal K(+), was fully competent in chill sensing. When heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, BetP did not respond to chill stress. This may indicate that the membrane in which BetP is inserted plays an important role in chill activation and thus in signal transduction by BetP, different from the previously established K(+)-mediated process.

  2. A Mathematical Model of Solute Coupled Water Transport in Toad Intestine Incorporating Recirculation of the Actively Transported Solute

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of an absorbing leaky epithelium is developed for analysis of solute coupled water transport. The non-charged driving solute diffuses into cells and is pumped from cells into the lateral intercellular space (lis). All membranes contain water channels with the solute passing those of tight junction and interspace basement membrane by convection-diffusion. With solute permeability of paracellular pathway large relative to paracellular water flow, the paracellular flux ratio of the solute (influx/outflux) is small (2–4) in agreement with experiments. The virtual solute concentration of fluid emerging from lis is then significantly larger than the concentration in lis. Thus, in absence of external driving forces the model generates isotonic transport provided a component of the solute flux emerging downstream lis is taken up by cells through the serosal membrane and pumped back into lis, i.e., the solute would have to be recirculated. With input variables from toad intestine (Nedergaard, S., E.H. Larsen, and H.H. Ussing, J. Membr. Biol. 168:241–251), computations predict that 60–80% of the pumped flux stems from serosal bath in agreement with the experimental estimate of the recirculation flux. Robust solutions are obtained with realistic concentrations and pressures of lis, and with the following features. Rate of fluid absorption is governed by the solute permeability of mucosal membrane. Maximum fluid flow is governed by density of pumps on lis-membranes. Energetic efficiency increases with hydraulic conductance of the pathway carrying water from mucosal solution into lis. Uphill water transport is accomplished, but with high hydraulic conductance of cell membranes strength of transport is obscured by water flow through cells. Anomalous solvent drag occurs when back flux of water through cells exceeds inward water flux between cells. Molecules moving along the paracellular pathway are driven by a translateral flow of water, i.e., the model

  3. Modeling preferential water flow and solute transport in unsaturated soil using the active region model

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, F.; Wang, K.; Zhang, R.; Liu, H.H.

    2009-03-15

    Preferential flow and solute transport are common processes in the unsaturated soil, in which distributions of soil water content and solute concentrations are often characterized as fractal patterns. An active region model (ARM) was recently proposed to describe the preferential flow and transport patterns. In this study, ARM governing equations were derived to model the preferential soil water flow and solute transport processes. To evaluate the ARM equations, dye infiltration experiments were conducted, in which distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration were measured. Predicted results using the ARM and the mobile-immobile region model (MIM) were compared with the measured distributions of soil water content and Cl{sup -} concentration. Although both the ARM and the MIM are two-region models, they are fundamental different in terms of treatments of the flow region. The models were evaluated based on the modeling efficiency (ME). The MIM provided relatively poor prediction results of the preferential flow and transport with negative ME values or positive ME values less than 0.4. On the contrary, predicted distributions of soil water content and Cl- concentration using the ARM agreed reasonably well with the experimental data with ME values higher than 0.8. The results indicated that the ARM successfully captured the macroscopic behavior of preferential flow and solute transport in the unsaturated soil.

  4. Solute transport in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dougherty, David E.

    Continued research interest in transport in the subsurface was demonstrated at the “Solute Transport in Groundwater” session held at the 1985 AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore. This session, following on the heels of the very successful special symposium on “Coupling Geochemical and Hydrologic Models for Subsurface Solute Transport,” was organized by Lenny Konikow of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS, Reston, Va.) and copresided by Steve Gorelick (USGS, Menlo Park, Calif.) and David Dougherty (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.). Participation was strong, with 12 contributed papers and about 150 attendees. The papers addressed a wide variety of topics, ranging from the theoretical to the applied, from physics to numerical methods.

  5. Peritoneal transport with icodextrin solution.

    PubMed

    Heimbürger, Olof

    2006-01-01

    Icodextrin is the only large molecular weight osmotic agent available in peritoneal dialysis solutions. Icodextrin (compared to glucose) has a prolonged positive ultrafiltration because of the slow absortion of icodextrin due to its large molecular weight. As icodextrin induces transcapillary ultrafiltration by a mechanism resembling 'colloid' osmosis (with the ultrafiltration occurring mainly through the small pores) almost no sieving of solutes is observed with icodextrin-based solution resulting in increased convective transport and clearance of small solutes. In general, the transport characteristics of the peritoneal membrane are similar with glucose- and icodextrin-based solution, but results from the EAPOS study suggests that use of icodextrin-based solution may be associated with less changes in peritoneal transport with time.

  6. Performance Analysis of Solution Transportation Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Behdad; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Thermally activated advanced absorption cycles are considered promising candidates to replace CFCs, HCFCs and HFCs for residential and commercial applications. In such absorption systems, it is desirable to utilize the waste heat from industries for heating and cooling applications in commercial and residential sectors. For this purpose, it is necessary to transport energy over some distance because the waste heat source and demand are generally located apart from each other. Transportation of steam, hot water or chilled water requires high construction costs for insulation. There is an efficient method of energy transportation using absorption system called “ Solution Transportation Absorption System (STA)”. The solution is transported at an ambient temperature so that tube-insulations not required. This paper shows the simulation of the abovementioned system and the optimal result, using mathematical optimization. The optimum system with industry‧s waste heat utilization is obtained. At the end, the effect on the pollution emission and energy conservation is obtained.

  7. Transport solutions for cleaner air.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Frank J; Zhu, Tong

    2016-05-20

    In cities across the globe, road transport remains an important source of air pollutants that are linked with acute and chronic health effects. Decreasing vehicle emissions--while maintaining or increasing commuter journeys--remains a major challenge for city administrators. In London, congestion-charging and a citywide low-emission zone failed to bring nitrogen dioxide concentrations under control. In Beijing, controls on the purchase and use of cars have not decreased transport emissions to a sufficient extent. As cities continue to grow, not even zero-emission vehicles are the solution. Moving increasingly large numbers of people efficiently around a city can only be achieved by expanding mass transit systems. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Reexamining ultrafiltration and solute transport in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuzil, C. E.; Person, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Geologic ultrafiltration—slowing of solutes with respect to flowing groundwater—poses a conundrum: it is consistently observed experimentally in clay-rich lithologies, but has been difficult to identify in subsurface data. Resolving this could be important for clarifying clay and shale transport properties at large scales as well as interpreting solute and isotope patterns for applications ranging from nuclear waste repository siting to understanding fluid transport in tectonically active environments. Simulations of one-dimensional NaCl transport across ultrafiltering clay membrane strata constrained by emerging data on geologic membrane properties showed different ultrafiltration effects than have often been envisioned. In relatively high-permeability advection-dominated regimes, salinity increases occurred mostly within membrane units while their effluent salinity initially fell and then rose to match solute delivery. In relatively low-permeability diffusion-dominated regimes, salinity peaked at the membrane upstream boundary and effluent salinity remained low. In both scenarios, however, only modest salinity changes (up to ˜3 g L-1) occurred because of self-limiting tendencies; membrane efficiency declines as salinity rises, and although sediment compaction increases efficiency, it is also decreases permeability and allows diffusive transport to dominate. It appears difficult for ultrafiltration to generate brines as speculated, but widespread and less extreme ultrafiltration effects in the subsurface could be unrecognized. Conditions needed for ultrafiltration are present in settings that include topographically-driven flow systems, confined aquifer systems subjected to injection or withdrawal, compacting basins, and accretionary complexes.

  9. Solute Transport in Unsaturated Sphagnum Mosses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, J. S.; Faux, E. A.

    2009-05-01

    Natural Sphagnum cushions develop an upwardly increasing concentration of dissolved solutes during periods of sustained upward capillary flow of solutes, and become enriched by evaporative loss of water. The transport process is poorly documented as a consequence of poor parameterization of unsaturated flow parameters, and the lack of transport parameters such as dispersivity and solute retardation coefficients for flow in unsaturated mosses. Sphagnum mosses contain hyaline cells and dead-end pores that can store but not transmit water and solute. Since these spaces do not drain at moderate (negative) pressures (ψ), the ratio of fluid actively flowing in films in the unsaturated moss to that which is stored decreases as the moss drains. Solutes can pass by diffusion from the film of flowing water into these closed spaces resulting in increased dispersion of the flowing solute, and retardation of even conservative solutes like chloride. These processes were demonstrated in unsaturated Sphagnum mosses using a step input solute (NaCl) source from a constant head device for undecomposed near-surface moss (~5 cm depth), and slightly more decomposed deeper moss (~25 cm depth). Smaller water retention in the undecomposed upper moss sample resulted in lower unsaturated hydraulic conductivity thus lower flow rates. When the sample was initially drained (ψ = ~ 4 cm of water) it was determined that the solute breakthrough expressed as relative concentration (C/C0 = 0.5) occurred at a cumulative discharge of 91.5 ml and at 5.8 minutes in the upper moss, compared to 233.2 ml after 2.8 minutes in the lower (more decomposed) sample. In a drier state (ψ = ~ 16 cm of water), C/C0 = 0.5 was reached after 67.9 ml of discharge at 37.9 minutes in the upper moss compared to 109.2 ml and at 22.4 minutes in the lower sample. Thus less solute flow is required for breakthrough in less decomposed mosses, and in mosses that are relatively dry. Dispersivity was determined on the basis of

  10. Beta-adrenergic activation of solute coupled water uptake by toad skin epithelium results in near-isosmotic transport.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Robert; Larsen, Erik Hviid

    2007-09-01

    Transepithelial potential (V(T)), conductance (G(T)), and water flow (J(V)) were measured simultaneously with good time resolution (min) in isolated toad (Bufo bufo) skin epithelium with Ringer on both sides. Inside application of 5 microM isoproterenol resulted in the fast increase in G(T) from 1.2+/-0.3 to 2.4+/-0.4 mS x cm(-2) and slower increases in equivalent short circuit current, I(SC)(Eqv) = -G(T) x V(T), from 12.7+/-3.2 to 33.1+/-6.8 microA cm(-2), and J(V) from 0.72+/-0.17 to 3.01+/-0.49 nL cm(-2) s(-1). Amiloride in the outside solution abolished I(SC)(Eqv) (-1.6+/-0.1 microA cm(-2)) while J(V) decreased to 0.50+/-0.15 nL cm(-2) x s(-1), which is significantly different from zero. Isoproterenol decreased the osmotic concentration of the transported fluid, C(osm) approximately 2 x I(SC)(Eqv)/J(V), from 351+/-72 to 227+/-28 mOsm (Ringer's solution: 252.8 mOsm). J(V) depicted a saturating function of [Na+]out in agreement with Na+ self-inhibition of ENaC. Ouabain on the inside decreased I(SC)(Eqv) from 60+/-10 to 6.1+/-1.7 microA cm(-2), and J(V) from 3.34+/-0.47 to 1.40+/-0.24 nL cm(-2) x s(-1). Short-circuited preparations exhibited a linear relationship between short-circuit current and J(V) with a [Na+] of the transported fluid of 130+/-24 mM ([Na+]Ringer's solution = 117.4 mM). Addition of bumetanide to the inside solution reduced J(V). Water was transported uphill and J(V) reversed at an excess outside osmotic concentration, deltaC(S,rev) = 28.9+/-3.9 mOsm, amiloride decreased deltaC(S,rev) to 7.5+/-1.5 mOsm. It is concluded that water uptake is accomplished by osmotic coupling in the lateral intercellular space (lis), and hypothesized that a small fraction of the Na+ flux pumped into lis is recirculated via basolateral NKCC transporters.

  11. Prediction of solute transport during peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hirszel, P; Lasrich, M; Maher, J M; Maher, J F

    1979-08-01

    Solute transport, predominantly diffusion, across the peritoneum correlates inversely with molecular weight. Provided that the solute is water soluble, not protein bound, not of unusual density, not ionized, does not have a large hydration shell, and is transported from plasma to dialysate, the peritoneal clearance is predictable over the molecular weight range from 60 to 11,000 daltons. Transport reates that deviate from the predicted can be explained by known physical properties of particular solutes.

  12. Osmosis with active solutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Thomas W.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2014-05-01

    Despite much current interest in active matter, little is known about osmosis in active systems. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate how active solutes perturb osmotic steady states. We find that solute activity increases the osmotic pressure, and can also expel solvent from the solution —i.e. cause reverse osmosis. The latter effect cannot be described by an effective temperature, but can be reproduced by mapping the active solution onto a passive one with the same degree of local structuring as the passive solvent component. Our results provide a basic framework for understanding active osmosis, and suggest that activity-induced structuring of the passive component may play a key role in the physics of active-passive mixtures.

  13. Active Solute Transport across Frog Skin and Epithelial Cell Systems According to the Association-Induction Hypothesis,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    indicated in insect Malpighian tubules, insect midgut , choroid plexus and gastric mucosa. 9.2.5 Conciliation of the Conflict Between Models of "Homocellular...SeApeinaebility is therefore under close I Ling (P;. 14) control by hormones or drugs that react with receptor sites on these protelns and so...bears remembering that in active transport across bifacial cells the key cation is not always No% Thus in MalPighian tubules of insects the key Lon

  14. Solute transport by a volatile solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Glenn O.; McWhorter, David B.

    1990-05-01

    In relatively dry porous media, water is transported as both liquid and vapor. Exact knowledge of this two-phase transport, and the phase transfer of water associated with it, is required for the prediction of solute transport. Combined liquid and vapor transport is examined starting from basic principles. An analytic solution is presented for the case of isothermal, transient, one-dimensional sorption of water with constant liquid content boundaries. A relation is also obtained for the evaporation and condensation within the flow field. A numerical solution for the solute transport is obtained which takes maximum advantage of the analytical flow solution. Using the properties of Lurgi retorted oil shale, several special cases are examined which show the relative importance of the separate phases in the total transport of water, the effects on the phase transfer, and the solute transport. It is expected that these methods and results can be applied to other problems in multiple phase transport, such as hazardous waste disposal and pesticide transport.

  15. Electrofuels: Versatile Transportation Energy Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    Electrofuels Project: ARPA-E’s Electrofuels Project is using microorganisms to create liquid transportation fuels in a new and different way that could be up to 10 times more energy efficient than current biofuel production methods. ARPA-E is the only U.S. government agency currently funding research on Electrofuels.

  16. The effect of surface-active solutes on water flow and contaminant transport in variably saturated porous media with capillary fringe effects.

    PubMed

    Henry, E J; Smith, J E

    2002-06-01

    storage capacity of the vadose zone, the dye breakthrough time to the water table was more than twice as fast when the contaminant solution contained surfactant. The extensive propagation of the drying front and the effect of vadose zone drainage on contaminant breakthrough time suggest the importance of considering surface tension effects on unsaturated flow and transport in systems containing surface-active organic contaminants or systems, where surfactants are used for remediation of the vadose zone or unconfined aquifers.

  17. Paradoxes in peritoneal transport of small solutes.

    PubMed

    Waniewski, J; Heimbürger, O; Werynski, A; Lindholm, B

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of kinetic studies of peritoneal solute transport involves the need for discrimination between three transport components: diffusion, convective transport, and peritoneal absorption. The description of convective transport in standard clinical conditions of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), as well as in isochratic measurements, has met some problems related to the paradoxical and often anomalous values of sieving coefficient, a parameter that characterizes solute drag with the flow of ultrafiltrate. A possible explanation of some of these results is the time dependence of the transport parameters, which is in contrast to their assumed steadiness. These anomalies as well as the time dependence of the transport parameters are confined more to the standard glucose-based dialysis fluid than to some alternative dialysis fluids. Furthermore, the most striking anomalies have been found for small electrolytes as well as for osmotic agents, which are applied in high, unphysiological concentrations. These solutes may be involved in the transport between intracellular and extracellular compartments within the peritoneal membrane, which phenomena are not included in the current modeling.

  18. Harnessing Solute Carrier Transporters for Precision Oncology.

    PubMed

    Nyquist, Michael D; Prasad, Bhagwat; Mostaghel, Elahe A

    2017-03-28

    Solute Carrier (SLC) transporters are a large superfamily of transmembrane carriers involved in the regulated transport of metabolites, nutrients, ions and drugs across cellular membranes. A subset of these solute carriers play a significant role in the cellular uptake of many cancer therapeutics, ranging from chemotherapeutics such as antimetabolites, topoisomerase inhibitors, platinum-based drugs and taxanes to targeted therapies such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors. SLC transporters are co-expressed in groups and patterns across normal tissues, suggesting they may comprise a coordinated regulatory circuit serving to mediate normal tissue functions. In cancer however, there are dramatic changes in expression patterns of SLC transporters. This frequently serves to feed the increased metabolic demands of the tumor cell for amino acids, nucleotides and other metabolites, but also presents a therapeutic opportunity, as increased transporter expression may serve to increase intracellular concentrations of substrate drugs. In this review, we examine the regulation of drug transporters in cancer and how this impacts therapy response, and discuss novel approaches to targeting therapies to specific cancers via tumor-specific aberrations in transporter expression. We propose that among the oncogenic changes in SLC transporter expression there exist emergent vulnerabilities that can be exploited therapeutically, extending the application of precision medicine from tumor-specific drug targets to tumor-specific determinants of drug uptake.

  19. Analytical Solution for Reactive Solute Transport Considering Incomplete Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellin, A.; Chiogna, G.

    2013-12-01

    The laboratory experiments of Gramling et al. (2002) showed that incomplete mixing at the pore scale exerts a significant impact on transport of reactive solutes and that assuming complete mixing leads to overestimation of product concentration in bimolecular reactions. We consider here the family of equilibrium reactions for which the concentration of the reactants and the product can be expressed as a function of the mixing ratio, the concentration of a fictitious non reactive solute. For this type of reactions we propose, in agreement with previous studies, to model the effect of incomplete mixing at scales smaller than the Darcy scale assuming that the mixing ratio is distributed within an REV according to a Beta distribution. We compute the parameters of the Beta model by imposing that the mean concentration is equal to the value that the concentration assumes at the continuum Darcy scale, while the variance decays with time as a power law. We show that our model reproduces the concentration profiles of the reaction product measured in the Gramling et al. (2002) experiments using the transport parameters obtained from conservative experiments and an instantaneous reaction kinetic. The results are obtained applying analytical solutions both for conservative and for reactive solute transport, thereby providing a method to handle the effect of incomplete mixing on multispecies reactive solute transport, which is simpler than other previously developed methods. Gramling, C. M., C. F. Harvey, and L. C. Meigs (2002), Reactive transport in porous media: A comparison of model prediction with laboratory visualization, Environ. Sci. Technol., 36(11), 2508-2514.

  20. Multilevel transport solution of LWR reactor cores

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Ignacio Marquez Damian; Cassiano R.E. de Oliveira; HyeonKae Park

    2008-09-01

    This work presents a multilevel approach for the solution of the transport equation in typical LWR assemblies and core configurations. It is based on the second-order, even-parity formulation of the transport equation, which is solved within the framework provided by the finite element-spherical harmonics code EVENT. The performance of the new solver has been compared with that of the standard conjugate gradient solver for diffusion and transport problems on structured and unstruc-tured grids. Numerical results demonstrate the potential of the multilevel scheme for realistic reactor calculations.

  1. The solute carrier 6 family of transporters

    PubMed Central

    Bröer, Stefan; Gether, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    The solute carrier 6 (SLC6) family of the human genome comprises transporters for neurotransmitters, amino acids, osmolytes and energy metabolites. Members of this family play critical roles in neurotransmission, cellular and whole body homeostasis. Malfunction or altered expression of these transporters is associated with a variety of diseases. Pharmacological inhibition of the neurotransmitter transporters in this family is an important strategy in the management of neurological and psychiatric disorders. This review provides an overview of the biochemical and pharmacological properties of the SLC6 family transporters. LINKED ARTICLES BJP published a themed section on Transporters in 2011. To view articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.2011.164.issue-7/issuetoc PMID:22519513

  2. Solute transport through a deforming porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Glen P.; Smith, David W.

    2002-06-01

    Solute transport through a porous medium is typically modelled assuming the porous medium is rigid. However, many applications exist where the porous medium is deforming, including, municipal landfill liners, mine tailings dams, and land subsidence. In this paper, mass balance laws are used to derive the flow and transport equations for a deforming porous medium. The equations are derived in both spatial and material co-ordinate systems. Solute transport through an engineered landfill liner is used as an illustrative example to show the differences between the theory for a rigid porous medium, and small and large deformation analysis of a deforming porous medium. It is found that the large deformation model produces shorter solute breakthrough times, followed by the small deformation model, and then the rigid porous medium model. It is also found that it is important to include spatial and temporal void ratio variations in the large deformation analysis. It is shown that a non-linear large deformation model may greatly reduce the solute breakthrough time, compared to a standard transport analysis typically employed by environmental engineers.

  3. Numerical solution of the electron transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Mark

    The electron transport equation has been solved many times for a variety of reasons. The main difficulty in its numerical solution is that it is a very stiff boundary value problem. The most common numerical methods for solving boundary value problems are symmetric collocation methods and shooting methods. Both of these types of methods can only be applied to the electron transport equation if the boundary conditions are altered with unrealistic assumptions because they require too many points to be practical. Further, they result in oscillating and negative solutions, which are physically meaningless for the problem at hand. For these reasons, all numerical methods for this problem to date are a bit unusual because they were designed to try and avoid the problem of extreme stiffness. This dissertation shows that there is no need to introduce spurious boundary conditions or invent other numerical methods for the electron transport equation. Rather, there already exists methods for very stiff boundary value problems within the numerical analysis literature. We demonstrate one such method in which the fast and slow modes of the boundary value problem are essentially decoupled. This allows for an upwind finite difference method to be applied to each mode as is appropriate. This greatly reduces the number of points needed in the mesh, and we demonstrate how this eliminates the need to define new boundary conditions. This method is verified by showing that under certain restrictive assumptions, the electron transport equation has an exact solution that can be written as an integral. We show that the solution from the upwind method agrees with the quadrature evaluation of the exact solution. This serves to verify that the upwind method is properly solving the electron transport equation. Further, it is demonstrated that the output of the upwind method can be used to compute auroral light emissions.

  4. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  5. Common folds and transport mechanisms of secondary active transporters.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yigong

    2013-01-01

    Secondary active transporters exploit the electrochemical potential of solutes to shuttle specific substrate molecules across biological membranes, usually against their concentration gradient. Transporters of different functional families with little sequence similarity have repeatedly been found to exhibit similar folds, exemplified by the MFS, LeuT, and NhaA folds. Observations of multiple conformational states of the same transporter, represented by the LeuT superfamily members Mhp1, AdiC, vSGLT, and LeuT, led to proposals that structural changes are associated with substrate binding and transport. Despite recent biochemical and structural advances, our understanding of substrate recognition and energy coupling is rather preliminary. This review focuses on the common folds and shared transport mechanisms of secondary active transporters. Available structural information generally supports the alternating access model for substrate transport, with variations and extensions made by emerging structural, biochemical, and computational evidence.

  6. Exact Model of Vacancy-Mediated Solute Transport in Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Ravi; Trinkle, Dallas R.

    2017-03-01

    Most substitutional solutes in solids diffuse via vacancies. However, widely used analytic models for diffusivity make uncontrolled approximations in the relations between atomic jump rates that reduce accuracy. Symmetry analysis of the hexagonal close packed crystal identifies more distinct vacancy transitions than prior models, and a Green function approach computes diffusivity exactly for solutes in magnesium. We find large differences for the solute drag of Al, Zn, and rare earth solutes, and improved diffusion activation energies—highlighting the need for exact analytic transport models.

  7. Probing Nanoscale Thermal Transport in Surfactant Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fangyu; Liu, Ying; Xu, Jiajun; He, Yadong; Hammouda, B.; Qiao, Rui; Yang, Bao

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant solutions typically feature tunable nanoscale, internal structures. Although rarely utilized, they can be a powerful platform for probing thermal transport in nanoscale domains and across interfaces with nanometer-size radius. Here, we examine the structure and thermal transport in solution of AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate) in n-octane liquids using small-angle neutron scattering, thermal conductivity measurements, and molecular dynamics simulations. We report the first experimental observation of a minimum thermal conductivity occurring at the critical micelle concentration (CMC): the thermal conductivity of the surfactant solution decreases as AOT is added till the onset of micellization but increases as more AOT is added. The decrease of thermal conductivity with AOT loading in solutions in which AOT molecules are dispersed as monomers suggests that even the interfaces between individual oleophobic headgroup of AOT molecules and their surrounding non-polar octane molecules can hinder heat transfer. The increase of thermal conductivity with AOT loading after the onset of micellization indicates that the thermal transport in the core of AOT micelles and across the surfactant-oil interfaces, both of which span only a few nanometers, are efficient. PMID:26534840

  8. Pathogen transport in groundwater systems: contrasts with traditional solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Randall J.; Johnson, William P.

    2016-12-01

    Water quality affects many aspects of water availability, from precluding use to societal perceptions of fit-for-purpose. Pathogen source and transport processes are drivers of water quality because they have been responsible for numerous outbreaks resulting in large economic losses due to illness and, in some cases, loss of life. Outbreaks result from very small exposure (e.g., less than 20 viruses) from very strong sources (e.g., trillions of viruses shed by a single infected individual). Thus, unlike solute contaminants, an acute exposure to a very small amount of contaminated water can cause immediate adverse health effects. Similarly, pathogens are larger than solutes. Thus, interactions with surfaces and settling become important even as processes important for solutes such as diffusion become less important. These differences are articulated in "Colloid Filtration Theory", a separate branch of pore-scale transport. Consequently, understanding pathogen processes requires changes in how groundwater systems are typically characterized, where the focus is on the leading edges of plumes and preferential flow paths, even if such features move only a very small fraction of the aquifer flow. Moreover, the relatively short survival times of pathogens in the subsurface require greater attention to very fast (<10 year) flow paths. By better understanding the differences between pathogen and solute transport mechanisms discussed here, a more encompassing view of water quality and source water protection is attained. With this more holistic view and theoretical understanding, better evaluations can be made regarding drinking water vulnerability and the relation between groundwater and human health.

  9. Pathogen transport in groundwater systems: contrasts with traditional solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Randall J.; Johnson, William P.

    2017-06-01

    Water quality affects many aspects of water availability, from precluding use to societal perceptions of fit-for-purpose. Pathogen source and transport processes are drivers of water quality because they have been responsible for numerous outbreaks resulting in large economic losses due to illness and, in some cases, loss of life. Outbreaks result from very small exposure (e.g., less than 20 viruses) from very strong sources (e.g., trillions of viruses shed by a single infected individual). Thus, unlike solute contaminants, an acute exposure to a very small amount of contaminated water can cause immediate adverse health effects. Similarly, pathogens are larger than solutes. Thus, interactions with surfaces and settling become important even as processes important for solutes such as diffusion become less important. These differences are articulated in "Colloid Filtration Theory", a separate branch of pore-scale transport. Consequently, understanding pathogen processes requires changes in how groundwater systems are typically characterized, where the focus is on the leading edges of plumes and preferential flow paths, even if such features move only a very small fraction of the aquifer flow. Moreover, the relatively short survival times of pathogens in the subsurface require greater attention to very fast (<10 year) flow paths. By better understanding the differences between pathogen and solute transport mechanisms discussed here, a more encompassing view of water quality and source water protection is attained. With this more holistic view and theoretical understanding, better evaluations can be made regarding drinking water vulnerability and the relation between groundwater and human health.

  10. Active control transport design criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, B. M.; Harris, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    Vehicle design considerations for active control applications to subsonic transports are examined. Active control is defined along with those functions which are considered in the study of design criteria. The FAA regulations governing transport aircraft design are briefly discussed.

  11. Transport to Rhebpress activity.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Amanda; Brandt, Marta; Djouder, Nabil

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPases from the rat sarcoma (Ras) superfamily are a heterogeneous group of proteins of about 21 kDa that act as molecular switches, modulating cell signaling pathways and controlling diverse cellular processes. They are active when bound to guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and inactive when bound to guanosine diphosphate (GDP). Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) is a member of the Ras GTPase superfamily and a key activator of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). We recently determined that microspherule protein 1 (MCRS1) maintains Rheb at lysosomal surfaces in an amino acid-dependent manner. MCRS1 depletion promotes the formation of the GDP-bound form of Rheb, which is then delocalized from the lysosomal platform and transported to endocytic recycling vesicles, leading to mTORC1 inactivation. During this delocalization process, Rheb-GDP remains farnesylated and associated with cellular endomembranes. These findings provide new insights into the regulation of small GTPases, whose activity depends on both their GTP/GDP switch state and their capacity to move between different cellular membrane-bound compartments. Dynamic spatial transport between compartments makes it possible to alter the proximity of small GTPases to their activatory sites depending on the prevailing physiological and cellular conditions.

  12. Reactive solute transport in acidic streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Broshears, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Spatial and temporal profiles of Ph and concentrations of toxic metals in streams affected by acid mine drainage are the result of the interplay of physical and biogeochemical processes. This paper describes a reactive solute transport model that provides a physically and thermodynamically quantitative interpretation of these profiles. The model combines a transport module that includes advection-dispersion and transient storage with a geochemical speciation module based on MINTEQA2. Input to the model includes stream hydrologic properties derived from tracer-dilution experiments, headwater and lateral inflow concentrations analyzed in field samples, and a thermodynamic database. Simulations reproduced the general features of steady-state patterns of observed pH and concentrations of aluminum and sulfate in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream near Leadville, Colorado. These patterns were altered temporarily by injection of sodium carbonate into the stream. A transient simulation reproduced the observed effects of the base injection.

  13. Neurosteroid transport by the organic solute transporter OSTα-OSTβ

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Fang; Christian, Whitney V.; Gorman, Sadie G.; Cui, Mei; Huang, Jiaoti; Tieu, Kim; Ballatori, Nazzareno

    2010-01-01

    A variety of steroids, including pregnenolone sulfate (PREGS) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) are synthesized by specific brain cells, and are then delivered to their target sites, where they exert potent effects on neuronal excitability. The present results demonstrate that [3H]DHEAS and [3H]PREGS are relatively high affinity substrates for the organic solute transporter, OSTα–OSTβ, and that the two proteins that constitute this transporter are selectively localized to steroidogenic cells in the cerebellum and hippocampus, namely the Purkinje cells and cells in the CA region in both mouse and human brain. Analysis of Ostα and Ostβ mRNA levels in mouse Purkinje and hippocampal cells isolated via laser capture microdissection supported these findings. In addition, Ostα-deficient mice exhibited changes in serum dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEAS levels, and in tissue distribution of administered [3H]DHEAS. OSTα and OSTβ proteins were also localized to the zona reticularis of human adrenal gland, the major region for DHEAS production in the periphery. These results demonstrate that OSTα-OSTβ is localized to steroidogenic cells of the brain and adrenal gland, and that it modulates DHEA/DHEAS homeostasis, suggesting that it may contribute to neurosteroid action. PMID:20649839

  14. Modeling flow and solute transport in irrigation furrows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper presents an internally coupled flow and solute transport model for free-draining irrigation furrows. Furrow hydraulics is simulated with a numerical zero-inertia model and solute transport is computed with a model based on a numerical solution of the cross-section averaged advection-dispe...

  15. Use of boundary fluxes when simulating solute transport with the MODFLOW ground-water transport process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes modifications to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) threedimensional solute-transport model (MODFLOWGWT), which is incorporated into the USGS MODFLOW ground-water model as the Ground- Water Transport (GWT) Process. The modifications improve the capability of MODFLOW-GWT to accurately simulate solute transport in simulations that represent a nonzero flux across an aquifer boundary. In such situations, the new Boundary Flux Package (BFLX) will allow the user flexibility to assign the flux to specific cell faces, although that flexibility is limited for certain types of fluxes (such as recharge and evapotranspiration, which can only be assigned to the top face if either is to be represented as a boundary flux). The approach is consistent with that used in the MODPATH model. The application of the BFLX Package was illustrated using a test case in which the Lake Package was active. The results using the BFLX Package showed noticeably higher magnitudes of velocity in the cells adjacent to the lake than previous results without the BFLX Package. Consequently, solute was transported slightly faster through the lake-aquifer system when the BFLX Package is active. However, the overall solute distributions did not differ greatly from simulations made without using the BFLX Package.

  16. Mechanistic equations for membrane transport of multicomponent solutions.

    PubMed

    Suchanek, G

    2006-03-01

    In the present article, mechanistic equations for membrane transport of N + 1-component solutions have been derived. The major specific investigation result is the introduction - for ternary solutions - of two diffusion coefficients omega(d1) and omega(d2) for solutes, as well as two cross coefficients omega(d12) and omega(d21) for these solutes. The latter parameters may be treated as coefficients of interdiffusion. The expansion of the description of substance transport to include the N + 1-component solutions does not formulate any additional physical phenomena other than those which are formulated by the transport equations for three-component solutions.

  17. A quasilinear model for solute transport under unsaturated flow

    SciTech Connect

    Houseworth, J.E.; Leem, J.

    2009-05-15

    We developed an analytical solution for solute transport under steady-state, two-dimensional, unsaturated flow and transport conditions for the investigation of high-level radioactive waste disposal. The two-dimensional, unsaturated flow problem is treated using the quasilinear flow method for a system with homogeneous material properties. Dispersion is modeled as isotropic and is proportional to the effective hydraulic conductivity. This leads to a quasilinear form for the transport problem in terms of a scalar potential that is analogous to the Kirchhoff potential for quasilinear flow. The solutions for both flow and transport scalar potentials take the form of Fourier series. The particular solution given here is for two sources of flow, with one source containing a dissolved solute. The solution method may easily be extended, however, for any combination of flow and solute sources under steady-state conditions. The analytical results for multidimensional solute transport problems, which previously could only be solved numerically, also offer an additional way to benchmark numerical solutions. An analytical solution for two-dimensional, steady-state solute transport under unsaturated flow conditions is presented. A specific case with two sources is solved but may be generalized to any combination of sources. The analytical results complement numerical solutions, which were previously required to solve this class of problems.

  18. Innovative Solutions to Challenges in Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Jonathan; Burkybile, Sharon

    2000-01-01

    States have had to budget increasing amounts for mandated pupil-transportation services as their state transportation aid has been slashed dramatically. Among school districts, cooperation and coordination through shared services (consortia) have resulted in safer, more reliable, and more efficient transportation. Implementation advice is…

  19. Innovative Solutions to Challenges in Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Jonathan; Burkybile, Sharon

    2000-01-01

    States have had to budget increasing amounts for mandated pupil-transportation services as their state transportation aid has been slashed dramatically. Among school districts, cooperation and coordination through shared services (consortia) have resulted in safer, more reliable, and more efficient transportation. Implementation advice is…

  20. Ion and solute transport by Prestin in Drosophila and Anopheles.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Taku; Czapar, Anna; Brin, Lauren; Haritonova, Alyona; Bondeson, Daniel P; Linser, Paul; Cabrero, Pablo; Thompson, James; Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2012-04-01

    The gut and Malpighian tubules of insects are the primary sites of active solute and water transport for controlling hemolymph and urine composition, pH, and osmolarity. These processes depend on ATPase (pumps), channels and solute carriers (Slc proteins). Maturation of genomic databases enables us to identify the putative molecular players for these processes. Anion transporters of the Slc4 family, AE1 and NDAE1, have been reported as HCO(3)(-) transporters, but are only part of the story. Here we report Dipteran (Drosophila melanogaster (d) and Anopheles gambiae (Ag)) anion exchangers, belonging to the Slc26 family, which are multi-functional anion exchangers. One Drosophila and two Ag homologues of mammalian Slc26a5 (Prestin) and Slc26a6 (aka, PAT1, CFEX) were identified and designated dPrestin, AgPrestinA and AgPrestinB. dPrestin and AgPrestinB show electrogenic anion exchange (Cl(-)/nHCO(3)(-), Cl(-)/SO(4)(2-) and Cl(-)/oxalate(2-)) in an oocyte expression system. Since these transporters are the only Dipteran Slc26 proteins whose transport is similar to mammalian Slc26a6, we submit that Dipteran Prestin are functional and even molecular orthologues of mammalian Slc26a6. OSR1 kinase increases dPrestin ion transport, implying another set of physiological processes controlled by WNK/SPAK signaling in epithelia. All of these mRNAs are highly expressed in the gut and Malpighian tubules. Dipteran Prestin proteins appear suited for central roles in bicarbonate, sulfate and oxalate metabolism including generating the high pH conditions measured in the Dipteran midgut lumen. Finally, we present and discuss Drosophila genetic models that integrate these processes.

  1. Ion and solute transport by prestin in Drosophila and Anopheles

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Taku; Czapar, Anna; Brin, Lauren R.; Haritonova, Alyona; Bondeson, Daniel P.; Linser, Paul J.; Cabrero, Pablo; Dow, Julian A. T.; Romero, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    The gut and Malpighian tubules of insects are the primary sites of active solute and water transport for controlling hemolymph and urine composition, pH, and osmolarity. These processes depend on ATPase (pumps), channels and solute carriers (Slc proteins). Maturation of genomic databases enables us to identify the putative molecular players for these processes. Anion transporters of the Slc4 family, AE1 and NDAE1, have been reported as HCO3− transporters, but are only part of the story. Here we report Dipteran (Drosophila melanogaster (d) and Anopheles gambiae (Ag)) anion exchangers, belonging to the Slc26 family, which are multi-functional anion exchangers. One Drosophila and two Ag homologues of mammalian Slc26a5 (prestin) and Slc26a6 (aka, PAT1, CFEX) were identified and designated dPrestin, AgPrestinA and AgPrestinB. dPrestin and AgPrestinB show electrogenic anion exchange (Cl−/nHCO3−, Cl−/SO42− and Cl−/oxalate2−) in an oocyte expression system. Since these transporters are the only Dipteran Slc26 proteins whose transport is similar to mammalian Slc26a6, we submit that Dipteran Prestin are functional and even molecular orthologues of mammalian Slc26a6. OSR1 kinase increases dPrestin ion transport, implying another set of physiological processes controlled by WNK/SPAK signaling in epithelia. All of these mRNAs are highly expressed in the gut and Malpighian tubules. Dipteran Prestin proteins appear suited for central roles in bicarbonate, sulfate and oxalate metabolism including generating the high pH conditions measured in the Dipteran midgut lumen. Finally, we present and discuss Drosophila genetic models that integrate these processes. PMID:22321763

  2. Using OTIS to model solute transport in streams and rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    Solute transport in streams and rivers is governed by a suite of hydrologic and geochemical processes. Knowledge of these processes is needed when assessing the fate of contaminants that are released into surface waters. The study of solute fate and transport often is aided by solute transport models that mathematically describe the underlying processes. This fact sheet describes a model that considers One-Dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage (OTIS). As shown by several example applications, OTIS may be used in conjunction with field-scale data to quantify hydrologic processes (advection, dispersion, and transient storage) and certain chemical reactions (sorption and first-order decay).

  3. Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

  4. Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

  5. POLAR FIELD PUZZLE: SOLUTIONS FROM FLUX-TRANSPORT DYNAMO AND SURFACE-TRANSPORT MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Dikpati, Mausumi

    2011-06-01

    Polar fields in solar cycle 23 were about 50% weaker than those in cycle 22. The only theoretical models which have addressed this puzzle are surface-transport models and flux-transport dynamo models. Comparing polar fields obtained from numerical simulations using surface-flux-transport models and flux-transport dynamo models, we show that both classes of models can explain the polar field features within the scope of the physics included in the respective models. In both models, how polar fields change as a result of changes in meridional circulation depends on the details of meridional circulation profile used. Using physical reasoning and schematics as well as numerical solutions from a flux-transport dynamo model, we demonstrate that polar fields are determined mostly by the strength of a surface poloidal source provided by the decay of tilted, bipolar active regions. The profile of a meridional flow with the latitude and its changes with time have much less effect in flux-transport dynamo models than in surface-transport models.

  6. Activated transport in AMTEC electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1992-01-01

    Transport of alkali, metal atoms through porous cathodes of alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cells is responsible for significant reducible losses in the electrical performance of these cells. Experimental evidence for activated transport of metal atoms at grain surfaces and boundaries within some AMTEC electrodes has been derived from temperature dependent studies as well as from analysis of the detailed frequency dependence of ac impedance results for other electrodes, including thin, mature molybdenum electrodes which exhibit transport dominated by free molecular flow of sodium gas at low frequencies or dc conditions. Activated surface transport will almost always exist in parallel with free molecular flow transport, and the process of alkali atom adsorption/desorption from the electrode surface will invariably be part of the transport process, and possibly a dominant part in some cases. The temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient of the alkali metal through the electrode in several cases provides an activation energy and preexponential, but at least two activated processes may be operative, and the activation parameters should be expected to depend on the alkali metal activity gradient that the electrode experiences. In the case of Pt/W/Mn electrodes operated for 2500 hours, limiting currents varied with electrode thickness, and the activation parameters could be assigned primarily to the surface/grain boundary diffusion process.

  7. Imaging and quantification of preferential solute transport in soil macropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestel, John; Larsbo, Mats

    2014-05-01

    Despite significant advances during the last decades, there are still many processes related to nonequilibrium flow and transport in macroporous soil that are far from completely understood. The use of X-rays for imaging time-lapse 3-D solute transport has a large potential to help advance the knowledge in this field. We visualized the transport of potassium iodide (20 g iodide l-1 H2O) through a small undisturbed soil column (height 3.8 cm, diameter 6.8 cm) under steady state hydraulic conditions using an industrial X-ray scanner. In addition, the electrical conductivity was measured in the effluent solution during the experiment. We attained a series of seventeen 3-D difference images which we related to iodide concentrations using a linear calibration relationship. The solute transport through the soil mainly took place in two cylindrical macropores, by-passing more than 90% of the bulk soil volume during the entire experiment. From these macropores the solute diffused into the surrounding soil matrix. We illustrated the properties of the investigated solute transport by comparing it to a 1-D convective-dispersive transport and by calculating the temporal evolution of the dilution index. We furthermore showed that the tracer diffusion from one of the macropores into the surrounding soil matrix could not be exactly fitted with the cylindrical diffusion equation. We believe that similar studies will help establish links between soil structure and solute transport processes and lead to improvements in models for solute transport through undisturbed soil.

  8. Activated transport in AMTEC electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M.A.; Underwood, M.L.; O`Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1992-07-01

    Transport of alkali metal atoms through porous cathodes of alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cells is responsible for significant, reducible losses in the electrical performance of these cells. Experimental evidence for activated transport of metal atoms at grain surfaces and boundaries within some AMTEC electrodes has been derived from temperature dependent studies as well as from analysis of the detailed frequency dependence of ac impedance results for other electrodes, including thin, mature molybdenum electrodes which exhibit transport dominated by free molecular flow of sodium gas at low frequencies or dc conditions. Activated surface transport will almost always exist in parallel with free molecular flow transport, and the process of alkali atom adsorption/desorption from the electrode surface will invariably be part of the transport process, and possibly a dominant part in some cases. Little can be learned about the detailed mass transport process from the ac impedance or current voltage curves of an electrode at one set of operating parameters, because the transport process includes a number of important physical parameters that are not all uniquely determined by one experiment. The temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient of the alkali metal through the electrode in several cases provides an activation energy and pre-exponential, but at least two activated processes may be operative, and the activation parameters should be expected to depend on the alkali metal activity gradient that the electrode experiences. In the case of Pt/W/Mn electrodes operated for 2500 hours, limiting currents varied with electrode thickness, and the activation parameters could be assigned primarily to the surface/grain boundary diffusion process. 17 refs.

  9. Activated transport in AMTEC electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M.A.; Underwood, M.L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

    1992-01-01

    Transport of alkali metal atoms through porous cathodes of alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cells is responsible for significant, reducible losses in the electrical performance of these cells. Experimental evidence for activated transport of metal atoms at grain surfaces and boundaries within some AMTEC electrodes has been derived from temperature dependent studies as well as from analysis of the detailed frequency dependence of ac impedance results for other electrodes, including thin, mature molybdenum electrodes which exhibit transport dominated by free molecular flow of sodium gas at low frequencies or dc conditions. Activated surface transport will almost always exist in parallel with free molecular flow transport, and the process of alkali atom adsorption/desorption from the electrode surface will invariably be part of the transport process, and possibly a dominant part in some cases. Little can be learned about the detailed mass transport process from the ac impedance or current voltage curves of an electrode at one set of operating parameters, because the transport process includes a number of important physical parameters that are not all uniquely determined by one experiment. The temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient of the alkali metal through the electrode in several cases provides an activation energy and pre-exponential, but at least two activated processes may be operative, and the activation parameters should be expected to depend on the alkali metal activity gradient that the electrode experiences. In the case of Pt/W/Mn electrodes operated for 2500 hours, limiting currents varied with electrode thickness, and the activation parameters could be assigned primarily to the surface/grain boundary diffusion process. 17 refs.

  10. Biological solutions to transport network design.

    PubMed

    Bebber, Daniel P; Hynes, Juliet; Darrah, Peter R; Boddy, Lynne; Fricker, Mark D

    2007-09-22

    Transport networks are vital components of multicellular organisms, distributing nutrients and removing waste products. Animal and plant transport systems are branching trees whose architecture is linked to universal scaling laws in these organisms. In contrast, many fungi form reticulated mycelia via the branching and fusion of thread-like hyphae that continuously adapt to the environment. Fungal networks have evolved to explore and exploit a patchy environment, rather than ramify through a three-dimensional organism. However, there has been no explicit analysis of the network structures formed, their dynamic behaviour nor how either impact on their ecological function. Using the woodland saprotroph Phanerochaete velutina, we show that fungal networks can display both high transport capacity and robustness to damage. These properties are enhanced as the network grows, while the relative cost of building the network decreases. Thus, mycelia achieve the seemingly competing goals of efficient transport and robustness, with decreasing relative investment, by selective reinforcement and recycling of transport pathways. Fungal networks demonstrate that indeterminate, decentralized systems can yield highly adaptive networks. Understanding how these relatively simple organisms have found effective transport networks through a process of natural selection may inform the design of man-made networks.

  11. Using PHREEQC to simulate solute transport in fractured bedrock.

    PubMed

    Lipson, David S; McCray, John E; Thyne, Geoffrey D

    2007-01-01

    The geochemical computer model PHREEQC can simulate solute transport in fractured bedrock aquifers that can be conceptualized as dual-porosity flow systems subject to one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport in the bedrock fractures and diffusive transport in the bedrock matrix. This article demonstrates how the physical characteristics of such flow systems can be parameterized for use in PHREEQC, it provides a method for minimizing numerical dispersion in PHREEQC simulations, and it compares PHREEQC simulations with results of an analytical solution. The simulations assumed a dual-porosity conceptual model involving advective-reactive-dispersive transport in the mobile zone (bedrock fracture) and diffusive-reactive transport in the immobile zone (bedrock matrix). The results from the PHREEQC dual-porosity transport model that uses a finite-difference approach showed excellent agreement compared with an analytical solution.

  12. Solute transport across a contact interface in deformable porous media.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2012-04-05

    A finite element formulation of neutral solute transport across a contact interface between deformable porous media is implemented and validated against analytical solutions. By reducing the integral statements of external virtual work on the two contacting surfaces into a single contact integral, the algorithm automatically enforces continuity of solute molar flux across the contact interface, whereas continuity of the effective solute concentration (a measure of the solute mechano-chemical potential) is achieved using a penalty method. This novel formulation facilitates the analysis of problems in biomechanics where the transport of metabolites across contact interfaces of deformable tissues may be of interest. This contact algorithm is the first to address solute transport across deformable interfaces, and is made available in the public domain, open-source finite element code FEBio (http://www.febio.org).

  13. Regulators of Slc4 bicarbonate transporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Thornell, Ian M.; Bevensee, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    The Slc4 family of transporters is comprised of anion exchangers (AE1-4), Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporters (NCBTs) including electrogenic Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCe1 and NBCe2), electroneutral Na/bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCn1 and NBCn2), and the electroneutral Na-driven Cl-bicarbonate exchanger (NDCBE), as well as a borate transporter (BTR1). These transporters regulate intracellular pH (pHi) and contribute to steady-state pHi, but are also involved in other physiological processes including CO2 carriage by red blood cells and solute secretion/reabsorption across epithelia. Acid-base transporters function as either acid extruders or acid loaders, with the Slc4 proteins moving HCO−3 either into or out of cells. According to results from both molecular and functional studies, multiple Slc4 proteins and/or associated splice variants with similar expected effects on pHi are often found in the same tissue or cell. Such apparent redundancy is likely to be physiologically important. In addition to regulating pHi, a HCO−3 transporter contributes to a cell's ability to fine tune the intracellular regulation of the cotransported/exchanged ion(s) (e.g., Na+ or Cl−). In addition, functionally similar transporters or splice variants with different regulatory profiles will optimize pH physiology and solute transport under various conditions or within subcellular domains. Such optimization will depend on activated signaling pathways and transporter expression profiles. In this review, we will summarize and discuss both well-known and more recently identified regulators of the Slc4 proteins. Some of these regulators include traditional second messengers, lipids, binding proteins, autoregulatory domains, and less conventional regulators. The material presented will provide insight into the diversity and physiological significance of multiple members within the Slc4 gene family. PMID:26124722

  14. Transport of Organic Solutes in Clay Formations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research is a pilot investigation for the SERDP (Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program, DoD) founded project, Impact of Clay-DNAPL Interactions on Transport and Storage of Chlorinated Solvents in Low Permeability Zones, from 2010-2012. The report tries to s...

  15. Transport of volatile solutes through AQP1

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Gordon J; Zhou, Yuehan; Bouyer, Patrice; Grichtchenko, Irina I; Boron, Walter F

    2002-01-01

    For almost a century it was generally assumed that the lipid phases of all biological membranes are freely permeable to gases. However, recent observations challenge this dogma. The apical membranes of epithelial cells exposed to hostile environments, such as gastric glands, have no demonstrable permeability to the gases CO2 and NH3. Additionally, the water channel protein aquaporin 1 (AQP1), expressed at high levels in erythrocytes, can increase membrane CO2 permeability when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Similarly, nodulin-26, which is closely related to AQP1, can act as a conduit for NH3. A key question is whether aquaporins, which are abundant in virtually every tissue that transports O2 and CO2 at high levels, ever play a physiologically significant role in the transport of small volatile molecules. Preliminary data are consistent with the hypothesis that AQP1 enhances the reabsorption of HCO3− by the renal proximal tubule by increasing the CO2 permeability of the apical membrane. Other preliminary data on Xenopus oocytes heterologously expressing the electrogenic Na+-HCO3− cotransporter (NBC), AQP1 and carbonic anhydrases are consistent with the hypothesis that the macroscopic cotransport of Na+ plus two HCO3− occurs as NBC transports Na+ plus CO32- and AQP1 transports CO2 and H2O. Although data – obtained on AQP1 reconstituted into liposomes or on materials from AQP1 knockout mice – appear inconsistent with the model that AQP1 mediates substantial CO2 transport in certain preparations, the existence of unstirred layers or perfusion-limited conditions may have masked the contribution of AQP1 to CO2 permeability. PMID:12096045

  16. Band 3 (AE1, SLC4A1)-mediated transport of stilbenedisulfonates. III: Role of solute and protein structure in proton-activated stilbenedisulfonate influx.

    PubMed

    Salhany, James M; Cordes, Karen S; Sloan, Renee L

    2006-01-01

    DBDS (4,4'-dibenzamido-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonate) influx into magnesium resealed ghosts (MRSG) occurs over the anion/proton co-transport pH range (pK approximately 5.0). Here, factors are studied which may influence the pH dependence of DBDS transport. Accumulation of various stilbenedisulfonate (SD) molecules was studied and found to be correlated with the hydrophobicity of the R-groups (Hansch factor), not protonation of the sulfonates. The role of proton binding to glutamate 681 was found not to be part of the rate-limiting step in DBDS uptake by MRSG. Finally, the pH dependence of changes in quaternary structure/conformational state was investigated using an assay involving photo-crosslinking of band 3 subunits in the presence of DASD (4,4'-diazido-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonate). Lowering the pH promoted intersubunit crosslinking by DASD, with a pK value of 4.75+/-1.0. This value is comparable to the pK for DBDS binding to the "second" class of sites on control band 3 (pK = 5.01+/-0.16), and to DBDS influx into control MRSG (pK values between 4.57+/-0.15 and 4.7+/-0.1). Susceptibility to photo-crosslinking was reversed by raising the pH prior to initiation of the reaction. Significantly, no photo-crosslinking was observed between pH 6.0 and 8.0, where band 3 subunits are known to exist as stable dimers and tetramers. We conclude that intersubunit photo-crosslinking does not simply involve random collision between photo-activated DASD and band 3. Rather, proton binding to band 3 either alters the conformation at the interface between subunits of pre-existing tetramers, or it promotes self-association of stable dimers to a "novel" tetrameric conformational state.

  17. Future variability of solute transport in a macrotidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Peter E.; Lewis, Matt J.; Simpson, John H.; Howlett, Eleanor R.; Malham, Shelagh K.

    2014-12-01

    The physical controls on salt distribution and river-sourced conservative solutes, including the potential implications of climate change, are investigated referring to model simulations of a macrotidal estuary. In the UK, such estuaries typically react rapidly to rainfall events and, as such, are often in a state of non-equilibrium in terms of solute transport; hence are particularly sensitive to climate extremes. Sea levels are projected to rise over the 21st century, extending the salinity maximum upstream in estuaries, which will also affect downstream solute transport, promoting estuarine trapping and reducing offshore dispersal of material. Predicted 'drier summers' and 'wetter winters' in the UK will influence solute transport further still; we found that projected river flow climate changes were more influential than sea-level rise, especially for low flow conditions. Our simulations show that projected climate change for the UK is likely to increase variability in estuarine solute transport and, specifically, increase the likelihood of estuarine trapping during summer, mainly due to drier weather conditions. Future changes in solute transport were less certain during winter, since increased river flow will to some extent counter-act the effects of sea-level rise. Our results have important implications for non-conservative nutrient transport, water quality, coastal management and ecosystem resilience.

  18. Stochastic study of solute transport in a nonstationary medium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bill X

    2006-01-01

    A Lagrangian stochastic approach is applied to develop a method of moment for solute transport in a physically and chemically nonstationary medium. Stochastic governing equations for mean solute flux and solute covariance are analytically obtained in the first-order accuracy of log conductivity and/or chemical sorption variances and solved numerically using the finite-difference method. The developed method, the numerical method of moments (NMM), is used to predict radionuclide solute transport processes in the saturated zone below the Yucca Mountain project area. The mean, variance, and upper bound of the radionuclide mass flux through a control plane 5 km downstream of the footprint of the repository are calculated. According to their chemical sorption capacities, the various radionuclear chemicals are grouped as nonreactive, weakly sorbing, and strongly sorbing chemicals. The NMM method is used to study their transport processes and influence factors. To verify the method of moments, a Monte Carlo simulation is conducted for nonreactive chemical transport. Results indicate the results from the two methods are consistent, but the NMM method is computationally more efficient than the Monte Carlo method. This study adds to the ongoing debate in the literature on the effect of heterogeneity on solute transport prediction, especially on prediction uncertainty, by showing that the standard derivation of solute flux is larger than the mean solute flux even when the hydraulic conductivity within each geological layer is mild. This study provides a method that may become an efficient calculation tool for many environmental projects.

  19. Solute transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage.

    PubMed

    Chin, Hooi Chuan; Moeini, Mohammad; Quinn, Thomas M

    2013-07-15

    Solute transport through extracellular matrix (ECM) is important to physiology and contrast agent-based clinical imaging of articular cartilage. Mechanical injury is likely to have important effects on solute transport since it involves alteration of ECM structure. Therefore it is of interest to characterize effects of mechanical injury on solute transport in cartilage. Using cartilage explants injured by an established mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusivities of solutes for transport across the articular surface were measured. A range of fluorescent solutes (fluorescein isothiocyanate, 4 and 40kDa dextrans, insulin, and chondroitin sulfate) and an X-ray contrast agent (sodium iodide) were used. Mechanical injury was associated with a significant increase in effective diffusivity versus uninjured explants for all solutes studied. On the other hand, mechanical injury had no effects on effective partition coefficients for most solutes tested, except for 40kDa dextran and chondroitin sulfate where small but significant changes in effective partition coefficient were observed in injured explants. Findings highlight enhanced diffusive transport across the articular surface of injured cartilage, which may have important implications for injury and repair situations. Results also support development of non-equilibrium methods for identification of focal cartilage lesions by contrast agent-based clinical imaging.

  20. Glymphatic solute transport does not require bulk flow

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Mahdi; de Zélicourt, Diane; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2016-01-01

    Observations of fast transport of fluorescent tracers in mouse brains have led to the hypothesis of bulk water flow directed from arterial to venous paravascular spaces (PVS) through the cortical interstitium. At the same time, there is evidence for interstitial solute transport by diffusion rather than by directed bulk fluid motion. It has been shown that the two views may be consolidated by intracellular water flow through astrocyte networks combined with mainly diffusive extracellular transport of solutes. This requires the presence of a driving force that has not been determined to date, but for which arterial pulsation has been suggested as the origin. Here we show that arterial pulsation caused by pulse wave propagation is an unlikely origin of this hypothetical driving force. However, we further show that such pulsation may still lead to fast para-arterial solute transport through dispersion, that is, through the combined effect of local mixing and diffusion in the para-arterial space. PMID:27929105

  1. Glymphatic solute transport does not require bulk flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgari, Mahdi; de Zélicourt, Diane; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2016-12-01

    Observations of fast transport of fluorescent tracers in mouse brains have led to the hypothesis of bulk water flow directed from arterial to venous paravascular spaces (PVS) through the cortical interstitium. At the same time, there is evidence for interstitial solute transport by diffusion rather than by directed bulk fluid motion. It has been shown that the two views may be consolidated by intracellular water flow through astrocyte networks combined with mainly diffusive extracellular transport of solutes. This requires the presence of a driving force that has not been determined to date, but for which arterial pulsation has been suggested as the origin. Here we show that arterial pulsation caused by pulse wave propagation is an unlikely origin of this hypothetical driving force. However, we further show that such pulsation may still lead to fast para-arterial solute transport through dispersion, that is, through the combined effect of local mixing and diffusion in the para-arterial space.

  2. Transient solute transport with sorption in Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, M. A.; Zhang, L.; Wang, M.

    2016-12-01

    Sorption onto the wall has been observed to both increase [Lungu and Moffatt, 1982] and decrease the average solute transport velocity [Golay, 1958], relative to the mean flow velocity. Similarly, opposite conclusion have been reached for the effect of sorption on dispersion. In this work, we study transient solute transport in Poiseuille flow with sorptive boundary and initial transversely uniform distribution (linear release) to reconcile the two different views on solute transport (figure 1) with sorption. Two-dimensional simulations in figure 2 show that there is a transition from fast transport dominated by a fast-moving pulse in the middle of the channel at early times, to slow transport at late times once desorption from the walls becomes important. A set of series solutions for zeroth, first and second longitudinal moment have been derived and we show that the zeroth-order term in the solution corresponds to the slow transport in the late regime, while the first-order term corresponds to the fast transport in the early regime (figure 3). Based on the analytical solution, the time scales for early regime and late regimes of both the velocity and the dispersion coefficient have been determined for an equilibrium sorption model and a kinetic linear sorption model. Furthermore, we give approximated analytical solution when both adsorption and desorption are slow. References M.J.E. Golay. Theory of chromatography in open and coated tubular columns iwth round and rectangular cross-sections. In D.H.Desty, editor, Gas Chromatography, pages 36-53, New York, 1958. Academic Press Inc. E.M. Lungu and H.K. Moffatt. the effect of wall conductance on heat diffusion in duct flow. Journal of Engineering Mathematics, 1692 ;121-136, 1982.

  3. Lysosomal solute carrier transporters gain momentum in research.

    PubMed

    Bissa, B; Beedle, A M; Govindarajan, R

    2016-11-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that lysosome function extends beyond macromolecular degradation. Genetic and functional defects in components of the lysosomal transport machinery cause lysosomal storage disorders implicating the lysosomal solute carrier (SLC) transporters as essential to vital cell processes. The pathophysiology and therapeutic potential of lysosomal SLC transporters are highlighted here, focusing on recent discoveries in autophagic amino acid sensing (SLC38A9), phagocytic regulation in macrophages (SLC29A3, SLC15A3/A4), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) exocytosis in neurotransmission (SLC17A9), and lysosomal transport of maytansine catabolites into the cytoplasm (SLC46A3).

  4. Lysosomal solute carrier transporters gain momentum in research

    PubMed Central

    Beedle, AM; Govindarajan, R

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that lysosome function extends beyond macromolecular degradation. Genetic and functional defects in components of the lysosomal transport machinery cause lysosomal storage disorders implicating the lysosomal solute carrier (SLC) transporters as essential to vital cell processes. The pathophysiology and therapeutic potential of lysosomal SLC transporters are highlighted here, focusing on recent discoveries in autophagic amino acid sensing (SLC38A9), phagocytic regulation in macrophages (SLC29A3, SLC15A3/A4), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) exocytosis in neurotransmission (SLC17A9), and lysosomal transport of maytansine catabolites into the cytoplasm (SLC46A3). PMID:27530302

  5. Mechanisms of solute transport in extracorporeal therapies.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Claudio; Levin, Nathan W

    2005-01-01

    Diffusion and convection are the main mechanisms involved in the membrane separation processes occurring in extracorporeal hemodialysis. Operational parameters should be optimized in hollow fiber hemodialyzers to achieve the maximal efficiency. The nature of blood which is a non Newtonian fluid, requires specific attention in the design of dialyzers to ensure that the blood compartment operates properly. Similar attention must be placed in the design of the dialysate compartment to ensure a homogeneous distribution of the fluid and to prevent blood to dialysate flow mismatch. Finally, the membrane represents the third component of the hemodialyzer. Membrane performance depends on the used biomaterial, its biocompatibility, the thickness, the hydrophilic-hydrophobic mixture, the hydraulic permeability and the number and diameter of the pores. In this setting, diffusion and convection tend to reciprocally interfere, producing a final result that depends on the prevalence of one or the other mechanism for every specific solute.

  6. A Functional-Phylogenetic Classification System for Transmembrane Solute Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saier, Milton H.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive classification system for transmembrane molecular transporters has been developed and recently approved by the transport panel of the nomenclature committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This system is based on (i) transporter class and subclass (mode of transport and energy coupling mechanism), (ii) protein phylogenetic family and subfamily, and (iii) substrate specificity. Almost all of the more than 250 identified families of transporters include members that function exclusively in transport. Channels (115 families), secondary active transporters (uniporters, symporters, and antiporters) (78 families), primary active transporters (23 families), group translocators (6 families), and transport proteins of ill-defined function or of unknown mechanism (51 families) constitute distinct categories. Transport mode and energy coupling prove to be relatively immutable characteristics and therefore provide primary bases for classification. Phylogenetic grouping reflects structure, function, mechanism, and often substrate specificity and therefore provides a reliable secondary basis for classification. Substrate specificity and polarity of transport prove to be more readily altered during evolutionary history and therefore provide a tertiary basis for classification. With very few exceptions, a phylogenetic family of transporters includes members that function by a single transport mode and energy coupling mechanism, although a variety of substrates may be transported, sometimes with either inwardly or outwardly directed polarity. In this review, I provide cross-referencing of well-characterized constituent transporters according to (i) transport mode, (ii) energy coupling mechanism, (iii) phylogenetic grouping, and (iv) substrates transported. The structural features and distribution of recognized family members throughout the living world are also evaluated. The tabulations should facilitate familial and functional

  7. Molecular modeling and ligand docking for Solute Carrier (SLC) transporters

    PubMed Central

    Schlessinger, Avner; Khuri, Natalia; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Sali, Andrej

    2014-01-01

    Solute Carrier (SLC) transporters are membrane proteins that transport solutes, such as ions, metabolites, peptides, and drugs, across biological membranes, using diverse energy coupling mechanisms. In human, there are 386 SLC transporters, many of which contribute to the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs and/or can be targeted directly by therapeutics. Recent atomic structures of SLC transporters determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy have significantly expanded the applicability of structure-based prediction of SLC transporter ligands, by enabling both comparative modeling of additional SLC transporters and virtual screening of small molecules libraries against experimental structures as well as comparative models. In this review, we begin by describing computational tools, including sequence analysis, comparative modeling, and virtual screening, that are used to predict the structures and functions of membrane proteins such as SLC transporters. We then illustrate the applications of these tools to predicting ligand specificities of select SLC transporters, followed by experimental validation using uptake kinetic measurements and other assays. We conclude by discussing future directions in the discovery of the SLC transporter ligands. PMID:23578028

  8. End-Member Formulation of Solid Solutions and Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtner, Peter C.

    2015-09-01

    A model for incorporating solid solutions into reactive transport equations is presented based on an end-member representation. Reactive transport equations are solved directly for the composition and bulk concentration of the solid solution. Reactions of a solid solution with an aqueous solution are formulated in terms of an overall stoichiometric reaction corresponding to a time-varying composition and exchange reactions, equivalent to reaction end-members. Reaction rates are treated kinetically using a transition state rate law for the overall reaction and a pseudo-kinetic rate law for exchange reactions. The composition of the solid solution at the onset of precipitation is assumed to correspond to the least soluble composition, equivalent to the composition at equilibrium. The stoichiometric saturation determines if the solid solution is super-saturated with respect to the aqueous solution. The method is implemented for a simple prototype batch reactor using Mathematica for a binary solid solution. Finally, the sensitivity of the results on the kinetic rate constant for a binary solid solution is investigated for reaction of an initially stoichiometric solid phase with an undersaturated aqueous solution.

  9. Single-molecule detection with active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, David Allan

    A glass capillary is used near the focal region of a custom-built confocal microscope to investigate the use of active transport for single-molecule detection in solution, with both one and two-photon laser excitation. The capillary tip has a diameter of several microns and is carefully aligned nearby to the sub-micron laser beam waist, collinear to the optical axis, so that a negative pressure-difference causes molecules to be drawn into the capillary, along the laser beam axis. The flow of solution, which is characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), can increase the single-molecule detection rate for slowly diffusing proteins by over a factor of 100, while the mean rate of photons during each burst is similar to that for random diffusional transport. Also, the flow is along the longest axis of the ellipsoidally-shaped confocal volume, which results in more collected photons per molecule than that for transverse flow at the same speed. When transport is dominated by flow, FCS can no longer distinguish molecules with differing translational diffusion, and hence a fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method based on differences in fluorescence brightness is investigated as a means for assaying different solution components, for applications in pharmaceutical drug discovery. Multi-channel fluctuation spectroscopy techniques can also be used for assays with the flow system and hence this dissertation also reports the characterization of a prototype 4-channel single-photon detector with a two-wavelength polarization-resolved optical set-up.

  10. Insights into non-Fickian solute transport in carbonates

    PubMed Central

    Bijeljic, Branko; Mostaghimi, Peyman; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    [1] We study and explain the origin of early breakthrough and long tailing plume behavior by simulating solute transport through 3-D X-ray images of six different carbonate rock samples, representing geological media with a high degree of pore-scale complexity. A Stokes solver is employed to compute the flow field, and the particles are then transported along streamlines to represent advection, while the random walk method is used to model diffusion. We compute the propagators (concentration versus displacement) for a range of Peclet numbers (Pe) and relate it to the velocity distribution obtained directly on the images. There is a very wide distribution of velocity that quantifies the impact of pore structure on transport. In samples with a relatively narrow spread of velocities, transport is characterized by a small immobile concentration peak, representing essentially stagnant portions of the pore space, and a dominant secondary peak of mobile solute moving at approximately the average flow speed. On the other hand, in carbonates with a wider velocity distribution, there is a significant immobile peak concentration and an elongated tail of moving fluid. An increase in Pe, decreasing the relative impact of diffusion, leads to the faster formation of secondary mobile peak(s). This behavior indicates highly anomalous transport. The implications for modeling field-scale transport are discussed. Citation: Bijeljic, B., P. Mostaghimi, and M. J. Blunt (2013), Insights into non-Fickian solute transport in carbonates, Water Resour. Res., 49, 2714–2728, doi:10.1002/wrcr.20238. PMID:24223444

  11. Molecular level water and solute transport in reverse osmosis membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Shen, Meng; Keten, Sinan

    2015-11-01

    The water permeability and rejection characteristics of six solutes, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, urea, Na+, and Cl-, were studied for a polymeric reverse osmosis (RO) membrane using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate that water flux increases with an increasing fraction of percolated free volume in the membrane polymer structure. Solute molecules display Brownian motion and hop from pore to pore as they pass through the membrane. The solute rejection depends on both the size of the solute molecule and the chemical interaction of the solute with water and the membrane. When the open spaces in the polymeric structure are such that solutes have to shed at least one water molecule from their solvation shell to pass through the membrane molecular structure, the water-solute pair interaction energy governs solute rejection. Organic solutes more easily shed water molecules than ions to more readily pass through the membrane. Hydrogen-bonding sites for molecules like urea also lead to a higher rejection. These findings underline the importance of the solute's solvation shell and solute-water-membrane chemistry in solute transport and rejection in RO membranes. Funded by the Institute for Sustainability and Energy at Northwestern with computing resources from XSEDE (NSF grant ACI-1053575).

  12. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 2. Transient storage and decay chain solutions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Contaminant transport processes in streams, rivers, and other surface water bodies can be analyzed or predicted using the advection-dispersion equation and related transport models. In part 1 of this two-part series we presented a large number of one- and multi-dimensional analytical solutions of t...

  13. Spectral method for solution of the fractional transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadem, Abdelouahab; Luchko, Yury; Baleanu, Dumitru

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, the Chebyshev polynomials expansion method is applied to find both an analytical solution of the fractional transport equation in the one-dimensional plane geometry and its numerical approximations. The idea of the method is in reducing of the fractional transport equation to a system of the linear fractional differential equations for the unknown coefficients of the Chebyshev polynomials expansion. The obtained system of equations is then solved by using the operational method for the Caputo fractional derivative.

  14. Nonrelativistic grey Sn-transport radiative-shock solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, J. M.; Morel, J. E.; Lowrie, R. B.

    2017-06-01

    We present semi-analytic radiative-shock solutions in which grey Sn-transport is used to model the radiation, and we include both constant cross sections and cross sections that depend on temperature and density. These new solutions solve for a variable Eddington factor (VEF) across the shock domain, which allows for interesting physics not seen before in radiative-shock solutions. Comparisons are made with the grey nonequilibrium-diffusion radiative-shock solutions of Lowrie and Edwards [1], which assumed that the Eddington factor is constant across the shock domain. It is our experience that the local Mach number is monotonic when producing nonequilibrium-diffusion solutions, but that this monotonicity may disappear while integrating the precursor region to produce Sn-transport solutions. For temperature- and density-dependent cross sections we show evidence of a spike in the VEF in the far upstream portion of the radiative-shock precursor. We show evidence of an adaptation zone in the precursor region, adjacent to the embedded hydrodynamic shock, as conjectured by Drake [2,3], and also confirm his expectation that the precursor temperatures adjacent to the Zel'dovich spike take values that are greater than the downstream post-shock equilibrium temperature. We also show evidence that the radiation energy density can be nonmonotonic under the Zel'dovich spike, which is indicative of anti-diffusive radiation flow as predicted by McClarren and Drake [4]. We compare the angle dependence of the radiation flow for the Sn-transport and nonequilibrium-diffusion radiation solutions, and show that there are considerable differences in the radiation flow between these models across the shock structure. Finally, we analyze the radiation flow to understand the cause of the adaptation zone, as well as the structure of the Sn-transport radiation-intensity solutions across the shock structure.

  15. Nonrelativistic grey S n -transport radiative-shock solutions

    DOE PAGES

    Ferguson, J. M.; Morel, J. E.; Lowrie, R. B.

    2017-06-01

    We present semi-analytic radiative-shock solutions in which grey Sn-transport is used to model the radiation, and we include both constant cross sections and cross sections that depend on temperature and density. These new solutions solve for a variable Eddington factor (VEF) across the shock domain, which allows for interesting physics not seen before in radiative-shock solutions. Comparisons are made with the grey nonequilibrium-diffusion radiative-shock solutions of Lowrie and Edwards [1], which assumed that the Eddington factor is constant across the shock domain. It is our experience that the local Mach number is monotonic when producing nonequilibrium-diffusion solutions, but that thismore » monotonicity may disappear while integrating the precursor region to produce Sn-transport solutions. For temperature- and density-dependent cross sections we show evidence of a spike in the VEF in the far upstream portion of the radiative-shock precursor. We show evidence of an adaptation zone in the precursor region, adjacent to the embedded hydrodynamic shock, as conjectured by Drake [2, 3], and also confirm his expectation that the precursor temperatures adjacent to the Zel’dovich spike take values that are greater than the downstream post-shock equilibrium temperature. We also show evidence that the radiation energy density can be nonmonotonic under the Zel’dovich spike, which is indicative of anti-diffusive radiation flow as predicted by McClarren and Drake [4]. We compare the angle dependence of the radiation flow for the Sn-transport and nonequilibriumdiffusion radiation solutions, and show that there are considerable differences in the radiation flow between these models across the shock structure. Lastly, we analyze the radiation flow to understand the cause of the adaptation zone, as well as the structure of the Sn-transport radiation-intensity solutions across the shock structure.« less

  16. Transport of Gas and Solutes in Permeable Estuarine Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00...fluorescent light to investigate bubble production in surface sands under controlled conditions. 2 Effect of ebullition on subsurface-surface...solute exchange. The effect of ebullition , the movement of bubbles from one medium to another, on inert solute tracer transport through coarse-grained

  17. Nonrelativistic radiative shock solutions with grey Sn-transport

    DOE PAGES

    Ferguson, Jim Michael; Morel, Jim Emanuel; Lowrie, Robert Byron

    2017-02-24

    We present semi-analytic radiative-shock solutions in which grey Sn-transport is used to model the radiation, and we include both constant cross sections and cross sections that depend on temperature and density. These new solutions solve for a variable Eddington factor (VEF) across the shock domain, which allows for interesting physics not seen before in radiative-shock solutions. Comparisons are made with the grey nonequilibrium-diffusion radiative-shock solutions of Lowrie and Edwards [1], which assumed that the Eddington factor is constant across the shock domain. It is our experience that the local Mach number is monotonic when producing nonequilibrium-diffusion solutions, but that thismore » monotonicity may disappear while integrating the precursor region to produce Sn-transport solutions. For temperature- and density-dependent cross sections we show evidence of a spike in the VEF in the far upstream portion of the radiative-shock precursor. We show evidence of an adaptation zone in the precursor region, adjacent to the embedded hydrodynamic shock, as conjectured by Drake [2, 3], and also confirm his expectation that the precursor temperatures adjacent to the Zel’dovich spike take values that are greater than the downstream post-shock equilibrium temperature. We also show evidence that the radiation energy density can be nonmonotonic under the Zel’dovich spike, which is indicative of anti-diffusive radiation flow as predicted by McClarren and Drake [4]. We compare the angle dependence of the radiation flow for the Sn-transport and nonequilibriumdiffusion radiation solutions, and show that there are considerable differences in the radiation flow between these models across the shock structure. Lastly, we analyze the radiation flow to understand the cause of the adaptation zone, as well as the structure of the Sn-transport radiation-intensity solutions across the shock structure.« less

  18. Transport-Constrained Extensions of Collision and Track Length Estimators for Solutions of Radiative Transport Problems

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Rong; Spanier, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we develop novel extensions of collision and track lengh estimators for the complete space-angle solutions of radiative transport problems. We derive the relevant equations, prove that our new estimators are unbiased, and compare their performance with that of more conventional ) estimators. Such comparisons based on numerical solutions of simple one dimensional slab problems indicate the the potential superiority of the new estimators for a wide variety of more general transport problems. PMID:24058206

  19. Transport-constrained extensions of collision and track length estimators for solutions of radiative transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Rong; Spanier, Jerome

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we develop novel extensions of collision and track length estimators for the complete space-angle solutions of radiative transport problems. We derive the relevant equations, prove that our new estimators are unbiased, and compare their performance with that of more conventional estimators. Such comparisons based on numerical solutions of simple one dimensional slab problems indicate the the potential superiority of the new estimators for a wide variety of more general transport problems.

  20. Solute transport along preferential flow paths in unsaturated fractures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, G.W.; Geller, J.T.; Pruess, K.; Hunt, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to study solute transport along preferential flow paths in unsaturated, inclined fractures. Qualitative aspects of solute transport were identified in a miscible dye tracer experiment conducted in a transparent replica of a natural granite fracture. Additional experiments were conducted to measure the breakthrough curves of a conservative tracer introduced into an established preferential flow path in two different fracture replicas and a rock-replica combination. The influence of gravity was investigated by varying fracture inclination. The relationship between the travel times of the solute and the relative influence of gravity was substantially affected by two modes of intermittent flow that occurred: the snapping rivulet and the pulsating blob modes. The measured travel times of the solute were evaluated with three transfer function models: the axial dispersion, the reactors-in-series, and the lognormal models. The three models described the solute travel times nearly equally well. A mechanistic model was also formulated to describe transport when the pulsating blob mode occurred which assumed blobs of water containing solute mixed with residual pools of water along the flow path.

  1. Theory for reactive solute transport through clay membrane barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malusis, Michael A.; Shackelford, Charles D.

    2002-12-01

    The theoretical development for one-dimensional, coupled migration of solutes with different ionic mobilities through clay soils that behave as ion-restrictive membranes, referred to as clay membrane barriers (CMBs), is presented. The transport formulation is based on principles of irreversible thermodynamics and accounts explicitly for coupling effects of hyperfiltration (ultrafiltration) and chemico-osmotic counter-advection associated with clay membrane behavior in the absence of electrical current. Since, by definition, no solute can enter a "perfect" or "ideal" membrane, the concept of an implicit coupling effect, such that the effective salt-diffusion coefficient, Ds* approaches zero as the chemico-osmotic efficiency coefficient, ω approaches unity is introduced. The theoretical development also illustrates that, even in the absence of membrane behavior, traditional advective-dispersive transport theory based on a constant value of Ds* for the solutes may not be appropriate for simulating transient transport in reactive (ion exchanging) systems. This potential limitation is illustrated through simulations for solute mass flux involving the migration of a binary salt solution (KCl) through a clay barrier with exchange sites saturated with a single exchangeable cation (e.g., Na +) that enters the pore solution upon ion exchange with the salt cation (K +).

  2. The prediction of solute transport in surcharged manholes using CFD.

    PubMed

    Lau, S D; Stovin, V R; Guymer, I

    2007-01-01

    Solute transport processes occur within a wide range of water engineering structures, and urban drainage engineers increasingly rely on modelling tools to represent the transport of dissolved materials. The models take as input representative travel time and dispersion characteristics for key system components, and these generally have to be identified via field or laboratory measurements. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has the potential to reveal the underlying hydraulic processes that control solute transport, and to provide a generic means of identifying relevant parameter values. This paper reports on a study that has been undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of utilising a CFD-based approach to modelling solute transport. Discrete phase modelling has been adopted, as this is computationally efficient and robust when compared with the time-dependent solution of the advection-dispersion equation. Simulation results are compared with published laboratory data characterising the dispersion effects of surcharged manholes, focusing specifically on an 800 mm diameter laboratory manhole for a flowrate of 0.002 m(3)/s and a range of surcharge depths. Preliminary indications are that the CFD results adequately replicate the measured downstream temporal concentration profiles, and that a threshold surcharge depth, corresponding to a change in hydraulic regime within the manhole, can also be identified.

  3. Scaling and predicting solute transport processes in streams

    Treesearch

    R. González-Pinzón; R. Haggerty; M. Dentz

    2013-01-01

    We investigated scaling of conservative solute transport using temporal moment analysis of 98 tracer experiments (384 breakthrough curves) conducted in 44 streams located on five continents. The experiments span 7 orders of magnitude in discharge (10-3 to 103 m3/s), span 5 orders of magnitude in...

  4. Signal focusing through active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  5. Mycobactericidal activity of glutaraldehyde solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, F M; Montalbine, V

    1976-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of alkaline glutaraldehyde (buffered at pH 8.5) inactivated a standard suspension of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv faster than the corresponding acid (pH 3.7 preparation. Quantitative differences in the rate of inactivation of eight other species of Mycobacterium were determined using a 1% solution of alkaline glutaraldehyde and inactivation of residual glutaraldehyde with 1% sodium bisulfite solution. Variations in the rate of kill were observed between the various mycobacterial species tested, but such differences were probably not sufficiently large to be of practical importance. A 2% alkaline glutaraldehyde solution inactivated 10(5) viable M. tuberculosis cells present on the surface of porcelain penicylinders within 5 min at 18 degrees C. This rate of inactivation was faster than in the acidic solution. PMID:11227

  6. Effect of proteolytic enzymes on transepithelial solute transport

    SciTech Connect

    Niewoehner, D.E.; Sinha, A.A.; Rice, K.; Cadman, S.; Wangensteen, D.

    1986-10-01

    The effects of proteases on air-space clearance (AC) of small ((/sup 14/C)sucrose, 342 daltons) and large (/sup 125/I-neutral dextran, 70,000 daltons) solutes were studied in isolated, fluid-filled hamster lungs that were perfused in a nonrecirculating system. When instilled into the air spaces, porcine pancreatic elastase (0.1-0.4 mg/ml) and bovine pancreatic trypsin (BPT) (0.5-2.0 mg/ml), but neither Clostridium histolyticum collagenase (5.0 mg/ml) nor phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride-inactivated BPT caused large increases in the AC of both tracer molecules. BPT-induced solute clearance was further characterized functionally and morphologically. The functional characteristics of solute AC under steady-state conditions did not indicate that transepithelial transport was diffusion-limited. Inhibition by millimolar concentrations of Zn/sup 2 +/ and by lung cooling, along with electron microscopic studies employing horseradish peroxidase as a macromolecule tracer, were consistent with epithelial solute transport by a vesicular mechanism (transcytosis). Solute transport from the interstitial compartment to the lung exterior was shown to occur via two pathways. By unknown mechanisms BPT caused small amounts of water to flow through an incompletely identified, extravascular pathway. In BPT-exposed lungs efflux of /sup 125/I-dextran 70 occurred almost exclusively through this pathway, whereas (/sup 14/C)sucrose was transported to the lung exterior partly through this same pathway and partly through the vasculature. The large differences in the diffusion coefficients of the two tracers may have accounted for these observed patterns of solute efflux from the lung. The possible significance of our findings to the pathogenesis of experimental emphysema are discussed.

  7. Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes.

  8. Solute transport in intervertebral disc: experiments and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Das, D B; Welling, A; Urban, J P G; Boubriak, O A

    2009-04-01

    Loss of nutrient supply to the human intervertebral disc (IVD) cells is thought to be a major cause of disc degeneration in humans. To address this issue, transport of molecules of different size have been analyzed by a combination of experimental and modeling studies. Solute transport has been compared for steady-state and transient diffusion of several different solutes with molecular masses in the range 3-70 kDa, injected into parts of the disc where degeneration is thought most likely to occur first and into the blood supply to the disc. Diffusion coefficients of fluorescently tagged dextran molecules of different molecular weights have been measured in vitro using the concentration gradient technique in thin specimens of disc outer annulus and nucleus pulposus. Diffusion coefficients were found to decrease with molecular weight following a nonlinear relationship. Diffusion coefficients changed more rapidly for solutes with molecular masses less than 10 kDa. Although unrealistic or painful, solutes injected directly into the disc achieve the largest disc coverage with concentrations that would be high enough to be of practical use. Although more practical, solutes injected into the blood supply do not penetrate to the central regions of the disc and their concentrations dissipate more rapidly. Injection into the disc would be the best method to get drugs or growth factors to regions of degeneration in IVDs quickly; else concentrations of solute must be kept at a high value for several hours in the blood supply to the discs.

  9. Conservative and reactive solute transport in constructed wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keefe, S.H.; Barber, L.B.; Runkel, R.L.; Ryan, J.N.; McKnight, Diane M.; Wass, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    The transport of bromide, a conservative tracer, and rhodamine WT (RWT), a photodegrading tracer, was evaluated in three wastewater-dependent wetlands near Phoenix, Arizona, using a solute transport model with transient storage. Coupled sodium bromide and RWT tracer tests were performed to establish conservative transport and reactive parameters in constructed wetlands with water losses ranging from (1) relatively impermeable (15%), (2) moderately leaky (45%), and (3) significantly leaky (76%). RWT first-order photolysis rates and sorption coefficients were determined from independent field and laboratory experiments. Individual wetland hydraulic profiles influenced the extent of transient storage interaction in stagnant water areas and consequently RWT removal. Solute mixing and transient storage interaction occurred in the impermeable wetland, resulting in 21% RWT mass loss from main channel and storage zone photolysis (10%) and sorption (11%) reactions. Advection and dispersion governed solute transport in the leaky wetland, limiting RWT photolysis removal (1.2%) and favoring main channel sorption (3.6%). The moderately leaky wetland contained islands parallel to flow, producing channel flow and minimizing RWT losses (1.6%).

  10. Stochastic analysis of transport of conservative solutes in caisson experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dagan, G.

    1995-02-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has conducted in the past a series of experiments of transport of conservative and reactive solutes. The experimental setup and the experimental results are presented in a series of reports. The main aim of the experiments was to validate models of transport of solutes in unsaturated flow at the caisson intermediate scale, which is much larger than the one pertaining to laboratory columns. First attempts to analyze the experimental results were by one-dimensional convective-dispersion models. These models could not explain the observed solute breakthrough curves and particularly the large solute dispersion in the caisson effluent Since there were some question marks about the uniformity of water distribution at the caisson top, the transport experiments were repeated under conditions of saturated flow. In these experiments constant heads were applied at the top and the bottom of the caisson and the number of concentration monitoring stations was quadrupled. The analysis of the measurements by the same one-dimensional model indicated clearly that the fitted dispersivity is much larger than the pore-sole dispersivity and that it grows with the distance in an approximately linear fashion. This led to the conclusion, raised before, that transport in the caisson is dominated by heterogeneity effects, i.e. by spatial variability of the material Such effects cannot be captured by traditional one-dimensional models. In order to account for the effect of heterogeneity, the saturated flow experiments have been analyzed by using stochastic transport modeling. The apparent linear growth of dispersivity with distance suggested that the system behaves like a stratified one. Consequently, the model of Dagan and Bresier has been adopted in order to interpret concentration measurements. In this simple model the caisson is viewed as a bundle of columns of different permeabilities, which are characterized by a p.d.f. (probability denasity function).

  11. Colloid Transport in Porous Medium: Impact of High Salinity Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbrod, N.; Magal, E.; Yechieli, Y.; Yakirevich, A.

    2009-12-01

    We explored the transport of colloids suspended in natural saline solutions with a wide range of ionic strengths, up to Dead Sea brines. Migration of latex microspheres through saturated sand columns of different sizes was studied in lab experiments, and colloid transport was simulated with a mathematical model. We have found that latex microspheres were mobile even in the extremely saline brines of the Dead Sea (ionic strength = 100.9 M). At this high ionic strength, according to the common colloid transport theories, no energetic barrier to colloid attachment exists and colloid adsorption was expected to be a favorable process. Apparently, even in that high salinity, colloids adsorption is not complete and ~20% colloids are allowed to transport (through 30-cm long column). Colloid transport was found to be related to the solution salinity, as expected. After 2-3 pore volumes (PV) the relative concentration of colloids at the outlet of 30-cm long columns decreased as the solution ionic strength increased until some critical value (ionic strength greater than 10-1.8 M) and then remained constant as the solution salinity increased. To further explore the sorption of colloids on sand surfaces in Dead Sea brines, breakthrough curves (BTCs) were studied using 7-cm long columns, through which hundreds of PV were introduced. The observed BTCs exhibited a bi-modal shape that suggests different rates of colloid attachment. After initial breakthrough the relative concentration of colloids at the outlet rose to a value of 0.8 (after 1.5 PV), and it remained relatively constant until approximately 17 PV were flushed through the column. After a total flow of about 20 PV, the relative concentration reached a value of one. The colloid migration process was successfully modeled using the limited entrapment model (Pachepsky et al., 2006), assuming the colloid attachment rate is dependent on the concentration of attached colloids.

  12. Transport properties of polymer solutions. A comparative approach.

    PubMed Central

    Foster, K R; Cheever, E; Leonard, J B; Blum, F D

    1984-01-01

    A variety of transport properties have been measured for solutions of the water soluble polymer poly(ethylene oxide)(PEO) with molecular weights ranging from 200 to 14,000, and volume fractions ranging from 0-80%. The transport properties are thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity at audio frequencies (in solutions containing dilute electrolyte), and water self-diffusion. These data, together with dielectric relaxation data previously reported, are amenable to analysis by the same mixture theory. The ionic conductivity and water self-diffusion coefficient, but not the thermal conductivity, are substantially smaller than predicted by the Maxwell and Hanai mixture relations, calculated using the known transport properties of pure liquid water. A 25% (by volume) solution of PEO exhibits an average dielectric relaxation frequency of the suspending water of one half that of pure water, with clear evidence of a distribution of relaxation times present. The limits of the cumulative distribution of dielectric relaxation times that are consistent with the data are obtained using a linear programming technique. The application of simple mixture theory, under appropriate limiting conditions, yields hydration values for the more dilute polymer solutions that are somewhat larger than values obtained from thermodynamic measurements. PMID:6733244

  13. Antitubercular Agent Delamanid and Metabolites as Substrates and Inhibitors of ABC and Solute Carrier Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Shibata, Masakazu; Hashizume, Kenta; Hamasako, Yusuke; Ohzone, Yoshihiro; Kashiyama, Eiji; Umehara, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Delamanid (Deltyba, OPC-67683) is the first approved drug in a novel class of nitro-dihydro-imidazooxazoles developed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Patients with tuberculosis require treatment with multiple drugs, several of which have known drug-drug interactions. Transporters regulate drug absorption, distribution, and excretion; therefore, the inhibition of transport by one agent may alter the pharmacokinetics of another, leading to unexpected adverse events. Therefore, it is important to understand how delamanid affects transport activity. In the present study, the potencies of delamanid and its main metabolites as the substrates and inhibitors of various transporters were evaluated in vitro. Delamanid was not transported by the efflux ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1/ABCB1) and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), solute carrier (SLC) transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptides, or organic cation transporter 1. Similarly, metabolite 1 (M1) was not a substrate for any of these transporters except P-gp. Delamanid showed no inhibitory effect on ABC transporters MDR1, BCRP, and bile salt export pump (BSEP; ABCB11), SLC transporters, or organic anion transporters. M1 and M2 inhibited P-gp- and BCRP-mediated transport but did so only at the 50% inhibitory concentrations (M1, 4.65 and 5.71 μmol/liter, respectively; M2, 7.80 and 6.02 μmol/liter, respectively), well above the corresponding maximum concentration in plasma values observed following the administration of multiple doses in clinical trials. M3 and M4 did not affect the activities of any of the transporters tested. These in vitro data suggest that delamanid is unlikely to have clinically relevant interactions with drugs for which absorption and disposition are mediated by this group of transporters. PMID:27021329

  14. Generic transport coefficients of a confined electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Tomoyuki; Washizu, Hitoshi; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-11-01

    Physical parameters characterizing electrokinetic transport in a confined electrolyte solution are reconstructed from the generic transport coefficients obtained within the classical nonequilibrium statistical thermodynamic framework. The electro-osmotic flow, the diffusio-osmotic flow, the osmotic current, as well as the pressure-driven Poiseuille-type flow, the electric conduction, and the ion diffusion are described by this set of transport coefficients. The reconstruction is demonstrated for an aqueous NaCl solution between two parallel charged surfaces with a nanoscale gap, by using the molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. A Green-Kubo approach is employed to evaluate the transport coefficients in the linear-response regime, and the fluxes induced by the pressure, electric, and chemical potential fields are compared with the results of nonequilibrium MD simulations. Using this numerical scheme, the influence of the salt concentration on the transport coefficients is investigated. Anomalous reversal of diffusio-osmotic current, as well as that of electro-osmotic flow, is observed at high surface charge densities and high added-salt concentrations.

  15. Simulation of solute transport across low-permeability barrier walls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2006-01-01

    Low-permeability, non-reactive barrier walls are often used to contain contaminants in an aquifer. Rates of solute transport through such barriers are typically many orders of magnitude slower than rates through the aquifer. Nevertheless, the success of remedial actions may be sensitive to these low rates of transport. Two numerical simulation methods for representing low-permeability barriers in a finite-difference groundwater-flow and transport model were tested. In the first method, the hydraulic properties of the barrier were represented directly on grid cells and in the second method, the intercell hydraulic-conductance values were adjusted to approximate the reduction in horizontal flow, allowing use of a coarser and computationally efficient grid. The alternative methods were tested and evaluated on the basis of hypothetical test problems and a field case involving tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination at a Superfund site in New Hampshire. For all cases, advective transport across the barrier was negligible, but preexisting numerical approaches to calculate dispersion yielded dispersive fluxes that were greater than expected. A transport model (MODFLOW-GWT) was modified to (1) allow different dispersive and diffusive properties to be assigned to the barrier than the adjacent aquifer and (2) more accurately calculate dispersion from concentration gradients and solute fluxes near barriers. The new approach yields reasonable and accurate concentrations for the test cases. ?? 2006.

  16. Simulation of solute transport across low-permeability barrier walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, Philip T.; Konikow, Leonard F.; Hornberger, George Z.

    2006-05-01

    Low-permeability, non-reactive barrier walls are often used to contain contaminants in an aquifer. Rates of solute transport through such barriers are typically many orders of magnitude slower than rates through the aquifer. Nevertheless, the success of remedial actions may be sensitive to these low rates of transport. Two numerical simulation methods for representing low-permeability barriers in a finite-difference groundwater-flow and transport model were tested. In the first method, the hydraulic properties of the barrier were represented directly on grid cells and in the second method, the intercell hydraulic-conductance values were adjusted to approximate the reduction in horizontal flow, allowing use of a coarser and computationally efficient grid. The alternative methods were tested and evaluated on the basis of hypothetical test problems and a field case involving tetrachloroethylene (PCE) contamination at a Superfund site in New Hampshire. For all cases, advective transport across the barrier was negligible, but preexisting numerical approaches to calculate dispersion yielded dispersive fluxes that were greater than expected. A transport model (MODFLOW-GWT) was modified to (1) allow different dispersive and diffusive properties to be assigned to the barrier than the adjacent aquifer and (2) more accurately calculate dispersion from concentration gradients and solute fluxes near barriers. The new approach yields reasonable and accurate concentrations for the test cases.

  17. Combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium transport model for solution conduits.

    PubMed

    Field, Malcolm S; Leij, Feike J

    2014-02-01

    Solute transport in karst aquifers is primarily constrained to relatively complex and inaccessible solution conduits where transport is often rapid, turbulent, and at times constrictive. Breakthrough curves generated from tracer tests in solution conduits are typically positively-skewed with long tails evident. Physical nonequilibrium models to fit breakthrough curves for tracer tests in solution conduits are now routinely employed. Chemical nonequilibrium processes are likely important interactions, however. In addition to partitioning between different flow domains, there may also be equilibrium and nonequilibrium partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases. A combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium (PCNE) model was developed for an instantaneous release similar to that developed by Leij and Bradford (2009) for a pulse release. The PCNE model allows for partitioning open space in solution conduits into mobile and immobile flow regions with first-order mass transfer between the two regions to represent physical nonequilibrium in the conduit. Partitioning between the aqueous and solid phases proceeds either as an equilibrium process or as a first-order process and represents chemical nonequilibrium for both the mobile and immobile regions. Application of the model to three example breakthrough curves demonstrates the applicability of the combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium model to tracer tests conducted in karst aquifers, with exceptionally good model fits to the data. The three models, each from a different state in the United States, exhibit very different velocities, dispersions, and other transport properties with most of the transport occurring via the fraction of mobile water. Fitting the model suggests the potentially important interaction of physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes.

  18. Calculation of solute transport parameters from the breakthrough experimental data using solute transport models

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Traditionally, a two-parameter partial differential equation has been used to describe the one-dimensional convective-dispersive transport of chemicals in field soils. The parameters in this equation include the dispersion coefficient and a distribution coefficient, the latter accounting for interac...

  19. Quantifying the relative contributions of different solute carriers to aggregate substrate transport

    PubMed Central

    Taslimifar, Mehdi; Oparija, Lalita; Verrey, Francois; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Olgac, Ufuk; Makrides, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Determining the contributions of different transporter species to overall cellular transport is fundamental for understanding the physiological regulation of solutes. We calculated the relative activities of Solute Carrier (SLC) transporters using the Michaelis-Menten equation and global fitting to estimate the normalized maximum transport rate for each transporter (Vmax). Data input were the normalized measured uptake of the essential neutral amino acid (AA) L-leucine (Leu) from concentration-dependence assays performed using Xenopus laevis oocytes. Our methodology was verified by calculating Leu and L-phenylalanine (Phe) data in the presence of competitive substrates and/or inhibitors. Among 9 potentially expressed endogenous X. laevis oocyte Leu transporter species, activities of only the uniporters SLC43A2/LAT4 (and/or SLC43A1/LAT3) and the sodium symporter SLC6A19/B0AT1 were required to account for total uptake. Furthermore, Leu and Phe uptake by heterologously expressed human SLC6A14/ATB0,+ and SLC43A2/LAT4 was accurately calculated. This versatile systems biology approach is useful for analyses where the kinetics of each active protein species can be represented by the Hill equation. Furthermore, its applicable even in the absence of protein expression data. It could potentially be applied, for example, to quantify drug transporter activities in target cells to improve specificity. PMID:28091567

  20. Molecular simulations of solute transport in xylose isomerase crystals.

    PubMed

    Malek, Kourosh; Coppens, Marc-Olivier

    2008-02-07

    Cross-linked enzyme crystals (CLECs) enclose an extensive regular matrix of chiral solvent-filled nanopores, via which ions and solutes travel in and out. Several cross-linked enzyme crystals have recently been used for chiral separation and as biocatalysts. We studied the dynamics of solute transport in orthorhombic d-xylose isomerase (XI) crystals by means of Brownian dynamics (BD) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which show how the protein residues influence the dynamics of solute molecules in confined regions inside the lattice. In the BD simulations, coarse-grained beads represent solutes of different sizes. The diffusion of S-phenylglycine molecules inside XI crystals is investigated by long-time MD simulations. The computed diffusion coefficients within a crystal are found to be orders of magnitude lower than in bulk water. The simulation results are compared to the recent experimental studies of diffusion and reaction inside XI crystals. The insights obtained from simulations allow us to understand the nature of solute-protein interactions and transport phenomena in CLECs, which is useful for the design of novel nanoporous biocatalysts and bioseparations based on CLECs.

  1. From analytical solutions of solute transport equations to multidimensional time-domain random walk (TDRW) algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    In this study, new multi-dimensional time-domain random walk (TDRW) algorithms are derived from approximate one-dimensional (1-D), two-dimensional (2-D), and three-dimensional (3-D) analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and from exact 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D analytical solutions of the pure-diffusion equation. These algorithms enable the calculation of both the time required for a particle to travel a specified distance in a homogeneous medium and the mass recovery at the observation point, which may be incomplete due to 2-D or 3-D transverse dispersion or diffusion. The method is extended to heterogeneous media, represented as a piecewise collection of homogeneous media. The particle motion is then decomposed along a series of intermediate checkpoints located on the medium interface boundaries. The accuracy of the multi-dimensional TDRW method is verified against (i) exact analytical solutions of solute transport in homogeneous media and (ii) finite-difference simulations in a synthetic 2-D heterogeneous medium of simple geometry. The results demonstrate that the method is ideally suited to purely diffusive transport and to advection-dispersion transport problems dominated by advection. Conversely, the method is not recommended for highly dispersive transport problems because the accuracy of the advection-dispersion TDRW algorithms degrades rapidly for a low Péclet number, consistent with the accuracy limit of the approximate analytical solutions. The proposed approach provides a unified methodology for deriving multi-dimensional time-domain particle equations and may be applicable to other mathematical transport models, provided that appropriate analytical solutions are available.

  2. Political activity for physical activity: health advocacy for active transport

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Effective health advocacy is a priority for efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Local councils are an important audience for this advocacy. The aim of the current study was to describe features of advocacy for active transport via submissions to city council annual plans in New Zealand, and the impact of an information sheet to encourage the health sector to be involved in this process. Written submissions to city council's annual consultation process were requested for 16 city councils over the period of three years (2007/08, 2008/09, and 2009/10). Submissions were reviewed and categories of responses were created. An advocacy information sheet encouraging health sector participation and summarising some of the evidence-base related to physical activity, active transport and health was released just prior to the 2009/10 submission time. Over the period of the study, city councils received 47,392 submissions, 17% of which were related to active transport. Most submissions came from city residents, with a small proportion (2%) from the health sector. The largest category of submissions was in support of pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, design and maintenance of facilities and additional features to support use of these transport modes. Health arguments featured prominently in justifications for active transport initiatives, including concerns about injury risk, obesity, physical inactivity, personal safety and facilities for people with disabilities. There was evidence that the information sheet was utilised by some health sector submitters (12.5%), providing tentative support for initiatives of this nature. In conclusion, the study provides novel information about the current nature of health advocacy for active transport and informs future advocacy efforts about areas for emphasis, such as health benefits of active transport, and potential alliances with other sectors such as environmental sustainability, transport and urban

  3. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, A. G.; Ghanbarian, B.; Skinner, T. E.; Ewing, R. P.

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture.

  4. An overview of uncertainties in modelling groundwater solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, Jesús

    1993-06-01

    Model predictions are uncertain because of uncertainties on future and/or anthropogenic stresses, parameter values and conceptual models. The first two groups of problems can be addressed through rather systematic methods (scenario analysis, error transmission techniques, automatic calibration algorithms, etc.). However, conceptual uncertainties are rarely given adequate attention. The objective of this paper is to synthesize conceptual difficulties associated with transport. These include: (1) processes that are significant at small scales may not be relevant at large scales; (2) inversely, new processes (e.g., dispersion) emerge in response to increase in scale and the way to represent them may depend on the assumed model structure; (3) the observed shapes of both breakthrough curves and pollutant plumes are not well represented by the classical transport equation; (4) porosities and dispersivities derived from field tracer tests often exhibit a directional dependence; etc. Though not directly related to solute transport, scale effects on hydraulic conductivity may also affect solute transport modelling. When these anomalies are examined, it is concluded that they are directly or indirectly caused by heterogeneity. Current approaches for dealing with heterogeneity can be divided into stochastic and deterministic. Stochastic methods have been successful in explaining qualitatively some anomalies of solute transport, but they appear to be far from reaching a stage at which they can be used routinely for solving realistic field problems. On the other hand, when applied with care, deterministic methods have been successfully used in actual problems. Yet, it can be argued that they fail to account for small-scale variability of concentrations so that they would become ineffective when dealing with nonlinear processes, such as chemical reactions. Relevance of on-going research for overcoming these difficulties is discussed.

  5. A pump-pore model for transmembrane transport of hydrophilic solutes.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, E

    1993-01-01

    Transmembrane transport of a hydrophilic solute is presumed to begin when hydrated ligand adheres in Velcro-like fashion to hydrated membrane surface. Asymmetric physical forces cause rolling movements of ligand over membrane surface until contact occurs with appropriate transport machinery, consisting of a pump (Pu) to which is tethered a ligand (Li)-specific perm-selective pore (Po). The Po is in the open form when the Li is attached to an external high-affinity allosteric site on it. The active form of the Pu is stabilized by attachment of the Li to high-affinity internal or low-affinity external allosteric sites. The active form of the Pu induces closure of the Po, even when ligand is bound to it; the inactive conformation of the Pu permits Po opening. Attachment of Li to either one of two binding sites on the active Pu and irreversible envelopment by it in Venus fly-trap fashion trigger transmembrane transport of Li. Multistep attachment of Li is rate-limiting in the transport process. Application of a simple equation derived from relevant kinetic considerations relating velocity of transport (V) to concentration of Li (L), V = k1(L)1/2, gives V-L curves approximating transport data obtained in a variety of biological systems. This model is congruent with the ability of cells to concentrate substances from extremely dilute solutions and with the adaptive informational value to cells of rates of transport. PMID:8102798

  6. Modeling effects of multinode wells on solute transport.

    PubMed

    Konikow, Leonard F; Hornberger, George Z

    2006-01-01

    Long-screen wells or long open boreholes with intraborehole flow potentially provide pathways for contaminants to move from one location to another in a ground water flow system. Such wells also can perturb a flow field so that the well will not provide water samples that are representative of ground water quality a short distance away from the well. A methodology is presented to accurately and efficiently simulate solute transport in ground water systems that include wells longer than the grid spacing used in a simulation model of the system and hence are connected to multiple nodes of the grid. The methods are implemented in a MODFLOW-compatible solute-transport model and use MODFLOW's Multi-Node Well Package but are generic and can be readily implemented in other solute-transport models. For nonpumping multinode wells (used to simulate open boreholes or observation wells, for example) and for low-rate pumping wells (in which the flow between the well and the ground water system is not unidirectional), a simple routing and local mixing model was developed to calculate nodal concentrations within the borehole. For high-rate pumping multinode wells (either withdrawal or injection, in which flow between the well and the ground water system is in the same direction at all well nodes), complete and instantaneous mixing in the wellbore of all inflows is assumed.

  7. Eolian transport, saline lake basins, and groundwater solutes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Warren W.; Sanford, Ward E.

    1995-01-01

    Eolian processes associated with saline lakes are shown to be important in determining solute concentration in groundwater in arid and semiarid areas. Steady state mass balance analyses of chloride in the groundwater at Double Lakes, a saline lake basin in the southern High Plains of Texas, United States, suggest that approximately 4.5 × 105 kg of chloride is removed from the relatively small (4.7 km2) basin floor each year by deflation. This mass enters the groundwater down the wind gradient from the lake, degrading the water quality. The estimates of mass transport were independently determined by evaluation of solutes in the unsaturated zone and by solute mass balance calculations of groundwater flux. Transport of salts from the lake was confirmed over a short term (2 years) by strategically placed dust collectors. Results consistent with those at Double Lake were obtained from dune surfaces collected upwind and downwind from a sabkha near the city of Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. The eolian transport process provides an explanation of the degraded groundwater quality associated with the 30–40 saline lake basins on the southern half of the southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico and in many other arid and semiarid areas.

  8. Modeling effects of multinode wells on solute transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2006-01-01

    Long-screen wells or long open boreholes with intraborehole flow potentially provide pathways for contaminants to move from one location to another in a ground water flow system. Such wells also can perturb a flow field so that the well will not provide water samples that are representative of ground water quality a short distance away from the well. A methodology is presented to accurately and efficiently simulate solute transport in ground water systems that include wells longer than the grid spacing used in a simulation model of the system and hence are connected to multiple nodes of the grid. The methods are implemented in a MODFLOW-compatible solute-transport model and use MODFLOW's Multi-Node Well Package but are generic and can be readily implemented in other solute-transport models. For nonpumping multinode wells (used to simulate open boreholes or observation wells, for example) and for low-rate pumping wells (in which the flow between the well and the ground water system is not unidirectional), a simple routing and local mixing model was developed to calculate nodal concentrations within the borehole. For high-rate pumping multinode wells (either withdrawal or injection, in which flow between the well and the ground water system is in the same direction at all well nodes), complete and instantaneous mixing in the wellbore of all inflows is assumed.

  9. SOLUTIONS APPROXIMATING SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A LEAKY AQUIFER RECEIVING WASTEWATER INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model amenable to analytical solution techniques is developed for the investigation of contaminant transport from an injection well into a leaky aquifer system, which comprises a pumped and an unpumped aquifer connected to each other by an aquitard. A steady state ...

  10. SOLUTIONS APPROXIMATING SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN A LEAKY AQUIFER RECEIVING WASTEWATER INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A mathematical model amenable to analytical solution techniques is developed for the investigation of contaminant transport from an injection well into a leaky aquifer system, which comprises a pumped and an unpumped aquifer connected to each other by an aquitard. A steady state ...

  11. Analytical solutions for ore fluid transport in fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Qi-Cong; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Bao, Zheng-Yu; Li, Fanglin

    2002-06-01

    The Dongguashan skarn copper deposit can be considered as the product of the transport-chemical reaction coupling process of ore-forming materials (for example, complexes of copper) in discrete, parallel fractures in a porous medium system. A mathematical model of metallogenesis has been established and the accurate analytical solutions for depicting the transport of ore-forming materials have been worked out. In establishing the model of metallogenesis and working out the analytical solutions, the following aspects have been taken into consideration: (1) advective transport along fractures; (2) diffusion and longitudinal mechanical dispersion of ore-forming materials (solutes) along the fracture axis; (3) diffusion of ore-forming materials from the fractures to the wall media; (4) adsorption of ore-forming materials on the surface of wall-rock matrices; (5) adsorption of ore-forming materials within the wall-rock matrices; (6) reduction of the concentrations of solutes due to the chemical reactions between ore fluids and wall-rock matrices and the precipitation of ore-forming materials. The general transient solution takes the form of a double integral, which can be evaluated using the Gauss-Legendre quadrature. By comparing the steady-state solutions in the special case of = D 0 (without dispersion) and of = [!=] 0 (with dispersion), a simple criterion can be established, with which one can assess the importance of longitudinal dispersion along the fracture system. Case studies showed that the developing extent of fractures in the system would exert a great influence on the transport rate and distance of ore-forming materials. In case that fractures are developed at small intervals, ore-forming materials will be transported along the fracture system over larger distance because of the limited capability of the wall rocks to store ore-forming materials. That is to say, larger orebodies would be formed. In the case of higher transport rates of ore fluids along the

  12. Energetics of active transport processes.

    PubMed

    Essig, A; Caplan, S R

    1968-12-01

    Discussions of active transport usually assume stoichiometry between the rate of transport J(+) and the metabolic rate J(r). However, the observation of a linear relationship between J(+) and J(r) does not imply a stoichiometric relationship, i.e., complete coupling. Since coupling may possibly be incomplete, we examine systems of an arbitrary degree of coupling q, regarding stoichiometry as a limiting case. We consider a sodium pump, with J(+) and J(r) linear functions of the electrochemical potential difference, -X(+), and the chemical affinity of the metabolic driving reaction, A. The affinity is well defined even for various complex reaction pathways. Incorporation of a series barrier and a parallel leak does not affect the linearity of the composite observable system. The affinity of some region of the metabolic chain may be maintained constant, either by large pools of reactants or by regulation. If so, this affinity can be evaluated by two independent methods. Sodium transport is conveniently characterized by the open-circuit potential (Deltapsi)(I=0) and the natural limits, level flow (J(+))(X+=0), and static head X(0) (+) = (X(+))(J+=0). With high degrees of coupling -X(0) (+)/F approaches the electromotive force E(Na) (Ussing); -X(0) (+)/F cannot be identified with ((RT/F) ln f)(X+=0), where f is the flux ratio. The efficiency eta = -J(+)X(+)/J(r)A is of significance only when appreciable energy is being converted from one form to another. When either J(+) or -X(+) is small eta is low; the significant parameters are then the efficacies epsilon(J+) = J(+)/J(r)A and epsilon(X+) = -X(+)/J(r)A, respectively maximal at level flow and static head. Leak increases both J(+) and epsilon(J+) for isotonic saline reabsorption, but diminishes -X(0) (+) and epsilon(Xfemale symbol). Electrical resistance reflects both passive parameters and metabolism. Various fundamental relations are preserved despite coupling of passive ion and water flows.

  13. Solute transport in orthorhombic lysozyme crystals: a molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Malek, Kourosh

    2007-12-01

    Long-time equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the passage of a substrate, L: -arabinose, through nanopores of orthorhombic hen egg white lysozyme crystals. Cross-linked protein crystals (CLPC), as novel biological nanoporous media, consist of an extensive regular matrix of chiral solvent-filled nanopores via which ions and solutes, e.g. sugars and amino acids, travel in and out. We studied the diffusive motion of arabinose inside protein channels. The computed diffusion coefficients within the crystal were orders of magnitudes lower relative to the diffusion coefficient of the solute in water. This study is valuable for understanding the nature of solute-protein interactions and transport phenomena in CLPCs and provides an understanding of biocatalytic and bioseparation processes using CLPC.

  14. Hydrophilic solute transport across the rat blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Lucchesi, K.J.

    1987-01-01

    Brain capillary permeability-surface area products (PS) of hydrophilic solutes ranging in size from 180 to 5,500 Daltons were measured in rats according to the method of Ohno, Pettigrew and Rapoport. The distribution volume of 70 KD dextran at 10 minutes after i.v. injection was also measured to determine the residual volume of blood in brain tissue at the time of sacrifice. Small test solutes were injected in pairs in order to elucidate whether their transfer into the brain proceeds by diffusion through water- or lipid-filled channels or by vesicular transport. This issue was examined in rats whose blood-brain barrier (BBB) was presumed to be intact (untreated) and in rats that received intracarotid infusions to open the BBB (isosmotic salt (ISS) and hyperosmolar arabinose). Ohno PS values of {sup 3}H-inulin and {sup 14}C-L-glucose in untreated rats were found to decrease as the labelling time was lengthened. This was evidence that a rapidly equilibrating compartment exists between blood and brain that renders the Ohno two-compartment model inadequate for computing true transfer rate constants. When the data were reanalyzed using a multi-compartment graphical analysis, solutes with different molecular radii were found to enter the brain at approximately equal rates. Furthermore, unidirectional transport is likely to be initiated by solute adsorption to a glycocalyx coat on the luminal surface of brain capillary endothelium. Apparently, more inulin than L-glucose was adsorbed, which may account for its slightly faster transfer across the BBB. After rats were treated with intracarotid infusions of ISS or hyperosmolar arabinose, solute PS values were significantly increased, but the ratio of PS for each of the solute pairs approached that of their free-diffusion coefficients.

  15. Solutions approximating solute transport in a leaky aquifer receiving wastewater injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chia-Shyun

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model amenable to analytical solution techniques is developed for the investigation of contaminant transport from an injection well into a leaky aquifer system, which comprises a pumped and an unpumped aquifer connected to each other by an aquitard. A steady state groundwater flow field is assumed, where the injected fluids move horizontally in the pumped aquifer and vertically in the aquitard. The unpumped aquifer is assumed to remain in hydrostatic condition due to its large transmissivity. Descriptions of groundwater velocities are based on appropriate leaky aquifer well hydraulics. The model assumes that contaminants are transmitted in the pumped aquifer by radial advection, and in the aquitard by vertical one-dimensional advection and longitudinal dispersion. Two coupled linear differential equations are formulated to deal with this transport problem; they involve variable coefficients dependent on Bessel functions. The unpumped aquifer is incorporated into the model as a boundary condition. Semianalytical transient solutions for concentration distributions in the pumped aquifer and the aquitard can be obtained by numerically inverting the Laplace domain solutions of the model with the Crump [1976] method. However, the steady state solutions of the model are determined in closed forms. In general, the modeling approach neglecting longitudinal dispersion in the pumped aquifer and lateral dispersion in the aquitard does not introduce significant error to the modelling results, as shown by the good agreement between numerical solutions including these two transport mechanisms and the solutions of the proposed model. Within the context of the assumed hydrogeological conditions, the proposed model appears to be a valid approximation to the problem of interest. Type curves for concentration evaluated at the well bore and the top of the aquitard are given, which can be employed to estimate whether the unpumped aquifer would be polluted as the

  16. Association between arterial stiffness and peritoneal small solute transport rate.

    PubMed

    Zhe, Xing-wei; Tian, Xin-kui; Chen, Wei; Guo, Li-juan; Gu, Yue; Chen, Hui-min; Tang, Li-jun; Wang, Tao

    2008-05-01

    While cardiovascular disease accounts for 40-50% of the mortality in dialysis patients, and while a high peritoneal transport in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) is an independent predictor of outcome, it is unclear if there are any links. Aortic stiffness has become established as a cardiovascular risk factor. We thus studied pulse wave velocity (PWV) in CAPD patients to explore the possible link between peritoneal small solute transport and aortic stiffness. CAPD patients (n = 76, 27 M/49 F) in our center were included in the present study. Aortic stiffness was assessed by brachial pulse pressure (PP) and carotid-femoral PWV. Patients' peritoneal small solute transport rate was assessed by D/P(cr) at 4 h. Extracellular water over total body water (E/T ratio) was assessed by means of bioimpedance analysis. C-reactive protein was also measured. Carotid-femoral PWV was positively associated with patients' age (r = 0.555; P < 0.01), time on peritoneal dialysis (r = 0.332; P < 0.01), diabetic status (r = 0.319; P < 0.01), D/P(cr) (r = 0.241; P < 0.05), PP (r = 0.475; P < 0.01), and E/T (r = 0.606; P < 0.01). In a multivariate regression analysis, carotid-femoral PWV was independently determined by E/T (P < 0.01), PP (P < 0.01), age (P < 0.01), and D/P(cr) (P < 0.05). D/P(cr), in addition to E/T, age, and PP, was an independent predictor of elevated carotid-femoral PWV in CAPD patients, suggesting that there might be a link between high aortic stiffness and increased peritoneal small solute transport rate.

  17. Phosphate transporters: a tale of two solute carrier families.

    PubMed

    Virkki, Leila V; Biber, Jürg; Murer, Heini; Forster, Ian C

    2007-09-01

    Phosphate is an essential component of life and must be actively transported into cells against its electrochemical gradient. In vertebrates, two unrelated families of Na+ -dependent P(i) transporters carry out this task. Remarkably, the two families transport different P(i) species: whereas type II Na+/P(i) cotransporters (SCL34) prefer divalent HPO(4)(2-), type III Na(+)/P(i) cotransporters (SLC20) transport monovalent H2PO(4)(-). The SCL34 family comprises both electrogenic and electroneutral members that are expressed in various epithelia and other polarized cells. Through regulated activity in apical membranes of the gut and kidney, they maintain body P(i) homeostasis, and in salivary and mammary glands, liver, and testes they play a role in modulating the P(i) content of luminal fluids. The two SLC20 family members PiT-1 and PiT-2 are electrogenic and ubiquitously expressed and may serve a housekeeping role for cell P(i) homeostasis; however, also more specific roles are emerging for these transporters in, for example, bone mineralization. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the characterization of the transport kinetics, structure-function relationships, and physiological implications of having two distinct Na+/P(i) cotransporter families.

  18. Hydrogeochemistry and simulated solute transport, Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, S.G.; Saulnier, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    Oil-shale mining activities in Piceance basin in northwestern Colorado could adversely affect the ground- and surface-water quality in the basin. This study of the hydrology and geochemistry of the area used ground-water solute-transport-modeling techniques to investigate the possible impact of the mines on water quality. Maps of the extent and structure of the aquifer were prepared and show that a saturated thickness of 2,000 feet occurs in the northeast part of the basin. Ground-water recharge in the upland areas in the east, south, and west parts of the basin moves down into deeper zones in the aquifer and laterally to the discharge areas along Piceance and Yellow Creeks. The saline zone and the unsaturated zone provide the majority of the dissolved solids found in the ground water. Precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions are also occuring in the aquifer. Model simulations of ground-water pumpage in tracts C-a and C-b indicate that the altered direction of ground-water movement near the pumped mines will cause an improvement in ground-water quality near the mines and a degradation of water quality downgradient from the tracts. Model simulations of mine leaching in tract C-a and C-b indicate that equal rates of mine leaching in the tracts will produce much different effects on the water quality in the basin. Tract C-a, by virtue of its remote location from perennial streams, will primarily degrade the ground-water quality over a large area to the northeast of the tract. Tract C-b, by contrast, will primarily degrade the surface-water quality in Piceance Creek, with only localized effects on the ground-water quality. (USGS)

  19. Hydrogeochemistry and simulated solute transport, Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robson, Stanley G.; Saulnier, George J.

    1980-01-01

    Oil-shale mining activities in Piceance basin in northwestern Colorado could adversely affect the ground- and surface-water quality in the basin. This study of the hydrology and geochemistry of the area used groundwater solute-transport-modeling techniques to investigate the possible impact of the mines on water quality. Maps of the extent and structure of the aquifer were prepared and show that a saturated thickness of 2,000 feet occurs in the northeast part of the basin. Ground-water recharge in the upland areas in the east, south, and west parts of the basin moves down into deeper zones in the aquifer and laterally to the discharge areas along Piceance and Yellow Creeks. The saline zone and the unsaturated zone provide the majority of the dissolved solids found in the ground water. Precipitation, ion-exchange, and oxidation-reduction reactions are also occurring in the aquifer. Model simulations of groundwater pumpage in tracts C-a and C-b indicate that the altered direction of groundwater movement near the pumped mines will cause an improvement in groundwater quality near the mines and a degradation of water quality downgradient from the tracts. Model simulations of mine leaching in tract C-a and C-b indicate that equal rates of mine leaching in the tracts will produce much different effects on the water quality in the basin. Tract C-a, by virtue of its remote location from perennial streams, will primarily degrade the groundwater quality over a large area to the northeast of the tract. Tract C-b, by contrast, will primarily degrade the surface-water quality in Piceance Creek, with only localized effects on the groundwater quality. (USGS)

  20. Modeling of active transmembrane transport in a mixture theory framework.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Morrison, Barclay; Hung, Clark T

    2010-05-01

    This study formulates governing equations for active transport across semi-permeable membranes within the framework of the theory of mixtures. In mixture theory, which models the interactions of any number of fluid and solid constituents, a supply term appears in the conservation of linear momentum to describe momentum exchanges among the constituents. In past applications, this momentum supply was used to model frictional interactions only, thereby describing passive transport processes. In this study, it is shown that active transport processes, which impart momentum to solutes or solvent, may also be incorporated in this term. By projecting the equation of conservation of linear momentum along the normal to the membrane, a jump condition is formulated for the mechano-electrochemical potential of fluid constituents which is generally applicable to nonequilibrium processes involving active transport. The resulting relations are simple and easy to use, and address an important need in the membrane transport literature.

  1. JOVIAN STRATOSPHERE AS A CHEMICAL TRANSPORT SYSTEM: BENCHMARK ANALYTICAL SOLUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xi; Shia Runlie; Yung, Yuk L.

    2013-04-20

    We systematically investigated the solvable analytical benchmark cases in both one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) chemical-advective-diffusive systems. We use the stratosphere of Jupiter as an example but the results can be applied to other planetary atmospheres and exoplanetary atmospheres. In the 1D system, we show that CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6} are mainly in diffusive equilibrium, and the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} profile can be approximated by modified Bessel functions. In the 2D system in the meridional plane, analytical solutions for two typical circulation patterns are derived. Simple tracer transport modeling demonstrates that the distribution of a short-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) is dominated by the local chemical sources and sinks, while that of a long-lived species (such as C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) is significantly influenced by the circulation pattern. We find that an equator-to-pole circulation could qualitatively explain the Cassini observations, but a pure diffusive transport process could not. For slowly rotating planets like the close-in extrasolar planets, the interaction between the advection by the zonal wind and chemistry might cause a phase lag between the final tracer distribution and the original source distribution. The numerical simulation results from the 2D Caltech/JPL chemistry-transport model agree well with the analytical solutions for various cases.

  2. Quantifying solute transport processes: are chemically "conservative" tracers electrically conservative?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singha, Kamini; Li, Li; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Regberg, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a nonreactive or conservative tracer, commonly invoked in investigations of solute transport, requires additional study in the context of electrical geophysical monitoring. Tracers that are commonly considered conservative may undergo reactive processes, such as ion exchange, thus changing the aqueous composition of the system. As a result, the measured electrical conductivity may reflect not only solute transport but also reactive processes. We have evaluated the impacts of ion exchange reactions, rate-limited mass transfer, and surface conduction on quantifying tracer mass, mean arrival time, and temporal variance in laboratory-scale column experiments. Numerical examples showed that (1) ion exchange can lead to resistivity-estimated tracer mass, velocity, and dispersivity that may be inaccurate; (2) mass transfer leads to an overestimate in the mobile tracer mass and an underestimate in velocity when using electrical methods; and (3) surface conductance does not notably affect estimated moments when high-concentration tracers are used, although this phenomenon may be important at low concentrations or in sediments with high and/or spatially variable cation-exchange capacity. In all cases, colocated groundwater concentration measurements are of high importance for interpreting geophysical data with respect to the controlling transport processes of interest.

  3. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  4. Transport of reacting solutes subject to a moving dissolution boundary--Numerical methods and solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willis, Catherine; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    In this paper we consider examples of chemistry-affected transport processes in porous media. A moving boundary problem which arises during transport with precipitation-dissolution reactions is solved by three different numerical methods. Two of these methods (one explicit and one implicit) are based on an integral formulation of mass balance and lead to an approximation of a weak solution. These methods are compared to a front-tracking scheme. Although the two approaches are conceptually different, the numerical solutions showed good agreement. As the ratio of dispersion to convection decreases, the methods based on the integral formulation become computationally more efficient. Specific reactions were modeled to examine the dependence of the system on the physical and chemical parameters.

  5. Solute transport modelling in a coupled water and heat flow system applied to cold regions hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2016-04-01

    In cold regions, flow in the unsaturated zone is highly dynamic with seasonal variability and changes in temperature, moisture, and heat and water fluxes, all of which affect ground freeze-thaw processes and influence transport of inert and reactive waterborne substances. In arctic permafrost environments, near-surface groundwater flow is further restricted to a relatively shallow and seasonally variable active layer, confined by perennially frozen ground below. The active layer is typically partially saturated with ice, liquid water and air, and is strongly dependent on seasonal temperature fluctuations, thermal forcing and infiltration patterns. Here there is a need for improved understanding of the mechanisms controlling subsurface solute transport in the partially saturated active layer zone. Studying solute transport in cold regions is relevant to improve the understanding of how natural and anthropogenic pollution may change as activities in arctic and sub-arctic regions increase. It is also particularly relevant for understanding how dissolved carbon is transported in coupled surface and subsurface hydrological systems under climate change, in order to better understand the permafrost-hydrological-carbon climate feedback. In this contribution subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in subsurface water flows and solute transport travel times are analysed for different modelled geological configurations during a 100-year warming period. Results show that for all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase non-linearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The travel time changes are shown to depend on combined warming effects of increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, reduced transport

  6. Proton-associated sucrose transport of mammalian solute carrier family 45: an analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bartölke, Rabea; Heinisch, Jürgen J; Wieczorek, Helmut; Vitavska, Olga

    2014-12-01

    The members of the solute carrier 45 (SLC45) family have been implicated in the regulation of glucose homoeostasis in the brain (SLC45A1), with skin and hair pigmentation (SLC45A2), and with prostate cancer and myelination (SLC45A3). However, apart from SLC45A1, a proton-associated glucose transporter, the function of these proteins is still largely unknown, although sequence similarities to plant sucrose transporters mark them as a putative sucrose transporter family. Heterologous expression of the three members SLC45A2, SLC45A3 and SLC45A4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae confirmed that they are indeed sucrose transporters. [(14)C]Sucrose-uptake measurements revealed intermediate transport affinities with Km values of approximately 5 mM. Transport activities were best under slightly acidic conditions and were inhibited by the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, demonstrating an H(+)-coupled transport mechanism. Na(+), on the other hand, had no effect on sucrose transport. Competitive inhibition assays indicated a possible transport also of glucose and fructose. Real-time PCR of mouse tissues confirmed mRNA expression of SLC45A2 in eyes and skin and of SLC45A3 primarily in the prostate, but also in other tissues, whereas SLC45A4 showed a predominantly ubiquitous expression. Altogether the results provide new insights into the physiological significance of SLC45 family members and challenge existing concepts of mammalian sugar transport, as they (i) transport a disaccharide, and (ii) perform secondary active transport in a proton-dependent manner.

  7. Solute transport in solution conduits exhibiting multi-peaked breakthrough curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Malcolm S.; Leij, Feike J.

    2012-05-01

    SummarySolute transport in karst aquifers is primarily constrained to solution conduits where transport is rapid, turbulent, and relatively unrestrictive. Breakthrough curves generated from tracer tests are typically positively-skewed and may exhibit multiple peaks. In order to understand the circumstances under which multi-peaked positively skewed breakthrough curves occur, physical experiments utilizing single- and multiple-flow channels were conducted. Experiments also included waterfalls, short-term solute detention in pools, and flow obstructions. Results demonstrated that breakthrough curve skewness nearly always occurs to some degree but is magnified as immobile-flow regions are encountered. Multi-peaked breakthrough curves occurred when flow in the main channel became partially occluded from blockage in the main channel that forced divergence of solute into auxiliary channels and when waterfalls and detention in pools occurred. Currently, multi-peaked breakthrough curves are fitted by a multi-dispersion model in which a series of curves generated by the advection-dispersion equation are fitted to each measured peak by superimposing the measured breakthrough curve to obtain a combined model fit with a consequent set of estimated velocities and dispersions. In this paper, a dual-advection dispersion equation with first-order mass transfer between conduits was derived. The dual-advection dispersion equation was then applied to the multi-peaked breakthrough curves obtained from the physical experiments in order to obtain some insight into the operative solute-transport processes through the acquisition of a consequent set of velocities, dispersions, and related parameters. Successful application of the dual-advection, dispersion equation to a tracer test that exhibited dual peaks for a karst aquifer known to consist of two connected but mostly separate conduits confirmed the appropriateness of using a multi-dispersion type model when conditions warrant.

  8. Modeling Solute Transport by DLA in Soils of Northeastern Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Yasser Ahmed; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Persson, Magnus; Berndtsson, Ronny; Wang, Xin-ping

    2015-01-01

    Arid soils in Egypt display large variability in solute transport properties, causing problems in soil management. To characterize this variability, dye infiltration experiments were conducted on four plots representing three main soil types in northeastern Egypt. The plots represented both cultivated and uncultivated land use. The observed dye patterns displayed a large variability and especially the clay soils indicated a high degree of preferential flow. The loamy sand and sandy soils displayed a more uniform dye distribution indicating more homogeneous soil properties. The observed dye patterns were modeled using a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model. The DLA is a random walk model where model parameters can be optimized using genetic algorithms (GA). The DLA model reproduced the observed dye patterns for all soils in an excellent way. The best fit was obtained with a specific combination of directional random walk probabilities Pu, Pd, Pr, and Pl for each plot (correlation 0.97–0.99). To account for soil layers with different hydraulic properties a two layer DLA model was developed. For all plots the Pu (upward random walk probability) was higher for the upper more homogeneous soil layer. The overall results showed that spatial variability resulting from solute transport for the investigated soils can be modeled using a DLA approach. PMID:25790463

  9. Modeling solute transport by DLA in soils of northeastern Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Yasser Ahmed; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Persson, Magnus; Berndtsson, Ronny; Wang, Xin-ping

    2015-01-01

    Arid soils in Egypt display large variability in solute transport properties, causing problems in soil management. To characterize this variability, dye infiltration experiments were conducted on four plots representing three main soil types in northeastern Egypt. The plots represented both cultivated and uncultivated land use. The observed dye patterns displayed a large variability and especially the clay soils indicated a high degree of preferential flow. The loamy sand and sandy soils displayed a more uniform dye distribution indicating more homogeneous soil properties. The observed dye patterns were modeled using a diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) model. The DLA is a random walk model where model parameters can be optimized using genetic algorithms (GA). The DLA model reproduced the observed dye patterns for all soils in an excellent way. The best fit was obtained with a specific combination of directional random walk probabilities Pu, Pd, Pr, and Pl for each plot (correlation 0.97-0.99). To account for soil layers with different hydraulic properties a two layer DLA model was developed. For all plots the Pu (upward random walk probability) was higher for the upper more homogeneous soil layer. The overall results showed that spatial variability resulting from solute transport for the investigated soils can be modeled using a DLA approach.

  10. Microbial Growth, Water Flow, and Solute Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Bottomley, P. J.; Selker, J. S.

    2004-05-01

    We present an investigation that studied interactions between microbial growth, water flow, and solute transport in variably saturated porous media. The experimental system provided for continuous, noninvasive observation of microbial activity, while simultaneously monitoring water content and solute flow paths in a two-dimensional porous matrix. The spatial and temporal development of microbial colonization by a Pseudomonas fluorescens bacterium was monitored by induction of a bioluminescent phenotype. A model was developed that allowed quantification of population density from bioluminescence measurements. Liquid saturation was quantified from the transmission of light through the system, and solute flow paths were determined with a dye tracer. Dramatic changes in microbial colonization were observed, including upward migration against flow. This migration was particularly interesting because it cannot be explained by passive transport. Bacterial growth and accumulation significantly impacted the hydrologic properties of the media, including apparent desaturation within the colonized region, diversion of flow around the colonized region, and lowering of the capillary fringe height.

  11. Polymer Dynamics Effects on Solute Transport in Hairy Nanoparticle Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buenning, Eileen; Bilchak, Connor; Durning, Christopher; Benicewicz, Brian; Sokolov, Alexei; Kumar, Sanat

    Molecular transport measurements in matrix-free grafted nanoparticle (MFGNP) films have shown remarkable enhancement of permeability and ideal selectivity of small condensable molecules and simple gases over the neat polymer melts and conventional, dispersed nanoparticle composites. Films comprised of covalently-attached poly(methyl acrylate) PMA chains to the surface of 14nm silica particles self-assemble into ordered arrays, and we postulate this structure plays an important role in regulating solute transport. This self-assembly creates interstitial spaces between the nanoparticle cores, which the polymer chains can only fill by stretching. Here we use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS), rheology and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (TMDSC) to probe polymer chain and segmental dynamics and investigate this hypothesis of chain stretching in MFGNP materials. We found that grafting slows both chain and segmental relaxation, and increases fragility, indicating that the chains are more ``frustrated'' in the grafted systems. We propose that the effects of the chain/surface interactions on chain dynamics leads to an increase in available free volume and thus enhances transport properties in MFGNP systems. Special thanks to the NSF GRFP and the DOE SCGSR programs.

  12. The two-dimensional transport solution within CASMO-4

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, D.; Edenius, M. )

    1993-01-01

    First-generation lattice physics codes, such as CASMO-1 through CASMO-3 (Ref. 1), were developed in an effort to analyze relatively short fuel cycles of [approximately]12 months. Fuel designs for these cycles were only mildly heterogeneous, containing a narrow range of enrichments and small loadings of burnable absorbers. The transport methods in these earlier codes, such as transmission probabilities for homogeneous cells, were more than adequate for such fuel designs. As utilities strive for longer cycle lengths, fuel designs have become far more heterogeneous, The current generation of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel designs may contain nearly 100 fuel pins, with enrichments ranging from 2 to 5% and gadolinia loadings upward of 10% in as many as a dozen pins. In addition, these designs contain large islands of water in and around the center of the assembly and varying amounts of box wall material around the corners of the channel. Such heterogeneities require a more accurate representation at the level of the two-dimensional transport calculation, and this need has fueled interest in a new generation of lattice physics codes. In the most recent version of CASMO (i.e., CASMO-4), the two-dimensional homogeneous transmission probability module from earlier CASMO versions has been replaced with a heterogeneous characteristics solution. Although not entirely integral in nature, the characteristics method combines the most desirable features of integral transport theory (i.e., heterogeneous geometry, explicit representation of streaming, and the capability of generating an exact solution for a given set of data) with those of discrete ordinates (i.e., easy representation of anisotropic scattering and execution time that is directly proportional to problem size).

  13. Enhancements and limits in drug membrane transport using supersaturated solutions of poorly water soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Raina, Shweta A; Zhang, Geoff G Z; Alonzo, David E; Wu, Jianwei; Zhu, Donghua; Catron, Nathaniel D; Gao, Yi; Taylor, Lynne S

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) give rise to supersaturated solutions (solution concentration greater than equilibrium crystalline solubility). We have recently found that supersaturating dosage forms can exhibit the phenomenon of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS). Thus, the high supersaturation generated by dissolving ASDs can lead to a two-phase system wherein one phase is an initially nanodimensioned and drug-rich phase and the other is a drug-lean continuous aqueous phase. Herein, the membrane transport of supersaturated solutions, at concentrations above and below the LLPS concentration has been evaluated using a side-by-side diffusion cell. Measurements of solution concentration with time in the receiver cell yield the flux, which reflects the solute thermodynamic activity in the donor cell. As the nominal concentration of solute in the donor cell increases, a linear increase in flux was observed up to the concentration where LLPS occurred. Thereafter, the flux remained essentially constant. Both nifedipine and felodipine solutions exhibit such behavior as long as crystallization is absent. This suggests that there is an upper limit in passive membrane transport that is dictated by the LLPS concentration. These results have several important implications for drug delivery, especially for poorly soluble compounds requiring enabling formulation technologies.

  14. A stochastic model for solute transport in macroporous soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bruggeman, A.C.; Mostaghimi, S.; Brannan, K.M.

    1999-12-01

    A stochastic, physically based, finite element model for simulating flow and solute transport in soils with macropores (MICMAC) was developed. The MICMAC model simulates preferential movement of water and solutes using a cylindrical macropore located in the center of a soil column. MICMAC uses Monte Carlo simulation to represent the stochastic processes inherent to the soil-water system. The model simulates a field as a collection of non-interacting soil columns. The random soil properties are assumed to be stationary in the horizontal direction, and ergodic over the field. A routine for the generation of correlated, non-normal random variates was developed for MICMAC's stochastic component. The model was applied to fields located in Nomini Creek Watershed, Virginia. Extensive field data were collected in fields that use either conventional or no-tillage for the evaluation of the MICMAC model. The field application suggested that the model underestimated the fast leaching of water and solutes from the root zone. However, the computed results were substantially better than the results obtained when no preferential flow component was included in the model.

  15. Solute Transport in Soils Under Conditions of Variable Flow Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liwang; Selim, H. M.

    1996-11-01

    Temporal and spatial variabilities of flow distribution significantly influence solute transport in soils. This laboratory study was designed to investigate the effects of temporal variation in flow velocity on pesticide transport in soils. Two pesticides, metribuzin (weakly adsorbed) and atrazine (moderately adsorbed), were chosen along with the following two soils: Cecil (<2 mm) and Sharkey (2-4 mm). Several tritium pulses were introduced into packed soil columns (15 or 30 cm in length) under different flow velocities to obtain velocity-dependent dispersion coefficients (D). Subsequently, several atrazine and metribuzin pulses were introduced under conditions of constant and variable velocities. For each experiment, changes in flow velocity were stepwise using a piston flow pump and were carried out during pulse application and leaching. For constant and variable flow velocity experiments, approximately similar pulse volumes and average flow velocities were maintained. Values of D versus pore water velocity (ν) from tritium breakthrough curves (BTCs) were well described using a linear equation for both soils. Identical BTCs for metribuzin were observed under conditions of constant or variable flow velocities in the Cecil soil column. However, metribuzin transport in the Sharkey soil was significantly influenced by velocity variations. Atrazine transport in the Sharkey soil was also significantly affected by variations in flow velocity. We further examined the error when an average rather than actual velocity distribution was used in BTC representation. The resulting experimental BTCs (concentration versus velocity-averaged pore volume) exhibited early arrival and the appearance of multiple peaks. Moreover, predictions of such BTCs based on the convective-dispersive equation were not successful. We concluded that actual water velocity distributions should be used in BTC representation, and, whenever possible, the use of an average velocity should be avoided.

  16. Analytical solutions of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion solute transport equation subject to time-dependent boundary conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion solute transport equation remain useful for a large number of applications in science and engineering. In this paper we extend the Duhamel theorem, originally established for diffusion type problems, to the case of advective-dispersive transport subj...

  17. Polyamine transport is mediated by both endocytic and solute carrier transport mechanisms in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takeshi; Stringer, David E; Blohm-Mangone, Karen A; Gerner, Eugene W

    2010-08-01

    The polyamines spermidine and spermine, and their precursor putrescine, are required for cell growth and cellular functions. The high levels of tissue polyamines are implicated in carcinogenesis. The major sources of exogenous polyamines are diet and intestinal luminal bacteria in gastrointestinal (GI) tissues. Both endocytic and solute carrier-dependent mechanisms have been described for polyamine uptake. Knocking down of caveolin-1 protein increased polyamine uptake in colon cancer-derived HCT116 cells. Dietary supplied putrescine was accumulated in GI tissues and liver in caveolin-1 knockout mice more than wild-type mice. Knocking out of nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), which has been implicated in the release of exogenous polyamines from internalized vesicles, abolished the accumulation of dietary putrescine in GI tissues. Under conditions of reduced endogenous tissue putrescine contents, caused by treatment with the polyamine synthesis inhibitor difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), small intestinal and colonic mucosal polyamine contents increased with dietary putrescine levels, even in mice lacking NOS2. Knocking down the solute carrier transporter SLC3A2 in HCT116-derived Hkh2 cells reduced the accumulation of exogenous putrescine and total polyamine contents in DFMO treated cells, relative to non-DFMO-treated cells. These data demonstrate that exogenous putrescine is transported into GI tissues by caveolin-1- and NOS2-dependent mechanisms, but that the solute carrier transporter SLC3A2 can function bidirectionally to import putrescine under conditions of low tissue polyamines.

  18. Effect of viscoelastic relaxation on moisture transport in foods. Part I: solution of general transport equation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pawan P; Maier, Dirk E; Cushman, John H; Haghighi, Kamyar; Corvalan, Carlos

    2004-07-01

    Within the framework of continuum mechanics, Singh et al. developed an integro-differential equation, which applies to both Darcian (Fickian) and non-Darcian (non-Fickian) modes of fluid transport in swelling biological systems. A dimensionless form of the equation was obtained and transformed from moving Eulerian to the stationary Lagrangian coordinates. Here a solution scheme for the transport equation is developed to predict moisture transport and viscoelastic stresses in spheroidal biopolymeric materials. The equation was solved numerically and results used for predicting drying and sorption curves, moisture profiles, and viscoelastic stresses in soybeans. The Lagrangian solution was obtained by assembling together several schemes: the finite element method was used to discretize the equation in space; non-linearity was addressed using the Newton-Raphson method; the Volterra term was handled via a time integration scheme of Patlashenko et al. and the Galerkin rule was used to solve the time-differential term. The solution obtained in Lagrangian coordinates was transformed back to the Eulerian coordinates. In part II of this sequence we present the numerical results.

  19. The structural basis of secondary active transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Lucy R; Krämer, Reinhard; Ziegler, Christine

    2011-02-01

    Secondary active transporters couple the free energy of the electrochemical potential of one solute to the transmembrane movement of another. As a basic mechanistic explanation for their transport function the model of alternating access was put forward more than 40 years ago, and has been supported by numerous kinetic, biochemical and biophysical studies. According to this model, the transporter exposes its substrate binding site(s) to one side of the membrane or the other during transport catalysis, requiring a substantial conformational change of the carrier protein. In the light of recent structural data for a number of secondary transport proteins, we analyze the model of alternating access in more detail, and correlate it with specific structural and chemical properties of the transporters, such as their assignment to different functional states in the catalytic cycle of the respective transporter, the definition of substrate binding sites, the type of movement of the central part of the carrier harboring the substrate binding site, as well as the impact of symmetry on fold-specific conformational changes. Besides mediating the transmembrane movement of solutes, the mechanism of secondary carriers inherently involves a mechanistic coupling of substrate flux to the electrochemical potential of co-substrate ions or solutes. Mainly because of limitations in resolution of available transporter structures, this important aspect of secondary transport cannot yet be substantiated by structural data to the same extent as the conformational change aspect. We summarize the concepts of coupling in secondary transport and discuss them in the context of the available evidence for ion binding to specific sites and the impact of the ions on the conformational state of the carrier protein, which together lead to mechanistic models for coupling. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Neutral solute transport across osteochondral interface: A finite element approach.

    PubMed

    Arbabi, Vahid; Pouran, Behdad; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-12-08

    Investigation of the solute transfer across articular cartilage and subchondral bone plate could nurture the understanding of the mechanisms of osteoarthritis (OA) progression. In the current study, we approached the transport of neutral solutes in human (slight OA) and equine (healthy) samples using both computed tomography and biphasic-solute finite element modeling. We developed a multi-zone biphasic-solute finite element model (FEM) accounting for the inhomogeneity of articular cartilage (superficial, middle and deep zones) and subchondral bone plate. Fitting the FEM model to the concentration-time curves of the cartilage and the equilibrium concentration of the subchondral plate/calcified cartilage enabled determination of the diffusion coefficients in the superficial, middle and deep zones of cartilage and subchondral plate. We found slightly higher diffusion coefficients for all zones in the human samples as compared to the equine samples. Generally the diffusion coefficient in the superficial zone of human samples was about 3-fold higher than the middle zone, the diffusion coefficient of the middle zone was 1.5-fold higher than that of the deep zone, and the diffusion coefficient of the deep zone was 1.5-fold higher than that of the subchondral plate/calcified cartilage. Those ratios for equine samples were 9, 2 and 1.5, respectively. Regardless of the species considered, there is a gradual decrease of the diffusion coefficient as one approaches the subchondral plate, whereas the rate of decrease is dependent on the type of species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparison of solute-transport solution techniques based on inverse modelling results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    Five common numerical techniques (finite difference, predictor-corrector, total-variation-diminishing, method-of-characteristics, and modified-method-of-characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using randomly distributed homogeneous blocks of five sand types. This experimental model provides an outstanding opportunity to compare the solution techniques because of the heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity distribution of known structure, and the availability of detailed measurements with which to compare simulated concentrations. The present work uses this opportunity to investigate how three common types of results-simulated breakthrough curves, sensitivity analysis, and calibrated parameter values-change in this heterogeneous situation, given the different methods of simulating solute transport. The results show that simulated peak concentrations, even at very fine grid spacings, varied because of different amounts of numerical dispersion. Sensitivity analysis results were robust in that they were independent of the solution technique. They revealed extreme correlation between hydraulic conductivity and porosity, and that the breakthrough curve data did not provide enough information about the dispersivities to estimate individual values for the five sands. However, estimated hydraulic conductivity values are significantly influenced by both the large possible variations in model dispersion and the amount of numerical dispersion present in the solution technique.Five common numerical techniques (finite difference, predictor-corrector, total-variation-diminishing, method-of-characteristics, and modified-method-of-characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using randomly

  2. Macropore system characteristics controls on non-reactive solute transport at different flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsbo, Mats; Koestel, John

    2014-05-01

    Preferential flow and transport in macroporous soils are important pathways for the leaching of agrochemicals through soils. Preferential solute transport in soil is to a large extent determined by the macropore system characteristics and the water flow conditions. The importance of different characteristics of the macropore system is likely to vary with the flow conditions. The objective of this study was to determine which properties of the macropore system that control the shape of non-reactive tracer solute breakthrough curves at different steady-state flow rates. We sampled five undisturbed columns (20 cm high, 20 cm diameter) from the soil surface of four soils with clay contents between 21 and 50 %. Solute transport experiments were carried out under unsaturated conditions at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12 mm h-1 flow rates. For each flow rate a pulse of potassium bromide solution was applied at the soil surface and the electrical conductivity was measured with high temporal resolution in the column effluent. We used the 5 % arrival time and the holdback factor to estimate the degree of preferential transport from the resulting breakthrough curves. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivities were measured at the soil surface of the columns using a tension disc infiltrometer. The macropore system was imaged by industrial X-ray computed tomography at a resolution of 125 μm in all directions. Measures of the macropore system characteristics including measures of pore continuity were calculated from these images using the ImageJ software. Results show that the degree of preferential transport is generally increasing with flow rate when larger pores become active in the transport. The degree of preferential flow was correlated to measures of macropore topology. This study show that conclusions drawn from experiments carried out at one flow rate should generally not be extrapolated to other flow rates.

  3. The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

  4. The transport properties of activated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    di Vittorio, S.L. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Dresselhaus, M.S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA . Dept. of Physics); Endo, M. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

    1990-07-01

    The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons. 19 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Coupling of solute transport and cell expansion in pea stems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalstig, J. G.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    As cells expand and are displaced through the elongation zone of the epicotyl of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. var Alaska) seedlings, there is little net dilution of the cell sap, implying a coordination between cell expansion and solute uptake from the phloem. Using [14C] sucrose as a phloem tracer (applied to the hypogeous cotyledons), the pattern of label accumulation along the stem closely matched the growth rate pattern: high accumulation in the growing zone, little accumulation in nongrowing regions. Several results suggest that a major portion of phloem contents enters elongating cells through the symplast. We propose that the coordination between phloem transport and cell expansion is accomplished via regulatory pathways affecting both plasmodesmata conductivity and cell expansion.

  6. Engineering charge transport by heterostructuring solution-processed semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voznyy, Oleksandr; Sutherland, Brandon R.; Ip, Alexander H.; Zhitomirsky, David; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-06-01

    Solution-processed semiconductor devices are increasingly exploiting heterostructuring — an approach in which two or more materials with different energy landscapes are integrated into a composite system. Heterostructured materials offer an additional degree of freedom to control charge transport and recombination for more efficient optoelectronic devices. By exploiting energetic asymmetry, rationally engineered heterostructured materials can overcome weaknesses, augment strengths and introduce emergent physical phenomena that are otherwise inaccessible to single-material systems. These systems see benefit and application in two distinct branches of charge-carrier manipulation. First, they influence the balance between excitons and free charges to enhance electron extraction in solar cells and photodetectors. Second, they promote radiative recombination by spatially confining electrons and holes, which increases the quantum efficiency of light-emitting diodes. In this Review, we discuss advances in the design and composition of heterostructured materials, consider their implementation in semiconductor devices and examine unexplored paths for future advancement in the field.

  7. Coupling of solute transport and cell expansion in pea stems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalstig, J. G.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1990-01-01

    As cells expand and are displaced through the elongation zone of the epicotyl of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. var Alaska) seedlings, there is little net dilution of the cell sap, implying a coordination between cell expansion and solute uptake from the phloem. Using [14C] sucrose as a phloem tracer (applied to the hypogeous cotyledons), the pattern of label accumulation along the stem closely matched the growth rate pattern: high accumulation in the growing zone, little accumulation in nongrowing regions. Several results suggest that a major portion of phloem contents enters elongating cells through the symplast. We propose that the coordination between phloem transport and cell expansion is accomplished via regulatory pathways affecting both plasmodesmata conductivity and cell expansion.

  8. Effects of isotope selection on solution convergence in HZE transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wilson, John W.; Kiefer, Richard L.; Thibeault, Sheila A.

    1994-01-01

    A fragmenting iron ion produces hundreds of isotopes during nuclear reactions. These isotopes are represented in the solution of the transport problem. A reduced set of isotopes is selected to minimize the computational burden but introduces error in the final result. A minimum list of 122 isotopes is required for adequate representation of the mass and charge distributions of the secondary radiation fields. A reduced set of 80 isotopes is sufficient to represent the charge distribution alone and represents reasonably well the linear energy transfer properties of the iron beam. Because iron fragmentation produces nearly every isotope lighter than iron, the resulting 122-isotope list should be adequate for ion beams with charges equal to or less than 26.

  9. Coupling of solute transport and cell expansion in pea stems.

    PubMed

    Schmalstig, J G; Cosgrove, D J

    1990-01-01

    As cells expand and are displaced through the elongation zone of the epicotyl of etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. var Alaska) seedlings, there is little net dilution of the cell sap, implying a coordination between cell expansion and solute uptake from the phloem. Using [14C] sucrose as a phloem tracer (applied to the hypogeous cotyledons), the pattern of label accumulation along the stem closely matched the growth rate pattern: high accumulation in the growing zone, little accumulation in nongrowing regions. Several results suggest that a major portion of phloem contents enters elongating cells through the symplast. We propose that the coordination between phloem transport and cell expansion is accomplished via regulatory pathways affecting both plasmodesmata conductivity and cell expansion.

  10. Solute transport under non-linear sorption and decay.

    PubMed

    Serrano, S E

    2001-04-01

    Contaminant transport in aquifers is usually represented by a solution to the advective-dispersive differential equation. When the contaminant is subject to non-linear degradation or decay, or it is characterized by a chemical constituent that follows a non-linear sorption isotherm, the resulting differential equation is non-linear. Using the method of decomposition, series solutions were obtained for the non-linear equation. The series were used to derive and test "simulant" solutions that aries using the concept of double decomposition. Simulant solutions are closed-form analytic expressions that approximate part of the series These expression are simple, stable, and flexible. They permit an accurate forecasting of contaminant propagation .under non-linearity in laboratory or field investigations at early or prolonged times after the spill. In this article, the practical scenario of an instantaneous spill, and that of a constant concentration boundary condition, is studied for situations of non-linear decay, non-linear Freundlich isotherm, and non-linear Langmuir isotherm. The solutions are verified with limited well-known analytical solutions of the linear reactive and non-reactive equations with excellent agreement, and with limited finite difference solutions. Plumes undergoing non-linear decay experience a profile re-scaling with respect to that of linear decay, the degree of which is controlled by magnitude of the non-linear parameter b. The direction of the scaling (scaling up or scaling down with respect to the linear decay plume) is controlled by the magnitude of C (whether greater or less than 1) in relation to the magnitude of b (whether greater or less than 1). When C>1, values of b<1 produce plumes that experience less decay (i.e., are scaled up) than that of the linear decay, whereas values of b> 1 produce non-linear plumes that experience more decay (i.e., are scaled down) than that of the linear decay. The opposite effect is observed when

  11. An exact solution of solute transport by one-dimensional random velocity fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cvetkovic, V.D.; Dagan, G.; Shapiro, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The problem of one-dimensional transport of passive solute by a random steady velocity field is investigated. This problem is representative of solute movement in porous media, for example, in vertical flow through a horizontally stratified formation of variable porosity with a constant flux at the soil surface. Relating moments of particle travel time and displacement, exact expressions for the advection and dispersion coefficients in the Focker-Planck equation are compared with the perturbation results for large distances. The first- and second-order approximations for the dispersion coefficient are robust for a lognormal velocity field. The mean Lagrangian velocity is the harmonic mean of the Eulerian velocity for large distances. This is an artifact of one-dimensional flow where the continuity equation provides for a divergence free fluid flux, rather than a divergence free fluid velocity. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Complex solution to nonideal contaminant transport through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Gambolati, G.; Pini, G.

    1998-09-20

    Nonideal or nonequilibrium transport through porous media is described by a convection-diffusion equation coupled to a first order kinetics accounting for mass transfer between the solid and the fluid phases. The overall mathematical model may be formulated using an integro-differential approach and very effectively Laplace transformed with complex parameters p{sub k} = 0, 1, {hor_ellipsis}, 2M + 1. Solution in Laplace space may be addressed by finite elements (FE). The resulting complex valued FE equations can be solved with either a complex or an equivalent real arithmetic operating on a problem twice as large as the original one. For both approaches preconditioned projection (or conjugate gradient-like) methods are used. Particularly difficult problems with high Peclet numbers are investigated as well. The results from three representative test cases totaling up to 15,000 equations show that the complex solution approach is superior to the real approach by up to almost two orders of magnitude, depending on the problem. It is also shown that while the solver performance vs p{sub k} is stable in complex arithmetic, this does not hold true for the solver in real arithmetic, and an argument based on the quality of preconditioning is offered to account for the observed different computational behavior.

  13. Active Calcium and Strontium Transport in Human Erythrocyte Ghosts

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Erik J.; Cazort, Ralph J.

    1969-01-01

    Both calcium and strontium could be transported actively from erythrocytes if adenosine triphosphate, guanosine triphosphate, or inosine triphosphate were included in the hypotonic medium used to infuse calcium or strontium into the cells. Acetyl phosphate and pyrophosphate were not energy sources for the transport of either ion. Neither calcium nor strontium transport was accompanied by magnesium exchange, and the addition of Mg++ to the reaction medium in a final concentration of 3.0 mmoles/liter did not promote the transport of either ion. In the absence of nucleotide triphosphates, the addition of 1.5 mmoles/liter of Sr++ to the reaction solution did not bring about active calcium transport and similarly 1.5 mmoles/liter of Ca++ did not bring about active strontium transport. The inclusion of 1.5 mmoles/liter of Ca++ or Sr++ in the reaction medium did not interfere with the transport of the other ion when the erythrocytes were infused with adenosine triphosphate. PMID:4304202

  14. Solute transport model for trace organic neutral and charged compounds through nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Uk; Drewes, Jörg E; Scott Summers, R; Amy, Gary L

    2007-09-01

    Rejection of trace organic compounds, including disinfection by-products (DBPs) and pharmaceutical active compounds (PhACs), by high-pressure membranes has become a focus of public interest internationally in both drinking water treatment and wastewater reclamation/reuse. The ability to simulate, or even predict, the rejection of these compounds by high-pressure membranes, encompassing nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO), will improve process economics and expand membrane applications. The objective of this research is to develop a membrane transport model to account for diffusive and convective contributions to solute transport and rejection. After completion of cross-flow tests and diffusion cell tests with target compounds, modeling efforts were performed in accordance with a non-equilibrium thermodynamic transport equation. Comparing the percentages of convection and diffusion contributions to transport, convection is dominant for most compounds, but diffusion is important for more hydrophobic non-polar compounds. Convection is also more dominant for looser membranes (i.e., NF). In addition, higher initial compound concentrations and greater J(0)/k ratios contribute to solute fluxes more dominated by convection. Given the treatment objective of compound rejection, compound transport and rejection trends are inversely related.

  15. Osmotic behavior and transport properties of human islets in a dimethyl sulfoxide solution.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, R C; Diller, K R; Lakey, J R; Rajotte, R V

    1997-11-01

    The osmotic responses of isolated human islets were evaluated using a perfusion cryomicroscope device. Individual islet volumes were measured following equilibration with a series of solutions of graded solute concentration. The osmotically inactive volume for human islets was determined to be 25% from a Boyle-van't Hoff plot of these data. A network thermodynamic model was developed via the bond graph method to describe the transport of water and cryoprotective agent in pancreatic islets. The model was curve fit to transient volumetric data for the response of islets to a stepwise exposure to 1 Me2SO at temperatures of 24.0, 3.0, or -3.5 degrees C. Standard membrane transport parameters (Lp, omega, sigma) and interstitial diffusion transport properties (kappa w, kappa p) were calculated from the fitting procedure. The temperature coefficients for membrane transport properties were expressed in terms of activation energies for water (ELp) and Me2SO (E omega). Osmotic challenge experiments conducted with fresh and cryopreserved human islets indicate that frozen/thawed islets exhibit a a slight increase in transport properties. Copyright 1997 Academic Press.

  16. Increased Ribozyme Activity in Crowded Solutions*

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Ravi; Kilburn, Duncan; Lee, Hui-Ting; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs must function in the crowded environment of the cell. Previous small-angle x-ray scattering experiments showed that molecular crowders stabilize the structure of the Azoarcus group I ribozyme, allowing the ribozyme to fold at low physiological Mg2+ concentrations. Here, we used an RNA cleavage assay to show that the PEG and Ficoll crowder molecules increased the biochemical activity of the ribozyme, whereas sucrose did not. Crowding lowered the Mg2+ threshold at which activity was detected and increased total RNA cleavage at high Mg2+ concentrations sufficient to fold the RNA in crowded or dilute solution. After correcting for solution viscosity, the observed reaction rate was proportional to the fraction of active ribozyme. We conclude that molecular crowders stabilize the native ribozyme and favor the active structure relative to compact inactive folding intermediates. PMID:24337582

  17. Solution processed metal oxide thin film hole transport layers for high performance organic solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Steirer, K. Xerxes; Berry, Joseph J.; Chesin, Jordan P.; Lloyd, Matthew T.; Widjonarko, Nicodemus Edwin; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.; Olson, Dana C.

    2017-01-10

    A method for the application of solution processed metal oxide hole transport layers in organic photovoltaic devices and related organic electronics devices is disclosed. The metal oxide may be derived from a metal-organic precursor enabling solution processing of an amorphous, p-type metal oxide. An organic photovoltaic device having solution processed, metal oxide, thin-film hole transport layer.

  18. An efficient numerical solution of the transient storage equations for solute transport in small streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.; Chapra, Steven C.

    1993-01-01

    Several investigators have proposed solute transport models that incorporate the effects of transient storage. Transient storage occurs in small streams when portions of the transported solute become isolated in zones of water that are immobile relative to water in the main channel (e.g., pools, gravel beds). Transient storage is modeled by adding a storage term to the advection-dispersion equation describing conservation of mass for the main channel. In addition, a separate mass balance equation is written for the storage zone. Although numerous applications of the transient storage equations may be found in the literature, little attention has been paid to the numerical aspects of the approach. Of particular interest is the coupled nature of the equations describing mass conservation for the main channel and the storage zone. In the work described herein, an implicit finite difference technique is developed that allows for a decoupling of the governing differential equations. This decoupling method may be applied to other sets of coupled equations such as those describing sediment-water interactions for toxic contaminants. For the case at hand, decoupling leads to a 50% reduction in simulation run time. Computational costs may be further reduced through efficient application of the Thomas algorithm. These techniques may be easily incorporated into existing codes and new applications in which simulation run time is of concern.

  19. Dual radiotracer measurement of zoobenthos-mediated solute and particle transport in freshwater sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Krezoski, J.R.; Robbins, J.A.; White, D.S.

    1984-09-01

    ..gamma.. spectroscopy methods have been applied to determine the effects of two freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates, on reworking of sediments and the transfer of solutes across the sediment-water interface. Natural lake sediments and overlying water were contained in temperature-regulated rectangular plastic cells. After addition of Stylodrilus (oligochaete worms) and Pontoporeia (crustacean amphipods) to these microcosms, the vertical distribution of Cs-137 (a tracer of particle transport) and Na-22 (a tracer of solute transport) were determined. In cells with Stylodrilus, the Cs-137 layer moved downward at a rate that decreased exponentially with time. In cells with Pontoporeia, Cs-137 activity was smeared downward in time owing to eddy diffusive mixing of sediments over a small range (1-2 cm). In cells without worms, the veneer of Cs active material remained at the interface while the penetration of Na-22 into sediments was consistent with diffusion in free solution with small corrections for sediment porosity and sorption. In cells with live Stylodrilus, penetration of Na-22 within the feeding zone was considerably more rapid. Advective transport arises from the incorporation of Na-22 into pore fluids moved downward as a result of conveyor-belt feeding. In cells with Pontoporeia, De is approximately twice that in control cells. In these cells, Na-22 profiles may be treated theoretically without advection. 47 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Molybdate transport in a chemically complex aquifer: Field measurements compared with solute-transport model predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stollenwerk, K.G.

    1998-01-01

    A natural-gradient tracer test was conducted in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Molybdate was included in the injectate to study the effects of variable groundwater chemistry on its aqueous distribution and to evaluate the reliability of laboratory experiments for identifying and quantifying reactions that control the transport of reactive solutes in groundwater. Transport of molybdate in this aquifer was controlled by adsorption. The amount adsorbed varied with aqueous chemistry that changed with depth as freshwater recharge mixed with a plume of sewage-contaminated groundwater. Molybdate adsorption was strongest near the water table where pH (5.7) and the concentration of the competing solutes phosphate (2.3 micromolar) and sulfate (86 micromolar) were low. Adsorption of molybdate decreased with depth as pH increased to 6.5, phosphate increased to 40 micromolar, and sulfate increased to 340 micromolar. A one-site diffuse-layer surface-complexation model and a two-site diffuse-layer surface-complexation model were used to simulate adsorption. Reactions and equilibrium constants for both models were determined in laboratory experiments and used in the reactive-transport model PHAST to simulate the two-dimensional transport of molybdate during the tracer test. No geochemical parameters were adjusted in the simulation to improve the fit between model and field data. Both models simulated the travel distance of the molybdate cloud to within 10% during the 2-year tracer test; however, the two-site diffuse-layer model more accurately simulated the molybdate concentration distribution within the cloud.

  1. Diffusion Dominant Solute Transport Modelling In Deep Repository Under The Effect of Emplacement Media Degradation - 13285

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, S.; Jivkov, A.P.

    2013-07-01

    Deep geologic disposal of high activity and long-lived radioactive waste is being actively considered and pursued in many countries, where low permeability geological formations are used to provide long term waste contaminant with minimum impact to the environment and risk to the biosphere. A multi-barrier approach that makes use of both engineered and natural barriers (i.e. geological formations) is often used to further enhance the containment performance of the repository. As the deep repository system subjects to a variety of thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical (THCM) effects over its long 'operational' lifespan (e.g. 0.1 to 1.0 million years, the integrity of the barrier system will decrease over time (e.g. fracturing in rock or clay)). This is broadly referred as media degradation in the present study. This modelling study examines the effects of media degradation on diffusion dominant solute transport in fractured media that are typical of deep geological environment. In particular, reactive solute transport through fractured media is studied using a 2-D model, that considers advection and diffusion, to explore the coupled effects of kinetic and equilibrium chemical processes, while the effects of degradation is studied using a pore network model that considers the media diffusivity and network changes. Model results are presented to demonstrate the use of a 3D pore-network model, using a novel architecture, to calculate macroscopic properties of the medium such as diffusivity, subject to pore space changes as the media degrade. Results from a reactive transport model of a representative geological waste disposal package are also presented to demonstrate the effect of media property change on the solute migration behaviour, illustrating the complex interplay between kinetic biogeochemical processes and diffusion dominant transport. The initial modelling results demonstrate the feasibility of a coupled modelling approach (using pore-network model and reactive

  2. Solute Transport Dynamics in a Large Hyporheic Corridor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, J. M.; Chen, X.; Murray, C. J.; Shuai, P.; Rizzo, C.; Song, X.; Dai, H.

    2016-12-01

    A hyporheic corridor is an extended zone of groundwater surface water-interaction that occurs within permeable aquifer sediments in hydrologic continuity with a river. These systems are dynamic and tightly coupled to river stage variations that may occur over variable time scales. Here we describe the behavior of a persistent uranium (U) contaminant plume that exists within the hyporheic corridor of a large, managed river system - the Columbia River. Temporally dense monitoring data were collected for a two year period from wells located within the plume at varying distances up to 400 m from the river shore. Groundwater U originates from desorption of residual U in the lower vadose zone during periods of high river stage and associated elevated water table. U is weakly adsorbed to aquifer sediments because of coarse texture, and along with specific conductance, serves as a tracer of vadose zone source terms, solute transport pathways, and groundwater-surface water mixing. Complex U concentration and specific conductance trends were observed for all wells that varied with distance from the river shoreline and the river hydrograph, although trends for each well were generally repeatable for each year during the monitoring period. Statistical clustering analysis was used to identify four groups of wells that exhibited common trends in dissolved U and specific conductance. A flow and reactive transport code, PFLOTRAN, was implemented within a hydrogeologic model of the groundwater-surface water interaction zone to provide insights on hydrologic processes controlling monitoring trends and cluster behavior. The hydrogeologic model was informed by extensive subsurface characterization, with the spatially variable topography of a basal aquitard being one of several key parameters. Numerical tracer experiments using PFLOTRAN revealed the presence of temporally complex flow trajectories, spatially variable domains of groundwater - river water mixing, and locations of

  3. Active Transport of Alcohol in Corynebacterium acetophilum

    PubMed Central

    Murooka, Yoshikatsu; Harada, Tokuya

    1974-01-01

    The transport of alcohols was studied in Corynebacterium acetophilum, which was isolated as a strain growing well on acetate and ethanol. The transport of ethanol was found to be inducible by ethanol, n-propanol, n-butanol, and acetate, whereas transport of methanol occurred by noninducible passive diffusion. The entry of ethanol into the cells occurred against a concentration gradient and showed saturation kinetics with two Km values of 2.4 × 10−5 M and 6.0 × 10−5 M. Uptake of ethanol was inhibited by sodium azide, sodium cyanide, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and p-chloromercuribenzoate. The transport of ethanol was competitively inhibited by normal alcohols, but not by iso- or tert-alcohols. From these studies, we concluded that an inducible active alcohol transport system mediates the entry of ethanol, n-propanol, or n-butanol into the cells of C. acetophilum. Images PMID:4821092

  4. Modeling colloid and microorganism transport and release with transients in solution ionic strength

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The transport and fate of colloids, microorganisms, and nanoparticles in subsurface environments is strongly influenced by transients in solution ionic strength (IS). A sophisticated dual-permeability transport model that is capable of simulating exponential, hyperexponential, uniform, and nonmonot...

  5. Product Lifecycle Management and the Quest for Sustainable Space Transportation Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Pamela W.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA Marshall's effort to sustain space transportation solutions through product lines that include: 1) Propulsion and Transportation Systems; 2) Life Support Systems; and 3) and Earth and Space Science Spacecraft Systems, and Operations.

  6. Ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bao-quan

    2016-01-01

    We numerically investigate the ratchet transport of mixtures of active and passive particles in a transversal asymmetric channel. A big passive particle is immersed in a ‘sea’ of active particles. Due to the chirality of active particles, the longitudinal directed transport is induced by the transversal asymmetry. For the active particles, the chirality completely determines the direction of the ratchet transport, the counterclockwise and clockwise particles move to the opposite directions and can be separated. However, for the passive particle, the transport behavior becomes complicated, the direction is determined by competitions among the chirality, the self-propulsion speed, and the packing fraction. Interestingly, within certain parameters, the passive particle moves to the left, while active particles move to the right. In addition, there exist optimal parameters (the chirality, the height of the barrier, the self-propulsion speed and the packing fraction) at which the rectified efficiency takes its maximal value. Our findings could be used for the experimental pursuit of the ratchet transport powered by chiral active particles. PMID:26795952

  7. Relations between macropore network characteristics and the degree of preferential solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsbo, M.; Koestel, J.; Jarvis, N.

    2014-12-01

    The characteristics of the soil macropore network determine the potential for fast transport of agrochemicals and contaminants through the soil. The objective of this study was to examine the relationships between macropore network characteristics, hydraulic properties and state variables and measures of preferential transport. Experiments were carried out under near-saturated conditions on undisturbed columns sampled from four agricultural topsoils of contrasting texture and structure. Macropore network characteristics were computed from 3-D X-ray tomography images of the soil pore system. Non-reactive solute transport experiments were carried out at five steady-state water flow rates from 2 to 12 mm h-1. The degree of preferential transport was evaluated by the normalised 5% solute arrival time and the apparent dispersivity calculated from the resulting breakthrough curves. Near-saturated hydraulic conductivities were measured on the same samples using a tension disc infiltrometer placed on top of the columns. Results showed that many of the macropore network characteristics were inter-correlated. For example, large macroporosities were associated with larger specific macropore surface areas and better local connectivity of the macropore network. Generally, an increased flow rate resulted in earlier solute breakthrough and a shifting of the arrival of peak concentration towards smaller drained volumes. Columns with smaller macroporosities, poorer local connectivity of the macropore network and smaller near-saturated hydraulic conductivities exhibited a greater degree of preferential transport. This can be explained by the fact that, with only two exceptions, global (i.e. sample scale) continuity of the macropore network was still preserved at low macroporosities. Thus, for any given flow rate, pores of larger diameter were actively conducting solute in soils of smaller near-saturated hydraulic conductivity. This was associated with larger local transport

  8. Stochastic steps in secondary active sugar transport.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Joshua L; Ghezzi, Chiara; Bisignano, Paola; Loo, Donald D F; Choe, Seungho; Abramson, Jeff; Rosenberg, John M; Wright, Ernest M; Grabe, Michael

    2016-07-05

    Secondary active transporters, such as those that adopt the leucine-transporter fold, are found in all domains of life, and they have the unique capability of harnessing the energy stored in ion gradients to accumulate small molecules essential for life as well as expel toxic and harmful compounds. How these proteins couple ion binding and transport to the concomitant flow of substrates is a fundamental structural and biophysical question that is beginning to be answered at the atomistic level with the advent of high-resolution structures of transporters in different structural states. Nonetheless, the dynamic character of the transporters, such as ion/substrate binding order and how binding triggers conformational change, is not revealed from static structures, yet it is critical to understanding their function. Here, we report a series of molecular simulations carried out on the sugar transporter vSGLT that lend insight into how substrate and ions are released from the inward-facing state of the transporter. Our simulations reveal that the order of release is stochastic. Functional experiments were designed to test this prediction on the human homolog, hSGLT1, and we also found that cytoplasmic release is not ordered, but we confirmed that substrate and ion binding from the extracellular space is ordered. Our findings unify conflicting published results concerning cytoplasmic release of ions and substrate and hint at the possibility that other transporters in the superfamily may lack coordination between ions and substrate in the inward-facing state.

  9. Stochastic steps in secondary active sugar transport

    PubMed Central

    Adelman, Joshua L.; Ghezzi, Chiara; Bisignano, Paola; Loo, Donald D. F.; Choe, Seungho; Abramson, Jeff; Rosenberg, John M.; Wright, Ernest M.; Grabe, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Secondary active transporters, such as those that adopt the leucine-transporter fold, are found in all domains of life, and they have the unique capability of harnessing the energy stored in ion gradients to accumulate small molecules essential for life as well as expel toxic and harmful compounds. How these proteins couple ion binding and transport to the concomitant flow of substrates is a fundamental structural and biophysical question that is beginning to be answered at the atomistic level with the advent of high-resolution structures of transporters in different structural states. Nonetheless, the dynamic character of the transporters, such as ion/substrate binding order and how binding triggers conformational change, is not revealed from static structures, yet it is critical to understanding their function. Here, we report a series of molecular simulations carried out on the sugar transporter vSGLT that lend insight into how substrate and ions are released from the inward-facing state of the transporter. Our simulations reveal that the order of release is stochastic. Functional experiments were designed to test this prediction on the human homolog, hSGLT1, and we also found that cytoplasmic release is not ordered, but we confirmed that substrate and ion binding from the extracellular space is ordered. Our findings unify conflicting published results concerning cytoplasmic release of ions and substrate and hint at the possibility that other transporters in the superfamily may lack coordination between ions and substrate in the inward-facing state. PMID:27325773

  10. Linear dynamic system approach to groundwater solute transport equation

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    Groundwater pollution in the United States has been recognized in the 1980's to be extensive both in degree and geographic distribution. It has been recognized that in many cases groundwater pollution is essentially irreversible from the engineering or economic viewpoint. Under the best circumstance the problem is complicated by insufficient amounts of field data which is costly to obtain. In general, the governing partial differential equation of solute transport is spatially discretized either using finite difference or finite element scheme. The time derivative is also approximated by finite difference. In this study, only the spatial discretization is performed using finite element method and the time derivative is retained in continuous form. The advantage is that special features of finite element are maintained but most important of all is that the equation can be rearranged to be in a standard form of linear dynamic system. Two problems were studied in detail: one is the determination of the locatio of groundwater pollution source(s). The problem is equivalent to identifying an input to the dynamic system and is solved by using the sensitivity theorem. The other one is the prediction of pollutant concentration at a given time at a given location. The eigenvalue technique was employed to solve this problem and the detailed procedures of the computation were delineated.

  11. Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Tracer Transport in Layered Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect

    G.J. Moridis; G. S. Bodvarsson

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

  12. Effects of Convective Solute and Impurity Transport in Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Thomas, Bill R.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution optical interferometry was used to investigate the effects of forced solution convection on the crystal growth kinetics of the model protein lysozyme. Most experiments were conducted with 99.99% pure protein solutions. To study impurity effects, approx. 1% of lysozyme dimer (covalently bound) was added in some cases. We show that the unsteady kinetics, corresponding to bunching of growth steps, can be characterized by the Fourier components of time traces of the growth rate. Specific Fourier spectra are uniquely determined by the solution conditions (composition, temperature, and flow rate) and the growth layer source activity. We found that the average step velocity and growth rate increase by approx. I0% with increasing flow rate, as a result of the enhanced solute supply to the interface. More importantly, faster convective transport results in lower fluctuation amplitudes. This observation supports our rationale for system-dependent effects of transport on the structural perfection of protein crystals. We also found that solution flow rates greater than 500 microns/s result in stronger fluctuations while the average growth rate is decreased. This can lead to growth cessation at low supersaturations. With the intentionally contaminated solutions, these undesirable phenomena occurred at about half the flow rates required in pure solutions. Thus, we conclude that they are due to enhanced convective supply of impurities that are incorporated into the crystal during growth. Furthermore, we found that the impurity effects are reduced at higher crystal growth rates. Since the exposure time of terraces is inversely proportional to the growth rate, this observation suggests that the increased kinetics instability results from impurity adsorption on the interface. Finally, we provide evidence relating earlier observations of "slow protein crystal growth kinetics" to step bunch formation in response to nonsteady step generation.

  13. Effects of Convective Solute and Impurity Transport in Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vekilov, Peter G.; Thomas, Bill R.; Rosenberger, Franz

    1998-01-01

    High-resolution optical interferometry was used to investigate the effects of forced solution convection on the crystal growth kinetics of the model protein lysozyme. Most experiments were conducted with 99.99% pure protein solutions. To study impurity effects, approx. 1% of lysozyme dimer (covalently bound) was added in some cases. We show that the unsteady kinetics, corresponding to bunching of growth steps, can be characterized by the Fourier components of time traces of the growth rate. Specific Fourier spectra are uniquely determined by the solution conditions (composition, temperature, and flow rate) and the growth layer source activity. We found that the average step velocity and growth rate increase by approx. I0% with increasing flow rate, as a result of the enhanced solute supply to the interface. More importantly, faster convective transport results in lower fluctuation amplitudes. This observation supports our rationale for system-dependent effects of transport on the structural perfection of protein crystals. We also found that solution flow rates greater than 500 microns/s result in stronger fluctuations while the average growth rate is decreased. This can lead to growth cessation at low supersaturations. With the intentionally contaminated solutions, these undesirable phenomena occurred at about half the flow rates required in pure solutions. Thus, we conclude that they are due to enhanced convective supply of impurities that are incorporated into the crystal during growth. Furthermore, we found that the impurity effects are reduced at higher crystal growth rates. Since the exposure time of terraces is inversely proportional to the growth rate, this observation suggests that the increased kinetics instability results from impurity adsorption on the interface. Finally, we provide evidence relating earlier observations of "slow protein crystal growth kinetics" to step bunch formation in response to nonsteady step generation.

  14. Solute transport in eroded and rehabilitated prairie landforms. 1. Nonreactive solute.

    PubMed

    Papiernik, Sharon K; Koskinen, William C; Yates, Scott R

    2009-08-26

    Information regarding solute and water transport as affected by soil properties, topography, and climatic conditions is required to improve and validate transport models. This study evaluated the dissipation of bromide applied to the soil surface in the fall and spring to undisturbed (eroded) and rehabilitated landforms, in which topsoil was moved from depositional areas to the eroded upper slope. Despite large changes in soil properties, the amount and center of mass of bromide remaining in the top 1 m of soil was the same in undisturbed and rehabilitated plots. Approximately 60% of the fall-applied bromide was lost during the winter and early spring, presumably due to leaching and runoff. The center of mass of spring-applied bromide remained at depths of <30 cm. At the end of the experiment, 33% of the spring-applied bromide was detected in soil and 56% in corn plants. These results suggest that little bromide was leached out of the root zone in the spring and that plant uptake was a major route of bromide dissipation during the growing season.

  15. Peritoneal Fluid Transport rather than Peritoneal Solute Transport Associates with Dialysis Vintage and Age of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Waniewski, Jacek; Antosiewicz, Stefan; Baczynski, Daniel; Poleszczuk, Jan; Pietribiasi, Mauro; Lindholm, Bengt; Wankowicz, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    During peritoneal dialysis (PD), the peritoneal membrane undergoes ageing processes that affect its function. Here we analyzed associations of patient age and dialysis vintage with parameters of peritoneal transport of fluid and solutes, directly measured and estimated based on the pore model, for individual patients. Thirty-three patients (15 females; age 60 (21-87) years; median time on PD 19 (3-100) months) underwent sequential peritoneal equilibration test. Dialysis vintage and patient age did not correlate. Estimation of parameters of the two-pore model of peritoneal transport was performed. The estimated fluid transport parameters, including hydraulic permeability (LpS), fraction of ultrasmall pores (α u), osmotic conductance for glucose (OCG), and peritoneal absorption, were generally independent of solute transport parameters (diffusive mass transport parameters). Fluid transport parameters correlated whereas transport parameters for small solutes and proteins did not correlate with dialysis vintage and patient age. Although LpS and OCG were lower for older patients and those with long dialysis vintage, αu was higher. Thus, fluid transport parameters--rather than solute transport parameters--are linked to dialysis vintage and patient age and should therefore be included when monitoring processes linked to ageing of the peritoneal membrane.

  16. Stability and bactericidal activity of chlorine solutions.

    PubMed

    Rutala, W A; Cole, E C; Thomann, C A; Weber, D J

    1998-05-01

    To determine the stability of sodium hypochlorite (diluted household bleach) when stored for 30 days in various types of containers and to determine the efficacy of low concentrations of free available chlorine to inactivate test bacteria. Laboratory-based study. Solutions of standard household bleach were prepared using tap water or sterile distilled water at dilutions of 1:100, 1:50, and 1:5. Chlorine concentrations were measured, and then the solutions were placed into five polyethylene containers and left at room temperature (20 degrees C) under various conditions (translucent containers with light exposure and with or without air; brown opaque container without light or air exposure). Samples for chlorine and pH determinations were taken at time 0 and on days 7, 14, 21, 30, and 40. Bactericidal activity of chlorine solutions was assessed using the Association of Official Analytical Chemists Use-Dilution Method. Test bacteria included Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella choleraesuis. Chlorine concentrations at 30 days varied from the 40% to 50% range for 1:50 or 1:100 dilutions stored in containers other than closed brown containers to 83% to 85% for the 1:5 dilution stored in closed but non-opaque containers to 97% to 100% for 1:50 or 1:5 solutions stored in closed brown containers. The lowest concentration of sodium hypochlorite solution that reliably inactivated all the test organisms was 100 ppm. These data suggest that chlorine solutions do not need to be prepared fresh daily, as is recommended currently, and the lowest concentration of chlorine that reliably inactivates S aureus, S choleraesuis, and P aeruginosa is 100 ppm.

  17. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar–canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30–50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in

  18. A multiscale 3D finite element analysis of fluid/solute transport in mechanically loaded bone.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lixia; Pei, Shaopeng; Lucas Lu, X; Wang, Liyun

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fluid, nutrients, and signaling molecules in the bone lacunar-canalicular system (LCS) is critical for osteocyte survival and function. We have applied the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) approach to quantify load-induced fluid and solute transport in the LCS in situ, but the measurements were limited to cortical regions 30-50 μm underneath the periosteum due to the constrains of laser penetration. With this work, we aimed to expand our understanding of load-induced fluid and solute transport in both trabecular and cortical bone using a multiscaled image-based finite element analysis (FEA) approach. An intact murine tibia was first re-constructed from microCT images into a three-dimensional (3D) linear elastic FEA model, and the matrix deformations at various locations were calculated under axial loading. A segment of the above 3D model was then imported to the biphasic poroelasticity analysis platform (FEBio) to predict load-induced fluid pressure fields, and interstitial solute/fluid flows through LCS in both cortical and trabecular regions. Further, secondary flow effects such as the shear stress and/or drag force acting on osteocytes, the presumed mechano-sensors in bone, were derived using the previously developed ultrastructural model of Brinkman flow in the canaliculi. The material properties assumed in the FEA models were validated against previously obtained strain and FRAP transport data measured on the cortical cortex. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of this computational approach in estimating the fluid flux in the LCS and the cellular stimulation forces (shear and drag forces) for osteocytes in any cortical and trabecular bone locations, allowing further studies of how the activation of osteocytes correlates with in vivo functional bone formation. The study provides a promising platform to reveal potential cellular mechanisms underlying the anabolic power of exercises and physical activities in treating

  19. Development of novel active transport membrande devices

    SciTech Connect

    Laciak, D.V.

    1994-11-01

    Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

  20. The Major Facilitative Folate Transporters Solute Carrier 19A1 and Solute Carrier 46A1: Biology and Role in Antifolate Chemotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mike R.; Hou, Zhanjun

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the biology of the major facilitative membrane transporters, the reduced folate carrier (RFC) (Solute Carrier 19A1) and the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) (Solute Carrier 46A1). Folates are essential vitamins, and folate deficiency contributes to a variety of health disorders. RFC is ubiquitously expressed and is the major folate transporter in mammalian cells and tissues. PCFT mediates the intestinal absorption of dietary folates and appears to be important for transport of folates into the central nervous system. Clinically relevant antifolates for cancer, such as methotrexate and pralatrexate, are transported by RFC, and loss of RFC transport is an important mechanism of methotrexate resistance in cancer cell lines and in patients. PCFT is expressed in human tumors, and is active at pH conditions associated with the tumor microenvironment. Pemetrexed is an excellent substrate for both RFC and PCFT. Novel tumor-targeted antifolates related to pemetrexed with selective membrane transport by PCFT over RFC are being developed. In recent years, there have been major advances in understanding the structural and functional properties and the regulation of RFC and PCFT. The molecular bases for methotrexate resistance associated with loss of RFC transport and for hereditary folate malabsorption, attributable to mutant PCFT, were determined. Future studies should continue to translate molecular insights from basic studies of RFC and PCFT biology into new therapeutic strategies for cancer and other diseases. PMID:24396145

  1. The major facilitative folate transporters solute carrier 19A1 and solute carrier 46A1: biology and role in antifolate chemotherapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Matherly, Larry H; Wilson, Mike R; Hou, Zhanjun

    2014-04-01

    This review summarizes the biology of the major facilitative membrane transporters, the reduced folate carrier (RFC) (Solute Carrier 19A1) and the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) (Solute Carrier 46A1). Folates are essential vitamins, and folate deficiency contributes to a variety of health disorders. RFC is ubiquitously expressed and is the major folate transporter in mammalian cells and tissues. PCFT mediates the intestinal absorption of dietary folates and appears to be important for transport of folates into the central nervous system. Clinically relevant antifolates for cancer, such as methotrexate and pralatrexate, are transported by RFC, and loss of RFC transport is an important mechanism of methotrexate resistance in cancer cell lines and in patients. PCFT is expressed in human tumors, and is active at pH conditions associated with the tumor microenvironment. Pemetrexed is an excellent substrate for both RFC and PCFT. Novel tumor-targeted antifolates related to pemetrexed with selective membrane transport by PCFT over RFC are being developed. In recent years, there have been major advances in understanding the structural and functional properties and the regulation of RFC and PCFT. The molecular bases for methotrexate resistance associated with loss of RFC transport and for hereditary folate malabsorption, attributable to mutant PCFT, were determined. Future studies should continue to translate molecular insights from basic studies of RFC and PCFT biology into new therapeutic strategies for cancer and other diseases.

  2. Effects of unstable flow on solute transport in the marsh soil and exchange with coastal water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chengji; Zhang, Chenming; Jin, Guangqiu; Kong, Jun; Li, Ling

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies of marsh hydraulics have focused on tide-induced pore water circulation as the main drive for solute transport in the marsh soil and exchange with coastal water. Our study revealed another important mechanism provided by unstable fingering flow, which largely modified solute transport paths. In the marsh interior, downward penetration of salt fingers forced ambient pore water and solute plumes to move upward and exit the marsh soil through marsh platform at relatively high concentrations, up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than exit solute concentrations at the tidal creek bed. The mixing of solute with ambient pore water in the marsh interior was intensified greatly by fingering flow. A critical distance to the creek was determined based on a field-scale model simulation to distinguish tidal circulation-dominated and fingering flow-dominated solute transport zones. The new transport mechanism has implications for understanding the fate of solutes in particularly salt marshes of low creek densities.

  3. Health Impacts of Active Transportation in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Rueda, David; de Nazelle, Audrey; Andersen, Zorana J.; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Bruha, Jan; Bruhova-Foltynova, Hana; Desqueyroux, Hélène; Praznoczy, Corinne; Ragettli, Martina S.; Tainio, Marko; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Policies that stimulate active transportation (walking and bicycling) have been related to heath benefits. This study aims to assess the potential health risks and benefits of promoting active transportation for commuting populations (age groups 16–64) in six European cities. We conducted a health impact assessment using two scenarios: increased cycling and increased walking. The primary outcome measure was all-cause mortality related to changes in physical activity level, exposure to fine particulate matter air pollution with a diameter <2.5 μm, as well as traffic fatalities in the cities of Barcelona, Basel, Copenhagen, Paris, Prague, and Warsaw. All scenarios produced health benefits in the six cities. An increase in bicycle trips to 35% of all trips (as in Copenhagen) produced the highest benefits among the different scenarios analysed in Warsaw 113 (76–163) annual deaths avoided, Prague 61 (29–104), Barcelona 37 (24–56), Paris 37 (18–64) and Basel 5 (3–9). An increase in walking trips to 50% of all trips (as in Paris) resulted in 19 (3–42) deaths avoided annually in Warsaw, 11(3–21) in Prague, 6 (4–9) in Basel, 3 (2–6) in Copenhagen and 3 (2–4) in Barcelona. The scenarios would also reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the six cities by 1,139 to 26,423 (metric tonnes per year). Policies to promote active transportation may produce health benefits, but these depend of the existing characteristics of the cities. Increased collaboration between health practitioners, transport specialists and urban planners will help to introduce the health perspective in transport policies and promote active transportation. PMID:26930213

  4. Solute transport and oxygen consumption along the nephrons: effects of Na+ transport inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Layton, Anita T; Laghmani, Kamel; Vallon, Volker; Edwards, Aurélie

    2016-12-01

    Sodium and its associated anions are the major determinant of extracellular fluid volume, and the reabsorption of Na(+) by the kidney plays a crucial role in long-term blood pressure control. The goal of this study was to investigate the extent to which inhibitors of transepithelial Na(+) transport (TNa) along the nephron alter urinary solute excretion and TNa efficiency and how those effects may vary along different nephron segments. To accomplish that goal, we used the multinephron model developed in the companion study (28). That model represents detailed transcellular and paracellular transport processes along the nephrons of a rat kidney. We simulated the inhibition of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE3), the bumetanide-sensitive Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) transporter (NKCC2), the Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (NCC), and the amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channel (ENaC). Under baseline conditions, NHE3, NKCC2, NCC, and ENaC reabsorb 36, 22, 4, and 7%, respectively, of filtered Na(+) The model predicted that inhibition of NHE3 substantially reduced proximal tubule TNa and oxygen consumption (QO2 ). Whole-kidney TNa efficiency, as reflected by the number of moles of Na(+) reabsorbed per moles of O2 consumed (denoted by the ratio TNa/QO2 ), decreased by ∼20% with 80% inhibition of NHE3. NKCC2 inhibition simulations predicted a substantial reduction in thick ascending limb TNa and QO2 ; however, the effect on whole-kidney TNa/QO2 was minor. Tubular K(+) transport was also substantially impaired, resulting in elevated urinary K(+) excretion. The most notable effect of NCC inhibition was to increase the excretion of Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-); its impact on whole-kidney TNa and its efficiency was minor. Inhibition of ENaC was predicted to have opposite effects on the excretion of Na(+) (increased) and K(+) (decreased) and to have only a minor impact on whole-kidney TNa and TNa/QO2 Overall, model predictions agree well with measured changes in Na(+) and K(+) excretion in response to

  5. Solute-mediated interactions between active droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerman, Pepijn G.; Moyses, Henrique W.; van der Wee, Ernest B.; Grier, David G.; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Kegel, Willem K.; Groenewold, Jan; Brujic, Jasna

    2017-09-01

    Concentration gradients play a critical role in embryogenesis, bacterial locomotion, as well as the motility of active particles. Particles develop concentration profiles around them by dissolution, adsorption, or the reactivity of surface species. These gradients change the surface energy of the particles, driving both their self-propulsion and governing their interactions. Here, we uncover a regime in which solute gradients mediate interactions between slowly dissolving droplets without causing autophoresis. This decoupling allows us to directly measure the steady-state, repulsive force, which scales with interparticle distance as F ˜1 /r2 . Our results show that the dissolution process is diffusion rather than reaction rate limited, and the theoretical model captures the dependence of the interactions on droplet size and solute concentration, using a single fit parameter, l =16 ±3 nm , which corresponds to the length scale of a swollen micelle. Our results shed light on the out-of-equilibrium behavior of particles with surface reactivity.

  6. Demonstrations in Solute Transport Using Dyes: Part II. Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butters, Greg; Bandaranayake, Wije

    1993-01-01

    A solution of the convection-dispersion equation is used to describe the solute breakthrough curves generated in the demonstrations in the companion paper. Estimation of the best fit model parameters (solute velocity, dispersion, and retardation) is illustrated using the method of moments for an example data set. (Author/MDH)

  7. Fluid transport by active elastic membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Arthur A.; Lauga, Eric

    2011-09-01

    A flexible membrane deforming its shape in time can self-propel in a viscous fluid. Alternatively, if the membrane is anchored, its deformation will lead to fluid transport. Past work in this area focused on situations where the deformation kinematics of the membrane were prescribed. Here we consider models where the deformation of the membrane is not prescribed, but instead the membrane is internally forced. Both the time-varying membrane shape and the resulting fluid motion result then from a balance between prescribed internal active stresses, internal passive resistance, and external viscous stresses. We introduce two specific models for such active internal forcing: one where a distribution of active bending moments is prescribed, and one where active inclusions exert normal stresses on the membrane by pumping fluid through it. In each case, we asymptotically calculate the membrane shape and the fluid transport velocities for small forcing amplitudes, and recover our results using scaling analysis.

  8. Astrocytic GABA transporter activity modulates excitatory neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Boddum, Kim; Jensen, Thomas P.; Magloire, Vincent; Kristiansen, Uffe; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Pavlov, Ivan; Walker, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are ideally placed to detect and respond to network activity. They express ionotropic and metabotropic receptors, and can release gliotransmitters. Astrocytes also express transporters that regulate the extracellular concentration of neurotransmitters. Here we report a previously unrecognized role for the astrocytic GABA transporter, GAT-3. GAT-3 activity results in a rise in astrocytic Na+ concentrations and a consequent increase in astrocytic Ca2+ through Na+/Ca2+ exchange. This leads to the release of ATP/adenosine by astrocytes, which then diffusely inhibits neuronal glutamate release via activation of presynaptic adenosine receptors. Through this mechanism, increases in astrocytic GAT-3 activity due to GABA released from interneurons contribute to 'diffuse' heterosynaptic depression. This provides a mechanism for homeostatic regulation of excitatory transmission in the hippocampus. PMID:27886179

  9. Study of active cooling for supersonic transports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The potential benefits of using the fuel heat sink of hydrogen fueled supersonic transports for cooling large portions of the aircraft wing and fuselage are examined. The heat transfer would be accomplished by using an intermediate fluid such as an ethylene glycol-water solution. Some of the advantages of the system are: (1) reduced costs by using aluminum in place of titanium, (2) reduced cabin heat loads, and (3) more favorable environmental conditions for the aircraft systems. A liquid hydrogen fueled, Mach 2.7 supersonic transport aircraft design was used for the reference uncooled vehicle. The cooled aircraft designs were analyzed to determine their heat sink capability, the extent and location of feasible cooled surfaces, and the coolant passage size and spacing.

  10. Affordable Freight Logistics Transport Information Management Optimisation and Asset Tracking Solution Using Smartphone GPS Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muna, Joseph T.; Prescott, Kevin

    2011-08-01

    Traditionally, freight transport and telematics solutions that exploit the GPS capabilities of in- vehicle devices to provide innovative Location Based Services (LBS) including track and trace transport systems have been the preserve of a select cluster of transport operators and organisations with the financial resources to develop the requisite custom software and hardware on which they are deployed. The average cost of outfitting a typical transport vehicle or truck with the latest Intelligent Transport System (ITS) increases the cost of the vehicle by anything from a couple to several thousand Euros, depending on the complexity and completeness of the solution. Though this does not generally deter large fleet transport owners since they typically get Return on Investment (ROI) based on economies of scale, it presents a barrier for the smaller independent entities that constitute the majority of freight transport operators [1].The North Sea Freight Intelligent Transport Solution (NS FRITS), a project co-funded by the European Commission Interreg IVB North Sea Region Programme, aims to make acquisition of such transport solutions easier for those organisations that cannot afford the expensive, bespoke systems used by their larger competitors.The project addresses transport security threats by developing a system capable of informing major actors along the freight logistics supply chain, of changing circumstances within the region's major transport corridors and between transport modes. The project also addresses issues of freight volumes, inter-modality, congestion and eco-mobility [2].

  11. Impact of 3D root uptake on solute transport: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, N.; Javaux, M.; Vanderborght, J.; Steffen, B.; Vereecken, H.

    2011-12-01

    Plant transpiration is an important component of the hydrological cycle. Through root water uptake, plants do not only affect the 3D soil water flow velocity distribution, but also solute movement in soil. This numerical study aims at investigating how solute fate is impacted by root uptake using the 3D biophysical model R-SWMS (Javaux et al., 2008). This model solves the Richards equation in 3D in the soil and the flow equation within the plant root xylem vessels. Furthermore, for solute transport simulations, the 3D particle tracker PARTRACE (Bechtold et al., 2011) was used. . We generated 3D virtual steady-state breakthrough curves (BTC) experiments in soils with transpiring plants. The averaged BTCs were then fitted with a 1D numerical flow model under steady-state conditions to obtain apparent CDE parameters. Two types of root architecture, a fibrous and a taprooted structure, were compared in virtual 3D experiments. The solute uptake type or the transpiration rate were also modified and we analyzed how these parameters affected apparent disperisivity and velocity profiles. Our simulation results show, that both, apparent velocity and dispersivity length are affected by water and solute root uptake. In addition, under high exclusion processes (slight or no active uptake), solute accumulates around roots and generates a long tailing to the breakthrough curves, which cannot be reproduced by 1D models that simulate root water uptake with solute exclusion. This observation may have an important impact on how to model pollutant mass transfer to groundwater at larger scales. Javaux, M., T. Schröder, J. Vanderborght, and H. Vereecken. 2008. Use of a three-dimensional detailed modeling approach for predicting root water uptake. Vadose Zone J. 7:1079-1088.doi: 10.2136/vzj2007.0115. Bechtold, M., S. Haber-Pohlmeier, J. Vanderborght, A. Pohlmeier, P.A. Ferre, and H. Vereecken. 2011. Near-surface solute redistribution during evaporation. Submitted to Geophys. Res. Lett

  12. Water flow and solute transport in floating fen root mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stofberg, Sija F.; EATM van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    be very similar and likely functionally related. Our experimental field data were used for modelling water flow and solute transport in floating fens, using HYDRUS 2D. Fluctuations of surface water and root mat, as well as geometry and unsaturated zone parameters can have a major influence on groundwater fluctuations and the exchange between rain and surface water and the water in the root mats. In combination with the duration of salt pulses in surface water, and sensitivity of fen plants to salinity (Stofberg et al. 2014, submitted), risks for rare plants can be anticipated.

  13. A modified two-state empirical valence bond model for proton transport in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Mabuchi, Takuya; Fukushima, Akinori; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2015-07-07

    A detailed analysis of the proton solvation structure and transport properties in aqueous solutions is performed using classical molecular dynamics simulations. A refined two-state empirical valence bond (aTS-EVB) method, which is based on the EVB model of Walbran and Kornyshev and the anharmonic water force field, is developed in order to describe efficiently excess proton transport via the Grotthuss mechanism. The new aTS-EVB model clearly satisfies the requirement for simpler and faster calculation, because of the simplicity of the two-state EVB algorithm, while providing a better description of diffusive dynamics of the excess proton and water in comparison with the previous two-state EVB models, which significantly improves agreement with the available experimental data. The results of activation energies for the excess proton and water calculated between 300 and 340 K (the temperature range used in this study) are also found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data.

  14. Isolated effects of external bath osmolality, solute concentration, and electrical charge on solute transport across articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pouran, Behdad; Arbabi, Vahid; Zadpoor, Amir A; Weinans, Harrie

    2016-12-01

    The metabolic function of cartilage primarily depends on transport of solutes through diffusion mechanism. In the current study, we use contrast enhanced micro-computed tomography to determine equilibrium concentration of solutes through different cartilage zones and solute flux in the cartilage, using osteochondral plugs from equine femoral condyles. Diffusion experiments were performed with two solutes of different charge and approximately equal molecular weight, namely iodixanol (neutral) and ioxaglate (charge=-1) in order to isolate the effects of solute's charge on diffusion. Furthermore, solute concentrations as well as bath osmolality were changed to isolate the effects of steric hindrance on diffusion. Bath concentration and bath osmolality only had minor effects on the diffusion of the neutral solute through cartilage at the surface, middle and deep zones, indicating that the diffusion of the neutral solute was mainly Fickian. The negatively charged solute diffused considerably slower through cartilage than the neutral solute, indicating a large non-Fickian contribution in the diffusion of charged molecules. The numerical models determined maximum solute flux in the superficial zone up to a factor of 2.5 lower for the negatively charged solutes (charge=-1) as compared to the neutral solutes confirming the importance of charge-matrix interaction in diffusion of molecules across cartilage. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analytical solutions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional solute transport in ground-water systems with uniform flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the advective-dispersive solute transport equation are useful in predicting the fate of solutes in groundwater. Analytical solutions compiled from available literature or derived by the author are presented in this report for a variety of boundary condition types and solute-source configuration in one-, two-, and three-dimensional systems with uniform groundwater flow. A set of user-oriented computer programs was created to evaluate these solutions and to display the results in tabular and computer-graphics format. These programs incorporate many features that enhance their accuracy, ease of use, and versatility. Documentation for the programs describes their operation and required input data, and presents the results of sample problems. Derivations of select solutions, source codes for the computer programs, and samples of program input and output also are described. (USGS)

  16. Analytical solutions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional solute transport in ground-water systems with uniform flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the advective-dispersive solute-transport equation are useful in predicting the fate of solutes in ground water. Analytical solutions compiled from available literature or derived by the author are presented for a variety of boundary condition types and solute-source configurations in one-, two-, and three-dimensional systems having uniform ground-water flow. A set of user-oriented computer programs was created to evaluate these solutions and to display the results in tabular and computer-graphics format. These programs incorporate many features that enhance their accuracy, ease of use, and versatility. Documentation for the programs describes their operation and required input data, and presents the results of sample problems. Derivations of selected solutions, source codes for the computer programs, and samples of program input and output also are included.

  17. A biomechanical triphasic approach to the transport of nondilute solutions in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Abazari, Alireza; Elliott, Janet A W; Law, Garson K; McGann, Locksley E; Jomha, Nadr M

    2009-12-16

    Biomechanical models for biological tissues such as articular cartilage generally contain an ideal, dilute solution assumption. In this article, a biomechanical triphasic model of cartilage is described that includes nondilute treatment of concentrated solutions such as those applied in vitrification of biological tissues. The chemical potential equations of the triphasic model are modified and the transport equations are adjusted for the volume fraction and frictional coefficients of the solutes that are not negligible in such solutions. Four transport parameters, i.e., water permeability, solute permeability, diffusion coefficient of solute in solvent within the cartilage, and the cartilage stiffness modulus, are defined as four degrees of freedom for the model. Water and solute transport in cartilage were simulated using the model and predictions of average concentration increase and cartilage weight were fit to experimental data to obtain the values of the four transport parameters. As far as we know, this is the first study to formulate the solvent and solute transport equations of nondilute solutions in the cartilage matrix. It is shown that the values obtained for the transport parameters are within the ranges reported in the available literature, which confirms the proposed model approach.

  18. A Biomechanical Triphasic Approach to the Transport of Nondilute Solutions in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Abazari, Alireza; Elliott, Janet A.W.; Law, Garson K.; McGann, Locksley E.; Jomha, Nadr M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Biomechanical models for biological tissues such as articular cartilage generally contain an ideal, dilute solution assumption. In this article, a biomechanical triphasic model of cartilage is described that includes nondilute treatment of concentrated solutions such as those applied in vitrification of biological tissues. The chemical potential equations of the triphasic model are modified and the transport equations are adjusted for the volume fraction and frictional coefficients of the solutes that are not negligible in such solutions. Four transport parameters, i.e., water permeability, solute permeability, diffusion coefficient of solute in solvent within the cartilage, and the cartilage stiffness modulus, are defined as four degrees of freedom for the model. Water and solute transport in cartilage were simulated using the model and predictions of average concentration increase and cartilage weight were fit to experimental data to obtain the values of the four transport parameters. As far as we know, this is the first study to formulate the solvent and solute transport equations of nondilute solutions in the cartilage matrix. It is shown that the values obtained for the transport parameters are within the ranges reported in the available literature, which confirms the proposed model approach. PMID:20006942

  19. Diffusion Dominant Solute Transport Modelling in Fractured Media Under Deep Geological Environment - 12211

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, S.; Jivkov, A.P.

    2012-07-01

    Deep geologic disposal of high activity and long-lived radioactive waste is gaining increasing support in many countries, where suitable low permeability geological formation in combination with engineered barriers are used to provide long term waste contaminant and minimise the impacts to the environment and risk to the biosphere. This modelling study examines the solute transport in fractured media under low flow velocities that are relevant to a deep geological environment. In particular, reactive solute transport through fractured media is studied using a 2-D model, that considers advection and diffusion, to explore the coupled effects of kinetic and equilibrium chemical processes. The effects of water velocity in the fracture, matrix porosity and diffusion on solute transport are investigated and discussed. Some illustrative modelled results are presented to demonstrate the use of the model to examine the effects of media degradation on solute transport, under the influences of hydrogeological (diffusion dominant) and microbially mediated chemical processes. The challenges facing the prediction of long term degradation such as cracks evolution, interaction and coalescence are highlighted. The potential of a novel microstructure informed modelling approach to account for these effects is discussed, particularly with respect to investigating multiple phenomena impact on material performance. The GRM code is used to examine the effects of media degradation for a geological waste disposal package, under the combined hydrogeological (diffusion dominant) and chemical effects in low groundwater flow conditions that are typical of deep geological disposal systems. An illustrative reactive transport modelling application demonstrates the use of the code to examine the interplay of kinetic controlled biogeochemical reactive processes with advective and diffusive transport, under the influence of media degradation. The initial model results are encouraging which show the

  20. CFD modeling of fluid flow and solute transport in a µXCT scanned natural fracture: Impact of fracture geometry on solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, F. M.; Enzmann, F.; Wenka, A.; Dentz, M.; Schaefer, T.

    2010-12-01

    Fluid flow and solute transport through fractures are a key process in both industrial and scientific issues ranging from e.g. geothermal energy production to the disposal of nuclear waste in deep geologic formations. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of the various interdependent processes governing fluid flow and solute transport in fractures over a broad range of length and time scales is of utmost importance. Numerous studies have shown the importance of fracture geometry on flow and solute transport. More recently, significance of so called recirculation zones which are accessible for solutes and colloids through hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular diffusion have been identified [1,2] which can be responsible for pronounced late time solute breakthrough (tailing). Unfortunately, these studies are mostly focused on 2D. Thus, the intention of the prevailing study is to investigate the influence of fracture geometry on solute transport under a broad range of flow conditions (Pe number from 0.1 up to 1000) and as a function of flow direction (that is, reversed flow direction) both in 2D and 3D. We present µXCT measurements with a spatial resolution of 80 µm of a natural single fracture in a diorite drill core from Äspö, Sweden, which serves as direct input for computational mesh generation in order to obtain a realistic 3D model. Besides, a 2D model was produced by projecting the 3D mesh into the x-y-plane to completely exclude the fracture aperture information. Computational fluid dynamic simulations in 2D and 3D have been conducted to study fluid flow and conservative tracer (HTO) transport by means of the finite volume code FLUENT. The natural fracture exhibits a very complex geometry with asperities, rough side walls and a heterogenous aperture distribution. Furthermore, the µXCT data clearly shows that the fracture is not filled with fault gauge material. Simulation results confirm the impact of fracture geometry/roughness on fluid flow causing

  1. Simulating water, solute, and heat transport in the subsurface with the VS2DI software package

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    The software package VS2DI was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for simulating water, solute, and heat transport in variably saturated porous media. The package consists of a graphical preprocessor to facilitate construction of a simulation, a postprocessor for visualizing simulation results, and two numerical models that solve for flow and solute transport (VS2DT) and flow and heat transport (VS2DH). The finite-difference method is used to solve the Richards equation for flow and the advection-dispersion equation for solute or heat transport. This study presents a brief description of the VS2DI package, an overview of the various types of problems that have been addressed with the package, and an analysis of the advantages and limitations of the package. A review of other models and modeling approaches for studying water, solute, and heat transport also is provided. ?? Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  2. Solute transport and storage mechanisms in wetlands of the Everglades, south Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Saiers, James E.; Newlin, Jessica T.

    2005-05-01

    Solute transport and storage processes in wetlands play an important role in biogeochemical cycling and in wetland water quality functions. In the wetlands of the Everglades, there are few data or guidelines to characterize transport through the heterogeneous flow environment. Our goal was to conduct a tracer study to help quantify solute exchange between the relatively fast flowing water in the open part of the water column and much more slowly moving water in thick floating vegetation and in the pore water of the underlying peat. We performed a tracer experiment that consisted of a constant-rate injection of a sodium bromide (NaBr) solution for 22 hours into a 3 m wide, open-ended flume channel in Everglades National Park. Arrival of the bromide tracer was monitored at an array of surface water and subsurface samplers for 48 hours at a distance of 6.8 m downstream of the injection. A one-dimensional transport model was used in combination with an optimization code to identify the values of transport parameters that best explained the tracer observations. Parameters included dimensions and mass transfer coefficients describing exchange with both short (hours) and longer (tens of hours) storage zones as well as the average rates of advection and longitudinal dispersion in the open part of the water column (referred to as the ``main flow zone''). Comparison with a more detailed set of tracer measurements tested how well the model's storage zones approximated the average characteristics of tracer movement into and out of the layer of thick floating vegetation and the pore water in the underlying peat. The rate at which the relatively fast moving water in the open water column was exchanged with slowly moving water in the layer of floating vegetation and in sediment pore water amounted to 50 and 3% h-1, respectively. Storage processes decreased the depth-averaged velocity of surface water by 50% relative to the water velocity in the open part of the water column. As a

  3. Solute transport and storage mechanisms in wetlands of the Everglades, south Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Judson W.; Saiers, James E.; Newlin, Jessica T.

    2005-05-01

    Solute transport and storage processes in wetlands play an important role in biogeochemical cycling and in wetland water quality functions. In the wetlands of the Everglades, there are few data or guidelines to characterize transport through the heterogeneous flow environment. Our goal was to conduct a tracer study to help quantify solute exchange between the relatively fast flowing water in the open part of the water column and much more slowly moving water in thick floating vegetation and in the pore water of the underlying peat. We performed a tracer experiment that consisted of a constant-rate injection of a sodium bromide (NaBr) solution for 22 hours into a 3 m wide, open-ended flume channel in Everglades National Park. Arrival of the bromide tracer was monitored at an array of surface water and subsurface samplers for 48 hours at a distance of 6.8 m downstream of the injection. A one-dimensional transport model was used in combination with an optimization code to identify the values of transport parameters that best explained the tracer observations. Parameters included dimensions and mass transfer coefficients describing exchange with both short (hours) and longer (tens of hours) storage zones as well as the average rates of advection and longitudinal dispersion in the open part of the water column (referred to as the "main flow zone"). Comparison with a more detailed set of tracer measurements tested how well the model's storage zones approximated the average characteristics of tracer movement into and out of the layer of thick floating vegetation and the pore water in the underlying peat. The rate at which the relatively fast moving water in the open water column was exchanged with slowly moving water in the layer of floating vegetation and in sediment pore water amounted to 50 and 3% h-1, respectively. Storage processes decreased the depth-averaged velocity of surface water by 50% relative to the water velocity in the open part of the water column. As a

  4. Solute transport and storage mechanisms in wetlands of the Everglades, south Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, J.W.; Saiers, J.E.; Newlin, J.T.

    2005-01-01

    Solute transport and storage processes in wetlands play an important role in biogeochemical cycling and in wetland water quality functions. In the wetlands of the Everglades, there are few data or guidelines to characterize transport through the heterogeneous flow environment. Our goal was to conduct a tracer study to help quantify solute exchange between the relatively fast flowing water in the open part of the water column and much more slowly moving water in thick floating vegetation and in the pore water of the underlying peat. We performed a tracer experiment that consisted of a constant-rate injection of a sodium bromide (NaBr) solution for 22 hours into a 3 m wide, open-ended flume channel in Everglades National Park. Arrival of the bromide tracer was monitored at an array of surface water and subsurface samplers for 48 hours at a distance of 6.8 m downstream of the injection. A one-dimensional transport model was used in combination with an optimization code to identify the values of transport parameters that best explained the tracer observations. Parameters included dimensions and mass transfer coefficients describing exchange with both short (hours) and longer (tens of hours) storage zones as well as the average rates of advection and longitudinal dispersion in the open part of the water column (referred to as the "main flow zone"). Comparison with a more detailed set of tracer measurements tested how well the model's storage zones approximated the average characteristics of tracer movement into and out of the layer of thick floating vegetation and the pore water in the underlying peat. The rate at which the relatively fast moving water in the open water column was exchanged with slowly moving water in the layer of floating vegetation and in sediment pore water amounted to 50 and 3% h-1, respectively. Storage processes decreased the depth-averaged velocity of surface water by 50% relative to the water velocity in the open part of the water column. As a

  5. Benchmarking the solute transport module of the WAVE_MAT model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamadou, Sall; Vanclooster, Marnik; Vansteenkiste, Joachim; Diels, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Modelling water flow and solute transport through heterogeneous unsaturated zone soil under unsteady state conditions requires the use of numerical solutions. The WAVE model (Vanclooster et al., 1996), which solves numerically the 1-D flow and transport equation, is often used to simulate the water and chemical transport (pesticides, nutrients) in agricultural soil. The original version of the model has been encoded in Fortran77. The most recent version (WAVE3.1), has been submitted to many validation and benchmarking studies. To facilitate the future exploitation and development of the WAVE model, the code is currently transposed in a MATLABTM environment, referred to as WAVE_MAT. Following the principles of good modelling practice, version control for the new WAVE_MAT model is implemented. An essential part of the version control is the benchmarking of each new release. In this poster, we present the results of benchmarking of the solute transport module of WAVE_MAT_V0060610. We compare results of simulated solute transport with WAVE_MAT_V0060610 with the analytical solutions of the governing transport equation and with those obtained with the HYDRUS-1D model. The benchmarks are performed for three soil types (clay, loam, and sand) of 100 or 200 cm of profile length and for different solute transport parameters, and for different flow and boundary conditions. Although the correction of numerical dispersion is not yet applied to WAVE_MAT, the results agree well to the analytical solution for reasonable hydrodynamic dispersivity.

  6. Analytical solution for one-dimensional advection-dispersion transport equation with distance-dependent coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Guerrero, J. S.; Skaggs, T. H.

    2010-08-01

    SummaryMathematical models describing contaminant transport in heterogeneous porous media are often formulated as an advection-dispersion transport equation with distance-dependent transport coefficients. In this work, a general analytical solution is presented for the linear, one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation with distance-dependent coefficients. An integrating factor is employed to obtain a transport equation that has a self-adjoint differential operator, and a solution is found using the generalized integral transform technique (GITT). It is demonstrated that an analytical expression for the integrating factor exists for several transport equation formulations of practical importance in groundwater transport modeling. Unlike nearly all solutions available in the literature, the current solution is developed for a finite spatial domain. As an illustration, solutions for the particular case of a linearly increasing dispersivity are developed in detail and results are compared with solutions from the literature. Among other applications, the current analytical solution will be particularly useful for testing or benchmarking numerical transport codes because of the incorporation of a finite spatial domain.

  7. Bursts of Active Transport in Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Kuo, James; Granick, Steve

    2013-11-01

    We show, using a large new data set, that the temporally resolved speed of active cargo transport in living cells follows a scaling law over several decades of time and length. The statistical regularities display a time-averaged shape that we interpret to reflect stress buildup, followed by rapid release. The scaling power law agrees quantitatively with those reported in inanimate systems (jammed colloids and granular media, and magnetic Barkhausen noise), suggesting a common origin in pushing through a crowded environment in a weak force regime. The implied regulation of the speed of active cellular transport due to environmental obstruction results in bursts of speed and acceleration. These findings extend the classical notion of molecular crowding.

  8. Bursts of active transport in living cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Kuo, James; Granick, Steve

    2013-11-15

    We show, using a large new data set, that the temporally resolved speed of active cargo transport in living cells follows a scaling law over several decades of time and length. The statistical regularities display a time-averaged shape that we interpret to reflect stress buildup, followed by rapid release. The scaling power law agrees quantitatively with those reported in inanimate systems (jammed colloids and granular media, and magnetic Barkhausen noise), suggesting a common origin in pushing through a crowded environment in a weak force regime. The implied regulation of the speed of active cellular transport due to environmental obstruction results in bursts of speed and acceleration. These findings extend the classical notion of molecular crowding.

  9. Active sodium transport and the electrophysiology of rabbit colon.

    PubMed

    Schultz, S G; Frizzell, R A; Nellans, H N

    1977-05-12

    The electrophysiologic properties of rabbit colonic epithelial cells were investigated employing microelectrode techniques. Under open-circuit conditions, the transepithelial electrical potential difference (PD) averaged 20 mV, serosa positive, and the intracellular electrical potential (psimc) averaged -32 mV, cell interior negative with respect to the mucosal solution; under short-circuit conditions, psimc averaged -46 mV. The addition of amiloride to the mucosal solution abolishes the transepithelial PD and active Na transport, and psimc is hyperpolarized to an average value of -53 mV. These results indicate that Na entry into the mucosal cell is a conductive process which, normally, depolarized psimc. The data obtained were interpreted using a double-membrane equivalent electrical circuit model of the "active Na transport pathway" involving two voltage-independent electromotive forces (emf's) and two voltage-independent resistances arrayed in series. Our observations are consistent with the notions that: (a) The emf's and resistances across the mucosal and baso-lateral membranes are determined predominantly by the emf (64 mV) and resistance of the Na entry process and the emf (53 mV) and resistance of the process responsible for active Na extrusion across the baso-lateral membranes: that is, the electrophysiological properties of the cell appear to be determined solely by the properties and processes responsible for transcellular active Na transport. The emf of the Na entry process is consistent with the notion that the Na activity in the intracellular transport pool is approximately one-tenth that in the mucosal solution or about 14 mM. (b) In the presence of amiloride, the transcellular conductance is essentially abolished and the total tissue conductance is the result of ionic diffusion through paracellular pathways. (c) The negative intracellular potential (with respect to the mucosal solution) is due primarily to the presence of a low resistance

  10. Pore connectivity effects on solute transport in rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qinhong; Ewing, Robert P.

    2001-11-30

    Retardation of nuclear contaminants in rock matrices can lead to long retention times, allowing substantial radionuclide decay prior to eventual release. Imbibition and diffusion into the rock matrix can move contaminants away from an active fracture, thereby contributing to their retardation. However, diffusive transport in some rocks may behave anomalously because of their sparsely connected porespace, in contrast to diffusion in rocks with denser pore connections. We examined imbibition of weakly sorbing tracers into welded tuff and Indiana sandstone, and water imbibition into metagraywacke and Berea sandstone. Tuff samples were initially equilibrated to 12% and 76% water (v/v) within controlled humidity chambers, while the other rocks were air-dried. For imbibition, one face was exposed to water, with or without tracer, and uptake was measured over time. Following imbibition, tracer concentration measurements were made at fine (1 mm) increments. Three anomalous results were observed: (1) Indiana sandstone and metagraywacke showed mass of imbibed water scaling as time{sup 0.26}, while tuff and Berea sandstone showed the more classical scaling with time{sup 0.5}; (2) tracer movement into dry (2% initial saturation) Indiana sandstone showed a dispersion pattern similar to that expected during tracer movement into moist (76% initial saturation) tuff; and (3) tracer concentrations at the inlet face of the tuff sample were approximately twice those deeper inside the sample. The experiment was then modeled using random walk methods on a 3-D lattice with different values of pore coordination. Network model simulations that used a pore coordination of 1.49 for Indiana sandstone and 1.56 for metagraywacke showed similar temporal scaling, a result of their porespace being close to the percolation threshold. Tracer concentration profiles in Indiana sandstone and tuff were closely matched by simulations that used pore coordinations of 1.49 and 1.68, respectively, because of

  11. Pore Connectivity Effects on Solute Transport in Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Oinhong Hu

    2001-12-05

    Retardation of nuclear contaminants in rock matrices can lead to long retention times, allowing substantial radionuclide decay prior to eventual release. Imbibition and diffusion into the rock matrix can move contaminants away from an active fracture, thereby contributing to their retardation. However, diffusive transport in some rocks may behave anomalously because of their sparsely connected porespace, in contrast to diffusion in rocks with denser pore connections. We examined imbibition of weakly sorbing tracers into welded tuff and Indiana sandstone, and water imbibition into metagraywacke and Berea sandstone. Tuff samples were initially equilibrated to 12% and 76% water (v/v) within controlled humidity chambers, while the other rocks were air-dried. For imbibition, one face was exposed to water, with or without tracer, and uptake was measured over time. Following imbibition, tracer concentration measurements were made at fine (1 mm) increments. Three anomalous results were observed: (1) Indiana sandstone and metagraywacke showed mass of imbibed water scaling as time{sup 0.26}, while tuff and Berea sandstone showed the more classical scaling with time{sup 0.05}; (2) tracer movement into dry (2% initial saturation) Indiana sandstone showed a dispersion pattern similar to that expected during tracer movement into moist (76% initial saturation) tuft and (3) tracer concentrations at the inlet face of the tuff sample were approximately twice those deeper inside the sample. The experiment was then modeled using random walk methods on a 3-D lattice with different values of pore coordination. Network model simulations that used a pore coordination of 1.49 for Indiana sandstone and 1.56 for metagraywacke showed similar temporal scaling, a result of their porespace being close to the percolation threshold. Tracer concentration profiles in Indiana sandstone and tuff were closely matched by simulations that used pore coordinations of 1.49 and 1.68, respectively, because of

  12. Light-driven solute transport in Halobacterium halobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    The cell membrane of Halobacterium halobium exhibits differential regions which contain crystalline arrays of a single kind of protein, termed bacteriorhodopsin. This bacterial retinal-protein complex resembles the visual pigment and, after the absorption of protons, translocates H(+) across the cell membrane, leading to an electrochemical gradient for protons between the inside and the outside of the cell. Thus, light is an alternate source of energy in these bacteria, in addition to terminal oxidation. The paper deals with work on light-driven transport in H. halobium with cell envelope vesicles. The discussion covers light-driven movements of H(+), Na(+), and K(+); light-driven amino acid transport; and apparent allosteric control of amino acid transport. The scheme of energy coupling in H. halobium vesicles appears simple, its quantitative details are quite complex and reveal regulatory phenomena. More knowledge is required of the way the coupling components are regulated by the ion gradients present.

  13. Light-driven solute transport in Halobacterium halobium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, J. K.

    1979-01-01

    The cell membrane of Halobacterium halobium exhibits differential regions which contain crystalline arrays of a single kind of protein, termed bacteriorhodopsin. This bacterial retinal-protein complex resembles the visual pigment and, after the absorption of protons, translocates H(+) across the cell membrane, leading to an electrochemical gradient for protons between the inside and the outside of the cell. Thus, light is an alternate source of energy in these bacteria, in addition to terminal oxidation. The paper deals with work on light-driven transport in H. halobium with cell envelope vesicles. The discussion covers light-driven movements of H(+), Na(+), and K(+); light-driven amino acid transport; and apparent allosteric control of amino acid transport. The scheme of energy coupling in H. halobium vesicles appears simple, its quantitative details are quite complex and reveal regulatory phenomena. More knowledge is required of the way the coupling components are regulated by the ion gradients present.

  14. Analytical solutions for solute transport in groundwater and riverine flow using Green's Function Method and pertinent coordinate transformation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanskrityayn, Abhishek; Suk, Heejun; Kumar, Naveen

    2017-04-01

    In this study, analytical solutions of one-dimensional pollutant transport originating from instantaneous and continuous point sources were developed in groundwater and riverine flow using both Green's Function Method (GFM) and pertinent coordinate transformation method. Dispersion coefficient and flow velocity are considered spatially and temporally dependent. The spatial dependence of the velocity is linear, non-homogeneous and that of dispersion coefficient is square of that of velocity, while the temporal dependence is considered linear, exponentially and asymptotically decelerating and accelerating. Our proposed analytical solutions are derived for three different situations depending on variations of dispersion coefficient and velocity, respectively which can represent real physical processes occurring in groundwater and riverine systems. First case refers to steady solute transport situation in steady flow in which dispersion coefficient and velocity are only spatially dependent. The second case represents transient solute transport in steady flow in which dispersion coefficient is spatially and temporally dependent while the velocity is spatially dependent. Finally, the third case indicates transient solute transport in unsteady flow in which both dispersion coefficient and velocity are spatially and temporally dependent. The present paper demonstrates the concentration distribution behavior from a point source in realistically occurring flow domains of hydrological systems including groundwater and riverine water in which the dispersivity of pollutant's mass is affected by heterogeneity of the medium as well as by other factors like velocity fluctuations, while velocity is influenced by water table slope and recharge rate. Such capabilities give the proposed method's superiority about application of various hydrological problems to be solved over other previously existing analytical solutions. Especially, to author's knowledge, any other solution doesn

  15. Transparent and Highly Responsive Phototransistors Based on a Solution-Processed, Nanometers-Thick Active Layer, Embedding a High-Mobility Electron-Transporting Polymer and a Hole-Trapping Molecule.

    PubMed

    Caranzi, Lorenzo; Pace, Giuseppina; Sassi, Mauro; Beverina, Luca; Caironi, Mario

    2017-08-30

    Organic materials are suitable for light sensing devices showing unique features such as low cost, large area, and flexibility. Moreover, transparent photodetectors are interesting for smart interfaces, windows, and display-integrated electronics. The ease of depositing ultrathin organic films with simple techniques enables low light absorbing active layers, resulting in the realization of transparent devices. Here, we demonstrate a strategy to obtain high efficiency organic photodetectors and phototransistors based on transparent active layers with a visible transmittance higher than 90%. The photoactive layer is composed of two phases, each a few nanometers thick. First, an acceptor polymer, which is a good electron-transporting material, on top of which a small molecule donor material is deposited, forming noncontinuous domains. The small molecule phase acts as a trap for holes, thus inducing a high photoconductive gain, resulting in a high photoresponsivity. The organic transparent detectors proposed here can reach very high external quantum efficiency and responsivity values, which in the case of the phototransistors can be as high as ∼74000% and 340 A W(-1) at 570 nm respectively, despite an absorber total thickness below 10 nm. Moreover, frequency dependent 2D photocurrent mapping allows discrimination between the contribution of a fast but inefficient and highly spatially localized photoinduced injection mechanism at the electrodes, and the onset of a slower and spatially extended photoconductive process, leading to high responsivity.

  16. A dual-porosity model for simulating solute transport in oil shale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glover, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    A model is described for simulating three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport in oil shale and associated geohydrologic units. The model treats oil shale as a dual-porosity medium by simulating flow and transport within fractures using the finite-element method. Diffusion of solute between fractures and the essentially static water of the shale matrix is simulated by including an analytical solution that acts as a source-sink term to the differential equation of solute transport. While knowledge of fracture orientation and spacing is needed to effectively use the model, it is not necessary to map the locations of individual fractures. The computer program listed in the report incorporates many of the features of previous dual-porosity models while retaining a practical approach to solving field problems. As a result the theory of solute transport is not extended in any appreciable way. The emphasis is on bringing together various aspects of solute transport theory in a manner that is particularly suited to the unusual groundwater flow and solute transport characteristics of oil shale systems. (Author 's abstract)

  17. KINEMATIC MODELING OF MULTIPHASE SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN THE VADOSE ZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research was the development of a computationally efficient simulation model for multiphase flow of organic hazardous waste constituents in the shallow soil environment. Such a model is appropriate for investigation of fate and transport of organic chemicals intr...

  18. KINEMATIC MODELING OF MULTIPHASE SOLUTE TRANSPORT IN THE VADOSE ZONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this research was the development of a computationally efficient simulation model for multiphase flow of organic hazardous waste constituents in the shallow soil environment. Such a model is appropriate for investigation of fate and transport of organic chemicals intr...

  19. Geomorphic and substrate controls on spatial variability in river solute transport and biogeochemical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaen, Phillip; Kurz, Marie; Knapp, Julia; Mendoza-Lera, Clara; Lee-Cullin, Joe; Klaar, Megan; Drummond, Jen; Jaeger, Anna; Zarnetske, Jay; Lewandowski, Joerg; Marti, Eugenia; Ward, Adam; Fleckenstein, Jan; Datry, Thibault; Larned, Scott; Krause, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient concentrations in surface waters and groundwaters are increasing in many agricultural catchments worldwide as a result of anthropogenic activities. Increasing geomorphological heterogeneity in river channels may help to attenuate nutrient pollution by facilitating water exchange fluxes with the hyporheic zone; a site of intense microbial activity where biogeochemical transformation rates (e.g. denitrification) can be high. However, the controls on spatial variability in biogeochemical cycling, particularly at scales relevant for river managers, are not well understood. Here, we aimed to assess: 1) how differences in geomorphological heterogeneity control river solute transport and rates of biogeochemical cycling at sub-reach scales (102 m); and 2) the relative magnitude of these differences versus those relating to reach scale substrate variability (103 m). We used the reactive 'smart' tracer resazurin (Raz), a weakly fluorescent dye that transforms to highly fluorescent resorufin (Rru) under mildly reducing conditions, as a proxy to assess rates of biogeochemical cycling in a lowland river in southern England. Solute tracer tests were conducted in two reaches with contrasting substrates: one sand-dominated and the other gravel-dominated. Each reach was divided into sub-reaches that varied in geomorphic complexity (e.g. by the presence of pool-riffle sequences or the abundance of large woody debris). Slug injections of Raz and the conservative tracer fluorescein were conducted in each reach during baseflow conditions (Q ≈ 80 L/s) and breakthrough curves monitored using in-situ fluorometers. Preliminary results indicate overall Raz:Rru transformation rates in the gravel-dominated reach were more than 50% higher than those in the sand-dominated reach. However, high sub-reach variability in Raz:Rru transformation rates and conservative solute transport parameters suggests small-scale targeted management interventions to alter geomorphic heterogeneity may be

  20. Reconstitution of the glucose transport activity of rat adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Malchoff, D M; Parker, V G; Langdon, R G

    1985-07-25

    Rat epididymal fat cell membrane proteins were extracted from adipocyte ghosts with octylglucoside and incorporated by detergent dialysis into unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles approx. 200 nm in diameter. The rate of glucose transport into the vesicles under zero-trans conditions was substrate dependent, saturable and inhibited by phloretin and cytochalasin B. Their maximum specific transport activity was 35.6 mumol/min per mg protein, and their half saturation constant for glucose was 15 mM. Glucose transport into the reconstituted vesicles was inhibited by only those sugars which competitively inhibited glucose transport into intact adipocytes. A major protein component of the vesicles was a 100 kDa protein which we had previously found to react with the affinity label maltosyl isothiocyanate (Malchoff, D.M., Olansky, L., Pohl, S. and Langdon, R.G. (1981) Fed. Proc. 40, 1893). Removal of adipocyte ghost membrane extrinsic proteins with dimethylmaleic anhydride followed by extraction of the resulting membrane pellet with octylglucoside yielded a solution which contained two major proteins, of Mr 100 000 and 85 000, with very small quantities of lower Mr proteins. Vesicles into which these proteins were incorporated had average specific transport activities of 624 mumol/min per mg protein and half saturation constants of 22 mM. Our results strongly indicate that the native glucose transporter of the rat adipocyte, like that of the human erythrocyte (Shelton, R.L. and Langdon, R.G. (1983) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 733, 25-33), is a 100 kDa protein.

  1. Profiling solute carrier transporters in the human blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Geier, E G; Chen, E C; Webb, A; Papp, A C; Yee, S W; Sadee, W; Giacomini, K M

    2013-12-01

    The neuroprotective function of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) presents a major challenge for drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS). Critical to this function, BBB membrane transporters include the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which limit drug penetration across the BBB, and the less-well-studied solute carrier (SLC) transporters. In this work, expression profiling of 359 SLC transporters, comparative expression analysis with kidney and liver, and immunoassays in brain microvessels (BMVs) identified previously unknown transporters at the human BBB.

  2. Active learning in transportation engineering education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weir, Jennifer Anne

    The objectives of this research were (1) to develop experimental active-based-learning curricula for undergraduate courses in transportation engineering and (2) to assess the effectiveness of an active-learning-based traffic engineering curriculum through an educational experiment. The researcher developed a new highway design course as a pilot study to test selected active-learning techniques before employing them in the traffic engineering curriculum. Active-learning techniques, including multiple-choice questions, short problems completed by individual students or small groups, and group discussions, were used as active interludes within lectures. The researcher also collected and analyzed student performance and attitude data from control and experimental classes to evaluate the relative effectiveness of the traditional lecture (control) approach and the active-learning (experimental) approach. The results indicate that the active-learning approach adopted for the experimental class did have a positive impact on student performance as measured by exam scores. The students in the experimental class also indicated slightly more positive attitudes at the end of the course than the control class, although the difference was not significant. The author recommends that active interludes similar to those in the experimental curricula be used in other courses in civil engineering.

  3. A compartmentalized solute transport model for redox zones in contaminated aquifers--1, Theory and development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abrams , Robert H.; Loague, Keith

    2000-01-01

    This paper, the first of two parts [see Abrams and Loague, this issue], takes the compartmentalized approach for the geochemical evolution of redox zones presented by Abrams et al. [1998] and embeds it within a solute transport framework. In this paper the compartmentalized approach is generalized to facilitate the description of its incorporation into a solute transport simulator. An equivalent formulation is developed which removes any discontinuities that may occur when switching compartments. Rate-limited redox reactions are modeled with a modified Monod relationship that allows either the organic substrate or the electron acceptor to be the rate-limiting reactant. Thermodynamic constraints are used to inhibit lower-energy redox reactions from occurring under infeasible geochemical conditions without imposing equilibrium on the lower-energy reactions. The procedure used allows any redox reaction to be simulated as being kinetically limited or thermodynamically limited, depending on local geochemical conditions. Empirical reaction inhibition methods are not needed. The sequential iteration approach (SIA), a technique which allows the number of solute transport equations to be reduced, is adopted to solve the coupled geochemical/solute transport problem. When the compartmentalized approach is embedded within the SIA, with the total analytical concentration of each component as the dependent variable in the transport equation, it is possible to reduce the number of transport equations even further than with the unmodified SIA. A one-dimensional, coupled geochemical/solute transport simulation is presented in which redox zones evolve dynamically in time and space. The compartmentalized solute transport (COMPTRAN) model described in this paper enables the development of redox zones to be simulated under both kinetic and thermodynamic constraints. The modular design of COMPTRAN facilitates the use of many different, preexisting solute transport and geochemical codes

  4. Active Transportation Surveillance - United States, 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Geoffrey P; Paul, Prabasaj; Wendel, Arthur M

    2015-08-28

    Physical activity is a health-enhancing behavior, and most U.S. adults do not meet the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Active transportation, such as by walking or bicycling, is one way that persons can be physically active. No comprehensive, multiyear assessments of active transportation surveillance in the United States have been conducted. 1999-2012. Five surveillance systems assess one or more components of active transportation. The American Community Survey and the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) both assess the mode of transportation to work in the past week. From these systems, the proportion of respondents who reported walking or bicycling to work can be calculated. NHTS and the American Time Use Survey include 1-day assessments of trips or activities. With that information, the proportion of respondents who report any walking or bicycling for transportation can be calculated. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the National Health Interview Survey both assess recent (i.e., in the past week or past month) habitual physical activity behaviors, including those performed during active travel. From these systems, the proportion of respondents who report any recent habitual active transportation can be calculated. The prevalence of active transportation as the primary commute mode to work in the past week ranged from 2.6% to 3.4%. The 1-day assessment indicated that the prevalence of any active transportation ranged from 10.5% to 18.5%. The prevalence of any habitual active transportation ranged from 23.9% to 31.4%. No consistent trends in active transportation across time periods and surveillance systems were identified. Among systems, active transportation was usually more common among men, younger respondents, and minority racial/ethnic groups. Among education groups, the highest prevalence of active transportation was usually among the least or most educated groups, and active transportation tended to be more

  5. TLC scheme for numerical solution of the transport equation on equilateral triangular meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    A new triangular linear characteristic TLC scheme for numerically solving the transport equation on equilateral triangular meshes has been developed. This scheme uses the analytic solution of the transport equation in the triangle as its basis. The data on edges of the triangle are assumed linear as is the source representation. A characteristic approach or nodal approach is used to obtain the analytic solution. Test problems indicate that the new TLC is superior to the widely used DITRI scheme for accuracy.

  6. The effect of low-GDP solution on ultrafiltration and solute transport in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu-Hyang; Do, Jun-Young; Park, Jong-Won; Yoon, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have reported benefits for human peritoneal mesothelial cell function of a neutral-pH dialysate low in glucose degradation products (GDPs). However, the effects of low-GDP solution on ultrafiltration (UF), transport of solutes, and control of body water remain elusive. We therefore investigated the effect of low-GDP solution on UF, solute transport, and control of body water. Among 79 new continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, 60 completed a 12-month protocol (28 in a lactate-based high-GDP solution group, 32 in a lactate-based low-GDP solution group). Clinical indices--including 24-hour UF volume (UFV), 24-hour urine volume (UV), residual renal function, and dialysis adequacy--were measured at months 1, 6, and 12. At months 1, 6, and 12, UFV, glucose absorption, 4-hour dialysate-to-plasma (D/P) creatinine, and 1-hour D/P Na(+) were assessed during a modified 4.25% peritoneal equilibration test (PET). Body composition by bioelectric impedance analysis was measured at months 1 and 12 in 26 CAPD patients. Daily UFV was lower in the low-GDP group. Despite similar solute transport and aquaporin function, the low-GDP group also showed lower UFV and higher glucose absorption during the PET. Factors associated with UFV during the PET were lactate-based high-GDP solution and 1-hour D/P Na(+). No differences in volume status and obesity at month 12 were observed, and improvements in hypervolemia were equal in both groups. Compared with the high-GDP group, the low-GDP group had a lower UFV during a PET and a lower daily UFV during the first year after peritoneal dialysis initiation. Although the low-GDP group had a lower daily UFV, no difficulties in controlling edema were encountered.

  7. Transport of Gas and Solutes in Permeable Estuarine Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    subsurface methane accumulations that formed gas layers up to 2 cm thick at 3 to 10 cm sediment depth. This gas was collected in the chambers and the...reactive solutes in the surface layers of the bed. Gas producing organisms benefit from this filtration, i.e. methanogens from the filtration of organic

  8. Effects of Temperature on Solute Transport Parameters in Differently-Textured Soils at Saturated Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, S.; Arihara, M.; Kawamoto, K.; Nishimura, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2014-12-01

    Subsurface warming driven by global warming, urban heat islands, and increasing use of shallow geothermal heating and cooling systems such as the ground source heat pump, potentially causes changes in subsurface mass transport. Therefore, understanding temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics is essential to accurately assess environmental risks due to increased subsurface temperature. In this study, one-dimensional solute transport experiments were conducted in soil columns under temperature control to investigate effects of temperature on solute transport parameters, such as solute dispersion and diffusion coefficients, hydraulic conductivity, and retardation factor. Toyoura sand, Kaolin clay, and intact loamy soils were used in the experiments. Intact loamy soils were taken during a deep well boring at the Arakawa Lowland in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. In the transport experiments, the core sample with 5-cm diameter and 4-cm height was first isotropically consolidated, whereafter 0.01M KCl solution was injected to the sample from the bottom. The concentrations of K+ and Cl- in the effluents were analyzed by an ion chromatograph to obtain solute breakthrough curves. The solute transport parameters were calculated from the breakthrough curves. The experiments were conducted under different temperature conditions (15, 25, and 40 oC). The retardation factor for the intact loamy soils decreased with increasing temperature, while water permeability increased due to reduced viscosity of water at higher temperature. Opposite, the effect of temperature on solute dispersivity for the intact loamy soils was insignificant. The effects of soil texture on the temperature dependency of the solute transport characteristics will be further investigated from comparison of results from differently-textured samples.

  9. A transportronic solution to the problem of interorbital transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, William C.

    1992-01-01

    An all-electronic transportation system described by the term 'transportronics' is examined as a means of solving the current problem of the high cost of transporting material from low-Earth orbit (LEO) to geostationary orbit (GEO). In this transportation system, low cost electric energy at the surface of the Earth is efficiently converted into microwave power which is then efficiently formed into a narrow beam which is kept incident upon the orbital transfer vehicles (OTV's) by electronic tracking. The incident beam is efficiently captured and converted into DC power by a device which has a very high ratio of DC power output to its mass. Because the mass of the electric thruster is also low, the resulting acceleration is unprecedented for electric-propelled vehicles. However, the performance of the system in terms of transit times from LEO to GEO is penalized by the short time of contact between the beam and the vehicle in low-Earth orbits. This makes it necessary to place the Earth based transmitters and the vehicles in the equatorial plane thus introducing many geopolitical factors. Technically, however, such a system as described in the report may out-perform any other approach to transportation in the LEO to GEO regime. The report describes and analyzes all portions of the beamed microwave power transmission system in considerable detail. An economic analysis of the operating and capital costs is made with the aid of a reference system capable of placing about 130,000 kilograms of payload into GEO each year. More mature states of the system are then examined, to a level in which 60,000 metric tons per year could be placed into GEO.

  10. One-dimensional potential of mean force underestimates activation barrier for transport across flexible lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopelevich, Dmitry I.

    2013-10-01

    Transport of a fullerene-like nanoparticle across a lipid bilayer is investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force (PMF) acting on the nanoparticle in a flexible bilayer suspended in water and a bilayer restrained to a flat surface are computed by constrained MD simulations. The rate of the nanoparticle transport into the bilayer interior is predicted using one-dimensional Langevin models based on these PMFs. The predictions are compared with the transport rates obtained from a series of direct (unconstrained) MD simulations of the solute transport into the flexible bilayer. It is observed that the PMF acting on the solute in the flexible membrane underestimates the transport rate by more than an order of magnitude while the PMF acting on the solute in the restrained membrane yields an accurate estimate of the activation energy for transport into the flexible membrane. This paradox is explained by a coexistence of metastable membrane configurations for a range of the solute positions inside and near the flexible membrane. This leads to a significant reduction of the contribution of the transition state to the mean force acting on the solute. Restraining the membrane shape ensures that there is only one stable membrane configuration corresponding to each solute position and thus the transition state is adequately represented in the PMF. This mechanism is quite general and thus this phenomenon is expected to occur in a wide range of interfacial systems. A simple model for the free energy landscape of the coupled solute-membrane system is proposed and validated. This model explicitly accounts for effects of the membrane deformations on the solute transport and yields an accurate prediction of the activation energy for the solute transport.

  11. One-dimensional potential of mean force underestimates activation barrier for transport across flexible lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Kopelevich, Dmitry I

    2013-10-07

    Transport of a fullerene-like nanoparticle across a lipid bilayer is investigated by coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Potentials of mean force (PMF) acting on the nanoparticle in a flexible bilayer suspended in water and a bilayer restrained to a flat surface are computed by constrained MD simulations. The rate of the nanoparticle transport into the bilayer interior is predicted using one-dimensional Langevin models based on these PMFs. The predictions are compared with the transport rates obtained from a series of direct (unconstrained) MD simulations of the solute transport into the flexible bilayer. It is observed that the PMF acting on the solute in the flexible membrane underestimates the transport rate by more than an order of magnitude while the PMF acting on the solute in the restrained membrane yields an accurate estimate of the activation energy for transport into the flexible membrane. This paradox is explained by a coexistence of metastable membrane configurations for a range of the solute positions inside and near the flexible membrane. This leads to a significant reduction of the contribution of the transition state to the mean force acting on the solute. Restraining the membrane shape ensures that there is only one stable membrane configuration corresponding to each solute position and thus the transition state is adequately represented in the PMF. This mechanism is quite general and thus this phenomenon is expected to occur in a wide range of interfacial systems. A simple model for the free energy landscape of the coupled solute-membrane system is proposed and validated. This model explicitly accounts for effects of the membrane deformations on the solute transport and yields an accurate prediction of the activation energy for the solute transport.

  12. A computational approach to calculate the heat of transport of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Lecce, Silvia; Albrecht, Tim; Bresme, Fernando

    2017-03-01

    Thermal gradients induce concentration gradients in alkali halide solutions, and the salt migrates towards hot or cold regions depending on the average temperature of the solution. This effect has been interpreted using the heat of transport, which provides a route to rationalize thermophoretic phenomena. Early theories provide estimates of the heat of transport at infinite dilution. These values are used to interpret thermodiffusion (Soret) and thermoelectric (Seebeck) effects. However, accessing heats of transport of individual ions at finite concentration remains an outstanding question both theoretically and experimentally. Here we discuss a computational approach to calculate heats of transport of aqueous solutions at finite concentrations, and apply our method to study lithium chloride solutions at concentrations >0.5 M. The heats of transport are significantly different for Li+ and Cl‑ ions, unlike what is expected at infinite dilution. We find theoretical evidence for the existence of minima in the Soret coefficient of LiCl, where the magnitude of the heat of transport is maximized. The Seebeck coefficient obtained from the ionic heats of transport varies significantly with temperature and concentration. We identify thermodynamic conditions leading to a maximization of the thermoelectric response of aqueous solutions.

  13. A computational approach to calculate the heat of transport of aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    Di Lecce, Silvia; Albrecht, Tim; Bresme, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Thermal gradients induce concentration gradients in alkali halide solutions, and the salt migrates towards hot or cold regions depending on the average temperature of the solution. This effect has been interpreted using the heat of transport, which provides a route to rationalize thermophoretic phenomena. Early theories provide estimates of the heat of transport at infinite dilution. These values are used to interpret thermodiffusion (Soret) and thermoelectric (Seebeck) effects. However, accessing heats of transport of individual ions at finite concentration remains an outstanding question both theoretically and experimentally. Here we discuss a computational approach to calculate heats of transport of aqueous solutions at finite concentrations, and apply our method to study lithium chloride solutions at concentrations >0.5 M. The heats of transport are significantly different for Li+ and Cl− ions, unlike what is expected at infinite dilution. We find theoretical evidence for the existence of minima in the Soret coefficient of LiCl, where the magnitude of the heat of transport is maximized. The Seebeck coefficient obtained from the ionic heats of transport varies significantly with temperature and concentration. We identify thermodynamic conditions leading to a maximization of the thermoelectric response of aqueous solutions. PMID:28322266

  14. Solute transport with equilibrium aqueous complexation and either sorption or ion exchange: Simulation methodology and applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, F.M.; Voss, C.I.; Rubin, J.

    1987-01-01

    Methodologies that account for specific types of chemical reactions in the simulation of solute transport can be developed so they are compatible with solution algorithms employed in existing transport codes. This enables the simulation of reactive transport in complex multidimensional flow regimes, and provides a means for existing codes to account for some of the fundamental chemical processes that occur among transported solutes. Two equilibrium-controlled reaction systems demonstrate a methodology for accommodating chemical interaction into models of solute transport. One system involves the sorption of a given chemical species, as well as two aqueous complexations in which the sorbing species is a participant. The other reaction set involves binary ion exchange coupled with aqueous complexation involving one of the exchanging species. The methodology accommodates these reaction systems through the addition of nonlinear terms to the transport equations for the sorbing species. Example simulation results show (1) the effect equilibrium chemical parameters have on the spatial distributions of concentration for complexing solutes; (2) that an interrelationship exists between mechanical dispersion and the various reaction processes; (3) that dispersive parameters of the porous media cannot be determined from reactive concentration distributions unless the reaction is accounted for or the influence of the reaction is negligible; (4) how the concentration of a chemical species may be significantly affected by its participation in an aqueous complex with a second species which also sorbs; and (5) that these coupled chemical processes influencing reactive transport can be demonstrated in two-dimensional flow regimes. ?? 1987.

  15. Water and Solute Transport Governed by Tunable Pore Size Distributions in Nanoporous Graphene Membranes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Doojoon; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Laoui, Tahar; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-10-10

    Nanoporous graphene has the potential to advance membrane separations by offering high selectivity with minimal resistance to flow, but how mass transport depends on the structure of pores in this atomically thin membrane is poorly understood. Here, we investigate the relationship between tunable pore creation using ion bombardment and oxygen plasma etching, the resulting pore size distributions, and the consequent water and solute transport. Through tuning of the pore creation process, we demonstrate nanofiltration membranes that reject small molecules but offer high permeance to water or monovalent ions. Theoretical multiscale modeling of transport across the membranes reveals a disproportionate contribution of large pores to osmotic water flux and diffusive solute transport and captures the observed trends in transport measurements except for the smallest pores. This work provides insights into the effects of graphene pore size distribution and support layer on transport and presents a framework for designing atomically thin membranes.

  16. Ovariectomy Enhances Mechanical Load-Induced Solute Transport around Osteocytes in Rat Cancellous Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Cesare; Sharma, Divya; Doty, Stephen B.; Fritton, Susannah P.

    2014-01-01

    To test if osteoporosis alters mechanical load-induced interstitial fluid flow in bone, this study examined the combined effect of estrogen deficiency and external loading on solute transport around osteocytes. An in vivo tracer, FITC-labeled bovine serum albumin, was injected into anaesthetized ovariectomized and control female Sprague Dawley rats before the right tibia was subjected to a controlled, physiological, non-invasive sinusoidal load to mimic walking. Tracer movement through the lacunar-canalicular system surrounding osteocytes was quantified in cortical and cancellous bone from the proximal tibia using confocal microscopy, with the non-loaded tibia serving as internal control. Overall, the application of mechanical loading increased the percentage of osteocyte lacunae labeled with injected tracer, and ovariectomy further enhanced movement of tracer. An analysis of separate regions demonstrated that ovariectomy enhanced in vivo transport of the injected tracer in the cancellous bone of the tibial epiphysis and metaphysis but not in the cortical bone of the metaphysis. These findings show that bone changes due to reduced estrogen levels alter convectional transport around osteocytes in cancellous bone and demonstrate a functional difference of interstitial fluid flow around osteocytes in estrogen-deficient rats undergoing the same physical activity as controls. The altered interstitial fluid flow around osteocytes is likely related to nanostructural matrix-mineral level differences recently demonstrated at the lacunar-canalicular surface of estrogen-deficient rats, which could affect the transmission of mechanical loads to the osteocyte. PMID:24316418

  17. Combined physical and chemical nonequilibrium transport model: Analytical solution, moments, and application to colloids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The transport of solutes and colloids in porous media is influenced by a variety of physical and chemical nonequilibrium processes. A combined physical–chemical nonequilibrium (PCNE) model was therefore used to describe general mass transport. The model partitions the pore space into “mobile” and “i...

  18. The Governor's Challenge: "Building a Stronger Virginia Today": Transportation Visions and Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Using STM(Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) education, this emerging workforce will have the chance to creatively solve one of Virginia's biggest challenges: TRANSPORTATION. - Students will be asked to develop alternative transportation systems for the state. This competition will enable teams to work with business mentors to design creative solutions for regional gridlocks and develop other transportation systems to more easily and expediently reach all parts of the Commonwealth.

  19. Light-trails: an optical solution for IP transport [Invited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumaste, Ashwin; Chlamtac, Imrich

    2004-05-01

    We present a solution for IP-centric communication at the optical layer through a combination of a hardware platform and algorithmic implementation. The presented approach, termed light-trails, is shown to yield a reconfigurable networking platform in which optical connections of arbitrary duration can be established and torn down flexibly in negligible time, accommodating the dynamic traffic requirements of the IP world. The hardware platform and protocol are evaluated with tractable mathematical models validated through detailed simulation.

  20. The Mechanism of Field-Scale Solute Transport: An insight from Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, David

    2014-05-01

    Field-scale transport of conservative (chloride) and reactive (nitrate) solutes was analyzed by means of two different model processes for the local description of the transport. The first is the classical, one-region advection dispersion equation (ADE) model, while the second is the two-region, mobile-immobile (MIM) model. The analyses were performed by means of detailed three-dimensional (3-D), numerical simulations of the flow and the transport considering realistic features of the soil-water-plant-atmosphere system, pertinent to a turf field located in the Glil Yam site, Israel, irrigated with treated waste water (TWW). Simulated water content and concentration profiles were compared with available measurements of their counterparts. Results of the analyses suggest that the behavior of both the conservative and the reactive solutes in the Glil Yam site is quantified better when the transport on the local scale is modeled as a two-region, MIM model, than when a single-region, ADE model is used. Reconstruction of the shape of the measured solute concentration profiles using the MIM transport model, required relatively large immobile water content fraction and relatively small mass transfer coefficient. These results suggest that in the case of initially non-zero solute concentration profile (e.g., chloride and nitrate), the 3-D ADE transport model may significantly overestimate the groundwater contamination hazard posed by the solutes moving through the vadose zone, as compared with the 3-D MIM transport model, while the opposite is true in the case of initially zero solute concentration profile (e.g., carbamazepine). These findings stem from the combination of relatively large immobile water content fraction and relatively small mass transfer coefficient taken into account in the MIM transport model. In the first case, this combination forces a considerable portion of the solute mass to remain in the immobile region of the water-filled pores, while the opposite

  1. Reactive silica transport in fractured porous media: Analytical solutions for a system of parallel fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianwen

    2012-04-01

    A general analytical solution is derived by using the Laplace transformation to describe transient reactive silica transport in a conceptualized 2-D system involving a set of parallel fractures embedded in an impermeable host rock matrix, taking into account of hydrodynamic dispersion and advection of silica transport along the fractures, molecular diffusion from each fracture to the intervening rock matrix, and dissolution of quartz. A special analytical solution is also developed by ignoring the longitudinal hydrodynamic dispersion term but remaining other conditions the same. The general and special solutions are in the form of a double infinite integral and a single infinite integral, respectively, and can be evaluated using Gauss-Legendre quadrature technique. A simple criterion is developed to determine under what conditions the general analytical solution can be approximated by the special analytical solution. It is proved analytically that the general solution always lags behind the special solution, unless a dimensionless parameter is less than a critical value. Several illustrative calculations are undertaken to demonstrate the effect of fracture spacing, fracture aperture and fluid flow rate on silica transport. The analytical solutions developed here can serve as a benchmark to validate numerical models that simulate reactive mass transport in fractured porous media.

  2. New approach to the solution of the Boltzmann radiation transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffi, Vinicio C.; Dunn, William L.

    1987-03-01

    Transport monodimensional stationary solutions for the angular space-energy neutron flux, of interest in radiation penetration problems, are studied by Green's function method. Explicit analytical results for the spatial moments of the sought solution are obtained for the case of an isotropically scattering slab of infinite thickness and of a continuous slowing down model in energy.

  3. Analytical power series solution for contaminant transport with hyperbolic asymptotic distance-dependent dispersivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jui-Sheng; Ni, Chuen-Fa; Liang, Ching-Ping; Chiang, Chen-Chung

    2008-11-01

    SummaryA hyperbolic asymptotic function, which characterizes that the dispersivity initially increases with travel distance and eventually reaches an asymptotic value at long travel distance, is adopted and incorporated into the general advection-dispersion equation for describing scale-dependent solute transport in porous media in this study. An analytical technique for solving advection-dispersion equation with hyperbolic asymptotic distance-dependent dispersivity is presented. The analytical solution is derived by applying the extended power series method coupling with the Laplace transform. The developed analytical solution is compared with the corresponding numerical solution to evaluate its accuracy. Results demonstrate that the breakthrough curves at different locations obtained from the derived power series solution agree closely with those from the numerical solution. Moreover, breakthrough curves obtained from the hyperbolic asymptotic dispersivity model are compared with those obtained from the constant dispersivity model to scrutinize the relationship of the transport parameters derived by Mishra and Parker [Mishra, S., Parker, J.C., 1990. Analysis of solute transport with a hyperbolic scale dependent dispersion model. Hydrol. Proc. 4(1), 45-47]. The result reveals that the relationship postulated by Mishra and Parker [Mishra, S., Parker, J.C., 1990. Analysis of solute transport with a hyperbolic scale dependent dispersion model. Hydrol. Proc. 4(1), 45-47] is only valid under conditions with small dimensionless asymptotic dispersivity ( aa) and large dimensionless characteristic half length ( b).

  4. Solute transport through a pine-bark based substrate under saturated and unsaturated conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An understanding of how dissolved mineral nutrient ions (solutes) move through pine bark substrates during the application of irrigation water is vital to better understand nutrient transport and leaching from containerized crops during an irrigation event. However, current theories on solute transp...

  5. Exact analytical solutions for contaminant transport in rivers 1. The equilibrium advection-dispersion equation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Analytical solutions of the advection-dispersion equation and related models are indispensable for predicting or analyzing contaminant transport processes in streams and rivers, as well as in other surface water bodies. Many useful analytical solutions originated in disciplines other than surface-w...

  6. Water flow and multicomponent solute transport in drip-irrigated lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raij, Iael; Šimûnek, Jiří; Ben-Gal, Alon; Lazarovitch, Naftali

    2016-08-01

    Controlled experiments and modeling are crucial components in the evaluation of the fate of water and solutes in environmental and agricultural research. Lysimeters are commonly used to determine water and solute balances and assist in making sustainable decisions with respect to soil reclamation, fertilization, or irrigation with low-quality water. While models are cost-effective tools for estimating and preventing environmental damage by agricultural activities, their value is highly dependent on the accuracy of their parameterization, often determined by calibration. The main objective of this study was to use measured major ion concentrations collected from drip-irrigated lysimeters to calibrate the variably saturated water flow model HYDRUS (2D/3D) coupled with the reactive transport model UNSATCHEM. Irrigation alternated between desalinated and brackish waters. Lysimeter drainage and soil solution samples were collected for chemical analysis and used to calibrate the model. A second objective was to demonstrate the potential use of the calibrated model to evaluate lower boundary design options of lysimeters with respect to leaching fractions determined using drainage water fluxes, chloride concentrations, and overall salinity of drainage water, and exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP) in the profile. The model showed that, in the long term, leaching fractions calculated with electrical conductivity values would be affected by the lower boundary condition pressure head, while those calculated with chloride concentrations and water fluxes would not be affected. In addition, clear dissimilarities in ESP profiles were found between lysimeters with different lower boundary conditions, suggesting a potential influence on hydraulic conductivities and flow patterns.

  7. An Evaluation of Conditioning Data for Solute Transport Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2003-03-01

    The large and diverse body of subsurface characterization data generated at a field research site near Oyster, Virginia provides a unique opportunity to test the impact of conditioning data of various types on predictions of flow and transport. Bromide breakthrough curves (BTCs) were measured during a forced-gradient local-scale injection experiment conducted in 1999. Observed BTCs are available at 140 sampling points in a three dimensional array within the transport domain. A detailed three-dimensional numerical model is used to simulate breakthrough curves at the same locations as the observed BTCs under varying assumptions regarding the character of hydraulic conductivity spatial distributions, and variable amounts and types of conditioning data. We present comparative results of six different cases ranging from simple (deterministic homogeneous models) to complex (stochastic indicator simulation conditioned to cross-borehole geophysical observations). Quantitative measures of model goodness-of-fit are presented. The results show that conditioning to a large number of small-scale measurements does not significantly improve model predictions, and may lead to biased or overly confident predictions. However, conditioning to geophysical interpretations with larger spatial support significantly improves the accuracy and precision of model predictions. In all cases, the effects of model error appear to be significant in relation to parameter uncertainty.

  8. A conceptual framework for ground-water solute-transport studies with emphasis on physical mechanisms of solute movement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.; Franke, O. Lehn; Buxton, Herbert T.; Bennett, Gordon D.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of solute transport in groundwater systems involves a complex, multi-discipline study that requires intensive and costly investigation. Groundwater contamination, particularly from point sources, has been growing in importance in recent years. This report examines the physical mechanisms of solute transport, advection and dispersion, and explains how they relate to one another and the scale of study. The approach uses a preliminary analysis prior to collection of new data to focus on the technical problems to be addressed and to direct the initial collection of new data if warranted. The field investigation (collection of new data) progresses in stages that use the new knowledge and understanding gained from the preceding data collection to aid in further data collection as the study proceeds. A major premise of the approach is that the foundation of any analysis is a detailed quantitative definition of: (1) the groundwater flow field in three dimensions, and (2) the distribution of solutes in the contaminant plume in three dimensions at one point in time, or preferably at more than features of the groundwater flow field, and is an important tool for analysis. However, the scale of analysis for solute transport studies is usually much finer than the scale of analysis for groundwater flow alone. Therefore, an increase in detail of the velocity field is needed to provide for accurate calculations of pathlines in three-dimensional heterogeneous groundwater systems. (Lantz-PTT)

  9. Anatomic Variations of the Lacunar-Canalicular System Influence Solute Transport in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaozhou; Novotny, John E.; Wang, Liyun

    2009-01-01

    Solute transport in the lacunar-canalicular system (LCS) is essential for bone metabolism and mechanotransduction. Using the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) we have been quantifying solute transport in the LCS of murine long bone as a function of loading parameters and molecular size. However, the influence of LCS anatomy, which varies among animal species, bone type and location, age and health condition, is not well understood. In this study, we developed a mathematical model to simulate solute convection in the LCS during a FRAP experiment under a physiological cyclic flow. We found that the transport rate (the reciprocal time constant for refilling the photobleached lacuna) increased linearly with canalicular number and decreased with canalicular length for both diffusion and convection. As a result, the transport enhancement of convection over diffusion was much less sensitive to the variations associated with chick, mouse, rabbit, bovine, dog, horse, and human LCS anatomy, when compared with the rates of diffusion or convection alone. Canalicular density did not affect transport enhancement, while solute size and the lacunar density had more complicated, nonlinear effects. This parametric study suggests that solute transport could be altered by varying LCS parameters, and that the anatomical details of the LCS need systemic examination to further understand the etiology of aged and osteoporotic bones. PMID:19576310

  10. Integrated compartmental model for describing the transport of solute in a fractured porous medium. [FRACPORT

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1984-10-01

    This report documents a model, FRACPORT, that simulates the transport of a solute through a fractured porous matrix. The model should be useful in analyzing the possible transport of radionuclides from shallow-land burial sites in humid environments. The use of the model is restricted to transport through saturated zones. The report first discusses the general modeling approach used, which is based on the Integrated Compartmental Method. The basic equations of solute transport are then presented. The model, which assumes a known water velocity field, solves these equations on two different time scales; one related to rapid transport of solute along fractures and the other related to slower transport through the porous matrix. FRACPORT is validated by application to a simple example of fractured porous medium transport that has previously been analyzed by other methods. Then its utility is demonstrated in analyzing more complex cases of pulses of solute into a fractured matrix. The report serves as a user's guide to FRACPORT. A detailed description of data input, along with a listing of input for a sample problem, is provided. 16 references, 18 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Transport in active systems crowded by obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2017-02-01

    The reactive and diffusive dynamics of a single chemically powered Janus motor in a crowded medium of moving but passive obstacles is investigated using molecular simulation. It is found that the reaction rate of the catalytic motor reaction decreases in a crowded medium as the volume fraction of obstacles increases as a result of a reduction in the Smoluchowski diffusion-controlled reaction rate coefficient that contributes to the overall reaction rate. A continuum model is constructed and analyzed to interpret the dependence of the steady-state reaction rate observed in simulations on the volume fraction of obstacles in the system. The steady-state concentration fields of reactant and product are shown to be sensitive to the local structure of obstacles around the Janus motor. It is demonstrated that the active motor exhibits enhanced diffusive motion at long times with a diffusion constant that decreases as the volume fraction of crowding species increases. In addition, the dynamical properties of a passive tracer particle in a system containing many active Janus motors is studied to investigate how an active environment influences the transport of non-active species. The diffusivity of a passive tracer particle in an active medium is found to be enhanced in systems with forward-moving Janus motors due to the cooperative dynamics of these motors.

  12. Automated calibration of a stream solute transport model: Implications for interpretation of biogeochemical parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, D.T.; Gooseff, M.N.; Bencala, K.E.; Runkel, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    The hydrologic processes of advection, dispersion, and transient storage are the primary physical mechanisms affecting solute transport in streams. The estimation of parameters for a conservative solute transport model is an essential step to characterize transient storage and other physical features that cannot be directly measured, and often is a preliminary step in the study of reactive solutes. Our study used inverse modeling to estimate parameters of the transient storage model OTIS (One dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage). Observations from a tracer injection experiment performed on Uvas Creek, California, USA, are used to illustrate the application of automated solute transport model calibration to conservative and nonconservative stream solute transport. A computer code for universal inverse modeling (UCODE) is used for the calibrations. Results of this procedure are compared with a previous study that used a trial-and-error parameter estimation approach. The results demonstrated 1) importance of the proper estimation of discharge and lateral inflow within the stream system; 2) that although the fit of the observations is not much better when transient storage is invoked, a more randomly distributed set of residuals resulted (suggesting non-systematic error), indicating that transient storage is occurring; 3) that inclusion of transient storage for a reactive solute (Sr2+) provided a better fit to the observations, highlighting the importance of robust model parameterization; and 4) that applying an automated calibration inverse modeling estimation approach resulted in a comprehensive understanding of the model results and the limitation of input data.

  13. Molecular transport through surfactant-covered oil-water interfaces: role of physical properties of solutes and surfactants in creating energy barriers for transport.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong Nam; Gupta, Ashish; Chauhan, Anuj; Kopelevich, Dmitry I

    2011-03-15

    Mechanisms of molecular transport across oil-water interfaces covered by nonionic surfactants are investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. Resistance of the surfactant monolayer to the solute transport is shown to be controlled by dense regions in the monolayer. The dense regions are formed on both sides of the dividing surface and the barrier to the solute transport is created by those of them experiencing unfavorable interactions with the solute. Resistance to the transport of a hydrophobic (hydrophilic) solute increases with the excess density of the head (tail) group region of the monolayer, which in turn increases with the length of the surfactant head (tail) group. Barriers for solute transport through surfactant monolayers are also influenced by the solute size. However, the extent of this influence is determined by the monolayer thickness and the solute structure and composition. For example, it is shown that resistance offered by thin monolayers to transport of linear oligomers is relatively insensitive to the solute length. The barrier sensitivity to the length of these solutes increases with the monolayer thickness. In addition to the static barriers, the solute transport is shown to be affected by dynamic barriers due to a nonadiabatic coupling of the monolayer surface with the solute position and configuration. This coupling leads to deviations of the system dynamics from the minimum energy path. The deviations are most significant in the neighborhood of the static energy barrier, which effectively leads to an increase of the barrier for the solute transport.

  14. Role of ABC and Solute Carrier Transporters in the Placental Transport of Lamivudine

    PubMed Central

    Ceckova, Martina; Reznicek, Josef; Ptackova, Zuzana; Cerveny, Lukas; Müller, Fabian; Kacerovsky, Marian; Fromm, Martin F.; Glazier, Jocelyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Lamivudine is one of the antiretroviral drugs of choice for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) in HIV-positive women. In this study, we investigated the relevance of drug efflux transporters P-glycoprotein (P-gp) (MDR1 [ABCB1]), BCRP (ABCG2), MRP2 (ABCC2), and MATE1 (SLC47A1) for the transmembrane transport and transplacental transfer of lamivudine. We employed in vitro accumulation and transport experiments on MDCK cells overexpressing drug efflux transporters, in situ-perfused rat term placenta, and vesicular uptake in microvillous plasma membrane (MVM) vesicles isolated from human term placenta. MATE1 significantly accelerated lamivudine transport in MATE1-expressing MDCK cells, whereas no transporter-driven efflux of lamivudine was observed in MDCK-MDR1, MDCK-MRP2, and MDCK-BCRP monolayers. MATE1-mediated efflux of lamivudine appeared to be a low-affinity process (apparent Km of 4.21 mM and Vmax of 5.18 nmol/mg protein/min in MDCK-MATE1 cells). Consistent with in vitro transport studies, the transplacental clearance of lamivudine was not affected by P-gp, BCRP, or MRP2. However, lamivudine transfer across dually perfused rat placenta and the uptake of lamivudine into human placental MVM vesicles revealed pH dependency, indicating possible involvement of MATE1 in the fetal-to-maternal efflux of the drug. To conclude, placental transport of lamivudine does not seem to be affected by P-gp, MRP2, or BCRP, but a pH-dependent mechanism mediates transport of lamivudine in the fetal-to-maternal direction. We suggest that MATE1 might be, at least partly, responsible for this transport. PMID:27401571

  15. Classical heat transport in anharmonic molecular junctions: exact solutions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Wang, Jian-Sheng; Li, Baowen

    2013-02-01

    We study full counting statistics for classical heat transport through anharmonic or nonlinear molecular junctions formed by interacting oscillators. An analytical result of the steady-state heat flux for an overdamped anharmonic junction with arbitrary temperature bias is obtained. It is found that the thermal conductance can be expressed in terms of a temperature-dependent effective force constant. The role of anharmonicity is identified. We also give the general formula for the second cumulant of heat in steady state, as well as the average geometric heat flux when two system parameters are modulated adiabatically. We present an anharmonic example for which all cumulants for heat can be obtained exactly. For a bounded single oscillator model with mass we found that the cumulants are independent of the nonlinear potential.

  16. Information entropy to measure the spatial and temporal complexity of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiyao; Huang, Guanhua; Xiong, Yunwu

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of the spatial structure of porous media, randomness of groundwater recharge and discharge (rainfall, runoff, etc.) has led to groundwater movement complexity, physical and chemical interaction between groundwater and porous media cause solute transport in the medium more complicated. An appropriate method to describe the complexity of features is essential when study on solute transport and conversion in porous media. Information entropy could measure uncertainty and disorder, therefore we attempted to investigate complexity, explore the contact between the information entropy and complexity of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media using information entropy theory. Based on Markov theory, two-dimensional stochastic field of hydraulic conductivity (K) was generated by transition probability. Flow and solute transport model were established under four conditions (instantaneous point source, continuous point source, instantaneous line source and continuous line source). The spatial and temporal complexity of solute transport process was characterized and evaluated using spatial moment and information entropy. Results indicated that the entropy increased as the increase of complexity of solute transport process. For the point source, the one-dimensional entropy of solute concentration increased at first and then decreased along X and Y directions. As time increased, entropy peak value basically unchanged, peak position migrated along the flow direction (X direction) and approximately coincided with the centroid position. With the increase of time, spatial variability and complexity of solute concentration increase, which result in the increases of the second-order spatial moment and the two-dimensional entropy. Information entropy of line source was higher than point source. Solute entropy obtained from continuous input was higher than instantaneous input. Due to the increase of average length of lithoface, media continuity increased, flow and

  17. Addition of simultaneous heat and solute transport and variable fluid viscosity to SEAWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorne, D.; Langevin, C.D.; Sukop, M.C.

    2006-01-01

    SEAWAT is a finite-difference computer code designed to simulate coupled variable-density ground water flow and solute transport. This paper describes a new version of SEAWAT that adds the ability to simultaneously model energy and solute transport. This is necessary for simulating the transport of heat and salinity in coastal aquifers for example. This work extends the equation of state for fluid density to vary as a function of temperature and/or solute concentration. The program has also been modified to represent the effects of variable fluid viscosity as a function of temperature and/or concentration. The viscosity mechanism is verified against an analytical solution, and a test of temperature-dependent viscosity is provided. Finally, the classic Henry-Hilleke problem is solved with the new code. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Urinary solute transport by ileal segments. I. Effects of nicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Piñeiro, L; Mateos, F; Montero, A; Madero, R; Martínez-Piñeiro, J A

    1993-12-01

    This study was conducted to quantify urinary solute transport by the ileum, using an in vivo human model, and to determine the effect of nicotinic acid on this process. Patients were studied under both basal conditions and niacin therapy. The rates of solute transport were established by analysis of excretion indexes for each solute. Potassium and ammonium were absorbed by the ileum, while phosphorus, sodium and bicarbonate were secreted. The percentage excretion index of sodium and bicarbonate increased by approximately 100 and 600% respectively, causing a significant rise in urinary pH. Although not statistically significant, there was a tendency for chloride to be absorbed and for water to pass into the bowel lumen. Nicotinic acid 3 g/day had no significant effect on urinary solute transport.

  19. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 Theory Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2005-11-01

    This document presents the mathematical theory implemented in the CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator. The simulator is a three-dimensional finite element model that can be used for evaluating flow and solute mass transport. Although the theory for thermal transport is presented in this guide, it has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. The flow module is capable of simulating both confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentration of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. Mesh construction employs “collapsible”, hexahedral finite elements in a three-dimensional coordinate system. CFEST uses the Galerkin finite element method to convert the partial differential equations to algebraic form. To solve the coupled equations for momentum, solute and heat transport, either Picard or Newton-Raphson iterative schemes are used to treat nonlinearities. An upstream weighted residual finite-element method is used to solve the advective-dispersive transport and energy transfer equations, which circumvents problems of numerical oscillation problems. Matrix solutions of the flow and transport problems are performed using efficient iterative solvers available in ITPACK and PETSc, solvers that are available in the public domain. These solvers are based on the preconditioned conjugate gradient and ORTHOMIN methods for symmetric and a nonsymmetric matrices, respectively.

  20. Experimental study of solute transport in pool-pipe system and its significance on karst hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X.; Chang, Y.; Peng, F.; Wu, J.

    2016-12-01

    Study of solute transport in karst conduit is of great significance for prediction and prevention of groundwater pollution in southwest karst region. Solute transport in karst conduit is strongly influenced by pools which often develop along karst conduit. In order to investigate the effect of transient storage within pools on solute transport in the conduit, a pool-pipe system was built in the laboratory and some tracer tests were performed in various flow conditions to characterize the solute transport in different pool-pipe structures. The Qtracer2 program was used to obtain solute transport parameters. We used retardation coefficient R to characterize the difference between the 1-D analytical solution of the classical advection-dispersion equation and experimental results. The experimental results reveal that the concentration peak decreases with the number of pools whereas the dispersion coefficient and dispersivity increase gradually. Adding transient storage increases retardation as tailing of the breakthrough curve(BTC) is growing with the number of pools. This demonstrates that transient storage within pools is transformed to retardation. The symmetrical pool has longer tails compared to the asymmetrical pool. The concentration peak lag behind significantly due to the asymmetrical pool. A decrease in dispersivity and tailing of the BTC is observed in all pipes with the increase of flow velocities. The 1-D analytical solution of the classical advection-dispersion equation is well fitted to BTC of a single pipe in maximum flow velocity but is poorly fitted to other BTCs with appreciable tails. Therefore, it requires an appropriate model to explain tailing of the BTC. The conclusion has important significance for understanding of solute transport process in karst conduit. Future work will focus on using the appropriate model to explain tailing of the BTC.

  1. An implicit dispersive transport algorithm for the US Geological Survey MOC3D solute-transport model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kipp, K.L.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents an extension to the U.S. Geological Survey MOC3D transport model that incorporates an implicit-in-time difference approximation for the dispersive transport equation, including source/sink terms. The original MOC3D transport model (Version 1) uses the method of characteristics to solve the transport equation on the basis of the velocity field. The original MOC3D solution algorithm incorporates particle tracking to represent advective processes and an explicit finite-difference formulation to calculate dispersive fluxes. The new implicit procedure eliminates several stability criteria required for the previous explicit formulation. This allows much larger transport time increments to be used in dispersion-dominated problems. The decoupling of advective and dispersive transport in MOC3D, however, is unchanged. With the implicit extension, the MOC3D model is upgraded to Version 2. A description of the numerical method of the implicit dispersion calculation, the data-input requirements and output options, and the results of simulator testing and evaluation are presented. Version 2 of MOC3D was evaluated for the same set of problems used for verification of Version 1. These test results indicate that the implicit calculation of Version 2 matches the accuracy of Version 1, yet is more efficient than the explicit calculation for transport problems that are characterized by a grid Peclet number less than about 1.0.

  2. Stochastic models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, V.N.; Korotkin, I.A.; Pruess, K.; Goloviznin, V.M.; Sorokovikova, O.S.

    2009-09-15

    A stochastic model of anomalous diffusion was developed in which transport occurs by random motion of Brownian particles, described by distribution functions of random displacements with heavy (power-law) tails. One variant of an effective algorithm for random function generation with a power-law asymptotic and arbitrary factor of asymmetry is proposed that is based on the Gnedenko-Levy limit theorem and makes it possible to reproduce all known Levy {alpha}-stable fractal processes. A two-dimensional stochastic random walk algorithm has been developed that approximates anomalous diffusion with streamline-dependent and space-dependent parameters. The motivation for introducing such a type of dispersion model is the observed fact that tracers in natural aquifers spread at different super-Fickian rates in different directions. For this and other important cases, stochastic random walk models are the only known way to solve the so-called multiscaling fractional order diffusion equation with space-dependent parameters. Some comparisons of model results and field experiments are presented.

  3. Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace Woan-chee

    1999-10-01

    Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

  4. Rashba quantum wire: exact solution and ballistic transport.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Bercioux, D; Ramaglia, V Marigliano; Cataudella, V

    2007-05-08

    The effect of Rashba spin-orbit interaction in quantum wires with hard-wall boundaries is discussed. The exact wavefunction and eigenvalue equation are worked out, pointing out the mixing between the spin and spatial parts. The spectral properties are also studied within perturbation theory with respect to the strength of the spin-orbit interaction and diagonalization procedure. A comparison is made with the results of a simple model, the two-band model, that takes account only of the first two sub-bands of the wire. Finally, the transport properties within the ballistic regime are analytically calculated for the two-band model and through a tight-binding Green function for the entire system. Single and double interfaces separating regions with different strengths of spin-orbit interaction are analysed by injecting carriers into the first and the second sub-band. It is shown that in the case of a single interface the spin polarization in the Rashba region is different from zero, and in the case of two interfaces the spin polarization shows oscillations due to spin-selective bound states.

  5. Lattice Boltzmann solution of the transient Boltzmann transport equation in radiative and neutron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yahui; Yan, Liming; Ma, Yu

    2017-06-01

    Applications of the transient Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) have undergone much investigation, such as radiative heat transfer and neutron transport. This paper provides a lattice Boltzmann model to efficiently resolve the multidimensional transient BTE. For a higher angular resolution, enough transport directions are considered while the transient BTE in each direction is treated as a conservation law equation and solved independently. Both macroscopic equations recovered from a Chapman-Enskog expansion and simulated results of typical benchmark problems show not only the second-order accuracy but also the flexibility and applicability of the proposed lattice Boltzmann model. This approach may contribute a powerful technique for the parallel simulation of large-scale engineering and some alternative perspectives for solving the nonlinear transport problem further.

  6. Lattice Boltzmann solution of the transient Boltzmann transport equation in radiative and neutron transport.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yahui; Yan, Liming; Ma, Yu

    2017-06-01

    Applications of the transient Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) have undergone much investigation, such as radiative heat transfer and neutron transport. This paper provides a lattice Boltzmann model to efficiently resolve the multidimensional transient BTE. For a higher angular resolution, enough transport directions are considered while the transient BTE in each direction is treated as a conservation law equation and solved independently. Both macroscopic equations recovered from a Chapman-Enskog expansion and simulated results of typical benchmark problems show not only the second-order accuracy but also the flexibility and applicability of the proposed lattice Boltzmann model. This approach may contribute a powerful technique for the parallel simulation of large-scale engineering and some alternative perspectives for solving the nonlinear transport problem further.

  7. A general method for determining secondary active transporter substrate stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Gabriel A; Mulligan, Christopher; Mindell, Joseph A

    2017-01-25

    The number of ions required to drive substrate transport through a secondary active transporter determines the protein's ability to create a substrate gradient, a feature essential to its physiological function, and places fundamental constraints on the transporter's mechanism. Stoichiometry is known for a wide array of mammalian transporters, but, due to a lack of readily available tools, not for most of the prokaryotic transporters for which high-resolution structures are available. Here, we describe a general method for using radiolabeled substrate flux assays to determine coupling stoichiometries of electrogenic secondary active transporters reconstituted in proteoliposomes by measuring transporter equilibrium potentials. We demonstrate the utility of this method by determining the coupling stoichiometry of VcINDY, a bacterial Na(+)-coupled succinate transporter, and further validate it by confirming the coupling stoichiometry of vSGLT, a bacterial sugar transporter. This robust thermodynamic method should be especially useful in probing the mechanisms of transporters with available structures.

  8. Solute Transport in Eroded and Rehabilitated Prairie Landforms. 2. Reactive Solute

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Information regarding the impact of varying soil, landscape, and climate conditions on the off-site transport of pesticides is critical to the development of improved pesticide management practices. We quantified the rate of S-metolachlor dissipation after fall and spring application in eroded and r...

  9. Reactive solute transport in streams. 1. Development of an equilibrium- based model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, R.L.; Bencala, K.E.; Broshears, R.E.; Chapra, S.C.

    1996-01-01

    An equilibrium-based solute transport model is developed for the simulation of trace metal fate and transport in streams. The model is formed by coupling a solute transport model with a chemical equilibrium submodel based on MINTEQ. The solute transport model considers the physical processes of advection, dispersion, lateral inflow, and transient storage, while the equilibrium submodel considers the speciation and complexation of aqueous species, precipitation/dissolution and sorption. Within the model, reactions in the water column may result in the formation of solid phases (precipitates and sorbed species) that are subject to downstream transport and settling processes. Solid phases on the streambed may also interact with the water column through dissolution and sorption/desorption reactions. Consideration of both mobile (water-borne) and immobile (streambed) solid phases requires a unique set of governing differential equations and solution techniques that are developed herein. The partial differential equations describing physical transport and the algebraic equations describing chemical equilibria are coupled using the sequential iteration approach.

  10. Reactive Solute Transport in Streams: 1. Development of an Equilibrium-Based Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runkel, Robert L.; Bencala, Kenneth E.; Broshears, Robert E.; Chapra, Steven C.

    1996-02-01

    An equilibrium-based solute transport model is developed for the simulation of trace metal fate and transport in streams. The model is formed by coupling a solute transport model with a chemical equilibrium submodel based on MINTEQ. The solute transport model considers the physical processes of advection, dispersion, lateral inflow, and transient storage, while the equilibrium submodel considers the speciation and complexation of aqueous species, precipitation/dissolution and sorption. Within the model, reactions in the water column may result in the formation of solid phases (precipitates and sorbed species) that are subject to downstream transport and settling processes. Solid phases on the streambed may also interact with the water column through dissolution and sorption/desorption reactions. Consideration of both mobile (water-borne) and immobile (streambed) solid phases requires a unique set of governing differential equations and solution techniques that are developed herein. The partial differential equations describing physical transport and the algebraic equations describing chemical equilibria are coupled using the sequential iteration approach.

  11. A finite-volume ELLAM for three-dimensional solute-transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Russell, T.F.; Heberton, C.I.; Konikow, L.F.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-volume ELLAM method has been developed, tested, and successfully implemented as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) MODFLOW-2000 ground water modeling package. It is included as a solver option for the Ground Water Transport process. The FVELLAM uses space-time finite volumes oriented along the streamlines of the flow field to solve an integral form of the solute-transport equation, thus combining local and global mass conservation with the advantages of Eulerian-Lagrangian characteristic methods. The USGS FVELLAM code simulates solute transport in flowing ground water for a single dissolved solute constituent and represents the processes of advective transport, hydrodynamic dispersion, mixing from fluid sources, retardation, and decay. Implicit time discretization of the dispersive and source/sink terms is combined with a Lagrangian treatment of advection, in which forward tracking moves mass to the new time level, distributing mass among destination cells using approximate indicator functions. This allows the use of large transport time increments (large Courant numbers) with accurate results, even for advection-dominated systems (large Peclet numbers). Four test cases, including comparisons with analytical solutions and benchmarking against other numerical codes, are presented that indicate that the FVELLAM can usually yield excellent results, even if relatively few transport time steps are used, although the quality of the results is problem-dependent.

  12. Elements of fractal generalization of dual-porosity model for solute transport in unsaturated fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Matveev, L.; Pruess, K.

    2008-09-01

    In this study, new elements were developed to generalize the dual-porosity model for moisture infiltration on and solute transport in unsaturated rocks, taking into account fractal aspects of the percolation process. Random advection was considered as a basic mechanism of solute transport in self-similar fracture systems. In addition to spatial variations in the infiltration velocity field, temporal fluctuations were also taken into account. The rock matrix, a low-permeability component of the heterogeneous geologic medium, acts as a trap for solute particles and moisture. Scaling relations were derived for the moisture infiltration flux, the velocity correlation length, the average velocity of infiltration, and the velocity correlation function. The effect of temporal variations in precipitation intensity on the infiltration processes was analyzed. It showed that the mode of solute transport is determined by the power exponent in the advection velocity correlation function and the dimensionality of the trapping system, both of which may change with time. Therefore, depending on time, various transport regimes may be realized: superdiffusion, subdiffusion, or classical diffusion. The complex structure of breakthrough curves from changes in the transport regimes was also examined. A renormalization of the solute source strength due to characteristic fluctuations of highly disordered media was established.

  13. Physically-based validation of numerical codes for solute transport involving mineral dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Kayla; Holländer, Hartmut

    2017-04-01

    Solute transport in deep groundwater is a complex process, involving mineral dissolution, geochemical reactions, dispersion, aqueous brine advection and density driven convection. Flow and transport solutions for solute transport are non-linear and unstable and best represented by numerical model codes. Current benchmark problems used to validate solute transport models do not consider the salt mineral but represent the salt as an aqueous boundary condition. Mineral dissolution is important in deep sedimentary groundwater systems, including flow over salt domes and for deep geothermal projects. The aim of this project was to create a physically-based numerical benchmark for the validation of model codes for projects which involve salt dissolution. This was done by creating a laboratory model in which salt mineral cores were dissolved and salt concentration measurements were collected. The physical data were then entered into a numerical model, and compared to aqueous phase results. Thus, we developed a new solute transport validation benchmark which involves the dissolution of the salt mineral.

  14. The Impact of Early Time Behavior of Solute Transport at High Peclet Number on Upscaled Markovian Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sund, N. L.; Bolster, D.; Benson, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    In order to predict transport of solutes, upscaling techniques are often applied. After the amount of time it takes the solute to sample all of the velocities in the system, the upscaling process is well understood and fairly simple to implement. But in highly heterogeneous velocity fields, this amount of time may be prohibitively long. When there is a need to predict transport at earlier times, the upscaling process is more difficult because the solute tends to stay on or near its initial streamline, inducing a correlation between its average velocity over fixed distances (or times), which must be accounted for. A Spatial Markov model was developed in 2008 that does just that[1]. It accounts for the velocity correlation by treating the transport process as a Markov Chain. This model has been successfully applied to predict solute transport in a large variety of complicated flow fields and is becoming increasing popular. It almost seems as though it works for every situation, but so far no rigorous study has gone into determining its limitations. So we have decided to take a step back and ask: when is this model valid? We understand the asymptotic behavior in the limit as t→ ∞, but what about in the limit as 1/t→ ∞ (or t→ 0)? Are the assumptions of the Spatial Markov model valid over all length (and time) scales? It turns out that the answer is no. At very early times, the transport process is diffusion dominated, leading to non-monotonic correlation between solute particles' average velocity over consecutive space and time steps. The assumptions of the Spatial Markov model only hold after this early diffusive regime ends and the correlation function peaks. We find the location of the peak in the correlation function for transport in simple stratified flows and show the effect of using the Spatial Markov model over length scales on either side of the peak.REFERENCES[1] T.L. Borgne, M. Dentz, J. Carrera: Spatial Markov processes for modeling Lagrangian

  15. Analytical Model and Analysis of Solute Transport by Unsteady Unsaturated Gravitational Infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indelman, P.; Lessoff, S. C.

    2002-12-01

    Penetration of reactive solute into a soil during a cycle of water infiltration and redistribution is investigated by deriving analytical closed form solutions for fluid flux, moisture content and contaminant concentration. The solution is developed for gravitational flow and advective transport and is applied to two scenarios of solute applications encountered in the applications: a finite pulse of solute dissolved in irrigation water and an instantaneous pulse broadcasted onto the soil surface. Through comparison to simulations of Richards' flow, capillary suction is shown to have contrasting effects on the upper and lower boundaries of the fluid pulse, speeding penetration of the wetting front and reducing the rate of drying. This leads to agreement between the analytical and numerical solutions for typical field and experimental conditions. The analytical solution is further incorporated into a stochastic column model of flow and transport to compute mean solute concentration in a heterogeneous field. An unusual phenomenon of plume contraction is observed at long times of solute propagation during the drying stage. The mean concentration profiles match those of the Monte-Carlo simulations for capillary length scales typical of sandy soils. The efficient column model is ideal for testing multiple scenarios. Its use is illustrated in determining transport parameters by the data from an experiment in a heterogeneous field. Parameter sensitivity is analyzed and confidence intervals are estimated for effective field reactive parameters (partition coefficient Kd and effective first order degradation rate λ ) of some common herbicides (Atrazine, Bromacil, and Terbuthylazine) The results are compared to literature reported values. The field data for this work was presented in the Fall 2000 AGU meeting, the stochastic analysis is reported in [S. C. Lessoff, P. Indelman and G. Dagan, Heat and Mass Transfer in the Natural Environment Raats, P., D. Smiles and A. Warrick

  16. Peptide-size dependent active transport in the proteasome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikin, A.; Pöschel, T.

    2005-03-01

    We investigate the transport of proteins inside the proteasome and propose an active-transport mechanism based on a spatially asymmetric interaction potential of peptide chains. The transport is driven by fluctuations which are always present in such systems. We compute the peptide-size dependent transport rate which is essential for the functioning of the proteasome. In agreement with recent experiments, varying temperature changes the transport mechanism qualitatively.

  17. Global stability and exact solution of an arbitrary-solute nonlinear cellular mass transport system.

    PubMed

    Benson, James D

    2014-12-01

    The prediction of the cellular state as a function of extracellular concentrations and temperatures has been of interest to physiologists for nearly a century. One of the most widely used models in the field is one where mass flux is linearly proportional to the concentration difference across the membrane. These fluxes define a nonlinear differential equation system for the intracellular state, which when coupled with appropriate initial conditions, define the intracellular state as a function of the extracellular concentrations of both permeating and nonpermeating solutes. Here we take advantage of a reparametrization scheme to extend existing stability results to a more general setting and to a develop analytical solutions to this model for an arbitrary number of extracellular solutes.

  18. Analytically-derived sensitivities in one-dimensional models of solute transport in porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knopman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Analytically-derived sensitivities are presented for parameters in one-dimensional models of solute transport in porous media. Sensitivities were derived by direct differentiation of closed form solutions for each of the odel, and by a time integral method for two of the models. Models are based on the advection-dispersion equation and include adsorption and first-order chemical decay. Boundary conditions considered are: a constant step input of solute, constant flux input of solute, and exponentially decaying input of solute at the upstream boundary. A zero flux is assumed at the downstream boundary. Initial conditions include a constant and spatially varying distribution of solute. One model simulates the mixing of solute in an observation well from individual layers in a multilayer aquifer system. Computer programs produce output files compatible with graphics software in which sensitivities are plotted as a function of either time or space. (USGS)

  19. Active electrolyte transport in mammalian buccal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orlando, R.C.; Tobey, N.A.; Schreiner, V.J.; Readling, R.D. )

    1988-09-01

    The transmural electrical potential difference (PD) was measured in vivo across the buccal mucosa of humans and experimental animals. Mean PD was {minus}31 {plus minus} 2 mV in humans, {minus}34 {plus minus} 2 mV in dogs, {minus}39 {plus minus} 2 mV in rabbits, and {minus}18 {plus minus} 1 mV in hamsters. The mechanisms responsible for this PD were explored in Ussing chambers using dog buccal mucosa. Fluxes of ({sup 14}C)mannitol, a marker of paracellular permeability, varied directly with tissue conductance. The net fluxes of {sup 22}Na and {sup 36}Cl were +0.21 {plus minus} 0.05 and {minus}0.04 {plus minus} 0.02 {mu}eq/h{center dot}cm{sup 2}, respectively, but only the Na{sup +} flux differed significantly from zero. I{sub sc} was reduced by luminal amiloride, serosal ouabain, or by reducing luminal Na{sup +} below 20 mM. This indicated that the I{sub sc} was determined primarily by active Na{sup +} absorption and that Na{sup +} traverses the apical membrane at least partly through amiloride-sensitive channels and exists across the basolateral membrane through Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-ATPase activity. The authors conclude that buccal mucosa is capable of active electrolyte transport and that this capacity contributes to generation of the buccal PD in vivo.

  20. Coupled thermohaline groundwater flow and single-species reactive solute transport in fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Thomas; Therrien, René

    2007-04-01

    SummaryA 3D numerical model has been developed to solve coupled fluid flow, heat and single-species reactive mass transport with variable fluid density and viscosity. We focus on a single reaction between quartz and its aqueous form silica. The fluid density and viscosity and the dissolution rate constant, equilibrium constant and activity coefficient are calculated as a function of the concentrations of major ions and temperature. Reaction and flow parameters, such as mineral surface area and permeability, are updated at the end of each time step with explicitly calculated reaction rates. Adaptive time stepping is used to increase or decrease the time step size according to the rate of temporal variation of the solution to prevent physically unrealistic results. The time step size depends on maximum changes in matrix porosity and/or fracture aperture. The model is verified against existing analytical solutions of heat transfer and reactive transport in fractured porous media. The complexity of the model formulation allows studying chemical reactions and variable-density flow in a more realistic way than done previously. The newly developed model has been used to simulate illustrative examples of coupled thermohaline flow and reactive transport in fractured porous media. Simulations indicate that thermohaline (double-diffusive) transport impacts both buoyancy-driven flow and chemical reactions. Hot zones correspond to upwelling and to quartz dissolution while in cooler zones, the plume sinks and silica precipitates. The silica concentration is inversely proportional to salinity in high-salinity regions and proportional to temperature in low-salinity regions. Density contrasts are generally small and fractures do not act like preferential pathways but contribute to transverse dispersion of the plume. Results of a long-term (100 years) simulation indicate that the coexistence of dissolution and precipitation leads to self-sealing of fractures. Salt mass fluxes

  1. Kinetically influenced terms for solute transport affected by heterogeneous and homogeneous classical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper extends a four-step derivation procedure, previously presented for cases of transport affected by surface reactions, to transport problems involving homogeneous reactions. Derivations for these classes of reactions are used to illustrate the manner in which mathematical differences between reaction classes are reflected in the mathematical derivation procedures required to identify kinetically influenced terms. Simulation results for a case of transport affected by a single solution phase complexation reaction and for a case of transport affected by a precipitation-dissolution reaction are used to demonstrate the nature of departures from equilibrium-controlled transport as well as the use of kinetically influenced terms in determining criteria for the applicability of the local equilibrium assumption. A final derivation for a multireaction problem demonstrates the application of the generalized procedure to a case of transport affected by reactions of several classes. -from Author

  2. Transport of Gas and Solutes in Permeable Estuarine Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    from the upper 10 cm and even deeper layers of shallow sands typically is photosynthetically active when exposed to light . For two dimensional plots of...ultrasonic and optical methods on sediment cores maintained at in-situ pressure, light and temperature and without changing the orientation of the...core. − Mapping of the spatial and temporal distribution of high sedimentary photosynthetic production and sites for free gas development

  3. Antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite-based irrigating solutions.

    PubMed

    Poggio, Claudio; Arciola, Carla Renata; Dagna, Alberto; Chiesa, Marco; Sforza, Dario; Visai, Livia

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present study was the in vitro evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of three different NaOCl-based endodontic irrigating solutions: a 5.25% conventional sodium hypochlorite solution; and two new irrigating solutions, a 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution with the addition of a proteolytic enzyme and a surfactant; and a 5.25% sodium hypochlorite gel with inorganic silicate. Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans strains were selected to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of the endodontic irrigating solutions by the agar disc diffusion test. Paper disks were saturated with each one of the tested solutions (at room temperature and pre-warmed at 45°C) and placed onto culture agar-plates pre-adsorbed with bacterial cells and further incubated for 24 h at 37°C. The growth inhibition zones around each irrigating solution were recorded and compared for each bacterial strain. The results were significantly different among the tested irrigating solutions: 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution produced the highest inhibition areas; 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution with a proteolytic enzyme and a surfactant, and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite gel with inorganic silicate showed the lowest zones of inhibition. Even if all tested irrigating solution possessed antibacterial activity versus all tested bacterial strains, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution with a proteolytic enzyme and a surfactant, and 5.25% sodium hypochlorite gel with inorganic silicate showed lower in vitro efficacy than 5.25% conventional sodium hypochlorite solution.

  4. One-Dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage (OTIS): A Solute Transport Model for Streams and Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    OTIS is a mathematical simulation model used to characterize the fate and transport of water-borne solutes in streams and rivers. The governing equation underlying the model is the advection-dispersion equation with additional terms to account for transient storage, lateral inflow, first-order decay, and sorption. This equation and the associated equations describing transient storage and sorption are solved using a Crank-Nicolson finite-difference solution. OTIS may be used in conjunction with data from field-scale tracer experiments to quantify the hydrologic parameters affecting solute transport. This application typically involves a trial-and-error approach wherein parameter estimates are adjusted to obtain an acceptable match between simulated and observed tracer concentrations. Additional applications include analyses of nonconservative solutes that are subject to sorption processes or first-order decay. OTIS-P, a modified version of OTIS, couples the solution of the governing equation with a nonlinear regression package. OTIS-P determines an optimal set of parameter estimates that minimize the squared differences between the simulated and observed concentrations, thereby automating the parameter estimation process. This report details the development and application of OTIS and OTIS-P. Sections of the report describe model theory, input/output specifications, sample applications, and installation instructions.

  5. Transport of Solutes in Hyporheic Zones with Temperature-Dependent Reversible Sorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, M.; Cardenas, M. B.; Zheng, L.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most important processes impacting the mobility of heavy metals in rivers and their hyporheic zones is reversible sorption to sediment. Reversible sorption has been shown to be a temperature dependent process, however the impact of this variability on heavy metal fate and transport, as well as environmental metal concentrations, has not received much attention. In this study we used zinc as an example heavy metal. Previous studies of the impact of temperature on the sorption of zinc on a goethite substrate show a change in partitioning coefficient and thus retardation factor of 10 to over 60 percent with a temperature change from 10 to 25*C, depending on concentration of dissolved zinc in the water. This relationship was extrapolated to estimate the change in reversible sorption of zinc on silicate sand. This change was then utilized within a finite-element model coupling hyporheic fluid flow in porous media with heat transfer and solute transport with reversible sorption to explore the ways in which variations in surface water temperature over varying timescales can drive changes in both zinc sorption and dissolved zinc fluxes at the bedform scale. These linked processes are of fundamental importance when considering the number of different ways in which surface water temperatures can be varied through both human and non-human activities.

  6. Integration of a 'proton antenna' facilitates transport activity of the monocarboxylate transporter MCT4.

    PubMed

    Noor, Sina Ibne; Pouyssegur, Jacques; Deitmer, Joachim W; Becker, Holger M

    2017-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) mediate the proton-coupled transport of high-energy metabolites like lactate and pyruvate and are expressed in nearly every mammalian tissue. We have shown previously that transport activity of MCT4 is enhanced by carbonic anhydrase II (CAII), which has been suggested to function as a 'proton antenna' for the transporter. In the present study, we tested whether creation of an endogenous proton antenna by introduction of a cluster of histidine residues into the C-terminal tail of MCT4 (MCT4-6xHis) could facilitate MCT4 transport activity when heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Our results show that integration of six histidines into the C-terminal tail does indeed increase transport activity of MCT4 to the same extent as did coexpression of MCT4-WT with CAII. Transport activity of MCT4-6xHis could be further enhanced by coexpression with extracellular CAIV, but not with intracellular CAII. Injection of an antibody against the histidine cluster into MCT4-expressing oocytes decreased transport activity of MCT4-6xHis, while leaving activity of MCT4-WT unaltered. Taken together, these findings suggest that transport activity of the proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter MCT4 can be facilitated by integration of an endogenous proton antenna into the transporter's C-terminal tail. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. The maltose ABC transporter: action of membrane lipids on the transporter stability, coupling and ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huan; Dalal, Kush; Wang, Victor; Rouiller, Isabelle; Duong, Franck

    2013-08-01

    The coupling between ATP hydrolysis and substrate transport remains a key question in the understanding of ABC-mediated transport. We show using the MalFGK2 complex reconstituted into nanodiscs, that membrane lipids participate directly to the coupling reaction by stabilizing the transporter in a low energy conformation. When surrounded by short acyl chain phospholipids, the transporter is unstable and hydrolyzes large amounts of ATP without inducing maltose. The presence of long acyl chain phospholipids stabilizes the conformational dynamics of the transporter, reduces its ATPase activity and restores dependence on maltose. Membrane lipids therefore play an essential allosteric function, they restrict the transporter ATPase activity to increase coupling to the substrate. In support to the notion, we show that increasing the conformational dynamics of MalFGK2 with mutations in MalF increases the transporter ATPase activity but decreases the maltose transport efficiency.

  8. Impact of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kone, T.; Golfier, F.; Orgogozo, L.; Oltéan, C.; Lefèvre, E.; Block, J. C.; Buès, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    In subsurface systems, biofilm may degrade organic or organometallic pollutants contributing to natural attenuation and soil bioremediation techniques. This increase of microbial activity leads to change the hydrodynamic properties of aquifers. The purpose of this work was to investigate the influence of biofilm-induced heterogeneities on solute transport in porous media and more specifically on dispersivity. We pursued this goal by (i) monitoring both spatial concentration fields and solute breakthrough curves from conservative tracer experiments in a biofilm-supporting porous medium, (ii) characterizing in situ the changes in biovolume and visualizing the dynamics of the biological material at the mesoscale. A series of experiments was carried out in a flow cell system (60 cm3) with a silica sand (Φ = 50-70 mesh) as solid carrier and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as bacterial strain. Biofilm growth was monitored by image acquisition with a digital camera. The biofilm volume fraction was estimated through tracer experiments with the Blue Dextran macromolecule as in size-exclusion chromatography, leading to a fair picture of the biocolonization within the flow cell. Biofilm growth was achieved in the whole flow cell in 29 days and up to 50% of void space volume was plugged. The influence of biofilm maturation on porous medium transport properties was evaluated from tracer experiments using Brilliant Blue FCF. An experimental correlation was found between effective (i.e., nonbiocolonized) porosity and biofilm-affected dispersivity. Comparison with values given by the theoretical model of Taylor and Jaffé (1990b) yields a fair agreement.

  9. Influence of reservoirs on solute transport: A regional-scale approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, V.J.

    2001-01-01

    Regional transport of water and dissolved constituents through heavily regulated river systems is influenced by the presence of reservoirs. Analysis of seasonal patterns in solute fluxes for salinity and nutrients indicates that in-reservoir processes within large storage reservoirs in the Rio Grande and Colorado basins (southwestern USA) are superimposed over the underlying watershed processes that predominate in relatively unregulated stream reaches. Connectivity of the aquatic system with the landscape is apparently disrupted by processes within the reservoir systems; these processes result in large changes in characteristics for solute transport that persist downstream in the absence of significant inputs. Additionally, reservoir processes may be linked for upstream/downstream reservoirs that are located relatively close in a series. In contrast, the regional effect of in-reservoir processes is negligible for solute transport through run-of-river reservoirs in the lower Columbia River (northwestern USA).

  10. Using a derivative-free optimization method for multiple solutions of inverse transport problems

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-14

    Identifying unknown components of an object that emits radiation is an important problem for national and global security. Radiation signatures measured from an object of interest can be used to infer object parameter values that are not known. This problem is called an inverse transport problem. An inverse transport problem may have multiple solutions and the most widely used approach for its solution is an iterative optimization method. This paper proposes a stochastic derivative-free global optimization algorithm to find multiple solutions of inverse transport problems. The algorithm is an extension of a multilevel single linkage (MLSL) method where a meshmore » adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm is incorporated into the local phase. Furthermore, numerical test cases using uncollided fluxes of discrete gamma-ray lines are presented to show the performance of this new algorithm.« less

  11. Analytical Solutions of a Fractional Diffusion-advection Equation for Solar Cosmic-Ray Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  12. Analytical solutions of a fractional diffusion-advection equation for solar cosmic-ray transport

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, Yuri E.; Effenberger, Frederic

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by recent applications of superdiffusive transport models to shock-accelerated particle distributions in the heliosphere, we analytically solve a one-dimensional fractional diffusion-advection equation for the particle density. We derive an exact Fourier transform solution, simplify it in a weak diffusion approximation, and compare the new solution with previously available analytical results and with a semi-numerical solution based on a Fourier series expansion. We apply the results to the problem of describing the transport of energetic particles, accelerated at a traveling heliospheric shock. Our analysis shows that significant errors may result from assuming an infinite initial distance between the shock and the observer. We argue that the shock travel time should be a parameter of a realistic superdiffusive transport model.

  13. Using a derivative-free optimization method for multiple solutions of inverse transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-14

    Identifying unknown components of an object that emits radiation is an important problem for national and global security. Radiation signatures measured from an object of interest can be used to infer object parameter values that are not known. This problem is called an inverse transport problem. An inverse transport problem may have multiple solutions and the most widely used approach for its solution is an iterative optimization method. This paper proposes a stochastic derivative-free global optimization algorithm to find multiple solutions of inverse transport problems. The algorithm is an extension of a multilevel single linkage (MLSL) method where a mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm is incorporated into the local phase. Furthermore, numerical test cases using uncollided fluxes of discrete gamma-ray lines are presented to show the performance of this new algorithm.

  14. Geochemical & Physical Aquifer Property Heterogeneity: A Multiscale Sedimentologic Approach to Reactive Solute Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Chris; Allen-King, Richelle; Weissmann, Gary

    2006-06-01

    This project is testing the hypothesis that sedimentary lithofacies determine the geochemical and physical hydrologic properties that control reactive solute transport (Figure 1). We are testing that hypothesis for one site, a portion of the saturated zone at the Hanford Site (Ringold Formation), and for a model solute, carbon tetrachloride (CT). The representative geochemical and physical aquifer properties selected for quantification in the proposed project are the properties that control CT transport: hydraulic conductivity (K) and reactivity (sorption distribution coefficient, Kd, and anaerobic transformation rate constant, kn). We are combining observations at outcrop analog sites (to measure lithofacies dimensions and statistical relations) with measurements from archived and fresh core samples (for geochemical experiments and to provide additional constraint to the stratigraphic model) from the Ringold Formation to place local-scale lithofacies successions, and their distinct hydrologic property distributions, into the basinal context, thus allowing us to estimate the spatial distributions of properties that control reactive solute transport in the subsurface.

  15. A Polymer "Pollution Solution" Classroom Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helser, Terry L.

    1996-01-01

    Explains an approach to presenting polymer chemistry to nonmajors that employs polystyrene foam, foam peanuts made from water soluble starch, and water soluble plastic bags. Students are presented with a pollution scenario and are guided to the discovery of solutions. (DDR)

  16. A Polymer "Pollution Solution" Classroom Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helser, Terry L.

    1996-01-01

    Explains an approach to presenting polymer chemistry to nonmajors that employs polystyrene foam, foam peanuts made from water soluble starch, and water soluble plastic bags. Students are presented with a pollution scenario and are guided to the discovery of solutions. (DDR)

  17. Explicit solutions of the radiative transport equation in the P{sub 3} approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Liemert, André Kienle, Alwin

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Explicit solutions of the monoenergetic radiative transport equation in the P{sub 3} approximation have been derived which can be evaluated with nearly the same computational effort as needed for solving the standard diffusion equation (DE). In detail, the authors considered the important case of a semi-infinite medium which is illuminated by a collimated beam of light. Methods: A combination of the classic spherical harmonics method and the recently developed method of rotated reference frames is used for solving the P{sub 3} equations in closed form. Results: The derived solutions are illustrated and compared to exact solutions of the radiative transport equation obtained via the Monte Carlo (MC) method as well as with other approximated analytical solutions. It is shown that for the considered cases which are relevant for biomedical optics applications, the P{sub 3} approximation is close to the exact solution of the radiative transport equation. Conclusions: The authors derived exact analytical solutions of the P{sub 3} equations under consideration of boundary conditions for defining a semi-infinite medium. The good agreement to Monte Carlo simulations in the investigated domains, for example, in the steady-state and time domains, as well as the short evaluation time needed suggests that the derived equations can replace the often applied solutions of the diffusion equation for the homogeneous semi-infinite medium.

  18. Berberine acutely activates the glucose transport activity of GLUT1.

    PubMed

    Cok, Alexandra; Plaisier, Christina; Salie, Matthew J; Oram, Daniel S; Chenge, Jude; Louters, Larry L

    2011-07-01

    Berberine, which has a long history of use in Chinese medicine, has recently been shown to have efficacy in the treatment of diabetes. While the hypoglycemic effect of berberine has been clearly documented in animal and cell line models, such as 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myotube cells, the mechanism of action appears complex with data implicating activation of the insulin signaling pathway as well as activation of the exercise or AMP kinase-mediated pathway. There have been no reports of the acute affects of berberine on the transport activity of the insulin-insensitive glucose transporter, GLUT1. Therefore, we examined the acute effects of berberine on glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells, a cell line that express only GLUT1. Berberine- activated glucose uptake reaching maximum stimulation of five-fold at >40 μM. Significant activation (P < 0.05) was measured within 5 min reaching a maximum by 30 min. The berberine effect was not additive to the maximal stimulation by other known stimulants, azide, methylene blue or glucose deprivation, suggesting shared steps between berberine and these stimulants. Berberine significantly reduced the K(m) of glucose uptake from 6.7 ± 1.9 mM to 0.55 ± 0.08 mM, but had no effect on the V(max) of uptake. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP kinase, did not affect berberine-stimulated glucose uptake, but inhibitors of downstream kinases partially blocked berberine stimulation. SB203580 (inhibitor of p38 MAP kinase) did not affect submaximal berberine activation, but did lower maximal berberine stimulation by 26%, while PD98059 (inhibitor of ERK kinase) completely blocked submaximal berberine activation and decreased the maximal stimulation by 55%. It appears from this study that a portion of the hypoglycemic effects of berberine can be attributed to its acute activation of the transport activity of GLUT1.

  19. Simulation of unsaturated flow and nonreactive solute transport in a heterogeneous soil at the field scale

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, M L

    1993-02-01

    A field-scale, unsaturated flow and solute transport experiment at the Las Cruces trench site in New Mexico was simulated as part of a blind'' modeling exercise to demonstrate the ability or inability of uncalibrated models to predict unsaturated flow and solute transport in spatially variable porous media. Simulations were conducted using a recently developed multiphase flow and transport simulator. Uniform and heterogeneous soil models were tested, and data from a previous experiment at the site were used with an inverse procedure to estimate water retention parameters. A spatial moment analysis was used to provide a quantitative basis for comparing the mean observed and simulated flow and transport behavior. The results of this study suggest that defensible predictions of waste migration and fate at low-level waste sites will ultimately require site-specific data for model calibration.

  20. Nutrition of the intervertebral disc: effect of fluid flow on solute transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, J.P.; Holm, S.; Maroudas, A.; Nachemson, A.

    1982-10-01

    Adult dogs were injected intravenously with /sup 35/S-sulphate, and moderately exercised for one to six hours to measure isotope concentrations and profiles throughout the intervertebral discs. The isotope profiles were also observed in control animals that had been under anesthesia between injections and death. In both sets of animals, the profiles were in agreement with those expected for isotope transport by diffusion. This agreement indicates that fluid pumping during movement has an insignificant effect on transport of nutrients into the disc. Small solutes, e.g., O/sub 2/, glucose, and sulphate, are transported into the disc chiefly by diffusion. However, calculations show that because of their low diffusivities, pumping may increase the rate of transport of large solutes into the disc, as it does in articular cartilage.

  1. Validation of theoretical framework explaining active solute uptake in dynamically loaded porous media

    PubMed Central

    Albro, Michael B.; Li, Roland; Banerjee, Rajan E.; Hung, Clark T.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2010-01-01

    Solute transport in biological tissues is a fundamental process necessary for cell metabolism. In connective soft tissues, such as articular cartilage, cells are embedded within a dense extracellular matrix that hinders the transport of solutes. However, according to a recent theoretical study (Mauck et al., 2003, J. Biomech. Eng. 125, 602–614), the convective motion of a dynamically loaded porous solid matrix can also impart momentum to solutes, pumping them into the tissue and giving rise to concentrations which exceed those achived under passive diffusion alone. In this study, the theoretical predictions of this model are verified against experimental measurements. The mechanical and transport properties of an agarose–dextran model system were characterized from independent measurements and substituted into the theory to predict solute uptake or desorption under dynamic mechanical loading for various agarose concentrations and dextran molecular weights, as well as different boundary and initial conditions. In every tested case, agreement was observed between experiments and theoretical predictions as assessed by coefficients of determination ranging from R2=0.61 to 0.95. These results provide strong support for the hypothesis that dynamic loading of a deformable porous tissue can produce active transport of solutes via a pumping mechanisms mediated by momentum exchange between the solute and solid matrix. PMID:20553797

  2. Validation of theoretical framework explaining active solute uptake in dynamically loaded porous media.

    PubMed

    Albro, Michael B; Li, Roland; Banerjee, Rajan E; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2010-08-26

    Solute transport in biological tissues is a fundamental process necessary for cell metabolism. In connective soft tissues, such as articular cartilage, cells are embedded within a dense extracellular matrix that hinders the transport of solutes. However, according to a recent theoretical study (Mauck et al., 2003, J. Biomech. Eng. 125, 602-614), the convective motion of a dynamically loaded porous solid matrix can also impart momentum to solutes, pumping them into the tissue and giving rise to concentrations which exceed those achived under passive diffusion alone. In this study, the theoretical predictions of this model are verified against experimental measurements. The mechanical and transport properties of an agarose-dextran model system were characterized from independent measurements and substituted into the theory to predict solute uptake or desorption under dynamic mechanical loading for various agarose concentrations and dextran molecular weights, as well as different boundary and initial conditions. In every tested case, agreement was observed between experiments and theoretical predictions as assessed by coefficients of determination ranging from R(2)=0.61 to 0.95. These results provide strong support for the hypothesis that dynamic loading of a deformable porous tissue can produce active transport of solutes via a pumping mechanisms mediated by momentum exchange between the solute and solid matrix.

  3. A 2-D numerical simulation study on longitudinal solute transport and longitudinal dispersion coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-07-01

    The longitudinal dispersion coefficient, DL, is a fundamental parameter of longitudinal solute transport models: the advection-dispersion (AD) model and various deadzone models. Since DL cannot be measured directly, and since its calibration using tracer test data is quite expensive and not always available, researchers have developed various methods, theoretical or empirical, for estimating DL by easier available cross-sectional hydraulic measurements (i.e., the transverse velocity profile, etc.). However, for known and unknown reasons, DL cannot be satisfactorily predicted using these theoretical/empirical formulae. Either there is very large prediction error for theoretical methods, or there is a lack of generality for the empirical formulae. Here, numerical experiments using Mike21, a software package that implements one of the most rigorous two-dimensional hydrodynamic and solute transport equations, for longitudinal solute transport in hypothetical streams, are presented. An analysis of the evolution of simulated solute clouds indicates that the two fundamental assumptions in Fischer's longitudinal transport analysis may be not reasonable. The transverse solute concentration distribution, and hence the longitudinal transport appears to be controlled by a dimensionless number ?, where Q is the average volumetric flowrate, Dt is a cross-sectional average transverse dispersion coefficient, and W is channel flow width. A simple empirical ? relationship may be established. Analysis and a revision of Fischer's theoretical formula suggest that ɛ influences the efficiency of transverse mixing and hence has restraining effect on longitudinal spreading. The findings presented here would improve and expand our understanding of longitudinal solute transport in open channel flow.

  4. Modeling reactive geochemical transport of concentrated aqueous solutions in variably saturated media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Zheng, Zuoping; Wan, Jiamin

    2004-01-28

    Concentrated aqueous solutions (CAS) have unique thermodynamic and physical properties. Chemical components in CAS are incompletely dissociated, especially those containing divalent or polyvalent ions. The problem is further complicated by the interaction between CAS flow processes and the naturally heterogeneous sediments. As the CAS migrates through the porous media, the composition may be altered subject to fluid-rock interactions. To effectively model reactive transport of CAS, we must take into account ion-interaction. A combination of the Pitzer ion-interaction and the ion-association model would be an appropriate way to deal with multiple-component systems if the Pitzer' parameters and thermodynamic data of dissolved components and the related minerals are available. To quantify the complicated coupling of CAS flow and transport, as well as the involved chemical reactions in natural and engineered systems, we have substantially extended an existing reactive biogeochemical transport code, BIO-CORE{sup 2D}{copyright}, by incorporating a comprehensive Pitzer ion-interaction model. In the present paper, the model, and two test cases against measured data were briefly introduced. Finally we present an application to simulate a laboratory column experiment studying the leakage of the high alkaline waste fluid stored in Hanford (a site of the U.S. Department of Energy, located in Washington State, USA). With the Pitzer ion-interaction ionic activity model, our simulation captures measured pH evolution. The simulation indicates that all the reactions controlling the pH evolution, including cation exchanges, mineral precipitation and dissolution, are coupled.

  5. Effects of surfactants and thermodynamic activity of model active ingredient on transport over plant leaf cuticle.

    PubMed

    Fagerström, Anton; Kocherbitov, Vitaly; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Westbye, Peter; Bergström, Karin; Engblom, Johan

    2013-03-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of molecular transport across the cuticle of Clivia leaves. In vitro diffusion methodology was used to investigate the transport of a systemic fungicide, tebuconazole, over a model silicone membrane, enzymatically isolated cuticle membranes, and dermatomed leaves. It was shown that dermatomed leaves may replace enzymatically isolated cuticles. Furthermore, the effects of two surfactants, C(10)EO(7) and C(8)G(1.6), on the fungicide transport were investigated. Tebuconazole cuticle permeation was described using Fick's first law of diffusion, expressed by the thermodynamic activity of the solute in the membrane. A new method for calculation of diffusion coefficients in the membrane is proposed. To access the thermodynamic activity of the fungicide in the membranes, sorption isotherms of tebuconazole in the membrane materials studied were recorded. The thermodynamic activity of the fungicide in aqueous solutions was calculated from solubility data. For that purpose, the effect of surfactants on tebuconazole solubility was studied. The results show that addition of surfactants allows for higher concentrations of tebuconazole available for penetration. Nonetheless, at a fixed fungicide thermodynamic activity, all formulations produced the same flux over the silicone membrane independently on the fungicide concentration. This shows that the driving force across non-responding membranes is the gradient of thermodynamic activity, rather than the gradient of the fungicide concentration. In case of leaves, surfactants induced the same quantitative increase in both flux and diffusion coefficient of solute in the cuticle, while the cuticle-water partition coefficient was unaffected.

  6. Imaging and quantification of preferential solute transport in an undisturbed soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koestel, John; Larsbo, Mats

    2014-05-01

    Despite significant advances during the last decades there are still many processes related to non-equilibrium flow and transport in macroporous soil that are far from being completely understood. The use of 3-D X-ray for imaging time-lapse 3-D solute transport has a large potential to help advance the knowledge in this field. We visualized the transport of a potassium iodide tracer (20 mg iodine ml-1 H2O) front through a small undisturbed soil column (height 3.8 cm, diameter 6.8 cm) under steady-state hydraulic conditions using an industrial X-ray scanner. Following an elaborate and time-costly illumination correction approach we yielded a series of seventeen 3-D difference images of density-changes with respect to the start of the tracer application. The spatial resolution was approximately 0.196 mm in all directions. The noise level varied between 3% and 8% of the maximally expected density changes. We related the time-lapse images to iodine concentrations using a linear calibration relationship. The electrical conductivity, assumed proportional to the iodide concentration, was measured in the effluent solution during the experiment. Eighty-five percent of the applied iodine mass was recovered in the effluent and inside the column. The solute transport through the soil predominantly took place within two cylindrical macropores, by-passing more than 90% of the bulk soil volume during the entire experiment. From these macropores the solute diffused into the surrounding soil matrix. We illustrated the properties of the investigated solute transport by comparing it to a 1-D convective-dispersive transport in terms of 1-D resident concentration profiles and to dilution indices, here used as estimates of preferential transport. We, furthermore, showed that the tracer diffusion from one of the macropores into the soil matrix could not be fitted with a cylindrical diffusion equation. We are positive that similar studies will help establishing links between soil

  7. Evaluation of unsaturated-zone solute-transport models for studies of agricultural chemicals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nolan, Bernard T.; Bayless, E. Randall; Green, Christopher T.; Garg, Sheena; Voss, Frank D.; Lampe, David C.; Barbash, Jack E.; Capel, Paul D.; Bekins, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Of the models tested, RZWQM, HYDRUS2D, VS2DT, GLEAMS and PRZM had graphical user interfaces. Extensive documentation was available for RZWQM, HYDRUS2D, and VS2DT. RZWQM can explicitly simulate water and solute flux in macropores, and both HYDRUS2D and VS2DT can simulate water and solute flux in two dimensions. The version of RZWQM tested had a maximum simulation depth of 3 meters. The complex models simulate the formation, transport, and fate of degradates of up to three to five compounds including the parent, with the exception of VS2DT, which simulates the transport and fate of a single compound.

  8. Verification of T2VOC using an analytical solution for VOC transport in vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, C.

    1995-03-01

    T2VOC represents an adaption of the STMVOC to the TOUGH2 environment. In may contaminated sites, transport of volatile organic chemicals (VOC) is a serious problem which can be simulated by T2VOC. To demonstrate the accuracy and robustness of the code, we chose a practical problem of VOC transport as the test case, conducted T2VOC simulations, and compared the results of T2VOC with those of an analytical solution. The agreements between T2VOC and the analytical solutions are excellent. In addition, the numerical results of T2VOC are less sensitive to grid size and time step to a certain extent.

  9. Anomalous solute transport in saturated porous media: Relating transport model parameters to electrical and nuclear magnetic resonance properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; France, Samantha; Osterman, Gordon; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Singha, Kamini

    2015-02-01

    The advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fails to describe commonly observed non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models such as the dual-domain mass-transfer (DDMT) model. DDMT model parameters are commonly calibrated via curve fitting, providing little insight into the relation between effective parameters and physical properties of the medium. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can provide insight into the geometry and connectedness of pore spaces related to transport model parameters. Here, we consider proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), direct-current (DC) resistivity, and complex conductivity (CC) measurements for this purpose, and assess these methods using glass beads as a control and two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material that demonstrates non-Fickian transport due to intragranular porosity. We estimate DDMT parameters via calibration of a transport model to column-scale solute tracer tests, and compare NMR, DC resistivity, CC results, which reveal that grain size alone does not control transport properties and measured geophysical parameters; rather, volume and arrangement of the pore space play important roles. NMR cannot provide estimates of more-mobile and less-mobile pore volumes in the absence of tracer tests because these estimates depend critically on the selection of a material-dependent and flow-dependent cutoff time. Increased electrical connectedness from DC resistivity measurements are associated with greater mobile pore space determined from transport model calibration. CC was hypothesized to be related to length scales of mass transfer, but the CC response is unrelated to DDMT.

  10. TiO2 Anatase Solutions for Electron Transporting Layers in Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    El Kass, Moustafa; Brohan, Luc; Gautier, Nicolas; Béchu, Solène; David, Céline; Lemaitre, Noëlla; Berson, Solenn; Richard-Plouet, Mireille

    2017-09-06

    Reflux of a solution of [Ti8 O12 (H2 O)24 ]Cl8 ⋅HCl⋅7 H2 O as titanium precursor at 120 °C for 24 h leads to a transparent colloidal solution of nanosized crystallized anatase TiO2 . The adjustment of the particle size and composition of the dispersant is monitored through the initial water content while controlling the conversion of propylene carbonate into propylene glycol during reflux. The solutions were processed as thin films to produce electron transporting layers in hybrid bulk heterojunction solar cells, by using a blend of P3HT:PCBM polymers as absorbers, in inverted architectures. The solutions obtained by reflux were demonstrated to produce suitable electron transporting layers. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Strategic network design of Java Island fuel supply with production-transportation solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianawati, Fauzia; Farizal, -; Surjandari, Isti; Marzuli, Rully

    2011-10-01

    This study aims to find more efficient supply network, from refineries / imports to fuel terminal, which still uses the Tanker, Tank Trucks or Rail Tank Wagon with an alternative pipeline that are considered more efficient than other transport modes, as well as gaining pipeline transportation network optimization analysis tailored to the capabilities/ capacity of refinery production and capacity of the pipe mode. With the complexity of the number of 3 point sources of supply, 19 destination of terminal, 4 kinds of products and 4 types of transport modes, transport-production model modified by adding multi-modal transport and investment costs of new pipeline. Then coded in Lingo program which adopts Branch & Bound technique and input the processed data in order to obtain an optimal distribution pattern produced the lowest distribution costs. This B&B solution was also compared with SCO solution which is a metaheuristic method. The results of this study lead to the development of new modes of pipeline connections in amount of 4 alternatives, generated from the optimal solution, but still potentially earned savings of about IDR 1 Trillion per year from cost-efficiency of product procurement and transportation costs.

  12. Analytic solutions of tracer transport in fractured rock associated with precipitation-dissolution reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Spycher, N.; Kennedy, B.

    2011-03-15

    Precipitation-dissolution reactions are important for a number of applications such as isotopic tracer transport in the subsurface. Analytical solutions have been developed for tracer transport in both single-fracture and multiple-fracture systems associated with these reactions under transient and steady-state transport conditions. These solutions also take into account advective transport in fractures and molecular diffusion in the rock matrix. For studying distributions of disturbed tracer concentration (the difference between actual concentration and its equilibrium value), effects of precipitation-dissolution reactions are mathematically equivalent to a 'decay' process with a decay constant proportional to the corresponding bulk reaction rate. This important feature significantly simplifies the derivation procedure by taking advantage of the existence of analytical solutions for tracer transport associated with radioactive decay in fractured rock. It is also useful for interpreting tracer breakthrough curves, because the impact of a decay process is relatively easy to analyze. Several illustrative examples are presented, which show that the results are sensitive to fracture spacing, matrix diffusion coefficient (fracture surface area), and bulk reaction rate (or 'decay' constant), indicating that the relevant flow and transport parameters may be estimated by analyzing tracer signals.

  13. Active urea transport by the skin of Bufo viridis: Amiloride- and phloretin-sensitive transport sites

    SciTech Connect

    Rapoport, J.; Abuful, A.; Chaimovitz, C.; Noeh, Z.; Hays, R.M. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY )

    1988-09-01

    Urea is actively transported inwardly (J{sub i}) across the skin of the green toad Bufo viridis. J{sub i} is markedly enhanced in toads adapted to hypertonic saline. The authors studied urea transport across the skin of Bufo viridis under a variety of experimental conditions, including treatment with amiloride and phloretin, agents that inhibit urea permeability in the bladder of Bufo marinus. Amiloride (10{sup {minus}4} M) significantly inhibited J{sub i} in both adapted and unadapted animals and was unaffected by removal of sodium from the external medium. Phloretin (10{sup {minus}4} M) significantly inhibited J{sub i} in adapted animals by 23-46%; there was also a reduction in J{sub i} in unadapted toads at 10{sup {minus}4} and 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M phloretin. A dose-response study revealed that the concentration of phloretin causing half-maximal inhibition (K{sub {1/2}}) was 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M for adapted animals. J{sub i} was unaffected by the substitution of sucrose for Ringer solution or by ouabain. They conclude (1) the process of adaptation appears to involve an increase in the number of amiloride- and phloretin-inhibitable urea transport sites in the skin, with a possible increase in the affinity of the sites for phloretin; (2) the adapted skin resembles the Bufo marinus urinary bladder with respect to amiloride and phloretin-inhibitable sites; (3) they confirm earlier observations that J{sub i} is independent of sodium transport.

  14. Contribution of peat soil structure to biogeochemical processes: A physical understanding of pore distribution and solute transport characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanezhad, Fereidoun; Kleimeier, Christian; Milojevic, Tatjana; Liu, Haojie; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Lennartz, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Peatlands are a valuable but environmentally vulnerable resource. They represent a globally-significant carbon and energy reservoir and play major roles in water and biogeochemical cycles. Peat soils are highly complex porous media with unique physical and hydraulic properties. In peat soils, the unique complex dual-porosity structure with mobile-immobile pore fractions controls water flow and solute migration, which, in turn, affect reactive transport processes and biogeochemical functions. In this presentation, we start with an introduction of key physical and hydraulic properties related to the structure of peat soils and discuss their implications for water storage, flow and the migration of solutes. Then, we present the results of two experiments to understand the effect of pore fractions on the denitrification process in a peat depth profile, with the main objective to show how this process is controlled by pore-scale mass transfer and exchange of nitrate between mobile and immobile pores. In these experiments, bromide and nitrate breakthrough curves were used to constrain transport parameters and steady-state nitrate reduction rates in the depth profile. The vertical distribution of potential denitrification rates were compared with depth distributions of partitioning mobile-immobile pores and the exchange coefficient between the pores. The results showed that an increase of immobile pore fractions with depth increases the common interface surface area between mobile and immobile pores which leads to a more pronounced exchange between the two transport domains and enhances the denitrification activities. Furthermore, the physical non-equilibrium approaches were linked to reactive geochemical transformation processes by comparing the different transport characteristics using the pore distribution analyses between degraded and un-degraded peats and their effects on denitrification activities. The conclusion was that in addition to a reducing condition

  15. Solutions and reductions for radiative energy transport in laser-heated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Broadbridge, P.; Ivanova, N. M.

    2015-01-15

    A full symmetry classification is given for models of energy transport in radiant plasma when the mass density is spatially variable and the diffusivity is nonlinear. A systematic search for conservation laws also leads to some potential symmetries and to an integrable nonlinear model. Classical point symmetries, potential symmetries, and nonclassical symmetries are used to effect variable reductions and exact solutions. The simplest time-dependent solution is shown to be stable and relevant to a closed system.

  16. New Solution of Diffusion-Advection Equation for Cosmic-Ray Transport Using Ultradistributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, M. C.; Plastino, A. R.; Plastino, A.; Ferri, G. L.; de Paoli, A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we exactly solve the diffusion-advection equation (DAE) for cosmic-ray transport. For such a purpose we use the Theory of Ultradistributions of J. Sebastiao e Silva, to give a general solution for the DAE. From the ensuing solution, we obtain several approximations as limiting cases of various situations of physical and astrophysical interest. One of them involves Solar cosmic-rays' diffusion.

  17. The nature of the sunspot phenomenon. I - Solutions of the heat transport equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1974-01-01

    It is pointed out that sunspots represent a disruption in the uniform flow of heat through the convective zone. The basic sunspot structure is, therefore, determined by the energy transport equation. The solutions of this equation for the case of stochastic heat transport are examined. It is concluded that a sunspot is basically a region of enhanced, rather than inhibited, energy transport and emissivity. The heat flow equations are discussed and attention is given to the shallow depth of the sunspot phenomenon. The sunspot is seen as a heat engine of high efficiency which converts most of the heat flux into hydromagnetic waves.

  18. Transport solutions of the Lamé equations and shock elastic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeyeva, L. A.; Kaishybaeva, G. K.

    2016-07-01

    The Lamé system describing the dynamics of an isotropic elastic medium affected by a steady transport load moving at subsonic, transonic, or supersonic speed is considered. Its fundamental and generalized solutions in a moving frame of reference tied to the transport load are analyzed. Shock waves arising in the medium at supersonic speeds are studied. Conditions on the jump in the stress, displacement rate, and energy across the shock front are obtained using distribution theory. Numerical results concerning the dynamics of an elastic medium influenced by concentrated transport loads moving at sub-, tran- and supersonic speeds are presented.

  19. A comprehensive one-dimensional numerical model for solute transport in rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barati Moghaddam, Maryam; Mazaheri, Mehdi; MohammadVali Samani, Jamal

    2017-01-01

    One of the mechanisms that greatly affect the pollutant transport in rivers, especially in mountain streams, is the effect of transient storage zones. The main effect of these zones is to retain pollutants temporarily and then release them gradually. Transient storage zones indirectly influence all phenomena related to mass transport in rivers. This paper presents the TOASTS (third-order accuracy simulation of transient storage) model to simulate 1-D pollutant transport in rivers with irregular cross-sections under unsteady flow and transient storage zones. The proposed model was verified versus some analytical solutions and a 2-D hydrodynamic model. In addition, in order to demonstrate the model applicability, two hypothetical examples were designed and four sets of well-established frequently cited tracer study data were used. These cases cover different processes governing transport, cross-section types and flow regimes. The results of the TOASTS model, in comparison with two common contaminant transport models, shows better accuracy and numerical stability.

  20. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  1. A Simple Laboratory Exercise Illustrating Active Transport in Yeast Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambuk, Boris U.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a simple laboratory activity illustrating the chemiosmotic principles of active transport in yeast cells. Demonstrates the energy coupling mechanism of active a-glucoside uptake by Saccaromyces cerevisiae cells with a colorimetric transport assay using very simple equipment. (Contains 22 references.) (Author/YDS)

  2. Phenylalanine transport in guinea pig jejunum. A general mechanism for organic solute and sodium cotransport.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, F; Lherminier, M

    1982-08-01

    1. Sodium-dependent phenylalanine transport by guinea pig jejunum exhibits apparently pure K-type activation kinetics where Vmaxs is constant but KT decreases as [Na+] increases. At 0, 3 and 6 mM sodium, however, the results deviate from the expected hyperbolic kinetics and give a plateau. 2. This finding is interpreted in terms of the hypothesis that the outer face of the brush border membrane contains enough Na+ to support amino acid and Na+ cotransport at essentially maximal rates, even after preincubation of the tissues in vitro for several minutes in sodium-free buffers. 3. Sodium could move dynamically into this region from tissue stores and across the paracellular pathway. Passage of NaCl directly across the brush border also seems possible by reversal of the (neutral) Na+ and Cl- cotransport system. 4. To reconcile contradictory observations obtained in different laboratories, either with intact-epithelium preparations or with isolated brush border membrane vesicles, we include a theoretical analysis of the kinetics of organic solute and Na+ cotransport. For simplicity, this analysis is limited to cases of 1/2 stoichiometry and to neutral organic solutes such as sugars and monoamino-monocarboxylic amino acids. 5. Cotransport is explained in terms of a general, allosteric mechanism involving one site for S and another for Na+. There is no preferential order for binding, but only the ternary complex S-carrier-Na+ can translocate at quantitatively significant rates (obligatory activation kinetics). Since Na+ crosses the membrane as the free cation, under physiological conditions (inside-negative membrane potential) it will move towards its position of electrical equilibrium, hence unidirectionally. This explains why, with intact-tissue preparations, solute influx exhibits Michaelis-Menten kinetics. 6. By definition, cotransport kinetics are mixed type and involve effects on both KT and Vmaxs. Macroscopic deviations from this expected behaviour can be explained

  3. Modeling variably saturated subsurface solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and MT3DMS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morway, Eric D.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Langevin, Christian D.; Bailey, Ryan T.; Healy, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    The MT3DMS groundwater solute transport model was modified to simulate solute transport in the unsaturated zone by incorporating the unsaturated-zone flow (UZF1) package developed for MODFLOW. The modified MT3DMS code uses a volume-averaged approach in which Lagrangian-based UZF1 fluid fluxes and storage changes are mapped onto a fixed grid. Referred to as UZF-MT3DMS, the linked model was tested against published benchmarks solved analytically as well as against other published codes, most frequently the U.S. Geological Survey's Variably-Saturated Two-Dimensional Flow and Transport Model. Results from a suite of test cases demonstrate that the modified code accurately simulates solute advection, dispersion, and reaction in the unsaturated zone. Two- and three-dimensional simulations also were investigated to ensure unsaturated-saturated zone interaction was simulated correctly. Because the UZF1 solution is analytical, large-scale flow and transport investigations can be performed free from the computational and data burdens required by numerical solutions to Richards' equation. Results demonstrate that significant simulation runtime savings can be achieved with UZF-MT3DMS, an important development when hundreds or thousands of model runs are required during parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. Three-dimensional variably saturated flow and transport simulations revealed UZF-MT3DMS to have runtimes that are less than one tenth of the time required by models that rely on Richards' equation. Given its accuracy and efficiency, and the wide-spread use of both MODFLOW and MT3DMS, the added capability of unsaturated-zone transport in this familiar modeling framework stands to benefit a broad user-ship.

  4. Modeling variably saturated subsurface solute transport with MODFLOW-UZF and MT3DMS.

    PubMed

    Morway, Eric D; Niswonger, Richard G; Langevin, Christian D; Bailey, Ryan T; Healy, Richard W

    2013-03-01

    The MT3DMS groundwater solute transport model was modified to simulate solute transport in the unsaturated zone by incorporating the unsaturated-zone flow (UZF1) package developed for MODFLOW. The modified MT3DMS code uses a volume-averaged approach in which Lagrangian-based UZF1 fluid fluxes and storage changes are mapped onto a fixed grid. Referred to as UZF-MT3DMS, the linked model was tested against published benchmarks solved analytically as well as against other published codes, most frequently the U.S. Geological Survey's Variably-Saturated Two-Dimensional Flow and Transport Model. Results from a suite of test cases demonstrate that the modified code accurately simulates solute advection, dispersion, and reaction in the unsaturated zone. Two- and three-dimensional simulations also were investigated to ensure unsaturated-saturated zone interaction was simulated correctly. Because the UZF1 solution is analytical, large-scale flow and transport investigations can be performed free from the computational and data burdens required by numerical solutions to Richards' equation. Results demonstrate that significant simulation runtime savings can be achieved with UZF-MT3DMS, an important development when hundreds or thousands of model runs are required during parameter estimation and uncertainty analysis. Three-dimensional variably saturated flow and transport simulations revealed UZF-MT3DMS to have runtimes that are less than one tenth of the time required by models that rely on Richards' equation. Given its accuracy and efficiency, and the wide-spread use of both MODFLOW and MT3DMS, the added capability of unsaturated-zone transport in this familiar modeling framework stands to benefit a broad user-ship.

  5. Osmosis and solute-solvent drag: fluid transport and fluid exchange in animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Hammel, H T; Schlegel, Whitney M

    2005-01-01

    , (3) the return of interstitial fluid to the vasa recta, (4) return of aqueous humor to the episcleral veins, and (5) flow of phloem from source to sink in higher plants and many more examples of fluid transport and fluid exchange in animal and plant physiology. When a membrane is permeable to water only and when it separates differing aqueous solutions, the flow of water is from the solution with the lower osmotic pressure to the solution with the higher osmotic pressure.

  6. Active urea transport independent of H+ and Na+ transport in frog skin epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lacoste, I; Dunel-Erb, S; Harvey, B J; Laurent, P; Ehrenfeld, J

    1991-10-01

    We investigated the relationship between H+ secretion (JH), Na+ absorption (JNa), and urea transport (Ju) in skin of frogs (Rana esculenta) adapted to running tap water, NaCl (100 mM), and KCl (100 mM). In addition, cell morphological changes, particularly in the mitochondria-rich cells (MRC), were followed. NaCl adaptation stimulated an active Ju, reduced JNa and JH, and caused a decrease in the apical surface of MRC. After KCl adaptation, JNa and JH were increased and highly correlated, with a twofold increase in Ju, whereas the numerous MRC developed infoldings on their apical membranes. No correlation was found between JH and Ju. Clamping the skins in a range of +/- 50 mV or changing the external pH from 7.4 to 5.4 (at high cellular buffering power) had no effect on Ju. Depolarization of the basolateral membranes (serosal KCl-Ringer) had no effect on Ju. Ju was reversibly blocked by acidification of the cells by oxygen-free solution and sulfhydryl reagents (Hg2+, p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid, and N-ethylmaleimide). Diethylstilbestrol, a proton transport blocker, had no effect on Ju. Apical addition of amiloride and derivatives (phenamil and ethylisopropyl amiloride) reversibly blocked Ju, whereas ouabain had no effect. We conclude that a cation (Na+ or H+)-dependent process is unlikely to exist in R. esculenta skin. A primary active transport in a two-step process is the simplest hypothesis to account for the energy-dependent Ju that develops in NaCl-adapted frogs.

  7. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include methods that 1) explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) those that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of class 1, based on direct numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of class 1 based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of class 2 (a pore-network model or PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results with previously reported experimental observations. Experimental observations are limited to measured pore-scale velocities, so solute transport comparisons are made only among the various models. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations).

  8. Transportation as a "Related Service": Issues that Involve Transition Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Missouri LINC.

    The paper discusses transportation as a related service for students with disabilities expecially as related to school-to-work transition activities. First, the legislative and legal basis for providing transportation services is discussed in the form of answers to frequently asked questions: why provide transportation? what is the basis for…

  9. Transportation as a "Related Service": Issues that Involve Transition Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Missouri LINC.

    The paper discusses transportation as a related service for students with disabilities expecially as related to school-to-work transition activities. First, the legislative and legal basis for providing transportation services is discussed in the form of answers to frequently asked questions: why provide transportation? what is the basis for…

  10. Solute transport in eroded and rehabilitated prairie landforms. 2. Reactive solute.

    PubMed

    Papiernik, Sharon K; Koskinen, William C; Yates, Scott R

    2009-08-26

    The impact of varying soil, landscape, and climate conditions on the off-site transport of pesticides must be determined to develop improved pesticide management practices. This study quantified the rate of S-metolachlor dissipation after fall and spring application in eroded and rehabilitated landforms in which topsoil was moved from the lower slope to the upper slope. Fall-applied metolachlor provided no control of annual grasses because approximately 80% was removed from the root zone during the winter and early spring, presumably by leaching and runoff. S-Metolachlor dissipated in the spring with a DT(50) of 24-29 days. These results suggest that fall-applied metolachlor may not provide economic weed control and presents an increased risk of water contamination. Although landscape position and bulk soil movement within the landform had a large impact on soil properties, no significant differences in metolachlor dissipation between different landscape positions and between eroded and rehabilitated landforms were observed.

  11. Biotin uptake in prokaryotes by solute transporters with an optional ATP-binding cassette-containing module.

    PubMed

    Hebbeln, Peter; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Alfandega, Anja; Eitinger, Thomas

    2007-02-20

    BioMNY proteins are considered to constitute tripartite biotin transporters in prokaryotes. Recent comparative genomic and experimental analyses pointed to the similarity of BioMN to homologous modules of prokaryotic transporters mediating uptake of metals, amino acids, and vitamins. These systems resemble ATP-binding cassette-containing transporters and include typical ATPases (e.g., BioM). Absence of extracytoplasmic solute-binding proteins among the members of this group, however, is a distinctive feature. Genome context analyses uncovered that only one-third of the widespread bioY genes are linked to bioMN. Many bioY genes are located at loci encoding biotin biosynthesis, and others are unlinked to biotin metabolic or transport genes. Heterologous expression of the bioMNY operon and of the single bioY of the alpha-proteobacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus conferred biotin-transport activity on recombinant Escherichia coli cells. Kinetic analyses identified BioY as a high-capacity transporter that was converted into a high-affinity system in the presence of BioMN. BioMNY-mediated biotin uptake was severely impaired by replacement of the Walker A lysine residue in BioM, demonstrating dependency of high-affinity transport on a functional ATPase. Biochemical assays revealed that BioM, BioN, and BioY proteins form stable complexes in membranes of the heterologous host. Expression of truncated bio transport operons, each with one gene deleted, resulted in stable BioMN complexes but revealed only low amounts of BioMY and BioNY aggregates in the absence of the respective third partner. The results substantiate our earlier suggestion of a mechanistically novel group of membrane transporters.

  12. Biotin uptake in prokaryotes by solute transporters with an optional ATP-binding cassette-containing module

    PubMed Central

    Hebbeln, Peter; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Alfandega, Anja; Eitinger, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    BioMNY proteins are considered to constitute tripartite biotin transporters in prokaryotes. Recent comparative genomic and experimental analyses pointed to the similarity of BioMN to homologous modules of prokaryotic transporters mediating uptake of metals, amino acids, and vitamins. These systems resemble ATP-binding cassette-containing transporters and include typical ATPases (e.g., BioM). Absence of extracytoplasmic solute-binding proteins among the members of this group, however, is a distinctive feature. Genome context analyses uncovered that only one-third of the widespread bioY genes are linked to bioMN. Many bioY genes are located at loci encoding biotin biosynthesis, and others are unlinked to biotin metabolic or transport genes. Heterologous expression of the bioMNY operon and of the single bioY of the α-proteobacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus conferred biotin-transport activity on recombinant Escherichia coli cells. Kinetic analyses identified BioY as a high-capacity transporter that was converted into a high-affinity system in the presence of BioMN. BioMNY-mediated biotin uptake was severely impaired by replacement of the Walker A lysine residue in BioM, demonstrating dependency of high-affinity transport on a functional ATPase. Biochemical assays revealed that BioM, BioN, and BioY proteins form stable complexes in membranes of the heterologous host. Expression of truncated bio transport operons, each with one gene deleted, resulted in stable BioMN complexes but revealed only low amounts of BioMY and BioNY aggregates in the absence of the respective third partner. The results substantiate our earlier suggestion of a mechanistically novel group of membrane transporters. PMID:17301237

  13. Testing and benchmarking of a three-dimensional groundwater flow and solute transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, P.N.; Andersen, P.F.; Faust, C.R.; Stephenson, D.E.

    1988-12-31

    A three-dimensional finite-difference model was developed to simulate groundwater flow and solute transport. The model is intended for application to a variety of groundwater resource and solute migration evaluations, including several complex sites at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Because the model, FTWORK, is relatively new, there is a need to provide confidence in the model results. Methodologies that test models include comparisons with analytical solutions, comparisons with empirical data, and checking that conservation properties hold. Another level of testing is the comparison of one code against another. This paper describes the testing and benchmarking procedure used to verify the validate FTWORK.

  14. Air pollution exposure: An activity pattern approach for active transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew D.; Yiannakoulias, Nikolaos; Kanaroglou, Pavlos S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the calculation of personal air pollution exposure during trips made by active transportation using activity patterns without personal monitors. We calculate exposure as the inhaled dose of particulate matter 2.5 μg or smaller. Two modes of active transportation are compared, and they include cycling and walking. Ambient conditions are calculated by combining mobile and stationary monitoring data in an artificial neural network space-time model. The model uses a land use regression framework and has a prediction accuracy of R2 = 0.78. Exposure is calculated at 10 m or shorter intervals during the trips using inhalation rates associated with both modes. The trips are children's routes between home and school. The average dose during morning cycling trips was 2.17 μg, during morning walking trips was 3.19 μg, during afternoon cycling trips was 2.19 μg and during afternoon walking trips was 3.23 μg. The cycling trip dose was significantly lower than the walking trip dose. The air pollution exposure during walking or cycling trips could not be strongly predicted by either the school or household ambient conditions, either individually or in combination. Multiple linear regression models regressing both the household and school ambient conditions against the dose were only able to account for, at most, six percent of the variance in the exposure. This paper demonstrates that incorporating activity patterns when calculating exposure can improve the estimate of exposure compared to its calculation from ambient conditions.

  15. Analytical solution for the advection-dispersion transport equation in layered media

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The advection-dispersion transport equation with first-order decay was solved analytically for multi-layered media using the classic integral transform technique (CITT). The solution procedure used an associated non-self-adjoint advection-diffusion eigenvalue problem that had the same form and coef...

  16. Analytical solutions for one-dimensional colloid transport in saturated fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Salam, Assem; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    Closed-form analytical solutions for colloid transport in single rock fractures with and without colloid penetration into the rock matrix are derived for constant concentration as well as constant flux boundary conditions. A single fracture is idealized as two semi-infinite parallel plates. It is assumed that colloidal particles undergo irreversible deposition onto fracture surfaces and may penetrate into the rock matrix, and deposit irreversibly onto rock matrix solid surfaces. The solutions are obtained by taking Laplace transforms to the governing transport equations and boundary conditions with respect to time and space. For the case of no colloid penetration into the rock matrix, the solutions are expressed in terms of exponentials and complimentary error functions; whereas, for the case of colloid penetration into the rock matrix, the solutions are expressed in terms of convolution integrals and modified Bessel functions. The impact of the model parameters on colloid transport is examined. The results from several simulations indicate that liquid-phase as well as deposited colloid concentrations in the fracture are sensitive to the fracture surface deposition coefficient, the fracture aperture, and the Brownian diffusion coefficient for colloidal particles penetrating the rock matrix. Furthermore, it is shown that the differences between the two boundary conditions investigated are minimized at dominant advective transport conditions. The constant concentration condition overestimates liquid-phase colloid concentrations, whereas the constant flux condition leads to conservation of mass.

  17. Solute Transport of Negatively Charged Contrast Agents Across Articular Surface of Injured Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Kokkonen, H T; Chin, H C; Töyräs, J; Jurvelin, J S; Quinn, T M

    2017-04-01

    Solute transport through the extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to chondrocyte metabolism. Cartilage injury affects solute transport in cartilage due to alterations in ECM structure and solute-matrix interactions. Therefore, cartilage injury may be detected by using contrast agent-based clinical imaging. In the present study, effects of mechanical injury on transport of negatively charged contrast agents in cartilage were characterized. Using cartilage plugs injured by mechanical compression protocol, effective partition coefficients and diffusion fluxes of iodine- and gadolinium-based contrast agents were measured using high resolution microCT imaging. For all contrast agents studied, effective diffusion fluxes increased significantly, particularly at early times during the diffusion process (38 and 33% increase after 4 min, P < 0.05 for iodine and Gd-DTPA; and 76% increase after 10 min for diatrizoate, P < 0.05). Effective partition coefficients were unaffected in mechanically injured cartilage. Mechanical injury reduced PG content and collagen integrity in cartilage superficial zone. This study suggests that alterations in contrast agent diffusion flux, a non-equilibrium transport parameter, provides a more sensitive indicator for assessment of cartilage matrix integrity than partition coefficient and the equilibrium distribution of solute. These findings may help in developing clinical methods of contrast agent-based imaging to detect cartilage injury.

  18. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- or depth-dependent retention in porous media

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for...

  19. Semianalytical Solutions for Transport in Aquifer and Fractured Clay Matrix System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-dimensional mathematical model that describes transport of contaminant in a horizontal aquifer with simultaneous diffusion into a fractured clay formation is proposed. A group of analytical solutions is derived based on specific initial and boundary conditions as well as ...

  20. Semianalytical Solutions for Transport in Aquifer and Fractured Clay Matrix System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-dimensional mathematical model that describes transport of contaminant in a horizontal aquifer with simultaneous diffusion into a fractured clay formation is proposed. A group of analytical solutions is derived based on specific initial and boundary conditions as well as ...

  1. Nonequilibrium NAPL dissolution and solute transport: Influence on aquifer remediation and post remedial contaminant rebound

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The rate of ground-water pumping can affect the efficiency of contaminant transport. High pore-water velocities affect remedial pumping efficiency by limiting the solute concentration in the extracted ground water. The two separate processes potentially involved are solute transport and residual NAPL dissolution. In both cases, the contact time between mobile ground water and immobile contaminant phases (i.e., sorbed contaminants or residual NAPL) is reduced by a higher pore-water velocity. The relative chemical equilibrium established can result in a reduced solute concentration due to mass transfer limitations. This effect is often described as nonequilibrium contaminant transport and is thought to be due to a molecular diffusion rate-limited effect. Several methods are described to apply the nonequilibrium concepts of both contaminant transport processes to zero-dimensional and one-dimensional models. Two spreadsheet-based analytical computer programs are provided and application of the models are demonstrated by simulating several case examples. The two computer models are practical management tools which cannot only estimate the volume of extracted water and remedial pumping times required, but they also have the unique capability to simulate solute contaminant rebound resulting from a drop in the ground-water velocity.

  2. MaSTiS, microorganism and solute transport in streams, model documentation and user manual

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In-stream fate and transport of solutes and microorganisms need to be understood to evaluate suitability of waters for agricultural, recreational, and household uses and eventually minimize surface water contamination. Concerns over safety of this water resulted in development of predictive models f...

  3. Destabilization of the thermohaline circulation by atmospheric transports: An analytic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Krasovskiy, Y.P.; Stone, P.H.

    1998-07-01

    The four-box coupled atmosphere-ocean model of Marotzke is solved analytically, by introducing the approximation that the effect of oceanic heat advection on ocean temperatures is small (but not negligible) compared to the effect of surface heat fluxes. The solutions are written in a form that displays how the stability of the thermohaline circulation depends on the relationship between atmospheric meridional transports of heat and moisture and the meridional temperature gradient. In the model, these relationships are assumed to be power laws with different exponents allowed for the dependence of the transports of heat and moisture on the gradient. The approximate analytic solutions are in good agreement with Marotzke`s exact numerical solutions, but show more generally how the destabilization of the thermohaline circulation depends on the sensitivity of the atmospheric transports to the meridional temperature gradient. The solutions are also used to calculate how the stability of the thermohaline circulation is changed if model errors are corrected by using conventional flux adjustments. Errors like those common in GCMs destabilize the model`s thermohaline circulation, even if conventional flux adjustments are used. However, the resulting errors in the magnitude of the critical perturbations necessary to destabilize the thermohaline circulation can be corrected by modifying transport efficiencies instead.

  4. Analysis of the sodium recirculation theory of solute-coupled water transport in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2002-01-01

    Our previous mathematical model of solute-coupled water transport through the intestinal epithelium is extended for dealing with electrolytes rather than electroneutral solutes. A 3Na+–2K+ pump in the lateral membranes provides the energy-requiring step for driving transjunctional and translateral flows of water across the epithelium with recirculation of the diffusible ions maintained by a 1Na+-1K+–2Cl− cotransporter in the plasma membrane facing the serosal compartment. With intracellular non-diffusible anions and compliant plasma membranes, the model describes the dependence on membrane permeabilities and pump constants of fluxes of water and electrolytes, volumes and ion concentrations of cell and lateral intercellular space (lis), and membrane potentials and conductances. Simulating physiological bioelectrical features together with cellular and paracellular fluxes of the sodium ion, computations predict that the concentration differences between lis and bathing solutions are small for all three ions. Nevertheless, the diffusion fluxes of the ions out of lis significantly exceed their mass transports. It is concluded that isotonic transport requires recirculation of all three ions. The computed sodium recirculation flux that is required for isotonic transport corresponds to that estimated in experiments on toad small intestine. This result is shown to be robust and independent of whether the apical entrance mechanism for the sodium ion is a channel, a SGLT1 transporter driving inward uphill water flux, or an electroneutral Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter. PMID:12096047

  5. Reflections on solute transport in rivers: Historical developments, present approaches, and future promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packman, A. I.

    2012-12-01

    Thirty years after Bencala and Walters' landmark paper on transient storage seems like a good time to reflect on our understanding of hyporheic exchange and solute transport in rivers. Bencala and Walters' work, and the related fieldwork of many others at the U.S. Geological Survey, changed the paradigm for flow in river corridors. Previously, the prevailing view had been that in-stream transport was regulated primarily by advection and dispersion. This thinking was rooted in well-established theory derived from the work of G.I. Taylor on dispersion processes, and supported by extensive fieldwork in the 1960's and 1970's. River and groundwater flow were strictly separated at the channel boundary. After Bencala and Walters (and a lot of follow-up work!) we now understand that water continuously exchanges across stream channel boundaries. This has profound implications for not only solute transport in rivers, but also a wide variety of biogeochemical, ecological, and even geomorphological processes. In this talk, I will review the historical development of theory for solute transport in rivers, try to convey why Bencala and Walters was so important to both hydrology and biogeochemistry, and discuss how recent developments in measurement methods and stochastic transport theory can be used to further advance our understanding of surface-groundwater connectivity.

  6. Examining the influence of heterogeneous porosity fields on conservative solute transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hu, B.X.; Meerschaert, M.M.; Barrash, W.; Hyndman, D.W.; He, C.; Li, X.; Guo, Laodong

    2009-01-01

    It is widely recognized that groundwater flow and solute transport in natural media are largely controlled by heterogeneities. In the last three decades, many studies have examined the effects of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields on flow and transport processes, but there has been much less attention to the influence of heterogeneous porosity fields. In this study, we use porosity and particle size measurements from boreholes at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) to evaluate the importance of characterizing the spatial structure of porosity and grain size data for solute transport modeling. Then we develop synthetic hydraulic conductivity fields based on relatively simple measurements of porosity from borehole logs and grain size distributions from core samples to examine and compare the characteristics of tracer transport through these fields with and without inclusion of porosity heterogeneity. In particular, we develop horizontal 2D realizations based on data from one of the less heterogeneous units at the BHRS to examine effects where spatial variations in hydraulic parameters are not large. The results indicate that the distributions of porosity and the derived hydraulic conductivity in the study unit resemble fractal normal and lognormal fields respectively. We numerically simulate solute transport in stochastic fields and find that spatial variations in porosity have significant effects on the spread of an injected tracer plume including a significant delay in simulated tracer concentration histories.

  7. The inhibitory effects of camptothecin (CPT) and its derivatives on the substrate uptakes mediated by human solute carrier transporters (SLCs).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Chan, Ting; Zhu, Ling; Yan, Xiufeng; Cao, Zhisong; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Fanfan

    2016-09-01

    1. Camptothecin (CPT) and its derivatives are potent candidate compounds in treating cancers. However, their clinical applications are largely restricted by severe toxicities. 2. The solute carrier transporters (SLCs), particularly the organic anion transporting polypeptides and organic anion/cation transporters (OATs/OCTs) are widely expressed in human key organs and responsible for the cellular influx of many substances including endogenous substrates and many clinically important drugs. Drug-drug interactions through SLCs often result in unsatisfied therapeutic outcomes and/or unexpected toxicities. 3. This study investigated the inhibitory effects of CPT and its eight derivatives on the cellular uptake of specific substrates mediated by the essential SLCs in over-expressing Human embryonic kidney 293 cells. 4. Our data revealed that CPT, 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT), 10-methoxycamptothecin (MCPT) and 9-nitrocamptothecin (9NC) significantly inhibit the uptake activity of OAT3. 9NC also inhibited the substrate transport mediated by OAT1. The substrate uptakes of OAT1, OCTN1 and OCTN2 were significantly decreased in the presence of CZ112, while CPT-11 potently down-regulated the transport activity of OCT1 and OCT3. 5. In summary, our study demonstrated that CPT and its eight derivatives selectively inhibit the substrate uptakes mediated by the essential SLCs. This information contributes to understanding the localized toxicity of CPTs and provides novel molecular targets for the therapeutic optimization of CPTs in the future.

  8. Low-flow transport models for conservative and sorbed solutes; Uvas Creek, near Morgan Hill, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackman, A.P.; Walters, R.A.; Kennedy, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Models describing low-flow transport of conservative (nonreactive) and reactive solutes, which adsorb on the streambed, are developed and tested. Temporary storage within the bed plays an important role in solute movement. Three different models of bed-storage processes are developed for conservative solutes. One model assumes the bed is a well-mixed, nondiffusing, nonreacting zone. Solute flux into the bed is then proportional to the difference between stream and bed-solute concentrations. A second model assumes that solute is transported within the bed by a vertical diffusion process. The bed-solute concentration, which matches the stream concentration at the interface, varies with depth in the bed according to Fick 's law. A third model assumes convection in the downstream direction occurs in certain parts of the bed, while the mechanism of the first model functions elsewhere. Storage of absorbing species is assumed to occur by equilibrium adsorption within streambed particles. Uptake rate is described by an intraparticle diffusion process. Model equations were solved using finite element numerical methods. Models were calibrated using data from a 24-hour injection of conservative chloride and adsorptive Sr ions at Uvas Creek near Morgan Hill, California. All models predict well except for some overestimation by the adsorption model during dieaway. (USGS)

  9. Active transportation and public transportation use to achieve physical activity recommendations? A combined GPS, accelerometer, and mobility survey study.

    PubMed

    Chaix, Basile; Kestens, Yan; Duncan, Scott; Merrien, Claire; Thierry, Benoît; Pannier, Bruno; Brondeel, Ruben; Lewin, Antoine; Karusisi, Noëlla; Perchoux, Camille; Thomas, Frédérique; Méline, Julie

    2014-09-27

    Accurate information is lacking on the extent of transportation as a source of physical activity, on the physical activity gains from public transportation use, and on the extent to which population shifts in the use of transportation modes could increase the percentage of people reaching official physical activity recommendations. In 2012-2013, 234 participants of the RECORD GPS Study (French Paris region, median age = 58) wore a portable GPS receiver and an accelerometer for 7 consecutive days and completed a 7-day GPS-based mobility survey (participation rate = 57.1%). Information on transportation modes and accelerometry data aggregated at the trip level [number of steps taken, energy expended, moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and sedentary time] were available for 7,644 trips. Associations between transportation modes and accelerometer-derived physical activity were estimated at the trip level with multilevel linear models. Participants spent a median of 1 h 58 min per day in transportation (8.2% of total time). Thirty-eight per-cent of steps taken, 31% of energy expended, and 33% of MVPA over 7 days were attributable to transportation. Walking and biking trips but also public transportation trips with all four transit modes examined were associated with greater steps, MVPA, and energy expenditure when compared to trips by personal motorized vehicle. Two simulated scenarios, implying a shift of approximately 14% and 33% of all motorized trips to public transportation or walking, were associated with a predicted 6 point and 13 point increase in the percentage of participants achieving the current physical activity recommendation. Collecting data with GPS receivers, accelerometers, and a GPS-based electronic mobility survey of activities and transportation modes allowed us to investigate relationships between transportation modes and physical activity at the trip level. Our findings suggest that an increase in active transportation

  10. Solution-processable graphene oxide as an efficient hole transport layer in polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shao-Sian; Tu, Kun-Hua; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Wei; Chhowalla, Manish

    2010-06-22

    The utilization of graphene oxide (GO) thin films as the hole transport and electron blocking layer in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is demonstrated. The incorporation of GO deposited from neutral solutions between the photoactive poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) layer and the transparent and conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) leads to a decrease in recombination of electrons and holes and leakage currents. This results in a dramatic increase in the OPV efficiencies to values that are comparable to devices fabricated with PEDOT:PSS as the hole transport layer. Our results indicate that GO could be a simple solution-processable alternative to PEDOT:PSS as the effective hole transport and electron blocking layer in OPV and light-emitting diode devices.

  11. The solute carrier family 10 (SLC10): beyond bile acid transport

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Tatiana Claro; Polli, James E.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    The solute carrier (SLC) family 10 (SLC10) comprises influx transporters of bile acids, steroidal hormones, various drugs, and several other substrates. Because the seminal transporters of this family, namely, sodium/taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP; SLC10A1) and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; SLC10A2), were primarily bile acid transporters, the term “sodium bile salt cotransporting family” was used for the SLC10 family. However, this notion became obsolete with the finding of other SLC10 members that do not transport bile acids. For example, the sodium-dependent organic anion transporter (SOAT; SLC10A6) transports primarily sulfated steroids. Moreover, NTCP was shown to also transport steroids and xenobiotics, including HMG-CoA inhibitors (statins). The SLC10 family contains four additional members, namely, P3 (SLC10A3; SLC10A3), P4 (SLC10A4; SLC10A4), P5 (SLC10A5; SLC10A5) and SLC10A7 (SLC10A7), several of which were unknown or considered hypothetical until approximately a decade ago. While their substrate specificity remains undetermined, great progress has been made towards their characterization in recent years. SLC10A4 may participate in vesicular storage or exocytosis of neurotransmitters or mastocyte mediators, whereas SLC10A5 and SLC10A7 may be involved in solute transport and SLC10A3 may have a role as a housekeeping protein. Finally, the newly found role of bile acids in glucose and energy homeostasis, via the TGR5 receptor, sheds new light on the clinical relevance of ASBT and NTCP. The present mini-review provides a brief summary of recent progress on members of the SLC10 family. PMID:23506869

  12. ELVIS: Multi-Electrolyte Aqueous Activity Model for Geothermal Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingerl, F. F.; Wagner, T.; Driesner, T.; Kulik, D. A.; Kosakowski, G.

    2011-12-01

    High temperature, pressure, and fluid salinities render geochemical modeling of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems a demanding task. Accurate prediction of fluid-mineral equilibria strongly depends on the availability of thermodynamic data and activity models. Typically, the Pitzer activity model is applied for geothermal fluids. A drawback of this model is the large number of parameters required to account for temperature and pressure dependencies, which significantly reduces computational efficiency of reactive transport simulations. In addition, most available parameterizations are valid only at vapor-saturated conditions. As an alternative we implemented the EUNIQUAC local composition model [2] that needs substantially fewer fitting parameters. However, the current EUNIQUAC model design does not include provision for high temperature (>150°C) applications and lacks a formulation for pressure dependence. Therefore, its application to geothermal conditions requires a re-formulation and re-fitting of the model. We developed a new tool termed GEMSFIT that allows generic fitting of activity models (for aqueous electrolyte and non-electrolyte solutions) and equations of state implemented in our geochemical equilibrium solver GEM-Selektor (http://gems.web.psi.ch). GEMSFIT combines a PostgreSQL database for storing and managing the datasets of experimental measurements and interaction parameters, the parallelized genetic algorithm toolbox of MATLAB° for the parameter fitting, and an interface to the numerical kernel of GEM-Selektor to access activity models and perform chemical equilibrium calculations. Benchmarking of the partly re-parameterized EUNIQUAC model against Pitzer revealed that the former is less accurate, which can result in incorrect predictions of mineral precipitation/dissolution. Consequently, we modified the EUNIQUAC model and concurrently introduced a pressure dependence to be able to fit experimental data over wide ranges of

  13. A nonequilibrium model for reactive contaminant transport through fractured porous media: Model development and semianalytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Nitin; Ojha, C. S. P.; Sharma, P. K.

    2012-10-01

    In this study a conceptual model that accounts for the effects of nonequilibrium contaminant transport in a fractured porous media is developed. Present model accounts for both physical and sorption nonequilibrium. Analytical solution was developed using the Laplace transform technique, which was then numerically inverted to obtain solute concentration in the fracture matrix system. The semianalytical solution developed here can incorporate both semi-infinite and finite fracture matrix extent. In addition, the model can account for flexible boundary conditions and nonzero initial condition in the fracture matrix system. The present semianalytical solution was validated against the existing analytical solutions for the fracture matrix system. In order to differentiate between various sorption/transport mechanism different cases of sorption and mass transfer were analyzed by comparing the breakthrough curves and temporal moments. It was found that significant differences in the signature of sorption and mass transfer exists. Applicability of the developed model was evaluated by simulating the published experimental data of Calcium and Strontium transport in a single fracture. The present model simulated the experimental data reasonably well in comparison to the model based on equilibrium sorption assumption in fracture matrix system, and multi rate mass transfer model.

  14. Anomalous Solute Transport in Saturated Porous Media: Linking Transport Model Parameters to Electrical and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Binley, A. M.; Keating, K.; France, S.; Osterman, G. K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2013-12-01

    The advection-dispersion equation fails to describe non-Fickian solute transport in saturated porous media, necessitating the use of other models. The dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) model partitions the total porosity into mobile and less-mobile domains with solute exchange between the domains; consequently, the DDMT model can produce a better fit to breakthrough curves (BTCs) in systems defined by more- and less-mobile components. However, direct experimental estimation of DDMT model parameters such as rate of exchange and the mobile and less-mobile porosities remains elusive. Consequently, model parameters are often calculated purely as a model fitting exercise. There is a clear need for material characterization techniques that can offer some insight into the pore space geometrical arrangement, particularly if such techniques can be extended to the field scale. Here, we interpret static direct-current (DC) resistivity, complex resistivity (CR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) geophysical measurements in the characterization of mass transfer parameters. We use two different samples of the zeolite clinoptilolite, a material shown to demonstrate solute mass transfer due to a significant intragranular porosity, along with glass beads as a control. We explore the relation between geophysical and DDMT parameters in conjunction with supporting material characterization methods. Our results reveal how these geophysical measurements can offer some insight into the pore structures controlling the observed anomalous transport behavior.

  15. Colloid transport in porous media: impact of hyper-saline solutions.

    PubMed

    Magal, Einat; Weisbrod, Noam; Yechieli, Yoseph; Walker, Sharon L; Yakirevich, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    The transport of colloids suspended in natural saline solutions with a wide range of ionic strengths, up to that of Dead Sea brines (10(0.9) M) was explored. Migration of microspheres through saturated sand columns of different sizes was studied in laboratory experiments and simulated with mathematical models. Colloid transport was found to be related to the solution salinity as expected. The relative concentration of colloids at the columns outlet decreased (after 2-3 pore volumes) as the solution ionic strength increased until a critical value was reached (ionic strength > 10(-1.8) M) and then remained constant above this level of salinity. The colloids were found to be mobile even in the extremely saline brines of the Dead Sea. At such high ionic strength no energetic barrier to colloid attachment was presumed to exist and colloid deposition was expected to be a favorable process. However, even at these salinity levels, colloid attachment was not complete and the transport of ∼ 30% of the colloids through the 30-cm long columns was detected. To further explore the deposition of colloids on sand surfaces in Dead Sea brines, transport was studied using 7-cm long columns through which hundreds of pore volumes were introduced. The resulting breakthrough curves exhibited a bimodal shape whereby the relative concentration (C/C(0)) of colloids at the outlet rose to a value of 0.8, and it remained relatively constant (for the ∼ 18 pore volumes during which the colloid suspension was flushed through the column) and then the relative concentration increased to a value of one. The bimodal nature of the breakthrough suggests different rates of colloid attachment. Colloid transport processes were successfully modeled using the limited entrapment model, which assumes that the colloid attachment rate is dependent on the concentration of the attached colloids. Application of this model provided confirmation of the colloid aggregation and their accelerated attachment during

  16. Simulation and analysis of solute transport in 2D fracture/pipe networks: The SOLFRAC program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Jacques; Porel, Gilles; Delay, Fred; Ubertosi, Fabrice; Bernard, Stéphane; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2007-01-01

    The Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) method has been recently developed by Delay and Bodin [Delay, F. and Bodin, J., 2001. Time domain random walk method to simulate transport by advection-dispersion and matrix diffusion in fracture networks. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(21): 4051-4054.] and Bodin et al. [Bodin, J., Porel, G. and Delay, F., 2003c. Simulation of solute transport in discrete fracture networks using the time domain random walk method. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 6566: 1-8.] for simulating solute transport in discrete fracture networks. It is assumed that the fracture network can reasonably be represented by a network of interconnected one-dimensional pipes (i.e. flow channels). Processes accounted for are: (1) advection and hydrodynamic dispersion in the channels, (2) matrix diffusion, (3) diffusion into stagnant zones within the fracture planes, (4) sorption reactions onto the fracture walls and in the matrix, (5) linear decay, and (6) mass sharing at fracture intersections. The TDRW method is handy and very efficient in terms of computation costs since it allows for the one-step calculation of the particle residence time in each bond of the network. This method has been programmed in C++, and efforts have been made to develop an efficient and user-friendly software, called SOLFRAC. This program is freely downloadable at the URL http://labo.univ-poitiers.fr/hydrasa/intranet/telechargement.htm. It calculates solute transport into 2D pipe networks, while considering different types of injections and different concepts of local dispersion within each flow channel. Post-simulation analyses are also available, such as the mean velocity or the macroscopic dispersion at the scale of the entire network. The program may be used to evaluate how a given transport mechanism influences the macroscopic transport behaviour of fracture networks. It may also be used, as is the case, e.g., with analytical solutions, to interpret laboratory or field tracer test experiments

  17. Simulation and analysis of solute transport in 2D fracture/pipe networks: the SOLFRAC program.

    PubMed

    Bodin, Jacques; Porel, Gilles; Delay, Fred; Ubertosi, Fabrice; Bernard, Stéphane; de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald

    2007-01-05

    The Time Domain Random Walk (TDRW) method has been recently developed by Delay and Bodin [Delay, F. and Bodin, J., 2001. Time domain random walk method to simulate transport by advection-dispersion and matrix diffusion in fracture networks. Geophys. Res. Lett., 28(21): 4051-4054.] and Bodin et al. [Bodin, J., Porel, G. and Delay, F., 2003c. Simulation of solute transport in discrete fracture networks using the time domain random walk method. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 6566: 1-8.] for simulating solute transport in discrete fracture networks. It is assumed that the fracture network can reasonably be represented by a network of interconnected one-dimensional pipes (i.e. flow channels). Processes accounted for are: (1) advection and hydrodynamic dispersion in the channels, (2) matrix diffusion, (3) diffusion into stagnant zones within the fracture planes, (4) sorption reactions onto the fracture walls and in the matrix, (5) linear decay, and (6) mass sharing at fracture intersections. The TDRW method is handy and very efficient in terms of computation costs since it allows for the one-step calculation of the particle residence time in each bond of the network. This method has been programmed in C++, and efforts have been made to develop an efficient and user-friendly software, called SOLFRAC. This program is freely downloadable at the URL (labo.univ-poitiers.fr/hydrasa/intranet/telechargement.htm). It calculates solute transport into 2D pipe networks, while considering different types of injections and different concepts of local dispersion within each flow channel. Post-simulation analyses are also available, such as the mean velocity or the macroscopic dispersion at the scale of the entire network. The program may be used to evaluate how a given transport mechanism influences the macroscopic transport behaviour of fracture networks. It may also be used, as is the case, e.g., with analytical solutions, to interpret laboratory or field tracer test experiments performed

  18. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence

  19. The composite water and solute transport of barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots: effect of suberized barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ranathunge, Kosala; Kim, Yangmin X.; Wassmann, Friedrich; Kreszies, Tino; Zeisler, Viktoria

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims Roots have complex anatomical structures, and certain localized cell layers develop suberized apoplastic barriers. The size and tightness of these barriers depend on the growth conditions and on the age of the root. Such complex anatomical structures result in a composite water and solute transport in roots. Methods Development of apoplastic barriers along barley seminal roots was detected using various staining methods, and the suberin amounts in the apical and basal zones were analysed using gas chromatography–mass spectometry (GC-MS). The hydraulic conductivity of roots (Lpr) and of cortical cells (Lpc) was measured using root and cell pressure probes. Key Results When grown in hydroponics, barley roots did not form an exodermis, even at their basal zones. However, they developed an endodermis. Endodermal Casparian bands first appeared as ‘dots’ as early as at 20 mm from the apex, whereas a patchy suberin lamellae appeared at 60 mm. The endodermal suberin accounted for the total suberin of the roots. The absolute amount in the basal zone was significantly higher than in the apical zone, which was inversely proportional to the Lpr. Comparison of Lpr and Lpc suggested that cell to cell pathways dominate for water transport in roots. However, the calculation of Lpr from Lpc showed that at least 26 % of water transport occurs through the apoplast. Roots had different solute permeabilities (Psr) and reflection coefficients (σsr) for the solutes used. The σsr was below unity for the solutes, which have virtually zero permeability for semi-permeable membranes. Conclusions Suberized endodermis significantly reduces Lpr of seminal roots. The water and solute transport across barley roots is composite in nature and they do not behave like ideal osmometers. The composite transport model should be extended by adding components arranged in series (cortex, endodermis) in addition to the currently included components arranged in

  20. A Review of Darcy's Law: Limitations and Alternatives for Predicting Solute Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenhuis, Tammo; Kung, K.-J. Sam; Jaynes, Dan; Helling, Charles S.; Gish, Tim; Kladivko, Eileen

    2016-04-01

    Darcy's Law that was derived originally empirically 160 years ago, has been used successfully in calculating the (Darcy) flux in porous media throughout the world. However, field and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that the Darcy flux employed in the convective disperse equation could only successfully predict solute transport under two conditions: (1) uniformly or densely packed porous media; and (2) field soils under relatively dry condition. Employing the Darcy flux for solute transport in porous media with preferential flow pathways was problematic. In this paper we examine the theoretical background behind these field and laboratory observations and then provide an alternative to predict solute movement. By examining the characteristics of the momentum conservation principles on which Darcy's law is based, we show under what conditions Darcy flux can predict solute transport in porous media of various complexity. We find that, based on several case studies with capillary pores, Darcy's Law inherently merges momentum and in that way erases information on pore-scale velocities. For that reason the Darcy flux cannot predict flow in media with preferential flow conduits where individual pore velocities are essential in predicting the shape of the breakthrough curve and especially "the early arrival" of solutes. To overcome the limitations of the assumption in Darcy's law, we use Jury's conceptualization and employ the measured chemical breakthrough curve as input to characterize the impact of individual preferential flow pathways on chemical transport. Specifically, we discuss how best to take advantage of Jury's conceptualization to extract the pore-scale flow velocity to accurately predict chemical transport through soils with preferential flow pathways.

  1. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mehmani, Yashar; Schoenherr, Martin; Pasquali, Andrea; Perkins, William A.; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li -Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Yang, Xiaofan; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Trask, Nathaniel

    2015-09-28

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This paper provides support for confidence

  2. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence

  3. The composite water and solute transport of barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots: effect of suberized barriers.

    PubMed

    Ranathunge, Kosala; Kim, Yangmin X; Wassmann, Friedrich; Kreszies, Tino; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas

    2017-03-01

    Roots have complex anatomical structures, and certain localized cell layers develop suberized apoplastic barriers. The size and tightness of these barriers depend on the growth conditions and on the age of the root. Such complex anatomical structures result in a composite water and solute transport in roots. Development of apoplastic barriers along barley seminal roots was detected using various staining methods, and the suberin amounts in the apical and basal zones were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectometry (GC-MS). The hydraulic conductivity of roots ( Lp r ) and of cortical cells ( Lp c ) was measured using root and cell pressure probes. When grown in hydroponics, barley roots did not form an exodermis, even at their basal zones. However, they developed an endodermis. Endodermal Casparian bands first appeared as 'dots' as early as at 20 mm from the apex, whereas a patchy suberin lamellae appeared at 60 mm. The endodermal suberin accounted for the total suberin of the roots. The absolute amount in the basal zone was significantly higher than in the apical zone, which was inversely proportional to the Lp r . Comparison of Lp r and Lp c suggested that cell to cell pathways dominate for water transport in roots. However, the calculation of Lp r from Lp c showed that at least 26 % of water transport occurs through the apoplast. Roots had different solute permeabilities ( P sr ) and reflection coefficients ( σ sr ) for the solutes used. The σ sr was below unity for the solutes, which have virtually zero permeability for semi-permeable membranes. Suberized endodermis significantly reduces Lp r of seminal roots. The water and solute transport across barley roots is composite in nature and they do not behave like ideal osmometers. The composite transport model should be extended by adding components arranged in series (cortex, endodermis) in addition to the currently included components arranged in parallel (apoplastic, cell to cell pathways).

  4. Aquifer Heterogeneity and Solute-Transport Modeling in the Floridan Aquifer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W.; Maliva, R. G.; Missimer, T. M.

    2008-05-01

    The Floridan Aquifer System (FAS) is one of the most prolific aquifers in the world and is widely used for public and irrigation water supply. The FAS is also increasingly being used as a storage zone for aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) systems, including a 333-well system that is planned as part of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). The FAS is highly heterogeneous with respect to hydraulic conductivity, with meter- scale inter-bed variation exceeding seven orders of magnitude in some cases, even in South Florida where mega-karst is not well developed. Aquifer heterogeneity can have a major impact on ASR system performance because of its affects on the movement and mixing of stored water. Aquifer heterogeneity poses challenges for accurate modeling of the FAS, including solute transport modeling of ASR systems and variable density flow modeling of the freshwater/saltwater interface along coastal areas. Dispersivity is an important parameter in solute transport modeling, which is associated with aquifer heterogeneity. Commonly the values of dispersivity used in solute-transport modeling are derived from literature review and adjusted during model calibration process. Artificially large dispersivity values are often used in solute-transport models of ASR systems as a "fudge factor" to simulate the apparent greater mixing caused by inter-bed heterogeneity. This approach is problematic because the use of artificial hydraulic parameters for calibration opens the results of predictive simulations to question. The use of large dispersivity values to simulate aquifer heterogeneity also does not incorporate other impacts of aquifer heterogeneity, such as differential flow rates and migration distances between beds. The technical challenge is to incorporate aquifer heterogeneity into groundwater models at a scale that is sufficient to adequately simulate its effect on ASR system performance and coastal groundwater flow, while maintaining acceptable

  5. A mathematical model for the transport of a solute through a porous-walled tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Ian; Shipley, Rebecca

    2012-02-01

    Predicting the distribution of solutes or particles in flows within porous-walled tubes is essential to inform the design of cross-flow filtration devices. Here we use Taylor-dispersion theory to derive a radially averaged model for solute transport in a tube with porous walls, where the wall Darcy permeability may vary both spatially and in time. Crucially, this model includes solute advection via both radial and axial flow components, as well as diffusion, and the advection, diffusion and uptake coefficients in the averaged equation are explicitly derived. The model is used to explore the specific example of a hollow-fibre membrane bioreactor for tissue engineering applications - here membrane fouling and cell population expansion mean that the effective membrane permeability is intrinsically coupled to both fluid flow and nutrient transport. We conclude by presenting design considerations that promote spatially uniform cell population growth.

  6. Solute Transport in Hemodialysis: Advances and Limitations of Current Membrane Technology.

    PubMed

    Clark, William R; Gao, Dayong; Neri, Mauro; Ronco, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Extracorporeal therapy for end-stage renal disease is now provided to more than three million patients globally. Nearly all treatments are performed with filters containing hollow fiber membranes, removing solutes and water by diffusion, convection, and ultrafiltration. In this review, we will provide a detailed quantitative analysis of the transport processes involved in different hemodialysis (HD) therapies. We will also report some technical aspects of hollow fiber membranes and filters composed of them along with the mechanisms of solute and water removal for such devices. Diffusive mass transfer will be assessed according to the three major aspects of a hollow fiber filter (blood compartment, membrane, and dialysate compartment). With regard to convective transport, the importance of internal filtration as a solute removal mechanism in high-flux HD will be highlighted, along with the critical role that blood/membrane interactions assume in filtration-based therapies. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Thermodynamics of Irreversible Processes Applied to Solute Transport in Non Saturated Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu-Balster, I.; Sicard, J.

    1999-09-01

    Modeling of solute transport in non-saturated and non-isothermal porous media is dealt with by thermodynamics of irreversible processes. This rigorous approach enables us to consider the different kinds of transfer and the coupling. Every physical phenomenon as water phase transition and solute adsorption by the solid matrix can be taken into account. The final model may be applied to several fields such as civil engineering, agronomy, pollution and the assessment of radioactive waste repositories. A numerical modeling taking into account the effect of temperature gradient on solute transport (“Soret effect”) is in the process of implementation in the French software “CESAR-LCPC” of the “Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussées”.

  8. Testing a method-of-characteristics model of three-dimensional solute transport in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goode, Daniel J.; Konikow, Leonard F.; ,

    1991-01-01

    A new three-dimensional model of solute transport in groundwater that is based on a widely used two-dimensional method of characteristics model and is coupled to a modular finite-difference flow model is under development. The model's accuracy for ideal aquifers having homogeneous properties, uniform boundary conditions, and steady flow along a grid direction is demonstrated by comparison with conventional analytical solutions. The effect of spatially and temporally variable flow velocities is investigated by comparison with special analytical solutions. To test the performance of the model for typical hydrogeologic conditions, we compare results with those from other models as well as with results from the same model using smaller grid spacings and time steps. This model generally provides accurate results for realistic simulations, and is particularly efficient for advection-dominated transport.

  9. Temperature and solute-transport simulation in streamflow using a Lagrangian reference frame

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.

    1980-01-01

    A computer program for simulating one-dimensional, unsteady temperature and solute transport in a river has been developed and documented for general use. The solution approach to the convective-diffusion equation uses a moving reference frame (Lagrangian) which greatly simplifies the mathematics of the solution procedure and dramatically reduces errors caused by numerical dispersion. The model documentation is presented as a series of four programs of increasing complexity. The conservative transport model can be used to route a single conservative substance. The simplified temperature model is used to predict water temperature in rivers when only temperature and windspeed data are available. The complete temperature model is highly accurate but requires rather complete meteorological data. Finally, the 10-parameter model can be used to route as many as 10 interacting constituents through a river reach. (USGS)

  10. Percolation theory for solute transport in porous media: Geochemistry, geomorphology, and carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Allen G.; Ghanbarian, Behzad

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the time-dependent scaling of chemical weathering has been a significant research goal for over a decade. A percolation theoretical treatment of nonreactive solute transport that was previously shown compatible with the scaling of chemical weathering rates is here shown to be compatible with soil formation rates, and with C and N sequestration rates in the soil as well. In this theoretical framework, the percolation backbone fractal dimensionality, which generates the long-time tail of the solute arrival time distribution, also predicts the scaling of the reaction rates, while laboratory proportionality to the fluid flow velocity translates to an analogous relevance of the vertical infiltration rate in the field. The predicted proportionality of solute transport to net infiltration generates simultaneously the variability in soil formation rates across 4 orders of magnitude of precipitation and 12 orders of magnitude of time scales.

  11. Bovine and porcine transscleral solute transport: influence of lipophilicity and the Choroid-Bruch's layer.

    PubMed

    Cheruvu, Narayan P S; Kompella, Uday B

    2006-10-01

    To determine the influence of the choroid-Bruch's layer and solute lipophilicity on in vitro transscleral drug permeability in bovine and porcine eyes. The in vitro permeability of two VEGF inhibitory drugs, budesonide and celecoxib, which are lipophilic and neutral at physiologic pH, and of three marker solutes, 3H-mannitol (hydrophilic, neutral), sodium fluorescein (hydrophilic, anionic), and rhodamine 6G (lipophilic, cationic), were determined across freshly excised scleras, with or without the underlying choroid-Bruch's layer. Select studies were performed using porcine sclera with and without choroid-Bruch's layer. Neural retina was removed by exposure of the eyecup to isotonic buffer and wherever required, the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) layer of the preparation was disrupted and removed by exposure to hypertonic buffer. Because of the poor solubility of celecoxib and budesonide, permeability studies were conducted with 5% wt/vol of hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPbetaCD). For other solutes, permeability studies were conducted, with and without HPbetaCD. Partitioning of the solutes into bovine sclera and choroid-Bruch's layer was also determined. The calculated log (distribution coefficient) values were -2.89, -0.68, 2.18, 3.12, and 4.02 for mannitol, sodium fluorescein, budesonide, celecoxib, and rhodamine 6G, respectively. Removal of RPE was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy and differences in the transport of mannitol. The order of the permeability coefficients (Papp) across sclera and sclera-choroid-Bruch's layers in bovine and porcine models was 3H-mannitol > fluorescein > budesonide > celecoxib > rhodamine 6G, with HPbetaCD, and 3H-mannitol > fluorescein > rhodamine 6G, without HPbetaCD. The presence of choroid-Bruch's layer reduced the bovine scleral permeability by 2-, 8-, 16-, 36-, and 50-fold and porcine tissue permeability by 2-, 7-, 15-, 33-, and 40-fold, respectively, for mannitol, sodium fluorescein, budesonide, celecoxib

  12. Analytical solution and simplified analysis of coupled parent-daughter steady-state transport with multirate mass transfer

    Treesearch

    R. Haggerty

    2013-01-01

    In this technical note, a steady-state analytical solution of concentrations of a parent solute reacting to a daughter solute, both of which are undergoing transport and multirate mass transfer, is presented. Although the governing equations are complicated, the resulting solution can be expressed in simple terms. A function of the ratio of concentrations, In (daughter...

  13. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model.

    PubMed

    Vaquer, Sergi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Rabadán, Arnau; González, Albert; Fenollosa, Felip; de la Torre, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay (®) (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary) was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG) transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP) during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology opens new and

  14. Active transmembrane drug transport in microgravity: a validation study using an ABC transporter model

    PubMed Central

    Vaquer, Sergi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Rabadán, Arnau; González, Albert; Fenollosa, Felip; de la Torre, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to influence the expression of ABC (ATP-Binding Cassette) transporters in bacteria, fungi and mammals, but also to modify the activity of certain cellular components with structural and functional similarities to ABC transporters. Changes in activity of ABC transporters could lead to important metabolic disorders and undesired pharmacological effects during spaceflights. However, no current means exist to study the functionality of these transporters in microgravity. To this end, a Vesicular Transport Assay ® (Solvo Biotechnology, Hungary) was adapted to evaluate multi-drug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2) trans-membrane estradiol-17-β-glucuronide (E17βG) transport activity, when activated by adenosine-tri-phosphate (ATP) during parabolic flights. Simple diffusion, ATP-independent transport and benzbromarone inhibition were also evaluated. A high accuracy engineering system was designed to perform, monitor and synchronize all procedures. Samples were analysed using a validated high sensitivity drug detection protocol. Experiments were performed in microgravity during parabolic flights, and compared to 1g on ground results using identical equipment and procedures in all cases. Our results revealed that sufficient equipment accuracy and analytical sensitivity were reached to detect transport activity in both gravitational conditions. Additionally, transport activity levels of on ground samples were within commercial transport standards, proving the validity of the methods and equipment used. MRP2 net transport activity was significantly reduced in microgravity, so was signal detected in simple diffusion samples. Ultra-structural changes induced by gravitational stress upon vesicle membranes or transporters could explain the current results, although alternative explanations are possible. Further research is needed to provide a conclusive answer in this regard. Nevertheless, the present validated technology opens new and

  15. A three-dimensional method-of-characteristics solute-transport model (MOC3D)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Goode, D.J.; Hornberger, G.Z.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents a model, MOC3D, that simulates three-dimensional solute transport in flowing ground water. The model computes changes in concentration of a single dissolved chemical constituent over time that are caused by advective transport, hydrodynamic dispersion (including both mechanical dispersion and diffusion), mixing (or dilution) from fluid sources, and mathematically simple chemical reactions (including linear sorption, which is represented by a retardation factor, and decay). The transport model is integrated with MODFLOW, a three-dimensional ground-water flow model that uses implicit finite-difference methods to solve the transient flow equation. MOC3D uses the method of characteristics to solve the transport equation on the basis of the hydraulic gradients computed with MODFLOW for a given time step. This implementation of the method of characteristics uses particle tracking to represent advective transport and explicit finite-difference methods to calculate the effects of other processes. However, the explicit procedure has several stability criteria that may limit the size of time increments for solving the transport equation; these are automatically determined by the program. For improved efficiency, the user can apply MOC3D to a subgrid of the primary MODFLOW grid that is used to solve the flow equation. However, the transport subgrid must have uniform grid spacing along rows and columns. The report includes a description of the theoretical basis of the model, a detailed description of input requirements and output options, and the results of model testing and evaluation. The model was evaluated for several problems for which exact analytical solutions are available and by benchmarking against other numerical codes for selected complex problems for which no exact solutions are available. These test results indicate that the model is very accurate for a wide range of conditions and yields minimal numerical dispersion for advection

  16. Mathematical modelling of the transport of low molecular weight solutes across biological membranes. The transport of Leu, His and Glu into human blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Walkowiak, B; Cierniewski, C S

    1988-10-01

    A model describing the transport of low molecular weight solutes across cell membranes is presented. The model accounts for many different systems which may mediate the fluxes of various solutes, for the effect of Na+ ions, and for time dependence of the processes. It generalizes the classical three-parameter equation for transport. Solutions to the model were employed to interprete experimental data obtained for the uptake of DL-leu, L-his and L-glu by human blood platelets.

  17. Isotherm-Based Thermodynamic Model for Solute Activities of Asymmetric Electrolyte Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Lucy; Dutcher, Cari S

    2017-08-04

    Adsorption isotherm-based statistical thermodynamic models can be used to determine solute concentration and solute and solvent activities in aqueous solutions. Recently, the number of adjustable parameters in the isotherm model of Dutcher et al. J. Phys. Chem. A/C 2011, 2012, 2013 were reduced for neutral solutes as well as symmetric 1:1 electrolytes by using a Coulombic model to describe the solute - solvent energy interactions (Ohm et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2015, Nandy et al. J. Phys. Chem. A 2016). Here, the Coulombic treatment for symmetric electrolytes is extended to establish improved isotherm model equations for asymmetric 1-2 and 1-3 electrolyte systems. The Coulombic model developed here results in prediction of activities and other thermodynamic properties in multicomponent systems containing ions of arbitrary charge. The model is found to accurately calculate osmotic coefficient over the entire solute concentration range with two model parameters, related to intermolecular solute-solute and solute-solvent spacing. The inorganic salts and acids treated here are generally considered to be fully dissociated. However, there are certain weak acids that do not dissociate completely, such as the bisulfate ion. In this work, partial dissociation of the bisulfate ion from sulfuric acid is treated as a mixture, with an additional model parameter which accounts for dissociation ratio of the dissociated ions to non-dissociated ions.

  18. Pedelecs as a physically active transportation mode.

    PubMed

    Peterman, James E; Morris, Kalee L; Kram, Rodger; Byrnes, William C

    2016-08-01

    Pedelecs are bicycles that provide electric assistance only when a rider is pedaling and have become increasingly popular. Our purpose was to quantify usage patterns over 4 weeks of real-world commuting with a pedelec and to determine if pedelec use would improve cardiometabolic risk factors. Twenty sedentary commuters visited the laboratory for baseline physiological measurements [body composition, maximum oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), blood lipid profile, and 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)]. The following 4 weeks, participants were instructed to commute using a pedelec at least 3 days week(-1) for 40 min day(-1) while wearing a heart rate monitor and a GPS device. Metabolic equivalents (METS) were estimated from heart rate data. Following the intervention, we repeated the physiological measurements. Average total distance and time were 317.9 ± 113.8 km and 15.9 ± 3.4 h, respectively. Participants averaged 4.9 ± 1.2 METS when riding. Four weeks of pedelec commuting significantly improved 2-h post-OGTT glucose (5.53 ± 1.18-5.03 ± 0.91 mmol L(-1), p < 0.05), [Formula: see text] (2.21 ± 0.48-2.39 ± 0.52 L min(-1), p < 0.05), and end of [Formula: see text] test power output (165.1 ± 37.1-189.3 ± 38.2 W, p < 0.05). There were trends for improvements in MAP (84.6 ± 10.5-83.2 ± 9.4 mmHg, p = 0.15) and fat mass (28.6 ± 11.3-28.2 ± 11.4 kg, p = 0.07). Participants rode a pedelec in the real world at a self-selected moderate intensity, which helped them meet physical activity recommendations. Pedelec commuting also resulted in significant improvements in 2-h post-OGTT glucose, [Formula: see text], and power output. Pedelecs are an effective form of active transportation that can improve some cardiometabolic risk factors within only 4 weeks.

  19. Active transport of calcium in Neurospora plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Stroobant, P; Scarborough, G A

    1979-01-01

    Functionally inverted plasma membrane vesicles isolated from the eukaryotic microorganism Neurospora crassa catalyze Mg2+/ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake. Inhibitors induced efflux studies and isotope-exchange experiments indicate that the Ca2+ is accumulated inside the vesicles against a concentration gradient of about 40-fold, and that the majority of the transported Ca2+ is present essentially in free solution. Comparisons of Mg2+/ATP-driven 45Ca2+ uptake and [14C]SCN-uptake with respect to the Mg2+/ATP concentration dependence, the effects of inhibitors, and the nucleotide and divalent cation specificities indicate that the energy for Ca2+ accumulation is derived from ATP hydrolysis catalyzed by the electrogenic plasma membrane ATPase. Energized Ca2+ uptake is stimulated by the permeant anion SCN- to a degree that varies reciprocally with the ability of this anion to dissipate the membrane potential, and is inhibited by K+ in the presence of nigericin. All of these data point to the conclusion that the active transport of Ca2+ across the Neurospora plasma membrane takes place via a Ca2+/H+ antiporter, which functions to pump Ca2+ out of the intact cell. PMID:40223

  20. Overlapping local/global iteration framework for whole-core transport solution

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, N. Z.; Yuk, S.; Yoo, H. J.; Yun, S.

    2012-07-01

    In current practice of reactor design analysis, whole-core diffusion nodal method is used in which nodal parameters are provided by single-assembly lattice physics calculation with net current zero boundary condition. Thus, the whole-core solution is not transport, because the inter-assembly transport effect is not incorporated. In this paper, the overlapping local/global iteration framework is described that removes the limitation of the current method. It consists of two-level iterative computations: half-node overlapping local problems embedded in a global problem. The local problem can employ fine-group deterministic or continuous-energy stochastic (Monte Carlo) transport methods, while the global problem is an equivalent coarse-group transport model based on p-CMFD methodology. The method is tested on several highly heterogeneous multi-slab problems with encouraging results. (authors)

  1. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  2. Transporting Radioactive Waste: An Engineering Activity. Grades 5-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAZWRAP, The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program.

    This brochure contains an engineering activity for upper elementary, middle school, and high school students that examines the transportation of radioactive waste. The activity is designed to inform students about the existence of radioactive waste and its transportation to disposal sites. Students experiment with methods to contain the waste and…

  3. Control and optimization of solute transport in a thin porous tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, I. M.; Howell, P. D.; Shipley, R. J.

    2013-03-01

    Predicting the distribution of solutes or particles in flows within porous-walled tubes is essential to inform the design of devices that rely on cross-flow filtration, such as those used in water purification, irrigation devices, field-flow fractionation, and hollow-fibre bioreactors for tissue-engineering applications. Motivated by these applications, a radially averaged model for fluid and solute transport in a tube with thin porous walls is derived by developing the classical ideas of Taylor dispersion. The model includes solute diffusion and advection via both radial and axial flow components, and the advection, diffusion, and uptake coefficients in the averaged equation are explicitly derived. The effect of wall permeability, slip, and pressure differentials upon the dispersive solute behaviour are investigated. The model is used to explore the control of solute transport across the membrane walls via the membrane permeability, and a parametric expression for the permeability required to generate a given solute distribution is derived. The theory is applied to the specific example of a hollow-fibre membrane bioreactor, where a uniform delivery of nutrient across the membrane walls to the extra-capillary space is required to promote spatially uniform cell growth.

  4. Subsurface solute transport with one-, two-, and three-dimensional arbitrary shape sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kewei; Zhan, Hongbin; Zhou, Renjie

    2016-07-01

    Solutions with one-, two-, and three-dimensional arbitrary shape source geometries will be very helpful tools for investigating a variety of contaminant transport problems in the geological media. This study proposed a general method to develop new solutions for solute transport in a saturated, homogeneous aquifer (confined or unconfined) with a constant, unilateral groundwater flow velocity. Several typical source geometries, such as arbitrary line sources, vertical and horizontal patch sources, circular and volumetric sources, were considered. The sources can sit on the upper or lower aquifer boundary to simulate light non-aqueous-phase-liquids (LNAPLs) or dense non-aqueous-phase-liquids (DNAPLs), respectively, or can be located anywhere inside the aquifer. The developed new solutions were tested against previous benchmark solutions under special circumstances and were shown to be robust and accurate. Such solutions can also be used as a starting point for the inverse problem of source zone and source geometry identification in the future. The following findings can be obtained from analyzing the solutions. The source geometry, including shape and orientation, generally played an important role for the concentration profile through the entire transport process. When comparing the inclined line sources with the horizontal line sources, the concentration contours expanded considerably along the vertical direction, and shrank considerably along the groundwater flow direction. A planar source sitting on the upper aquifer boundary (such as a LNAPL pool) would lead to significantly different concentration profiles compared to a planar source positioned in a vertical plane perpendicular to the flow direction. For a volumetric source, its dimension along the groundwater flow direction became less important compared to its other two dimensions.

  5. Laboratory experiments on solute transport in bimodal porous media under cyclic precipitation-evaporation boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Flow and solute transport in the shallow subsurface is strongly governed by atmospheric boundary conditions. Erratically varying infiltration and evaporation cycles lead to alternating upward and downward flow, as well as spatially and temporally varying water contents and associated hydraulic conductivity of the prevailing materials. Thus presenting a highly complicated, dynamic system. Knowledge of subsurface solute transport processes is vital to assess e.g. the entry of, potentially hazardous, solutes to the groundwater and nutrient uptake by plant roots and can be gained in many ways. Besides field measurements and numerical simulations, physical laboratory experiments represent a way to establish process understanding and furthermore validate numerical schemes. With the aim to gain a better understanding and to quantify solute transport in the unsaturated shallow subsurface under natural precipitation conditions in heterogeneous media, we conduct physical laboratory experiments in a 22 cm x 8 cm x 1 cm flow cell that is filled with two types of sand and apply cyclic infiltration-evaporation phases at the soil surface. Pressure at the bottom of the domain is kept constant. Following recent studies (Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al., 2011a), heterogeneity is introduced by a sharp vertical interface between coarse and fine sand. Fluorescent tracers are used to i) qualitatively visualize transport paths within the domain and ii) quantify solute leaching at the bottom of the domain. Temporal and spatial variations in water content during the experiment are derived from x-ray radiographic images. Monitored water contents between infiltration and evaporation considerably changed in the coarse sand while the fine sand remained saturated throughout the experiments. Lateral solute transport through the interface in both directions at different depths of the investigated soil columns were observed. This depended on the flow rate applied at the soil surface and

  6. Solute washout experiments for characterizing mass transport in hollow fiber immunoisolation membranes.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R F; López, M; Stephens, C L; Vélez, G M; Ramírez, C A; Zydney, A L

    1998-01-01

    The transport characteristics of immunoisolation membranes can have a critical effect on the design of hybrid artificial organs and cell therapies. However, it has been difficult to quantitatively evaluate the desired transport properties of different hollow fiber membranes due to bulk mass transfer limitations in the fiber lumen and annular space. An attractive alternative to existing methodologies is to use the rate of solute removal or "washout" from the annular space during constant flow perfusion through the fiber lumen. Experimental washout curves were obtained for glucose and a 10 kD dextran in two different hollow fiber devices. Data were analyzed using a theoretical model which accounts for convective and diffusive transport in the lumen, membrane, and annular space. The model was in good agreement with the experimental results and provided an accurate measure of the effective membrane diffusion coefficient for both small and large solutes. This approach should prove useful in theoretical analyses of solute transport and performance of hollow fiber artificial organs.

  7. The adjoint neutron transport equation and the statistical approach for its solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracco, P.; Dulla, S.; Ravetto, P.

    2016-11-01

    The adjoint equation was introduced in the early days of neutron transport and its solution, the neutron importance, has been used for several applications in neutronics. The work presents at first a critical review of the adjoint neutron transport equation. Afterwards, the adjont model is constructed for a reference physical situation, for which an analytical approach is viable, i.e. an infinite homogeneous scattering medium. This problem leads to an equation that is the adjoint of the slowing-down equation, which is well known in nuclear reactor physics. A general closed-form analytical solution to such adjoint equation is obtained by a procedure that can be used also to derive the classical Placzek functions. This solution constitutes a benchmark for any statistical or numerical approach to the adjoint equation. A sampling technique to evaluate the adjoint flux for the transport equation is then proposed and physically interpreted as a transport model for pseudo-particles. This can be done by introducing appropriate kernels describing the transfer of the pseudo-particles in the phase space. This technique allows estimating the importance function by a standard Monte Carlo approach. The sampling scheme is validated by comparison with the analytical results previously obtained.

  8. Solute transport on the sub 100 ms scale across the lipid bilayer membrane of individual proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Gabriel; Tabaei, Seyed R; Beech, Jason; Kvassman, Jan; Johanson, Urban; Kjellbom, Per; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Höök, Fredrik

    2012-11-21

    Screening assays designed to probe ligand and drug-candidate regulation of membrane proteins responsible for ion-translocation across the cell membrane are wide spread, while efficient means to screen membrane-protein facilitated transport of uncharged solutes are sparse. We report on a microfluidic-based system to monitor transport of uncharged solutes across the membrane of multiple (>100) individually resolved surface-immobilized liposomes. This was accomplished by rapidly switching (<10 ms) the solution above dye-containing liposomes immobilized on the floor of a microfluidic channel. With liposomes encapsulating the pH-sensitive dye carboxyfluorescein (CF), internal changes in pH induced by transport of a weak acid (acetic acid) could be measured at time scales down to 25 ms. The applicability of the set up to study biological transport reactions was demonstrated by examining the osmotic water permeability of human aquaporin (AQP5) reconstituted in proteoliposomes. In this case, the rate of osmotic-induced volume changes of individual proteoliposomes was time resolved by imaging the self quenching of encapsulated calcein in response to an osmotic gradient. Single-liposome analysis of both pure and AQP5-containing liposomes revealed a relatively large heterogeneity in osmotic permeability. Still, in the case of AQP5-containing liposomes, the single liposome data suggest that the membrane-protein incorporation efficiency depends on liposome size, with higher incorporation efficiency for larger liposomes. The benefit of low sample consumption and automated liquid handling is discussed in terms of pharmaceutical screening applications.

  9. Sediment and solute transport in a mountainous watershed in Valle del Cauca, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, C. D.; Castro, A.; Morales, A.; Hoyos, F.; Moreno, P.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2014-12-01

    A main goal of this study was to improve prediction of sediment and solute transport using soil surface and soil nutrient changes, based on field measurements, within small watersheds receiving conservation measures. Sediment samples and solute concentrations were measured from two streams in the southwestern region of the Colombian Andes. Two modeling approaches for stream discharge and sediment transport predicted were used with one of these being used for nutrient transport prediction. These streams are a part of a recent initiative from a water fund established by Asobolo, Asocaña, and Cenicaña in collaboration with the Natural Capital Project to improve conservation efforts and monitor their effects. On-site soil depth changes, groundwater depth measurements, and soil nutrient concentrations were also monitored to provide more information about changes within this mountainous watershed during one part of the yearly rainy season. This information is being coupled closely with the outlet sediment concentration and solute concentration patterns to discern correlations. Lateral transects in the upper, middle, and lower part of the hillsides in the Aguaclara watershed of the Rio Bolo watershed network showed differences in soil nutrient status and soil surface depth changes. The model based on semi-distributed hydrology was able to reproduce discharge and sediment transport rates as well as the initially used model indicating available options for comparison of conservation changes in the future.

  10. Numerical Investigations of Vadose Zone Transport of Saturated Sodium Thiosulfate Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. D.; Ward, A. L.

    2001-12-01

    Compared with water, hypersaline liquid wastes ([NaNO3] > 10 N) from the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) process at the Hanford site have elevated viscosity (μ > 1.2 cP), density (ρ > 1.4 gm/cm3), and surface tension (σ > 100 dyn/cm). Such liquids have infiltrated into the vadose zone at Hanford from leaking underground storage tanks. The migration behavior of saturated or hypersaline salt solutions through unsaturated soils is largely unknown. Laboratory tests with tank-waste simulants suggest that the elevated density, viscosity, and surface tension properties of these liquids can influence the wetting front behavior, altering its shape and migration rate. Conditions under which these mechanisms are active in the field and the extent to which they contribute to transport through the vadose zone are largely unknown, making it impossible to accurately predict the post-leak distribution of these fluids in the field. To investigate the effects of fluid properties on subsurface migration of hypersaline saline solutions, numerical simulations were conducted of a field-scale, tank-leak experiment. The field experiments consisted of five 4000-L injections, at a depth of 5 m, of saturated sodium thiosulfate brine (used as a surrogate for REDOX type wastes) over a 5-week period, followed by three 4000-L injections of Columbia River water. Pre-test modeling of river water injections at this Hanford field site predicted significant lateral spreading of the moisture plume and were confirmed by geophysical logging. A series of three-dimensional, multifluid (i.e., aqueous and gas phases) numerical simulations were conducted that systematically considered the effects of elevated density, viscosity, and surface tension, and reduced vapor pressure on vadose-zone transport. Hydrologic properties were determined from cores collected at the field site and calibrated using river-water injection experiments. Isothermal conditions were assumed for the simulations, however, the effects of

  11. Low band gap polymeric solar cells using solution-processable copper iodide as hole transporting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Neeraj; Kesari, J. P.; Chaudhary, Rajiv; Patra, Asit

    2016-08-01

    In the present work, we have shown the performance of solution-processable copper iodide (CuI) as an alternative hole transporting layer (HTL) for polymeric solar cells. Optical spectra of the CuI thin film reveal highly transparent and practically no absorption in the range vis-NIR region (450-1110 nm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of CuI exhibits as a p-type semiconductor as well as crystalline nature. The photovoltaic devices were fabricated using PCDTBT and PTB7 as donor materials blended with PC71BM as an acceptor material. The power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) based on CuI as an HTL have been achieved to up to 3.04% and 4.48% for PCDTBT and PTB7 based donor materials respectively with a configuration based on ITO/CuI(40 nm)/active layer (60 nm)/Al (120 nm). This study clearly indicated that the devices made with CuI as an HTL showed superior performance than the device fabricated from PEDOT:PSS layer as an HTL. Morphological characterization of the HTL using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were carried for better understanding.

  12. Body shaping under water stress: osmosensing and osmoregulation of solute transport in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Morbach, Susanne; Krämer, Reinhard

    2002-05-03

    Fluctuation of external osmolarity is one of the most common types of environmental stress factors for all kind of cells, both of prokaryotic and of eukaryotic origin. Cells try to keep their volume and/or turgor pressure constant; consequently, both a decrease (hypoosmotic stress) and an increase (hyperosmotic stress) of the solute concentration (correctly: increase or decrease in water activity) in the surrounding area, respectively, are challenges for cellular metabolism and survival. A common example from the prokaryotic world is the fate of a soil bacterium that, after a sunny day has dried out the soil (hyperosmotic stress), is suddenly exposed to a drop of distilled water from a rain cloud (hypoosmotic stress). The immediate and inevitable passive response to the sudden osmotic shift in the surroundings is fast water efflux out of the cell in the former situation and water influx in the latter. In the worst case, these responses may lead to either loss of cell turgor and plasmolysis or to cell burst. In order to overcome such drastic consequences cells have developed effective mechanisms, namely osmoadaptation, to cope with the two different types of osmotic stress. For a graded reaction to osmotic shifts, cells must be able (1) to sense stimuli related to osmotic stress, (2) to transduce corresponding signals to those systems that properly respond (3) by activating transport or enzymatic functions or (4) by changing gene expression profiles. In this review, membrane proteins involved in the cell's active response to osmotic stress are described. Molecular details of structure, function, and regulation of mechanosensitive efflux channels from various organisms, as well as of osmoregulated uptake systems are discussed.

  13. A semi-analytical solution for simulating contaminant transport subject to chain-decay reactions.

    PubMed

    Sudicky, Edward A; Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Illman, Walter A; Wu, Yu-Shu; Kool, Jan B; Huyakorn, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of new, semi-analytical solutions to simulate three-dimensional contaminant transport subject to first-order chain-decay reactions. The aquifer is assumed to be areally semi-infinite, but finite in thickness. The analytical solution can treat the transformation of contaminants into daughter products, leading to decay chains consisting of multiple contaminant species and various reaction pathways. The solution in its current form is capable of accounting for up to seven species and four decay levels. The complex pathways are represented by means of first-order decay and production terms, while branching ratios account for decay stoichiometry. Besides advection, dispersion, bio-chemical or radioactive decay and daughter product formation, the model also accounts for sorption of contaminants on the aquifer solid phase with each species having a different retardation factor. First-type contaminant boundary conditions are utilized at the source (x=0 m) and can be either constant-in-time for each species, or the concentration can be allowed to undergo first-order decay. The solutions are obtained by exponential Fourier, Fourier cosine and Laplace transforms. Limiting forms of the solutions can be obtained in closed form, but we evaluate the general solutions by numerically inverting the analytical solutions in exponential Fourier and Laplace transform spaces. Various cases are generated and the solutions are verified against the HydroGeoSphere numerical model.

  14. Unsteady solute-transport simulation in streamflow using a finite-difference model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Land, Larry F.

    1978-01-01

    This report documents a rather simple, general purpose, one-dimensional, one-parameter, mass-transport model for field use. The model assumes a well-mixed conservative solute that may be coming from an unsteady source and is moving in unsteady streamflow. The quantity of solute being transported is in the units of concentration. Results are reported as such. An implicit finite-difference technique is used to solve the mass transport equation. It consists of creating a tridiagonal matrix and using the Thomas algorithm to solve the matrix for the unknown concentrations at the new time step. The computer program pesented is designed to compute the concentration of a water-quality constituent at any point and at any preselected time in a one-dimensional stream. The model is driven by the inflowing concentration of solute at the upstream boundary and is influenced by the solute entering the stream from tributaries and lateral ground-water inflow and from a source or sink. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Controlling Solute Transport Processes in Soils by using Dual-Porosity Characteristics of Natural Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Y.; Higashi, N.

    2009-12-01

    Soils are notorious for their heterogeneity, and macropores conduct solutions by bypassing the surrounding soils, sometimes wasting the applied fertilizer or remediation chemicals. It would be beneficial in agriculture or environmental engineering fields if solute transport in soils were controlled with relatively simple techniques. In this study, the solute transport process was controlled using dual-characteristics of the soil pore system. Specifically convection and dispersion were controlled by changing the structure-dependent flow regime. Soil samples with/without artificial small macropores (diameter = 1mm) and undisturbed soil samples were prepared, and solute transport experiments were conducted, in which a variety of breakthrough curves (BTC) was obtained by changing flow rate (from 1 to 0.1 of saturated conductivity) and saturation (saturation to -3kPa). The results for the artificial macropore system showed that completely different BTCs were obtained with small suction differences, namely saturation and -3kPa. At saturation, the BTC showed a bi-modal distribution typical for soils with macropores. At a slightly unsaturated condition of -3kPa, however, the BTC showed a normal distribution quite similar to that of a repacked soil column. The results for undisturbed soil showed that the BTC gradually transitioned from a bi-modal to normal distribution, with the suction changing from saturation to only -3kPa. These results suggest that effective use of fertilizer or remediation chemicals are possible with a relatively simple and inexpensive technique, even when macropore networks are present.

  16. Hydrodynamics of steady state phloem transport with radial leakage of solute

    PubMed Central

    Cabrita, Paulo; Thorpe, Michael; Huber, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Long-distance phloem transport occurs under a pressure gradient generated by the osmotic exchange of water associated with solute exchange in source and sink regions. But these exchanges also occur along the pathway, and yet their physiological role has almost been ignored in mathematical models of phloem transport. Here we present a steady state model for transport phloem which allows solute leakage, based on the Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations which describe fluid motion rigorously. Sieve tube membrane permeability Ps for passive solute exchange (and correspondingly, membrane reflection coefficient) influenced model results strongly, and had to lie in the bottom range of the values reported for plant cells for the results to be realistic. This smaller permeability reflects the efficient specialization of sieve tube elements, minimizing any diffusive solute loss favored by the large concentration difference across the sieve tube membrane. We also found there can be a specific reflection coefficient for which pressure profiles and sap velocities can both be similar to those predicted by the Hagen-Poiseuille equation for a completely impermeable tube. PMID:24409189

  17. Change in active transportation and weight gain in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Skreden, Marianne; Øverby, Nina C; Sagedal, Linda R; Vistad, Ingvild; Torstveit, Monica K; Lohne-Seiler, Hilde; Bere, Elling

    2016-01-27

    Pregnancy is characterised by large weight gain over a short period, and often a notable change in mode of transportation. This makes pregnancy suitable for examining the plausible, but in the scientific literature still unclear, association between active transportation and weight gain. We hypothesize that women continuing an active mode of transportation to work or school from pre- to early pregnancy will have a lower gestational weight gain (GWG) than those who change to a less active mode of transportation. We analysed prospective data from the Norwegian Fit for Delivery (NFFD) trial. Between September 2009 and February 2013 606 women were consecutively enrolled in median gestational week 16 (range; 8-20). Of 219 women who used an active mode of transportation (biking, walking, public transportation) pre-pregnancy, 66 (30%) converted to a less active mode in early pregnancy ("active-less active" group), and 153 (70%) continued with active transportation ("active-active" group). Pre-pregnancy weight was self-reported. Weight at gestational (GA) weeks 16, 30, 36, and at term delivery was objectively measured. Weight gain was compared between the two groups. Linear mixed effects analysis of the repeated weight measures was performed including the group*time interaction. A significant overall group effect was observed for the four time points together ("active-active" group: 77.3 kg vs. "active-less active" group: 78.8 kg, p = 0.008). The interaction term group*time was significant indicating different weight gain throughout pregnancy for the two groups; the mean differences between the groups were 0.7 kg at week 16, 1.4 kg at week 30, 2.1 kg at week 36, and 2.2 kg at term delivery, respectively. The findings indicate that active transportation is one possible approach to prevent excessive weight gain in pregnancy.

  18. Reactive solute transport in a filled single fracture-matrix system under unilateral and radial flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Renjie; Zhan, Hongbin; Chen, Kewei

    2017-06-01

    The study of transport processes in a single fracture is the basis of understanding transport in complex fractured networks. Many single fractures in the field are filled with sediments, and the transport in such filled single fractures has received much less attention up to present. When the fracture is partially filled with sediments, a mobile-immobile approach is considered necessary. This study deals with a coupled three-domain transport problem using mobile and immobile domains to characterize a filled single fracture and a matrix domain to characterize the rock body. Mathematical models are developed for such a coupled three-domain transport problem with new semi-analytical solutions to analyze the spatial-temporal concentration and mass distributions in the fracture and rock matrix with the help of Laplace transforms. This study addresses transport in a filled fracture-matrix system under two different flow conditions: unilateral flow, and radial flow. The new solutions have been tested extensively against previous solutions under various special settings and are proven to be robust and accurate. This study has the following findings: 1) Longitudinal dispersion in the fracture often plays an important role in such a coupled system in unilateral flow, 2) Mass partitions in three domains follow similar patterns in respect to the influence of fracture apertures, mobile/immobile ratios, and first-order mass transfer rates, 3) The system is most sensitive to the dispersivity and least sensitive to the first-order mass transfer rate and the mobile/immobile ratio in the unilateral flow model over a wide range of time scales (if the longitudinal dispersivity and Darcian flow velocity remain constant), 4) The system is most sensitive to the dispersivity, less sensitive to the mobile/immobile ratio, and least sensitive to the first-order mass transfer rate in the radial flow model (if the radial dispersivity and injection rate remain constant).

  19. CFEST Coupled Flow, Energy & Solute Transport Version CFEST005 User’s Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Yousu; Gilca, Alex; Cole, Charles R.; Gupta, Sumant K.

    2006-07-20

    The CFEST (Coupled Flow, Energy, and Solute Transport) simulator described in this User’s Guide is a three-dimensional finite-element model used to evaluate groundwater flow and solute mass transport. Confined and unconfined aquifer systems, as well as constant and variable density fluid flows can be represented with CFEST. For unconfined aquifers, the model uses a moving boundary for the water table, deforming the numerical mesh so that the uppermost nodes are always at the water table. For solute transport, changes in concentra¬tion of a single dissolved chemical constituent are computed for advective and hydrodynamic transport, linear sorption represented by a retardation factor, and radioactive decay. Although several thermal parameters described in this User’s Guide are required inputs, thermal transport has not yet been fully implemented in the simulator. Once fully implemented, transport of thermal energy in the groundwater and solid matrix of the aquifer can also be used to model aquifer thermal regimes. The CFEST simulator is written in the FORTRAN 77 language, following American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. Execution of the CFEST simulator is controlled through three required text input files. These input file use a structured format of associated groups of input data. Example input data lines are presented for each file type, as well as a description of the structured FORTRAN data format. Detailed descriptions of all input requirements, output options, and program structure and execution are provided in this User’s Guide. Required inputs for auxillary CFEST utilities that aide in post-processing data are also described. Global variables are defined for those with access to the source code. Although CFEST is a proprietary code (CFEST, Inc., Irvine, CA), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory retains permission to maintain its own source, and to distribute executables to Hanford subcontractors.

  20. Mathematical Model Formulation And Validation Of Water And Solute Transport In Whole Hamster Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Charles T.; Critser, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of cryopreservation protocols for cells and tissues requires accurate models of heat and mass transport. Model selection often depends on the configuration of the tissue. Here, a mathematical and conceptual model of water and solute transport for whole hamster pancreatic islets has been developed and experimentally validated incorporating fundamental biophysical data from previous studies on individual hamster islet cells while retaining whole-islet structural information. It describes coupled transport of water and solutes through the islet by three methods: intracellularly, intercellularly, and in combination. In particular we use domain decomposition techniques to couple a transmembrane flux model with an interstitial mass transfer model. The only significant undetermined variable is the cellular surface area which is in contact with the intercellularly transported solutes, Ais. The model was validated and Ais determined using a 3 × 3 factorial experimental design blocked for experimental day. Whole islet physical experiments were compared with model predictions at three temperatures, three perfusing solutions, and three islet size groups. A mean of 4.4 islets were compared at each of the 27 experimental conditions and found to correlate with a coefficient of determination of 0.87 ± 0.06 (mean ± S.D.). Only the treatment variable of perfusing solution was found to be significant (p < 0.05). We have devised a model that retains much of the intrinsic geometric configuration of the system, and thus fewer laboratory experiments are needed to determine model parameters and thus to develop new optimized cryopreservation protocols. Additionally, extensions to ovarian follicles and other concentric tissue structures may be made. PMID:24950195

  1. Numerical study of solute transport in shallow beach aquifers subjected to waves and tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Xiaolong; Boufadel, Michel C.

    2015-02-01

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the fate of solute in a laboratory beach in response to waves and tides. A new temporal upscaling approach labeled "net inflow" was introduced to address impacts of waves on solute transport within beaches. Numerical simulations using a computational fluid dynamic model were used as boundary conditions for the two-dimensional variably saturated flow and solute transport model MARUN. The modeling approach was validated against experimental data of solute transport due to waves and tides. Exchange fluxes across the beach face and subsurface solute transport (e.g., trajectory, movement speed, and residence time) were quantified. Simulation results revealed that waves increased the exchange fluxes, and engendered a wider exchange flux zone along the beach surface. Compared to tide-only forcing, waves superimposed on tide caused the plume to be deeper into the beach, and to migrate more seaward. The infiltration into the beach was found to be directly proportional to the general hydraulic gradient in the beach and inversely proportional to the matrix retention (or capillary) capacity. The simulations showed that a higher inland water table would attenuate wave-caused seawater infiltration, which might impact beach geochemical processes (e.g., nutrient recycle and redox condition), especially at low tide zone. The concept of biochemical residence time maps (BRTM) was introduced to account for the net effect of limiting concentration of chemicals on biochemical reactions. It was found that waves shifted the BRTMs downward and seaward in the beach, and subsequently they engendered different biochemical conditions within the beach.

  2. Mathematical model formulation and validation of water and solute transport in whole hamster pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Benson, James D; Benson, Charles T; Critser, John K

    2014-08-01

    Optimization of cryopreservation protocols for cells and tissues requires accurate models of heat and mass transport. Model selection often depends on the configuration of the tissue. Here, a mathematical and conceptual model of water and solute transport for whole hamster pancreatic islets has been developed and experimentally validated incorporating fundamental biophysical data from previous studies on individual hamster islet cells while retaining whole-islet structural information. It describes coupled transport of water and solutes through the islet by three methods: intracellularly, intercellularly, and in combination. In particular we use domain decomposition techniques to couple a transmembrane flux model with an interstitial mass transfer model. The only significant undetermined variable is the cellular surface area which is in contact with the intercellularly transported solutes, Ais. The model was validated and Ais determined using a 3×3 factorial experimental design blocked for experimental day. Whole islet physical experiments were compared with model predictions at three temperatures, three perfusing solutions, and three islet size groups. A mean of 4.4 islets were compared at each of the 27 experimental conditions and found to correlate with a coefficient of determination of 0.87±0.06 (mean ± SD). Only the treatment variable of perfusing solution was found to be significant (p<0.05). We have devised a model that retains much of the intrinsic geometric configuration of the system, and thus fewer laboratory experiments are needed to determine model parameters and thus to develop new optimized cryopreservation protocols. Additionally, extensions to ovarian follicles and other concentric tissue structures may be made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A comparison of solute-transport solution techniques and their effect on sensitivity analysis and inverse modeling results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mehl, S.; Hill, M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Five common numerical techniques for solving the advection-dispersion equation (finite difference, predictor corrector, total variation diminishing, method of characteristics, and modified method of characteristics) were tested using simulations of a controlled conservative tracer-test experiment through a heterogeneous, two-dimensional sand tank. The experimental facility was constructed using discrete, randomly distributed, homogeneous blocks of five sand types. This experimental model provides an opportunity to compare the solution techniques: the heterogeneous hydraulic-conductivity distribution of known structure can be accurately represented by a numerical model, and detailed measurements can be compared with simulated concentrations and total flow through the tank. The present work uses this opportunity to investigate how three common types of results - simulated breakthrough curves, sensitivity analysis, and calibrated parameter values - change in this heterogeneous situation given the different methods of simulating solute transport. The breakthrough curves show that simulated peak concentrations, even at very fine grid spacings, varied between the techniques because of different amounts of numerical dispersion. Sensitivity-analysis results revealed: (1) a high correlation between hydraulic conductivity and porosity given the concentration and flow observations used, so that both could not be estimated; and (2) that the breakthrough curve data did not provide enough information to estimate individual values of dispersivity for the five sands. This study demonstrates that the choice of assigned dispersivity and the amount of numerical dispersion present in the solution technique influence estimated hydraulic conductivity values to a surprising degree.

  4. Closing Plant Stomata Requires a Homolog of an Aluminum-Activated Malate Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takayuki; Mori, Izumi C.; Furuichi, Takuya; Munemasa, Shintaro; Toyooka, Kiminori; Matsuoka, Ken; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    Plant stomata limit both carbon dioxide uptake and water loss; hence, stomatal aperture is carefully set as the environment fluctuates. Aperture area is known to be regulated in part by ion transport, but few of the transporters have been characterized. Here we report that AtALMT12 (At4g17970), a homolog of the aluminum-activated malate transporter (ALMT) of wheat, is expressed in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. Loss-of-function mutations in AtALMT12 impair stomatal closure induced by ABA, calcium and darkness, but do not abolish either the rapidly activated or the slowly activated anion currents previously identified as being important for stomatal closure. Expressed in Xenopus oocytes, AtALMT12 facilitates chloride and nitrate currents, but not those of organic solutes. Therefore, we conclude that AtALMT12 is a novel class of anion transporter involved in stomatal closure. PMID:20154005

  5. Investigation of flow and solute transport at the field scale through heterogeneous deformable porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Min; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2016-09-01

    This work describes an investigation of the spatial statistical structure of specific discharge field and solute transport process of a nonreactive solute at the field scale through a heterogeneous deformable porous medium. The flow field is driven by a vertical gradient in the excess pore water pressure induced by a step increase in load applied on the upper part of a finite-thickness aquifer. The non-stationary spectral representation is adopted to characterize the spatial covariance of the specific discharge field necessary for the development of the solute particle trajectory statistics using the Lagrangian formalism. We show that the statistics of the specific discharge and particle trajectory derived herein are non-stationary and functions of the coefficient of soil compressibility, μ. The effect of μ on the relative variation of specific discharge and the solute particle trajectory statistics are analyzed upon evaluating our expressions.

  6. Spatially distributed characterization of hyporheic solute transport during baseflow recession in a headwater mountain stream using electrical geophysical imaging

    Treesearch

    Adam S. Ward; Michael N. Gooseff; Michael Fitzgerald; Thomas J. Voltz; Kamini Singha

    2014-01-01

    The transport of solutes along hyporheic flowpaths is recognized as central to numerous biogeochemical cycles, yet our understanding of how this transport changes with baseflow recession, particularly in a spatially distributed manner, is limited. We conducted four steady-state solute tracer injections and collected electrical resistivity data to characterize hyporheic...

  7. Intragranular diffusion: An important mechanism influencing solute transport in clastic aquifers?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, W.W.; Kraemer, T.F.; Hearn, P.P.

    1990-01-01

    Quantification of intragranular porosity in sand-size material from an aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, by scanning electron microscopy, mercury injection, and epifluorescence techniques shows that there are more reaction sites and that porosity is greater that indicated by standard short-term laboratory tests and measurement techniques. Results from laboratory and field tracer tests show solute nonequilibrium for a reacting ion consistent with a model of diffusion into, and exchange within, grain interiors. These data indicate that a diffusion expression needs to be included in transport codes, particularly for simulation of the transport of radioactive and toxic wastes.

  8. Discrete ordinates (SN) method for the first solution of the transport equation using Chebyshev polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öztürk, Hakan

    2016-11-01

    First estimates for the numerical solution of the one-dimensional neutron transport equation for one-speed neutrons in a finite homogeneous slab is studied. The neutrons are assumed to be scattered isotropically through the medium. Then the discrete ordinates form of the transport equation is solved for the eigenvalue spectrum using the Chebyshev polynomials of second kind in the neutron angular flux. Therefore, the calculated eigenvalues for various values of the c0, the mean number of secondary neutrons per collision, are given in the tables using the Gauss-Chebyshev quadrature set.

  9. Modeling particle-facilitated solute transport using the C-Ride module of HYDRUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunek, Jiri; Bradford, Scott A.

    2017-04-01

    Strongly sorbing chemicals (e.g., heavy metals, radionuclides, pharmaceuticals, and/or explosives) in soils are associated predominantly with the solid phase, which is commonly assumed to be stationary. However, recent field- and laboratory-scale observations have shown that, in the presence of mobile colloidal particles (e.g., microbes, humic substances, clays and metal oxides), the colloids could act as pollutant carriers and thus provide a rapid transport pathway for strongly sorbing contaminants. Such transport can be further accelerated since these colloidal particles may travel through interconnected larger pores where the water velocity is relatively high. Additionally, colloidal particles have a considerable adsorption capacity for other species present in water because of their large specific surface areas and their high concentrations in soil-water and groundwater. As a result, the transport of contaminants can be significantly, sometimes dramatically, enhanced when they are adsorbed to mobile colloids. To address this problem, we have developed the C-Ride module for HYDRUS-1D. This one-dimensional numerical module is based on the HYDRUS-1D software package and incorporates mechanisms associated with colloid and colloid-facilitated solute transport in variably saturated porous media. This numerical model accounts for both colloid and solute movement due to convection, diffusion, and dispersion in variably-saturated soils, as well as for solute movement facilitated by colloid transport. The colloids transport module additionally considers processes of attachment/detachment to/from the solid phase, straining, and/or size exclusion. Various blocking and depth dependent functions can be used to modify the attachment and straining coefficients. The module additionally considers the effects of changes in the water content on colloid/bacteria transport and attachment/detachment to/from solid-water and air-water interfaces. For example, when the air

  10. Ground-water flow and solute transport at a municipal landfill site on Long Island, New York; Part 3, Simulation of solute transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wexler, E.J.

    1988-01-01

    A solute transport model representing a 2.3-sq mi area surrounding and downgradient from a municipal landfill site in the Town of Brookhaven, N.Y. was used to simulate migration of a conservative solute (chloride) in the upper glacial aquifer. Aquifer values used in the model were: hydraulic conductivity, 200 ft/day; effective porosity, 0.30; longitudinal dispersivity, 100 ft; transverse dispersivity, 20 ft. Average concentration of chloride was set at 875.0 mg/L in leachate and 10 mg/L in recharge and in ambient groundwater. Entry of leachate into the aquifer was assumed to have begun in 1977. Chloride concentrations in the simulated plume after 6 years of travel matched reasonably well the chloride data collected in October-December 1982. After 12 years of travel, the simulated plume extended 6,200 ft and was 2,600 ft wide. Maximum predicted concentration at the site boundary was 160 mg/L. Additional simulations were made to test the model 's ability to predict the effect of several remedial strategies on the movement of solutes. These included capping the landfill with an impermeable surface, removal of contaminated groundwater through four recovery wells, and a combination of the first two actions. (USGS)

  11. Heat transport in active harmonic chains

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Mei C.; Ellis, Fred M.; Kottos, Tsampikos; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Geisel, Theo; Prosen, Tomaz

    2011-08-15

    We show that a harmonic lattice model with amplifying and attenuating elements, when coupled to two thermal baths, exhibits unique heat transport properties. Some of these novel features include anomalous nonequilibrium steady-state heat currents, negative differential thermal conductance, as well as nonreciprocal heat transport. We find that when these elements are arranged in a PT-symmetric manner, the domain of existence of the nonequilibrium steady state is maximized. We propose an electronic experimental setup based on resistive-inductive-capacitive (RLC) transmission lines, where our predictions can be tested.

  12. Continuous time random walks for non-local radial solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-08-01

    This study formulates and analyzes continuous time random walk (CTRW) models in radial flow geometries for the quantification of non-local solute transport induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and by mobile-immobile mass transfer processes. To this end we derive a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates starting from the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The particle density, or solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. As a consequence, the memory kernel characterizing the non-local ADE, is radially dependent. Based on this general formulation, we derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneous advection in a mobile region and mass transfer between mobile and immobile regions. The expected solute breakthrough behavior is studied using numerical random walk particle tracking simulations. This behavior is analyzed by explicit analytical expressions for the asymptotic solute breakthrough curves. We observe clear power-law tails of the solute breakthrough for broad (power-law) distributions of particle transit times (heterogeneous advection) and particle trapping times (MRMT model). The combined model displays two distinct time regimes. An intermediate regime, in which the solute breakthrough is dominated by the particle transit times in the mobile zones, and a late time regime that is governed by the distribution of particle trapping times in immobile zones. These radial CTRW formulations allow for the identification of heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile processes as drivers of anomalous transport, under conditions relevant for field tracer

  13. Electroosmotic fluid motion and late-time solute transport at non-negligible zeta potentials

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    1999-12-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are employed to determine the electric potential, fluid velocity and late-time solute distribution for electroosmotic flow in a tube and channel when the zeta potential is not small. The electric potential and fluid velocity are in general obtained by numerical means. In addition, new analytical solutions are presented for the velocity in a tube and channel in the extremes of large and small Debye layer thickness. The electroosmotic fluid velocity is used to analyze late-time transport of a neutral non-reacting solute. Zeroth and first-order solutions describing axial variation of the solute concentration are determined analytically. The resulting expressions contain eigenvalues representing the dispersion and skewness of the axial concentration profiles. These eigenvalues and the functions describing transverse variation of the concentration field are determined numerically using a shooting technique. Results are presented for both tube and channel geometries over a wide range of the normalized Debye layer thickness and zeta potential. Simple analytical approximations to the eigenvalues are also provided for the limiting cases of large and small values of the Debye layer thickness. The methodology developed here for electroosmotic flow is also applied to the Taylor problem of late-time transport and dispersion in pressure-driven flows.

  14. Recent advances in particle methods for simulating solute transport in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Painter, S.

    2012-12-01

    Particle methods such as random walk particle tracking have a long history as numerical tools for simulating solute transport in the subsurface. In the traditional random walk particle tracking algorithm, particles representing packets of solute mass are moved through the velocity field obtained from a numerical flow solution to simulate advection; random spatial displacements are then added to simulate dispersion. The two well-known advantages of the approach are that it is relatively efficient for large problems and free of numerical dispersion. Recent large-scale applications have prompted the development of novel variants of particle methods that offer additional advantages. Interchanging the role of time and space - that is, sampling a residence time with a fixed displacement instead of a random displacement with a fixed time step - leads to a particularly efficient algorithm that also easily accommodates a very wide range of models for solute diffusion/sorption in immobile regions. Algorithms and computer codes that accommodate fully unstructured grids have recently appeared. In applications that involve significant parameter uncertainty, the Monte Carlo sampling of uncertain parameters may be intermingled with the Monte Carlo solution method, which leads to a particularly efficient estimate of the ensemble mean concentration or breakthrough curve. Methods for post-processing relatively simple particle tracking scenarios to include effects of matrix diffusion/sorption also allow uncertainty to be quantified in an efficient way. These and other recent developments will be reviewed; example applications involving radionuclide transport over long time and space scales will also be presented.

  15. Flux-Averaged and Volume-Averaged Concentrations in Continuum Approaches to Solute Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. C.; van Genuchten, M. Th.

    1984-07-01

    Transformations between volume-averaged pore fluid concentrations and flux-averaged concentrations are presented which show that both modes of concentration obey convective-dispersive transport equations of identical mathematical form for nonreactive solutes. The pertinent boundary conditions for the two modes, however, do not transform identically. Solutions of the convection-dispersion equation for a semi-infinite system during steady flow subject to a first-type inlet boundary condition is shown to yield flux concentrations, while solutions subject to a third-type boundary condition yield volume-averaged concentrations. These solutions may be applied with reasonable impunity to finite as well as semi-infinite media if back mixing at the exit is precluded. Implications of the distinction between resident and flux concentrations to laboratory and field studies of solute transport are discussed. It is suggested that perceived limitations of the convection-dispersion model for media with large variations in pore water velocities may in certain cases be attributable to a failure to distinguish between volume-averaged and flux-averaged concentrations.

  16. A new algorithm for generating highly accurate benchmark solutions to transport test problems

    SciTech Connect

    Azmy, Y.Y.

    1997-06-01

    We present a new algorithm for solving the neutron transport equation in its discrete-variable form. The new algorithm is based on computing the full matrix relating the scalar flux spatial moments in all cells to the fixed neutron source spatial moments, foregoing the need to compute the angular flux spatial moments, and thereby eliminating the need for sweeping the spatial mesh in each discrete-angular direction. The matrix equation is solved exactly in test cases, producing a solution vector that is free from iteration convergence error, and subject only to truncation and roundoff errors. Our algorithm is designed to provide method developers with a quick and simple solution scheme to test their new methods on difficult test problems without the need to develop sophisticated solution techniques, e.g. acceleration, before establishing the worthiness of their innovation. We demonstrate the utility of the new algorithm by applying it to the Arbitrarily High Order Transport Nodal (AHOT-N) method, and using it to solve two of Burre`s Suite of Test Problems (BSTP). Our results provide highly accurate benchmark solutions, that can be distributed electronically and used to verify the pointwise accuracy of other solution methods and algorithms.

  17. Transport and biological activities of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, Brittnee L; Agellon, Luis B

    2013-07-01

    Bile acids have emerged as important biological molecules that support the solubilization of various lipids and lipid-soluble compounds in the gut, and the regulation of gene expression and cellular function. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and eventually released into the small intestine. The majority of bile acids are recovered in the distal end of the small intestine and then returned to the liver for reuse. The components of the mechanism responsible for the recycling of bile acids within the enterohepatic circulation have been identified whereas the mechanism for intracellular transport is less understood. Recently, the ileal lipid binding protein (ILBP; human gene symbol FABP6) was shown to be needed for the efficient transport of bile acids from the apical side to the basolateral side of enterocytes in the distal intestine. This review presents an overview of the transport of bile acids between the liver and the gut as well as within hepatocytes and enterocytes. A variety of pathologies is associated with the malfunction of the bile acid transport system.

  18. Self-Consistent Solutions of the Plasma Transport Equations in an Axisymmetric Toroidal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardin, S. C.

    1981-09-01

    A numerical method is presented for solving a recently derived ( S. P. Hirshman and S. C. Jardin, Phys. Fluids22(1979) , 731) reduced set of equations describing two-dimensional transport in tokamak plasmas. The formulation exploits the different diffusion time scales by dividing each time advancement step into two parts. In the first part, the one-dimensional surface averaged partial differential equations are advanced implicitly. In the second part, the two-dimensional generalized differential equation for the toroidal flux surface velocity is inverted directly. Accurate efficient solutions are obtained with only explicit terms coupling these two steps. Solutions are presented illustrating the validity and the accuracy of this method.

  19. Evaluation of bacteria-facilitated cadmium transport in gravel columns using the HYDRUS colloid-facilitated solute transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Liping; Å Imå¯Nek, Jirka

    2006-12-01

    The colloid-facilitated solute transport model, based on HYDRUS-1D, was evaluated using the column experimental data of Pang et al. (2005) for cadmium (Cd) transport facilitated by B. subtilis spores or E. coli in saturated coarse alluvial gravels. We simulated Cd transport involving convection, dispersion, kinetic adsorption/desorption to/from the aquifer media and to/from mobile/immobile bacteria, and kinetic attachment/detachment of the bacteria to/from the aquifer media. To reduce the number of parameters to be optimized, we independently estimated Cd sorption/desorption rates to mobile bacteria from a batch study. The model described the collected experimental data reasonably well. Extensive sensitivity analysis to various reaction parameters was carried out to obtain an understanding of the relative importance of individual model parameters on model predictions. Our modeling results suggest that the rates of Cd sorption or desorption differ not only between different bacterial species but also between unattached and deposited bacteria. The results of the sensitivity analysis indicated that the Cd sorption rate to unattached bacteria had a significantly greater impact on the model results than its sorption rate to deposited bacteria. For the experimental system investigated here, model results were most sensitive to parameters describing interactions between Cd-aquifer media, bacteria-aquifer media, and Cd-mobile bacteria, and they were less sensitive to interactions between Cd-immobile bacteria and desorption rate from mobile bacteria.

  20. Active filter solutions for utility interface of industrial loads

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, S.; Divan, D.

    1995-12-31

    Active filters are an effective means for harmonic compensation of non-linear power electronic loads, of particular importance as utilities enforce harmonic standards such as IEEE 519. Harmonic compensation is an extremely cost sensitive application since the value-added to the user is not apparent. This paper addresses the cost effectiveness of various active filter topologies for utility interface of industrial loads and their application. Pure active filter solutions and hybrid active filter solutions are both seen to have merit in realizing a harmonic free utility interface for industrial loads rated at 100 kW to 100 MW. The objective of this paper is to present a methodology, for both the industrial user and the utility, to match the optimal active filter solution to their application.

  1. Adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hai-song; Yang, Xiao-juan; Mao, Yan-peng; Chen, Yu; Long, Xiang-li; Yuan, Wei-kang

    2011-01-30

    In this study, the adsorption of EDTA on activated carbon from aqueous solutions has been investigated in a batch stirred cell. Experiments have been carried out to investigate the effects of temperature, EDTA concentration, pH, activated carbon mass and particle size on EDTA adsorption. The experimental results manifest that the EDTA adsorption rate increases with its concentration in the aqueous solutions. EDTA adsorption also increases with temperature. The EDTA removal from the solution increases as activated carbon mass increases. The Langmuir and Freundlich equilibrium isotherm models are found to provide a good fitting of the adsorption data, with R(2) = 0.9920 and 0.9982, respectively. The kinetic study shows that EDTA adsorption on the activated carbon is in good compliance with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The thermodynamic parameters (E(a), ΔG(0), ΔH(0), ΔS(0)) obtained indicate the endothermic nature of EDTA adsorption on activated carbon.

  2. Simulation of unsteady flow and solute transport in a tidal river network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhan, X.

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model and numerical method for water flow and solute transport in a tidal river network is presented. The tidal river network is defined as a system of open channels of rivers with junctions and cross sections. As an example, the Pearl River in China is represented by a network of 104 channels, 62 nodes, and a total of 330 cross sections with 11 boundary section for one of the applications. The simulations are performed with a supercomputer for seven scenarios of water flow and/or solute transport in the Pearl River, China, with different hydrological and weather conditions. Comparisons with available data are shown. The intention of this study is to summarize previous works and to provide a useful tool for water environmental management in a tidal river network, particularly for the Pearl River, China.

  3. Benchmark solutions for the galactic ion transport equations: Energy and spatially dependent problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, Barry D.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.

    1989-01-01

    Nontrivial benchmark solutions are developed for the galactic ion transport (GIT) equations in the straight-ahead approximation. These equations are used to predict potential radiation hazards in the upper atmosphere and in space. Two levels of difficulty are considered: (1) energy independent, and (2) spatially independent. The analysis emphasizes analytical methods never before applied to the GIT equations. Most of the representations derived have been numerically implemented and compared to more approximate calculations. Accurate ion fluxes are obtained (3 to 5 digits) for nontrivial sources. For monoenergetic beams, both accurate doses and fluxes are found. The benchmarks presented are useful in assessing the accuracy of transport algorithms designed to accommodate more complex radiation protection problems. In addition, these solutions can provide fast and accurate assessments of relatively simple shield configurations.

  4. Eigen decomposition solution to the one-dimensional time-dependent photon transport equation.

    PubMed

    Handapangoda, Chintha C; Pathirana, Pubudu N; Premaratne, Malin

    2011-02-14

    The time-dependent one-dimensional photon transport (radiative transfer) equation is widely used to model light propagation through turbid media with a slab geometry, in a vast number of disciplines. Several numerical and semi-analytical techniques are available to accurately solve this equation. In this work we propose a novel efficient solution technique based on eigen decomposition of the vectorized version of the photon transport equation. Using clever transformations, the four variable integro-differential equation is reduced to a set of first order ordinary differential equations using a combination of a spectral method and the discrete ordinates method. An eigen decomposition approach is then utilized to obtain the closed-form solution of this reduced set of ordinary differential equations.

  5. A two-constituent solute-transport model for ground water having variable density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, W.E.; Konikow, L.F.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed to simulate solute transport and dispersion of either one or two constituents in groundwater where there is two-dimensional, density-dependent flow. The model is a modified version of the one documented by Konikow and Bredehoeft (1978), which uses finite-difference methods and the method of characteristics to solve the flow and transport equations. The model was tested on an idealized seawater intrusion problem for which an analytical solution has been developed. The results were nearly identical to those of other numerical models tested on the same problem. A description of the formats for the input data, a sample of input and output for a two-constituent example problem, and a listing of the Fortran program are presented. (Author 's abstract)

  6. Solution of stochastic media transport problems using a numerical quadrature-based method

    SciTech Connect

    Pautz, S. D.; Franke, B. C.; Prinja, A. K.; Olson, A. J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a new conceptual framework for analyzing transport problems in random media. We decompose such problems into stratified subproblems according to the number of material pseudo-interfaces within realizations. For a given subproblem we assign pseudo-interface locations in each realization according to product quadrature rules, which allows us to deterministically generate a fixed number of realizations. Quadrature integration of the solutions of these realizations thus approximately solves each subproblem; the weighted superposition of solutions of the subproblems approximately solves the general stochastic media transport problem. We revisit some benchmark problems to determine the accuracy and efficiency of this approach in comparison to randomly generated realizations. We find that this method is very accurate and fast when the number of pseudo-interfaces in a problem is generally low, but that these advantages quickly degrade as the number of pseudo-interfaces increases. (authors)

  7. Size-dependent control of colloid transport via solute gradients in dead-end channels

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sangwoo; Um, Eujin; Sabass, Benedikt; Ault, Jesse T.; Rahimi, Mohammad; Warren, Patrick B.; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-01-01

    Transport of colloids in dead-end channels is involved in widespread applications including drug delivery and underground oil and gas recovery. In such geometries, Brownian motion may be considered as the sole mechanism that enables transport of colloidal particles into or out of the channels, but it is, unfortunately, an extremely inefficient transport mechanism for microscale particles. Here, we explore the possibility of diffusiophoresis as a means to control the colloid transport in dead-end channels by introducing a solute gradient. We demonstrate that the transport of colloidal particles into the dead-end channels can be either enhanced or completely prevented via diffusiophoresis. In addition, we show that size-dependent diffusiophoretic transport of particles can be achieved by considering a finite Debye layer thickness effect, which is commonly ignored. A combination of diffusiophoresis and Brownian motion leads to a strong size-dependent focusing effect such that the larger particles tend to concentrate more and reside deeper in the channel. Our findings have implications for all manners of controlled release processes, especially for site-specific delivery systems where localized targeting of particles with minimal dispersion to the nontarget area is essential. PMID:26715753

  8. Benchmark solutions for the galactic heavy-ion transport equations with energy and spatial coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganapol, Barry D.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Lamkin, Stanley L.; Wilson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Nontrivial benchmark solutions are developed for the galactic heavy ion transport equations in the straightahead approximation with energy and spatial coupling. Analytical representations of the ion fluxes are obtained for a variety of sources with the assumption that the nuclear interaction parameters are energy independent. The method utilizes an analytical LaPlace transform inversion to yield a closed form representation that is computationally efficient. The flux profiles are then used to predict ion dose profiles, which are important for shield design studies.

  9. Comparison of theory and experiment for solute transport in highly heterogeneous porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golfier, Fabrice; Quintard, Michel; Cherblanc, Fabien; Zinn, Brendan A.; Wood, Brian D.

    2007-11-01

    In this work we compare the recently developed two-region mass transfer theory reported by Ahmadi et al. [A. Ahmadi, M. Quintard, S. Whitaker (1998), Transport in chemically and mechanically heterogeneous porous media, V, two-equation model for solute transport with adsorption, Adv. Water Resour. 1998;22:59-86] with experimental results reported by Zinn et al. [Zinn, B., L. C. Meigs, C. F. Harvey, R. Haggerty, W. J. Peplinski, C. F. Von Schwerin. Experimental visualization of solute transport and mass transfer processes in two-dimensional conductivity fields with connected regions of high conductivity. Environ Sci Technol 2004;38:3916-3926]. We find that the constant mass transfer coefficient predicted by the steady-state closure to the theory, when used with the macroscale transport equation, provides a reasonable prediction of the observed breakthrough curve. However, the use of a constant mass transfer coefficient does not allow good representation of the tailing that is observed in the data. We show that the mass transfer coefficient can be represented in terms of the eigenvalue expansion of a Green's function. For a steady solution to the closure problem, this expansion leads to the effective mass transfer coefficient being defined in terms of the harmonic average of the eigenvalues of the expansion; this is consistent with previous work on this topic. To further investigate the influence of using a single, constant value for the mass transfer coefficient, we examine the solution to the mass transfer problem in terms of a mixed model, where the eigenvalues of one region (the inclusions) are kept, while the second region (the matrix) is treated as a homogenized material. The results from this comparison indicate that the mass transfer coefficient predicted via volume averaging using a quasi-steady closure could potentially be improved upon by development of new methods that retain more of the eigenvalues of the system.

  10. Exact and efficient solution of the radiative transport equation for the semi-infinite medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2013-06-01

    An accurate and efficient solution of the radiative transport equation is proposed for modeling the propagation of photons in the three-dimensional anisotropically scattering half-space medium. The exact refractive index mismatched boundary condition is considered and arbitrary rotationally invariant scattering functions can be applied. The obtained equations are verified with Monte Carlo simulations in the steady-state, temporal frequency, and time domains resulting in an excellent agreement.

  11. [Changes induced by hypertonic solutions in the transportation of calcium by the cardiac reticular sarcoplasma].

    PubMed

    Sierra, M; Holguín, J A

    1979-01-01

    In the sarcoplasmic reticulum of the myocardium, celular organell which function is to regulate the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium in contraction and relaxation, we have studied the effect of hypertonic solutions of sucrose between 1 and 6.96 times the normal tonicity in order to observe the behavior of the internal linked or free calcium of this structure, as well as to prove the hypothesis that hypertonic solutions encourage the calcium exit of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum with the resulting signs of contractures. The following results were obtained: 1. The ATP hydrolisis and calcium transport rate are 14% and 90% respectively of the maximum speeds of 10(-5) M in calcium, while for concentrations of 10(-7) M or ess of the said cation, the transport rates and the ATPase do not reach 5% of the maximum values. 2. Between 1 and 2.54 times of the normal tonicity the calcium uptake remains between 400 and 500 nmoles of calcium/mg protein/min, the transported amount of calcium varies between 14 and 16 nmoles/mg protein and the rate of the ATP hydrolysis increases a 37% to 0.4 M in sucrose. 3. Between 0.4 and 1.2 M in sucrose of 2.54 to 6.96 times the isotonicity, the calcium transport rate velocity as well as the ATP hydrolisis are strongly inhibited. The vesicles volume minimizes and the amount of linked calcium remains within the control values, proving that the capacity of linking this cathion is independent from sarcoplasmic reticulum volume. These results show that the sarcoplasmic reticulum is involved in the contractures induced by hypertonic solutions in intact cells, since the osmolarity increase produces changes of volume which results in a decrease of the calcium transportation velocity or in an increase of the exit of said cathion.

  12. Effect of submerged vegetation on solute transport in an open channel using large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J.; Dai, HC

    2016-11-01

    Existence of vegetation plays a significant effect on the flow velocity distributions, turbulence structures and solute mixing in an open channel. This paper has implemented a 3D large eddy simulation model for the flow and scalar transport in the open channel with vegetation. The model can produce a typical turbulence characteristics and concentration distribution with vegetation. The scalar transport mechanism is quantitatively explained by the turbulent Schmidt number, Reynolds flux, coherent structures and quadrant conditional analysis. A dominance of ejection-sweeping events occurs in the process of the momentum and scalar flux transport. The spectral analysis is used to identify the Kelvin-Helmholtz frequency. The turbulence characteristics of the length scale of vortexes, Kelvin-Helmholtz frequency and Reynolds stress etc. are analyzed with the vegetation density. The model quantitatively predicts the trend of decreasing in the concentration distribution along the flow direction with the increasing of vegetation density.

  13. Molecular mechanism of ATP-dependent solute transport by multidrug resistance-associated protein 1.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiu-bao

    2010-01-01

    Millions of new cancer patients are diagnosed each year and over half of these patients die from this devastating disease. Thus, cancer causes a major public health problem worldwide. Chemotherapy remains the principal mode to treat many metastatic cancers. However, occurrence of cellular multidrug resistance (MDR) prevents efficient killing of cancer cells, leading to chemotherapeutic treatment failure. Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters, such as P-glycoprotein, breast cancer resistance protein and/or multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), confers an acquired MDR due to their capabilities of transporting a broad range of chemically diverse anticancer drugs across the cell membrane barrier. In this review, the molecular mechanism of ATP-dependent solute transport by MRP1 will be addressed.

  14. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2010-04-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is typically 'non-Fickian'; that is, it is characterized by early breakthrough and long tailing and by nonlinear growth of the Green function-centered second moment. This behavior is due to the effects of (1) multirate diffusion occurring between the highly permeable fracture network and the low-permeability rock matrix, (2) a wide range of advection rates in the fractures and, possibly, the matrix as well, and (3) a range of path lengths. As a consequence, prediction of solute transport processes at the macroscale represents a formidable challenge. Classical dual-porosity (or mobile-immobile) approaches in conjunction with an advection-dispersion equation and macroscopic dispersivity commonly fail to predict breakthrough of fractured porous media accurately. It was recently demonstrated that the continuous time random walk (CTRW) method can be used as a generalized upscaling approach. Here we extend this work and use results from high-resolution finite element-finite volume-based simulations of solute transport in an outcrop analogue of a naturally fractured reservoir to calibrate the CTRW method by extracting a distribution of retention times. This procedure allows us to predict breakthrough at other model locations accurately and to gain significant insight into the nature of the fracture-matrix interaction in naturally fractured porous reservoirs with geologically realistic fracture geometries.

  15. Final Technical Report - Investigation into the Relationship between Heterogeneity and Heavy-Tailed Solute Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Weissmann, Gary S

    2013-12-06

    The objective of this project was to characterize the influence that naturally complex geologic media has on anomalous dispersion and to determine if the nature of dispersion can be estimated from the underlying heterogeneous media. The UNM portion of this project was to provide detailed representations of aquifer heterogeneity through producing highly-resolved models of outcrop analogs to aquifer materials. This project combined outcrop-scale heterogeneity characterization (conducted at the University of New Mexico), laboratory experiments (conducted at Sandia National Laboratory), and numerical simulations (conducted at Sandia National Laboratory and Colorado School of Mines). The study was designed to test whether established dispersion theory accurately predicts the behavior of solute transport through heterogeneous media and to investigate the relationship between heterogeneity and the parameters that populate these models. The dispersion theory tested by this work was based upon the fractional advection-dispersion equation (fADE) model. Unlike most dispersion studies that develop a solute transport model by fitting the solute transport breakthrough curve, this project explored the nature of the heterogeneous media to better understand the connection between the model parameters and the aquifer heterogeneity. We also evaluated methods for simulating the heterogeneity to see whether these approaches (e.g., geostatistical) could reasonably replicate realistic heterogeneity. The UNM portion of this study focused on capturing realistic geologic heterogeneity of aquifer analogs using advanced outcrop mapping methods.

  16. Transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in saturated porous media under various solution chemistry conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Gao, Bin; Morales, Verónica L.; Tian, Yuan; Wu, Lei; Gao, Jie; Bai, Wei; Yang, Liuyan

    2012-09-01

    Because of its wide applications, nanosized titanium dioxide may become a potential environmental risk to soil and groundwater system. It is therefore important to improve current understanding of the environmental fate and transport of titanium oxides nanoparticles (TONPs). In this work, the effect of solution chemistry (i.e., pH, ionic strength, and natural organic matter (NOM) concentration) on the deposition and transport of TONPs in saturated porous media was examined in detail. Laboratory columns packed with acid-cleaned quartz sand were used in the experiment as porous media. Transport experiments were conducted with various chemistry combinations, including four ionic strengths, three pH levels, and two NOM concentrations. The results showed that TONP mobility increased with increasing solution pH, but decreased with increasing solution ionic strength. It is also found that the presence of NOM in the system enhanced the mobility of TONPs in the saturated porous media. The Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory was used to justify the mobility trends observed in the experimental data. Predictions from the theory agreed excellently with the experimental data.

  17. Exploring Solute Transport and Streamline Connectivity Using Two-point and Multipoint Simulation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klise, K. A.; McKenna, S. A.; Tidwell, V. C.; Lane, J. W.; Weissmann, G. S.; Wawrzyniec, T. F.; Nichols, E. M.

    2008-12-01

    Sequential indicator simulation is widely used to create lithofacies models based on the two-point correlation of the desired heterogeneous field. However, two-point correlation (i.e. the variogram) is not capable of preserving complex patterns such as connected curvilinear structures often noted in realistic geologic media. As an alternative, several multipoint simulation methods have been suggested to replicate structural patterns based on a training image. To understand the implications that two-point and multipoint methods have on predicting solute transport, rigorous tests are needed that use realistic aquifer analogs. For this study, we use high-resolution terrestrial lidar scans to identify sand and gravel lithofacies at the outcrop (meter) scale. The lithofacies map serves as the aquifer analog and is used as a training image. The use of two-point (sisim) and multipoint (filtersim and snesim) stochastic simulation methods are then compared based on the ability of the resulting simulations to replicate solute transport characteristics using the aquifer analog. Detailed particle tracking simulations are used to explore the streamline-based connectivity that is preserved using each method. Based on the three simulation methods tested here, filtersim, a multipoint method that replicates structural patterns seen in the aquifer analog, best predicts non- Fickian solute transport characteristics by matching the connectivity of facies along streamlines. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  18. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, S.; Cortis, A.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Solute transport in fractured porous media is typically "non-Fickian"; that is, it is characterized by early breakthrough and long tailing and by nonlinear growth of the Green function-centered second moment. This behavior is due to the effects of (1) multirate diffusion occurring between the highly permeable fracture network and the low-permeability rock matrix, (2) a wide range of advection rates in the fractures and, possibly, the matrix as well, and (3) a range of path lengths. As a consequence, prediction of solute transport processes at the macroscale represents a formidable challenge. Classical dual-porosity (or mobile-immobile) approaches in conjunction with an advection-dispersion equation and macroscopic dispersivity commonly fail to predict breakthrough of fractured porous media accurately. It was recently demonstrated that the continuous time random walk (CTRW) method can be used as a generalized upscaling approach. Here we extend this work and use results from high-resolution finite element-finite volume-based simulations of solute transport in an outcrop analogue of a naturally fractured reservoir to calibrate the CTRW method by extracting a distribution of retention times. This procedure allows us to predict breakthrough at other model locations accurately and to gain significant insight into the nature of the fracture-matrix interaction in naturally fractured porous reservoirs with geologically realistic fracture geometries.

  19. [Model of active peristaltic transport in biosystems].

    PubMed

    Klochkov, B N; Romanov, A S

    2013-01-01

    A nonlinear distributed mathematical model of soft vessel with the nonmonotonous static characteristic is proposed and considered. The model describes space-time dynamics of vessel clearance change. Wave phenomena in vessels of different nature and the possibility of peristaltic fluid pumping are discussed and analyzed. The model is rather common in character and represents a description of the whole class of transport phenomena. Lymphatic vessels are particularly considered.

  20. Space-time mesh adaptation for solute transport in randomly heterogeneous porous media.

    PubMed

    Dell'Oca, Aronne; Porta, Giovanni Michele; Guadagnini, Alberto; Riva, Monica

    2017-07-05

    We assess the impact of an anisotropic space and time grid adaptation technique on our ability to solve numerically solute transport in heterogeneous porous media. Heterogeneity is characterized in terms of the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity, whose natural logarithm, Y, is treated as a second-order stationary random process. We consider nonreactive transport of dissolved chemicals to be governed by an Advection Dispersion Equation at the continuum scale. The flow field, which provides the advective component of transport, is obtained through the numerical solution of Darcy's law. A suitable recovery-based error estimator is analyzed to guide the adaptive discretization. We investigate two diverse strategies guiding the (space-time) anisotropic mesh adaptation. These are respectively grounded on the definition of the guiding error estimator through the spatial gradients of: (i) the concentration field only; (ii) both concentration and velocity components. We test the approach for two-dimensional computational scenarios with moderate and high levels of heterogeneity, the latter being expressed in terms of the variance of Y. As quantities of interest, we key our analysis towards the time evolution of section-averaged and point-wise solute breakthrough curves, second centered spatial moment of concentration, and scalar dissipation rate. As a reference against which we test our results, we consider corresponding solutions associated with uniform space-time grids whose level of refinement is established through a detailed convergence study. We find a satisfactory comparison between results for the adaptive methodologies and such reference solutions, our adaptive technique being associated with a markedly reduced computational cost. Comparison of the two adaptive strategies tested suggests that: (i) defining the error estimator relying solely on concentration fields yields some advantages in grasping the key features of solute transport taking place within

  1. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- and depth-dependent retention in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leij, Feike J.; Bradford, Scott A.; Sciortino, Antonella

    2016-12-01

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for aqueous and solid phase colloid concentrations in a porous medium where colloids were subject to advective transport and reversible time and/or depth-dependent retention. Time-dependent blocking and ripening retention were described using a Langmuir-type equation with a rate coefficient that respectively decreased and increased linearly with the retained concentration. Depth-dependent retention was described using a rate coefficient that is a power-law function of distance. The stream tube modeling concept was employed to extend these analytic solutions to transport scenarios with two different partitioning processes (i.e., two types of retention sites). The sensitivity of concentrations was illustrated for the various time- and/or depth-dependent retention model parameters. The developed analytical models were subsequently used to describe breakthrough curves and, in some cases, retention profiles from several published column studies that employed nanoparticle or pathogenic microorganisms. Simulations results provided valuable insights on causes for many observed complexities associated with colloid transport and retention, including: increasing or decreasing effluent concentrations with continued colloid application, delayed breakthrough, low concentration tailing, and retention profiles that are hyper-exponential, exponential, linear, or non-monotonic with distance.

  2. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- and depth-dependent retention in porous media.

    PubMed

    Leij, Feike J; Bradford, Scott A; Sciortino, Antonella

    2016-12-01

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for aqueous and solid phase colloid concentrations in a porous medium where colloids were subject to advective transport and reversible time and/or depth-dependent retention. Time-dependent blocking and ripening retention were described using a Langmuir-type equation with a rate coefficient that respectively decreased and increased linearly with the retained concentration. Depth-dependent retention was described using a rate coefficient that is a power-law function of distance. The stream tube modeling concept was employed to extend these analytic solutions to transport scenarios with two different partitioning processes (i.e., two types of retention sites). The sensitivity of concentrations was illustrated for the various time- and/or depth-dependent retention model parameters. The developed analytical models were subsequently used to describe breakthrough curves and, in some cases, retention profiles from several published column studies that employed nanoparticle or pathogenic microorganisms. Simulations results provided valuable insights on causes for many observed complexities associated with colloid transport and retention, including: increasing or decreasing effluent concentrations with continued colloid application, delayed breakthrough, low concentration tailing, and retention profiles that are hyper-exponential, exponential, linear, or non-monotonic with distance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Anisotropic surface hole-transport property of triphenylamine-derivative single crystal prepared by solution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Minoru; Katagiri, Mitsuhiko; Shironita, Sayoko; Nagayama, Norio

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports the anisotropic hole transport at the triphenylamine-derivative single crystal surface prepared by a solution method. Triphenylamine derivatives are commonly used in a hole-transport material for organic photoconductors of laser-beam printers, in which the materials are used as an amorphous form. For developing organic photovoltaics using the photoconductor's technology, preparation of a single crystal seems to be a specific way by realizing the high mobility of an organic semiconductor. In this study, a single crystal of 4-(2,2-diphenylethenyl)-N,N-bis(4-methylphenyl)-benzenamine (TPA) was prepared and its anisotropic hole-transport property measured. First, the hole-transport property of the TPA was investigated based on its chemical structure and electrochemical redox characteristics. Next, a large-scale single crystal formation at a high rate was developed by employing a solution method based on its solubility and supersolubility curves. The grown TPA was found to be a single crystal based on the polarization micrograph observation and crystallographic analysis. For the TPA single crystal, an anisotropic surface conduction was found, which was well explained by its molecular stack structure. The measured current in the long-axis direction is one order of magnitude greater than that of amorphous TPA.

  4. Pore network modeling of the electrical signature of solute transport in dual-domain media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Linde, N.; Haggerty, R.; Singha, K.; Briggs, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    Dual-domain models are used to explain anomalous solute transport behavior observed in diverse hydrologic settings and applications, from groundwater remediation to hyporheic exchange. To constrain such models, new methods are needed with sensitivity to both immobile and mobile domains. Recent experiments indicate that dual-domain transport of ionic tracers has an observable geoelectrical signature, appearing as a nonlinear, hysteretic relation between paired bulk and fluid electrical conductivity. Here we present a mechanistic explanation for this geoelectrical signature and evaluate assumptions underlying a previously published petrophysical model for bulk conductivity in dual-domain media. Pore network modeling of fluid flow, solute transport, and electrical conduction (1) verifies the geoelectrical signature of dual-domain transport, (2) reveals limitations of the previously used petrophysical model, and (3) demonstrates that a new petrophysical model, based on differential effective media theory, closely approximates the simulated bulk/fluid conductivity relation. These findings underscore the potential of geophysically based calibration of dual-domain models.

  5. Stochastic modeling of solute transport in aquifers: From heterogeneity characterization to risk analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, A.; Bellin, A.; Cvetkovic, V.; de Barros, F. P. J.; Dagan, G.

    2015-08-01

    The article presents a few recent developments advanced by the authors in a few key areas of stochastic modeling of solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers. First, a brief review of the Lagrangian approach to modeling plumes longitudinal mass distribution and temporal (the breakthrough curve) mass arrival, is presented. Subsequently, transport in highly heterogeneous aquifers is analyzed by using a recently developed predictive model. It relates the non-Gaussian BTC to the permeability univariate pdf and integral scale, with application to the MADE field observations. Next, the approach is extended to transport of reactive solute, combinnig the effects of the random velocity field and multirate mass transfer on the BTC, with application to mass attenuation. The following topic is modeling of the local concentration field as affected by mixing and dilution due to pore scale dispersion. The results are applied to the analysis of concentration measurements at the Cape Cod field experiment. The last section incorporates the results of the preceding ones in health risk assessment by analyzing the impact of concentration prediction on risk uncertainty. It is illustrated by assessing the effect of identification of macrodispersivity from field characterization and transport modeling, upon the probability of health risk.

  6. Application of multiphysics models to efficient design of experiments of solute transport across articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Pouran, Behdad; Arbabi, Vahid; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-11-01

    Transport of solutes helps to regulate normal physiology and proper function of cartilage in diarthrodial joints. Multiple studies have shown the effects of characteristic parameters such as concentration of proteoglycans and collagens and the orientation of collagen fibrils on the diffusion process. However, not much quantitative information and accurate models are available to help understand how the characteristics of the fluid surrounding articular cartilage influence the diffusion process. In this study, we used a combination of micro-computed tomography experiments and biphasic-solute finite element models to study the effects of three parameters of the overlying bath on the diffusion of neutral solutes across cartilage zones. Those parameters include bath size, degree of stirring of the bath, and the size and concentration of the stagnant layer that forms at the interface of cartilage and bath. Parametric studies determined the minimum of the finite bath size for which the diffusion behavior reduces to that of an infinite bath. Stirring of the bath proved to remarkably influence neutral solute transport across cartilage zones. The well-stirred condition was achieved only when the ratio of the diffusivity of bath to that of cartilage was greater than ≈1000. While the thickness of the stagnant layer at the cartilage-bath interface did not significantly influence the diffusion behavior, increase in its concentration substantially elevated solute concentration in cartilage. Sufficient stirring attenuated the effects of the stagnant layer. Our findings could be used for efficient design of experimental protocols aimed at understanding the transport of molecules across articular cartilage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploring Lithologic Controls on Solute Transport at the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, K.; Kuntz, B. W.; Toran, L.

    2009-12-01

    The Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory (SHCZO) team has found that soil chemistry does not correlate with variability in pore fluid chemistry, suggesting the presence of macropores. Because of such heterogeneity, it is often difficult to relate short-term event chemistry to what we know about the chemistry of waters in catchments. Additionally, it is not clear what role the shale bedrock has on flow and transport of solutes within the catchment. We have been conducting tracer tests at the laboratory and field-scale to move toward describing short-term flux and solute transport behavior with the goal of integrating behavior over geologic time clarify the relationship between soil chemistry and pore fluid data. In field sites where such high permeability contrasts exist, what roles do flow and transport play in long-term fate of solutes? What is the importance of the interface between the shale bedrock and the regolith above? Is the shale bedrock “impermeable”? To improve characterization of permeability of the consolidated shale, we drilled four 17-m deep bedrock wells at the SHCZO and have collected a suite of borehole logs. From the drilling and data collected within the new wells, we can make the following conclusions: that there is a “slow drilling” zone around 6-7 m below land surface, above which is highly weathered shale that is reddish in color, beneath which is largely unfractured blue-grey shale. The natural gamma data similar indicate a higher percentage of clays with depth than in the top 6 m, which corresponds with data from Jin et al. (submitted, Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta) that shows variability in shale bedrock density down about 6 m. Pump and slug test indicate an effective hydraulic conductivity of the Rose Hill Shale in the drilled boreholes on the order of 10-6 m/s, although hydraulic conductivity of the shale bedrock matrix estimated in a triaxial compression chamber is approximately10-15 m/s. In field-scale and lab-scale tracer

  8. Numerical investigations of solute transport in bimodal porous media under dynamic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa; Bechtold, Michel; Vanderborght, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of flow and solute transport in the shallow subsurface adjacent to the atmosphere is decisive to prevent groundwater pollution and conserve groundwater quality, to develop successful remediation strategies and to understand nutrient cycling. In nature, due to erratic precipitation-evaporation patterns, soil moisture content and related hydraulic conductivity in the vadose zone are not only variable in space but also in time. Flow directions and flow paths locally change between precipitation and evaporation periods. This makes the identification and description of solute transport processes in the vadose zone a complex problem. Recent studies (Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al., 2011a) focused on the investigation of upward transport of solutes during evaporation in heterogeneous soil columns, where heterogeneity was introduced by a sharp vertical material interface between two types of sand. Lateral solute transport through the interface in both (lateral) directions was observed at different depths of the investigated soil columns. Following recent approaches, we conduct two-dimensional numerical simulations in a similar setup which is composed of two sands with a sharp vertical material interface. The investigation is broadened from the sole evaporation to combined precipitation-evaporation cycles in order to quantify transport processes resulting from the combined effects of heterogeneous soil structure and dynamic flow conditions. Simulations are performed with a coupled finite volume and random walk particle tracking algorithm (Ippisch et al., 2006; Bechtold et al., 2011b). By comparing scenarios with cyclic boundary conditions and stationary counterparts with the same net flow rate, we found that duration and intensity of precipitation and evaporation periods potentially have an influence on lateral redistribution of solutes and thus leaching rates. Whether or not dynamic boundary conditions lead to significant deviations in the transport

  9. In vitro synthesis of a Major Facilitator Transporter for specific active transport across Droplet Interface Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Heather E.; Harris, Nicola J.; Booth, Paula J.

    2016-01-01

    Nature encapsulates reactions within membrane-bound compartments, affording sequential and spatial control over biochemical reactions. Droplet Interface Bilayers are evolving into a valuable platform to mimic this key biological feature in artificial systems. A major issue is manipulating flow across synthetic bilayers. Droplet Interface Bilayers must be functionalised, with seminal work using membrane-inserting toxins, ion channels and pumps illustrating the potential. Specific transport of biomolecules, and notably transport against a concentration gradient, across these bilayers has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we successfully incorporate the archetypal Major Facilitator Superfamily transporter, lactose permease, into Droplet Interface Bilayers and demonstrate both passive and active, uphill transport. This paves the way for controllable transport of sugars, metabolites and other essential biomolecular substrates of this ubiquitous transporter superfamily in DIB networks. Furthermore, cell-free synthesis of lactose permease during DIB formation also results in active transport across the interface bilayer. This adds a specific disaccharide transporter to the small list of integral membrane proteins that can be synthesised via in vitro transcription/translation for applications of DIB-based artificial cell systems. The introduction of a means to promote specific transport of molecules across Droplet Interface Bilayers against a concentration gradient gives a new facet to droplet networks. PMID:27996025

  10. Effect of the background solution and material composition on the transport of silver nanoparticles in saturated aquifer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adrian, Yorck; Schneidewind, Uwe; Fernandez-Steeger, Tomas; Azzam, Rafig

    2016-04-01

    Engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are used in various consumer products such as cloth or personal care products due to their antimicrobial properties (Benn et al., 2010). Their transport behavior in the environment is still under investigation. Previous studies have been focusing on the transport of AgNP in simple test systems with glass beads or soil materials (Braun et al., 2015), but studies investigating aquifer material are rare. However, the protection of fresh water resources in the subsurface is an important part in the protection of human health and the assurance of future economic activities. Therefore, expert knowledge regarding the transport and fate of engineered nanoparticles as potential contaminants in aquifers is essential. Within the scope of the research project NanoMobil funded by German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the transport and retention behavior of AgNP in aquifer material was investigated under saturated conditions in laboratory columns for different flow velocities, ionic strengths (IS) and background solutions. The used aquifer material consisted mainly of quartz and albite. The quartz grains were partially coated with iron hydroxides and oxides. Furthermore, 1% hematite was present in the silicate dominated aquifer material. The experiments were conducted using NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2 background solutions to examine the effects of monovalent and divalent cations on the transport of AgNP. Flow velocities in the columns were chosen to represent typical flow velocities of groundwater in the subsurface. For the experiments two mean grain sizes of 0.3 and 0.7 mm were used to investigate the effect of the grain size on the transport behavior. Particle concentration was measured using ICP-MS and particle size was determined using flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF). HYDRUS-1D (Šimůnek et al., 2013) was used to elucidate the transport and retention processes of the AgNP in the aquifer material. The obtained results show

  11. The Method of Manufactured Solutions for RattleSnake A SN Radiation Transport Solver Inside the MOOSE Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Yaqi Wang

    2012-06-01

    The Method of Manufactured Solutions (MMS) is an accepted technique to verify that a numerical discretization for the radiation transport equation has been implemented correctly. This technique offers a few advantages over other methods such as benchmark problems or analytical solutions. The solution can be manufactured such that properties for the angular flux are either stressed or preserved. For radiation transport, these properties can include desired smoothness, positiveness and arbitrary order of anisotropy in angle. Another advantage is that the angular flux solution can be manufactured for multidimensional problems where analytical solutions are difficult to obtain in general.

  12. Modeling Activity: Ions to Hydrophobics in Crowded Biological Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettitt, Montgomery

    2006-03-01

    Nonideal solutions play a role in many aspects of chemistry. As concentrations increase, concentration itself becomes a less useful quantity to understand equilibria. Industrial and medicinal chemistry often fail due to the difference between concentration and activity. An understanding of the impact of the crowded conditions in the cytoplasm on its biomolecules is of clear importance to biochemical, medical and pharmaceutical science. Work on the use of small biochemical compounds to crowd protein solutions indicates that a quantitative description of their non-ideal behavior is possible and straightforward. Here, we will show what the structural origin of this non-ideal solution behavior is from expression derived from a semi grand ensemble approach. We discuss the consequences of these findings regarding protein folding stability and solvation in crowded solutions through a structural analysis of the m-value or the change in free energy difference of a macromolecule in solution with respect to the concentration of a third component.

  13. The co-benefits for health of investing in active transportation.

    PubMed

    Giles-Corti, Billie; Foster, Sarah; Shilton, Trevor; Falconer, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Amid growing concerns about the impact of rising obesity and physical inactivity levels, climate change, population growth, increasing traffic congestion and declining oil supplies, multiple sectors are now promoting active transportation as an alternative to driving. This paper considers the health benefits and co-benefits of investing in active transportation, enabling comparison of policy options to optimise societal objectives aimed at creating healthy, socially and environmentally sustainable communities. Policies promoting the use of both energy-efficient motor vehicles and increased active transportation would almost double the impact on greenhouse gas emissions and would reduce disease burden by increasing physical activity. More co-benefit and economic analyses research is required to inform 'joined-up' policy solutions.

  14. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport.

    PubMed

    Leung, Juliana Y; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  15. Effects of reservoir heterogeneity on scaling of effective mass transfer coefficient for solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Juliana Y.; Srinivasan, Sanjay

    2016-09-01

    Modeling transport process at large scale requires proper scale-up of subsurface heterogeneity and an understanding of its interaction with the underlying transport mechanisms. A technique based on volume averaging is applied to quantitatively assess the scaling characteristics of effective mass transfer coefficient in heterogeneous reservoir models. The effective mass transfer coefficient represents the combined contribution from diffusion and dispersion to the transport of non-reactive solute particles within a fluid phase. Although treatment of transport problems with the volume averaging technique has been published in the past, application to geological systems exhibiting realistic spatial variability remains a challenge. Previously, the authors developed a new procedure where results from a fine-scale numerical flow simulation reflecting the full physics of the transport process albeit over a sub-volume of the reservoir are integrated with the volume averaging technique to provide effective description of transport properties. The procedure is extended such that spatial averaging is performed at the local-heterogeneity scale. In this paper, the transport of a passive (non-reactive) solute is simulated on multiple reservoir models exhibiting different patterns of heterogeneities, and the scaling behavior of effective mass transfer coefficient (Keff) is examined and compared. One such set of models exhibit power-law (fractal) characteristics, and the variability of dispersion and Keff with scale is in good agreement with analytical expressions described in the literature. This work offers an insight into the impacts of heterogeneity on the scaling of effective transport parameters. A key finding is that spatial heterogeneity models with similar univariate and bivariate statistics may exhibit different scaling characteristics because of the influence of higher order statistics. More mixing is observed in the channelized models with higher-order continuity. It

  16. The study of latent heat transport characteristics by solid particles and saccharide solution mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Shin-ichi; Hayamizu, Yasutaka; Inaba, Hideo

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is the development of latent heat transport system by using the mixture of the minute latent heat storage materials and the saccharine solution as medium. The experimental studies are carried out by the evaluation of viscosity and pressure loss in a pipe. Polyethylene (P.E.) is selected as the dispersed minute material that has closeness density (920kg/m3) of ice (917kg/m3). D-sorbitol and D-xylose solutions are picked as continuum phase of the test mixture. The concentration of D-sorbitol solution is set 48mass% from measured results of saturation solubility and the melting point. 40mass% solution of D-xylose is selected as the other test continuum phase. The non-ion surfactant, EA157 Dai-ichiseiyaku CO. Ltd, is used in order to prevent of dispersed P.E. powder cohere. The pressure loss of test mixture is measured by the straight circular pipe that has smooth inner surface. The measuring length for pressure loss is 1000 mm, and the inner diameter of pipe is 15mm. The accuracy of experiment apparatus for measuring pressure loss is within ±5%. The pressure loss data is estimated by the relationship between the heat transport ratio and the required pump power. It is clarified that the optimum range of mixing ratio exists over 10mass% of latent heat storage material.

  17. Thermal transport properties of halide solid solutions: Experiments vs equilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheribi, Aïmen E.; Salanne, Mathieu; Chartrand, Patrice

    2015-03-01

    The composition dependence of thermal transport properties of the (Na,K)Cl rocksalt solid solution is investigated through equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations in the entire range of composition and the results are compared with experiments published in recent work [Gheribi et al., J. Chem. phys. 141, 104508 (2014)]. The thermal diffusivity of the (Na,K)Cl solid solution has been measured from 473 K to 823 K using the laser flash technique, and the thermal conductivity was deduced from critically assessed data of heat capacity and density. The thermal conductivity was also predicted at 900 K in the entire range of composition by a series of EMD simulations in both NPT and NVT statistical ensembles using the Green-Kubo theory. The aim of the present paper is to provide an objective analysis of the capability of EMD simulations in predicting the composition dependence of the thermal transport properties of halide solid solutions. According to the Klemens-Callaway [P. G. Klemens, Phys. Rev. 119, 507 (1960) and J. Callaway and H. C. von Bayer, Phys. Rev. 120, 1149 (1960)] theory, the thermal conductivity degradation of the solid solution is explained by mass and strain field fluctuations upon the phonon scattering cross section. A rigorous analysis of the consistency between the theoretical approach and the EMD simulations is discussed in detail.

  18. Catchment travel and residence time distributions: a theoretical framework for solute transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, G.; Bertuzzo, E.; Rinaldo, A.

    2011-12-01

    The probability density functions (pdf's) of travel and residence times are key descriptors of the mechanisms through which catchments retain and release old and event water, transporting solutes to receiving water bodies. In this contribution we derive a general stochastic framework applicable to arbitrary catchment control volumes, where time-variable precipitation, evapotranspiration and discharge are assumed to be the major hydrological drivers for water and solutes. A master equation for the residence time pdf is derived and solved analytically, providing expressions for travel and residence time pdf's as a function of input/output fluxes and of the relevant mixing processes occurring along streamflow production and plant upatke. Our solutions suggest intrinsically time variant travel and residence time pdf's through a direct dependence on the underlying hydrological forcings and soil vegetation dynamics. The proposed framework highlights the dependence of water/solute travel times on eco-hydrological processes (especially transpiration and uptake), and integrates age-dating and tracer hydrology techniques by providing a coherent framework for catchment transport models. An application to the release of pesticides from an agricultural watershead is also discussed.

  19. Impact of space-time mesh adaptation on solute transport modeling in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiar, Bahman; Porta, Giovanni; Perotto, Simona; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2015-02-01

    We implement a space-time grid adaptation procedure to efficiently improve the accuracy of numerical simulations of solute transport in porous media in the context of model parameter estimation. We focus on the Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE) for the interpretation of nonreactive transport experiments in laboratory-scale heterogeneous porous media. When compared to a numerical approximation based on a fixed space-time discretization, our approach is grounded on a joint automatic selection of the spatial grid and the time step to capture the main (space-time) system dynamics. Spatial mesh adaptation is driven by an anisotropic recovery-based error estimator which enables us to properly select the size, shape, and orientation of the mesh elements. Adaptation of the time step is performed through an ad hoc local reconstruction of the temporal derivative of the solution via a recovery-based approach. The impact of the proposed adaptation strategy on the ability to provide reliable estimates of the key parameters of an ADE model is assessed on the basis of experimental solute breakthrough data measured following tracer injection in a nonuniform porous system. Model calibration is performed in a Maximum Likelihood (ML) framework upon relying on the representation of the ADE solution through a generalized Polynomial Chaos Expansion (gPCE). Our results show that the proposed anisotropic space-time grid adaptation leads to ML parameter estimates and to model results of markedly improved quality when compared to classical inversion approaches based on a uniform space-time discretization.

  20. Thermal transport properties of halide solid solutions: Experiments vs equilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gheribi, Aïmen E. Chartrand, Patrice; Salanne, Mathieu

    2015-03-28

    The composition dependence of thermal transport properties of the (Na,K)Cl rocksalt solid solution is investigated through equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations in the entire range of composition and the results are compared with experiments published in recent work [Gheribi et al., J. Chem. phys. 141, 104508 (2014)]. The thermal diffusivity of the (Na,K)Cl solid solution has been measured from 473 K to 823 K using the laser flash technique, and the thermal conductivity was deduced from critically assessed data of heat capacity and density. The thermal conductivity was also predicted at 900 K in the entire range of composition by a series of EMD simulations in both NPT and NVT statistical ensembles using the Green-Kubo theory. The aim of the present paper is to provide an objective analysis of the capability of EMD simulations in predicting the composition dependence of the thermal transport properties of halide solid solutions. According to the Klemens-Callaway [P. G. Klemens, Phys. Rev. 119, 507 (1960) and J. Callaway and H. C. von Bayer, Phys. Rev. 120, 1149 (1960)] theory, the thermal conductivity degradation of the solid solution is explained by mass and strain field fluctuations upon the phonon scattering cross section. A rigorous analysis of the consistency between the theoretical approach and the EMD simulations is discussed in detail.

  1. Upscaling of Solute Transport in Heterogeneous Media with Non-uniform Flow and Dispersion Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2013-10-01

    An analytical and computational model for non-reactive solute transport in periodic heterogeneous media with arbitrary non-uniform flow and dispersion fields within the unit cell of length ε is described. The model lumps the effect of non-uniform flow and dispersion into an effective advection velocity Ve and an effective dispersion coefficient De. It is shown that both Ve and De are scale-dependent (dependent on the length scale of the microscopic heterogeneity, ε), dependent on the Péclet number Pe, and on a dimensionless parameter α that represents the effects of microscopic heterogeneity. The parameter α, confined to the range of [-0.5, 0.5] for the numerical example presented, depends on the flow direction and non-uniform flow and dispersion fields. Effective advection velocity Ve and dispersion coefficient De can be derived for any given flow and dispersion fields, and . Homogenized solutions describing the macroscopic variations can be obtained from the effective model. Solutions with sub-unit-cell accuracy can be constructed by homogenized solutions and its spatial derivatives. A numerical implementation of the model compared with direct numerical solutions using a fine grid, demonstrated that the new method was in good agreement with direct solutions, but with significant computational savings.