Science.gov

Sample records for active sonar systems

  1. Digital sonar system

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.K.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1995-11-21

    A transponder of an active digital sonar system identifies a multifrequency underwater activating sonar signal received from a remote sonar transmitter. The transponder includes a transducer that receives acoustic waves, including the activating sonar signal, and generates an analog electrical receipt signal. The analog electrical receipt signal is converted to a digital receipt signal and cross-correlated with a digital transmission signal pattern corresponding to the activating sonar signal. A relative peak in the cross-correlation value is indicative of the activating sonar signal having been received by the transponder. In response to identifying the activating sonar signal, the transponder transmits a responding multifrequency sonar signal. 4 figs.

  2. Digital sonar system

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Kenneth K.; Wilkes, R. Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    A transponder of an active digital sonar system identifies a multifrequency underwater activating sonar signal received from a remote sonar transmitter. The transponder includes a transducer that receives acoustic waves, including the activating sonar signal, and generates an analog electrical receipt signal. The analog electrical receipt signal is converted to a digital receipt signal and cross-correlated with a digital transmission signal pattern corresponding to the activating sonar signal. A relative peak in the cross-correlation value is indicative of the activating sonar signal having been received by the transponder. In response to identifying the activating sonar signal, the transponder transmits a responding multifrequency sonar signal.

  3. Active Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Edmund J.

    An active sonar system is one in which pulses of acoustic energy are launched into the water for the purpose of producing echoes. By examining the echoes of transmitted pulses, it affords the capability of both detecting the presence of and estimating the range, and in certain cases, the bearing, of an underwater target. In its most common arrangement, the transmitter (or projector) and the receiver are colocated. This is known as the monostatic configuration and is depicted in Figure 1. When this is not so, it is known as a bistatic or multistatic configuration.

  4. 77 FR 52317 - Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active Sonar

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Navy Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active... Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) sonar systems with certain...

  5. Sonar Locator Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An underwater locator device called a Pinger is attached to an airplane's flight recorder for recovery in case of a crash. Burnett Electronics Pinger Model 512 resulted from a Burnett Electronics Laboratory, Inc./Langley Research Center contract for development of a search system for underwater mines. The Pinger's battery-powered transmitter is activated when immersed in water, and sends multidirectional signals for up to 500 hours. When a surface receiver picks up the signal, a diver can retrieve the pinger and the attached airplane flight recorder. Other pingers are used to track whales, mark underwater discoveries and assist oil drilling vessels.

  6. Effects of surveillance towed array sensor system (SURTASS) low frequency active sonar on fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popper, Arthur N.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Miller, Diane; Smith, Michael E.; Song, Jiakun; Wysocki, Lidia E.; Hastings, Mardi C.; Kane, Andrew S.; Stein, Peter

    2005-04-01

    We investigated the effects of exposure to Low Frequency Active (LFA) sonar on rainbow trout (a hearing non-specialist related to several endangered salmonids) and channel catfish (a hearing specialist), using an element of the standard SURTASS LFA source array. We measured hearing sensitivity using auditory brainstem response, effects on inner ear structure using scanning electron microscopy, effects on non-auditory tissues using general pathology and histopathology, and behavioral effects with video monitoring. Exposure to 193 dB re 1 microPa (rms received level) in the LFA frequency band for 324 seconds resulted in a TTS of 20 dB at 400 Hz in rainbow trout, with less TTS at 100 and 200 Hz. TTS in catfish ranged from 6 to 12 dB at frequencies from 200 to 1000 Hz. Both species recovered from hearing loss in several days. Inner ears sensory tissues appeared unaffected by acoustic exposure. Gross pathology indicated no damage to non-auditory tissues, including the swim bladder. Both species showed consistent startle responses at sound onsets and changed their position relative to the sound source during exposures. There was no fish death attributable to sound exposure even up to four days post-exposure. [Work supported by Chief of Naval Operations.

  7. Detector analysis for shallow water active sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Thomas J.; Phillips, Michael E.

    2002-11-01

    SPAWAR Systems Center-San Diego, in concert with the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has designed and built a proof-of-concept broadband biomimetic sonar. This proof-of-concept sonar emulates a dolphin biosonar system; emitted broadband signals approximate the frequency and time domain characteristics of signals produced by echolocating dolphins, the receive system is spatially modeled after the binaural geometry of the dolphin, and signal processing algorithms incorporate sequential integration of aspect varying returns. As with any sonar, object detection in shallow water while maintaining an acceptable false alarm rate is an important problem. A comprehensive parametric analysis of detection algorithms is presented, focusing primarily on two detector strategies: a matched filter and a spectral detector. The spectral detector compares the ratio of in-band to out-of-band power, and thus functions something like a phase-incoherent matched filter. This computationally efficient detector is shown to perform well with high proportional bandwidth signals. The detector (either matched filter or spectral) is coupled with an alpha-beta tracker which maintains a running noise estimate and calculates signal excess above the estimated noise level which is compared to a fixed threshold.

  8. Sonar location system for freely floating buoys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, I. G.

    1983-05-01

    A rf interrogated sonar location system for freely floating buoys is described. The location of an array of up to three buoys may be determined on an almost continuous basis within a radius of 500 m from a shipboard monitoring station. Location accuracy of typically ±0.5 m at 200-m range, low cost, and ease of operation are the major features of the system.

  9. Physics and technical characteristics of ultrasonic sonar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclsaac, Dan; Hämäläinen, Ari

    2002-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, ultrasonic sonar technology has become more prevalent in teaching introductory mechanics laboratories. Hence, an awareness of the physics, measurement constraints, classroom limitations, and pedagogic practices underlying these systems is beneficial professional knowledge for introductory mechanics instructors. This article describes the physics behind these systems at length, discusses Polaroid system technical constraints and behaviors, and suggests solutions for common problematic classroom situations. Alternate classroom sonar systems and sonar-related curricula materials are also addressed.

  10. High-frequency laser sonar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cray, Benjamin A.; Sarma, Ashwin; Kirsteins, Ivars P.

    2002-11-01

    A set of measurements recently completed at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) demonstrated that a laser-based sonar system can be used to detect acoustic particle velocity on the surface of a thin acoustically-compliant plate embedded beneath a standard acoustic window. The theoretical acoustic and measured surface particle velocity varied by less than 1 dB (reference m/s) over a wide frequency band (10 kHz to 100 kHz). However, the Polytec Model PSV-100 Scanning Laser Vibrometer System (SLVS) used in the experiments had relatively poor acoustic sensitivity, presumably due to high electronic noise, speckle noise, stand-off distance, and drifting laser focus. The laser's acoustic sensitivity appears to be inversely proportional to the backscatter signal level. The existing SLVS can sample a grid of 512 by 512 points, with each grid point having a spot size of approximately 10 mm (0.0004 in.). Such fine sampling may be used to create essentially a continuous aperture, eliminating acoustic grating lobes at all frequencies of practical sonar interest.

  11. Delphinid behavioral responses to incidental mid-frequency active sonar.

    PubMed

    Henderson, E Elizabeth; Smith, Michael H; Gassmann, Martin; Wiggins, Sean M; Douglas, Annie B; Hildebrand, John A

    2014-10-01

    Opportunistic observations of behavioral responses by delphinids to incidental mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar were recorded in the Southern California Bight from 2004 through 2008 using visual focal follows, static hydrophones, and autonomous recorders. Sound pressure levels were calculated between 2 and 8 kHz. Surface behavioral responses were observed in 26 groups from at least three species of 46 groups out of five species encountered during MFA sonar incidents. Responses included changes in behavioral state or direction of travel, changes in vocalization rates and call intensity, or a lack of vocalizations while MFA sonar occurred. However, 46% of focal groups not exposed to sonar also changed their behavior, and 43% of focal groups exposed to sonar did not change their behavior. Mean peak sound pressure levels when a behavioral response occurred were around 122 dB re: 1 μPa. Acoustic localizations of dolphin groups exhibiting a response gave insight into nighttime movement patterns and provided evidence that impacts of sonar may be mediated by behavioral state. The lack of response in some cases may indicate a tolerance of or habituation to MFA sonar by local populations; however, the responses that occur at lower received levels may point to some sensitization as well. PMID:25324099

  12. Active sonar, beaked whales and European regional policy.

    PubMed

    Dolman, Sarah J; Evans, Peter G H; Notarbartolo-di-Sciara, Giuseppe; Frisch, Heidrun

    2011-01-01

    Various reviews, resolutions and guidance from international and regional fora have been produced in recent years that acknowledge the significance of marine noise and its potential impacts on cetaceans. Within Europe, ACCOBAMS and ASCOBANS have shown increasing attention to the issue. The literature highlights concerns surrounding the negative impacts of active sonar on beaked whales in particular, where concerns primarily relate to the use of mid-frequency active sonar (1-10kHz), as used particularly in military exercises. The authors review the efforts that European regional policies have undertaken to acknowledge and manage possible negative impacts of active sonar and how these might assist the transition from scientific research to policy implementation, including effective management and mitigation measures at a national level. PMID:20451221

  13. Development of a sonar-based object recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecemis, Mustafa Ihsan

    2001-02-01

    Sonars are used extensively in mobile robotics for obstacle detection, ranging and avoidance. However, these range-finding applications do not exploit the full range of information carried in sonar echoes. In addition, mobile robots need robust object recognition systems. Therefore, a simple and robust object recognition system using ultrasonic sensors may have a wide range of applications in robotics. This dissertation develops and analyzes an object recognition system that uses ultrasonic sensors of the type commonly found on mobile robots. Three principal experiments are used to test the sonar recognition system: object recognition at various distances, object recognition during unconstrained motion, and softness discrimination. The hardware setup, consisting of an inexpensive Polaroid sonar and a data acquisition board, is described first. The software for ultrasound signal generation, echo detection, data collection, and data processing is then presented. Next, the dissertation describes two methods to extract information from the echoes, one in the frequency domain and the other in the time domain. The system uses the fuzzy ARTMAP neural network to recognize objects on the basis of the information content of their echoes. In order to demonstrate that the performance of the system does not depend on the specific classification method being used, the K- Nearest Neighbors (KNN) Algorithm is also implemented. KNN yields a test accuracy similar to fuzzy ARTMAP in all experiments. Finally, the dissertation describes a method for extracting features from the envelope function in order to reduce the dimension of the input vector used by the classifiers. Decreasing the size of the input vectors reduces the memory requirements of the system and makes it run faster. It is shown that this method does not affect the performance of the system dramatically and is more appropriate for some tasks. The results of these experiments demonstrate that sonar can be used to develop

  14. Shallow water imaging sonar system for environmental surveying. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The scope of this research is to develop a shallow water sonar system designed to detect and map the location of objects such as hazardous wastes or discarded ordnance in coastal waters. The system will use high frequency wide-bandwidth imaging sonar, mounted on a moving platform towed behind a boat, to detect and identify objects on the sea bottom. Resolved images can be obtained even if the targets are buried in an overlayer of silt. The specific technical objective of this research was to develop and test a prototype system that is capable of (1) scan at high speeds (up to 10m/s), even in shallow water (depth to ten meters), without motion blurring or loss of resolution; (2) produce images of the bottom structure that are detailed enough for unambiguous detection of objects as small as 15cm, even if they are buried up to 30cm deep in silt or sand. The critical technology involved uses an linear FM (LFM) or similar complex waveform, which has a high bandwidth for good range resolution, with a long pulse length for similar Dopper resolution. The lone duration signal deposits more energy on target than a narrower pulse, which increases the signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-clutter ratio. This in turn allows the use of cheap, lightweight, low power, piezoelectric transducers at the 30--500 kHz range.

  15. Early Results from the IMI-30 Towed Sonar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M. H.; Rognstad, M. R.; Tottori, S. N.; Davis, R. B.; Appelgate, T. B.; Johnson, P. D.; Kevis-Stirling, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Hawaii Mapping Research Group (HMRG) of the University of Hawaii has designed and built a 30 kHz deep-towed sonar, the IMI-30, which simultaneously collects interferometric bathymetry and backscatter data. The sonar is capable of being deployed to 6000 m water depth, where it is towed 100-500 m above the seafloor yielding a total swath width of 1-5 km for sidescan and somewhat less than that for bathymetry. The across-track resolution is <10 m for bathymetry depending on towing geometry and substrate type, and 0.3- 3 m for sidescan, depending on the selected transmit pulse length and tow vehicle altitude. The along-track resolution, which is dependent on vehicle speed and pulse repetition rate, varies between 0.6 and 3 meters. Here we report on data collected by the system during two different deployments in the Pacific: the IMI-30's initial field program in the Lau Basin in 2004 and the most recent survey using the system, south of Oahu in June of 2006. Between the 2004 Lau program and the June 2006 survey, several engineering improvements were made including: 1) changing the housings of the side-looking transducers from cast polyurethane to oil- filled polyethylene; 2) adding syntactic foam baffling to reduce surface bounce; 3) synchronizing sound velocimeter measurements with sonar transmit; 4) adding sub-bottom transducers and associated electronics to the tow vehicle; 5) adding two additional side-looking transducer rows per side, and 6) upgrading the surface and subsurface power supplies. This engineering effort has improved reliability of the system by eliminating transducer failures caused by seawater leakage and power supply over-temperature shutdown in tropical waters. Reducing the system noise - electrical, hydrodynamic, and acoustic - has improved data quality and extended the swath width. The addition of sub-bottom data acquisition further increases the utility of the IMI-30 system. Our presentation will document the engineering effort and

  16. Digitally controlled sonars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Sonars are usually designed and constructed as stand alone instruments. That is, all elements or subsystems of the sonar are provided: power conditioning, displays, intercommunications, control, receiver, transmitter, and transducer. The sonars which are a part of the Advanced Ocean Test Development Platform (AOTDP) represent a departure from this manner of implementation and are configured more like an instrumentation system. Only the transducer, transmitter, and receiver which are unique to a particular sonar function; Up, Down, Side Scan, exist as separable subsystems. The remaining functions are reserved to the AOTDP and serve all sonars and other instrumentation in a shared manner. The organization and functions of the common AOTDP elements were described and then the interface with the sonars discussed. The techniques for software control of the sonar parameters were explained followed by the details of the realization of the sonar functions and some discussion of the performance of the side scan sonars.

  17. Digitally controlled sonars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, G. R.

    1983-10-01

    Sonars are usually designed and constructed as stand alone instruments. That is, all elements or subsystems of the sonar are provided: power conditioning, displays, intercommunications, control, receiver, transmitter, and transducer. The sonars which are a part of the Advanced Ocean Test Development Platform (AOTDP) represent a departure from this manner of implementation and are configured more like an instrumentation system. Only the transducer, transmitter, and receiver which are unique to a particular sonar function; Up, Down, Side Scan, exist as separable subsystems. The remaining functions are reserved to the AOTDP and serve all sonars and other instrumentation in a shared manner. The organization and functions of the common AOTDP elements were described and then the interface with the sonars discussed. The techniques for software control of the sonar parameters were explained followed by the details of the realization of the sonar functions and some discussion of the performance of the side scan sonars.

  18. Active Fish Tracking Sonar (AFTS) for Assessing Fish Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hedgepeth, J; Johnson, Gary E. ); Skalski, John R.; Burczynski, J

    2002-11-01

    Active fish tracking sonars (AFTS) were used in 2001 to study fish movement in response to intake occlusion plates at The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River. AFTS provides three-dimensional fish tracks by aligning the axis of a split-beam transducer with a fish target. High-speed stepper motors move the transducer so that a tracked target remains on-axis. Occlusion plates with lateral extensions covered the top half of the turbine intakes to produce a fish friendly near-dam environment. Two AFTS were positioned at the center of Main Unit 1, one each for monitoring installed and removed plate conditions. A regression analysis showed that occlusion plates had pronounced effects on fish movement along the dam. The plates appeared to inhibit movement toward the spillway, movement toward the dam (especially in front of the turbine intake), and movement downward toward the turbines. Fish fate (as opposed to movement directions from regression slopes) into particular areas was determined using Markov-chain analysis. The sluiceway (a safer passage route above the turbine intake) zone of influence was larger with the occlusion plates installed, contrary to the regression results. In addition, the probability of passage out the near turbine and bottom sides of the sample volume was about 50% lower with occlusion plates installed.

  19. Application of musical timbre discrimination features to active sonar classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Victor W.; Hines, Paul C.; Pecknold, Sean

    2005-04-01

    In musical acoustics significant effort has been devoted to uncovering the physical basis of timbre perception. Most investigations into timbre rely on multidimensional scaling (MDS), in which different musical sounds are arranged as points in multidimensional space. The Euclidean distance between points corresponds to the perceptual distance between sounds and the multidimensional axes are linked to measurable properties of the sounds. MDS has identified numerous temporal and spectral features believed to be important to timbre perception. There is reason to believe that some of these features may have wider application in the disparate field of underwater acoustics, since anecdotal evidence suggests active sonar returns from metallic objects sound different than natural clutter returns when auralized by human operators. This is particularly encouraging since attempts to develop robust automatic classifiers capable of target-clutter discrimination over a wide range of operational conditions have met with limited success. Spectral features relevant to target-clutter discrimination are believed to include click-pitch and envelope irregularity; relevant temporal features are believed to include duration, sub-band attack/decay time, and time separation pitch. Preliminary results from an investigation into the role of these timbre features in target-clutter discrimination will be presented. [Work supported by NSERC and GDC.

  20. First results of a deep tow CHIRP sonar seafloor imaging system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parent, M.; Fang, Changle; O'Brien, Thomas F.; Danforth, William W.

    1993-01-01

    The latest and most innovative technology has been applied towards the development of a full-ocean depth multi-sensor sonar system using linear swept-FM (Chirp) technology. The seafloor imaging system (SIS- 7000) described herein uses Chirp sidescan sonar to provide high resolution imagery at long range, and Chirp subbottom sonar to provide high resolution profiles in both the near bottom and deeper subbottom. The tow vehicle contains a suite of full-ocean depth instrumentation for measuring various oceanographic parameters and for monitoring vehicle status. Top side systems include a sonar display and data logging system as well as real-time sensor status display and tow vehicle control system. This paper will present an overview of this system, describe its technology and capabilities, and present some initial results. 

  1. First direct measurements of behavioural responses by Cuvier's beaked whales to mid-frequency active sonar.

    PubMed

    DeRuiter, Stacy L; Southall, Brandon L; Calambokidis, John; Zimmer, Walter M X; Sadykova, Dinara; Falcone, Erin A; Friedlaender, Ari S; Joseph, John E; Moretti, David; Schorr, Gregory S; Thomas, Len; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-08-23

    Most marine mammal- strandings coincident with naval sonar exercises have involved Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). We recorded animal movement and acoustic data on two tagged Ziphius and obtained the first direct measurements of behavioural responses of this species to mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar signals. Each recording included a 30-min playback (one 1.6-s simulated MFA sonar signal repeated every 25 s); one whale was also incidentally exposed to MFA sonar from distant naval exercises. Whales responded strongly to playbacks at low received levels (RLs; 89-127 dB re 1 µPa): after ceasing normal fluking and echolocation, they swam rapidly, silently away, extending both dive duration and subsequent non-foraging interval. Distant sonar exercises (78-106 dB re 1 µPa) did not elicit such responses, suggesting that context may moderate reactions. The observed responses to playback occurred at RLs well below current regulatory thresholds; equivalent responses to operational sonars could elevate stranding risk and reduce foraging efficiency. PMID:23825085

  2. First direct measurements of behavioural responses by Cuvier's beaked whales to mid-frequency active sonar

    PubMed Central

    DeRuiter, Stacy L.; Southall, Brandon L.; Calambokidis, John; Zimmer, Walter M. X.; Sadykova, Dinara; Falcone, Erin A.; Friedlaender, Ari S.; Joseph, John E.; Moretti, David; Schorr, Gregory S.; Thomas, Len; Tyack, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Most marine mammal­ strandings coincident with naval sonar exercises have involved Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). We recorded animal movement and acoustic data on two tagged Ziphius and obtained the first direct measurements of behavioural responses of this species to mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar signals. Each recording included a 30-min playback (one 1.6-s simulated MFA sonar signal repeated every 25 s); one whale was also incidentally exposed to MFA sonar from distant naval exercises. Whales responded strongly to playbacks at low received levels (RLs; 89–127 dB re 1 µPa): after ceasing normal fluking and echolocation, they swam rapidly, silently away, extending both dive duration and subsequent non-foraging interval. Distant sonar exercises (78–106 dB re 1 µPa) did not elicit such responses, suggesting that context may moderate reactions. The observed responses to playback occurred at RLs well below current regulatory thresholds; equivalent responses to operational sonars could elevate stranding risk and reduce foraging efficiency. PMID:23825085

  3. Application of Digital Polarity Correlators in a Sonar Ranging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Tetsuji; Nakahira, Kenji; Kanaya, Yuuki; Yoshikawa, Takahiko

    In robotics applications, ultrasonic transducers are frequently used as rangefinders, thanks to their low cost and small size. The pulse compression techniques were adopted to locate multiple objects at the same time and to eliminate frequent misreadings caused by crosstalk or external ultrasound sources. However, a few problems become apparent when implementing the pulse compression techniques. First, each transducer must be equipped with a processing system for the implementation of correlation functions. This may significantly increase the complexity of the total system, cutting down one of the advantages of ultrasonic systems. Second, the majority of transducers for use in air are based on piezoelectric design, which usually used over a narrow bandwidth. Among digital correlators, significant reductions of the processing cost can be achieved with a polarity correlator. However, this polarity correlation adds quantisation noise to the signals and leads to a degradation of the output signal to noise ratio. This paper presents an analysis of the polarity correlator applying to a sonar ranging system, consisting of piezoelectric transducers and a chirp filter. A numerical evaluation of the output signal shows that the signal to noise ratio degrades only a small amount comparable with that obtained by direct digital correlators.

  4. The application of m-sequences to bi-static active sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deferrari, Harry A.

    2003-10-01

    The m-sequences are ideal pulse compression signals that combine the energy of CW with the resolution of a pulse. Successful applications include numerous acoustic propagation experiments and the Global Positioning System. Yet, early attempts (circa 1960) to apply m-sequences to mono-static active sonar were unsuccessful. Through the years, Birdsall, Metzger and others have developed a body of theory, numerical methods and at-sea demonstrations that establish the feasibility of a novel bi-static approach-one that holds promise in high reverberation shallow water environs. An analysis is presented here. The approach includes (1) continuous transmission of long m-sequences (2) synchronous sampling to form a CON (Complete Ortho-Normal) data set; (3) direct blast removal by HCCO (Hyperspace Cancellation by Coordinate Zeroing); and (4) a full range waveform Doppler search. Ultra-fast Hadamard Transforms speed up the direct waveform pulse m-sequence pulse compression and the inverse pulse waveform transform and thereby allow timely execution of the intensive computational burden. The result is a demonstrable approach that produces a gain of 30 dB over a simple pulse and 10 dB over other sonar signals. In the end, the approach requires continuous transmission and reception as opposed to ping and listen an awkward concept at first.

  5. Digital processing of side-scan sonar data with the Woods Hole image processing system software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paskevich, Valerie F.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1985, the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology has been involved in collecting, processing and digitally mosaicking high and low-resolution side-scan sonar data. Recent development of a UNIX-based image-processing software system includes a series of task specific programs for processing side-scan sonar data. This report describes the steps required to process the collected data and to produce an image that has equal along- and across-track resol

  6. The Subarray MVDR Beamformer: A Space-Time Adaptive Processor Applied to Active Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezanson, Leverett Guidroz

    The research for this thesis was mainly performed at the NATO Underwater Research Center, now named the Center for Maritime Research and Experimentation (CMRE). The purpose of the research was to improve the detection of underwater targets in the littoral ocean when using active sonar. Currently these detections are being made by towed line arrays using a delay and sum beamformer for bearing measurements and noise suppression. This method of beamforming has can suffer from reverberation that commonly is present in the littoral environment. A proposed solution is to use an adaptive beamformer which can attenuate reverberation and increase the bearing resolution. The adaptive beamforming algorithms have existed for a long time and typically are not used in the active case due to limited amount of observable data that is needed for adaptation. This deficiency is caused by the conflicting requirements for high Doppler resolution for target detection and small time windows for building up full-rank covariance estimates. The algorithms also are sensitive to bearing estimate errors that commonly occur in active sonar systems. Recently it has been proposed to overcome these limitations through the use of reduced beamspace adaptive beamforming. The Subarray MVDR beamformer is analyzed, both against simulated data and against experimental data collected by CMRE during the GLINT/NGAS11 experiment in 2011. Simulation results indicate that the Subarray MVDR beamformer rejects interfering signals that are not effectively attenuated by conventional beamforming. The application of the Subarray MVDR beamformer to the experimental data shows that the Doppler spread of the reverberation ridge is reduced, and the bearing resolution improved. The signal to noise ratio is calculated at the target location and also shows improvement. These calculated and observed performance metrics indicate an improvement of detection in reverberation noise.

  7. 78 FR 70567 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... technology would be used in support of USCG missions to locate, image, and classify submerged/underwater... ability to locate, image, and classify underwater threats and other TOIs. HF and UHF SONAR technology... activities. The USCG needs to broaden its capability to locate, image, and classify submerged/underwater...

  8. 75 FR 81284 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Background and Purpose Purpose.... Active SONAR technology would be used in support of USCG missions to locate, image, and classify... the ability to locate, image, and classify underwater threats and other TOIs. HF and UHF...

  9. Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density smoothing with multistatic sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandakumaran, N.; Tharmarasa, R.; Lang, T.; Kirubarajan, T.

    2008-04-01

    Passive sonar is widely used in practice to covertly detect maritime vessels. However, the detection of stealthy vessels often requires active sonar. The risk of the overt nature of active sonar operation can be reduced by using multistatic sonar techniques. Cheap sonar sensors that do not require any beamforming technique can be exploited in a multistatic system for spacial diversity. In this paper, Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GMPHD) filter, which is a computationally cheap multitarget tracking algorithm, is used to track multiple targets using the multistatic sonar system that provides only bistatic range and Doppler measurements. The filtering results are further improved by extending the recently developed PHD smoothing algorithm for GMPHD. This new backward smoothing algorithm provides delayed, but better, estimates for the target state. Simulations are performed with the proposed method on a 2-D scenario. Simulation results present the benefits of the proposed algorithm.

  10. Patterns of Occurrence and Marine Mammal Acoustic Behavior in Relation to Navy Sonar Activity Off Jacksonville, Florida.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Julie N; Norris, Thomas F; Yack, Tina M; Ferguson, Elizabeth L; Kumar, Anurag; Nissen, Jene; Bell, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Passive acoustic data collected from marine autonomous recording units deployed off Jacksonville, FL (from 13 September to 8 October 2009 and 3 December 2009 to 8 January 2010), were analyzed for detection of cetaceans and Navy sonar. Cetaceans detected included Balaenoptera acutorostrata, Eubalaena glacialis, B. borealis, Physeter macrocephalus, blackfish, and delphinids. E. glacialis were detected at shallow and, somewhat unexpectedly, deep sites. P. macrocephalus were characterized by a strong diel pattern. B. acutorostrata showed the strongest relationship between sonar activity and vocal behavior. These results provide a preliminary assessment of cetacean occurrence off Jacksonville and new insights on vocal responses to sonar. PMID:26611034

  11. Waveguide invariant active sonar target detection and depth classification in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhahn, Ryan A.

    Reverberation and clutter are two of the principle obstacles to active sonar target detection in shallow water. Diffuse seabed backscatter can obscure low energy target returns, while clutter discretes, specific features of the sea floor, produce temporally compact returns which may be mistaken for targets of interest. Detecting weak targets in the presence of reverberation and discriminating water column targets from bottom clutter are thus critical to good performance in active sonar. Both problems are addressed in this thesis using the time-frequency interference pattern described by a constant known as the waveguide invariant which summarizes in a scalar parameter the dispersive properties of the ocean environment. Conventional active sonar detection involves constant false alarm rate (CFAR) normalization of the reverberation return which does not account for the frequency-selective fading in a wideband pulse caused by multipath propagation. An alternative to conventional reverberation estimation is presented, motivated by striations observed in time-frequency analysis of active sonar data. A mathematical model for these reverberation striations is derived using waveguide invariant theory. This model is then used to motivate waveguide invariant reverberation estimation which involves averaging the time-frequency spectrum along these striations. An evaluation of this reverberation estimate using real Mediterranean data is given and its use in a generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT) based CFAR detector is demonstrated. CFAR detection using waveguide invariant reverberation estimates is shown to out-perform conventional cell-averaged and frequency-invariant CFAR detection methods in shallow water environments producing strong reverberation returns which exhibit the described striations. Results are presented on simulated and real Mediterranean data from the SCARAB98 experiment. The ability to discriminate between water column targets and clutter discretes is

  12. A Risk Function for Behavioral Disruption of Blainville’s Beaked Whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) from Mid-Frequency Active Sonar

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, David; Thomas, Len; Marques, Tiago; Harwood, John; Dilley, Ashley; Neales, Bert; Shaffer, Jessica; McCarthy, Elena; New, Leslie; Jarvis, Susan; Morrissey, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing concern about the potential effects of noise pollution on marine life in the world’s oceans. For marine mammals, anthropogenic sounds may cause behavioral disruption, and this can be quantified using a risk function that relates sound exposure to a measured behavioral response. Beaked whales are a taxon of deep diving whales that may be particularly susceptible to naval sonar as the species has been associated with sonar-related mass stranding events. Here we derive the first empirical risk function for Blainville’s beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) by combining in situ data from passive acoustic monitoring of animal vocalizations and navy sonar operations with precise ship tracks and sound field modeling. The hydrophone array at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center, Bahamas, was used to locate vocalizing groups of Blainville’s beaked whales and identify sonar transmissions before, during, and after Mid-Frequency Active (MFA) sonar operations. Sonar transmission times and source levels were combined with ship tracks using a sound propagation model to estimate the received level (RL) at each hydrophone. A generalized additive model was fitted to data to model the presence or absence of the start of foraging dives in 30-minute periods as a function of the corresponding sonar RL at the hydrophone closest to the center of each group. This model was then used to construct a risk function that can be used to estimate the probability of a behavioral change (cessation of foraging) the individual members of a Blainville’s beaked whale population might experience as a function of sonar RL. The function predicts a 0.5 probability of disturbance at a RL of 150dBrms re µPa (CI: 144 to 155) This is 15dB lower than the level used historically by the US Navy in their risk assessments but 10 dB higher than the current 140 dB step-function. PMID:24465477

  13. A risk function for behavioral disruption of Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) from mid-frequency active sonar.

    PubMed

    Moretti, David; Thomas, Len; Marques, Tiago; Harwood, John; Dilley, Ashley; Neales, Bert; Shaffer, Jessica; McCarthy, Elena; New, Leslie; Jarvis, Susan; Morrissey, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing concern about the potential effects of noise pollution on marine life in the world's oceans. For marine mammals, anthropogenic sounds may cause behavioral disruption, and this can be quantified using a risk function that relates sound exposure to a measured behavioral response. Beaked whales are a taxon of deep diving whales that may be particularly susceptible to naval sonar as the species has been associated with sonar-related mass stranding events. Here we derive the first empirical risk function for Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) by combining in situ data from passive acoustic monitoring of animal vocalizations and navy sonar operations with precise ship tracks and sound field modeling. The hydrophone array at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center, Bahamas, was used to locate vocalizing groups of Blainville's beaked whales and identify sonar transmissions before, during, and after Mid-Frequency Active (MFA) sonar operations. Sonar transmission times and source levels were combined with ship tracks using a sound propagation model to estimate the received level (RL) at each hydrophone. A generalized additive model was fitted to data to model the presence or absence of the start of foraging dives in 30-minute periods as a function of the corresponding sonar RL at the hydrophone closest to the center of each group. This model was then used to construct a risk function that can be used to estimate the probability of a behavioral change (cessation of foraging) the individual members of a Blainville's beaked whale population might experience as a function of sonar RL. The function predicts a 0.5 probability of disturbance at a RL of 150 dBrms re µPa (CI: 144 to 155) This is 15dB lower than the level used historically by the US Navy in their risk assessments but 10 dB higher than the current 140 dB step-function. PMID:24465477

  14. Digital mapping of side-scan sonar data with the Woods Hole Image Processing System software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paskevich, Valerie F.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1985, the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology has been involved in collecting, processing and digitally mosaicking high and low resolution sidescan sonar data. In the past, processing and digital mosaicking has been accomplished with a dedicated, shore-based computer system. Recent development of a UNIX-based image-processing software system includes a series of task specific programs for pre-processing sidescan sonar data. To extend the capabilities of the UNIX-based programs, development of digital mapping techniques have been developed. This report describes the initial development of an automated digital mapping procedure. Included is a description of the programs and steps required to complete the digital mosaicking on a UNIXbased computer system, and a comparison of techniques that the user may wish to select.

  15. Development of a handheld bistatic imaging sonar system for underwater search and survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Alice; Broadstone, Steven; Impagliazzo, John

    2003-10-01

    A high resolution, handheld imaging sonar system is under development by Teratech Corporation for the U.S. Navy. This is a 192 channel, dual frequency bistatic sonar for Navy divers performing search and survey missions for underwater explosives. Our goal is to provide the most compact and energy efficient imaging system for the divers. The system consists of a self-contained handheld unit and a head mounted display integrated into the divers mask. The low power and small volume are a result of the development of Teratechs Charge Domain Processing (CDP) technology. This technology has led to the development of a low power 64-channel beamformer chip. As a result, only three beamformer chips will be required for the 192 channels. Until now, the implementation of small, low power sonar systems containing this many elements and forming enough beams to create an image was considered impossible. Progress in the development of this product will be presented. In-water testing is planned for late summer 2003. Experimental results and test images available will be presented at the conference. [Work sponsored by ONR and OSD Small Business Innovative Research Program, Program manager, Mr. Bruce Johnson, Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division.

  16. Time domain beamforming ASIC for a handheld bistatic imaging sonar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Alice M.; Broadstone, Steven R.; Impagliazzo, John M.

    2001-05-01

    A high-resolution, handheld imaging sonar system has been developed by Teratech Corporation for the U.S. Navy. This is a 192-channel, dual-frequency bistatic sonar for Navy divers performing search and survey missions for underwater explosives. The goal is to provide the most compact and energy-efficient imaging system for the divers. The low power and small volume are a result of the development of Teratech's Charge Domain Processing (CDP) technology. This technology has led to the development of a low-power 64-channel beamformer chip. As a result, only three beamformer chips are needed for the 192-element array. Until now, implementation of small, low-power sonar systems containing this many elements and forming enough beams to create an image was considered impossible. Test results and acoustic images obtained in Teratech's acoustic test tank will be presented. [Work sponsored by ONR and OSD Small Business Innovative Research Program, Program Manager, Mr. Bruce Johnson, Naval Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technology Division.

  17. 77 FR 6080 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; U.S. Navy's Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ...In accordance with the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), as amended, and implementing regulations, notice is hereby given that NMFS has issued a letter of authorization (LOA) to the U.S. Navy (Navy) to take marine mammals incidental to Navy training, maintenance, and research, development, testing, and evaluation (RDT&E) activities to be conducted within the Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar......

  18. 75 FR 5055 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; U.S. Navy's Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training (AFAST)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... to AFAST training, maintenance, and RDT&E became effective on January 22, 2009 (74 FR 4843, January... conducted within the AFAST Study Area under regulations issued on January 22, 2009 (74 FR 4843, January 27.... Navy's Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training (AFAST) AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service...

  19. Ice/berm interaction study using rotary sidescan sonar and acoustic profiling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Good, R.R.; Anderson, K.G.; Lanzier, H.H.

    1984-05-01

    Tarsiut Island, in the Canadian Beaufort Sea, was the first dredged caisson retained island built for exploration drilling operations in the Arctic offshore. Due to the island's configuration location, a large first-year ice rubble pile would result from the ice/structure interaction. This paper outlines how a rotary side-scan sonar and a mechanically scanning, narrow-beam acoustic profiling system were used to determine the geometry and the contact area of the underside of heavily rubbled first-year ice. The results of this study are to be used to further the understanding of the nature and mechanism of the ice/structure interaction in Arctic offshore structures.

  20. Integrating new technologies into split-beam riverine sonar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, James

    2005-04-01

    While development has continued on both acoustic hardware and data processing software, parallel development has involved integration of other technologies. Users may now access and control acoustic systems over the Internet or phone lines. Smart system software can perform self-diagnostics, alert remote users of system status, and automatically adjust operational and physical parameters (such as transducer orientation) during autonomous operation. In addition, advanced remote and autonomous systems are capable of real-time analysis and decision-making functions enabling near real-time decisions and automated interactions with a variety of devices, such as modems, Ethernet adapters, motor controls, and on-site electro-mechanical devices. Details and benefits of these advances are presented in a variety of case studies.

  1. Geomorphic features off southern California as seen by GLORIA side-scan sonar system

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.D.; Field, M.E.; Carlson, P.R.; Kenyon, N.H.

    1985-02-01

    Approximately 165,000 km/sup 2/ of the sea floor off southern California was mapped during May 1984, as part of a USGS/IOS cooperative program to study the newly proclaimed Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the US Pacific margin. The area was insonified using the Geological Long-Range Inclined Asdic (GLORIA), a long-range side-scan sonar system. Images were corrected for water-column velocity anomalies, for along-track distortions caused by acoustic ray travel paths. A photomosaic of the overlapping sonographs has been compiled at a scale of 1:375,000. The basins of the inner California continental borderland are characterized by both sinuous channel and fan complexes and by feathery acoustic patterns indicating active sediment transport. In contrast, outer borderland basins appear to be more sediment starved, exhibit large areas of sediment failure, and show significant structural influence. West of Patton Escarpment, the sonographs are dominated by acoustic patterns showing volcanic ridges and seamounts and by deposits of the Monterey and Arguello fans. Arguello fan, for example, exhibits multiple sinuous channels that have transported sediment 60 km south from the canyon mouth. These channels coalesce into a single 100-km long, westward-meandering channel that terminates in a 600-m deep box canyon. A zone of sediment failure is identifiable on the north levee of an upper fan channel. Tectonic trends associated with oceanic basement are highlighted by the terminus of the west-trending Murray Fracture Zone and by the prevailing northeast trend of volcanic ridge and seamount chains.

  2. Potential Population Consequences of Active Sonar Disturbance in Atlantic Herring: Estimating the Maximum Risk.

    PubMed

    Sivle, Lise Doksæter; Kvadsheim, Petter Helgevold; Ainslie, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Effects of noise on fish populations may be predicted by the population consequence of acoustic disturbance (PCAD) model. We have predicted the potential risk of population disturbance when the highest sound exposure level (SEL) at which adult herring do not respond to naval sonar (SEL(0)) is exceeded. When the population density is low (feeding), the risk is low even at high sonar source levels and long-duration exercises (>24 h). With densely packed populations (overwintering), a sonar exercise might expose the entire population to levels >SEL(0) within a 24-h exercise period. However, the disturbance will be short and the response threshold used here is highly conservative. It is therefore unlikely that naval sonar will significantly impact the herring population. PMID:26610962

  3. Gain control in the sonar of odontocetes.

    PubMed

    Ya Supin, Alexander; Nachtigall, Paul E

    2013-06-01

    The sonar of odontocetes processes echo-signals within a wide range of echo levels. The level of echoes varies widely by tens of decibels depending on the level of the emitted sonar pulse, the target strength, the distance to the target, and the sound absorption by the water media. The auditory system of odontocetes must be capable of effective perception, analysis, and discrimination of echo-signals within all this variability. The sonar of odontocetes has several mechanisms to compensate for the echo-level variation (gain control). To date, several mechanisms of the biosonar gain control have been revealed in odontocetes: (1) adjustment of emitted sonar pulse levels (the longer the distance to the target, the higher the level of the emitted pulse), (2) short-term variation of hearing sensitivity based on forward masking of the echo by the preceding self-heard emitted pulse and subsequent release from the masking, and (3) active long-term control of hearing sensitivity. Recent investigations with the use of the auditory evoked-potential technique have demonstrated that these mechanisms effectively minimize the variation of the response to the echo when either the emitted sonar pulse level, or the target distance, or both vary within a wide range. A short review of these data is presented herein. PMID:23132646

  4. Design of a multi-sensor sonar system for indoor range measurement as a navigational aid for the blind.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Maroof H; Barreto, Armando

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the methodology for the design of a sonar-based ranging and guidance system. The intended application of the system is to help a blind person avoid obstacles as he/she navigates his/her environment. Six sonar transceivers are arranged radially on a headgear worn by the user. The transceivers detect discrete range data at discrete-time sampling instances. A panoramic map of the environment is generated from the discrete-space sensory data. The paper emphasizes the challenges faced during the measurement of omnidirectional ranging information in indoor environments. Situations have been identified where erroneous range readings are generated due to channel cross talk caused by echo bouncing off multiple surfaces. Several sonar control and measurement schemes were developed and tested to avoid these situations. The results and performance of these different control schemes are compared in this paper. A microcontroller-based system commands the sonar ping sequences, acquires the echo return times and computes the ranges. The set of range data is transmitted to a PC, which utilizes the information to build a spatialized audio map of the surrounding obstacles. The hardware and software layout for the system are described in this paper. PMID:12724864

  5. Optimization of Adaboost Algorithm for Sonar Target Detection in a Multi-Stage ATR System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Tsung Han (Hank)

    2011-01-01

    JPL has developed a multi-stage Automated Target Recognition (ATR) system to locate objects in images. First, input images are preprocessed and sent to a Grayscale Optical Correlator (GOC) filter to identify possible regions-of-interest (ROIs). Second, feature extraction operations are performed using Texton filters and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Finally, the features are fed to a classifier, to identify ROIs that contain the targets. Previous work used the Feed-forward Back-propagation Neural Network for classification. In this project we investigate a version of Adaboost as a classifier for comparison. The version we used is known as GentleBoost. We used the boosted decision tree as the weak classifier. We have tested our ATR system against real-world sonar images using the Adaboost approach. Results indicate an improvement in performance over a single Neural Network design.

  6. Improvement of energy efficiency via spectrum optimization of excitation sequence for multichannel simultaneously triggered airborne sonar system.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing-Hao; Yao, Zhen-Jing; Peng, Han-Yang

    2009-12-01

    Both the energy efficiency and correlation characteristics are important in airborne sonar systems to realize multichannel ultrasonic transducers working together. High energy efficiency can increase echo energy and measurement range, and sharp autocorrelation and flat cross correlation can help eliminate cross-talk among multichannel transducers. This paper addresses energy efficiency optimization under the premise that cross-talk between different sonar transducers can be avoided. The nondominated sorting genetic algorithm-II is applied to optimize both the spectrum and correlation characteristics of the excitation sequence. The central idea of the spectrum optimization is to distribute most of the energy of the excitation sequence within the frequency band of the sonar transducer; thus, less energy is filtered out by the transducers. Real experiments show that a sonar system consisting of eight-channel Polaroid 600 series electrostatic transducers excited with 2 ms optimized pulse-position-modulation sequences can work together without cross-talk and can measure distances up to 650 cm with maximal 1% relative error. PMID:20059163

  7. Improvement of energy efficiency via spectrum optimization of excitation sequence for multichannel simultaneously triggered airborne sonar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Hao; Yao, Zhen-Jing; Peng, Han-Yang

    2009-12-01

    Both the energy efficiency and correlation characteristics are important in airborne sonar systems to realize multichannel ultrasonic transducers working together. High energy efficiency can increase echo energy and measurement range, and sharp autocorrelation and flat cross correlation can help eliminate cross-talk among multichannel transducers. This paper addresses energy efficiency optimization under the premise that cross-talk between different sonar transducers can be avoided. The nondominated sorting genetic algorithm-II is applied to optimize both the spectrum and correlation characteristics of the excitation sequence. The central idea of the spectrum optimization is to distribute most of the energy of the excitation sequence within the frequency band of the sonar transducer; thus, less energy is filtered out by the transducers. Real experiments show that a sonar system consisting of eight-channel Polaroid 600 series electrostatic transducers excited with 2 ms optimized pulse-position-modulation sequences can work together without cross-talk and can measure distances up to 650 cm with maximal 1% relative error.

  8. Miniature sonar fish tag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelady, R. W.; Ferguson, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Self-powered sonar device may be implanted in body of fish. It transmits signal that can be detected with portable tracking gear or by automatic detection-and-tracking system. Operating life of over 4000 hours may be expected. Device itself may be used almost indefinitely.

  9. Protocols for calibrating multibeam sonar.

    PubMed

    Foote, Kenneth G; Chu, Dezhang; Hammar, Terence R; Baldwin, Kenneth C; Mayer, Larry A; Hufnagle, Lawrence C; Jech, J Michael

    2005-04-01

    Development of protocols for calibrating multibeam sonar by means of the standard-target method is documented. Particular systems used in the development work included three that provide the water-column signals, namely the SIMRAD SM2000/90- and 200-kHz sonars and RESON SeaBat 8101 sonar, with operating frequency of 240 kHz. Two facilities were instrumented specifically for the work: a sea well at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and a large, indoor freshwater tank at the University of New Hampshire. Methods for measuring the transfer characteristics of each sonar, with transducers attached, are described and illustrated with measurement results. The principal results, however, are the protocols themselves. These are elaborated for positioning the target, choosing the receiver gain function, quantifying the system stability, mapping the directionality in the plane of the receiving array and in the plane normal to the central axis, measuring the directionality of individual beams, and measuring the nearfield response. General preparations for calibrating multibeam sonars and a method for measuring the receiver response electronically are outlined. Advantages of multibeam sonar calibration and outstanding problems, such as that of validation of the performance of multibeam sonars as configured for use, are mentioned. PMID:15898644

  10. Classification of elastic objects by active sonar in the vicinity of shallow sea boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunaurd, Guillermo C.; Werby, Michael F.

    1992-09-01

    Active sonar classification of submerged elastic structures becomes increasingly difficult when the structure is close to the bottom or surface of the sea. The backscattering cross-section (BSCS) of any target, which is relatively simpler to determine in deep waters, away from boundaries, becomes substantially distorted as the structure approaches either one of these environmental boundaries. Near these interfaces the classification methodology based on echo resonances that we have used in the past (viz., Appl. Mechanics Reviews 43, 171-208, (1990)) can no longer be used. By means of the examples of a spherical shell and an elastic solid sphere insonified by plane waves, we study the above mentioned degradation in BSCS in order to assess how distant the structure should be from these boundaries before the resonance features become discernible again in the echoes, and object recognition is again possible. Our approach is based on the method of images for the construction of the appropriate Green's functions, combined with a very involved two-body scattering formulation that determines the combined T-Matrix of two insonified objects, when the T-Matrix of each individual object is known. The method is extended to the time domain. We present form-functions in the frequency domain, as well as late-time responses in the time domain for both sphere and shell as they approach the mentioned boundaries. Boundary effects seem to be confined to a 'skin layer' bounded by R

  11. Enhanced sonar array target localization using time-frequency interference phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibley, Jordan Almon

    The ability of traditional active sonar processing methods to detect targets is often limited by clutter and reverberation from ocean environments. Similarly, multipath arrivals from radiating sources such as ships and submarines are received at sensors in passive sonar systems. Reverberation and multipath signals introduce constructive and destructive interference patterns in received spectrograms in both active and passive sonar applications that vary with target range and frequency. The characterization and use of interference phenomena can provide insights into environmental parameters and target movement in conjunction with standard processing methods including spectrograms and array beamforming. This thesis focuses on utilizing the time-frequency interference structure of moving targets captured on sonar arrays to enhance the resolution and abilities of conventional sonar methods to detect and localize targets. Physics-based methods for interference-based beamforming and target depth separation are presented with application of these methods shown using broadband simulated array data.

  12. A rail system for circular synthetic aperture sonar imaging and acoustic target strength measurements: Design/operation/preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, J. L.; Marston, T. M.; Lee, K.; Lopes, J. L.; Lim, R.

    2014-01-01

    A 22 m diameter circular rail, outfitted with a mobile sonar tower trolley, was designed, fabricated, instrumented with underwater acoustic transducers, and assembled on a 1.5 m thick sand layer at the bottom of a large freshwater pool to carry out sonar design and target scattering response studies. The mobile sonar tower translates along the rail via a drive motor controlled by customized LabVIEW software. The rail system is modular and assembly consists of separately deploying eight circular arc sections, measuring a nominal center radius of 11 m and 8.64 m arc length each, and having divers connect them together in the underwater environment. The system enables full scale measurements on targets of interest with 0.1° angular resolution over a complete 360° aperture, without disrupting target setup, and affording a level of control over target environment conditions and noise sources unachievable in standard field measurements. In recent use, the mobile cart carrying an instrumented sonar tower was translated along the rail in 720 equal position increments and acoustic backscatter data were acquired at each position. In addition, this system can accommodate both broadband monostatic and bistatic scattering measurements on targets of interest, allowing capture of target signature phenomena under diverse configurations to address current scientific and technical issues encountered in mine countermeasure and unexploded ordnance applications. In the work discussed here, the circular rail apparatus is used for acoustic backscatter testing, but this system also has the capacity to facilitate the acquisition of magnetic and optical sensor data from targets of interest. A brief description of the system design and operation will be presented along with preliminary processed results for data acquired from acoustic measurements conducted at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division Test Pond Facility. [Work Supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and

  13. A rail system for circular synthetic aperture sonar imaging and acoustic target strength measurements: design/operation/preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, J L; Marston, T M; Lee, K; Lopes, J L; Lim, R

    2014-01-01

    A 22 m diameter circular rail, outfitted with a mobile sonar tower trolley, was designed, fabricated, instrumented with underwater acoustic transducers, and assembled on a 1.5 m thick sand layer at the bottom of a large freshwater pool to carry out sonar design and target scattering response studies. The mobile sonar tower translates along the rail via a drive motor controlled by customized LabVIEW software. The rail system is modular and assembly consists of separately deploying eight circular arc sections, measuring a nominal center radius of 11 m and 8.64 m arc length each, and having divers connect them together in the underwater environment. The system enables full scale measurements on targets of interest with 0.1° angular resolution over a complete 360° aperture, without disrupting target setup, and affording a level of control over target environment conditions and noise sources unachievable in standard field measurements. In recent use, the mobile cart carrying an instrumented sonar tower was translated along the rail in 720 equal position increments and acoustic backscatter data were acquired at each position. In addition, this system can accommodate both broadband monostatic and bistatic scattering measurements on targets of interest, allowing capture of target signature phenomena under diverse configurations to address current scientific and technical issues encountered in mine countermeasure and unexploded ordnance applications. In the work discussed here, the circular rail apparatus is used for acoustic backscatter testing, but this system also has the capacity to facilitate the acquisition of magnetic and optical sensor data from targets of interest. A brief description of the system design and operation will be presented along with preliminary processed results for data acquired from acoustic measurements conducted at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division Test Pond Facility. [Work Supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and

  14. Security sonar for water intakes

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenbuhler, D.E.

    1987-07-01

    The security of the water approaches to nuclear facilities has been largely neglected because of the lack of solutions to the intrusion problem. This paper reviews underwater scanning sonar in general, highlights a number of problems encountered in a threat detection system using sonar and suggests some procedures that can help make such a system workable. Information is drawn from recent experience with several security projects in the governmental and private sectors, one of which was a nuclear facility.

  15. Sonar equations for planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Michael A; Leighton, Timothy G

    2016-08-01

    The set of formulations commonly known as "the sonar equations" have for many decades been used to quantify the performance of sonar systems in terms of their ability to detect and localize objects submerged in seawater. The efficacy of the sonar equations, with individual terms evaluated in decibels, is well established in Earth's oceans. The sonar equations have been used in the past for missions to other planets and moons in the solar system, for which they are shown to be less suitable. While it would be preferable to undertake high-fidelity acoustical calculations to support planning, execution, and interpretation of acoustic data from planetary probes, to avoid possible errors for planned missions to such extraterrestrial bodies in future, doing so requires awareness of the pitfalls pointed out in this paper. There is a need to reexamine the assumptions, practices, and calibrations that work well for Earth to ensure that the sonar equations can be accurately applied in combination with the decibel to extraterrestrial scenarios. Examples are given for icy oceans such as exist on Europa and Ganymede, Titan's hydrocarbon lakes, and for the gaseous atmospheres of (for example) Jupiter and Venus. PMID:27586766

  16. The IMI-30 Seafloor Imaging System: Development of A New NSF Deep-Towed 30kHz Bathymetric Sidescan Sonar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognstad, M.; Appelgate, B.; Ericksen, T.

    2003-12-01

    The Hawai`i Mapping Research Group (HMRG) has been funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation (OCE-0097822 ) to build and operate a new deep-towed 30kHz phase-difference bathymetric sidescan sonar, the Imaging & Mapping Instrument - 30kHz (IMI-30) . IMI-30 will simultaneously acquire sidescan sonar imagery, phase difference bathymetry, and multibeam subbottom data, with the ability to host other user-supplied instruments as well. Construction of IMI-30 began in early 2003, and the first funded research survey using the system is anticipated to be scheduled in 2004. Here we discuss the planned capabilities of the system, describe the current state of development, and present results from recent test cruises. The IMI-30 design is functionally similar to the HAWAII MR1 and DSL-120 towed sonars, sharing fundamental electronic characteristics, data acquisition computers, and sonar processing software. These shared characteristics allow hardware, software, and support staff to be shared between these systems, resulting in lower operational costs and a larger pool of engineers, technicians and scientists familiar with the maintenance, operation, and data processing requirements of this family of sonars. IMI-30 is fully portable for use on UNOLS global- or ocean-class vessels. Once operational, IMI-30 will be available to all NSF-funded researchers as an NSF facility maintained as part of the University of Hawai`i shared-use equipment pool. Transducers for IMI-30 were fabricated in-house using surplus United States Navy DT605 hydrophones recovered from decommissioned Sturgeon-class submarines. These transducers were designed for use at 30 kHz, and are of an advanced design with multiple element ceramic stacks and exotic materials for head and tail masses. To create long arrays we encapsulated parts of the DT605 array in smaller modules, and tested the sample modules at the Acoustic Test Facility at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center in Keyport, WA. We compared the

  17. Active part of Charlie--Gibbs fracture zone: A study using sonar and other geophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, R.

    1981-01-10

    A short survey with Gloria side-scan sonar and other geophysical instruments has revealed new information about Charlie--Gibbs fracture zone between 29/sup 0/ and 36 /sup 0/W. The traces of two transform faults have been clearly delineated. They fit small circles about the pole of rotation with an rms error of only about 1 km, but they do not always follow the deepest parts of the transform valleys. The transforms are joined by a short spreading center at 31 /sup 0/45 'W. The median transverse ridge appears to have been produced by normal seafloor spreading at this center and bears identifiable Vine-Matthews magnetic anomalies. A transverse ridge along the eastern inactive part of the northern transform may be an intrusive feature. Considerable thickness of sediment appear to have been deposited in the northern transform valley from Norwegian Sea overflow water passing through the fracture zone, but transverse ridges have prevented the sediment reaching the southern valley.

  18. Dolphin sonar detection and discrimination capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Whitlow W. L.

    2001-05-01

    Dolphins have a very sophisticated short range sonar that surpasses all technological sonar in its capabilities to perform complex target discrimination and recognition tasks. The system that the U.S. Navy has for detecting mines buried under ocean sediment is one that uses Atlantic bottlenose dolphins. However, close examination of the dolphin sonar system will reveal that the dolphin acoustic hardware is fairly ordinary and not very special. The transmitted signals have peak-to-peak amplitudes as high as 225-228 dB re 1 μPa which translates to an rms value of approximately 210-213 dB. The transmit beamwidth is fairly broad at about 10o in both the horizontal and vertical planes and the receiving beamwidth is slightly broader by several degrees. The auditory filters are not very narrow with Q values of about 8.4. Despite these fairly ordinary features of the acoustic system, these animals still demonstrate very unusual and astonishing capabilities. Some of the capabilities of the dolphin sonar system will be presented and the reasons for their keen sonar capabilities will be discussed. Important features of their sonar include the broadband clicklike signals used, adaptive sonar search capabilities and large dynamic range of its auditory system.

  19. Using side scan sonar data in a geographic information system to locate and display lake trout spawning habitat in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Charles L.; Edsall, Thomas A.; Waltermire, Robert G.; White, Barbara

    1988-01-01

    The National Fisheries Research Center-Great Lakes of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has extensively used a side scan sonar to survey and pinpoint lake trout spawning grounds in the Great Lakes. The Geographic Information System (GIS) of the National Ecology Research Center produced maps from the side scan sonar data showing the exact location of the spawning grounds; this will enable current stocking programs to be carried out at those locations. These maps show the geographic position (latitude and longitude) of both the color-coded primary substrate types and the secondary substrate types, which are denoted by overstrikes. The maps must be supplemented with a Loran-C navigation grid for field use. The maps are proving useful to fishery managers by locating lake trout stocking areas in Lakes Michigan and Huron, as well as to researchers who investigate habitat quality on lake trout spawning grounds.

  20. Unconstrained underwater multi-target tracking in passive sonar systems using two-stage PF-based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgy, Jacques; Noureldin, Aboelmagd

    2014-03-01

    A robust particle filter (PF)-based multi-target tracking solution for passive sonar systems able to track an unknown time-varying number of multiple targets, while keeping continuous tracks of such targets, is presented in this article. PF is a nonlinear filtering technique that can accommodate arbitrary sensor characteristics, motion dynamics and noise distributions. An enhanced version of PF is employed and is called Mixture PF. The commonly used sampling/importance resampling PF samples from the prior importance density, while Mixture PF samples from both the prior and the observation likelihood. In order to be able to track an unknown time-varying number of multiple targets, two Mixture PFs are used, one for target detection and the other for tracking multiple targets, and a density-based clustering technique is used after the first filter. This article demonstrates the applicability of the proposed technique for the passive problem, which suffers from the lack of measurements and the small detection range of the buoys, especially for weak signals. A contact-level simulation was used to generate different scenarios and the performance of the proposed technique called Clustered-Mixture PF was examined with either bearing measurement only or bearing and Doppler measurements, and it demonstrated its high performance.

  1. Phase space analysis and classification of sonar echoes in shallow-water channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okopal, Greg

    A primary objective of active sonar systems is to detect, locate, and classify objects, such as mines, ships, and biologics, based on their sonar backscatter. A shallow-water ocean channel is a challenging environment in which to classify sonar echoes because interactions of the sonar signal with the ocean surface and bottom induce frequency-dependent changes (especially dispersion and damping) in the signal as it propagates, the effects of which typically grow with range. Accordingly, the observed signal depends not only on the initial target backscatter, but also the propagation channel and how far the signal has propagated. These propagation effects can increase the variability of observed target echoes and degrade classification performance. Furthermore, uncertainty of the exact propagation channel and random variations within a channel cause classification features extracted from the received sonar echo to behave as random variables. With the goal of improving sonar signal classification in shallow-water environments, this work develops a phase space framework for studying sound propagation in channels with dispersion and damping. This approach leads to new moment features for classification that are invariant to dispersion and damping, the utility of which is demonstrated via simulation. In addition, the accuracy of a previously developed phase space approximation method for range-independent pulse propagation is analyzed and shown to be greater than the accuracy of the standard stationary phase approximation for both large and small times/distances. The phase space approximation is also extended to range dependent propagation. Finally, the phase space approximation is used to investigate the random nature of moment features for classification by calculating the moments of the moment features under uncertain and random channel assumptions. These moments of the moment features are used to estimate probability distribution functions for the moment features, and

  2. Offshore exploration and platform siting by imaging Sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, A.M.

    1986-03-17

    Sonar, an acronym for sonic azimuth and ranging (some say ''sonic detection and ranging''), is the name of a type of remote sensor that was developed in World War II for antisubmarine warfare purposes. The principles of the sensor system are simple in that it broadcasts a focused (shaped) sonic pulse through the water (transmission medium), then receives the echo of that pulse and processes this signal for its information content. Hence, Sonar system principles are highly analagous to those of radar. Post-World War II saw development of Sonar probes that provided some success in determining sea floor materials composition and condition (e.g., subbottom profilers). The major advance, however, was with the advent of digital computation systems. These permitted the coupling of Sonar azimuth and range components to provide ''x'' and ''y'' coordinates for each echo location, or ''z'' value. This advance is seeing a proliferation of different types of imaging Sonar systems and performances.

  3. Processing of SeaMARC swath sonar imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Pratson, L.; Malinverno, A.; Edwards, M.; Ryan, W. )

    1990-05-01

    Side-scan swath sonar systems have become an increasingly important means of mapping the sea floor. Two such systems are the deep-towed, high-resolution SeaMARC I sonar, which has a variable swath width of up to 5 km, and the shallow-towed, lower-resolution SeaMARC II sonar, which has a swath width of 10 km. The sea-floor imagery of acoustic backscatter output by the SeaMARC sonars is analogous to aerial photographs and airborne side-looking radar images of continental topography. Geologic interpretation of the sea-floor imagery is greatly facilitated by image processing. Image processing of the digital backscatter data involves removal of noise by median filtering, spatial filtering to remove sonar scans of anomalous intensity, across-track corrections to remove beam patterns caused by nonuniform response of the sonar transducers to changes in incident angle, and contrast enhancement by histogram equalization to maximize the available dynamic range. Correct geologic interpretation requires submarine structural fabrics to be displayed in their proper locations and orientations. Geographic projection of sea-floor imagery is achieved by merging the enhanced imagery with the sonar vehicle navigation and correcting for vehicle attitude. Co-registration of bathymetry with sonar imagery introduces sea-floor relief and permits the imagery to be displayed in three-dimensional perspectives, furthering the ability of the marine geologist to infer the processes shaping formerly hidden subsea terrains.

  4. Pathology: whales, sonar and decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Piantadosi, Claude A; Thalmann, Edward D

    2004-04-15

    We do not yet know why whales occasionally strand after sonar has been deployed nearby, but such information is important for both naval undersea activities and the protection of marine mammals. Jepson et al. suggest that a peculiar gas-forming disease afflicting some stranded cetaceans could be a type of decompression sickness (DCS) resulting from exposure to mid-range sonar. However, neither decompression theory nor observation support the existence of a naturally occurring DCS in whales that is characterized by encapsulated, gas-filled cavities in the liver. Although gas-bubble formation may be aggravated by acoustic energy, more rigorous investigation is needed before sonar can be firmly linked to bubble formation in whales. PMID:15085881

  5. Synthetic aperture sonar image statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Shawn F.

    Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS) systems are capable of producing photograph quality seafloor imagery using a lower frequency than other systems of comparable resolution. However, as with other high-resolution sonar systems, SAS imagery is often characterized by heavy-tailed amplitude distributions which may adversely affect target detection systems. The constant cross-range resolution with respect to range that results from the synthetic aperture formation process provides a unique opportunity to improve our understanding of system and environment interactions, which is essential for accurate performance prediction. This research focused on the impact of multipath contamination and the impact of resolution on image statistics, accomplished through analyses of data collected during at-sea experiments, analytical modeling, and development of numerical simulations. Multipath contamination was shown to have an appreciable impact on image statistics at ranges greater than the water depth and when the levels of the contributing multipath are within 10 dB of the direct path, reducing the image amplitude distribution tails while also degrading image clarity. Image statistics were shown to depend strongly upon both system resolution and orientation to seafloor features such as sand ripples. This work contributes to improving detection systems by aiding understanding of the influences of background (i.e. non-target) image statistics.

  6. Acoustical characteristic predictions of a multi-layer system of a submerged vehicle hull mounted sonar simplified to an infinite planar model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Hong, Suk-Yoon; Song, Jee-Hun; Kil, Hyun-Gwon; Jeon, Jae Jin; Seo, Young-Soo

    2012-06-01

    Hull Mounted Sonar (HMS) is a long range submerged vehicle's hull-mounted passive sonar system which detects low-frequency noise caused by machineries of enemy ships or submerged vehicles. The HMS needs a sound absorption /insulation multi-layer structure to shut out the self-noise from own machineries and to amplify signals from outside. Therefore, acoustic analysis of the multi-layer system should be performed when the HMS is designed. This paper simplified the HMS multi-layer system to be an infinite planar multi-layer model. Also, main excitations that influence the HMS were classified into mechanical, plane wave and turbulent flow excitation, and the investigations for each excitation were performed for various models. Stiffened multi-layer analysis for mechanical excitation and general multi-layer analysis for turbulent flow excitation were developed. The infinite planar multi-layer analysis was expected to be more useful for preliminary design stage of HMS system than the infinite cylindrical model because of short analysis time and easiness of parameter study.

  7. Sonar array processing borrows from geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.

    1989-09-01

    The author reports a recent advance in sonar signal processing that has potential military application. It improves signal extraction by modifying a technique devised by a geophysicist. Sonar signal processing is used to track submarine and surface targets, such as aircraft carriers, oil tankers, and, in commercial applications, schools of fish or sunken treasure. Similar signal-processing techniques help radio astronomers track galaxies, physicians see images of the body interior, and geophysicists map the ocean floor or find oil. This hydrid technique, applied in an experimental system, can help resolve strong signals as well as weak ones in the same step.

  8. Introduction to Sonar, Navy Training Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    Fundamentals of sonar systems are presented in this book, prepared for both regular navy and naval reserve personnel who are seeking advancement in rating. An introductory description is first made of submarines and antisubmarine units. Determination of underwater targets is analyzed from the background of true and relative bearings, true and…

  9. Evolution: Fossil Ears and Underwater Sonar.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Olivier

    2016-08-22

    A key innovation in the history of whales was the evolution of a sonar system together with high-frequency hearing. Fossils of an archaic toothed whale's inner ear bones provide clues for a stepwise emergence of underwater echolocation ability. PMID:27554653

  10. Swath sonar mapping of Earth's submarine plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V. L.; Celnick, M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Ryan, W. B. F.

    2014-12-01

    The recent loss of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in an area of the Indian Ocean where less than 5% of the seafloor is mapped with depth sounding data (Smith and Marks, EOS 2014) highlights the striking lack of detailed knowledge of the topography of the seabed for much of the worlds' oceans. Advances in swath sonar mapping technology over the past 30 years have led to dramatic improvements in our capability to map the seabed. However, the oceans are vast and only an estimated 10% of the seafloor has been mapped with these systems. Furthermore, the available coverage is highly heterogeneous and focused within areas of national strategic priority and community scientific interest. The major plate boundaries that encircle the globe, most of which are located in the submarine environment, have been a significant focus of marine geoscience research since the advent of swath sonar mapping. While the location of these plate boundaries are well defined from satellite-derived bathymetry, significant regions remain unmapped at the high-resolutions provided by swath sonars and that are needed to study active volcanic and tectonic plate boundary processes. Within the plate interiors, some fossil plate boundary zones, major hotspot volcanoes, and other volcanic provinces have been the focus of dedicated research programs. Away from these major tectonic structures, swath mapping coverage is limited to sparse ocean transit lines which often reveal previously unknown deep-sea channels and other little studied sedimentary structures not resolvable in existing low-resolution global compilations, highlighting the value of these data even in the tectonically quiet plate interiors. Here, we give an overview of multibeam swath sonar mapping of the major plate boundaries of the globe as extracted from public archives. Significant quantities of swath sonar data acquired from deep-sea regions are in restricted-access international archives. Open access to more of these data sets would

  11. Imaging beneath the skin of large tropical rivers: System morphodynamics of the Fly and Beni Rivers revealed by novel sub-surface sonar, deep coring, and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, R. E.; Grenfell, M.; Lauer, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Tropical rivers dominate Earth's fluvial fluxes for water, carbon, and mineral sediment. They are characterized by large channels and floodplains, old system histories, prolonged periods of flooding, and a clay-dominated sediment flux. However, the underlying bed & floodplain strata are poorly understood. Available data commonly stem from skin-deep approaches such as GIS analysis of imagery, shallow sampling & topographic profiling during lower river stages. Given the large temporal & spatial scales, new approaches are needed to see below lag deposits on mobile sandy beds & deep into expansive floodbasins. Furthermore, such data are needed to test whether we can interpret large tropical river morphology using analogies to small temperate systems. Systems in a dynamic state of response to sea level rise or an increase/contrast in sediment load would provide especially valuable insight. Last August we conducted a field campaign along the Fly and Strickland Rivers in Papua New Guinea (discharge ~5,350 CMS) and this September we investigated the Beni River in Northern Bolivia (discharge ~3,500 CMS). Results were obtained using a novel measurement method: a high-power (>4kW) dual-frequency SyQwest sub-bottom profiler customized to best image 10-20m below the river/lake bed in shallow water. We were able to distinguish sandy deposits from harder clay and silt lenses and also collected bed grab samples to verify our sonar results. Deep borehole samples (5-15m), bank samples, and push cores confirmed observations from the sonar profiling. We simultaneously collected side-scan sonar imagery plus DGPS records of water/bed elevations that could be used to parameterize numerical models. We have now analyzed these results in some detail. Findings for the Fly River include: 1) The prevalence of hard clay beneath the bed of the Lower Fly River and many locations along the Strickland River, retarding migration; 2) Unusual bed morphology along the lower Middle Fly River, where the

  12. EEZ-SCAN: A U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY SEA-FLOOR IMAGING PROGRAM USING THE GLORIA SIDE-SCAN SONAR SYSTEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, Gary W.

    1985-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey initiated Program EEZ-SCAN in April 1984 in cooperation with the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) of the United Kingdom to map the U. S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) at reconnaissance scale as a first effort to develop a geologic understanding of the new national territory. GLORIA*, a unique side-scan sonar system capable of mapping over 27,000 sq. km per day, is the principal tool being used in the mapping surveys. In 1984, GLORIA surveys were conducted in the EEZ off California, Oregon, and Washington covering an area of approximately 250,000 sq. nautical miles. These surveys were highlighted by discoveries of major geologic features.

  13. Technology Infusion of CodeSonar into the Space Network Ground Segment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Markland J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the applicability of CodeSonar to the Space Network software. CodeSonar is a commercial off the shelf system that analyzes programs written in C, C++ or Ada for defects in the code. Software engineers use CodeSonar results as an input to the existing source code inspection process. The study is focused on large scale software developed using formal processes. The systems studied are mission critical in nature but some use commodity computer systems.

  14. Sonar feature-based bandwidth compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghri, John A.; Tescher, Andrew G.

    1992-07-01

    A sonar bandwidth compression (BWC) technique which, unlike conventional methods, adaptively varies the coding resolution in the compression process based on a priori information is described. This novel approach yields a robust compression system whose performance exceeds the conventional methods by factors of 2-to-1 and 1.5-to-1 for display- formatted and time series sonar data, respectively. The data is first analyzed by a feature extraction routine to determine those pixels of the image that collectively comprise intelligence-bearing signal features. The data is then split into a foreground image which contains the extracted source characteristic and a larger background image which is the remainder. Since the background image is highly textured, it suffices to code only the local statistics rather than the actual pixels themselves. This results in a substantial reduction of the bit rate required to code the background image. The feature-based compression algorithm developed for sonar imagery data is also extended to the sonar time series data via a novel approach involving an initial one-dimensional DCT transformation of the time series data before the actual compression process. The unique advantage of this approach is that the coding is done in an alternative two-dimensional image domain where, unlike the original time domain, it is possible to observe, differentiate, and prioritize essential features of data in the compression process. The feature-based BWC developed for sonar data is potentially very useful for applications involving highly textured imagery. Two such applications are synthetic aperture radar and ultrasound medical imaging.

  15. Mapping with side-scan sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, D.B.; Coleman, J.M.; Roberts, H.H.

    1981-04-01

    The use of sideways scanning sonar as a technique for detailed sea-floor mapping is described in this article. Sea-floor mapping of the continental shelf is becoming increasingly necessary for the development of oil and gas resources. More recently attempts are being made to extend the survey capabilities to deeper water shelf margins, slopes, and basins. Conventional systems, digital systems, survey ranges, data processing, mosaics, and applications are discussed. (DMC)

  16. Sonar detection range index estimation approach in uncertain environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fan; Guo, Sheng-ming; Chen, Yao-ming

    2010-09-01

    The traditional detection range index prediction of sonar systems assumes a deterministic environment and causes overestimation of the detection range index. The realistic ocean environment consists of a quantitative measure of environmental uncertainty such as sound speed profile, sea depth and so on. An estimation approach that incorporates the effects of environmental uncertainty into the sonar detection range index is proposed in this paper. The sonar detection range index prediction has been implemented by using Monte Carlo simulation. In simulation, the sound speed gradient, sea depth and bottom geo-acoustic parameters as important uncertainty environmental parameters are generalized to stochastic variables and satisfy the normal distribution. The sonar detection range index with unknown source depth is also considered.

  17. Radar and sonar probing of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Unterberger, R.R.

    1983-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the research of the past sixteen years on methods of probing into solid rock. For these purposes, there are three completely different systems: radar, sonar, and nonlinear sonar. In dry salt all of the systems work. Five radar systems of different frequencies have been used to probe salt for different purposes and with different resolutions. Distances penetrated were from almost 2000 meters to under one 1 meter. With some moisture in the rock, the low frequency Alpha radar system is best because it operates at the frequency of the minimum in loss tangent for water. Sonar systems are used for even more water in the rock. Ranges of one to 300 meters have been obtained in salt with the lower ranges (to 100m) being obtainable is salt with the most water in it. Using one or more of the probing systems, the authors have detected, and ranged to, salt dome flanks, the top of salt, sandstone, anhydrite and sylvite stringers in salt, fractures in salt and water-filled fractures. We have also detected old boreholes in salt pillars, and measured the range and direction to them.

  18. Evaluation of a Single-Beam Sonar System to Map Seagrass at Two Sites in Northern Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Andrew W.; Lacy, Jessica R.; Finlayson, David P.; Gelfenbaum, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Seagrass at two sites in northern Puget Sound, Possession Point and nearby Browns Bay, was mapped using both a single-beam sonar and underwater video camera. The acoustic and underwater video data were compared to evaluate the accuracy of acoustic estimates of seagrass cover. The accuracy of the acoustic method was calculated for three classifications of seagrass observed in underwater video: bare (no seagrass), patchy seagrass, and continuous seagrass. Acoustic and underwater video methods agreed in 92 percent and 74 percent of observations made in bare and continuous areas, respectively. However, in patchy seagrass, the agreement between acoustic and underwater video was poor (43 percent). The poor agreement between the two methods in areas with patchy seagrass is likely because the two instruments were not precisely colocated. The distribution of seagrass at the two sites differed both in overall percent vegetated and in the distribution of percent cover versus depth. On the basis of acoustic data, seagrass inhabited 0.29 km2 (19 percent of total area) at Possession Point and 0.043 km2 (5 percent of total area) at the Browns Bay study site. The depth distribution at the two sites was markedly different. Whereas the majority of seagrass at Possession Point occurred between -0.5 and -1.5 m MLLW, most seagrass at Browns Bay occurred at a greater depth, between -2.25 and -3.5 m MLLW. Further investigation of the anthropogenic and natural factors causing these differences in distribution is needed.

  19. BatSLAM: Simultaneous localization and mapping using biomimetic sonar.

    PubMed

    Steckel, Jan; Peremans, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    We propose to combine a biomimetic navigation model which solves a simultaneous localization and mapping task with a biomimetic sonar mounted on a mobile robot to address two related questions. First, can robotic sonar sensing lead to intelligent interactions with complex environments? Second, can we model sonar based spatial orientation and the construction of spatial maps by bats? To address these questions we adapt the mapping module of RatSLAM, a previously published navigation system based on computational models of the rodent hippocampus. We analyze the performance of the proposed robotic implementation operating in the real world. We conclude that the biomimetic navigation model operating on the information from the biomimetic sonar allows an autonomous agent to map unmodified (office) environments efficiently and consistently. Furthermore, these results also show that successful navigation does not require the readings of the biomimetic sonar to be interpreted in terms of individual objects/landmarks in the environment. We argue that the system has applications in robotics as well as in the field of biology as a simple, first order, model for sonar based spatial orientation and map building. PMID:23365647

  20. BatSLAM: Simultaneous Localization and Mapping Using Biomimetic Sonar

    PubMed Central

    Steckel, Jan; Peremans, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    We propose to combine a biomimetic navigation model which solves a simultaneous localization and mapping task with a biomimetic sonar mounted on a mobile robot to address two related questions. First, can robotic sonar sensing lead to intelligent interactions with complex environments? Second, can we model sonar based spatial orientation and the construction of spatial maps by bats? To address these questions we adapt the mapping module of RatSLAM, a previously published navigation system based on computational models of the rodent hippocampus. We analyze the performance of the proposed robotic implementation operating in the real world. We conclude that the biomimetic navigation model operating on the information from the biomimetic sonar allows an autonomous agent to map unmodified (office) environments efficiently and consistently. Furthermore, these results also show that successful navigation does not require the readings of the biomimetic sonar to be interpreted in terms of individual objects/landmarks in the environment. We argue that the system has applications in robotics as well as in the field of biology as a simple, first order, model for sonar based spatial orientation and map building. PMID:23365647

  1. Assessment of Marine Mammal Impact Zones for Use of Military Sonar in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Mathias H; Johansson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Military sonars are known to have caused cetaceans to strand. Navies in shallow seas use different frequencies and sonar pulses, commonly frequencies between 25 and 100 kHz, compared with most studied NATO sonar systems that have been evaluated for their environmental impact. These frequencies match the frequencies of best hearing in the harbor porpoises and seals resident in the Baltic Sea. This study uses published temporary and permanent threshold shifts, measured behavioral response thresholds, technical specifications of a sonar system, and environmental parameters affecting sound propagation common for the Baltic Sea to estimate the impact zones for harbor porpoises and seals. PMID:26610942

  2. Sonar Signals of the Sea Lion.

    PubMed

    Poulter, T C

    1963-02-22

    Tape recordings were made of the underwater noises of captive sea lions swimming in a concrete pool at night. When approaching pieces of fish that were thrown into the water, the sea lions emitted trains of sound signals like those of the bat and the porpoise. A detailed analysis of these noises shows that they meet the criteria of a pulse-modulated sonar system and, in fact, reveal an amazing sophistication so far as echo ranging is concerned. PMID:17829121

  3. Measurement of stream channel habitat using sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flug, M.; Seitz, H.; Scott, J.

    1998-01-01

    An efficient and low cost technique using a sonar system was evaluated for describing channel geometry and quantifying inundated area in a large river. The boat-mounted portable sonar equipment was used to record water depths and river width measurements for direct storage on a laptop computer. The field data collected from repeated traverses at a cross-section were evaluated to determine the precision of the system and field technique. Results from validation at two different sites showed average sample standard deviations (S.D.s) of 0.12 m for these complete cross-sections, with coefficient of variations of 10%. Validation using only the mid-channel river cross-section data yields an average sample S.D. of 0.05 m, with a coefficient of variation below 5%, at a stable and gauged river site using only measurements of water depths greater than 0.6 m. Accuracy of the sonar system was evaluated by comparison to traditionally surveyed transect data from a regularly gauged site. We observed an average mean squared deviation of 46.0 cm2, considering only that portion of the cross-section inundated by more than 0.6 m of water. Our procedure proved to be a reliable, accurate, safe, quick, and economic method to record river depths, discharges, bed conditions, and substratum composition necessary for stream habitat studies. ?? 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Multimodal integration of micro-Doppler sonar and auditory signals for behavior classification with convolutional networks.

    PubMed

    Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Garreau, Guillaume; Georgiou, Julius; Andreou, Andreas G; Denham, Susan L; Wennekers, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The ability to recognize the behavior of individuals is of great interest in the general field of safety (e.g. building security, crowd control, transport analysis, independent living for the elderly). Here we report a new real-time acoustic system for human action and behavior recognition that integrates passive audio and active micro-Doppler sonar signatures over multiple time scales. The system architecture is based on a six-layer convolutional neural network, trained and evaluated using a dataset of 10 subjects performing seven different behaviors. Probabilistic combination of system output through time for each modality separately yields 94% (passive audio) and 91% (micro-Doppler sonar) correct behavior classification; probabilistic multimodal integration increases classification performance to 98%. This study supports the efficacy of micro-Doppler sonar systems in characterizing human actions, which can then be efficiently classified using ConvNets. It also demonstrates that the integration of multiple sources of acoustic information can significantly improve the system's performance. PMID:23924412

  5. Implementation and testing of a Deep Water Correlation Velocity Sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.R.; Bookheimer, W.C.; Rhoades, K.W.

    1983-05-01

    The paper describes a new sonar designated the Magnavox MX 810 Deep Water Correlation Sonar which is under development by the General Electric Company and the Magnavox Advanced Products and Systems Company. The sonar measures ship's velocity relative to the bottom but instead of using the conventional doppler effect, it uses the correlation method described by Dickey and Edward in 1978. In this method, the narrow beams required for doppler are not needed and a low frequency that penetrates to the bottom in deep water is used. The sonar was designed with the constraint that it use a transducer that mounts through a single 12 inch gate valve. Most offshore geophysical surveys at present make use of an integrated navigation system with bottom referenced velocity input from a doppler sonar which, because of limitations on the sonar bottomtracking range, has difficulty in areas where the water depth is greater than about 500 meters. The MX 810 provides bottom tracking in regions of much greater water depth. It also may be applied as an aid in continuous positioning of a vessel over a fixed location. It also should prove useful as a more general navigation aid. The sonar is undergoing a series of tests using Magnavox's facilities for the purpose of verifying the performance and obtaining data to support and quantify planned improvements in both software and hardware. A prototype transducer of only 5 watts power output was used, but in spite of this low power, successful operation to depths of 1900 meters was obtained. Extrapolation to system parameters to be implemented in production models predicts operation to depths of 5000 meters.

  6. Active Processes On The Sw Iberian Margin: High-resolution Sidescan Sonar Mapping Of The "marques De Pombal" Fault And Associated Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gràcia, E.; Dañobeitia, J. J.; Terrinha, P.; Blondel, P.; Farrán, M.; Jacobs, C.; Hits Cruise Party, The

    The SW Iberian Margin hosts the present-day boundary between the European and African Plates, and is characterized by a significant seismic activity, source of the largest earthquakes in Western Europe. One of the main goals of the recent HITS cruise ("High Resolution Imaging of Tsunamigenic Structures in SW Iberia"), carried out on board the RV Hesperides during September 2001, was to determine the geom- etry of active seismogenic structures and the flux and sediment instability associated with the tectonic activity. Two areas were surveyed using the high-resolution TOBI sidescan sonar together with swath-bathymetry and sub-bottom profiler, totalling more than 550 nm. On the first area, we identified a NNE-trending lineament, correspond- ing to the seafloor rupture of the 50 km long Marques de Pombal thrust fault (MPF), possible source of the 1755 Lisbon Earthquake and Tsunami. Associated to this struc- ture, we identified a fresh mass-wasting landslide complex covering an area of 20 km x 13 km. This large gravity deposit is made of two individual flows separated by an acoustically darker region. Both flows have a common source upslope displaying the headscarp and a set of slide blocks. At the northern termination of the MPF there are a series of folds and small fissures which accommodate present-day deformation. The most prominent feature is the Bow Spur, a reflective topographic high corresponding to a horst, probably inherited from the original architecture of the Mesozoic margin. The transfer zone to the south of the MPF was also imaged, showing localized scars and mass-wasting features. On the second area, the TOBI and swath-bathymetry im- ages show that the San Vicente Canyon is deeply incised into the seafloor with an asymmetric cross-section. The linear and angular appearance of its flanks strongly suggests that the canyon is fault-controlled. The bottom of the canyon, barren of re- cent sediments, appears highly reflective with corrugated surfaces which

  7. Bats coordinate sonar and flight behavior as they forage in open and cluttered environments.

    PubMed

    Falk, Benjamin; Jakobsen, Lasse; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F

    2014-12-15

    Echolocating bats use active sensing as they emit sounds and listen to the returning echoes to probe their environment for navigation, obstacle avoidance and pursuit of prey. The sensing behavior of bats includes the planning of 3D spatial trajectory paths, which are guided by echo information. In this study, we examined the relationship between active sonar sampling and flight motor output as bats changed environments from open space to an artificial forest in a laboratory flight room. Using high-speed video and audio recordings, we reconstructed and analyzed 3D flight trajectories, sonar beam aim and acoustic sonar emission patterns as the bats captured prey. We found that big brown bats adjusted their sonar call structure, temporal patterning and flight speed in response to environmental change. The sonar beam aim of the bats predicted the flight turn rate in both the open room and the forest. However, the relationship between sonar beam aim and turn rate changed in the forest during the final stage of prey pursuit, during which the bat made shallower turns. We found flight stereotypy developed over multiple days in the forest, but did not find evidence for a reduction in active sonar sampling with experience. The temporal patterning of sonar sound groups was related to path planning around obstacles in the forest. Together, these results contribute to our understanding of how bats coordinate echolocation and flight behavior to represent and navigate their environment. PMID:25394632

  8. Bats coordinate sonar and flight behavior as they forage in open and cluttered environments

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Benjamin; Jakobsen, Lasse; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating bats use active sensing as they emit sounds and listen to the returning echoes to probe their environment for navigation, obstacle avoidance and pursuit of prey. The sensing behavior of bats includes the planning of 3D spatial trajectory paths, which are guided by echo information. In this study, we examined the relationship between active sonar sampling and flight motor output as bats changed environments from open space to an artificial forest in a laboratory flight room. Using high-speed video and audio recordings, we reconstructed and analyzed 3D flight trajectories, sonar beam aim and acoustic sonar emission patterns as the bats captured prey. We found that big brown bats adjusted their sonar call structure, temporal patterning and flight speed in response to environmental change. The sonar beam aim of the bats predicted the flight turn rate in both the open room and the forest. However, the relationship between sonar beam aim and turn rate changed in the forest during the final stage of prey pursuit, during which the bat made shallower turns. We found flight stereotypy developed over multiple days in the forest, but did not find evidence for a reduction in active sonar sampling with experience. The temporal patterning of sonar sound groups was related to path planning around obstacles in the forest. Together, these results contribute to our understanding of how bats coordinate echolocation and flight behavior to represent and navigate their environment. PMID:25394632

  9. FTV: a sonar for tracking macrozooplankton in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Jules S.; Reuss, Edward; McGehee, Duncan; Chandran, Girish

    1995-08-01

    A three-dimensional sonar imaging system, Fish TV (FTV), was developed to observe the three-dimensional trajectories of macrozooplankton in situ. Consisting of two arrays of eight transducers, the sonar uses one of the arrays as a projector and the other as a receiver. In this way, a combination of 8 × 8, or 64 beams, is constructed. Spatial resolution is approximately 2° by 2° and the range resolution is 3 cm. The sonar is capable of recording up to five images every second. The data is stored digitally in a three-dimensional matrix which can be postprocessed. Tests performed in the lab with both test targets and freshwater shrimp indicate that the system has the sensitivity and accuracy to track euphausiids in the ocean. The system was deployed at sea on an ROV (Remote Operational Vehicle) and the tracks of euphausiid sized objects were recorded.

  10. Ultrasonic bistatic Doppler sonar in air for personnel motion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekimov, Alexander; Hickey, Craig J.

    2012-06-01

    The National Center for Physical Acoustics (NCPA) at the University of Mississippi is working on the application of ultrasonic Doppler sonars in air for personnel motion detection. Two traditional Doppler sonar configurations, a monostatic and a bistatic, are being studied. In the monostatic configuration, the distance between the transmitter and the receiver is small. The proximity of the source to the receiver places a limitation on the system associated with the overloading of the receivers' input due to acoustic energy leakage from the transmitters' output. The maximum range of detection is therefore limited by the dynamic range of the acquisition system. In a bistatic Doppler ultrasonic sonar, the source and receiver are spaced apart and the acoustic energy along the direct path does not constrain the maximum acoustic power level output of the transmitter. In a monostatic configuration the acoustic signal suffers from beam spreading and natural absorption during propagation from the transmitter to the target and from the target back to the receiver. In a bistatic configuration the acoustic propagation is in one direction only and theoretically the detection distance can be twice the monostatic distance. For comparison the experiments of a human walking in a building hallway using the bistatic and monostaic Doppler sonars in air were conducted. The experimental results for human signatures from these Doppler sonars are presented and discussed.

  11. A micro-Doppler sonar for acoustic surveillance in sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaonian

    Wireless sensor networks have been employed in a wide variety of applications, despite the limited energy and communication resources at each sensor node. Low power custom VLSI chips implementing passive acoustic sensing algorithms have been successfully integrated into an acoustic surveillance unit and demonstrated for detection and location of sound sources. In this dissertation, I explore active and passive acoustic sensing techniques, signal processing and classification algorithms for detection and classification in a multinodal sensor network environment. I will present the design and characterization of a continuous-wave micro-Doppler sonar to image objects with articulated moving components. As an example application for this system, we use it to image gaits of humans and four-legged animals. I will present the micro-Doppler gait signatures of a walking person, a dog and a horse. I will discuss the resolution and range of this micro-Doppler sonar and use experimental results to support the theoretical analyses. In order to reduce the data rate and make the system amenable to wireless sensor networks, I will present a second micro-Doppler sonar that uses bandpass sampling for data acquisition. Speech recognition algorithms are explored for biometric identifications from one's gait, and I will present and compare the classification performance of the two systems. The acoustic micro-Doppler sonar design and biometric identification results are the first in the field as the previous work used either video camera or microwave technology. I will also review bearing estimation algorithms and present results of applying these algorithms for bearing estimation and tracking of moving vehicles. Another major source of the power consumption at each sensor node is the wireless interface. To address the need of low power communications in a wireless sensor network, I will also discuss the design and implementation of ultra wideband transmitters in a three dimensional

  12. Depth classification based solely on incoherent sonar information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miklovic, Donald W.

    2005-09-01

    Most work on sonar contact depth estimation has been based on deterministic, coherent propagation modeling of the sound channel, e.g., matched-field processing. This has met with limited success due to the inability to precisely predict the sound-pressure field in realistic scenarios. This paper addresses the problem of using probabilistic, incoherent information from the sonar itself for depth classification with active sonar, without having to depend on precise and accurate propagation models and ancillary environmental measurements. In particular, the problem of deciding whether or not a given contact is on the bottom based solely on the sonar data is looked at, i.e., without resorting to the use of any additional environmental measurements or predictive models. To do this, the in situ local bottom reverberation is used to calibrate the channel. Probability theory is explored to provide a theoretical basis for the development of a single-hypothesis decision metric to best exploit this information. The methods are tested on a combination of broadband sonar data and detailed ocean simulations. The particular metric proposed for this problem seems to be important for achieving good performance, and may be of some interest in its own right for other types of single-hypothesis decision problems.

  13. Interpretation of sea-floor processes in Gulf of Mexico using GLORIA side-scan sonar system

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, B.A.; Kenyon, N.H.; Rothwell, R.G.; Twichell, D.C.; Parson, L.M.

    1986-09-01

    The extensive deformation of the continental slope seaward of Texas and Louisiana by salt tectonics has resulted in a complex pattern of basins and salt-dome highs. One continuous meandering channel was identified in this part of the gulf, extending from the shelf edge to the Sigsbee abyssal plain. Bottom currents have reworked the sediments in this channel's levees seaward of the Sigsbee Escarpment, the seaward edge of the salt front, suggesting that this channel may no longer be actively transporting sediment. Talus appears to lie along the base of the Sigsbee Escarpment, suggesting that erosion and deposition are occurring along this front. Three other discontinuous channel systems can be identified on the mosaic and appear to be contributing sediments to the deep gulf. Fans related to these channel systems are present seaward of the Rio Grande, the Mississippi Canyon, and the Desoto Canyon areas. Three major submarine slides were mapped: the East Breaks slide in the northwestern gulf, a slide in the Mississippi Canyon and fan area of the central gulf, and a slide in the Desoto Canyon area in the northeastern gulf. The areal extent of these slide and debris-flow deposits (ranging from 6000 to 50,000 km/sup 2/) suggests that mass wasting is an important process in distributing sediments in the Gulf of Mexico.

  14. Contrast control for sonar pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Francoise; Bonnaud, Laurent; Collet, Christophe

    1996-11-01

    During the sonar image acquisition, several physical phenomena degrade the final picture a lot. We examine particularly two damages: the energy loss function of the distance covered by the acoustical wave and the speckle noise. For the first phenomenon, we suggest a corrective post processing which takes some acquisition parameters into account. For the second phenomenon, we apply filtering algorithms like the maximum a posteriori filter, a modified version of the Lee algorithm or an adaptive weighted median filter. The results are shown on real sonar images.

  15. 50 CFR 218.180 - Specified activity and specified geographical area and effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy mission... year). (2) The use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active...

  16. 50 CFR 218.180 - Specified activity and specified geographical area and effective dates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy mission... year). (2) The use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active...

  17. Time varied gain functions for pulsed sonars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLennan, D. N.

    1986-11-01

    The time varied gain (TVG) of a sonar is intended to remove the range dependence of echo strength. The conventional "40 log R" and "20 log R" TVG functions, which apply to single and distributed targets respectively, provide exact compensation only at infinite range. At short range, the conventional functions are inexact due to bandwidth related delays and the change in receiver gain over a pulse length. The theory of echo formation is used to derive exact gain functions which make the echo energy integral independent of the target range. In the case of randomly distributed targets, the linear form of the exact function is shown to be ( t)= ct exp (α ct/2)√{(1- T 1/t ) 2-( T 2/t ) 2}, for sound speed c and absorption coefficient α. T1 and T2 are constants for a given sonar and target. The ct exp ( αct/2) term is equivalent to "20 log R+2 αR". The single target function is similarly the conventional function multiplied by a polynomial expression in 1/ t. Analytic functions are derived for systems with simple transfer functions. As the pulse length bandwidth product increases, the exact function tends to that of the wideband ideal system for which T1= T/2 and T2 = T/√(12), T being the transmitter pulse length. Exact TVG functions are derived numerically for two echo sounders used in fishery research and are compared with the measured gain variation. The TVG function realized in sonars may depart considerably from the exact form. Delaying the start of the TVG ramp may reduce the error. The delay required for exact compensation depends upon the target range and is at least half the pulse length.

  18. Quantification of a multibeam sonar for fisheries assessment applications.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, N A; Li, Y; Melvin, G D

    2003-08-01

    The acoustic theory is developed for a multibeam fisheries-type sonar employing a circular arc of transducer elements. Specifically, numerical relations for transmit and receive beam patterns are derived and methodologies set forth for the derivation of appropriately scaled acoustic target strength and acoustic volume backscattering strength from an ideally performing multibeam device. Predicted and measured beam characteristics of a realizable multibeam sonar, a Kongsberg Simrad-Mesotech SM 2000, are compared. Practical techniques for the extraction of calibrated acoustic volume backscattering strength from real systems are advanced. PMID:12942957

  19. Quantifying methane flux from lake sediments using multibeam sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, B.; Urban, P.; Delwiche, K.; Greinert, J.; Hemond, H.; Ruppel, C. D.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and the production and emission of methane from sediments in wetlands, lakes and rivers both contributes to and may be exacerbated by climate change. In some of these shallow-water settings, methane fluxes may be largely controlled by episodic venting that can be triggered by drops in hydrostatic pressure. Even with better constraints on the mechanisms for gas release, quantifying these fluxes has remained a challenge due to rapid spatiotemporal changes in the patterns of bubble emissions from the sediments. The research presented here uses a fixed-location Imagenex DeltaT 837B multibeam sonar to estimate methane-venting fluxes from organic-rich lake sediments over a large area (~400 m2) and over a multi-season deployment period with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Simpler, single-beam sonar systems have been used in the past to estimate bubble fluxes in a variety of settings. Here we extend this methodology to a multibeam system by means of: (1) detailed calibration of the sonar signal against imposed bubble streams, and (2) validation against an in situ independent record of gas flux captured by overlying bubble traps. The calibrated sonar signals then yield estimates of the methane flux with high spatial resolution (~1 m) and temporal frequency (6 Hz) from a portion of the deepwater basin of Upper Mystic Lake, MA, USA, a temperate eutrophic kettle lake. These results in turn inform mathematical models of methane transport and release from the sediments, which reproduce with high fidelity the ebullitive response to hydrostatic pressure variations. In addition, the detailed information about spatial variability of methane flux derived from sonar records is used to estimate the uncertainty associated with upscaling flux measurements from bubble traps to the scale of the sonar observation area. Taken together, these multibeam sonar measurements and analysis provide a novel quantitative approach for the assessment of

  20. High-resolution imaging of the Okinawa Trough deep-tow sonar WADATSUMI exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okino, K.; Tokuyama, H.; Takeuchi, A.; Sibuet, J. C.; Lee, C. S.

    2003-04-01

    High-resolution deep-tow side scan sonar data collected in the Okinawa Trough reveal details of the volcanic and tectonic features occurring along an active backarc rift zone, including an active hydrothermal vent site. Our new system, the deep-tow vector sidescan sonar WADATSUMI, is a 100 kHz system, which provides not only high-resolution backscattering images but also phase bathymetry. The system also includes a 3-6 kHz chirp sonar to investigate sub-bottom structure. The swath width for this survey is 1 km for a towing altitude of 100 to 350 m. The pixel size of the collected images is 50 cm. The towfish positioning is based on the ISBL (inverted short baseline) system, in which the signal transmitted from the ship is received at the towfish and all information is sent to the onboard control unit using co-axial cable. Four MAPRs (Miniature Autonomous Plume Recorder / provided by NOAA) were also equipped on the deep-tow system to detect hydrothermal activity using its thermometer and nephelometer. The Okinawa Trough, located between Japan and Taiwan, is an incipient backarc basin formed by extension within continental lithosphere behind the Ryukyu trench-arc system. The continuous formation of new oceanic crust has not yet occurred, however, crustal thinning and rifting is ongoing and many normal faults have developed. The southwestern part of the trough is most active and contains many interesting features, such as numerous volcanoes crossing the rift zone, high heat flow, and active hydrothermal site. The WADATSUMI images revealed the detailed volcanic and tectonic structure of the axial rift and a hydrothermal site. In the western area seafloor is dominated by volcanic construction, including hummocks, sheet flows, and blocky lava terrains. Small volcanic cones with crater pits are aligned along an E-W direction, which may constitute an elongated volcanic ridge within the graben. On the other hand, the eastern part of the survey area is a sedimented, deep

  1. Hearing thresholds of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) for sweeps (1-2 kHz and 6-7 kHz bands) mimicking naval sonar signals.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Hoek, Lean; de Jong, Christ A F

    2011-05-01

    The distance at which active naval sonar signals can be heard by harbor porpoises depends, among other factors, on the hearing thresholds of the species for those signals. Therefore the hearing sensitivity of a harbor porpoise was determined for 1 s up-sweep and down-sweep signals, mimicking mid-frequency and low-frequency active sonar sweeps (MFAS, 6-7 kHz band; LFAS, 1-2 kHz band). The 1-2 kHz sweeps were also tested with harmonics, as sonars sometimes produce these as byproducts of the fundamental signal. The hearing thresholds for up-sweeps and down-sweeps within each sweep pair were similar. The 50% detection threshold sound pressure levels (broadband, averaged over the signal duration) of the 1-2 kHz and 6-7 kHz sweeps were 75 and 67 dB re 1 μPa(2), respectively. Harmonic deformation of the 1-2 kHz sweeps reduced the threshold to 59 dB re 1 μPa(2). This study shows that the presence of harmonics in sonar signals can increase the detectability of a signal by harbor porpoises, and that tonal audiograms may not accurately predict the audibility of sweeps. LFAS systems, when designed to produce signals without harmonics, can operate at higher source levels than MFAS systems, at similar audibility distances for porpoises. PMID:21568440

  2. High-resolution adaptive spiking sonar.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Fernando J; Kuc, Roman

    2009-05-01

    A new sonar system based on the conventional 6500 ranging module is presented that generates a sequence of spikes whose temporal density is related to the strength of the received echo. This system notably improves the resolution of a previous system by shortening the discharge cycle of the integrator included in the module. The operation is controlled by a PIC18F452 device, which can adapt the duration of the discharge to changing features of the echo, providing the system with a novel adaptive behavior. The performance of the new sensor is characterized and compared with that of the previous system by performing rotational scans of simple objects with different reflecting strengths. Some applications are suggested that exploit the high resolution and adaptability of this sensor. PMID:19473919

  3. Place recognition using batlike sonar.

    PubMed

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map. PMID:27481189

  4. An underwater ship fault detection method based on Sonar image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Shi; Fang-jian, Shan; Bo, Cong; Wei, Qiu

    2016-02-01

    For the research of underwater ship fault detection method in conditions of sailing on the ocean especially in poor visibility muddy sea, a fault detection method under the assist of sonar image processing was proposed. Firstly, did sonar image denoising using the algorithm of pulse coupled neural network (PCNN); secondly, edge feature extraction for the image after denoising was carried out by morphological wavelet transform; Finally, interested regions Using relevant tracking method were taken, namely fault area mapping. The simulation results presented here proved the feasibility and effectiveness of the sonar image processing in underwater fault detection system.

  5. Application of mobile robot localization using sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.; Hill, K.H.

    1994-12-31

    A sonar-based mobile robot has been developed for inspection of low-level radioactive waste drums. An algorithm was developed which gives the robot the ability to refence itself to cylindrical objects. The drum-following algorithm has been demonstrated in 4-ft drum aisles at the Mobile Robotics Laboratory at the University of South Carolina. The final version has proven to be robust through extensive long-term navigation tests. Future enhancements will employ a narrow-aisle version of the Nav-master to allow navigation in 3-ft drum aisles. The final version of the inspection robot will include the drum-navigation algorithm as a low-level primitive instruction. The onboard management system will be dedicated to more of the high-level functions, such as planning, now provided by the offboard supervisory system.

  6. Computers improves sonar seabed maps

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    A software package for computer aided mapping of sonar (CAMOS) has been developed in Norway. It has automatic mosaic presentation, which produces fully scale-rectified side scan sonograms automatically plotted on geographical and UTM map grids. The program is the first of its kind in the world. The maps produced by this method are more accurate and detailed than those produced by conventional methods. The main applications of CAMOS are: seafloor mapping; pipeline route surveys; pipeline inspection surveys; platform site surveys; geological mapping and geotechnical investigations. With the aerial-photograph quality of the CAMOS maps, a more accurate and visual representation of the seabed is achieved.

  7. Acoustic lens-based swimmer's sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnenbrink, Thomas E.; Desilets, Charles S.; Folds, Donald L.; Quick, Marshall K.

    1999-07-01

    A new high resolution imaging sonar is begin developed for use by swimmers to identify objects in turbid water or under low light level conditions. Beam forming for both the transmit and receive functions is performed with acoustic lenses. The acoustic image is focused on an acoustic retina or focal pane. An acoustic video converter converts the acoustic image to an electronic from suitable for display with conventional electronics. The image will be presented to the swimmer as a heads-up display on the face of his or her mask. The system will provide 1 cm resolution in range and cross range from 1-5 meters from the object. A longer range search mode is being explored. Laboratory prototypes of key components have been fabricated and evaluated. Results to date are promising.

  8. Design and operation specifications of an active monitoring system for detecting southern resident killer whales

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xu, Jinshan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Weiland, Mark A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Myers, Joshua R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Before final approval is given to the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 for deploying the first tidal power devices in the United States in an open water environment, a system to manage the potential risk of injury to killer whales due to collision with moving turbine blades must be demonstrated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with establishing the performance requirements for, constructing, and testing a prototype marine animal alert system for triggering temporary turbine shutdown when there is risk of collision with a killer whale. To develop a system that relies on active sonar two critical areas must be investigated - the target strength of killer whales and the frequency content of commercially available active sonar units. PNNL studied three target strength models: a simple model, the Fourier matching model, and the Kirchoff-ray mode model. Using target strength measurements of bottlenose dolphins obtained by previous researchers and assuming killer whales share similar morphology and structure, PNNL extrapolated the target strength of an adult killer whale 7.5 m in length at a frequency of 67 kHz. To study the frequency content of a commercially available sonar unit, direct measurements of the signal transmitted by the sonar were obtained by using a hydrophone connected to a data acquisition system in both laboratory and field conditions. The measurements revealed that in addition to the primary frequency of 200 kHz, there is a secondary frequency component at 90 kHz, which is within the hearing range of killer whales. The amplitude of the 90-kHz frequency component is above the hearing threshold of killer whales but below the threshold for potential injuries.

  9. Place recognition using batlike sonar

    PubMed Central

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14188.001 PMID:27481189

  10. Acoustic Facies Analysis of Side-Scan Sonar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwan, Fa Shu

    Acoustic facies analysis methods have allowed the generation of system-independent values for the quantitative seafloor acoustic parameter, backscattering strength, from GLORIA and (TAMU) ^2 side-scan sonar data. The resulting acoustic facies parameters enable quantitative comparisons of data collected by different sonar systems, data from different environments, and measurements made with survey geometries. Backscattering strength values were extracted from the sonar amplitude data by inversion based on the sonar equation. Image processing products reveal seafloor features and patterns of relative intensity. To quantitatively compare data collected at different times or by different systems, and to ground truth-measurements and geoacoustic models, quantitative corrections must be made on any given data set for system source level, beam pattern, time-varying gain, processing gain, transmission loss, absorption, insonified area contribution, and grazing angle effects. In the sonar equation, backscattering strength is the sonar parameter which is directly related to seafloor properties. The GLORIA data used in this study are from the edge of a distal lobe of the Monterey Fan. An interfingered region of strong and weak seafloor signal returns from a flat seafloor region provides an ideal data set for this study. Inversion of imagery data from the region allows the quantitative definition of different acoustic facies. The (TAMU) ^2 data used are from a calibration site near the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. Acoustic facies analysis techniques were implemented to generate statistical information for acoustic facies based on the estimates of backscattering strength. The backscattering strength values have been compared with Lambert's Law and other functions to parameterize the description of the acoustic facies. The resulting Lambertian constant values range from -26 dB to -36 dB. A modified Lambert relationship, which consists of both intercept and slope

  11. Fusion of Local Statistical Parameters for Buried Underwater Mine Detection in Sonar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maussang, F.; Rombaut, M.; Chanussot, J.; Hétet, A.; Amate, M.

    2008-12-01

    Detection of buried underwater objects, and especially mines, is a current crucial strategic task. Images provided by sonar systems allowing to penetrate in the sea floor, such as the synthetic aperture sonars (SASs), are of great interest for the detection and classification of such objects. However, the signal-to-noise ratio is fairly low and advanced information processing is required for a correct and reliable detection of the echoes generated by the objects. The detection method proposed in this paper is based on a data-fusion architecture using the belief theory. The input data of this architecture are local statistical characteristics extracted from SAS data corresponding to the first-, second-, third-, and fourth-order statistical properties of the sonar images, respectively. The interest of these parameters is derived from a statistical model of the sonar data. Numerical criteria are also proposed to estimate the detection performances and to validate the method.

  12. Bio-Inspired In-Air Sonar Localization: What Artificial Pinnae do for Robotic Bats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillebeeckx, Filips

    This dissertation investigates the hypothesis that binaural spectral cues, as generated by biomimetic microphone-baffle shapes in a suitable configuration, are both a sufficient and efficient means to realize real-time 3D localization capabilities for an in-air sonar system. We demonstrate 3D localization of real reflectors under realistic noise conditions, a task previously not performed successfully with a single binaural sonar measurement. The principal driving force behind this new approach is the use of two complex artificial pinna structures acting as complex direction-dependent spectral filters on the returning echoes. The technique makes use of broadband spectral cues in the received echoes only. Experiments with complex reflectors illustrate that the active head-related transfer function dominates the echo spectrum, allowing 3D localization in the presence of spectrum distortions caused by unknown reflector filtering. Also, experimental results in which multiple targets are localized simultaneously are presented. It is then investigated how binaural sonar system configuration choices affect 3D spectrum-based reflector localization. The proposed model demonstrates the limits of the spectral cue information provided by conventional transducers. Configurations composed of conventional receivers are evaluated as a function of unknown reflection strength and compared with a system with artificial pinnae receivers. Localization performance is quantified by an information theoretic performance criterion expressing the mutual information carried by a binaural spectrum on the corresponding 3D reflector location. Optimal configurations with conventional transducers are shown to be a function of echo reflection strength and the specific region of interest. The more complex spatial sensitivity patterns of organic pinna forms such as that of the Phyllostomus discolor bat species provide additional spectral cues that greatly improve localization information transfer

  13. Near-real-time mosaics from high-resolution side-scan sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danforth, William W.; O'Brien, Thomas F.; Schwab, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution side-scan sonar has proven to be a very effective tool for stuyding and understanding the surficial geology of the seafloor. Since the mid-1970s, the US Geological Survey has used high-resolution side-scan sonar systems for mapping various areas of the continental shelf. However, two problems typically encountered included the short range and the high sampling rate of high-resolution side-scan sonar systems and the acquisition and real-time processing of the enormous volume of sonar data generated by high-resolution suystems. These problems were addressed and overcome in August 1989 when the USGS conducted a side-scan sonar and bottom sampling survey of a 1000-sq-km section of the continental shelf in the Gulf of Farallones located offshore of San Francisco. The primary goal of this survey was to map an area of critical interest for studying continental shelf sediment dynamics. This survey provided an opportunity to test an image processing scheme that enabled production of a side-scan sonar hard-copy mosaic during the cruise in near real-time.

  14. Qualitative and quantitative processing of side-scan sonar data

    SciTech Connect

    Dwan, F.S.; Anderson, A.L.; Hilde, T.W.C. )

    1990-06-01

    Modern side-scan sonar systems allow vast areas of seafloor to be rapidly imaged and quantitatively mapped in detail. The application of remote sensing image processing techniques can be used to correct for various distortions inherent in raw sonography. Corrections are possible for water column, slant-range, aspect ratio, speckle and striping noise, multiple returns, power drop-off, and for georeferencing. The final products reveal seafloor features and patterns that are geometrically correct, georeferenced, and have improved signal/noise ratio. These products can be merged with other georeferenced data bases for further database management and information extraction. In order to compare data collected by different systems from a common area and to ground truth measurements and geoacoustic models, quantitative correction must be made for calibrated sonar system and bathymetry effects. Such data inversion must account for system source level, beam pattern, time-varying gain, processing gain, transmission loss, absorption, insonified area, and grazing angle effects. Seafloor classification can then be performed on the calculated back-scattering strength using Lambert's Law and regression analysis. Examples are given using both approaches: image analysis and inversion of data based on the sonar equation.

  15. Using vertical Sidescan Sonar as a tool for seagrass cartography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Carnero, N.; Rodríguez-Pérez, D.; Couñago, E.; Aceña, S.; Freire, J.

    2012-12-01

    An acoustic method, a vertically oriented Sidescan Sonar (SSSv), is used to detect and map Posidonia oceanica meadows in the bay of Agua Amarga (SE of the Mediterranean coast of Spain). Sidescan sonar, among other active hydroacoustic techniques, has shown its ability to detect, map and monitor seagrass based on its acoustic backscatter; however, some limitations linked to its power based approach have been reported in the literature. Our method is based on the SSSv measurement of canopy height distribution, making the most use of the SSSv acoustic data and using existing algorithms as statistical mapping methods. The results show a spatially coherent and statistically consistent classification. The comparison with groundtruthing is difficult due to the steep variations in the seafloor cover found in the area of interest, nevertheless the validation is successful (proving low-order discrimination) in a zone with a large range of depth variations (0-25 m).

  16. A novel approach to surveying sturgeon using side-scan sonar and occupancy modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flowers, H. Jared; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances represent opportunities to enhance and supplement traditional fisheries sampling approaches. One example with growing importance for fisheries research is hydroacoustic technologies such as side-scan sonar. Advantages of side-scan sonar over traditional techniques include the ability to sample large areas efficiently and the potential to survey fish without physical handling-important for species of conservation concern, such as endangered sturgeons. Our objectives were to design an efficient survey methodology for sampling Atlantic Sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus by using side-scan sonar and to developmethods for analyzing these data. In North Carolina and South Carolina, we surveyed six rivers thought to contain varying abundances of sturgeon by using a combination of side-scan sonar, telemetry, and video cameras (i.e., to sample jumping sturgeon). Lower reaches of each river near the saltwater-freshwater interface were surveyed on three occasions (generally successive days), and we used occupancy modeling to analyze these data.We were able to detect sturgeon in five of six rivers by using these methods. Side-scan sonar was effective in detecting sturgeon, with estimated gear-specific detection probabilities ranging from 0.2 to 0.5 and river-specific occupancy estimates (per 2-km river segment) ranging from 0.0 to 0.8. Future extensions of this occupancy modeling framework will involve the use of side-scan sonar data to assess sturgeon habitat and abundance in different river systems.

  17. Sonar imagery of mobile targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medynski, D.; Dorey, Ph.

    A spectral autoregression model is presented for extracting imagery from the brilliant reflections of pure tone sonar signals reflected from a moving target. The model is intended for bypassing the resolution degradation normally caused by temporal and frequency shifts. The Doppler shift caused by a large, moving object (100 m long) is shown to be large enough at a 1000 m distance with a 30 kHz signal that sequential autospectral analysis of the shifts can provide transverse image data of the target. A Fourier transformation would be inadequate for characterizing the difference in the return signals. The autoregression analysis proceeds by pattern recognition and error prediction steps at a set time interval. A SNR of 20 dB is obtained, which exceeds that available using PCM techniques.

  18. High resolution sea floor bathymetry using high frequency multibeam sonar and structured light laser imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, C.; Inglis, G.; Smart, C.; Vaughn, I.; Carey, S.

    2011-12-01

    Detailed bathymetric maps of the sea floor with centimeter level resolution can be produced by underwater vehicles using multibeam sonars and structured light laser imaging. Over spatial scales up to tens of thousands of square meters it is possible to produce maps gridded to sub centimeter levels. This level of accuracy demands detailed treatments of the sensor relative data, the vehicle navigation data and the vehicle to sensor position and rotational offsets. The presented results will show comparisons between these two sensor modalities. Data have a been collected during recent field programs to the Kolumbo volcanic crater and the Southern Aegean Sea. Our data processing and map making technique is based on the Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) concept, which is an active research area in both the marine and land robotics communities. The SLAM method provides a common framework for addressing both sensor and navigation errors in a self consistent manner. Using automated patch registration and filter techniques both the multibeam and laser data can be processed by the same algorithm. Structured light imaging has been a common machine vision technique for 3D shape estimation in industrial applications, but has had limited use underwater. By using a camera to image a projected laser line on the sea floor it is possible to determine the 3D profile of the bottom with sub centimeter resolution. Sequential images taken during a survey can be processed and merged into a bathymetric map in a similar manner as individual multibeam sonar pings. The resulting maps can be gridded down to 2.5 millimeter resolution and clearly show objects just a few centimeters in size. The structured light data have been compared to multibeam sonar data taken with BlueView Technologies sonars operating at both 1375 kHz and 2250 kHz. Such high frequency sonars offer centimeter resolution over ranges to 30 and 10 meters respectively. The difference between the broader footprint

  19. 50 CFR 216.270 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or...) (estimated amounts below): (i) AN/SQS-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 9885 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 1977 hours per year) (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 2470...

  20. 50 CFR 216.270 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or...) (estimated amounts below): (i) AN/SQS-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 9885 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 1977 hours per year) (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 2470...

  1. 50 CFR 218.100 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training...-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 10865 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 2173 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)-up to 705 hours over the course of 5 years...

  2. 50 CFR 218.100 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training...-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 10865 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 2173 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)-up to 705 hours over the course of 5 years...

  3. 50 CFR 218.100 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training...-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 10865 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 2173 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)-up to 705 hours over the course of 5 years...

  4. 50 CFR 216.270 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or...) (estimated amounts below): (i) AN/SQS-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 9885 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 1977 hours per year) (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 2470...

  5. 50 CFR 218.110 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources... below: (i) AN/SQS-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 215 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 43 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 325 hours over the course...

  6. Remote characterizing diffuse hydrothermal flows using multi-beam sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakin, A. N.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-beam sonars are normally used for bottom bathymetry and backscatter intensity measurements, which provide a base for remotely characterizing the seabed. If not only sonar echo intensity (squared magnitude of acoustic pressure) but also the cross-correlation between successive echoes is measured, then temporal changes in sound speed in the near-bottom environment can be determined. This, in turn, allows estimation of the change of environmental parameters, e.g. temperature variations, as there is a simple linear relationship between sound speed and temperature changes. Stochastic modeling shows that the dependence of the echo decorrelation on the lag time has a relationship with the statistics of temperature variations above the seabed that determine their spatial and temporal scales, power spectra, and structure functions. This approach has been applied to quantify the bottom diffuse hydrothermal flow activity at the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge using the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) connected to the Ocean Network Canada's NEPTUNE observatory. In contrast to our previous work, which was focused on spatial imaging of acoustic decorrelation at fixed lag, here the lag dependence of the acoustic structure function is measured and analyzed. This allows extraction of additional parameters of temperature fluctuation statistics. A potential to map diffuse flow using a ROV/HOV is discussed.

  7. Novel sonar signal processing tool using Shannon entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Quazi, A.H.

    1996-06-01

    Traditionally, conventional signal processing extracts information from sonar signals using amplitude, signal energy or frequency domain quantities obtained using spectral analysis techniques. The object is to investigate an alternate approach which is entirely different than that of traditional signal processing. This alternate approach is to utilize the Shannon entropy as a tool for the processing of sonar signals with emphasis on detection, classification, and localization leading to superior sonar system performance. Traditionally, sonar signals are processed coherently, semi-coherently, and incoherently, depending upon the a priori knowledge of the signals and noise. Here, the detection, classification, and localization technique will be based on the concept of the entropy of the random process. Under a constant energy constraint, the entropy of a received process bearing finite number of sample points is maximum when hypothesis H{sub 0} (that the received process consists of noise alone) is true and decreases when correlated signal is present (H{sub 1}). Therefore, the strategy used for detection is: (I) Calculate the entropy of the received data; then, (II) compare the entropy with the maximum value; and, finally, (III) make decision: H{sub 1} is assumed if the difference is large compared to pre-assigned threshold and H{sub 0} is otherwise assumed. The test statistics will be different between entropies under H{sub 0} and H{sub 1}. Here, we shall show the simulated results for detecting stationary and non-stationary signals in noise, and results on detection of defects in a Plexiglas bar using an ultrasonic experiment conducted by Hughes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Interferometric side-scan sonar signal denoised by wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sintes, Christophe R.; Legris, Michel; Solaiman, Basel

    2003-04-01

    This paper concerns the possibilities that side scan sonar have to determine the bathymetry. New side scan sonars, which are able to image the sea bottom with a high definition, estimate the relief with the same definition as conventional sonar images, using an interferometric multisensors system. Drawbacks concern the accuracy and errors of the numerical altitude model. Interferometric methods use a phase difference to determine a time delay between two sensors. The phase difference belongs to a finite interval (-π, +π), but the time delay between two sensors does not belong to a finite interval: the phase is 2π biased. The used sonar is designend for the use of the vernier technique, which allows to remove this bias. The difficulty comes from interferometric noise, which generates errors on the 2π bias estimation derived from the verier. The traditional way to reduce noise impact on the interferometric signal, is to average data. This method does not preserve the resolution of the bathymetric estimation. This paper presents an attempt to improve the accuracy and resolution of the interferometric signal through a wavelets based method of image despecklization. Traditionally, despecklization is processed on the logarithm of absolute value of the signal. But for this application, the proposed interferometric despecklizaiotn is achieved directly on the interferometric signal by integrating information, guided by the despeckled image. Finally, this multiscale analysis corresponds to an auto adaptive average filtering. A variant of this method is introduced and based on this assumption. This method used the identify function to reconstruct the signal. On the presented results, phase despecklization improves considerably the quality of the interferometric signal in terms of to noise ratio, without an important degradation of resolution.

  9. Calibration sphere for low-frequency parametric sonars.

    PubMed

    Foote, Kenneth G; Francis, David T I; Atkins, Philip R

    2007-03-01

    The problem of calibrating parametric sonar systems at low difference frequencies used in backscattering applications is addressed. A particular parametric sonar is considered: the Simrad TOPAS PS18 Parametric Sub-bottom Profiler. This generates difference-frequency signals in the band 0.5-6 kHz. A standard target is specified according to optimization conditions based on maximizing the target strength consistent with the target strength being independent of orientation and the target being physically manageable. The second condition is expressed as the target having an immersion weight less than 200 N. The result is a 280-mm-diam sphere of aluminum. Its target strength varies from -43.4 dB at 0.5 kHz to -20.2 dB at 6 kHz. Maximum excursions in target strength over the frequency band due to uncertainty in material properties of the sphere are of order +/-0.1 dB. Maximum excursions in target strength due to variations in mass density and sound speed of the immersion medium are larger, but can be eliminated by attention to the hydrographic conditions. The results are also applicable to the standard-target calibration of conventional sonars operating at low-kilohertz frequencies. PMID:17407885

  10. Blue whales respond to simulated mid-frequency military sonar

    PubMed Central

    Goldbogen, Jeremy A.; Southall, Brandon L.; DeRuiter, Stacy L.; Calambokidis, John; Friedlaender, Ari S.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Falcone, Erin A.; Schorr, Gregory S.; Douglas, Annie; Moretti, David J.; Kyburg, Chris; McKenna, Megan F.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Mid-frequency military (1–10 kHz) sonars have been associated with lethal mass strandings of deep-diving toothed whales, but the effects on endangered baleen whale species are virtually unknown. Here, we used controlled exposure experiments with simulated military sonar and other mid-frequency sounds to measure behavioural responses of tagged blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) in feeding areas within the Southern California Bight. Despite using source levels orders of magnitude below some operational military systems, our results demonstrate that mid-frequency sound can significantly affect blue whale behaviour, especially during deep feeding modes. When a response occurred, behavioural changes varied widely from cessation of deep feeding to increased swimming speed and directed travel away from the sound source. The variability of these behavioural responses was largely influenced by a complex interaction of behavioural state, the type of mid-frequency sound and received sound level. Sonar-induced disruption of feeding and displacement from high-quality prey patches could have significant and previously undocumented impacts on baleen whale foraging ecology, individual fitness and population health. PMID:23825206

  11. Blue whales respond to simulated mid-frequency military sonar.

    PubMed

    Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Southall, Brandon L; DeRuiter, Stacy L; Calambokidis, John; Friedlaender, Ari S; Hazen, Elliott L; Falcone, Erin A; Schorr, Gregory S; Douglas, Annie; Moretti, David J; Kyburg, Chris; McKenna, Megan F; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-08-22

    Mid-frequency military (1-10 kHz) sonars have been associated with lethal mass strandings of deep-diving toothed whales, but the effects on endangered baleen whale species are virtually unknown. Here, we used controlled exposure experiments with simulated military sonar and other mid-frequency sounds to measure behavioural responses of tagged blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) in feeding areas within the Southern California Bight. Despite using source levels orders of magnitude below some operational military systems, our results demonstrate that mid-frequency sound can significantly affect blue whale behaviour, especially during deep feeding modes. When a response occurred, behavioural changes varied widely from cessation of deep feeding to increased swimming speed and directed travel away from the sound source. The variability of these behavioural responses was largely influenced by a complex interaction of behavioural state, the type of mid-frequency sound and received sound level. Sonar-induced disruption of feeding and displacement from high-quality prey patches could have significant and previously undocumented impacts on baleen whale foraging ecology, individual fitness and population health. PMID:23825206

  12. Seafloor Characterisation and Imaging Using Multibeam Sonar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łubniewski, Zbigniew; Bruniecki, Krzysztof

    The approach to seafloor characterisation and imaging is presented. It relies on the combined, concurrent use of several techniques of multibeam sonar data processing. The first one is based on constructing the grey-level sonar images of seabed using the backscattering strength calculated for the echoes received in the consecutive beams. Then, the set of parameters describing the local region of sonar image is calculated. The second technique utilises the 3D model of the seabed surface, which is constructed as a set of (x, y, z) points using the detected bottom range for each beam in the multibeam system seafloor imaging procedure. For the local region of seabed surface, the descriptors like rms height and autocorrelation slope are calculated. The third technique assumes the use of a set of parameters of the multibeam echo envelope. Then, for selected parameters, the characteristic features quantitatively describing their dependence on seafloor incident angle, like slope, or range, are calculated. Finally, the features obtained by these three techniques are combined together. The proposed method has been tested using multibeam data records acquired from several bottom types in the Gulf of Gdańsk region. The obtained preliminary results show that application of the proposed combined approach improves the classification performance in comparison with those of using only the one scheme of seafloor multibeam data processing.

  13. Source ranging with an underwater geographic point in non-cooperative bistatic sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghwa; Jung, Tae Jin; Lee, Kyun Kyung; Myung, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Active sonar is divided into monostatic and bistatic sonar according to the relative positions of the source and the receiver. Bistatic sonar on modern submarines is classified into cooperative and non-cooperative operations. Cooperative operation uses an active signal of a friendly ship; therefore, source information is known a priori, whereas non-cooperative operation utilizes an active signal of the enemy, and hence, it is difficult to acquire source information, such as a source range, which is important for bistatic sonar operation. In order to overcome this difficulty, this paper proposes an estimation method for the source range that employs geographic information, and the utility of the source range estimation is evaluated. For the evaluation, we consider three error components. Then, the validity of the scheme is confirmed through theoretical error analysis and simulation study. The results show that geographic points that satisfy certain specific conditions can be used to estimate the source range within a range of tens of km in the simulation. Finally, we confirm that the receiver could estimate the source range from far away using non-cooperative bistatic sonar.

  14. 50 CFR 218.110 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training...-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 215 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 43 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 325 hours over the course of 5 years...

  15. 50 CFR 218.110 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training...-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 215 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 43 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 325 hours over the course of 5 years...

  16. 50 CFR 218.110 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training...-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 215 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 43 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 325 hours over the course of 5 years...

  17. Imaging beneath the skin of large tropical rivers: Clay controls on system morphodynamics revealed by novel CHIRP sub-surface sonar and deep coring along the Fly and Strickland Rivers, Papua New Guinea (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalto, R. E.; Grenfell, M.; Lauer, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Tropical rivers dominate Earth’s fluvial fluxes for water, carbon, and mineral sediment. They are characterized by large channels and floodplains, old system histories (in comparison to many temperate rivers), frequent and prolonged periods of flooding, and a clay-dominated sediment flux transported above a sandy bed. However, limited insight is available regarding the underlying bed & floodplain strata -- material that underpins system mobility and morphodynamics. Available data commonly stems from “skin-deep” approaches such as GIS analysis of imagery, shallow sampling of a surface veneer, & topographic profiling during lower river stages. Given the large temporal & spatial scales of such systems, new approaches are needed to see below lag deposits on mobile sandy beds & deep into expansive floodbasins. Furthermore, such data are needed to test whether we can usefully interpret large tropical river morphology using direct analogies to observations from small temperate sytems. Systems responding to sea level rise, pending avulsions, or an increase/contrast in sediment load would provide especially valuable insight. We conducted a field campaign along the Fly and Strickland Rivers in Papua New Guinea (discharge ~ 5,400 CMS). Immediate results were obtained using a dual-frequency CHIRP sub-bottom profiler optimized for fluvial environments, with which we were able to image 10-20m below the river/lake bed. We were able to distinguish sandy deposits from harder clay and silt lenses and also collected bed grab samples to verify our sonar results. Deep borehole samples (5-15m), push cores, and cutbank profiles of material strength confirmed observations from the sonar profiling. We simultaneously collected side-scan sonar imagery plus DGPS water/bed elevations. Findings include: 1) The prevalence of hard clay beneath the bed at many locations along the Lower Fly and Strickland Rivers, retarding migration; 2) Unusual bed morphology along the lower Middle Fly River

  18. Testing of a Composite Wavelet Filter to Enhance Automated Target Recognition in SONAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Automated Target Recognition (ATR) systems aim to automate target detection, recognition, and tracking. The current project applies a JPL ATR system to low resolution SONAR and camera videos taken from Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs). These SONAR images are inherently noisy and difficult to interpret, and pictures taken underwater are unreliable due to murkiness and inconsistent lighting. The ATR system breaks target recognition into three stages: 1) Videos of both SONAR and camera footage are broken into frames and preprocessed to enhance images and detect Regions of Interest (ROIs). 2) Features are extracted from these ROIs in preparation for classification. 3) ROIs are classified as true or false positives using a standard Neural Network based on the extracted features. Several preprocessing, feature extraction, and training methods are tested and discussed in this report.

  19. 50 CFR 216.170 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources for U.S. Navy anti-submarine warfare (ASW) training in the amounts indicated below (±10 percent): (i) AN/SQS-53 (hull-mounted sonar)—up...-mounted sonar)—up to 1915 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 383 hours per year) (iii)...

  20. Enhanced Sidescan-Sonar Imagery, North-Central Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Schattgen, P.T.; Doran, E.F.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection have been working cooperatively to map the sea-floor geology within Long Island Sound. Sidescan-sonar imagery collected during three NOAA hydrographic surveys (H11043, H11044, and H11045) was used to interpret the surficial-sediment distribution and sedimentary environments within the Sound. The original sidescan-sonar imagery generated by NOAA was used to evaluate hazards to navigation, which does not require consistent tonal matching throughout the survey. In order to fully utilize these data for geologic interpretation, artifacts within the imagery, primarily due to sidescan-system settings (for example, gain changes), processing techniques (for example, lack of across-track normalization) and environmental noise (for example, sea state), need to be minimized. Sidescan-sonar imagery from surveys H11043, H11044, and H11045 in north-central Long Island Sound was enhanced by matching the grayscale tones between adjacent sidescan-sonar lines to decrease the patchwork effect caused by numerous artifacts and to provide a more coherent sidescan-sonar image for use in geologic interpretation.

  1. Monitoring the solid-liquid interface in tanks using profiling sonar and 3D visualization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Nitin; Zhang, Jinsong; Roelant, David; Srivastava, Rajiv

    2005-03-01

    Visualization of the interface between settled solids and the optically opaque liquid above is necessary to facilitate efficient retrieval of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from underground storage tanks. A profiling sonar was used to generate 2-D slices across the settled solids at the bottom of the tank. By incrementally rotating the sonar about its centerline, slices of the solid-liquid interface can be imaged and a 3-D image of the settled solids interface generated. To demonstrate the efficacy of the sonar in real-time solid-liquid interface monitoring systems inside HLW tanks, two sets of experiments were performed. First, various solid objects and kaolin clay (10 μm dia) were successfully imaged while agitating with 30% solids (by weight) entrained in the liquid. Second, a solid with a density similar to that of the immersed fluid density was successfully imaged. Two dimensional (2-D) sonar images and the accuracy and limitations of the in-tank imaging will be presented for these two experiments. In addition, a brief review of how to utilize a 2-D sonar image to generate a 3-D surface of the settled layer within a tank will be discussed.

  2. Sonar pulse wave form optimization in cluttered environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichman, Peter B.

    2006-09-01

    A theory of active sonar (or radar) pulse wave form design, for optimal target detection in cluttered environments, is presented. The received target signal is maximized via a cost function L that incorporates both the signal-to-noise ratio and a generalization of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which is used to balance bandwidth (or range resolution) against signal gain. The optimal pulse wave form is the ground state solution to a one-dimensional Schrödinger-type equation in frequency space, with an effective potential energy that tends to concentrate pulse energy in frequency bands where the target reflectivity dominates the clutter reflectivity.

  3. Sonar investigations in the Laghi di Monticchio (Mt. Vúlture, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Ralph B.

    Sonar profiles across the Lago Grande and Lago Piccolo di Monticchio (two lakes in southern Italy, 20 km S of Melfi) were recorded to get knowledge on the lake basins an their surface prior coring. The combination of echo-graph data with digital landscape modelling was suitable for the detection and interpretation of complex structures of the lake bottom. The interpretation of the model shows the distortion of an old continuous sedimentation by younger tectonic events. The presence of terraces above and below the present-day lake level are interpreted as response to paleoclimatic fluctuations and human activities.

  4. Sonar pulse wave form optimization in cluttered environments.

    PubMed

    Weichman, Peter B

    2006-09-01

    A theory of active sonar (or radar) pulse wave form design, for optimal target detection in cluttered environments, is presented. The received target signal is maximized via a cost function L that incorporates both the signal-to-noise ratio and a generalization of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which is used to balance bandwidth (or range resolution) against signal gain. The optimal pulse wave form is the ground state solution to a one-dimensional Schrödinger-type equation in frequency space, with an effective potential energy that tends to concentrate pulse energy in frequency bands where the target reflectivity dominates the clutter reflectivity. PMID:17025776

  5. Changes in dive behavior during naval sonar exposure in killer whales, long-finned pilot whales, and sperm whales.

    PubMed

    Sivle, L D; Kvadsheim, P H; Fahlman, A; Lam, F P A; Tyack, P L; Miller, P J O

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic underwater sound in the environment might potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals enough to have an impact on their reproduction and survival. Diving behavior of four killer whales (Orcinus orca), seven long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), and four sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) was studied during controlled exposures to naval sonar [low frequency active sonar (LFAS): 1-2 kHz and mid frequency active sonar (MFAS): 6-7 kHz] during three field seasons (2006-2009). Diving behavior was monitored before, during and after sonar exposure using an archival tag placed on the animal with suction cups. The tag recorded the animal's vertical movement, and additional data on horizontal movement and vocalizations were used to determine behavioral modes. Killer whales that were conducting deep dives at sonar onset changed abruptly to shallow diving (ShD) during LFAS, while killer whales conducting deep dives at the onset of MFAS did not alter dive mode. When in ShD mode at sonar onset, killer whales did not change their diving behavior. Pilot and sperm whales performed normal deep dives (NDD) during MFAS exposure. During LFAS exposures, long-finned pilot whales mostly performed fewer deep dives and some sperm whales performed shallower and shorter dives. Acoustic recording data presented previously indicates that deep diving (DD) is associated with feeding. Therefore, the observed changes in dive behavior of the three species could potentially reduce the foraging efficiency of the affected animals. PMID:23087648

  6. More than the Bottom: Multibeam Sonars and Water-column Imaging (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, L. A.; Weber, T.; Gardner, J. V.; Malik, M.; Doucet, M.; Beaudoin, J.

    2010-12-01

    The past ten years have seen remarkable advances in our ability to rapidly and accurately map the seafloor. Improvements in sonar design and signal processing have dramatically increased both the spatial and temporal resolution of seafloor mapping systems as well as provided the opportunity to extract information about seafloor character through the concomitant mapping of seafloor backscatter. The latest generation of multibeam sonars, however, can now provide acoustic returns from the water-column as well as from the seafloor. When combined with powerful new visualization tools, the ability to acoustically map large volumes of the water-column opens up vast new areas of application for multibeam sonar data. When applied to the most traditional use of multibeam sonar data (seafloor mapping in support of safe navigation), water-column data afford the opportunity to see small, high-standing targets (like ship’s masts) and offer a powerful tool for critically needed, least-depth detection. Water-column data collected from multibeam sonars also provide numerous opportunities for fisheries research ranging from qualitative descriptions of fish school behavior and vessel avoidance studies (the systems can make measurements well beyond the limited, normal-incidence view of traditional fisheries sonars), to the eventual quantitative measurements of volume backscatter (as systems become more calibrated). Increases in system bandwidth will also open opportunities for target identification studies. With increased bandwith will also come the potential for tuning the systems for the mapping of watermass boundaries, offering a powerful tool for a range of physical oceanographic applications. Finally, the ability to map the water-column has great potential for quantifying the flux of methane into the ocean from natural (and un-natural) seeps. Water-column mapping has already proven a valuable asset in monitoring the Deepwater Horizon well-site for potential blow-outs or gas

  7. Automatic seagrass pattern identification on sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnemoonfar, Maryam; Rahman, Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    Natural and human-induced disturbances are resulting in degradation and loss of seagrass. Freshwater flooding, severe meteorological events and invasive species are among the major natural disturbances. Human-induced disturbances are mainly due to boat propeller scars in the shallow seagrass meadows and anchor scars in the deeper areas. Therefore, there is a vital need to map seagrass ecosystems in order to determine worldwide abundance and distribution. Currently there is no established method for mapping the pothole or scars in seagrass. One of the most precise sensors to map the seagrass disturbance is side scan sonar. Here we propose an automatic method which detects seagrass potholes in sonar images. Side scan sonar images are notorious for having speckle noise and uneven illumination across the image. Moreover, disturbance presents complex patterns where most segmentation techniques will fail. In this paper, by applying mathematical morphology technique and calculating the local standard deviation of the image, the images were enhanced and the pothole patterns were identified. The proposed method was applied on sonar images taken from Laguna Madre in Texas. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Motion compensation on synthetic aperture sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heremans, R.; Acheroy, M.; Dupont, Y.

    2006-09-01

    High resolution sonars are required to detect and classify mines on the sea-bed. Synthetic aperture sonar increases the sonar cross range resolution by several orders of magnitudes while maintaining or increasing the area search rate. The resolution is however strongly dependent on the precision with which the motion errors of the platform can be estimated. The term micro-navigation is used to describe this very special requirement for sub-wavelength relative positioning of the platform. Therefore algorithms were designed to estimate those motion errors and to correct for them during the (ω, k)-reconstruction phase. To validate the quality of the motion estimation algorithms a single transmitter/multiple receiver simulator was build, allowing to generate multiple point targets with or without surge and/or sway and/or yaw motion errors. The surge motion estimation is shown on real data, which were taken during a sea trial in November of 2003 with the low frequency (12 kHz) side scan sonar (LFSS) moving on a rail positioned on the sea-bed near Marciana Marina on the Elba Island, Italy.

  9. Active optical zoom system

    DOEpatents

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  10. A Fisheries Application of a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar Acoustic Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Moursund, Russell A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Peters, Rock D.

    2003-06-01

    The uses of an acoustic camera in fish passage research at hydropower facilities are being explored by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) is a high-resolution imaging sonar that obtains near video-quality images for the identification of objects underwater. Developed originally for the Navy by the University of Washington?s Applied Physics Laboratory, it bridges the gap between existing fisheries assessment sonar and optical systems. Traditional fisheries assessment sonars detect targets at long ranges but cannot record the shape of targets. The images within 12 m of this acoustic camera are so clear that one can see fish undulating as they swim and can tell the head from the tail in otherwise zero-visibility water. In the 1.8 MHz high-frequency mode, this system is composed of 96 beams over a 29-degree field of view. This high resolution and a fast frame rate allow the acoustic camera to produce near video-quality images of objects through time. This technology redefines many of the traditional limitations of sonar for fisheries and aquatic ecology. Images can be taken of fish in confined spaces, close to structural or surface boundaries, and in the presence of entrained air. The targets themselves can be visualized in real time. The DIDSON can be used where conventional underwater cameras would be limited in sampling range to < 1 m by low light levels and high turbidity, and where traditional sonar would be limited by the confined sample volume. Results of recent testing at The Dalles Dam, on the lower Columbia River in Oregon, USA, are shown.

  11. Automated detection of submerged navigational obstructions in freshwater impoundments with hull mounted sidescan sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Phillip A.

    The prevalence of low-cost side scanning sonar systems mounted on small recreational vessels has created improved opportunities to identify and map submerged navigational hazards in freshwater impoundments. However, these economical sensors also present unique challenges for automated techniques. This research explores related literature in automated sonar imagery processing and mapping technology, proposes and implements a framework derived from these sources, and evaluates the approach with video collected from a recreational grade sonar system. Image analysis techniques including optical character recognition and an unsupervised computer automated detection (CAD) algorithm are employed to extract the transducer GPS coordinates and slant range distance of objects protruding from the lake bottom. The retrieved information is formatted for inclusion into a spatial mapping model. Specific attributes of the sonar sensors are modeled such that probability profiles may be projected onto a three dimensional gridded map. These profiles are computed from multiple points of view as sonar traces crisscross or come near each other. As lake levels fluctuate over time so do the elevation points of view. With each sonar record, the probability of a hazard existing at certain elevations at the respective grid points is updated with Bayesian mechanics. As reinforcing data is collected, the confidence of the map improves. Given a lake's current elevation and a vessel draft, a final generated map can identify areas of the lake that have a high probability of containing hazards that threaten navigation. The approach is implemented in C/C++ utilizing OpenCV, Tesseract OCR, and QGIS open source software and evaluated in a designated test area at Lake Lavon, Collin County, Texas.

  12. High reliability outdoor sonar prototype based on efficient signal coding.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Fernando J; Ureña, Jesús; Mazo, Manuel; Hernández, Alvaro; García, Juan J; de Marziani, Carlos

    2006-10-01

    Many mobile robots and autonomous vehicles designed for outdoor operation have incorporated ultrasonic sensors in their navigation systems, whose function is mainly to avoid possible collisions with very close obstacles. The use of these systems in more precise tasks requires signal encoding and the incorporation of pulse compression techniques that have already been used with success in the design of high-performance indoor sonars. However, the transmission of ultrasonic encoded signals outdoors entails a new challenge because of the effects of atmospheric turbulence. This phenomenon causes random fluctuations in the phase and amplitude of traveling acoustic waves, a fact that can make the encoded signal completely unrecognizable by its matched receiver. Atmospheric turbulence is investigated in this work, with the aim of determining the conditions under which it is possible to assure the reliable outdoor operation of an ultrasonic pulse compression system. As a result of this analysis, a novel sonar prototype based on complementary sequences coding is developed and experimentally tested. This encoding scheme provides the system with very useful additional features, namely, high robustness to noise, multi-mode operation capability (simultaneous emissions with minimum cross talk interference), and the possibility of applying an efficient detection algorithm that notably decreases the hardware resource requirements. PMID:17036794

  13. High thresholds for avoidance of sonar by free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas).

    PubMed

    Antunes, R; Kvadsheim, P H; Lam, F P A; Tyack, P L; Thomas, L; Wensveen, P J; Miller, P J O

    2014-06-15

    The potential effects of exposing marine mammals to military sonar is a current concern. Dose-response relationships are useful for predicting potential environmental impacts of specific operations. To reveal behavioral response thresholds of exposure to sonar, we conducted 18 exposure/control approaches to 6 long-finned pilot whales. Source level and proximity of sonar transmitting one of two frequency bands (1-2 kHz and 6-7 kHz) were increased during exposure sessions. The 2-dimensional movement tracks were analyzed using a changepoint method to identify the avoidance response thresholds which were used to estimate dose-response relationships. No support for an effect of sonar frequency or previous exposures on the probability of response was found. Estimated response thresholds at which 50% of population show avoidance (SPLmax=170 dB re 1 μPa, SELcum=173 dB re 1 μPa(2) s) were higher than previously found for other cetaceans. The US Navy currently uses a generic dose-response relationship to predict the responses of cetaceans to naval active sonar, which has been found to underestimate behavioural impacts on killer whales and beaked whales. The navy curve appears to match more closely our results with long-finned pilot whales, though it might underestimate the probability of avoidance for pilot-whales at long distances from sonar sources. PMID:24820645

  14. Multibeam Sonar Backscatter Data Acquisition and Processing: Guidelines and Recommendations from the GEOHAB Backscatter Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffron, E.; Lurton, X.; Lamarche, G.; Brown, C.; Lucieer, V.; Rice, G.; Schimel, A.; Weber, T.

    2015-12-01

    Backscatter data acquired with multibeam sonars are now commonly used for the remote geological interpretation of the seabed. The systems hardware, software, and processing methods and tools have grown in numbers and improved over the years, yet many issues linger: there are no standard procedures for acquisition, poor or absent calibration, limited understanding and documentation of processing methods, etc. A workshop organized at the GeoHab (a community of geoscientists and biologists around the topic of marine habitat mapping) annual meeting in 2013 was dedicated to seafloor backscatter data from multibeam sonars and concluded that there was an overwhelming need for better coherence and agreement on the topics of acquisition, processing and interpretation of data. The GeoHab Backscatter Working Group (BSWG) was subsequently created with the purpose of documenting and synthetizing the state-of-the-art in sensors and techniques available today and proposing methods for best practice in the acquisition and processing of backscatter data. Two years later, the resulting document "Backscatter measurements by seafloor-mapping sonars: Guidelines and Recommendations" was completed1. The document provides: An introduction to backscatter measurements by seafloor-mapping sonars; A background on the physical principles of sonar backscatter; A discussion on users' needs from a wide spectrum of community end-users; A review on backscatter measurement; An analysis of best practices in data acquisition; A review of data processing principles with details on present software implementation; and finally A synthesis and key recommendations. This presentation reviews the BSWG mandate, structure, and development of this document. It details the various chapter contents, its recommendations to sonar manufacturers, operators, data processing software developers and end-users and its implication for the marine geology community. 1: Downloadable at https://www.niwa.co.nz/coasts-and-oceans/research-projects/backscatter-measurement-guidelines

  15. Algorithmic improvements to the real-time implementation of a synthetic aperture sonar beam former

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Douglas K.

    1997-07-01

    Coastal Systems Station has translated its synthetic aperture sonar beamformer from linear processing to parallel processing. The initial implementation included many linear processes delegated to individual processors and neglected algorithmic refinements available to parallel processing. The steps taken to achieve increased computational speed for real-time beam forming are presented.

  16. Sonar Recognition Training: An Investigation of Whole VS. Part and Analytic VS. Synthetic Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annett, John

    An experienced person, in such tasks as sonar detection and recognition, has a considerable superiority over a machine recognition system in auditory pattern recognition. However, people require extensive exposure to auditory patterns before achieving a high level of performance. In an attempt to discover a method of training people to recognize…

  17. Model-based approach to the detection and classification of mines in sidescan sonar.

    PubMed

    Reed, Scott; Petillot, Yvan; Bell, Judith

    2004-01-10

    This paper presents a model-based approach to mine detection and classification by use of sidescan sonar. Advances in autonomous underwater vehicle technology have increased the interest in automatic target recognition systems in an effort to automate a process that is currently carried out by a human operator. Current automated systems generally require training and thus produce poor results when the test data set is different from the training set. This has led to research into unsupervised systems, which are able to cope with the large variability in conditions and terrains seen in sidescan imagery. The system presented in this paper first detects possible minelike objects using a Markov random field model, which operates well on noisy images, such as sidescan, and allows a priori information to be included through the use of priors. The highlight and shadow regions of the object are then extracted with a cooperating statistical snake, which assumes these regions are statistically separate from the background. Finally, a classification decision is made using Dempster-Shafer theory, where the extracted features are compared with synthetic realizations generated with a sidescan sonar simulator model. Results for the entire process are shown on real sidescan sonar data. Similarities between the sidescan sonar and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging processes ensure that the approach outlined here could be made applied to SAR image analysis. PMID:14735943

  18. Model-based approach to the detection and classification of mines in sidescan sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Scott; Petillot, Yvan; Bell, Judith

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based approach to mine detection and classification by use of sidescan sonar. Advances in autonomous underwater vehicle technology have increased the interest in automatic target recognition systems in an effort to automate a process that is currently carried out by a human operator. Current automated systems generally require training and thus produce poor results when the test data set is different from the training set. This has led to research into unsupervised systems, which are able to cope with the large variability in conditions and terrains seen in sidescan imagery. The system presented in this paper first detects possible minelike objects using a Markov random field model, which operates well on noisy images, such as sidescan, and allows a priori information to be included through the use of priors. The highlight and shadow regions of the object are then extracted with a cooperating statistical snake, which assumes these regions are statistically separate from the background. Finally, a classification decision is made using Dempster-Shafer theory, where the extracted features are compared with synthetic realizations generated with a sidescan sonar simulator model. Results for the entire process are shown on real sidescan sonar data. Similarities between the sidescan sonar and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging processes ensure that the approach outlined here could be made applied to SAR image analysis.

  19. Object detection in side scan sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenwu; Cheng, Binbin; Chen, Yao

    2015-12-01

    Automatic target detection is a challenging task as the response from an underwater target may vary greatly depending on its configuration, sonar parameters and the environment. We propose a Z- test algorithm for target detection in side scan sonar image which avoids this problem that covers the variation in the target response. A Z-test is performed on the means of the pixel gray levels within and outside the window area, a detection being called when the value of test statistic feature exceeds a certain threshold. The algorithm is formulated for real-time execution on limited memory commercial-of-the-shelf platforms and is capable of detection objects on the seabed-bottom.

  20. Color and Grey Scale in Sonar Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraiss, K. F.; Kuettelwesch, K. H.

    1984-01-01

    In spite of numerous publications 1 it is still rather unclear, whether color is of any help in sonar displays. The work presented here deals with a particular type of sonar data, i.e., LOFAR-grams (low frequency analysing and recording) where acoustic sensor data are continuously written as a time-frequency plot. The question to be answered quantitatively is, whether color coding does improve target detection when compared with a grey scale code. The data show significant differences in receiver-operating characteristics performance for the selected codes. In addition it turned out, that the background noise level affects the performance dramatically for some color codes, while others remain stable or even improve. Generally valid rules are presented on how to generate useful color scales for this particular application.

  1. How do tiger moths jam bat sonar?

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Aaron J; Barber, Jesse R; Hristov, Nickolay I; Conner, William E

    2011-07-15

    The tiger moth Bertholdia trigona is the only animal in nature known to defend itself by jamming the sonar of its predators - bats. In this study we analyzed the three-dimensional flight paths and echolocation behavior of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) attacking B. trigona in a flight room over seven consecutive nights to determine the acoustic mechanism of the sonar-jamming defense. Three mechanisms have been proposed: (1) the phantom echo hypothesis, which states that bats misinterpret moth clicks as echoes; (2) the ranging interference hypothesis, which states that moth clicks degrade the bats' precision in determining target distance; and (3) the masking hypothesis, which states that moth clicks mask the moth echoes entirely, making the moth temporarily invisible. On nights one and two of the experiment, the bats appeared startled by the clicks; however, on nights three through seven, the bats frequently missed their prey by a distance predicted by the ranging interference hypothesis (∼15-20 cm). Three-dimensional simulations show that bats did not avoid phantom targets, and the bats' ability to track clicking prey contradicts the predictions of the masking hypothesis. The moth clicks also forced the bats to reverse their stereotyped pattern of echolocation emissions during attack, even while bats continued pursuit of the moths. This likely further hinders the bats' ability to track prey. These results have implications for the evolution of sonar jamming in tiger moths, and we suggest evolutionary pathways by which sonar jamming may have evolved from other tiger moth defense mechanisms. PMID:21697434

  2. Controllable Sonar Lenses and Prisms Based on ERFs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Paustian, Iris; Lopes, Joseph; Folds, Donald

    2004-01-01

    Sonar-beam-steering devices of the proposed type would contain no moving parts and would be considerably smaller and less power-hungry, relative to conventional multiple-beam sonar arrays. The proposed devices are under consideration for installation on future small autonomous underwater vehicles because the sizes and power demands of conventional multiple-beam arrays are excessive, and motors used in single-beam mechanically scanned systems are also not reliable. The proposed devices would include a variety of electrically controllable acoustic prisms, lenses, and prism/lens combinations both simple and compound. These devices would contain electrorheological fluids (ERFs) between electrodes. An ERF typically consists of dielectric particles floating in a dielectric fluid. When an electric field is applied to the fluid, the particles become grouped into fibrils aligned in rows, with a consequent increase in the viscosity of the fluid and a corresponding increase in the speed of sound in the fluid. The change in the speed of sound increases with an increase in the applied electric field. By thus varying the speed of sound, one varies the acoustic index of refraction, analogously to varying the index of refraction of an optical lens or prism. In the proposed acoustic devices, this effect would be exploited to control the angles of refraction of acoustic beams, thereby steering the beams and, in the case of lenses, controlling focal lengths.

  3. Processing of AUV Sidescan Sonar Images for Enhancement and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honsho, C.; Asada, A.; Ura, T.; Kim, K.

    2014-12-01

    An arc volcano hosting a hydrothermal field was surveyed by using an autonomous underwater vehicle equipped with a sidescan sonar system and a multibeam echo sounder. The survey area is relatively small in area but has large variations in bathymetry and geology. To correct large geometric distortions in sidescan images, actual topographic cross sections cut by fan beams were taken into consideration instead of assuming flat bottoms. Beam pattern corrections were cautiously performed in combination with theoretical radiometric corrections for slant range and incident angle. These detailed geometric and radiometric corrections were efficient to patch neighboring images and build a complete picture of the whole survey area. Three textural attributes were computed from the corrected images by means of grey level co-occurrence matrices and used for the seafloor classification. As no ground truth data were available to us, we used a cluster analysis for the classification and obtained a result that seems relevant to the geological features suggested by the topography. Moreover, slopes of the caldera wall and of the central cones are clearly differentiated in the classification result, though the difference is not immediately obvious to our eyes. As one of the classes clearly delineates a known hydrothermal field, we expect by analogy that this class will highlight hydrothermal features in the survey area, helping to detect potential targets to be specifically investigated for mineral exploration. Numerical processing of sonar images effectively complements their visual inspection with human eyes and is helpful in providing a different perspective.

  4. In situ calibration of sonar arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luker, L. D.; Forsythe, S. E.

    2003-10-01

    The transmitting and receiving properties of the channels of sonar arrays can change with time resulting in a degradation of the array's performance. Fortunately, the degradation in performance can be minimized, perhaps even eliminated, if the changes in a channel's transmitting or receiving properties are compensated for in the array's beamformer electronics. However, this requires up-to-date knowledge of the acoustic performance of each of the array's channels. This paper describes a procedure for the in situ calibration of sonar arrays when the vessel they are installed on is in open water. It can be used to determine changes in the electroacoustic performance of the projecting and receiving channels of the array. The method used is based on a procedure for in situ comparison calibration of transducers [A. L. Van Buren, ``Procedure for the in situ calibration of sonar transducers,'' J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 48-52 (1991)] that uses sound-propagation factors measured when the vessel is first deployed to account for the influence of the vessel's structure. Results are presented that show comparisons of the measured degradation of numerous channels in a planar array using an independent acoustic measurement and the in situ method. [Work supported by ONR.

  5. Human Face Classification Using Ultrasonic Sonar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhenwei; Ji, Wei; Xu, Yong; Yang, Jun

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, human face classification using ultrasonic sonar imaging is investigated. On the basis of Freedman's “image pulse” model, the scattering centers model is employed to simplify the complex geometry of the human face into a series of scattering centers. A chirp signal is utilized to detect the human face for its high range resolution and large signal-to-noise ratio. Ultrasonic sonar images, also named high-resolution range profiles, are obtained by demodulating the echoes with a reference chirp signal. Features directly related to the geometry of the human face are extracted from ultrasonic sonar images and verified in the experiments designed with different configurations of transmitter-receiver (TR) pairs. Experimental results indicate that the improved feature extraction method can achieve a high recognition rate of over 99% in the case of ultrasonic transmitters angled at 45° above and orthogonal to the face, and this method improves the performance of ultrasonic face recognition compared with our previous result.

  6. Sonar Sensor Models and Their Application to Mobile Robot Localization

    PubMed Central

    Burguera, Antoni; González, Yolanda; Oliver, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to mobile robot localization using sonar sensors. This approach is based on the use of particle filters. Each particle is augmented with local environment information which is updated during the mission execution. An experimental characterization of the sonar sensors used is provided in the paper. A probabilistic measurement model that takes into account the sonar uncertainties is defined according to the experimental characterization. The experimental results quantitatively evaluate the presented approach and provide a comparison with other localization strategies based on both the sonar and the laser. Some qualitative results are also provided for visual inspection. PMID:22303171

  7. Echo tracker/range finder for radars and sonars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinides, N. J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An echo tracker/range finder or altimeter is described. The pulse repetition frequency (PFR) of a predetermined plurality of transmitted pulses is adjusted so that echo pulses received from a reflecting object are positioned between transmitted pulses and divided their interpulse time interval into two time intervals having a predetermined ratio with respect to each other. The invention described provides a means whereby the arrival time of a plurality of echo pulses is defined as the time at which a composite echo pulse formed of a sum of the individual echo pulses has the highest amplitude. The invention is applicable to radar systems, sonar systems, or any other kind of system in which pulses are transmitted and echoes received therefrom.

  8. Tight coordination of aerial flight maneuvers and sonar call production in insectivorous bats.

    PubMed

    Falk, Benjamin; Kasnadi, Joseph; Moss, Cynthia F

    2015-11-01

    Echolocating bats face the challenge of coordinating flight kinematics with the production of echolocation signals used to guide navigation. Previous studies of bat flight have focused on kinematics of fruit and nectar-feeding bats, often in wind tunnels with limited maneuvering, and without analysis of echolocation behavior. In this study, we engaged insectivorous big brown bats in a task requiring simultaneous turning and climbing flight, and used synchronized high-speed motion-tracking cameras and audio recordings to quantify the animals' coordination of wing kinematics and echolocation. Bats varied flight speed, turn rate, climb rate and wingbeat rate as they navigated around obstacles, and they adapted their sonar signals in patterning, duration and frequency in relation to the timing of flight maneuvers. We found that bats timed the emission of sonar calls with the upstroke phase of the wingbeat cycle in straight flight, and that this relationship changed when bats turned to navigate obstacles. We also characterized the unsteadiness of climbing and turning flight, as well as the relationship between speed and kinematic parameters. Adaptations in the bats' echolocation call frequency suggest changes in beam width and sonar field of view in relation to obstacles and flight behavior. By characterizing flight and sonar behaviors in an insectivorous bat species, we find evidence of exquisitely tight coordination of sensory and motor systems for obstacle navigation and insect capture. PMID:26582935

  9. Bayesian sonar detection performance prediction in the presence of interference in uncertain environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Liewei; Nolte, Loren W.

    2005-04-01

    The detection performance of sonar systems can be greatly limited by the presence of interference and environmental uncertainty. The classic sonar equation does not take into account these two limiting factors and is inaccurate in predicting sonar detection performance. Here we have developed closed-form receiver operating characteristic (ROC) performance expressions for the Bayesian detector in the presence of interference in uncertain environments. Various scenarios extended from a NRL benchmark shallow-water model were used to test the analytical ROC expressions and to analyze the effects of interference and environmental uncertainty on detection performance. The results show that (1) the degradation on detection performance due to interference is greatly magnified by the presence of environmental uncertainty; (2) Bayesian sonar detection performance depends on the following fundamental parameters: the signal-to-noise ratio, the rank of the signal matrix, and the signal-to-interference coefficient; (3) the proposed analytical ROC performance predictions can be computed much faster than performance evaluations with commonly used Monte Carlo techniques. .

  10. Bayesian sonar detection performance prediction in the presence of interference in uncertain environments.

    PubMed

    Sha, Liewei; Nolte, Loren W

    2005-04-01

    The detection performance of sonar systems can be greatly limited by the presence of interference and environmental uncertainty. The classic sonar equation does not take into account these two limiting factors and is inaccurate in predicting sonar detection performance. Here we have developed closed-form receiver operating characteristic (ROC) performance expressions for the Bayesian detector in the presence of interference in uncertain environments. Various scenarios extended from a NRL benchmark shallow-water model were used to test the analytical ROC expressions and to analyze the effects of interference and environmental uncertainty on detection performance. The results show that (1) the degradation on detection performance due to interference is greatly magnified by the presence of environmental uncertainty; (2) Bayesian sonar detection performance depends on the following fundamental parameters: the signal-to-noise ratio, the rank of the signal matrix, and the signal-to-interference coefficient; (3) the proposed analytical ROC performance predictions can be computed much faster than performance evaluations with commonly used Monte Carlo techniques. PMID:15898640

  11. 50 CFR 218.120 - Specified activity and geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high-frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources...-mounted active sonar)—up to 2,890 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 578 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 260 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of...

  12. 50 CFR 218.120 - Specified activity and geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high-frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources...-mounted active sonar)—up to 2,890 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 578 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 260 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of...

  13. 50 CFR 218.120 - Specified activity and geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high-frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources...-mounted active sonar)—up to 2,890 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 578 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 260 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of...

  14. 50 CFR 218.120 - Specified activity and geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high-frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources...-mounted active sonar)—up to 2,890 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 578 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 260 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of...

  15. Solar cell activation system

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, L.

    1983-07-05

    A system for activating solar cells involves the use of phosphorescent paint, the light from which is amplified by a thin magnifying lens and used to activate solar cells. In a typical system, a member painted with phosphorescent paint is mounted adjacent a thin magnifying lens which focuses the light on a predetermined array of sensitive cells such as selenium, cadmium or silicon, mounted on a plastic board. A one-sided mirror is mounted adjacent the cells to reflect the light back onto said cells for purposes of further intensification. The cells may be coupled to rechargeable batteries or used to directly power a small radio or watch.

  16. Side-scan sonar mapping: Pseudo-real-time processing and mosaicking techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Danforth, W.W.; Schwab, W.C.; O'Brien, T.F. ); Karl, H. )

    1990-05-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) surveyed 1,000 km{sup 2} of the continental shelf off San Francisco during a 17-day cruise, using a 120-kHz side-scan sonar system, and produced a digitally processed sonar mosaic of the survey area. The data were processed and mosaicked in real time using software developed at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory and modified by the USGS, a substantial task due to the enormous amount of data produced by high-resolution side-scan systems. Approximately 33 megabytes of data were acquired every 1.5 hr. The real-time sonar images were displayed on a PC-based workstation and the data were transferred to a UNIX minicomputer where the sonar images were slant-range corrected, enhanced using an averaging method of desampling and a linear-contrast stretch, merged with navigation, geographically oriented at a user-selected scale, and finally output to a thermal printer. The hard-copy output was then used to construct a mosaic of the survey area. The final product of this technique is a UTM-projected map-mosaic of sea-floor backscatter variations, which could be used, for example, to locate appropriate sites for sediment sampling to ground truth the sonar imagery while still at sea. More importantly, reconnaissance surveys of this type allow for the analysis and interpretation of the mosaic during a cruise, thus greatly reducing the preparation time needed for planning follow-up studies of a particular area.

  17. Processing techniques for digital sonar images from GLORIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Image processing techniques have been developed to handle data from one of the newest members of the remote sensing family of digital imaging systems. This paper discusses software to process data collected by the GLORIA (Geological Long Range Inclined Asdic) sonar imaging system, designed and built by the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) in England, to correct for both geometric and radiometric distortions that exist in the original 'raw' data. Preprocessing algorithms that are GLORIA-specific include corrections for slant-range geometry, water column offset, aspect ratio distortion, changes in the ship's velocity, speckle noise, and shading problems caused by the power drop-off which occurs as a function of range.-from Author

  18. Production Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallaway, Ann, Ed.

    This production systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, domains and objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 30 modules on the following topics: production…

  19. Communication Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Barbara, Ed.

    This communication systems guide provides teachers with learning activities for secondary students. Introductory materials include an instructional planning outline and worksheet, an outline of essential elements, a list of objectives, a course description, and a content outline. The guide contains 32 modules on the following topics: story…

  20. Geometric corrections on sidescan sonar images based on bathymetry. Application with SeaMARC II and Sea Beam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervenka, Pierre; de Moustier, Christian; Lonsdale, Peter F.

    1994-10-01

    Acoustic backscatter images of the seafloor obtained with sidescan sonar systems are displayed most often using a flat bottom assumption. Whenever this assumption is not valid, pixels are mapped incorrectly in the image frame, yielding distorted representations of the seafloor. Here, such distortions are corrected by using an appropriate representation of the relief, as measured by the sonar that collected the acoustic backscatter information. In addition, all spatial filtering operations required in the pixel relocation process take the sonar geometry into account. Examples of the process are provided by data collected in the Northeastern Pacific over Fieberling Guyot with the SeaMARC II bathymetric sidescan sonar system and the Sea Beam multibeam echo-sounder. The nearly complete (90%) Sea Beam bathymetry coverage of the Guyot serves as a reference to quantify the distortions found in the backscatter images and to evaluate the accuracy of the corrections performed with SeaMARC II bathymetry. As a byproduct, the processed SeaMARC II bathymetry and the Sea Beam bathymetry adapted to the SeaMARC II sonar geometry exhibit a 35m mean-square difference over the entire area surveyed.

  1. Timing matters: sonar call groups facilitate target localization in bats

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ninad B.; Wohlgemuth, Melville J.; Hulgard, Katrine; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    To successfully negotiate a cluttered environment, an echolocating bat must control the timing of motor behaviors in response to dynamic sensory information. Here we detail the big brown bat's adaptive temporal control over sonar call production for tracking prey, moving predictably or unpredictably, under different experimental conditions. We studied the adaptive control of vocal-motor behaviors in free-flying big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, as they captured tethered and free-flying insects, in open and cluttered environments. We also studied adaptive sonar behavior in bats trained to track moving targets from a resting position. In each of these experiments, bats adjusted the features of their calls to separate target and clutter. Under many task conditions, flying bats produced prominent sonar sound groups identified as clusters of echolocation pulses with relatively stable intervals, surrounded by longer pulse intervals. In experiments where bats tracked approaching targets from a resting position, bats also produced sonar sound groups, and the prevalence of these sonar sound groups increased when motion of the target was unpredictable. We hypothesize that sonar sound groups produced during flight, and the sonar call doublets produced by a bat tracking a target from a resting position, help the animal resolve dynamic target location and represent the echo scene in greater detail. Collectively, our data reveal adaptive temporal control over sonar call production that allows the bat to negotiate a complex and dynamic environment. PMID:24860509

  2. Introduction to Sonar, Naval Education and Training Command. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    This Rate Training Manual (RTM) and Nonresident Career Course form a self-study package for those U.S. Navy personnel who are seeking advancement in the Sonar Technician Rating. Among the requirements of the rating are the abilities to obtain and interpret underwater data, operate and maintain upkeep of sonar equipment, and interpret target and…

  3. Groups of bats improve sonar efficiency through mutual suppression of pulse emissions.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Jenna; Jackson, William; Smotherman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    How bats adapt their sonar behavior to accommodate the noisiness of a crowded day roost is a mystery. Some bats change their pulse acoustics to enhance the distinction between theirs and another bat's echoes, but additional mechanisms are needed to explain the bat sonar system's exceptional resilience to jamming by conspecifics. Variable pulse repetition rate strategies offer one potential solution to this dynamic problem, but precisely how changes in pulse rate could improve sonar performance in social settings is unclear. Here we show that bats decrease their emission rates as population density increases, following a pattern that reflects a cumulative mutual suppression of each other's pulse emissions. Playback of artificially-generated echolocation pulses similarly slowed emission rates, demonstrating that suppression was mediated by hearing the pulses of other bats. Slower emission rates did not support an antiphonal emission strategy but did reduce the relative proportion of emitted pulses that overlapped with another bat's emissions, reducing the relative rate of mutual interference. The prevalence of acoustic interferences occurring amongst bats was empirically determined to be a linear function of population density and mean emission rates. Consequently as group size increased, small reductions in emission rates spread across the group partially mitigated the increase in interference rate. Drawing on lessons learned from communications networking theory we show how modest decreases in pulse emission rates can significantly increase the net information throughput of the shared acoustic space, thereby improving sonar efficiency for all individuals in a group. We propose that an automated acoustic suppression of pulse emissions triggered by bats hearing each other's emissions dynamically optimizes sonar efficiency for the entire group. PMID:23781208

  4. Groups of bats improve sonar efficiency through mutual suppression of pulse emissions

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Jenna; Jackson, William; Smotherman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    How bats adapt their sonar behavior to accommodate the noisiness of a crowded day roost is a mystery. Some bats change their pulse acoustics to enhance the distinction between theirs and another bat's echoes, but additional mechanisms are needed to explain the bat sonar system's exceptional resilience to jamming by conspecifics. Variable pulse repetition rate strategies offer one potential solution to this dynamic problem, but precisely how changes in pulse rate could improve sonar performance in social settings is unclear. Here we show that bats decrease their emission rates as population density increases, following a pattern that reflects a cumulative mutual suppression of each other's pulse emissions. Playback of artificially-generated echolocation pulses similarly slowed emission rates, demonstrating that suppression was mediated by hearing the pulses of other bats. Slower emission rates did not support an antiphonal emission strategy but did reduce the relative proportion of emitted pulses that overlapped with another bat's emissions, reducing the relative rate of mutual interference. The prevalence of acoustic interferences occurring amongst bats was empirically determined to be a linear function of population density and mean emission rates. Consequently as group size increased, small reductions in emission rates spread across the group partially mitigated the increase in interference rate. Drawing on lessons learned from communications networking theory we show how modest decreases in pulse emission rates can significantly increase the net information throughput of the shared acoustic space, thereby improving sonar efficiency for all individuals in a group. We propose that an automated acoustic suppression of pulse emissions triggered by bats hearing each other's emissions dynamically optimizes sonar efficiency for the entire group. PMID:23781208

  5. Mechanical charactization of sonar window materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S.J.; Groves, S.E.; Harwood, P.J.; Sanchez, R.J.

    1996-03-25

    The three-dimensional mechanical behavior of thick Spectra/epoxy sonar window materials containing various special materials is summarized in this report. Three different materials, which were fabricated by two companies known as `A` and `B` were received from the Naval Warfare Center. The three materials designated `A with microspheres (A micron),` `A without microspheres (A),` and `B` were measured for all properties. The total number of tests was reduced through the assumption that the two orthogonal, in-place directions were identical. Consequently, these materials should have only six independent elastic variables. The measured constants and strengths are given.

  6. Detecting Atlantic herring by parametric sonar.

    PubMed

    Godo, Olav Rune; Foote, Kenneth G; Dybedal, Johnny; Tenningen, Eirik; Patel, Ruben

    2010-04-01

    The difference-frequency band of the Kongsberg TOPAS PS18 parametric sub-bottom profiling sonar, nominally 1-6 kHz, is being used to observe Atlantic herring. Representative TOPAS echograms of herring layers and schools observed in situ in December 2008 and November 2009 are presented. These agree well with echograms of volume backscattering strength derived simultaneously with the narrowband Simrad EK60/18- and 38-kHz scientific echo sounder, also giving insight into herring avoidance behavior in relation to survey vessel passage. Progress in rendering the TOPAS echograms quantitative is described. PMID:20369983

  7. 50 CFR 216.170 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... incidental to the following activities: (1) The use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training activities (estimated amounts below): (1) The use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency...

  8. 50 CFR 216.170 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... incidental to the following activities: (1) The use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training activities (estimated amounts below): (1) The use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency...

  9. Teaching real-time ultrasonic imaging with a 4-channel sonar array, TI C6711 DSK and MATLAB.

    PubMed

    York, George W P; Welch, Thad B; Wright, Cameron H G

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonic medical imaging courses often stop at the theory or MATLAB simulation level, since professors find it challenging to give the students the experience of designing a real-time ultrasonic system. Some of the practical problems of working with real-time data from the ultrasonic transducers can be avoided by working at lower frequencies (sonar to low ultrasound) range. To facilitate this, we have created a platform using the ease of MATLAB programming with the real-time processing capability of the low-cost Texas Instruments C6711 DSP starter kit and a 4-channel sonar array. With this platform students can design a B-mode or Color-Mode sonar system in the MATLAB environment. This paper will demonstrate how the platform can be used in the classroom to demonstrate the real-time signal processing stages including beamforming, multi-rate sampling, demodulation, filtering, image processing, echo imaging, and Doppler frequency estimation. PMID:15850134

  10. Evaluating the use of side-scan sonar for detecting freshwater mussel beds in turbid river environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, Jarrod; Brewer, Shannon K.; Long, James M.; Campbell, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Side-scan sonar is a valuable tool for mapping habitat features in many aquatic systems suggesting it may also be useful for locating sedentary biota. The objective of this study was to determine if side-scan sonar could be used to identify freshwater mussel (unionid) beds and the required environmental conditions. We used side-scan sonar to develop a series of mussel-bed reference images by placing mussel shells within homogenous areas of fine and coarse substrates. We then used side-scan sonar to map a 32-km river reach during spring and summer. Using our mussel-bed reference images, several river locations were identified where mussel beds appeared to exist in the scanned images and we chose a subset of sites (n = 17) for field validation. The validation confirmed that ~60% of the sites had mussel beds and ~80% had some mussels or shells present. Water depth was significantly related to our ability to predict mussel-bed locations: predictive ability was greatest at depths of 1–2 m, but decreased in water >2-m deep. We determined side-scan sonar is an effective tool for preliminary assessments of mussel presence during times when they are located at or above the substrate surface and in relatively fine substrates excluding fine silt.

  11. Effects of competitive prey capture on flight behavior and sonar beam pattern in paired big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chen; Reddy, Puduru Viswanadha; Xian, Wei; Krishnaprasad, Perinkulam S.; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2010-01-01

    Foraging and flight behavior of echolocating bats were quantitatively analyzed in this study. Paired big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, competed for a single food item in a large laboratory flight room. Their sonar beam patterns and flight paths were recorded by a microphone array and two high-speed cameras, respectively. Bats often remained in nearly classical pursuit (CP) states when one bat is following another bat. A follower can detect and anticipate the movement of the leader, while the leader has the advantage of gaining access to the prey first. Bats in the trailing position throughout the trial were more successful in accessing the prey. In this study, bats also used their sonar beam to monitor the conspecific's movement and to track the prey. Each bat tended to use its sonar beam to track the prey when it was closer to the worm than to another bat. The trailing bat often directed its sonar beam toward the leading bat in following flight. When two bats flew towards each other, they tended to direct their sonar beam axes away from each other, presumably to avoid signal jamming. This study provides a new perspective on how echolocating bats use their biosonar system to coordinate their flight with conspecifics in a group and how they compete for the same food source with conspecifics. PMID:20833928

  12. Range detection for AGV using a rotating sonar sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Wen-chuan; Ramamurthy, Dhyana Chandra; Mundhenk, Terrell N.; Hall, Ernest L.

    1998-10-01

    A single rotating sonar element is used with a restricted angle of sweep to obtain readings to develop a range map for the unobstructed path of an autonomous guided vehicle (AGV). A Polaroid ultrasound transducer element is mounted on a micromotor with an encoder feedback. The motion of this motor is controlled using a Galil DMC 1000 motion control board. The encoder is interfaced with the DMC 1000 board using an intermediate IMC 1100 break-out board. By adjusting the parameters of the Polaroid element, it is possible to obtain range readings at known angles with respect to the center of the robot. The readings are mapped to obtain a range map of the unobstructed path in front of the robot. The idea can be extended to a 360 degree mapping by changing the assembly level programming on the Galil Motion control board. Such a system would be compact and reliable over a range of environments and AGV applications.

  13. Volcanic construction of submarine Kermadec arc volcanoes from near-bottom sidescan sonar data collected by the Sentry AUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soule, S. A.; de Ronde, C. E.; Leybourne, M. I.; Caratori Tontini, F.; Kaiser, C. L.; Kurras, G. J.; Kinsey, J. C.; Yoerger, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Seafloor mapping in the deep ocean has benefitted greatly from the advent and now routine use of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) to collect areally extensive near-bottom bathymetric, photographic, hydrographic, and magnetic data. For geologic investigations, AUV-derived data is often supplemented by near-bottom sidescan sonar backscatter data that provides information on seafloor substrate (e.g., sediment/bare rock) and roughness. High-frequency sidescan sonar data with comparable resolution to AUV-derived bathymetry is typically collected by deep-towed instruments at altitudes <100 m. This approach has limited use in rough terrain as rapid depth changes in towed-vehicles can significantly degrade sidescan sonar data quality. This limitation certainly applies to arc volcanoes where regional slopes in excess of 25 degrees are present on volcano flanks and much greater local slopes due steep-walled calderas and resurgent domes are common. Here we report the first deployment of a dual-frequency sidescan sonar system (Edgetech 2200M 120/410 kHz) on the National Deep Submergence Facility AUV Sentry, which can easily operate in rough terrain. Sidescan sonar data was collected over three submarine volcanoes in the Kermadec Arc (Brothers, Healy, Rumble III) on a cruise sponsored by the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Science, New Zealand. Sentry operated at ~40 m altitude with track spacing of 50-100 m. Sonar imagery from the 410 kHz channel has a spatial resolution of ~20 cm/pixel. To our knowledge, these are the first near-bottom, high-frequency sidescan sonar data collected at submarine arc volcanoes. We use these data to evaluate the type (explosive, effusive), size, and relative age of the deposits that make up these volcanic edifices based on acoustic backscatter intensity, along with ground-truthing from deep-towed photographic surveys. Relative to existing multibeam and sidescan sonar backscatter data in similar settings, the Sentry-collected sidescan

  14. Mid-water Software Tools and the Application to Processing and Analysis of the Latest Generation Multibeam Sonars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, L.; Doucet, M.

    2010-12-01

    of the significant volume of water column data. Currently, the source conversion system supports a wide variety of hydrographic and fisheries sonars such as the Kongsberg EM3002, EM302, EM122, ME70, EK60, EK500 and Reson 7125. It is proposed that the GWC format be public, and it has been distributed for review and comment to researchers, sonar manufacturers and software developers (http://www.ivs3d.com/support/gwc/). 3-D view of the bubble plume NW Rota Volcano. Data courtesy US Naval Oceanographic Office

  15. ADASY (Active Daylighting System)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Moliní, Daniel; González-Montes, Mario; Fernández-Balbuena, Antonio Á.; Bernabéu, Eusebio; García-Botella, Ángel; García-Rodríguez, Lucas; Pohl, Wilfried

    2009-08-01

    The main objective of ADASY (Active Daylighting System) work is to design a façade static daylighting system oriented to office applications, mainly. The goal of the project is to save energy by guiding daylight into a building for lighting purpose. With this approach we can reduce the electrical load for artificial lighting, completing it with sustainable energy. The collector of the system is integrated on a vertical façade and its distribution guide is always horizontal inside of the false ceiling. ADASY is designed with a specific patent pending caption system, a modular light-guide and light extractor luminaire system. Special care has been put on the final cost of the system and its building integration purpose. The current ADASY configuration is able to illuminate 40 m2 area with a 300lx-400lx level in the mid time work hours; furthermore it has a good enough spatial uniformity distribution and a controlled glare. The data presented in this study are the result of simulation models and have been confirmed by a physical scaled prototype. ADASY's main advantages over regular illumination systems are: -Low maintenance; it has not mobile pieces and therefore it lasts for a long time and require little attention once installed. - No energy consumption; solar light continue working even if there has been a power outage. - High quality of light: the colour rendering of light is very high - Psychological benefits: People working with daylight get less stress and more comfort, increasing productivity. - Health benefits

  16. Detection of buried mines with seismic sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Thomas G.; Baker, Steven R.; Gaghan, Frederick E.; Fitzpatrick, Sean M.; Hall, Patrick W.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Guy, Jeremie

    2003-10-01

    Prior research on seismo-acoustic sonar for detection of buried targets [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 2333-2343 (1998)] has continued with examination of the target strengths of buried test targets as well as targets of interest, and has also examined detection and confirmatory classification of these, all using arrays of seismic sources and receivers as well as signal processing techniques to enhance target recognition. The target strengths of two test targets (one a steel gas bottle, the other an aluminum powder keg), buried in a sand beach, were examined as a function of internal mass load, to evaluate theory developed for seismic sonar target strength [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 2344-2353 (1998)]. The detection of buried naval and military targets of interest was achieved with an array of 7 shaker sources and 5, three-axis seismometers, at a range of 5 m. Vector polarization filtering was the main signal processing technique for detection. It capitalizes on the fact that the vertical and horizontal components in Rayleigh wave echoes are 90 deg out of phase, enabling complex variable processing to obtain the imaginary component of the signal power versus time, which is unique to Rayleigh waves. Gabor matrix processing of this signal component was the main technique used to determine whether the target was man-made or just a natural target in the environment. [Work sponsored by ONR.

  17. Enhanced detection with bimodal sonar displays.

    PubMed

    Doll, T J; Hanna, T E

    1989-10-01

    Signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) required to detect narrow-band signals in white noise were compared for bimodal and single-modality sonar displays at two levels of signal uncertainty and two degrees of spatial compatibility between the auditory and visual displays. In bimodal test conditions the auditory and visual signals were equated in detectability for each subject. An adaptive, two-alternative, forced-choice procedure was used to maintain a constant percentage of correct responses. The decrement in performance with increased signal uncertainty was significantly greater for visual than for auditory displays, suggesting that auditory displays offer advantages for real-world sonar operations. Bimodal displays produced a reliable advantage in SNR required for detection over single-modality displays. Increased compatibility between the visual and auditory displays did not increase the advantage of bimodal presentation, nor did increased signal uncertainty. It was concluded that bimodal displays enhance operators' perceptual sensitivity. The magnitude of the enhancement was consistent with optimal integration of information in the two modalities. PMID:2625348

  18. Spawning behaviour of Allis shad Alosa alosa: new insights based on imaging sonar data.

    PubMed

    Langkau, M C; Clavé, D; Schmidt, M B; Borcherding, J

    2016-06-01

    Spawning behaviour of Alosa alosa was observed by high resolution imaging sonar. Detected clouds of sexual products and micro bubbles served as a potential indicator of spawning activity. Peak spawning time was between 0130 and 0200 hours at night. Increasing detections over three consecutive nights were consistent with sounds of mating events (bulls) assessed in hearing surveys in parallel to the hydro acoustic detection. In 70% of the analysed mating events there were no additional A. alosa joining the event whilst 70% of the mating events showed one or two A. alosa leaving the cloud. In 31% of the analysed mating events, however, three or more A. alosa were leaving the clouds, indicating that matings are not restricted to a pair. Imaging sonar is suitable for monitoring spawning activity and behaviour of anadromous clupeids in their spawning habitats. PMID:27126879

  19. 50 CFR 216.240 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Active Sonar Training (AFAST) § 216.240 Specified activity and specified geographical region. (a... Navy is only authorized if it occurs incidental to the use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, explosive sonobuoys, or similar sources,...

  20. 50 CFR 216.240 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Active Sonar Training (AFAST) § 216.240 Specified activity and specified geographical region. (a... Navy is only authorized if it occurs incidental to the use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, explosive sonobuoys, or similar sources,...

  1. 50 CFR 216.170 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... incidental to the following activities: (1) The use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training activities (estimated amounts below): (i) AN/SQS-53 (hull-mounted sonar)—up to 6420 hours over the course of 5 years (an...

  2. 50 CFR 216.240 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Active Sonar Training (AFAST) § 216.240 Specified activity and specified geographical region. (a... Navy is only authorized if it occurs incidental to the use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, explosive sonobuoys, or similar sources,...

  3. Sonar beam dynamics in leaf-nosed bats

    PubMed Central

    Linnenschmidt, Meike; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic emissions of bats are directional and delimit the echo-acoustic space. Directionality is quantified by the aperture of the sonar beam. Recent work has shown that bats often widen their sonar beam when approaching movable prey or sharpen their sonar beam when navigating through cluttered habitats. Here we report how nose-emitting bats, Phyllostomus discolor, adjust their sonar beam to object distance. First, we show that the height and width of the bats sonar beam, as imprinted on a parabolic 45 channel microphone array, varies even within each animal and this variation is unrelated to changes in call level or spectral content. Second, we show that these animals are able to systematically decrease height and width of their sonar beam while focusing on the approaching object. Thus it appears that sonar beam sharpening is a further, facultative means of reducing search volume, likely to be employed by stationary animals when the object position is close and unambiguous. As only half of our individuals sharpened their beam onto the approaching object we suggest that this strategy is facultative, under voluntary control, and that beam formation is likely mediated by muscular control of the acoustic aperture of the bats’ nose leaf. PMID:27384865

  4. Sonar beam dynamics in leaf-nosed bats.

    PubMed

    Linnenschmidt, Meike; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic emissions of bats are directional and delimit the echo-acoustic space. Directionality is quantified by the aperture of the sonar beam. Recent work has shown that bats often widen their sonar beam when approaching movable prey or sharpen their sonar beam when navigating through cluttered habitats. Here we report how nose-emitting bats, Phyllostomus discolor, adjust their sonar beam to object distance. First, we show that the height and width of the bats sonar beam, as imprinted on a parabolic 45 channel microphone array, varies even within each animal and this variation is unrelated to changes in call level or spectral content. Second, we show that these animals are able to systematically decrease height and width of their sonar beam while focusing on the approaching object. Thus it appears that sonar beam sharpening is a further, facultative means of reducing search volume, likely to be employed by stationary animals when the object position is close and unambiguous. As only half of our individuals sharpened their beam onto the approaching object we suggest that this strategy is facultative, under voluntary control, and that beam formation is likely mediated by muscular control of the acoustic aperture of the bats' nose leaf. PMID:27384865

  5. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  6. 50 CFR 218.100 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: (1) The use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS..., testing and evaluation (RDT&E): (i) AN/SQS-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 10865 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 2173 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)-up...

  7. 50 CFR 218.100 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: (1) The use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS..., testing and evaluation (RDT&E): (i) AN/SQS-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 10865 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 2173 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)-up...

  8. A new multibeam echo sounder/sonar for fishery research applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Lars Nonboe; Berg, Sverre; Stenersen, Erik; Gammelsaeter, Ole Bernt; Lunde, Even Borte

    2003-10-01

    Fisheries scientists have for many years been requesting a calibrated multibeam echo sounder/sonar specially designed for fishery research applications. Simrad AS has, in cooperation with IFREMER, France, agreed on specifications for a multibeam echo sounder and with IMR, Norway for a multibeam sonar, and contracts were signed for development of such systems in January 2003. The systems have 800 transmitting and receiving channels with similar hardware, but different software, and are characterized by narrow beams, low-sidelobe levels, and operate in the frequency range 70-120 kHz. The echo sounder is designed for high operating flexibility, with 1 to 47 beams of approximately 2°, covering a maximum sector of 60°. In addition, normal split beam mode on 70 and 120 kHz with 7° beams for comparison with standard system is available. The sonar will be mounted on a drop keel, looking horizontally, covering a horizontal sector of +/-30°, and a vertical sector of 45°. Total number of beams is 500, 25 beams horizontally with a resolution of ~3°, and 20 beams vertically with a resolution of ~4°. Both systems are designed for accurate fish-stock assessment and fish-behavior studies.

  9. Signal-to-symbol transformation: a summary of HASP/SIAP case study (sonar data)

    SciTech Connect

    Penny Nii, H.

    1983-01-01

    In the past fifteen years, ai scientists have built several signal interpretation, or understanding, programs. HASP/SIAP is one such program which tries to interest the meaning of sonar data in a particular context. An attempt is made to present a methodology for understanding signal data and to show that the traditional signal processing is but one part of the interpretation task. HASP/SIAP is also an expert system. 12 references.

  10. European Neutron Activation System.

    2013-01-11

    Version 03 EASY-2010 (European Activation System) consists of a wide range of codes, data and documentation all aimed at satisfying the objective of calculating the response of materials irradiated in a neutron flux. The main difference from the previous version is the upper energy limit, which has increased from 20 to 60 MeV. It is designed to investigate both fusion devices and accelerator based materials test facilities that will act as intense sources of high-energymore » neutrons causing significant activation of the surrounding materials. The very general nature of the calculational method and the data libraries means that it is applicable (with some reservations) to all situations (e.g. fission reactors or neutron sources) where materials are exposed to neutrons below 60 MeV. EASY can be divided into two parts: data and code development tools and user tools and data. The former are required to develop the latter, but EASY users only need to be able to use the inventory code FISPACT and be aware of the contents of the EAF library (the data source). The complete EASY package contains the FISPACT-2007 inventory code, the EAF-2003, EAF-2005, EAF-2007 and EAF-2010 libraries, and the EASY User Interface for the Window version. The activation package EASY-2010 is the result of significant development to extend the upper energy range from 20 to 60 MeV so that it is capable of being used for IFMIF calculations. The EAF-2010 library contains 66,256 reactions, almost five times more than in EAF-2003 (12,617). Deuteron-induced and proton-induced cross section libraries are also included, and can be used with EASY to enable calculations of the activation due to deuterons and proton [2].« less

  11. Technology Infusion of CodeSonar into the Space Network Ground Segment (RII07): Software Assurance Symposium Technical Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Markland J.

    2008-01-01

    Presents a source code analysis tool (CodeSonar) for use in the Space Network Ground Segment. The Space Network requires 99.9% proficiency and 97.0% availability of systems. Software has historically accounted for an annual average of 28% of the Space Network loss of availability and proficiency. CSCI A and CSCI B account for 42% of the previous eight months of software data loss. The technology infusion of CodeSonar into the Space Network Ground segment is meant to aid in determining the impact of the technology on the project both in the expenditure of effort and the technical results of the technology. Running a CodeSonar analysis and performing a preliminary review of the results averaged 3.5 minutes per finding (approximately 20 hours total). An additional 40 hours is estimated to analyze the 37 findings deemed too complex for the initial review. Using CodeSonar's tools to suppress known non-problems, delta tool runs will not repeat findings that have been marked as non-problems, further reducing the time needed for review. The 'non-interesting' finding rate of 70% is a large number, but filtering, search, and detailed contextual features of CodeSonar reduce the time per finding. Integration of the tool into the build process may also provide further savings by preventing developers from having to configure and operate the tool separately. These preliminary results show the tool to be easy to use and incorporate into the engineering process. These findings also provide significant potential improvements in proficiency and availability on the part of the software. As time-to-fix data become available a better cost trade can be made on person hours saved versus tool cost. Selective factors may be necessary to determine where best to apply CodeSonar to balance cost and benefits.

  12. Automated change detection for synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G-Michael, Tesfaye; Marchand, Bradley; Tucker, J. D.; Sternlicht, Daniel D.; Marston, Timothy M.; Azimi-Sadjadi, Mahmood R.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, an automated change detection technique is presented that compares new and historical seafloor images created with sidescan synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) for changes occurring over time. The method consists of a four stage process: a coarse navigational alignment; fine-scale co-registration using the scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm to match features between overlapping images; sub-pixel co-registration to improves phase coherence; and finally, change detection utilizing canonical correlation analysis (CCA). The method was tested using data collected with a high-frequency SAS in a sandy shallow-water environment. By using precise co-registration tools and change detection algorithms, it is shown that the coherent nature of the SAS data can be exploited and utilized in this environment over time scales ranging from hours through several days.

  13. From acoustic observatories to robust passive sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggeroer, Arthur B.

    2003-04-01

    The evolution of the DARPA Robust Passive Sonar (RPS) as well as the ONR Shallow Water Acoustic Testbed (SWAT) programs can be traced from concept of an acoustic observatory posed by Munk in 1980 through several assessment and feasibility studies to their current implementations. During this, the thinking on several key hypotheses matured. (i) Are noise fields directional enough to sustain high array gains? (ii) What are the tradeoffs among nonstationarity caused by ship motion, array configuration (geometry and the number of sensors), and ``snapshots'' needed for stable adaptive processing? (iii) What is the interaction between gains from vertical and horizontal apertures? (iv) How much signal gain degradation is acceptable? (v) What methods of post-processing can be done for normalization, tracking, and 3-D localization? This presentation will give a brief summary of the history of RPS and SWAT and pose the question of how well we can answer some of hypotheses which motivated them.

  14. 50 CFR 216.270 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... designated amounts of use: (1) The use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources for U.S. Navy anti-submarine warfare (ASW), mine warfare (MIW... below (±10 percent): (i) AN/SQS-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 9885 hours over the course of...

  15. ARTMAP-FTR: a neural network for fusion target recognition with application to sonar classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Gail A.; Streilein, William W.

    1998-09-01

    ART (Adaptive Resonance Theory) neural networks for fast, stable learning and prediction have been applied in a variety of areas. Applications include automatic mapping from satellite remote sensing data, machine tool monitoring, medical prediction, digital circuit design, chemical analysis, and robot vision. Supervised ART architectures, called ARTMAP systems, feature internal control mechanisms that create stable recognition categories of optimal size by maximizing code compression while minimizing predictive error in an on- line setting. Special-purpose requirements of various application domains have led to a number of ARTMAP variants, including fuzzy ARTMAP, ART-EMAP, ARTMAP-IC, Gaussian ARTMAP, and distributed ARTMAP. A new ARTMAP variant, called ARTMAP- FTR (fusion target recognition), has been developed for the problem of multi-ping sonar target classification. The development data set, which lists sonar returns from underwater objects, was provided by the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Coastal Systems Station (CSS), Dahlgren Division. The ARTMAP-FTR network has proven to be an effective tool for classifying objects from sonar returns. The system also provides a procedure for solving more general sensor fusion problems.

  16. Processing, mosaicking and management of the Monterey Bay digital sidescan-sonar images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S., Jr.; Isbrecht, J.; Galanis, P.; Gabel, G.L.; Sides, S.C.; Soltesz, D.L.; Ross, S.L.; Velasco, M.G.

    2002-01-01

    Sidescan-sonar imaging systems with digital capabilities have now been available for approximately 20 years. In this paper we present several of the various digital image processing techniques developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and used to apply intensity/radiometric and geometric corrections, as well as enhance and digitally mosaic, sidescan-sonar images of the Monterey Bay region. New software run by a WWW server was designed and implemented to allow very large image data sets, such as the digital mosaic, to be easily viewed interactively, including the ability to roam throughout the digital mosaic at the web site in either compressed or full 1-m resolution. The processing is separated into the two different stages: preprocessing and information extraction. In the preprocessing stage, sensor-specific algorithms are applied to correct for both geometric and intensity/radiometric distortions introduced by the sensor. This is followed by digital mosaicking of the track-line strips into quadrangle format which can be used as input to either visual or digital image analysis and interpretation. An automatic seam removal procedure was used in combination with an interactive digital feathering/stenciling procedure to help minimize tone or seam matching problems between image strips from adjacent track-lines. The sidescan-sonar image processing package is part of the USGS Mini Image Processing System (MIPS) and has been designed to process data collected by any 'generic' digital sidescan-sonar imaging system. The USGS MIPS software, developed over the last 20 years as a public domain package, is available on the WWW at: http://terraweb.wr.usgs.gov/trs/software.html.

  17. A New Synthetic Aperture Sonar Design with Multipath Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Marc; Bellettini, Andrea; Wang, Lian Sheng; Munk, Peter; Myers, Vincent; Pautet, Lucie

    2004-11-01

    Sonar performance in shallow water is severely degraded by multipath which reduces image contrast and degrades the performance of interferometric processing. This is an important limitation for high resolution applications such as minehunting, where target recognition exploits chiefly the shape and size of the target shadow. Experimental data showing the nature and importance of the multipath is presented together with a new sonar design, optimized to achieve a high level of multipath rejection at large range to water depth ratio.

  18. Beaked Whales Respond to Simulated and Actual Navy Sonar

    PubMed Central

    Tyack, Peter L.; Zimmer, Walter M. X.; Moretti, David; Southall, Brandon L.; Claridge, Diane E.; Durban, John W.; Clark, Christopher W.; D'Amico, Angela; DiMarzio, Nancy; Jarvis, Susan; McCarthy, Elena; Morrissey, Ronald; Ward, Jessica; Boyd, Ian L.

    2011-01-01

    Beaked whales have mass stranded during some naval sonar exercises, but the cause is unknown. They are difficult to sight but can reliably be detected by listening for echolocation clicks produced during deep foraging dives. Listening for these clicks, we documented Blainville's beaked whales, Mesoplodon densirostris, in a naval underwater range where sonars are in regular use near Andros Island, Bahamas. An array of bottom-mounted hydrophones can detect beaked whales when they click anywhere within the range. We used two complementary methods to investigate behavioral responses of beaked whales to sonar: an opportunistic approach that monitored whale responses to multi-day naval exercises involving tactical mid-frequency sonars, and an experimental approach using playbacks of simulated sonar and control sounds to whales tagged with a device that records sound, movement, and orientation. Here we show that in both exposure conditions beaked whales stopped echolocating during deep foraging dives and moved away. During actual sonar exercises, beaked whales were primarily detected near the periphery of the range, on average 16 km away from the sonar transmissions. Once the exercise stopped, beaked whales gradually filled in the center of the range over 2–3 days. A satellite tagged whale moved outside the range during an exercise, returning over 2–3 days post-exercise. The experimental approach used tags to measure acoustic exposure and behavioral reactions of beaked whales to one controlled exposure each of simulated military sonar, killer whale calls, and band-limited noise. The beaked whales reacted to these three sound playbacks at sound pressure levels below 142 dB re 1 µPa by stopping echolocation followed by unusually long and slow ascents from their foraging dives. The combined results indicate similar disruption of foraging behavior and avoidance by beaked whales in the two different contexts, at exposures well below those used by regulators to define

  19. A New Multibeam Sonar Technique for Evaluating Fine-Scale Fish Behavior Near Hydroelectric Dam Guidance Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert L.; Simmons, Mary Ann; Simmons, Carver S.; Blanton, Susan L.; Coutant, C.

    2002-03-07

    This book chapter describes a Dual-Head Multibeam Sonar (DHMS) system developed by Battelle and deployed at two dam sites on the Snake and Columbia rivers in Washington State to evaluate the fine-scale (

  20. Validity of the sonar equation and Babinet's principle for scattering in a stratified medium.

    PubMed

    Ratilal, Purnima; Lai, Yisan; Makris, Nicholas C

    2002-11-01

    The sonar equation rests on the assumption that received sound pressure level after scattering can be written in decibels as a sum of four terms: source level, transmission loss from the source to the target, target strength, and transmission loss from the target to the receiver. This assumption is generally not valid for scattering in a shallow water waveguide and can lead to large errors and inconsistencies in estimating a target's scattering properties as well as its limiting range of detection. By application of coherent waveguide scattering theory, the sonar equation is found to become approximately valid in a shallow water waveguide when the object's complex scatter function is roughly constant over the equivalent horizontal grazing angles +/- delta psi spanned by the dominant waveguide modes. This is approximately true (1) for all objects of spatial extent L and wavelength lambda when 2delta psisonar equation may be made valid by lowering the active frequency of operation in a waveguide. This is often desirable because it greatly simplifies the analysis necessary for target classification and localization. Similarly, conditions are given for when Babinet's principle becomes approximately valid in a shallow water waveguide. PMID:12430794

  1. Statistically normalized coherent change detection for synthetic aperture sonar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G-Michael, Tesfaye; Tucker, J. D.; Roberts, Rodney G.

    2016-05-01

    Coherent Change Detection (CCD) is a process of highlighting an area of activity in scenes (seafloor) under survey and generated from pairs of synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) images of approximately the same location observed at two different time instances. The problem of CCD and subsequent anomaly feature extraction/detection is complicated due to several factors such as the presence of random speckle pattern in the images, changing environmental conditions, and platform instabilities. These complications make the detection of weak target activities even more difficult. Typically, the degree of similarity between two images measured at each pixel locations is the coherence between the complex pixel values in the two images. Higher coherence indicates little change in the scene represented by the pixel and lower coherence indicates change activity in the scene. Such coherence estimation scheme based on the pixel intensity correlation is an ad-hoc procedure where the effectiveness of the change detection is determined by the choice of threshold which can lead to high false alarm rates. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for anomalous change pattern detection using the statistical normalized coherence and multi-pass coherent processing. This method may be used to mitigate shadows by reducing the false alarms resulting in the coherent map due to speckles and shadows. Test results of the proposed methods on a data set of SAS images will be presented, illustrating the effectiveness of the normalized coherence in terms statistics from multi-pass survey of the same scene.

  2. Archive of side scan sonar and swath bathymetry data collected during USGS cruise 10CCT01 offshore of Cat Island, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Mississippi, March 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Flocks, James G.; Pfeiffer, William R.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2010-01-01

    In March of 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys east of Cat Island, Mississippi (fig. 1). The efforts were part of the USGS Gulf of Mexico Science Coordination partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to assist the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) and the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazards Susceptibility Project by mapping the shallow geological stratigraphic framework of the Mississippi Barrier Island Complex. These geophysical surveys will provide the data necessary for scientists to define, interpret, and provide baseline bathymetry and seafloor habitat for this area and to aid scientists in predicting future geomorpholocial changes of the islands with respect to climate change, storm impact, and sea-level rise. Furthermore, these data will provide information for barrier island restoration, particularly in Camille Cut, and provide protection for the historical Fort Massachusetts. For more information refer to http://ngom.usgs.gov/gomsc/mscip/index.html. This report serves as an archive of the processed swath bathymetry and side scan sonar data (SSS). Data products herein include gridded and interpolated surfaces, surface images, and x,y,z data products for both swath bathymetry and side scan sonar imagery. Additional files include trackline maps, navigation files, GIS files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal FGDC metadata. Scanned images of the handwritten FACS logs and digital FACS logs are also provided as PDF files. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report or hold the cursor over an acronym for a pop-up explanation. The USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 10CCT01 tells us the data were collected in 2010 for the Coastal Change and Transport (CCT) study and the data were collected during the first field

  3. Multibeam sonar (DIDSON) assessment of American shad (Alosa sapidissima) approaching a hydroelectric dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grote, Ann B.; Bailey, Michael M.; Zydlewski, Joseph; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the fish community approaching the Veazie Dam on the Penobscot River, Maine, prior to implementation of a major dam removal and river restoration project. Multibeam sonar (dual-frequency identification sonar, DIDSON) surveys were conducted continuously at the fishway entrance from May to July in 2011. A 5% subsample of DIDSON data contained 43 793 fish targets, the majority of which were of Excellent (15.7%) or Good (73.01%) observation quality. Excellent quality DIDSON targets (n = 6876) were apportioned by species using a Bayesian mixture model based on four known fork length distributions (river herring (alewife,Alosa psuedoharengus, and blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis), American shad, Alosa sapidissima) and two size classes (one sea-winter and multi-sea-winter) of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). 76.2% of targets were assigned to the American shad distribution; Atlantic salmon accounted for 15.64%, and river herring 8.16% of observed targets. Shad-sized (99.0%) and salmon-sized (99.3%) targets approached the fishway almost exclusively during the day, whereas river herring-sized targets were observed both during the day (51.1%) and at night (48.9%). This approach demonstrates how multibeam sonar imaging can be used to evaluate community composition and species-specific movement patterns in systems where there is little overlap in the length distributions of target species.

  4. Accuracy of the spatial representation of the seafloor with bathymetric sidescan sonars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervenka, Pierre; Herzfeld, Ute Christina; de Moustier, Christian

    1994-12-01

    When isobath maps of the seafloor are constructed with a bathymetric sidescan sonar system the position of each sounding is derived from estimates of range and elevation. The location of each pixel forming the acoustic backscatter image is calculated from the same estimates. The accuracy of the resulting maps depends on the acoustic array geometry, on the performances of the acoustic signal processing, and on knowledge of other parameters including: the platform's navigation, the sonar transducer's attitude, and the sound rays' trajectory between the sonar and the seafloor. The relative importance of these factors in the estimation of target location is assesed. The effects of the platform motions (e.g. roll, pitch, yaw, sway, surge and heave) and of the uncertainties in the elevation angle measurements are analyzed in detail. The variances associated with the representation (orientation and depth) of a plane, rectangular patch of the seafloor are evaluated, depending on the geometry of the patch. The inverse problem is addressed. Its solution gives the lateral dimensions of the spatial filter that must be applied to the bathymetric data to obtain specified accuracies of the slopes and depths. The uncertainty in the estimate of elevation angle, mostly due to the acoustic noise, is found to bring the main error contribution in across-track slope estimates. It can also be critical for along-track slope estimates, overshadowing error contributions due to the platform's attitude. Numerical examples are presented.

  5. Technology Systems. Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brame, Ray; And Others

    This guide contains 43 modules of laboratory activities for technology education courses. Each module includes an instructor's resource sheet and the student laboratory activity. Instructor's resource sheets include some or all of the following elements: module number, course title, activity topic, estimated time, essential elements, objectives,…

  6. Hearing thresholds of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) for helicopter dipping sonar signals (1.43-1.33 kHz) (L).

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Hoek, Lean; de Jong, Christ A F

    2011-08-01

    Helicopter long range active sonar (HELRAS), a "dipping" sonar system used by lowering transducer and receiver arrays into water from helicopters, produces signals within the functional hearing range of many marine animals, including the harbor porpoise. The distance at which the signals can be heard is unknown, and depends, among other factors, on the hearing sensitivity of the species to these particular signals. Therefore, the hearing thresholds of a harbor porpoise for HELRAS signals were quantified by means of a psychophysical technique. Detection thresholds were obtained for five 1.25 s simulated HELRAS signals, varying in their harmonic content and amplitude envelopes. The 50% hearing thresholds for the different signals were similar: 76 dB re 1 μPa (broadband sound pressure level, averaged over the signal duration). The detection thresholds were similar to those found in the same porpoise for tonal signals in the 1-2 kHz range measured in a previous study. Harmonic distortion, which occurred in three of the five signals, had little influence on their audibility. The results of this study, combined with information on the source level of the signal, the propagation conditions and ambient noise levels, allow the calculation of accurate estimates of the distances at which porpoises can detect HELRAS signals. PMID:21877781

  7. "Gas and fat embolic syndrome" involving a mass stranding of beaked whales (family Ziphiidae) exposed to anthropogenic sonar signals.

    PubMed

    Fernández, A; Edwards, J F; Rodríguez, F; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Herráez, P; Castro, P; Jaber, J R; Martín, V; Arbelo, M

    2005-07-01

    A study of the lesions of beaked whales (BWs) in a recent mass stranding in the Canary Islands following naval exercises provides a possible explanation of the relationship between anthropogenic, acoustic (sonar) activities and the stranding and death of marine mammals. Fourteen BWs were stranded in the Canary Islands close to the site of an international naval exercise (Neo-Tapon 2002) held on 24 September 2002. Strandings began about 4 hours after the onset of midfrequency sonar activity. Eight Cuvier's BWs (Ziphius cavirostris), one Blainville's BW (Mesoplodon densirostris), and one Gervais' BW (Mesoplodon europaeus) were examined postmortem and studied histopathologically. No inflammatory or neoplastic processes were noted, and no pathogens were identified. Macroscopically, whales had severe, diffuse congestion and hemorrhage, especially around the acoustic jaw fat, ears, brain, and kidneys. Gas bubble-associated lesions and fat embolism were observed in the vessels and parenchyma of vital organs. In vivo bubble formation associated with sonar exposure that may have been exacerbated by modified diving behavior caused nitrogen supersaturation above a threshold value normally tolerated by the tissues (as occurs in decompression sickness). Alternatively, the effect that sonar has on tissues that have been supersaturated with nitrogen gas could be such that it lowers the threshold for the expansion of in vivo bubble precursors (gas nuclei). Exclusively or in combination, these mechanisms may enhance and maintain bubble growth or initiate embolism. Severely injured whales died or became stranded and died due to cardiovascular collapse during beaching. The present study demonstrates a new pathologic entity in cetaceans. The syndrome is apparently induced by exposure to mid-frequency sonar signals and particularly affects deep, long-duration, repetitive-diving species like BWs. PMID:16006604

  8. Seismic sonar sources for buried mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Steven R.; Muir, Thomas G.; Gaghan, Frederick E.; Fitzpatrick, Sean M.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Guy, Jeremie

    2003-10-01

    Prior research on seismo-acoustic sonar for detection of buried targets [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 103, 2333-2343 (1998)] has continued with examination of various means for exciting interface waves (Rayleigh or Scholte) used to reflect from targets. Several seismic sources were examined for sand beach applications, including vibrating shakers, shaker devices configured to preferentially excite interface waves, linear force actuators, and arrays of shaker sources to create directional interface wave beams. Burial of some plate-like or rod-like portion of the vibrating devices was found to ensure good coupling to the beach. The preferential interface excitation device employed two degrees of freedom to mimic the two components of elliptically polarized interface waves, and was successfully demonstrated. However, it was found that at long ranges, the medium itself created two component interface waves from vibrating source radiations operating with one degree of freedom in the vertical plane. Linear force actuators were functional in this mode. An array of seven vertical shakers was utilized to create interface waves at ranges of 5 m, in the form of directional beams, some 8 deg wide at the half-power points, at frequencies around 100 Hz. Application of these devices for target detection is discussed in the companion paper. [Work sponsored by ONR.

  9. MHT tracking for crossing sonar targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Peter; Luginbuhl, Tod; Giannopoulos, Evangelos

    2007-09-01

    Sometimes radar targets cross and become unresolved; this is a concern, but with a reasonable track depth and an appropriate merged-measurement model the concern is considerably mitigated. Sonar targets, however, can become merged (in the same beam) for considerably longer, particularly with bearing-only measurements. In such cases the crossing times can be 100 scans long, and no reasonable depth exists for an multi-frame tracker that can "see" both ends of the merged period. Further, there is a demonstrable tendency for estimated targets to repel each other as they are being tracked. In this paper we explore the hypothesis-oriented multi-hypothesis tracker (HO-MHT), an MHT approach that uses the new "rollout" optimization insight and the to give an appropriate and cost-effective means to rank hypotheses, and also the PMHT tracker that operates on batches of scans with linear computational complexity in most quantities. We show results in terms of estimation error (RMSE), consistency (NEES) and computational effort in both linear and beam-space tracking scenarios.

  10. Graphical derivations of radar, sonar, and communication signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altes, R. A.; Titlebaum, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    The designer of a communication system often has knowledge concerning the changes in distance between transmitter and receiver as a function of time. This information can be exploited to reduce multipath interference via proper signal design. A radar or sonar may also have good a priori information about possible target trajectories. Such knowledge can again be used to reduce the receiver's response to clutter (MTI), to enhance signal-to-noise ratio, or to simplify receiver design. There are also situations in which prior knowledge about trajectories is lacking. The system should then utilize a single-filter pair which is insensitive to the effects induced by relative motion between transmitter, receiver, and reflectors. For waveforms with large time-bandwidth products, such as long pulse trains, it is possible to graphically derive signal formats for both situations (trajectory known and unknown). Although the exact form of the signal is sometimes not specified by the graphical procedure, the problem in such cases is reduced to one which has already been solved, i.e., the generation of an impulse equivalent code.

  11. Comparison of effects of sonar bandwidth for underwater target classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi-Sadjadi, Mahmood R.; Yao, De; Li, Donghui; Jamshidi, Arta A.; Dobeck, Gerald J.

    2000-08-01

    In this paper, two different data sets which use linear FM incident signals with different bandwidths, namely 40 KHz and 80 KHz, are used for benchmarking. The goal is to study the effects of using larger bandwidth for underwater target classification. The classification system is formed of several subsystems including preprocessing, a subband decomposition suing wavelet packets, linear predictive coding in subbands, feature selection and neural network classifier. The classification performance is demonstrated on ten noisy realizations of the data sets formed by adding synthesized reverberation effects with 12 dB signal-to- reverberation ratio. The ROC and the error location plots for these dat sets are generated. To compare the generalization and robustness of the system on these data sets, the error and classification rate statistics are generated using Monte Carlo simulations on a large set of noisy data. The results point to the fact that the wideband sonar provides better robustness property. Three-aspect fusion is also adopted which yields almost perfect classification performance. These issues will be thoroughly studied and analyzed in this paper.

  12. Sonar-induced temporary hearing loss in dolphins

    PubMed Central

    Mooney, T. Aran; Nachtigall, Paul E.; Vlachos, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    There is increasing concern that human-produced ocean noise is adversely affecting marine mammals, as several recent cetacean mass strandings may have been caused by animals' interactions with naval ‘mid-frequency’ sonar. However, it has yet to be empirically demonstrated how sonar could induce these strandings or cause physiological effects. In controlled experimental studies, we show that mid-frequency sonar can induce temporary hearing loss in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). Mild-behavioural alterations were also associated with the exposures. The auditory effects were induced only by repeated exposures to intense sonar pings with total sound exposure levels of 214 dB re: 1 μPa2 s. Data support an increasing energy model to predict temporary noise-induced hearing loss and indicate that odontocete noise exposure effects bear trends similar to terrestrial mammals. Thus, sonar can induce physiological and behavioural effects in at least one species of odontocete; however, exposures must be of prolonged, high sound exposures levels to generate these effects. PMID:19364712

  13. Review of research on sonar imaging technology in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Haitao; Li, Renping; Xu, Feng; Liu, Liyuan

    2013-11-01

    Over the past 20 years, sonar imaging technology particularly for the high-technology sector has been a focus of research, in which many developed countries, especially those with coast lines, have been competing with each other. It has seen a rapid development with increasing widespread applications that has played an important and irreplaceable role in underwater exploration with great prospects for social, economic, scientific, and military benefits. The fundamental techniques underlying sonar imaging, including multi-beamforming, synthetic-aperture and inverse synthetic-aperture sonar, acoustic lensing, and acoustical holography, are described in this paper. This is followed by a comprehensive and systematic review on the advantages and disadvantages of these imaging techniques, applicability conditions, development trends, new ideas, new methods, and improvements in old methods over recent years with an emphasis on the situation in China, along with a bold and constructive prediction to some development characteristics of sonar imaging technology in the near future in China. The perspectives presented in this paper are offered with the idea of providing some degree of guidance and promotion of research on sonar imaging technology.

  14. Enhanced echolocation via robust statistics and super-resolution of sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kio

    Echolocation is a process in which an animal uses acoustic signals to exchange information with environments. In a recent study, Neretti et al. have shown that the use of robust statistics can significantly improve the resiliency of echolocation against noise and enhance its accuracy by suppressing the development of sidelobes in the processing of an echo signal. In this research, the use of robust statistics is extended to problems in underwater explorations. The dissertation consists of two parts. Part I describes how robust statistics can enhance the identification of target objects, which in this case are cylindrical containers filled with four different liquids. Particularly, this work employs a variation of an existing robust estimator called an L-estimator, which was first suggested by Koenker and Bassett. As pointed out by Au et al.; a 'highlight interval' is an important feature, and it is closely related with many other important features that are known to be crucial for dolphin echolocation. A varied L-estimator described in this text is used to enhance the detection of highlight intervals, which eventually leads to a successful classification of echo signals. Part II extends the problem into 2 dimensions. Thanks to the advances in material and computer technology, various sonar imaging modalities are available on the market. By registering acoustic images from such video sequences, one can extract more information on the region of interest. Computer vision and image processing allowed application of robust statistics to the acoustic images produced by forward looking sonar systems, such as Dual-frequency Identification Sonar and ProViewer. The first use of robust statistics for sonar image enhancement in this text is in image registration. Random Sampling Consensus (RANSAC) is widely used for image registration. The registration algorithm using RANSAC is optimized for sonar image registration, and the performance is studied. The second use of robust

  15. An improved processing sequence for uncorrelated Chirp sonar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baradello, Luca

    2014-12-01

    Chirp sonar systems can be used to obtain high resolution seismic reflection images of the sub-seafloor during marine surveys. The exact knowledge of the Chirp signature allows the use of deterministic algorithms to process the data, similarly to that applied to Vibroseis data on land. Here, it is described an innovative processing sequence to be applied to uncorrelated Chirp data, which can improve vertical and lateral resolution compared to conventional methods. It includes application of a Wiener filter to transform a frequency-modulated sweep into a minimum-phase pulse sequence. In this way, the data become causal and can undergo predictive deconvolution to reduce ringing and enhance vertical resolution. Afterwards, FX-deconvolution and Stolt migration can be applied to obtain an improved imaging of the subsurface. The result of this procedure is a seismic reflection image with higher resolution than traditional ones, which are normally represented using the envelope function of the signal. This technique can be particularly useful for engineering-geotechnical surveys and archaeological investigations that require a fine detail imaging of the uppermost meters of the sub-seafloor.

  16. Dolphin and bat sonar: Convergence, divergence, or parallelism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketten, Darlene R.; Simmons, James; Hubbard, Allyn E.; Mountain, David A.

    2001-05-01

    During the explosive period of mammalian radiation, two groups emerged with highly effective biosonar systems, bats and toothed whales. In the intervening 50 million years, these groups evolutionarily honed their hearing for operation in radically different media. This paper addresses what functional aspects the media influenced in the biosonar receptors of bats versus dolphins by comparing the auditory peripheries of these groups. Data were obtained using thin-section microscopy, CT imaging, and inner-ear models. Inner-ear anatomy is fundamentally similar in these animals, although differences exist in both neural density and distribution in each group. Specialist ears are present in both groups, suggesting at least one odontocete species has cochlear specializations consistent with CF-FM bats, including specialized basilar-membrane regions and high-frequency neural foveal areas. Cochlear specializations in both groups are primarily linked to peak spectra of sonar signals, may expand frequency representation, and may enhance tuning in adjacent ear segments by generating standing wave phenomena. Most differences, such as the soft-tissue external ear analogs in odontocetes, are clearly media driven. Other differences among species within each group are correlated with signal type or habitat complexity. [Work supported by Mellon Foundation; Seaver Institute; ONR.

  17. Sonar off-axis target classification by an echolocating dolphin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Patrick; Dankiewicz, Lois; Houser, Dorian

    2001-05-01

    Dolphin echolocation has evolved over millions of years under selection pressures imposed by a selective niche. The complexity and effectiveness of dolphin echolocation for detection and classification of objects within that niche has useful application to U. S. Naval objectives. In these environments, Navy dolphins are likely to first encounter targets on the edge of their sonar beam during a search. It is unknown, however, if target classification is possible from the off-axis (OA) information alone, or whether a more centrally focused interrogation is necessary. This talk addresses the initial findings of an animal detecting two different targets (cylinder and sphere) presented OA (left and ). Data collection methods will be presented. Outgoing echolocation clicks and echoes are digitized and stored to a PC for acoustic characterization using a high-speed Integrated Circuits Systems, Ltd. 32 channel A/D card, sampling 24 calibrated monitor hydrophones and analog filter-amplifiers arranged in a hemispherical support web in front of the animal. Emitted signals analyzed for various acoustic characteristics are discussed as well as detection performance. Since this is an on-going study, available results to date will be presented.

  18. Motion compensation technique for wide beam synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Jose E.; Cook, Daniel A.; Christoff, James T.

    2002-05-01

    Optimal performance of synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) systems requires accurate motion and medium compensation. Any uncorrected deviations from those assumed during the SAS beam formation process can degrade the beam pattern of the SA in various ways (broadening and distortion of the main lobe, increased side lobes and grating lobes levels, etc.). These would manifest in the imagery in the form of degraded resolution, blurring, target ghosts, etc. An accurate technique capable of estimating motion and medium fluctuations has been developed. The concept is to adaptively track a small patch on the sea bottom, which is in the order of a resolution cell, by steering the SAS beam as the platform moves in its trajectory. Any path length differences to that patch (other than the quadratic function product of the steering process) will be due to relative displacements caused by motion and/or medium fluctuations and can be detected by cross-correlation methods. This technique has advantages over other data driven motion compensation techniques because it operates in a much higher signal-to-noise beam space domain. The wide beam motion compensation technique was implemented in MATLAB and its performance evaluated via simulations. An overview of the technique, simulation, and results obtained are presented.

  19. Quantification of Diffuse Hydrothermal Flows Using Multibeam Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakin, A. N.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) deployed at the Main Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory has provided acoustic time series extending over 2 years. This includes 3D images of plume scattering strength and Doppler velocity measurements as well as 2D images showing regions of diffuse flow. The diffuse-flow images display the level of decorrelation between sonar echos with transmissions separated by 0.2 s. The present work aims to provide further information on the strength of diffuse flows. Two approaches are used: Measurement of the dependence of decorrelation on lag and measurement of phase shift of sonar echos, with lags in 3-hour increments up to several days. The phase shifts and decorrelation are linked to variations of temperature above the seabed, which allows quantification of those variations, their magnitudes, spatial and temporal scales, and energy spectra. These techniques are illustrated using COVIS data obtained near the Grotto vent complex.

  20. Sonar surveys used in gas-storage cavern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, N.G.

    1998-05-04

    Natural-gas storage cavern internal configuration, inspection information, and cavern integrity data can be obtained during high-pressure operations with specialized gas-sonar survey logging techniques. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., has successfully performed these operations on several of its deepest and highest pressurized caverns. The data can determine gas-in-place inventory and assess changes in spatial volumes. These changes can result from cavern creep, shrinkage, or closure or from various downhole abnormalities such as fluid infill or collapse of the sidewall or roof. The paper discusses conventional surveys with sonar, running surveys in pressurized caverns, accuracy of the sonar survey, initial development of Cavern 5, a roof fall, Cavern 4 development, and a damaged string.

  1. Sonar target enhancement by shrinkage of incoherent wavelet coefficients.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Alan J; van Vossen, Robbert

    2014-01-01

    Background reverberation can obscure useful features of the target echo response in broadband low-frequency sonar images, adversely affecting detection and classification performance. This paper describes a resolution and phase-preserving means of separating the target response from the background reverberation noise using a coherence-based wavelet shrinkage method proposed recently for de-noising magnetic resonance images. The algorithm weights the image wavelet coefficients in proportion to their coherence between different looks under the assumption that the target response is more coherent than the background. The algorithm is demonstrated successfully on experimental synthetic aperture sonar data from a broadband low-frequency sonar developed for buried object detection. PMID:24437766

  2. Automated detection of objects in Sidescan sonar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, John M.; Israel, Steven A.; Bergeron, Stuart

    2007-04-01

    Detection and mapping of subsurface obstacles is critical for safe navigation of littoral regions. Sidescan sonar data offers a rich source of information for developing such maps. Typically, data are collected at two frequencies using a sensor mounted on a towfish. The major features of interest depend on the specific mission, but often include: objects on the bottom that could pose hazards for navigation, linear features such as cables or pipelines, and the bottom type, e.g., clay, sand, rock, etc. A number of phenomena can complicate the analysis of the sonar data: Surface return, vessel wakes, fluctuations in the position and orientation of the towfish. Developing accurate maps of navigation hazards based on sidescan sonar data is generally labor intensive. We propose an automated approach, which employs commercial software tools, to detect of these objects. This method offers the prospect of substantially reducing production time for maritime geospatial data products.

  3. Portable active interrogation system.

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, C. E.; Brener, M. W.; Hollas, C. L.; Myers, W. L.

    2004-01-01

    The system consists of a pulsed DT neutron generator (5 x 10{sup 7} n/s) and a portable but high intrinsic efficiency, custom-designed, polyethylene-moderated {sup 3}He neutron detector. A multichannel scaler card in a ruggedized laptop computer acquires the data. A user-friendly LabVIEW program analyzes and displays the data. The program displays a warning message when highly enriched uranium or any other fissionable materials is detected at a specified number of sigmas above background in the delayed region between pulses. This report describes the system and gives examples of the response of the system to highly enriched uranium and some other fissionable materials, at several distances and with various shielding materials.

  4. Audiomotor integration for active sensing in the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Cynthia F.; Sinha, Shiva R.; Ghose, Kaushik

    2003-10-01

    Echolocating bats probe the environment with sonar signals that change as they seek, pursue and intercept insect prey on the wing. Coordinating its sonar vocalizations with flight dynamics in response to changing echo information, the bat exhibits a dazzling display of sensorimotor integration. Our work aims at understanding the mechanisms supporting audiomotor integration for echolocation in the FM-bat, Eptesicus fuscus. Behavioral studies measure adaptive responses of free-flying bats engaged in complex spatial tasks. The directional aim of the bat's sonar beam and temporal patterning of cries provide explicit data on the motor commands that feed directly back to the auditory system for spatially-guided behavior. Neural studies focus on the superior colliculus (SC), a midbrain structure implicated in species-specific orienting behaviors. A population of SC neurons shows echo-delay tuning, a response property believed to play a role in target range coding. Microstimulation of the SC elicits head and pinna movements, along with sonar vocalizations. SC recordings from tethered, vocalizing bats reveal bursts of neural activity preceding each sonar cry. Collectively, these results suggest that the bat SC plays a functional role in the auditory information processing and orienting behaviors that operate together in echolocation. [Work supported by NSF, NIMH and Whitehall Foundation.

  5. Synthetic aperture sonar imaging using joint time-frequency analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Genyuan; Xia, Xiang-Gen

    1999-03-01

    The non-ideal motion of the hydrophone usually induces the aperture error of the synthetic aperture sonar (SAS), which is one of the most important factors degrading the SAS imaging quality. In the SAS imaging, the return signals are usually nonstationary due to the non-ideal hydrophone motion. In this paper, joint time-frequency analysis (JTFA), as a good technique for analyzing nonstationary signals, is used in the SAS imaging. Based on the JTFA of the sonar return signals, a novel SAS imaging algorithm is proposed. The algorithm is verified by simulation examples.

  6. Analysis of the “Sonar Hopf” Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Albert; Martignoli, Stefan; Mathis, Wolfgang; Steeb, Willi-Hans; Stoop, Ralph Lukas; Stoop, Ruedi

    2011-01-01

    The “Sonar Hopf” cochlea is a recently much advertised engineering design of an auditory sensor. We analyze this approach based on a recent description by its inventors Hamilton, Tapson, Rapson, Jin, and van Schaik, in which they exhibit the “Sonar Hopf” model, its analysis and the corresponding hardware in detail. We identify problems in the theoretical formulation of the model and critically examine the claimed coherence between the described model, the measurements from the implemented hardware, and biological data. PMID:22163928

  7. Sperm whales reduce foraging effort during exposure to 1-2 kHz sonar and killer whale sounds.

    PubMed

    Isojunno, Saana; Cure, Charlotte; Kvadsheim, Petter Helgevold; Lam, Frans-Peter Alexander; Tyack, Peter Lloyd; Wensveen, Paul Jacobus; Miller, Patrick James O'Malley

    2016-01-01

    The time and energetic costs of behavioral responses to incidental and experimental sonar exposures, as well as control stimuli, were quantified using hidden state analysis of time series of acoustic and movement data recorded by tags (DTAG) attached to 12 sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) using suction cups. Behavioral state transition modeling showed that tagged whales switched to a non-foraging, non-resting state during both experimental transmissions of low-frequency active sonar from an approaching vessel (LFAS; 1-2 kHz, source level 214 dB re 1 µPa m, four tag records) and playbacks of potential predator (killer whale, Orcinus orca) sounds broadcast at naturally occurring sound levels as a positive control from a drifting boat (five tag records). Time spent in foraging states and the probability of prey capture attempts were reduced during these two types of exposures with little change in overall locomotion activity, suggesting an effect on energy intake with no immediate compensation. Whales switched to the active non-foraging state over received sound pressure levels of 131-165 dB re 1 µPa during LFAS exposure. In contrast, no changes in foraging behavior were detected in response to experimental negative controls (no-sonar ship approach or noise control playback) or to experimental medium-frequency active sonar exposures (MFAS; 6-7 kHz, source level 199 re 1 µPa m, received sound pressure level [SPL] = 73-158 dB re 1 µPa). Similarly, there was no reduction in foraging effort for three whales exposed to incidental, unidentified 4.7-5.1 kHz sonar signals received at lower levels (SPL = 89-133 dB re 1 µPa). These results demonstrate that similar to predation risk, exposure to sonar can affect functional behaviors, and indicate that increased perception of risk with higher source level or lower frequency may modulate how sperm whales respond to anthropogenic sound. PMID:27039511

  8. Morphology of turbidite systems within an active continental margin (the Palomares Margin, western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Hernandez, S.; Comas, M. C.; Escutia, C.

    2014-08-01

    The Palomares Margin, an NNE-SSW segment of the South Iberian Margin located between the Alboran and the Algerian-Balearic basins, is dissected by two major submarine canyon systems: the Gata (in the South) and the Alías-Almanzora (in the North). New swath bathymetry, side-scan sonar images, accompanied by 5 kHz and TOPAS subbottom profiles, allow us to recognize these canyons as Mediterranean examples of medium-sized turbidite systems developed in a tectonically active margin. The Gata Turbidite System is confined between residual basement seamounts and exhibits incised braided channels that feed a discrete deep-sea fan, which points to a dominantly coarse-grained turbiditic system. The Alías-Almanzora Turbidite System, larger and less confined, is a good example of nested turbiditic system within the canyon. Concentric sediment waves characterize the Alías-Almanzora deep-sea fan, and the size and acoustic character of these bedforms suggest a fine-grained turbidite system. Both canyons are deeply entrenched on a narrow continental shelf and terminate at the base of the continental slope as channels that feed deep sea fans. While the Alías-Almanzora Turbidite System is the offshore continuation of seasonal rivers, the Gata Turbidite System is exclusively formed by headward erosion along the continental slope. In both cases, left-lateral transpressive deformation influences their location, longitudinal profiles, incision at the upper sections, and canyon bending associated with specific fault segments.

  9. 2000 Multibeam Sonar Survey of Crater Lake, Oregon - Data, GIS, Images, and Movies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Dartnell, Peter

    2001-01-01

    In the summer of 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey, Pacific Seafloor Mapping Project in cooperation with the National Park Service, and the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping, University of New Hampshire used a state-of-the-art multibeam sonar system to collect high-resolution bathymetry and calibrated, co-registered acoustic backscatter to support both biological and geological research in the Crater Lake area. This interactive CD-ROM contains the multibeam bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data, along with an ESRI ArcExplorer project (and software), images, and movies.

  10. Enhanced Sidescan-Sonar Imagery Offshore of Southeastern Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; McMullen, Kate Y.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Ackerman, Seth D.; Glomb, K.A.; Forfinski, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) have been working cooperatively to map and study the coastal sea floor. The sidescan-sonar imagery collected during NOAA hydrographic surveys has been included as part of these studies. However, the original sonar imagery contains tonal artifacts from environmental noise (for example, sea state), equipment settings (for example, power and gain changes), and processing (for example, inaccurate cross-track and line-to-line normalization), which impart a quilt-like patchwork appearance to the mosaics. These artifacts can obscure the normalized backscatter properties of the sea floor. To address this issue, sidescan-sonar imagery from surveys H11076 and H11079 offshore of southeastern Massachusetts was enhanced by matching backscatter tones of adjacent sidescan-sonar lines. These mosaics provide continuous grayscale perspectives of the backscatter, more accurately reveal the sea-floor geologic trends, and minimize the environment-, acquisition-, and processing-related noise.

  11. Multiuser sonar watermarking and detection in an underwater acoustic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasseri, Bijan G.; Lynch, Robert S.; Andiario, David

    2013-06-01

    Sonar watermarking is the practice of embedding low-power, secure digital signatures in the time frequency space of a waveform. The algorithm is designed for a single source/receiver configuration. However, in a multiuser environment, multiple sources broadcast sonar waveforms that overlap in both time and frequency. The receiver can be configured as a filter bank where each bank is dedicated to detecting a specific watermark. However, a filter bank is prone to mutual interference as multiple sonar waveforms are simultaneously present at the detector input. To mitigate mutual interference, a multiuser watermark detector is formulated as a decorrelating detector that decouples detection amongst the watermark signatures. The acoustic channel is simulated in software and modeled by an FIR filter. This model is used to compensate for the degradation of spreading sequences used for watermark embedding. The test statistic generated at the output of the decorrelating detector is used in a joint maximum likelihood ratio detector to establish the presence or absence of the watermark in each sonar waveform. ROC curves are produced for multiple sources positioned at varying ranges subject to ambient ocean noise controlled by varying sea states.

  12. Robust feature detection using sonar sensors for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jinwoo; Ahn, Sunghwan; Chung, Wan Kyun

    2005-12-01

    Sonar sensor is an attractive tool for the SLAM of mobile robot because of their economic aspects. This cheap sensor gives relatively accurate range readings if disregarding angular uncertainty and specular reflections. However, these defects make feature detection difficult for the most part of the SLAM. This paper proposed a robust sonar feature detection algorithm. This algorithm gives feature detection methods for both point features and line features. The point feature detection method was based on the TBF scheme. Moreover, three additional processes improved the performance of feature detection as follows; 1) stable intersections, 2) efficient sliding window update and 3) removal of the false point features on the wall. The line feature detection method was based on the basic property of adjacent sonar sensors. Along the line feature, three adjacent sonar sensors gave similar range readings. Using this sensor property, it proposed a novel algorithm for line feature detection, which is simple and the feature can be obtained by using only current sensor data. The proposed feature detection algorithm gives a good solution for the SLAM of mobile robots because it gives accurate feature information for both the point and line features even with sensor errors. Furthermore, a sufficient number of features are available to correct mobile robot pose. Experimental results for point feature and line feature detection demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm in a home-like environment.

  13. Reliability of fish size estimates obtained from multibeam imaging sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hightower, Joseph E.; Magowan, Kevin J.; Brown, Lori M.; Fox, Dewayne A.

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam imaging sonars have considerable potential for use in fisheries surveys because the video-like images are easy to interpret, and they contain information about fish size, shape, and swimming behavior, as well as characteristics of occupied habitats. We examined images obtained using a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) multibeam sonar for Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus, striped bass Morone saxatilis, white perch M. americana, and channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus of known size (20–141 cm) to determine the reliability of length estimates. For ranges up to 11 m, percent measurement error (sonar estimate – total length)/total length × 100 varied by species but was not related to the fish's range or aspect angle (orientation relative to the sonar beam). Least-square mean percent error was significantly different from 0.0 for Atlantic sturgeon (x̄  =  −8.34, SE  =  2.39) and white perch (x̄  = 14.48, SE  =  3.99) but not striped bass (x̄  =  3.71, SE  =  2.58) or channel catfish (x̄  = 3.97, SE  =  5.16). Underestimating lengths of Atlantic sturgeon may be due to difficulty in detecting the snout or the longer dorsal lobe of the heterocercal tail. White perch was the smallest species tested, and it had the largest percent measurement errors (both positive and negative) and the lowest percentage of images classified as good or acceptable. Automated length estimates for the four species using Echoview software varied with position in the view-field. Estimates tended to be low at more extreme azimuthal angles (fish's angle off-axis within the view-field), but mean and maximum estimates were highly correlated with total length. Software estimates also were biased by fish images partially outside the view-field and when acoustic crosstalk occurred (when a fish perpendicular to the sonar and at relatively close range is detected in the side lobes of adjacent beams). These sources of

  14. Is it Possible to Detect Crustal Deformation of the Seafloor Using Interferometric Sonar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, D. R.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2002-12-01

    The advent of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has enabled the examination of crustal deformation due to both long and short timescale processes at incredibly high resolutions. While GPS geodesy can measure centimeter-scale crustal movement at discrete locations InSAR provides much better spatial coverage. Spectacular examples include interferograms of the Hector Mine and Landers earthquakes in central California. Similar high-resolution techniques are not available to monitor volcanic and tectonic deformation on the seafloor. To achieve interferometric synthetic aperture sonar (InSAS) requires two developments: 1) formation of a synthetic aperture image (SAS) and 2) differencing the phase of reference and repeat images. First, we examine the feasibility of adapting synthetic aperture radar theory to a multibeam sonar system, specifically the Simrad EM120 system on the R/V Roger Revelle. The range resolution of the EM120 system is 16m - a value comparable to that using SAR spacecraft. Although the standard azimuth resolution is 150 m, it is theoretically possible to achieve 3.5 m resolution using synthetic aperture techniques. The requirements are the ship speed must be less than 2.5 knots, the ship position must be known to a fraction of the sonar wavelength (12 cm), and the phase distortion due to sound velocity variations must be corrected. Recent DARPA-funded research at Dynamics Technology in Torrance, CA has achieved the theoretical limits of the SAS by correcting secondary phase errors with a point reflector. A more challenging second possibility is to create a sonar interferogram between repeated ship surveys spanning a period of crustal deformation. The main theoretical requirement of InSAS is that the spacing between the ship tracks of the reference and repeat acquisitions must be less than the critical baseline of 10 m. In reasonable sea state, this is possible with real-time GPS navigation. We hope to collect raw hydrophone data on R

  15. Active Response Gravity Offload System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valle, Paul; Dungan, Larry; Cunningham, Thomas; Lieberman, Asher; Poncia, Dina

    2011-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) provides the ability to simulate with one system the gravity effect of planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and microgravity, where the gravity is less than Earth fs gravity. The system works by providing a constant force offload through an overhead hoist system and horizontal motion through a rail and trolley system. The facility covers a 20 by 40-ft (approximately equals 6.1 by 12.2m) horizontal area with 15 ft (approximately equals4.6 m) of lifting vertical range.

  16. Estimated Tissue and Blood N2 Levels and Risk of Decompression Sickness in Deep-, Intermediate-, and Shallow-Diving Toothed Whales during Exposure to Naval Sonar

    PubMed Central

    Kvadsheim, P. H.; Miller, P. J. O.; Tyack, P. L.; Sivle, L. D.; Lam, F. P. A.; Fahlman, A.

    2012-01-01

    Naval sonar has been accused of causing whale stranding by a mechanism which increases formation of tissue N2 gas bubbles. Increased tissue and blood N2 levels, and thereby increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS), is thought to result from changes in behavior or physiological responses during diving. Previous theoretical studies have used hypothetical sonar-induced changes in both behavior and physiology to model blood and tissue N2 tension PN2, but this is the first attempt to estimate the changes during actual behavioral responses to sonar. We used an existing mathematical model to estimate blood and tissue N2 tension PN2 from dive data recorded from sperm, killer, long-finned pilot, Blainville’s beaked, and Cuvier’s beaked whales before and during exposure to Low- (1–2 kHz) and Mid- (2–7 kHz) frequency active sonar. Our objectives were: (1) to determine if differences in dive behavior affects risk of bubble formation, and if (2) behavioral- or (3) physiological responses to sonar are plausible risk factors. Our results suggest that all species have natural high N2 levels, with deep diving generally resulting in higher end-dive PN2 as compared with shallow diving. Sonar exposure caused some changes in dive behavior in both killer whales, pilot whales and beaked whales, but this did not lead to any increased risk of DCS. However, in three of eight exposure session with sperm whales, the animal changed to shallower diving, and in all these cases this seem to result in an increased risk of DCS, although risk was still within the normal risk range of this species. When a hypothetical removal of the normal dive response (bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction), was added to the behavioral response during model simulations, this led to an increased variance in the estimated end-dive N2 levels, but no consistent change of risk. In conclusion, we cannot rule out the possibility that a combination of behavioral and physiological responses to sonar

  17. Time-series measurements of hydrothermal plume volume flux with imaging sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Rona, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    COVIS (Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar) is an innovative sonar system designed to quantitatively monitor the outputs of deep-sea hydrothermal vent clusters for both high-temperature focused vents and diffuse flows. In September 2010, COVIS was connected to the NEPTUNE Canada underwater ocean observatory network (http://www.NEPTUNEcanada.ca) at the Grotto vent cluster at the Main Endeavour Field on the Endeavour Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Since then, COVIS has been monitoring the hydrothermal plumes above Grotto by transmitting high-frequency (400 kHz), pulsed acoustic waves towards the plumes and recording the backscattered signals from each pulse, except for a one-year hiatus due to the power-off of the NEPTUNE Canada network between November 2010 and September 2011. The received backscatter signals are transmitted via the NEPTUNE Canada network to the land-based servers in real time, where a combination of automatic and manual data analyses produces a plume volume-flux and flow-rate time series using both the intensity and Doppler shift of the backscatter signals. The initial 30-day time series (Sep-Oct 2010) was presented in AGU Fall meeting, 2011. Evident short-term temporal variations (< 2 days) have been observed, which indicates significant interaction between the plume and the ambient tidal current oscillations. To further investigate such interaction and capture long-term patterns of the system, we present a 10-month time series (since the resumption of COVIS in September 2011 until present) of the volume flux and flow rate of the plume discharging from the North Tower of Grotto. The new time series, with a 3-hour sampling rate and long duration, can reveal the variations of the plume on a wide range of time scales (< 2 days ~ months). Compared with its predecessor, the new time series provides a better chance to capture the episodic events (e.g. geologically driven), low-frequency periodic (e.g. seasonal) oscillations, and long-term trend in

  18. Real-Time Bathymetry and Backscatter Mosaic Software for Towed and Shipboard Mapping Sonars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, R. B.; Appelgate, T. B.; Johnson, P. D.

    2006-12-01

    The Hawaii Mapping Research Group (HMRG) of the University of Hawaii has developed a bathymetry and backscatter mosaic software package that is suitable for use either in real-time survey operations or non-real- time processing applications. The system was originally developed for use with HMRG's own towed sonar systems but is also compatible with shipboard multibeam systems. It has been operational on R/V Kilo Moana under the supervision of the University's Ocean Technology Group marine science technicians for well over a year in support of that vessel's Kongsberg/Simrad EM120 and EM1002 multibeams. The software grids and renders incoming data in geo-referenced chart-like displays. Data are typically processed in three operator-selectable resolutions limited only by the processing and storage capabilities of the Linux- or Unix-based host computer system. A master navigation chart shows survey tracklines and swath coverage -- from this chart the user can simultaneously open multiple mosaic views into the underlying bathymetry and backscatter datasets with independent resolutions and display properties (e.g., contour color key and interval for bathymetry, grayscale mapping for backscatter, region of interest, etc.) All displays are optimized for quick pan and zoom operations and include on-screen interface control features which permit numerous display parameters to be rapidly changed. All mosaic views, as well as the master navigation display, can be updated in real-time as new data are supplied by the mapping instrument and can also display a background reference dataset for comparison with incoming instrument data. The software also includes survey-planning features which permit new survey waypoints to be generated interactively with reference to incoming and/or historical background data. Aboard R/V Kilo Moana a pair of dual-monitor computer systems, one for the EM120 and one for the EM1002, are available for the processing and display of incoming data from

  19. The JET Neutron Activation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roquemore, A. L.; Bertalot, L.; Esposito, B.; Jarvis, O. N.; Loughlin, M. J.; Sadler, G.; van Belle, P.

    1997-11-01

    The JET activation system provides the absolute value of the neutron yields as well as a check on the linearity of other neutron detector systems. The total neutron yield is standardized to one irradiation end reentrant in the top of the vessel, while the results from the other seven irradiation ends are normalized to this standard end and provide redundancy as well as information on the plasma position. A pneumatic transfer system is used to transfer up to five capsules containing elemental foils for a single discharge on JET. Eleven different elemental foils have been utilized to determine the yields from both DD and DT plasmas. By placing several different foils with different activation energy thresholds in a single capsule for one DT discharge, neutron spectral information has been obtained by use of the SAND-II unfolding code. A description of the activation system hardware and calibration of the activation detector system will be presented along with the results from the DT neutron calibration campaign.

  20. Assessment of a Static Multibeam Sonar Scanner for 3d Surveying in Confined Subaquatic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisan, E.; Charbonnier, P.; Foucher, P.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Guillemin, S.; Samat, O.; Pagès, C.

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical Scanning Sonar (MSS) is a promising technology for surveying underwater environments. Such devices are comprised of a multibeam echosounder attached to a pan & tilt positioner, that allows sweeping the scene in a similar way as Terrestrial Laser Scanners (TLS). In this paper, we report on the experimental assessment of a recent MSS, namely, the BlueView BV5000, in a confined environment: lock number 50 on the Marne-Rhin canal (France). To this aim, we hung the system upside-down to scan the lock chamber from the surface, which allows surveying the scanning positions, up to an horizontal orientation. We propose a geometric method to estimate the remaining angle and register the scans in a coordinate system attached to the site. After reviewing the different errors that impair sonar data, we compare the resulting point cloud to a TLS model that was acquired the day before, while the lock was completely empty for maintenance. While the results exhibit a bias that can be partly explained by an imperfect setup, the maximum difference is less than 15 cm, and the standard deviation is about 3.5 cm. Visual inspection shows that coarse defects of the masonry, such as stone lacks or cavities, can be detected in the MSS point cloud, while smaller details, e.g. damaged joints, are harder to notice.

  1. Application of multibeam sonar in marine ecology and fisheries research: New fields and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlotto, Francois M.; Brehmer, Patrice A.; Fernandes, Paul G.; Reid, David G.; Copland, Philip; Georgakarakos, Stratis; Paramo, Jorge

    2003-10-01

    Multibeam sonars have been used since the mid 90s for three dimensions and a dynamic observation of fish schools and shoals in their environment. A 455 kHz Reson Seabat 6012, with 60 beams of 1.5×22 deg, was used. It has allowed the quantification of school avoidance in acoustic surveys; the three-dimensional description of school structure and position in the water column; the noninvasive study of the real schooling behavior of fish in the wild; the observation and quantification of fish in relation to survey gear; and the predation on mussels in aquaculture by fish schools; the fish school distribution in relation to ecological factors, even in very shallow water. These observations showed that a multibeam sonar can be a useful tool for improving the quality of stock assessment surveys and studying the behavioral ecology of important commercial species. To date all these applications are essentially observational. The next stage in the development of these systems will be to produce quantitative biomass estimates. To achieve this, calibration systems and side aspect TS measurements for the fish will be required. The paper presents the current uses of this instrument described above, and discuss the research requirements for use in fisheries science.

  2. Modeling approaches for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Sven; Atzrodt, Heiko; Mayer, Dirk; Thomaier, Martin

    2006-03-01

    To solve a wide range of vibration problems with the active structures technology, different simulation approaches for several models are needed. The selection of an appropriate modeling strategy is depending, amongst others, on the frequency range, the modal density and the control target. An active system consists of several components: the mechanical structure, at least one sensor and actuator, signal conditioning electronics and the controller. For each individual part of the active system the simulation approaches can be different. To integrate the several modeling approaches into an active system simulation and to ensure a highly efficient and accurate calculation, all sub models must harmonize. For this purpose, structural models considered in this article are modal state-space formulations for the lower frequency range and transfer function based models for the higher frequency range. The modal state-space formulations are derived from finite element models and/or experimental modal analyses. Consequently, the structure models which are based on transfer functions are directly derived from measurements. The transfer functions are identified with the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method. To convert them from the z-domain to the s-domain a least squares solution is implemented. An analytical approach is used to derive models of active interfaces. These models are transferred into impedance formulations. To couple mechanical and electrical sub-systems with the active materials, the concept of impedance modeling was successfully tested. The impedance models are enhanced by adapting them to adequate measurements. The controller design strongly depends on the frequency range and the number of modes to be controlled. To control systems with a small number of modes, techniques such as active damping or independent modal space control may be used, whereas in the case of systems with a large number of modes or with modes that are not well separated, other control

  3. Acoustic and foraging behavior of a Baird's beaked whale, Berardius bairdii, exposed to simulated sonar

    PubMed Central

    Stimpert, A. K.; DeRuiter, S. L.; Southall, B. L.; Moretti, D. J.; Falcone, E. A.; Goldbogen, J. A.; Friedlaender, A.; Schorr, G. S.; Calambokidis, J.

    2014-01-01

    Beaked whales are hypothesized to be particularly sensitive to anthropogenic noise, based on previous strandings and limited experimental and observational data. However, few species have been studied in detail. We describe the underwater behavior of a Baird's beaked whale (Berardius bairdii) from the first deployment of a multi-sensor acoustic tag on this species. The animal exhibited shallow (23 ± 15 m max depth), intermediate (324 ± 49 m), and deep (1138 ± 243 m) dives. Echolocation clicks were produced with a mean inter-click interval of approximately 300 ms and peak frequency of 25 kHz. Two deep dives included presumed foraging behavior, with echolocation pulsed sounds (presumed prey capture attempts) associated with increased maneuvering, and sustained inverted swimming during the bottom phase of the dive. A controlled exposure to simulated mid-frequency active sonar (3.5–4 kHz) was conducted 4 hours after tag deployment, and within 3 minutes of exposure onset, the tagged whale increased swim speed and body movement, and continued to show unusual dive behavior for each of its next three dives, one of each type. These are the first data on the acoustic foraging behavior in this largest beaked whale species, and the first experimental demonstration of a response to simulated sonar. PMID:25391309

  4. Acoustic and foraging behavior of a Baird's beaked whale, Berardius bairdii, exposed to simulated sonar.

    PubMed

    Stimpert, A K; DeRuiter, S L; Southall, B L; Moretti, D J; Falcone, E A; Goldbogen, J A; Friedlaender, A; Schorr, G S; Calambokidis, J

    2014-01-01

    Beaked whales are hypothesized to be particularly sensitive to anthropogenic noise, based on previous strandings and limited experimental and observational data. However, few species have been studied in detail. We describe the underwater behavior of a Baird's beaked whale (Berardius bairdii) from the first deployment of a multi-sensor acoustic tag on this species. The animal exhibited shallow (23 ± 15 m max depth), intermediate (324 ± 49 m), and deep (1138 ± 243 m) dives. Echolocation clicks were produced with a mean inter-click interval of approximately 300 ms and peak frequency of 25 kHz. Two deep dives included presumed foraging behavior, with echolocation pulsed sounds (presumed prey capture attempts) associated with increased maneuvering, and sustained inverted swimming during the bottom phase of the dive. A controlled exposure to simulated mid-frequency active sonar (3.5-4 kHz) was conducted 4 hours after tag deployment, and within 3 minutes of exposure onset, the tagged whale increased swim speed and body movement, and continued to show unusual dive behavior for each of its next three dives, one of each type. These are the first data on the acoustic foraging behavior in this largest beaked whale species, and the first experimental demonstration of a response to simulated sonar. PMID:25391309

  5. 3D Chirp Sonar Images on Fluid Migration Pathways and Their Implications on Seafloor Stability East of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon Offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. W.; Liu, C. S.; Su, C. C.; Hsu, H. H.; Chen, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    This study utilizes both chirp sonar images and coring results to investigate the unstable seafloor strata east of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon offshore southwestern Taiwan. We have constructed 3D chirp sonar images from a densely surveyed block to trace the attitude of an acoustic transparent layer and features caused by fluid activities. Based on the distribution of this transparent layer and fluid-related features, we suggest that this transparent layer forms a pathway for fluid migration which induces fluid-related characters such as acoustic blanking and fluid chimneys in the 3D chirp sonar images. Cored seafloor samples are used in this study to investigate the sediment compositions. The 210Pb activity profiles of the cores show oscillating and unsteady values at about 20~25 cm from core top. The bulk densities of the core samples in the same section (about 20~25 cm from core top) give values lower than those at deeper parts of the cores. These results indicate that the water content is much higher in the shallow sediments than in the deeper strata. From core sample analyses, we deduce that the local sediments are disturbed by liquefaction. From the analyses of 3D chirp sonar images and core data, we suggest that the seafloor east of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon is in an unstable condition, if disturbed by earthquakes, submarine landslides and gravity flows could be easily triggered and cause some geohazards, like breaking submarine cables during the 2006 Pingtung earthquake event.

  6. Fusion and Gaussian mixture based classifiers for SONAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotari, Vikas; Chang, KC

    2011-06-01

    Underwater mines are inexpensive and highly effective weapons. They are difficult to detect and classify. Hence detection and classification of underwater mines is essential for the safety of naval vessels. This necessitates a formulation of highly efficient classifiers and detection techniques. Current techniques primarily focus on signals from one source. Data fusion is known to increase the accuracy of detection and classification. In this paper, we formulated a fusion-based classifier and a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based classifier for classification of underwater mines. The emphasis has been on sound navigation and ranging (SONAR) signals due to their extensive use in current naval operations. The classifiers have been tested on real SONAR data obtained from University of California Irvine (UCI) repository. The performance of both GMM based classifier and fusion based classifier clearly demonstrate their superior classification accuracy over conventional single source cases and validate our approach.

  7. Sonar watermark embedding and detection: a sea trial report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasseri, Bijan G.; Chakilam, Nagarjun; Lynch, Robert S.

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports on performance of a previously reported sonar watermarking algorithm in actual sea trials. Tests were conducted at the South Florida Ocean Measurement Facility in shallow water depths of 200m and a range of 7km subject to a 80dB propagation loss. The watermark was designed to match the acoustic channel simulated in the Sonar Simulation Toolset (SST), but no access to the actual acoustic channel was available prior to the test. Watermark detection was carried out over multiple ping cycles. For a 10-ping cycle, it was possible to achieve zero false alarm and a single miss at SWR=27dB. At SWR=30dB, zero false alarm was maintained but the miss rate increased to three. This experiment has rearmed the detectability of the watermark in actual sea deployment.

  8. The activation system EASY-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, R. A.; Kopecky, J.

    2009-04-01

    Safety and waste management of materials for ITER, IFMIF and future power plants require knowledge of the activation caused by irradiation with neutrons, or in the case of IFMIF, deuterons. The European Activation System has been developed for such calculations and a new version was released earlier this year. This contains a large amount of nuclear data in the European Activation File covering neutron-, deuteron- and proton-induced cross sections. These data are input to the FISPACT code for activation calculations. EASY-2007 is being validated using integral and differential measurements. However, only a minority of reactions have experimental support and a statistical method is described that can test the complete library. Importance diagrams are useful in finding the dominant nuclides formed following irradiation and the reactions responsible for their production. These diagrams now cover energies above 20 MeV and examples of new dominant nuclides and reactions relevant to IFMIF are given.

  9. Continuous Transmission Frequency Modulation Detection under Variable Sonar-Target Speed Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    As a ranging sensor, a continuous transmission frequency modulation (CTFM) sonar with its ability for range finding and range profile formation works effectively under stationary conditions. When a relative velocity exists between the target and the sonar, the echo signal is Doppler-shifted. This situation causes the output of the sensor to deviate from the actual target range, thus limiting its applications to stationary conditions only. This work presents an approach for correcting such a deviation. By analyzing the Doppler effect during the propagation process, the sensor output can be corrected by a Doppler factor. To obtain this factor, a conventional CTFM system is slightly modified by adding a single tone signal with a frequency that locates out-of-sweep range of the transmitted signal. The Doppler factor can be extracted from the echo. Both verification experiments and performance tests are carried out. Results indicate the validity of the proposed approach. Moreover, ranging precision under different processing setups is discussed. For adjacent multiple targets, the discrimination ability is influenced by displacement and velocity. A discrimination boundary is provided through an analysis. PMID:23486221

  10. Dynamic response of an insonified sonar window interacting with a Tonpilz transducer array.

    PubMed

    Hull, Andrew J

    2007-08-01

    This paper derives and evaluates an analytical model of an insonified sonar window in contact with an array of Tonpilz transducers operating in receive mode. The window is fully elastic so that all wave components are present in the analysis. The output of the model is a transfer function of a transducer element output voltage divided by input pressure versus arrival angle and frequency. This model is intended for analysis of sonar systems that are to be built or modified for broadband processing. The model is validated at low frequency with a comparison to a previously derived thin plate model. Once this is done, an example problem is studied so that the effects of higher order wave interaction with acoustic reception can be understood. It was found that these higher order waves cause multiple nulls in the region where the array detects acoustic energy and that their locations in the arrival angle-frequency plane can be determined. The effects of these nulls in the beam patterns of the array are demonstrated. PMID:17672630

  11. Seafloor habitat mapping of the New York Bight incorporating sidescan sonar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lathrop, R.G.; Cole, M.; Senyk, N.; Butman, B.

    2006-01-01

    The efficacy of using sidescan sonar imagery, image classification algorithms and geographic information system (GIS) techniques to characterize the seafloor bottom of the New York Bight were assessed. The resulting seafloor bottom type map was compared with fish trawl survey data to determine whether there were any discernable habitat associations. An unsupervised classification with 20 spectral classes was produced using the sidescan sonar imagery, bathymetry and secondarily derived spatial heterogeneity to characterize homogenous regions within the study area. The spectral classes, geologic interpretations of the study region, bathymetry and a bottom landform index were used to produce a seafloor bottom type map of 9 different bottom types. Examination of sediment sample data by bottom type indicated that each bottom type class had a distinct composition of sediments. Analysis of adult summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, and adult silver hake, Merluccius bilinearis, presence/absence data from trawl surveys did not show evidence of strong associations between the species distributions and seafloor bottom type. However, the absence of strong habitat associations may be more attributable to the coarse scale and geographic uncertainty of the trawl sampling data than conclusive evidence that no habitat associations exist for these two species. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interference fringes on GLORIA side-scan sonar images from the Bering Sea and their implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huggett, Q.J.; Cooper, A. K.; Somers, M.L.; Stubbs, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    GLORIA side-scan sonographs from the Bering Sea Basin show a complex pattern of interference fringes sub-parallel to the ship's track. Surveys along the same trackline made in 1986 and 1987 show nearly identical patterns. It is concluded from this that the interference patterns are caused by features in the shallow subsurface rather than in the water column. The fringes are interpreted as a thin-layer interference effect that occurs when some of the sound reaching the seafloor passes through it and is reflected off a subsurface layer. The backscattered sound interferes (constructively or desctructively) with the reflected sound. Constructive/destructive interference occurs when the difference in the length of the two soundpaths is a whole/half multiple of GLORIA's 25 cm wavelength. Thus as range from the ship increases, sound moves in and out of phase causing bands of greater and lesser intensity on the GLORIA sonograph. Fluctuations (or 'wiggles') of the fringes on the GLORIA sonographs relate to changes in layer thickness. In principle, a simple three dimensional image of the subsurface layer may be obtained using GLORIA and bathymetric data from adjacent (parallel) ship's tracks. These patterns have also been identified in images from two other systems; SeaMARC II (12 kHz) long-range sonar, and TOBI (30 kHz) deep-towed sonar. In these, and other cases world-wide, the fringes do not appear with the same persistence as those seen in the Bering Sea. ?? 1992 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  13. Source level reduction and sonar beam aiming in landing big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus).

    PubMed

    Koblitz, Jens C; Stilz, Peter; Pflästerer, Wiebke; Melcón, Mariana L; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-11-01

    Reduction of echolocation call source levels in bats has previously been studied using set-ups with one microphone. By using a 16 microphone array, sound pressure level (SPL) variations, possibly caused by the scanning movements of the bat, can be excluded and the sonar beam aiming can be studied. During the last two meters of approach flights to a landing platform in a large flight room, five big brown bats aimed sonar beams at the landing site and reduced the source level on average by 7 dB per halving of distance. Considerable variation was found among the five individuals in the amount of source level reduction ranging from 4 to 9 dB per halving of distance. These results are discussed with respect to automatic gain control and intensity compensation and the combination of the two effects. It is argued that the two effects together do not lead to a stable echo level at the cochlea. This excludes a tightly coupled closed loop feed back control system as an explanation for the observed reduction of signal SPL in landing big brown bats. PMID:22087937

  14. Investigation of sonar transponders for offshore wind farms: modeling approach, experimental setup, and results.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Moritz B; Rolfes, Raimund

    2013-11-01

    The installation of offshore wind farms in the German Exclusive Economic Zone requires the deployment of sonar transponders to prevent collisions with submarines. The general requirements for these systems have been previously worked out by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Marine Geophysics of the Bundeswehr. In this article, the major results of the research project "Investigation of Sonar Transponders for Offshore Wind Farms" are presented. For theoretical investigations a hybrid approach was implemented using the boundary element method to calculate the source directivity and a three-dimensional ray-tracing algorithm to estimate the transmission loss. The angle-dependence of the sound field as well as the weather-dependence of the transmission loss are compared to experimental results gathered at the offshore wind farm alpha ventus, located 45 km north of the island Borkum. While theoretical and experimental results are in general agreement, the implemented model slightly underestimates scattering at the rough sea surface. It is found that the source level of 200 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m is adequate to satisfy the detectability of the warning sequence at distances up to 2 NM (≈3.7 km) within a horizontal sector of ±60° if realistic assumptions about signal-processing and noise are made. An arrangement to enlarge the angular coverage is discussed. PMID:24180764

  15. Continuous transmission frequency modulation detection under variable sonar-target speed conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    As a ranging sensor, a continuous transmission frequency modulation (CTFM) sonar with its ability for range finding and range profile formation works effectively under stationary conditions. When a relative velocity exists between the target and the sonar, the echo signal is Doppler-shifted. This situation causes the output of the sensor to deviate from the actual target range, thus limiting its applications to stationary conditions only. This work presents an approach for correcting such a deviation. By analyzing the Doppler effect during the propagation process, the sensor output can be corrected by a Doppler factor. To obtain this factor, a conventional CTFM system is slightly modified by adding a single tone signal with a frequency that locates out-of-sweep range of the transmitted signal. The Doppler factor can be extracted from the echo. Both verification experiments and performance tests are carried out. Results indicate the validity of the proposed approach. Moreover, ranging precision under different processing setups is discussed. For adjacent multiple targets, the discrimination ability is influenced by displacement and velocity. A discrimination boundary is provided through an analysis. PMID:23486221

  16. Anatomy and growth pattern of Amazon deep-sea fan as revealed by long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) and high-resolution seismic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Damuth, J.E.; Flood, R.D.; Kowsmann, R.O.; Belderson, R.H.; Gorini, M.A.

    1988-08-01

    Imaging of the Amazon deep-sea fan with long-range side-scan sonar (GLORIA) has, for the first time, revealed the anatomy, trends, and growth pattern of distributary channels on this fan. Only one channel-levee system was active at any given time and extended from the Amazon Submarine Canyon downslope onto the lower fan (> 4,200 m). Formation of new channel-levee systems occurred when a currently active channel-levee system was cut off and abandoned through avulsion, and a new channel-levee system was established nearby. Through time, successive channel-levee formation and abandonment built two broad levee complexes consisting of groups of overlapping, coalescing segments of channel-levee systems across the present fan surface. These, plus older, now buried levee complexes, indicate that fan growth is radially outward and downslope through development of successive levee complexes. The most striking characteristic of the distributary channels is their intricate, often recurving, meanders with sinuosities of up to 2.5. Cutoffs and abandoned meander loops indicate that the channels migrate laterally through time. Channel bifurcation results predominantly from avulsion when flows breach a channel levee, thereby abandoning the present channel and establishing a new channel-levee segment nearby. No clear evidence of channel branching (i.e., division of a single channel into two active segments) or braiding was observed. 22 figs.

  17. A miniature high resolution 3-D imaging sonar.

    PubMed

    Josserand, Tim; Wolley, Jason

    2011-04-01

    This paper discusses the design and development of a miniature, high resolution 3-D imaging sonar. The design utilizes frequency steered phased arrays (FSPA) technology. FSPAs present a small, low-power solution to the problem of underwater imaging sonars. The technology provides a method to build sonars with a large number of beams without the proportional power, circuitry and processing complexity. The design differs from previous methods in that the array elements are manufactured from a monolithic material. With this technique the arrays are flat and considerably smaller element dimensions are achievable which allows for higher frequency ranges and smaller array sizes. In the current frequency range, the demonstrated array has ultra high image resolution (1″ range×1° azimuth×1° elevation) and small size (<3″×3″). The design of the FSPA utilizes the phasing-induced frequency-dependent directionality of a linear phased array to produce multiple beams in a forward sector. The FSPA requires only two hardware channels per array and can be arranged in single and multiple array configurations that deliver wide sector 2-D images. 3-D images can be obtained by scanning the array in a direction perpendicular to the 2-D image field and applying suitable image processing to the multiple scanned 2-D images. This paper introduces the 3-D FSPA concept, theory and design methodology. Finally, results from a prototype array are presented and discussed. PMID:21112066

  18. Estimation and simulation of multi-beam sonar noise.

    PubMed

    Holmin, Arne Johannes; Korneliussen, Rolf J; Tjøstheim, Dag

    2016-02-01

    Methods for the estimation and modeling of noise present in multi-beam sonar data, including the magnitude, probability distribution, and spatial correlation of the noise, are developed. The methods consider individual acoustic samples and facilitate compensation of highly localized noise as well as subtraction of noise estimates averaged over time. The modeled noise is included in an existing multi-beam sonar simulation model [Holmin, Handegard, Korneliussen, and Tjøstheim, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 3720-3734 (2012)], resulting in an improved model that can be used to strengthen interpretation of data collected in situ at any signal to noise ratio. Two experiments, from the former study in which multi-beam sonar data of herring schools were simulated, are repeated with inclusion of noise. These experiments demonstrate (1) the potentially large effect of changes in fish orientation on the backscatter from a school, and (2) the estimation of behavioral characteristics such as the polarization and packing density of fish schools. The latter is achieved by comparing real data with simulated data for different polarizations and packing densities. PMID:26936566

  19. Application of acoustic reflection tomography to sonar imaging.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Brian G; Wyber, Ron J

    2005-05-01

    Computer-aided tomography is a technique for providing a two-dimensional cross-sectional view of a three-dimensional object through the digital processing of many one-dimensional views (or projections) taken at different look directions. In acoustic reflection tomography, insonifying the object and then recording the backscattered signal provides the projection information for a given look direction (or aspect angle). Processing the projection information for all possible aspect angles enables an image to be reconstructed that represents the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the object's acoustic reflectivity function when projected on the imaging plane. The shape of an idealized object, which is an elliptical cylinder, is reconstructed by applying standard backprojection, Radon transform inversion (using both convolution and filtered backprojections), and direct Fourier inversion to simulated projection data. The relative merits of the various reconstruction algorithms are assessed and the resulting shape estimates compared. For bandpass sonar data, however, the wave number components of the acoustic reflectivity function that are outside the passband are absent. This leads to the consideration of image reconstruction for bandpass data. Tomographic image reconstruction is applied to real data collected with an ultra-wideband sonar transducer to form high-resolution acoustic images of various underwater objects when the sonar and object are widely separated. PMID:15957762

  20. Proud elastic target discrimination using low-frequency sonar signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallen, Brenton

    This thesis presents a comparative analysis of various low-frequency sonar signature representations and their ability to discriminate between proud targets of varying physical parameters. The signature representations used include: synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) beamformed images, acoustic color plot images, and bispectral images. A relative Mean-Square Error (rMSE) performance metric and an effective Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNReff) performance metric have been developed and implemented to quantify the target differentiation. The analysis is performed on a subset of the synthetic sonar stave data provided by the Naval Surface Warfare Center -- Panama City Division (NSWC-PCD). The subset is limited to aluminum and stainless steel, thin-shell, spherical targets in contact with the seafloor (proud). It is determined that the SAS signature representation provides the best, least ambiguous, target differentiation with a minimum mismatch difference of 14.5802 dB. The acoustic color plot and bispectrum representations resulted in a minimum difference of 9.1139 dB and 1.8829 dB, respectively.

  1. Pockmarks, fluid flow, and sediments outboard of the deformation front at the Cascadia Subduction Zone from analysis of multi-channel seismic and multi-beam sonar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. C.; Carbotte, S. M.; Han, S.; Carton, H. D.; Canales, P.; Nedimovic, M. R.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence of active fluid flow and the nature of the sediment section near the Cascadia deformation front are explored using multi-channel (MCS) seismic and multi-beam sonar data collected in summer 2012 using the R/V Marcus G. Langseth during the Juan de Fuca Ridge to Trench Survey. The MCS data were collected along two full plate transects (the 'Oregon' and 'Washington' transects) and one trench parallel line using a 6600 cubic inch source, and an 8 km streamer with 636 channels (12.5 m spacing). The MCS data pre-stack processing sequence includes geometry definition, trace editing, F-K filter, and deconvolution. Velocity analysis is performed via semblance and constant velocity stacks in order to create a velocity model of the sediments and upper oceanic crust. The traces are then stacked, and post-stack time migrated. The sonar data were collected using the R/V Langseth's Kongsberg EM122 1°x1° multi-beam sonar with 288 beams and 432 total soundings across track. Using MB-system the sonar data are cleaned, and the bathymetry data are then gridded at 35 m, while the backscatter data are gridded at 15 m. From the high-resolution mapping data 48 pockmarks varying in diameter from 50 m - 1 km are identified within 60 km outboard of the deformation front. The surface expression of these large features in an area of heavy sedimentation is likely indicative of active fluid flow. In order to gain sub-seafloor perspective on these features the MCS data are draped below the bathymetry/backscatter grids using QPS Fledermaus. From this perspective, specific locations for detailed velocity and attribute analysis of the sediment section are chosen. Sediment velocity and attribute analysis also provide insight into apparent differences in the sediment section and décollement formation along the Oregon and Washington plate transects. While both lines intersect areas of dense pockmark concentration, the area around the Oregon transect has been shown to contain a continuous

  2. Seafloor image survey of Juk-byeon port in Uljin, South Korea, using side scan sonar with a fixed long frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. H.; Park, C.; Lee, M.; Park, H. Y.; Kim, C.

    2015-12-01

    A side scan sonar launches ultrasonic wave from both sides of the transducer. And it restores the image by receiving signals. It measures the strength of how "loud" the return echo is, and paints a picture. Hard areas of the sea floor like rocks reflect more return signal than softer areas like sand. We conducted seafloor image survey from 4, Mar. 2013 using R/V Jangmok2 (35ton), side scan sonar 4125 (Edge Tech corporation). The side scan sonar system (4125) is a dual frequency system of 400/900kHz. Seafloor image survey is commonly used to tow the sensor in the rear side of vessel. However, we fixed the tow-fish on right side of the vessel in the seawater with a long frame. The mounted side scan sonar survey was useful in shallow water like the port having many obstacles. And we conducted submarine topography using multi-beam echo sounder EM3001 (Kongs-berg corporation). Multi-beam echo sounder is a device for observing and recording the submarine topography using sound. We mounted the EM3001 on right side of the vessel. Multi-beam echo sounder transducer commonly to mount at right angles to the surface of water. However, we tilted 20-degrees of transducer for long range with 85-degrees measurement on the right side of the vessel. We were equipped with a motion sensor, DGPS(Differential Global Positioning System), and SV(Sound velocity) sensor for the vessel's motion compensation, vessel's position, and the velocity of sound of seawater. The surveys showed the sediment, waste materials, and a lot of discarded tires accumulated in the port. The maximum depth was 12m in the port. Such multi-beam echo sounder survey and side scan sonar survey will facilitate the management and the improvement of environment of port.

  3. Proposal to characterise legacy Sellafield ponds using SONAR and RadLine™.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Sarah F; Monk, Stephen D; Nye, Daniel W; Colling, Bethany R; Stanley, Steven J

    2012-07-01

    Sellafield Nuclear Reprocessing Plant in Cumbria contains storage ponds built in the 1950s which was originally intended to hold spent nuclear fuel for reprocessing, and eventual production of weapons grade plutonium. Parts of the spent fuel have corroded; some are buried under a layer of sediment or intertwined with other debris and removal and destruction of this nuclear waste is not a trivial task due to elevated radiation levels. We propose a system in collaboration with the National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) to characterise the ponds using a system containing three main parts; an ultrasonic SONAR system used to physically map the pond, scintillator based radiation detector (known as RadLine™) used to map the pond from a radiation point of view, and bespoke software intended to combine the physical and radiation plots of this environment to create an overall 3D source map. PMID:22698817

  4. Combining split-beam and dual-frequency identification sonars to estimate abundance of anadromous fishes in the Roanoke River, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, Jacob B.; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Riverine hydroacoustic techniques are an effective method for evaluating abundance of upstream migrating anadromous fishes. To use these methods in the Roanoke River, North Carolina, at a wide site with uneven bottom topography, we used a combination of split-beam sonar and dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) deployments. We aimed a split-beam sonar horizontally to monitor midchannel and near-bottom zones continuously over the 3-month spring monitoring periods in 2010 and 2011. The DIDSON was rotated between seven cross-channel locations (using a vertical aim) and nearshore regions (using horizontal aims). Vertical deployment addressed blind spots in split-beam coverage along the bottom and provided reliable information about the cross-channel and vertical distributions of upstream migrants. Using a Bayesian framework, we modeled sonar counts within four cross-channel strata and apportioned counts by species using species proportions from boat electrofishing and gill netting. Modeled estimates (95% credible intervals [CIs]) of total upstream migrants in 2010 and 2011 were 2.5 million (95% CI, 2.4–2.6 million) and 3.6 million (95% CI, 3.4–3.9 million), respectively. Results indicated that upstream migrants are extremely shore- and bottom-oriented, suggesting nearshore DIDSON monitoring improved the accuracy and precision of our estimates. This monitoring protocol and model may be widely applicable to river systems regardless of their cross-sectional width or profile.

  5. Pharmacy study of natural health product adverse reactions (SONAR): a cross-sectional study using active surveillance in community pharmacies to detect adverse events associated with natural health products and assess causality

    PubMed Central

    Necyk, Candace; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Boon, Heather; Foster, Brian C; LeGatt, Don; Cembrowski, George; Murty, Mano; Barnes, Joanne; Charrois, Theresa L; Arnason, John T; Ware, Mark A; Rosychuk, Rhonda J; Vohra, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the rates and causality of adverse event(s) (AE) associated with natural health product (NHP) use, prescription drug use and concurrent NHP-drug use through active surveillance in community pharmacies. Design Cross-sectional study of screened patients. Setting 10 community pharmacies across Alberta and British Columbia, Canada from 14 January to 30 July 2011. Participants The participating pharmacy staff screened consecutive patients, or agents of patients, who were dropping or picking up prescription medications. Primary outcome measures Patients were screened to determine the proportions of them using prescription drugs and/or NHPs, as well as their respective AE rates. All AEs reported by the screened patients who took a NHP, consented to, and were available for, a detailed telephone interview (14%) were adjudicated fully to assess for causality. Results Over a total of 105 pharmacy weeks and 1118 patients screened, 410 patients reported taking prescription drugs only (36.7%; 95% CI 33.9% to 39.5%), 37 reported taking NHPs only (3.3%; 95% CI 2.4% to 4.5%) and 657 reported taking prescription drugs and NHPs concurrently (58.8%; 95% CI 55.9% to 61.6%). In total, 54 patients reported an AE, representing 1.2% (95% CI 0.51% to 2.9%), 2.7% (95% CI 0.4% to 16.9%) and 7.3% (95% CI 5.6% to 9.6%) of each population, respectively. Compared with patients who reported using prescription drugs, the patients who reported using prescription drugs and NHPs concurrently were 6.4 times more likely to experience an AE (OR; 95% CI 2.52 to 16.17; p<0.001). Combined with data from Ontario, Canada, a national proportion was calculated, which found that 45.4% (95% CI 43.8% to 47.0%) of Canadians who visit community pharmacies take NHPs and prescription drugs concurrently, and of those, 7.4% (95% CI 6.3% to 8.8%) report an AE. Conclusions A substantial proportion of community pharmacy patients use prescription drugs and NHPs concurrently; these patients are at a

  6. The continental slope off New England: A long-range sidescan-sonar perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    The first continuous overview of a large segment of the continental slope and rise off the northeastern United States has been obtained using the GLORIA II long-range sidescan-sonar system. Extensive dissection by canyon and gully systems and evidence of possible large-scale sediment sliding are seen on the slope. The style and degree of incision, as well as the numbers and locations of canyons, have been found to differ significantly from previously published maps. It is suggested that the slope is a significant source of the sediment that has been deposited on the rise, and that some abrupt changes in the courses of canyons may be the result of local structural control. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  7. Navy sonar and cetaceans: just how much does the gun need to smoke before we act?

    PubMed

    Parsons, E C M; Dolman, Sarah J; Wright, Andrew J; Rose, Naomi A; Burns, W C G

    2008-07-01

    Cetacean mass stranding events associated with naval mid-frequency sonar use have raised considerable conservation concerns. These strandings have mostly involved beaked whales, with common pathologies, including "bubble lesions" similar to decompression sickness symptoms and acoustic traumas. However, other cetacean species have also stranded coincident with naval exercises. Possible mechanisms for the strandings include a behavioral response that causes deep divers to alter their diving behavior, which then results in decompression sickness-like impacts. Current mitigation measures during military exercises are focused on preventing auditory damage (hearing loss), but there are significant flaws with this approach. Behavioral responses, which occur at lower sound levels than those that cause hearing loss, may be more critical. Thus, mitigation measures should be revised. A growing number of international bodies recognize this issue and have urged increasing scrutiny of sound-producing activities, but many national jurisdictions have resisted calls for increased protection. PMID:18534632

  8. In vivo monitoring of cellular energy metabolism using SoNar, a highly responsive sensor for NAD(+)/NADH redox state.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuzheng; Wang, Aoxue; Zou, Yejun; Su, Ni; Loscalzo, Joseph; Yang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    NADH and its oxidized form NAD(+) have a central role in energy metabolism, and their concentrations are often considered to be among the most important readouts of metabolic state. Here, we present a detailed protocol to image and monitor NAD(+)/NADH redox state in living cells and in vivo using a highly responsive, genetically encoded fluorescent sensor known as SoNar (sensor of NAD(H) redox). The chimeric SoNar protein was initially developed by inserting circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) into the NADH-binding domain of Rex protein from Thermus aquaticus (T-Rex). It functions by binding to either NAD(+) or NADH, thus inducing protein conformational changes that affect its fluorescent properties. We first describe steps for how to establish SoNar-expressing cells, and then discuss how to use the system to quantify the intracellular redox state. This approach is sensitive, accurate, simple and able to report subtle perturbations of various pathways of energy metabolism in real time. We also detail the application of SoNar to high-throughput chemical screening of candidate compounds targeting cell metabolism in a microplate-reader-based assay, along with in vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenografts expressing SoNar in mice. Typically, the approximate time frame for fluorescence imaging of SoNar is 30 min for living cells and 60 min for living mice. For high-throughput chemical screening in a 384-well-plate assay, the whole procedure generally takes no longer than 60 min to assess the effects of 380 compounds on cell metabolism. PMID:27362337

  9. Coherent broadband sonar signal processing with the environmentally corrected matched filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camin, Henry John, III

    The matched filter is the standard approach for coherently processing active sonar signals, where knowledge of the transmitted waveform is used in the detection and parameter estimation of received echoes. Matched filtering broadband signals provides higher levels of range resolution and reverberation noise suppression than can be realized through narrowband processing. Since theoretical processing gains are proportional to the signal bandwidth, it is typically desirable to utilize the widest band signals possible. However, as signal bandwidth increases, so do environmental effects that tend to decrease correlation between the received echo and the transmitted waveform. This is especially true for ultra wideband signals, where the bandwidth exceeds an octave or approximately 70% fractional bandwidth. This loss of coherence often results in processing gains and range resolution much lower than theoretically predicted. Wiener filtering, commonly used in image processing to improve distorted and noisy photos, is investigated in this dissertation as an approach to correct for these environmental effects. This improved signal processing, Environmentally Corrected Matched Filter (ECMF), first uses a Wiener filter to estimate the environmental transfer function and then again to correct the received signal using this estimate. This process can be viewed as a smarter inverse or whitening filter that adjusts behavior according to the signal to noise ratio across the spectrum. Though the ECMF is independent of bandwidth, it is expected that ultra wideband signals will see the largest improvement, since they tend to be more impacted by environmental effects. The development of the ECMF and demonstration of improved parameter estimation with its use are the primary emphases in this dissertation. Additionally, several new contributions to the field of sonar signal processing made in conjunction with the development of the ECMF are described. A new, nondimensional wideband

  10. Morphology-Induced Information Transfer in Bat Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijniers, Jonas; Vanderelst, Dieter; Peremans, Herbert

    2010-10-01

    It has been argued that an important part of understanding bat echolocation comes down to understanding the morphology of the bat sound processing apparatus. In this Letter we present a method based on information theory that allows us to assess target localization performance of bat sonar, without a priori knowledge on the position, size, or shape of the reflecting target. We demonstrate this method using simulated directivity patterns of the frequency-modulated bat Micronycteris microtis. The results of this analysis indicate that the morphology of this bat’s sound processing apparatus has evolved to be a compromise between sensitivity and accuracy with the pinnae and the noseleaf playing different roles.

  11. Sonar and its Use in Kidney Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, E. A.; Murphy, A. V.; Arneil, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    The basic principles of diagnostic ultrasound or sonar are given, together with the special technique required for scanning newborn infants and small children for kidney abnormalities. Illustrative examples of the potential of this procedure, both in diagnosis and in monitoring changes include a normal neonatal and preadolescent kidney, unilateral renal agenesis, duplex kidney, renal cyst, polycystic disease, nephroblastoma, and examples of mild and severe hydronephrosis. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10FIG. 11FIG. 12 PMID:4343783

  12. Static analysis of a sonar dome rubber window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    The application of NASTRAN (level 16.0.1) to the static analysis of a sonar dome rubber window (SDRW) was demonstrated. The assessment of the conventional model (neglecting the enclosed fluid) for the stress analysis of the SDRW was made by comparing its results to those based on a sophisticated model (including the enclosed fluid). The fluid was modeled with isoparametric linear hexahedron elements with approximate material properties whose shear modulus was much smaller than its bulk modulus. The effect of the chosen material property for the fluid is discussed.

  13. Active thermal control system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petete, Patricia A.; Ames, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    The 'restructured' baseline of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has eliminated many of the growth options for the Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). Modular addition of baseline technology to increase heat rejection will be extremely difficult. The system design and the available real estate no longer accommodate this type of growth. As the station matures during its thirty years of operation, a demand of up to 165 kW of heat rejection can be expected. The baseline configuration will be able to provide 82.5 kW at Eight Manned Crew Capability (EMCC). The growth paths necessary to reach 165 kW have been identified. Doubling the heat rejection capability of SSF will require either the modification of existing radiator wings or the attachment of growth structure to the baseline truss for growth radiator wing placement. Radiator performance can be improved by enlarging the surface area or by boosting the operating temperature with a heat pump. The optimal solution will require both modifications. The addition of growth structure would permit the addition of a parallel ATCS using baseline technology. This growth system would simplify integration. The feasibility of incorporating these growth options to improve the heat rejection capacity of SSF is under evaluation.

  14. Binaural sonar electronic travel aid provides vibrotactile cues for landmark, reflector motion and surface texture classification.

    PubMed

    Kuc, Roman

    2002-10-01

    Electronic travel aids (ETAs) for the blind commonly employ conventional time-of-flight sonars to provide range measurements, but their wide beams prevent accurate determination of object bearing. We describe a binaural sonar that detects objects over a wider bearing interval compared with a single transducer and also determines if the object lies to the left or right of the sonar axis in a robust manner. The sonar employs a pair of Polaroid 6500 ranging modules connected to Polaroid 7000 transducers operating simultaneously in a binaural array configuration. The sonar determines which transducer detects the echo first. An outward vergence angle between the transducers improves the first-echo detection reliability by increasing the delay between the two detected echoes, a consequence of threshold detection. We exploit this left/right detection capability in an ETA that provides vibrotactile feedback. Pager motors mount on both sides of the sonar, possibly worn on the user's wrists. The motor on the same side as the reflecting object vibrates with speed inversely related to range. As the sonar or object moves, vibration patterns provide landmark, motion and texture cues. Orienting the sonar at 45 degrees relative to the travel direction and passing a right-angle corner produces a characteristic vibrational pattern. When pointing the sonar at a moving object, such as a fluttering flag, the motors alternate in a manner to give the user a perception of the object motion. When the sonar translates or rotates to scan a foliage surface, the vibrational patterns are related to the surface scatterer distribution, allowing the user to identify the foliage. PMID:12374342

  15. Signal classification using global dynamical models, Part II: SONAR data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremliovsky, Michael; Kadtke, James

    1996-06-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a numerical method for nonlinear signal detection and classification which made use of techniques borrowed from dynamical systems theory. Here in Part II of the paper, we will describe an example of data analysis using this method, for data consisting of open ocean acoustic (SONAR) recordings of marine mammal transients, supplied from NUWC sources. The purpose here is two-fold: first to give a more operational description of the technique and provide rules-of-thumb for parameter choices; and second to discuss some new issues raised by the analysis of non-ideal (real-world) data sets. The particular data set considered here is quite non-stationary, relatively noisy, is not clearly localized in the background, and as such provides a difficult challenge for most detection/classification schemes.

  16. Signal classification using global dynamical models, Part II: SONAR data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kremliovsky, M.; Kadtke, J.

    1996-06-01

    In Part I of this paper, we described a numerical method for nonlinear signal detection and classification which made use of techniques borrowed from dynamical systems theory. Here in Part II of the paper, we will describe an example of data analysis using this method, for data consisting of open ocean acoustic (SONAR) recordings of marine mammal transients, supplied from NUWC sources. The purpose here is two-fold: first to give a more operational description of the technique and provide rules-of-thumb for parameter choices; and second to discuss some new issues raised by the analysis of non-ideal (real-world) data sets. The particular data set considered here is quite non-stationary, relatively noisy, is not clearly localized in the background, and as such provides a difficult challenge for most detection/classification schemes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Case study of rotating sonar sensor application in unmanned automated guided vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandak, Pravin; Cao, Ming; Hall, Ernest L.

    2001-10-01

    A single rotating sonar element is used with a restricted angle of sweep to obtain readings to develop a range map for the unobstructed path of an autonomous guided vehicle (AGV). A Polaroid ultrasound transducer element is mounted on a micromotor with an encoder feedback. The motion of this motor is controlled using a Galil DMC 1000 motion control board. The encoder is interfaced with the DMC 1000 board using an intermediate IMC 1100 break-out board. By adjusting the parameters of the Polaroid element, it is possible to obtain range readings at known angles with respect to the center of the robot. The readings are mapped to obtain a range map of the unobstructed path in front of the robot. The idea can be extended to a 360 degree mapping by changing the assembly level programming on the Galil Motion control board. Such a system would be compact and reliable over a range of environments and AGV applications.

  18. Optimized passive sonar placement to allow improved interdiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bruce A.; Matthews, Cameron

    2016-05-01

    footprint. The resulting coverage optimizes the likelihood of encounter given an arbitrary sensor profile and threat from a free field statistical model approach. The free field statistical model is particularly applicable to worst case scenario modeling in open ocean operational profiles where targets to do not follow a particular pattern in any of the modeled dimensions. We present an algorithmic testbed which shows how to achieve approximately optimal solutions to the AGP for a network of underwater sensor nodes with or without effector systems for engagement while operating under changing environmental circumstances. The means by which we accomplish this goal are three-fold: 1) Develop a 3D model for the sonar signal propagating through the underwater environment 2) Add rigorous physics-based modeling of environmental events which can affect sensor information acquisition 3) Provide innovative solutions to the AGP which account for the environmental circumstances affecting sensor performance.

  19. Characteristics of a sandy depositional lobe on the outer Mississippi fan from SeaMARC IA sidescan sonar images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, David C.; Schwab, William C.; Nelson, C. Hans; Kenyon, Neil H.; Lee, Homa J.

    1992-01-01

    SeaMARC IA sidescan sonar images of the distal reaches of a depositional lobe on the Mississippi Fan show that channelized rather than unconfined transport was the dominant transport mechanism for coarse-grained sediment during the formation of this part of the deep-sea fan. Overbank sheet flow of sands was not an important process in the transport and deposition of the sandy and silty sediment found on this fan. The dendritic distributary pattern and the high order of splaying of the channels, only one of which appears to have been active at a time, suggest that coarse-grained deposits on this fan are laterally discontinuous.

  20. Characteristics of a sandy depositional lobe on the outer Mississippi fan from SeaMARC IA sidescan sonar images

    SciTech Connect

    Twichell, D.C.; Schwab, W.C. ); Nelson, C.H.; Lee, H.J. ); Kenyon, N.H. )

    1992-08-01

    SeaMARC IA sidescan sonar images of the distal reaches of a depositional lobe on the Mississippi Fan show that channelized rather than unconfined transport was the dominant transport mechanism for coarse-grained sediment during the formation of this part of the deep-sea fan. Overbank sheet flow of sands was not an important process in the transport and deposition of the sandy and silty sediment found on this fan. The dendritic distributary pattern and the high order of splaying of the channels, only one which appears to have been active at a time, suggest that coarse-grained deposits on this fan are laterally discontinuous.

  1. Linear Scour Depressions or Bedforms? Using Interferometric Sonar to Investigate Nearshore Sediment Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrelli, M.; Giese, G. S.; Dingman, S. L.; Gontz, A. M.; Adams, M. B.; Norton, A. R.; Brown, T. L.

    2011-12-01

    A series of ambiguous features on the seafloor off the coast of Provincetown, Massachusetts USA has been identified in two bathymetric lidar surveys (2007, 2010) conducted by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Similar features in the area have been described as linear scour depressions by other investigators, but at deeper water depths. These features exhibit some of the characteristics of bedforms, they have migrated tens of meters and maintained similar 3 dimensional morphologies. However, what would be described as the slipface more closely resembles the updrift face of a linear scour depression. The features are in relatively shallow water (9 - 15 m), are 150 - 200 m long, have spacings of 100 - 150 m and are 5-6 m in height. Further investigations are being undertaken to better understand these features and nearshore sediment transport in the area. The features appear along a high energy, accreting coast with both strong wave-driven sediment flux and tidal currents. Mapping of the study area with an interferometric sonar system, which collects coincident swath bathymetry and acoustic backscatter imagery, is ongoing. Interferometric sonar increases bathymetric swath width to depth ratios, in comparison to multibeam systems, and expedites data collection by reducing costs, vessel-time and hazards associated with navigating shallow waters. In addition, sediment grab samples and a series of seismic reflection profiles will also be collected in the area to ground-truth acoustic imagery and provide a subsurface framework for the features, respectively. These datasets will allow investigators to better document bottom conditions, estimate flow velocities needed to create these features and improve our understanding of sediment transport processes and pathways in the area.

  2. Analysis and representation of sonar echo returns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackman, Roger H.; Abatzoglou, Theagenis J.; Arnold, Hal B.; Reagan, John T.

    1993-10-01

    Active acoustic classification of underwater targets is an important problem of current interest. The echo return of such objects has components related to such distinct dynamical elements as the specular (geometric) return, reradiation of elastic resonances, diffracted (or Franz) waves, etc. The arrival times and spectral content of these components will generally give information about the structure and geometry of the scatterer. This information is reflected to the time- frequency structure of the echo return. In this paper, a comparative study is presented of the time-frequency analysis capability of a number of tools in applications to the echo structure of finite elastic cylinders. The time-frequency tools considered include the Wigner-Ville distribution, the Choi-Williams distribution, the Gabor transform, and the continuous wavelet transforms. The comparison is based on echo returns that have been synthesized from numerical T-matrix solutions to the associated free-field scattering problems.

  3. Cognitive adaptation of sonar gain control in the bottlenose dolphin.

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Laura N; Smith, Adam B; Nachtigall, Paul E; Buck, John R; Simmons, James A; Pacini, Aude F

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating animals adjust the transmit intensity and receive sensitivity of their sonar in order to regulate the sensation level of their echoes; this process is often termed automatic gain control. Gain control is considered not to be under the animal's cognitive control, but previous investigations studied animals ensonifying targets or hydrophone arrays at predictable distances. To test whether animals maintain gain control at a fixed level in uncertain conditions, we measured changes in signal intensity for a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) detecting a target at three target distances (2.5, 4 and 7 m) in two types of sessions: predictable and unpredictable. Predictable sessions presented the target at a constant distance; unpredictable sessions moved the target randomly between the three target positions. In the predictable sessions the dolphin demonstrated intensity distance compensation, increasing the emitted click intensity as the target distance increased. Additionally, as trials within sessions progressed, the animal adjusted its click intensity even from the first click in a click train, which is consistent with the animal expecting a target at a certain range. In the unpredictable sessions there was no significant difference of intensity with target distance until after the 7th click in a click train. Together, these results demonstrate that the bottlenose dolphin uses learning and expectation for sonar gain control. PMID:25153530

  4. Cognitive Adaptation of Sonar Gain Control in the Bottlenose Dolphin

    PubMed Central

    Kloepper, Laura N.; Smith, Adam B.; Nachtigall, Paul E.; Buck, John R.; Simmons, James A.; Pacini, Aude F.

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating animals adjust the transmit intensity and receive sensitivity of their sonar in order to regulate the sensation level of their echoes; this process is often termed automatic gain control. Gain control is considered not to be under the animal's cognitive control, but previous investigations studied animals ensonifying targets or hydrophone arrays at predictable distances. To test whether animals maintain gain control at a fixed level in uncertain conditions, we measured changes in signal intensity for a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) detecting a target at three target distances (2.5, 4 and 7 m) in two types of sessions: predictable and unpredictable. Predictable sessions presented the target at a constant distance; unpredictable sessions moved the target randomly between the three target positions. In the predictable sessions the dolphin demonstrated intensity distance compensation, increasing the emitted click intensity as the target distance increased. Additionally, as trials within sessions progressed, the animal adjusted its click intensity even from the first click in a click train, which is consistent with the animal expecting a target at a certain range. In the unpredictable sessions there was no significant difference of intensity with target distance until after the 7th click in a click train. Together, these results demonstrate that the bottlenose dolphin uses learning and expectation for sonar gain control. PMID:25153530

  5. Broadband sonar considerations for small underwater vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Kim C.

    2003-10-01

    As underwater vehicles become more prevalent, so too does the design and integration of compact broadband sonar arrays. Rather than rely on conventional tonpilz technology, where the bandwidth is governed by the width of the transducer's mechanical resonance, designers must consider other transducer technologies that are better suited to small vehicle packaging constraints. These constraints include operational ruggedness, light weight, conformability, and low cost. This talk advocates the use of 1-3 piezocomposite and discusses the rationale behind such a selection. In going to a wideband material such as a 1-3 piezocomposite, with typical mechanical quality factors (Qm) around 2, the selection of where to place the resonance frequency differs from that of its tonpilz counterpart. For the tonpilz array, the sonar operational bandwidth is totally governed by the resonance response of the array element and is typically limited to approximately its 3-dB or half power points. Relaxor-based ferroelectric materials such as single crystal PMN-PT, which exhibit extremely large electromechanical coupling coefficients, cannot attain 3-dB bandwidths of a decade or more when configured in a tonpilz design. This presentation will discuss a 1-3 piezocomposite-based approach that places mechanical resonance near the upper band edge of an operational bandwidth of 1 decade (10-100 kHz).

  6. Monitoring the US ATLAS Network Infrastructure with perfSONAR-PS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Shawn; Lake, Andrew; Laurens, Philippe; Severini, Horst; Wlodek, Tomasz; Wolff, Stephen; Zurawski, Jason

    2012-12-01

    Global scientific collaborations, such as ATLAS, continue to push the network requirements envelope. Data movement in this collaboration is routinely including the regular exchange of petabytes of datasets between the collection and analysis facilities in the coming years. These requirements place a high emphasis on networks functioning at peak efficiency and availability; the lack thereof could mean critical delays in the overall scientific progress of distributed data-intensive experiments like ATLAS. Network operations staff routinely must deal with problems deep in the infrastructure; this may be as benign as replacing a failing piece of equipment, or as complex as dealing with a multi-domain path that is experiencing data loss. In either case, it is crucial that effective monitoring and performance analysis tools are available to ease the burden of management. We will report on our experiences deploying and using the perfSONAR-PS Performance Toolkit at ATLAS sites in the United States. This software creates a dedicated monitoring server, capable of collecting and performing a wide range of passive and active network measurements. Each independent instance is managed locally, but able to federate on a global scale; enabling a full view of the network infrastructure that spans domain boundaries. This information, available through web service interfaces, can easily be retrieved to create customized applications. The US ATLAS collaboration has developed a centralized “dashboard” offering network administrators, users, and decision makers the ability to see the performance of the network at a glance. The dashboard framework includes the ability to notify users (alarm) when problems are found, thus allowing rapid response to potential problems and making perfSONAR-PS crucial to the operation of our distributed computing infrastructure.

  7. Optimal sonar tactics over uncertain sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbalzo, Donald R.; Powers, William J.; Cole, Bernie F.

    2005-09-01

    Tactical patterns for monostatic sensors were developed during the Cold War for deep, uniform underwater environments, where a simple median detection range defined a fixed spacing between search ladder legs. Acoustic conditions in littoral environments are so complex that spatial variability of bottom sediment properties destroys the simple homogeneous assumption associated with standard tactical search concepts. Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been applied to this problem to produce near-optimal, non-standard search tracks for monostatic mobile sensors that maximize probability of detection in such inhomogeneous environments. The present work describes a new capability called SPEAR (search planning with environmentally adaptive response) that adds tactical adaptation to search paths in a complex, littoral environment, as new in situ backscattering and bottom loss information becomes available. This presentation reviews the GA approach and discusses tactical adaptation to uncertain bottom sediment properties. The results show that easily implemented dynamic changes in active pulse depression angles and frequencies can produce significant improvement in detection performance in a complex littoral area. [Work supported by NAVSEA.

  8. Single crystal cylinder transducers for sonar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Harold; Stevens, Gerald; Buffman, Martin; Powers, James

    2005-04-01

    A segmented cylinder transducer constructed of single crystal lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) has been under development at NUWC and EDO Corporation for several years. The purpose of this development was to provide an extremely compact, high power broadband source. By virtue of their extraordinary material properties, ferroelectric single crystals are the ideal transduction material for developing such compact broadband systems. This presentation shall review the evolution of the transducer design as well as present the results of a successful in-water test conducted at NUWC in October of 2003. It shall be shown that design changes intended to eliminate spurious modes limiting the transducer bandwidth first observed in 2002 were successful, resulting in a transducer with a clean frequency response and an effective coupling factor of 0.85. The measured transducer admittance was in nearly exact agreement with theoretical predictions. The NUWC in-water tests demonstrated that the single crystal cylinder achieved an admittance bandwidth (based on the Stansfield criterion) of over 100%, while the tuned power factor was 0.8 or more over 2.5 octaves of frequency. Additionally, the transducer produced 12 dB higher source levels than a similarly sized PZT transducer. [Work sponsored by DARPA.

  9. Manually controlled neutron-activation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johns, R. A.; Carothers, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    A manually controlled neutron activation system, the Manual Reactor Activation System, was designed and built and has been operating at one of the Savannah River Plant's production reactors. With this system, samples can be irradiated for up to 24 hours and pneumatically transferred to a shielded repository for decay until their activity is low enough for them to be handled at a radiobench. The Manual Reactor Activation System was built to provide neutron activation of solid waste forms for the Alternative Waste Forms Leach Testing Program. Neutron activation of the bulk sample prior to leaching permits sensitive multielement radiometric analyses of the leachates.

  10. Wave activated power generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Y.

    1983-08-09

    A wave activated power generation system of the float type is disclosed, comprising at least one piston-cylinder device having an anchored cylinder and a piston slidable in the cylinder and cooperating with the cylinder to form a pumping chamber above the piston and a low pressure chamber below the piston. The cylinder has an intake port and an exhaust port both formed at an upper port thereof to communicate with the pumping chamber and each provided with a check valve. A float is connected through a cable to the piston of the piston- cylinder device. A pair of fluid storages are connected to the intake port and the exhaust port of the pumping chamber, respectively. A waterwheel generator is driven by the fluid flowing from one of the fluid storages to another. A pressure regulating device is connected to the low pressure chamber so as to maintain the low pressure chamber at a pressure lower than the pressure in the pumping chamber, the difference in pressure ceaselessly applying a downward force on the piston to keep the cable in a tensed condition.

  11. Simulation, manufacturing, and evaluation of a sonar for a miniaturized submersible explorer.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Jonas; Edqvist, Erik; Kratz, Henrik; Almqvist, Monica; Thornell, Greger

    2010-01-01

    Single-beam side-scan sonar elements, to be fitted on a miniaturized submersible, are here simulated, manufactured, and evaluated. Finite element analysis simulations are compared with measurements, and an overall observation is that the agreement between simulations and measurements deviates from the measured values of 1.5 to 2 degrees, for the narrow lobe angle, by less than 10% for most models. An overall finding is that the lobe width along the track direction can be accurately simulated and, hence, the resolution of the sonars can be predicted. This paper presents, to the authors' knowledge, the world's smallest side-scan sonars. PMID:20178915

  12. What Is an Activity? Appropriating an Activity-Centric System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarosh, Svetlana; Matthews, Tara; Moran, Thomas P.; Smith, Barton

    Activity-Centric Computing (ACC) systems seek to address the fragmentation of office work across tools and documents by allowing users to organize work around the computational construct of an Activity. Defining and structuring appropriate Activities within a system poses a challenge for users that must be overcome in order to benefit from ACC support. We know little about how knowledge workers appropriate the Activity construct. To address this, we studied users’ appropriation of a production-quality ACC system, Lotus Activities, for everyday work by employees in a large corporation. We contribute to a better understanding of how users articulate their individual and collaborative work in the system by providing empirical evidence of their patterns of appropriation. We conclude by discussing how our findings can inform the design of other ACC systems for the workplace.

  13. Morphology-induced information transfer in bat sonar.

    PubMed

    Reijniers, Jonas; Vanderelst, Dieter; Peremans, Herbert

    2010-10-01

    It has been argued that an important part of understanding bat echolocation comes down to understanding the morphology of the bat sound processing apparatus. In this Letter we present a method based on information theory that allows us to assess target localization performance of bat sonar, without a priori knowledge on the position, size, or shape of the reflecting target. We demonstrate this method using simulated directivity patterns of the frequency-modulated bat Micronycteris microtis. The results of this analysis indicate that the morphology of this bat's sound processing apparatus has evolved to be a compromise between sensitivity and accuracy with the pinnae and the noseleaf playing different roles. PMID:21230873

  14. Application of Giant Magnetostrictive Materials for Sonar Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Nguyen Thang; van Hien, Nguyen; Thuy, Nguyen Phu; Hien, Vu The

    2001-04-01

    Giant magnetostrictive material (Terfenol-D) has been extensively used in many applications such as actuators and sonar projectors. However, its major disadvantage is the relative high price due to the complication of manufacturing process. A high strain at moderate field can only be obtained with the single crystal or grain oriented polycrystal. In addition, the use of Terfenol-D is limited at high frequencies because its electrical conductivity is as high as metals. Overcoming this problem by using laminated or rolled sheets of Terfenol-D requires expensive techniques due to their brittleness. In this paper, we present studies on the behavior of Terfenol-D rod under dynamic condition in a Tonpilz type transducer. In addition, a Zinc-bonded sample is prepared and measured to compare with that of the bulk material.

  15. Scanning sonar of rolling porpoises during prey capture dives.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, T; Wang, D; Wang, K; Li, S; Dong, S

    2010-01-01

    Dolphins and porpoises have excellent biosonar ability, which they use for navigation, ranging and foraging. However, the role of biosonar in free-ranging small cetaceans has not been fully investigated. The biosonar behaviour and body movements of 15 free-ranging finless porpoises (Neophocaena phocaenoides) were observed using electronic tags attached to the animals. The porpoises often rotated their bodies more than 60 deg., on average, around the body axis in a dive bout. This behaviour occupied 31% of the dive duration during 186 h of effective observation time. Rolling dives were associated with extensive searching effort, and 23% of the rolling dive time was phonated, almost twice the phonation ratio of upright dives. Porpoises used short inter-click interval sonar 4.3 times more frequently during rolling dives than during upright dives. Sudden speed drops, which indicated that an individual turned around, occurred 4.5 times more frequently during rolling dives than during upright dives. Together, these data suggest that the porpoises searched extensively for targets and rolled their bodies to enlarge the search area by changing the narrow beam axis of the biosonar. Once a possible target was detected, porpoises frequently produced short-range sonar sounds. Continuous searching for prey and frequent capture trials appeared to occur during rolling dives of finless porpoises. In contrast, head movements ranging +/-2 cm, which can also change the beam axis, were regularly observed during both dives. Head movements might assist in instant assessment of the arbitrary direction by changing the beam axis rather than prey searching and pursuit. PMID:20008371

  16. Advanced piezoelectric single crystal based transducers for naval sonar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snook, Kevin A.; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Jiang, Xiaoning; Meyer, Richard J., Jr.; Markley, Douglas

    2005-05-01

    TRS is developing new transducers based on single crystal piezoelectric materials such as Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)x-1TixO3 (PMN-PT). Single crystal piezoelectrics such as PMN-PT exhibit very high piezoelectric coefficients (d33 ~ 1800 to >2000 pC/N) and electromechanical coupling factors (k33 > 0.9), respectively, which may be exploited for improving the performance of broad bandwidth and high frequency sonar. Apart from basic performance, much research has been done on reducing the size and increasing the output power of tonpilz transducers for sonar applications. Results are presented from two different studies. "33" mode single crystal tonpilz transducers have reduced stack lengths due to their low elastic stiffness relative to PZTs, however, this produces non-ideal aspect ratios due to large lateral dimensions. Alternative "31" resonance mode tonpilz elements are proposed to improve performance over these "33" designs. d32 values as high as 1600 pC/N have been observed, and since prestress is applied perpendicular to the poling direction, "31" mode Tonpilz elements exhibit lower loss and higher reliability than "33" mode designs. Planar high power tonpilz arrays are the optimum way to obtain the required acoustic pressure and bandwidth for small footprint, high power sensors. An important issue for these sensors is temperature and prestress stability, since fluctuations in tonpilz properties affects power delivery and sensing electronic design. TRS used the approach of modifying the composition of PMN-PT to improve the temperature dependence of properties of the material. Results show up to a 50% decrease in temperature change while losing minimal source level.

  17. Sonar sound groups and increased terminal buzz duration reflect task complexity in hunting bats.

    PubMed

    Hulgard, Katrine; Ratcliffe, John M

    2016-01-01

    More difficult tasks are generally regarded as such because they demand greater attention. Echolocators provide rare insight into this relationship because biosonar signals can be monitored. Here we show that bats produce longer terminal buzzes and more sonar sound groups during their approach to prey under presumably more difficult conditions. Specifically, we found Daubenton's bats, Myotis daubentonii, produced longer buzzes when aerial-hawking versus water-trawling prey, but that bats taking revolving air- and water-borne prey produced more sonar sound groups than did the bats when taking stationary prey. Buzz duration and sonar sound groups have been suggested to be independent means by which bats attend to would-be targets and other objects of interest. We suggest that for attacking bats both should be considered as indicators of task difficulty and that the buzz is, essentially, an extended sonar sound group. PMID:26857019

  18. Sonar sound groups and increased terminal buzz duration reflect task complexity in hunting bats

    PubMed Central

    Hulgard, Katrine; Ratcliffe, John M.

    2016-01-01

    More difficult tasks are generally regarded as such because they demand greater attention. Echolocators provide rare insight into this relationship because biosonar signals can be monitored. Here we show that bats produce longer terminal buzzes and more sonar sound groups during their approach to prey under presumably more difficult conditions. Specifically, we found Daubenton’s bats, Myotis daubentonii, produced longer buzzes when aerial-hawking versus water-trawling prey, but that bats taking revolving air- and water-borne prey produced more sonar sound groups than did the bats when taking stationary prey. Buzz duration and sonar sound groups have been suggested to be independent means by which bats attend to would-be targets and other objects of interest. We suggest that for attacking bats both should be considered as indicators of task difficulty and that the buzz is, essentially, an extended sonar sound group. PMID:26857019

  19. AUTOMATED PRODUCTION OF SEAGRASS MAPS FROM SIDESCAN SONAR IMAGERY: ACCURACY, VARIABILITY AND PATCH RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maps of seagrass beds are useful for monitoring estuarine condition, managing habitats, and modeling estuarine processes. We recently developed inexpensive methods for collecting and classifying sidescan sonar (SSS) imagery for seagrass presence in turbid waters as shallow as 1-...

  20. TECHNICAL NOTE: Observations on the use of a viscoelastic joint to provide noise reduced sonar domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, J. R.

    1997-10-01

    This paper concerns the noise and vibration advantages of an energy absorbing composite joint and its relevance to noise reduced glass reinforced polyester (GRP) sonar domes. Once installed on an operational boat, hydrodynamic flow and supporting structural induced vibrations cause the dome to vibrate, thus radiating noise and interfering with sonar sensor response. The results of a vibration transmissibility study on a GRP - steel interface are discussed as the first step in designing a composite viscoelastic joint that can act as a vibration sink to absorb flow generated and structure borne noise within GRP sonar domes. Preliminary investigations concerning the absorption of compressional waves by use of a tapered viscoelastic interlayer are discussed. It is shown that a tapered viscoelastic interlayer placed between a GRP beam and steel supporting substrate can produce a significant absorption of vibrational energy, reducing water borne radiated noise and providing a significantly quieter noise platform than conventional sonar jointing technology.

  1. Active control of acoustic field-of-view in a biosonar system.

    PubMed

    Yovel, Yossi; Falk, Ben; Moss, Cynthia F; Ulanovsky, Nachum

    2011-09-01

    Active-sensing systems abound in nature, but little is known about systematic strategies that are used by these systems to scan the environment. Here, we addressed this question by studying echolocating bats, animals that have the ability to point their biosonar beam to a confined region of space. We trained Egyptian fruit bats to land on a target, under conditions of varying levels of environmental complexity, and measured their echolocation and flight behavior. The bats modulated the intensity of their biosonar emissions, and the spatial region they sampled, in a task-dependant manner. We report here that Egyptian fruit bats selectively change the emission intensity and the angle between the beam axes of sequentially emitted clicks, according to the distance to the target, and depending on the level of environmental complexity. In so doing, they effectively adjusted the spatial sector sampled by a pair of clicks-the "field-of-view." We suggest that the exact point within the beam that is directed towards an object (e.g., the beam's peak, maximal slope, etc.) is influenced by three competing task demands: detection, localization, and angular scanning-where the third factor is modulated by field-of-view. Our results suggest that lingual echolocation (based on tongue clicks) is in fact much more sophisticated than previously believed. They also reveal a new parameter under active control in animal sonar-the angle between consecutive beams. Our findings suggest that acoustic scanning of space by mammals is highly flexible and modulated much more selectively than previously recognized. PMID:21931535

  2. Side-scan sonar imaging of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anima, Roberto; Wong, Florence L.; Hogg, David; Galanis, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents data collection methods and side-scan sonar data collected along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon in August and September of 2000. The purpose of the data collection effort was to image the distribution of sand between Glen Canyon Dam and river mile 87.4 before and after the 31,600 cfs flow of September 6-8. The side-scan sonar imaging focused on pools between rapids but included smaller rapids where possible.

  3. Off-axis sonar beam pattern of free-ranging finless porpoises measured by a stereo pulse event data logger.

    PubMed

    Akamatsua, Tomonari; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong

    2005-05-01

    The off-axis sonar beam patterns of eight free-ranging finless porpoises were measured using attached data logger systems. The transmitted sound pressure level at each beam angle was calculated from the animal's body angle, the water surface echo level, and the swimming depth. The beam pattern of the off-axis signals between 45 degrees and 115 degrees (where 0 degrees corresponds to the on-axis direction) was nearly constant. The sound pressure level of the off-axis signals reached 162 dB re 1 microPa peak-to-peak. The surface echo level received at the animal was over 140 dB, much higher than the auditory threshold level of small odontocetes. Finless porpoises are estimated to be able to receive the surface echoes of off-axis signals even at 50-m depth. Shallow water systems (less than 50-m depth) are the dominant habitat of both oceanic and freshwater populations of this species. Surface echoes may provide porpoises not only with diving depth information but also with information about surface direction and location of obstacles (including prey items) outside the on-axis sector of the sonar beam. PMID:15957799

  4. Data base management systems activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The Data Management System-1100 is designed to operate in conjunction with the UNIVAC 1100 Series Operating System on any 1100 Series computer. DMS-1100 is divided into the following four major software components: (1) Data Definition Languages (DDL); (2) Data Management Routine (DMR); (3) Data Manipulation Languages (DML); and (4) Data Base Utilities (DBU). These software components are described in detail.

  5. Orbiter active thermal control system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief description of the Orbiter Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) including (1) major functional requirements of heat load, temperature control and heat sink utilization, (2) the overall system arrangement, and (3) detailed description of the elements of the ATCS.

  6. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 4, West Hackberry site, Louisiana.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-09-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 4 focuses on the West Hackberry SPR site, located in southwestern Louisiana. Volumes 1, 2, and 3, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, and the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  7. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 3, Bryan Mound Site, Texas.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-09-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 3 focuses on the Bryan Mound SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 2, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  8. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 2, Big Hill Site, Texas.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-08-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 2 focuses on the Big Hill SPR site, located in southeastern Texas. Volumes 1, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, Louisiana, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  9. Sonar atlas of caverns comprising the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Volume 1, Bayou Choctaw site, Louisiana.

    SciTech Connect

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Lord, Anna Snider

    2007-10-01

    Downhole sonar surveys from the four active U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites have been modeled and used to generate a four-volume sonar atlas, showing the three-dimensional geometry of each cavern. This volume 1 focuses on the Bayou Choctaw SPR site, located in southern Louisiana. Volumes 2, 3, and 4, respectively, present images for the Big Hill SPR site, Texas, the Bryan Mound SPR site, Texas, and the West Hackberry SPR site, Louisiana. The atlas uses a consistent presentation format throughout. The basic geometric measurements provided by the down-cavern surveys have also been used to generate a number of geometric attributes, the values of which have been mapped onto the geometric form of each cavern using a color-shading scheme. The intent of the various geometrical attributes is to highlight deviations of the cavern shape from the idealized cylindrical form of a carefully leached underground storage cavern in salt. The atlas format does not allow interpretation of such geometric deviations and anomalies. However, significant geometric anomalies, not directly related to the leaching history of the cavern, may provide insight into the internal structure of the relevant salt dome.

  10. Experiment system of LAMOST active optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiangqun; Su, Ding; Li, Guoping; Yao, Zhengqiu; Zhang, Zhengcao; Li, Yeping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, You; Xu, Xinqi; Wang, Hai

    2004-10-01

    Active optics is the most difficult part in LAMOST project. Especially for the segmented reflecting Schmidt plate Ma, in which both segmented mirror active optics and thin mirror (or deformable mirror) active optics are applied. To test and optimize the thin mirror active optics of Ma, and to approach the reality of operating environment of the telescope, an outdoor experiment system has been established. This experiment system is also a `small LAMOST" with one sub-mirror of the primary mirror Mb and one sub-mirror of the Schmidt plate Ma, and with full scale in spacing (40 meters) between Ma and Mb. many parts of LAMOST were tested in the experiment system except segmented mirror active optics. Especially for force actuators, thin mirror support system, friction driving of the alt-azimuth mounting and its control system, wave front test along such a long optical path. This paper presents the experiment system, research and developments, and some experiment results.

  11. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  12. High speed hybrid active system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Ignacio F.; Chang, Fu-Kuo; Qing, Peter X.; Kumar, Amrita; Zhang, David

    2005-05-01

    A novel piezoelectric/fiber-optic system is developed for long-term health monitoring of aerospace vehicles and structures. The hybrid diagnostic system uses the piezoelectric actuators to input a controlled excitation to the structure and the fiber optic sensors to capture the corresponding structural response. The aim of the system is to detect changes in structures such as those found in aerospace applications (damage, cracks, aging, etc.). This system involves the use of fiber Bragg gratings, which may be either bonded to the surface of the material or embedded within it in order to detect the linear strain component produced by the excitation waves generate by an arbitrary waveform generator. Interrogation of the Bragg gratings is carried out using a high speed fiber grating demodulation unit and a high speed data acquisition card to provide actuation input. With data collection and information processing; is able to determine the condition of the structure. The demands on a system suitable for detecting ultrasonic acoustic waves are different than for the more common strain and temperature systems. On the one hand, the frequency is much higher, with typical values for ultrasonic frequencies used in non-destructive testing ranging from 100 kHz up to several MHz. On the other hand, the related strain levels are much lower, normally in the μstrain range. Fiber-optic solutions for this problem do exist and are particularly attractive for ultrasonic sensing as the sensors offer broadband detection capability.

  13. Effect of broadband-noise masking on the behavioral response of a harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) to 1-s duration 6-7 kHz sonar up-sweeps.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Steen, Nele; de Jong, Christ; Wensveen, Paul J; Verboom, Willem C

    2011-04-01

    Naval sonar systems produce signals which may affect the behavior of harbor porpoises, though their effect may be reduced by ambient noise. To show how natural ambient noise influences the effect of sonar sweeps on porpoises, a porpoise in a pool was exposed to 1-s duration up-sweeps, similar in frequency range (6-7 kHz) to those of existing naval sonar systems. The sweep signals had randomly generated sweep intervals of 3-7 s (duty cycle: 19%). Behavioral parameters during exposure to signals were compared to those during baseline periods. The sessions were conducted under five background noise conditions: the local normal ambient noise and four conditions mimicking the spectra for wind-generated noise at Sea States 2-8. In all conditions, the sweeps caused the porpoise to swim further away from the transducer, surface more often, swim faster, and breathe more forcefully than during the baseline periods. However, the higher the background noise level, the smaller the effects of the sweeps on the surfacing behavior of the porpoise. Therefore, the effects of naval sonar systems on harbor porpoises are determined not only by the received level of the signals and the hearing sensitivity of the animals but also by the background noise. PMID:21476686

  14. Utilizing new multibeam sonar datasets to map potential locations of sensitive benthic habitats in the U.S. Atlantic Extended Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, D.; Mayer, L. A.; Gardner, J. V.

    2013-12-01

    Recently completed multibeam sonar datasets of the U.S. Atlantic Extended Continental Shelf (ECS) area provide bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data that can be utilized in combination with other oceanographic data to help identify Habitats of Particular Concern (HAPCs), such as deepwater corals. Multibeam sonar data was collected by the University of New Hampshire's Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping/Joint Hydrographic Center (CCOM/JHC) on four different cruises between 2004-2012, and by multiple cruises of the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer between 2011-2013. These two new multibeam sonar datasets provide a historic new level of detail to our understanding of the Northwest Atlantic seafloor from Florida to the Canadian maritime boundary and from the edge of the continental shelf to the deep ocean. CCOM/JHC has embarked on a research effort to evaluate ways in which to use the new multibeam data sets from the Atlantic Margin, along with other existing ancillary datasets, to generate marine ecological classification maps and potential habitat prediction maps useful for supporting Ecosystem-Based Management. The initial component of this work involves processing the data using QPS Fledermaus and ESRI ArcGIS software to derive sediment classification predictions and terrain descriptors. Substrate characterization and thematic classifications derived using the 'GEOCODER' code from CCOM/JHC are used in combination with seafloor groundtruth data and oceanographic model output to identify potential habitat areas. Bathymetry and backscatter datasets collected with different sonar systems of varying resolution are compared to examine differences in interpreted properties of seafloor substrates within areas of overlapping hydrographic surveys. Results of this work are intended to substantially improve predictive models of potential coldwater coral distribution in the Atlantic ECS area. Future phases of this research effort will apply NOAA's Coastal and Marine Ecological

  15. Optimizing Installation and Operation Properties of an AUV-Mounted Swath Sonar Sensor for Automated Marine Gas Seep Detection - a Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenau, S.; Fei, T.; Tóth, Z.; Keil, H.; Spiess, V.; Kraus, D.

    2014-12-01

    The detection of gas bubble streams in the water column by single- and multibeam sonars has been a common procedure in the research of marine seep sites. In the framework of the development of an AUV capable of automatic detection and sampling of gas bubble streams, such acoustic flares were modelled in MATLAB routines to assess the optimal sonar configuration for flare detection. The AUV development (IMGAM-project) is carried out as a cooperation of the company ATLAS Hydrographic and the MARUM at the University of Bremen. The combination of sensor inclination, sonar carrier frequency and pulse characteristics affect the ability of the system to detect bubble streams of different sizes and intensities. These variations in acoustic signal return from gas bubble streams depending on acquisition parameters can affect the detectability and acoustic properties of recorded acoustic flares in various seepage areas in the world's oceans. We show several examples of acoustic signatures of previously defined bubble streams under varying acquisition parameters and document the effects of changing sensor parameters on detection efficiency.

  16. Archive of Side Scan Sonar and Swath Bathymetry Data collected during USGS Cruise 10CCT02 Offshore of Petit Bois Island Including Petit Bois Pass, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Mississippi, March 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pfeiffer, William R.; Flocks, James G.; DeWitt, Nancy T.; Forde, Arnell S.; Kelso, Kyle; Thompson, Phillip R.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2011-01-01

    In March of 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys offshore of Petit Bois Island, Mississippi, and Dauphin Island, Alabama (fig. 1). These efforts were part of the USGS Gulf of Mexico Science Coordination partnership with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to assist the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) and the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazards Susceptibility Project by mapping the shallow geologic stratigraphic framework of the Mississippi Barrier Island Complex. These geophysical surveys will provide the data necessary for scientists to define, interpret, and provide baseline bathymetry and seafloor habitat for this area and to aid scientists in predicting future geomorphological changes of the islands with respect to climate change, storm impact, and sea-level rise. Furthermore, these data will provide information for barrier island restoration, particularly in Camille Cut, and protection for the historical Fort Massachusetts on Ship Island, Mississippi. For more information please refer to http://ngom.usgs.gov/gomsc/mscip/index.html. This report serves as an archive of the processed swath bathymetry and side scan sonar data (SSS). Data products herein include gridded and interpolated surfaces, seabed backscatter images, and ASCII x,y,z data products for both swath bathymetry and side scan sonar imagery. Additional files include trackline maps, navigation files, GIS files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal FGDC metadata. Scanned images of the handwritten and digital FACS logs are also provided as PDF files. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report.

  17. Deep-Towed Sidescan Sonar Studies of Amagmatic Spreading Centres: the Mid-Atlantic Ridge at 13N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallows, C.; Searle, R. C.; Party, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    In areas of sparse magmatism, plate separation is accommodated predominately by tectonic processes, which is often observed in the form of long-lived detachment faults exhuming lower crustal rocks and mantle peridotites to the seafloor. During research cruise JC007, a number of these oceanic core complexes (OCCs) recently identified by Smith et al. (2006) along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) were imaged using the National Oceanography Centres Towed Ocean Bottom Instrument (TOBI). Sidescan sonar data were collected across two active OCCs at 1320N and 1330N and one inactive OCC at 1350N, including the intervening regions. We made extensive use of 3-D Fledermaus visualisations during our interpretations, and will include these in our presentation. The sidescan sonar data show distinct similarities between the two active OCCs. They both appear as large domal detachment surfaces being exhumed from beneath the ridge axis that are capped by a complexly deformed central massif and volcanic ridge at the breakaway (as suggested by Smith et al, 2006). The structures extend for c.20km off axis and c.10km along axis, and the detachment faults are characterised by large-scale spreading-parallel bathymetric corrugations and fine scale striations (interpreted as streams of basalt derived from tectonic erosional screes imaged at the terminations). The hanging walls above the zones of emergence of the detachment faults exhibit faulting that appears to trend from the ridge axis (N and S of the OCC) towards the spreading direction (at the OCC). The neo-volcanic zones along the ridge axis are apparently absent opposite active OCC formation, which is likely indicative of predominately tectonic spreading. In the regions between the active OCCs, sidescan sonar imagery shows a clear neo-volcanic zone at the ridge axis, indicating robust magmatic plate separation and accretion. The extinct OCC is characterised by heavy sediment cover over a much shallower detachment surface, presumably due to

  18. Centrally activated pipe snubbing system

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E.

    1985-01-01

    An electromechanical pipe snubbing system and an electromechanical pipe snubber. In the system, each pipe snubber, in a set of pipe snubbers, has an electromechanical mechanism to lock and unlock the snubber. A sensor, such as a seismometer, measures a quantity related to making a snubber locking or unlocking decision. A control device makes an electrical connection between a power supply and each snubber's electromechanical mechanism to simultaneously lock each snubber when the sensor measurement indicates a snubber locking condition. The control device breaks the connection to simultaneously unlock each snubber when the sensor measurement indicates a snubber unlocking condition. In the snubber, one end of the shaft slides within a bore in one end of a housing. The other end of the shaft is rotatably attached to a pipe; the other end of the housing is rotatively attached to a wall. The snubber's electromechanical mechanism locks the slidable end of the shaft to the housing and unlocks that end from the housing. The electromechanical mechanism permits remote testing and lockup status indication for each snubber.

  19. Sources of uncertainty in Doppler sonar measurements of fish speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollefsen, Cristina D. S.; Zedel, Len

    2001-05-01

    A 250-kHz, 30-kHz bandwidth coherent Doppler sonar was evaluated to determine sources of uncertainty in fish speed measurements. Three separate tests were undertaken: (1) towtank tests using styrofoam balls to simulate fish, (2) tank tests with live free-swimming fish, and (3) field tests with wild free-swimming fish. The standard deviation in a single speed estimate was 9 cms-1 for styrofoam balls, 10-11 cms-1 for swimming fish observed from a dorsal aspect, and 19 cms-1 for swimming fish observed from a caudal aspect. The variation in precision was primarily due to the different signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in each test: a larger SNR resulted in a smaller standard deviation. Doppler speed estimates were compared with independent estimates of target speed where possible. An accuracy of +/-4 cms-1 was typical of Doppler speed estimates in all the experiments.

  20. Sector-Scanning Sonar Imagery of Laboratory Bedforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejniczak, K. O.; Calantoni, J.; Penko, A.; Palmsten, M. L.; Sheremet, A.; Kaihatu, J. M.; Weiss, R.

    2014-12-01

    High-frequency (2.25 MHz) Sector-Scanning Sonar (SSS) provides low-cost imagery for observing bedform morphology. SSS data can be used to improve upon bedform morphology models and correct for acoustic scattering and absorption of the seafloor. We collected SSS data at a 3.0 m range over six days in the large wave flume at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory at Oregon State University. SSS data were averaged over the number of scan passes for each experiment. Experiments were conducted using solitons, as well as cnoidal and random waves with varying wave heights and periods from 0.25 m to 1.0 m and 2.0 to 5.0 seconds, respectively. Waves propagated over an 8 m long sediment test section containing Oregon beach sand with D50 = 0.23 mm. Ripple wavelengths were estimated using Fourier analysis and ranged from 0.41 m to 1.2 m.

  1. High-Resolution Underwater Mapping Using Side-Scan Sonar

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to generate high-resolution sea floor maps using a Side-Scan Sonar(SSS). This is achieved by explicitly taking into account the SSS operation as follows. First, the raw sensor data is corrected by means of a physics-based SSS model. Second, the data is projected to the sea-floor. The errors involved in this projection are thoroughfully analysed. Third, a probabilistic SSS model is defined and used to estimate the probability of each sea-floor region to be observed. This probabilistic information is then used to weight the contribution of each SSS measurement to the map. Because of these models, arbitrary map resolutions can be achieved, even beyond the sensor resolution. Finally, a geometric map building method is presented and combined with the probabilistic approach. The resulting map is composed of two layers. The echo intensity layer holds the most likely echo intensities at each point in the sea-floor. The probabilistic layer contains information about how confident can the user or the higher control layers be about the echo intensity layer data. Experimental results have been conducted in a large subsea region. PMID:26821379

  2. Bi-static sonar applications of intensity processing.

    PubMed

    Naluai, Nathan K; Lauchle, Gerald C; Gabrielson, Thomas B; Joseph, John H

    2007-04-01

    Acoustic intensity processing of signals from directional sonobuoy acoustic subsystems is used to enhance the detection of submerged bodies in bi-static sonar applications. In some directions, the scattered signals may be completely dominated by the incident blast from the source, depending upon the geometry, making the object undetectable by traditional pressure measurements. Previous theoretical derivations suggest that acoustic vector intensity sensors, and the associated intensity processing, are a potential solution to this problem. Deep water experiments conducted at Lake Pend Oreille in northern Idaho are described. A large, hollow cylindrical body is located between a source and a number of SSQ-53D sonobuoys positioned from 5 to 30 body lengths away from the scattering body. Measurements show changes in the acoustic pressure of less than 0.5 dB when the scattering body is inserted in the field. However, the phase of the acoustic intensity component formed between the acoustic pressure and particle velocity component orthogonal to the direction of incident wave propagation varies by as much as 55 degrees. This metric is shown to be a repeatable and strong indicator of the presence of the scattering body. PMID:17471706

  3. Processing of Ice Draft Measurements From Submarine Upward Looking Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wensnahan, M. R.; Bentley, D. L.; Rothrock, D. A.; Tucker, W. B.; Yu, Y.; Weaver, R.; Fetterer, F.

    2001-12-01

    In the last several years the US Navy has agreed to release data on ice draft taken using submarine-mounted upward looking sonar. This data spans more than 40 years, from 1957 to present, and represents a significant resource for climate researchers. Currently, the data are being processed by the Navy's Arctic Submarine Lab, the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington and the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab. After processing, data are sent to the National Snow and Ice Data Center, where they are permanently archived and made available on-line. Potential users of the data should be aware of several issues, i) processing methods, ii) data release requirements, iii) temporal and spatial coverage of the data, and iv) statistical products and potential uses of the data. The data are in two distinct forms, digital and paper record. Each form presents unique processing issues. Additionally, certain aspects of the original data are classified and particular steps are necessary to produce publicly releasable products. The data covers much of the Arctic basin and all seasons over 40+ years but the spatial and temporal coverage is not uniform. Finally, derived statistics can be used for research such as climate simulations, studies of long term changes in ice thickness, ice pack dynamics and thermodynamics.

  4. Automated target classification in high resolution dual frequency sonar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aridgides, Tom; Fernández, Manuel

    2007-04-01

    An improved computer-aided-detection / computer-aided-classification (CAD/CAC) processing string has been developed. The classified objects of 2 distinct strings are fused using the classification confidence values and their expansions as features, and using "summing" or log-likelihood-ratio-test (LLRT) based fusion rules. The utility of the overall processing strings and their fusion was demonstrated with new high-resolution dual frequency sonar imagery. Three significant fusion algorithm improvements were made. First, a nonlinear 2nd order (Volterra) feature LLRT fusion algorithm was developed. Second, a Box-Cox nonlinear feature LLRT fusion algorithm was developed. The Box-Cox transformation consists of raising the features to a to-be-determined power. Third, a repeated application of a subset feature selection / feature orthogonalization / Volterra feature LLRT fusion block was utilized. It was shown that cascaded Volterra feature LLRT fusion of the CAD/CAC processing strings outperforms summing, baseline single-stage Volterra and Box-Cox feature LLRT algorithms, yielding significant improvements over the best single CAD/CAC processing string results, and providing the capability to correctly call the majority of targets while maintaining a very low false alarm rate. Additionally, the robustness of cascaded Volterra feature fusion was demonstrated, by showing that the algorithm yields similar performance with the training and test sets.

  5. Sonar Seafloor Exploration within the Central South Atlantic Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, C. C.; Sautter, L. R.; Harris, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the College of Charleston's Transect Program, research cruises conducted aboard the RV Savannah of the Skidaway Institution of Oceanography and the NOAA Ship Nancy Foster have explored and sampled several localities within the central portion of the South Atlantic Bight, the continental shelf region between Florida and Cape Hatteras, NC. Klein sidescan and Kongsberg multibeam sonar arrays collected seafloor images and bathymetric data that were processed by CofC undergraduate geology researchers using Caris HIPS/SIPS software. Several of the data sets have been ground-truthed using sediment grabs, footage from ROV cameras and SCUBA videography. Two of the prominent seafloor features discovered are (1) an outcropping hard-ground shelf-edge structure approximately 650 by 150 m, with 10 m relief. It is oriented parallel to shore in water depths of 60 m. Possible geological and biological influences on the structure's origin and morphology are being explored; and (2) a meandering river channel located on the mid-shelf, where water depth is approximately 22 m. Rock and sediment samples as well as video documentation of this feature reveal a channel with 1.5 m of relief, cut into the hard-ground, and includes coarse sands and abundant river pebbles. Additional shelf hard-ground features will be presented.

  6. High-Resolution Underwater Mapping Using Side-Scan Sonar.

    PubMed

    Burguera, Antoni; Oliver, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to generate high-resolution sea floor maps using a Side-Scan Sonar(SSS). This is achieved by explicitly taking into account the SSS operation as follows. First, the raw sensor data is corrected by means of a physics-based SSS model. Second, the data is projected to the sea-floor. The errors involved in this projection are thoroughfully analysed. Third, a probabilistic SSS model is defined and used to estimate the probability of each sea-floor region to be observed. This probabilistic information is then used to weight the contribution of each SSS measurement to the map. Because of these models, arbitrary map resolutions can be achieved, even beyond the sensor resolution. Finally, a geometric map building method is presented and combined with the probabilistic approach. The resulting map is composed of two layers. The echo intensity layer holds the most likely echo intensities at each point in the sea-floor. The probabilistic layer contains information about how confident can the user or the higher control layers be about the echo intensity layer data. Experimental results have been conducted in a large subsea region. PMID:26821379

  7. Active microrheology in active matter systems: Mobility, intermittency, and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, C; Reichhardt, C J Olson

    2015-03-01

    We examine the mobility and velocity fluctuations of a driven particle moving through an active matter bath of self-mobile disks for varied density or area coverage and varied activity. We show that the driven particle mobility can exhibit nonmonotonic behavior that is correlated with distinct changes in the spatiotemporal structures that arise in the active media. We demonstrate that the probe particle velocity distributions exhibit specific features in the different dynamic regimes and identify an activity-induced uniform crystallization that occurs for moderate activity levels and is distinct from the previously observed higher activity cluster phase. The velocity distribution in the cluster phase has telegraph noise characteristics produced when the probe particle moves alternately through high-mobility areas that are in the gas state and low-mobility areas that are in the dense phase. For higher densities and large activities, the system enters what we characterize as an active jamming regime. Here the probe particle moves in intermittent jumps or avalanches that have power-law-distributed sizes that are similar to the avalanche distributions observed for nonactive disk systems near the jamming transition. PMID:25871116

  8. The paradox of drowned reefs: A Caribbean example mapped using SeaMARC II side-scan sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, D.; Mann, P. )

    1990-05-01

    Three models for the drowning of carbonate platforms and associated fringing coral reefs include (1) rapid submergence below the euphotic zone by tectonic subsidence and sea level rise; (2) excess nutrients in the water; and (3) burial by prograding marine siliclastic sediments. To examine these mechanisms on a regional scale, the authors mapped drowned barrier reef tracts around the active carbonate banks of the Nicaraguan Rise using SeaMARC II sidescan sonar, 3.5 KHz, and digital single channel reflection techniques. The reef tracts exhibited high sonar backscatter and were prominently displayed on sidescan images. Characteristic features of the reef tracts include (1) uneroded and slightly sinuous mounds that crop out on the sea floor and closely following bathymetric contours; (2) reef mounds that typically occur in stairstep sets of two to three terraces; (3) water depths at the crest of the reef mounds that range from 1,050 to 1,500 m; and (4) reef mounds that extend for 1,200 km around the base of the slope (depth 1,300 m) of an active carbonate platform in a moderately active, intraplate setting (Pedro Bank) and along the crest of a submerged fault block in a highly active, interplate setting (Bay Islands Ridge, ridge crest depth at 1,600 m). Because these newly discovered reef tracts have not been dredged, their ages and compositions remain unknown. Based on the observed sea floor outcrop, regional extent, and approximate correlation in water depth of the reef tracts, mechanisms 1 and 2 appear to be the most likely drowning mechanisms.

  9. Bathymetry mapping using a GPS-sonar equipped remote control boat: Application in waste stabilisation ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coggins, Liah; Ghadouani, Anas; Ghisalberti, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, bathymetry mapping of ponds, lakes and rivers have used techniques which are low in spatial resolution, sometimes subjective in terms of precision and accuracy, labour intensive, and that require a high level of safety precautions. In waste stabilisation ponds (WSP) in particular, sludge heights, and thus sludge volume, are commonly measured using a sludge judge (a clear plastic pipe with length markings). A remote control boat fitted with a GPS-equipped sonar unit can improve the resolution of depth measurements, and reduce safety and labour requirements. Sonar devices equipped with GPS technology, also known as fish finders, are readily available and widely used by people in boating. Through the use of GPS technology in conjunction with sonar, the location and depth can be recorded electronically onto a memory card. However, despite its high applicability to the field, this technology has so far been underutilised. In the case of WSP, the sonar can measure the water depth to the top of the sludge layer, which can then be used to develop contour maps of sludge distribution and to determine sludge volume. The coupling of sonar technology with a remotely operative vehicle has several advantages of traditional measurement techniques, particularly in removing human subjectivity of readings, and the sonar being able to collect more data points in a shorter period of time, and continuously, with a much higher spatial resolution. The GPS-sonar equipped remote control boat has been tested on in excess of 50 WSP within Western Australia, and has shown a very strong correlation (R2 = 0.98) between spot readings taken with the sonar compared to a sludge judge. This has shown that the remote control boat with GPS-sonar device is capable of providing sludge bathymetry with greatly increased spatial resolution, while greatly reducing profiling time. Remotely operated vehicles, such as the one built in this study, are useful for not only determining sludge

  10. Application of Shaping Deconvolution to the Generation of Arbitrary Acoustic Pulses with Conventional Sonar Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobo, P.

    1995-11-01

    Conventionally, a transducer driven with an electrical tone burst responds with a pressure wave whose exact waveform is determined by the impulse response of the transducer and the physical properties of the medium to which it is coupled. However, for some active sonar applications it is often desirable to have very specific transmitted acoustic signals rather than simply gated or swept sinusoids. By modelling the underwater transducer as a linear filter and estimating its transfer function it is possible to derive the required time history of the input voltage for a given output spectrum. There is the complication that because the transducer is inevitably band-limited in its frequency reponse, a regularization parameter has to be introduced to avoid division by zero. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by generating, with the same underwater transducer, zero-phase cosine-magnitude, bionic, Guassian and low transient pulses. The input voltage necessary to generate each pulse is synthesized with a programmable arbitrary waveform generator. The main worth of this method is the versatility it affords in the use of conventional transducers.

  11. AUV SLAM and Experiments Using a Mechanical Scanning Forward-Looking Sonar

    PubMed Central

    He, Bo; Liang, Yan; Feng, Xiao; Nian, Rui; Yan, Tianhong; Li, Minghui; Zhang, Shujing

    2012-01-01

    Navigation technology is one of the most important challenges in the applications of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) which navigate in the complex undersea environment. The ability of localizing a robot and accurately mapping its surroundings simultaneously, namely the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem, is a key prerequisite of truly autonomous robots. In this paper, a modified-FastSLAM algorithm is proposed and used in the navigation for our C-Ranger research platform, an open-frame AUV. A mechanical scanning imaging sonar is chosen as the active sensor for the AUV. The modified-FastSLAM implements the update relying on the on-board sensors of C-Ranger. On the other hand, the algorithm employs the data association which combines the single particle maximum likelihood method with modified negative evidence method, and uses the rank-based resampling to overcome the particle depletion problem. In order to verify the feasibility of the proposed methods, both simulation experiments and sea trials for C-Ranger are conducted. The experimental results show the modified-FastSLAM employed for the navigation of the C-Ranger AUV is much more effective and accurate compared with the traditional methods. PMID:23012549

  12. AUV SLAM and experiments using a mechanical scanning forward-looking sonar.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Liang, Yan; Feng, Xiao; Nian, Rui; Yan, Tianhong; Li, Minghui; Zhang, Shujing

    2012-01-01

    Navigation technology is one of the most important challenges in the applications of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) which navigate in the complex undersea environment. The ability of localizing a robot and accurately mapping its surroundings simultaneously, namely the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) problem, is a key prerequisite of truly autonomous robots. In this paper, a modified-FastSLAM algorithm is proposed and used in the navigation for our C-Ranger research platform, an open-frame AUV. A mechanical scanning imaging sonar is chosen as the active sensor for the AUV. The modified-FastSLAM implements the update relying on the on-board sensors of C-Ranger. On the other hand, the algorithm employs the data association which combines the single particle maximum likelihood method with modified negative evidence method, and uses the rank-based resampling to overcome the particle depletion problem. In order to verify the feasibility of the proposed methods, both simulation experiments and sea trials for C-Ranger are conducted. The experimental results show the modified-FastSLAM employed for the navigation of the C-Ranger AUV is much more effective and accurate compared with the traditional methods. PMID:23012549

  13. In-situ estimates of environmental uncertainty on sonar performance prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heaney, Kevin D.

    2005-04-01

    Oceanographic and geo-acoustic variability in the shallow water can dominate acoustic propagation. Sonar performance predictions using archival sound speed and geo-acoustic information do not contain any information about variability or uncertainty in the environment and its likely impact on sonar performance prediction. Using measurements from the NATO Undersea Research Centres BOUNDARY 2003 sea test, an approach is presented that estimates the uncertainty and transfers it through the acoustic propagation and the sonar equation to sonar performance. The sound speed field is characterized by an Empirical Orthogonal Function decomposition of the measured profiles. The geo-acoustic uncertainty is considered to be a normal distribution around the inverted geo-acoustic parameters (from 4 separate inversions). Dynamic ambient noise variability is measured from the array beamformer output. Uncertainty in propagation is quantified in terms of sound speed, geo-acoustic, and ambient noise uncertainty. The uncertainty in sonar performance, due to environmental uncertainty, is then displayed to the operator. [Work supported by the ONR Capturing Uncertainty DRI.

  14. Deploying perfSONAR-based End-2-End monitoring for production US CMS networking

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Maxim; Bobyshev, Andrey; Crawford, Matt; DeMar, Phil; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Petravick, Don; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Fermilab is the US Tier-1 Center for CMS data storage and analysis. End-2-End (E2E) circuits are utilized to support high impact data movement into and out of the Tier-1 Center. E2E circuits have been implemented to facilitate the movement of raw experiment data from the Tier-0 Center at CERN, as well as processed data to a number of the US Tier-2 sites. Troubleshooting and monitoring of those circuits presents a significant challenge, since the circuits typically cross multiple research & education networks, each with its own management domain and customized monitoring capabilities. The perfSONAR Monitoring Project was established to facilitate development and deployment of a common monitoring infrastructure across multiple network management domains. Fermilab has deployed perfSONAR across its E2E circuit infrastructure and enhanced the product with several tools that ease the monitoring and management of those circuits. This paper will present the current state of perfSONAR monitoring at Fermilab and detail our experiences using perfSONAR to manage our current E2E circuit infrastructure. We will describe how production network circuits are monitored by perfSONAR E2E Monitoring Points (MPs), and the benefits it has brought to production US CMS networking support.

  15. PASS: Creating Physically Active School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciotto, Carol M.; Fede, Marybeth H.

    2014-01-01

    PASS, a Physically Active School System, is a program by which school districts and schools utilize opportunities for school-based physical activity that enhance overall fitness and cognition, which can be broken down into four integral parts consisting of connecting, communicating, collaborating, and cooperating. There needs to be an…

  16. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  17. Nanoelectromechanics of Inorganic and Biological Systems: From Structural Imaging to Local Functionalities

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Brian; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen; Thompson, G. L.; Vertegel, Alexey; Hohlbauch, Sophia; Proksch, Roger

    2008-01-01

    Coupling between electrical and mechanical phenomena is extremely common in inorganic materials, and nearly ubiquitous in biological systems, underpinning phenomena and devices ranging from SONAR to cardiac activity and hearing. This paper briefly summarizes the Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) approach, referred to as Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM), for probing electromechanical coupling on the nanometer scales, and delineates some existing and emerging applications to probe local structure and functionality in inorganic ferroelectrics, calcified and connective tissues, and complex biosystems based on electromechanical detection.

  18. 50 CFR 216.187 - Applications for Letters of Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA sonar) Sonar § 216.187 Applications for Letters of... scheduled to begin conducting SURTASS LFA sonar operations or the previous Letter of Authorization...

  19. 50 CFR 216.187 - Applications for Letters of Authorization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA sonar) Sonar § 216.187 Applications for Letters of... scheduled to begin conducting SURTASS LFA sonar operations or the previous Letter of Authorization...

  20. Information theoretic bounds of ATR algorithm performance for sidescan sonar target classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Vincent L.; Pinto, Marc A.

    2005-05-01

    With research on autonomous underwater vehicles for minehunting beginning to focus on cooperative and adaptive behaviours, some effort is being spent on developing automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms that are able to operate with high reliability under a wide range of scenarios, particularly in areas of high clutter density, and without human supervision. Because of the great diversity of pattern recognition methods and continuously improving sensor technology, there is an acute requirement for objective performance measures that are independent of any particular sensor, algorithm or target definitions. This paper approaches the ATR problem from the point of view of information theory in an attempt to place bounds on the performance of target classification algorithms that are based on the acoustic shadow of proud targets. Performance is bounded by analysing the simplest of shape classification tasks, that of differentiating between a circular and square shadow, thus allowing us to isolate system design criteria and assess their effect on the overall probability of classification. The information that can be used for target recognition in sidescan sonar imagery is examined and common information theory relationships are used to derive properties of the ATR problem. Some common bounds with analytical solutions are also derived.

  1. Modeling human echolocation of near-range targets with an audible sonar.

    PubMed

    Kuc, Roman; Kuc, Victor

    2016-02-01

    Blind humans echolocate nearby targets by emitting palatal clicks and perceiving echoes that the auditory system is not able to resolve temporally. The mechanism for perceiving near-range echoes is not known. This paper models the direct mouth-to-ear signal (MES) and the echo to show that the echo enhances the high-frequency components in the composite MES/echo signal with features that allow echolocation. The mouth emission beam narrows with increasing frequency and exhibits frequency-dependent transmission notches in the backward direction toward the ears as predicted by the piston-in-sphere model. The ears positioned behind the mouth detect a MES that contains predominantly the low frequencies contained in the emission. Hence the high-frequency components in the emission that are perceived by the ears are enhanced by the echoes. A pulse/echo audible sonar verifies this model by echolocating targets from 5 cm range, where the MES and echo overlap significantly, to 55 cm. The model predicts that unambiguous ranging occurs over a limited range and that there is an optimal range that produces the highest range resolution. PMID:26936542

  2. A necklace sonar with adjustable scope range for assisting the visually impaired.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Luz H; Gualdron, Mauricio; Gonzalez, Fabio; Aceros, Juan; Rizzo-Sierra, Carlos V

    2013-01-01

    A sonar based device with tactile feedback was developed to improve the mobility and independence of visually impaired individuals. It features a transceiver/receiver, a potentiometer, a microcontroller, a rechargeable polymer lithium ion battery, and a Nokia Cell phone vibrator. All components are commercially available and housed in a custom acrylic package with 86 mm × 34 mm × 12 mm in dimension, and 120 grms in weight. Additionally, the device features an adjustable detection scheme for user customization of distance range, and a tactile feedback system that avoids interference with auditory sensory information. The device was tested for its navigational efficacy in an artificial indoor environment, and in a live outdoor setting. Ten subjects (9 males and 1 female), with a mean age of 35 years-old (range: 17 to 52) were presented with a series of navigational tasks resulting in considerable reduction of head, shoulder, chest, and arms collisions during their locomotion. We conclude that this device greatly improves the mobility and safety of visually impaired individuals. PMID:24109971

  3. Phase Transitions in Model Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redner, Gabriel S.

    The amazing collective behaviors of active systems such as bird flocks, schools of fish, and colonies of microorganisms have long amazed scientists and laypeople alike. Understanding the physics of such systems is challenging due to their far-from-equilibrium dynamics, as well as the extreme diversity in their ingredients, relevant time- and length-scales, and emergent phenomenology. To make progress, one can categorize active systems by the symmetries of their constituent particles, as well as how activity is expressed. In this work, we examine two categories of active systems, and explore their phase behavior in detail. First, we study systems of self-propelled spherical particles moving in two dimensions. Despite the absence of an aligning interaction, this system displays complex emergent dynamics, including phase separation into a dense active solid and dilute gas. Using simulations and analytic modeling, we quantify the phase diagram and separation kinetics. We show that this nonequilibrium phase transition is analogous to an equilibrium vapor-liquid system, with binodal and spinodal curves and a critical point. We also characterize the dense active solid phase, a unique material which exhibits the structural signatures of a crystalline solid near the crystal-hexatic transition point, as well as anomalous dynamics including superdiffusive motion on intermediate timescales. We also explore the role of interparticle attraction in this system. We demonstrate that attraction drastically changes the phase diagram, which contains two distinct phase-separated regions and is reentrant as a function of propulsion speed. We interpret this complex situation with a simple kinetic model, which builds from the observed microdynamics of individual particles to a full description of the macroscopic phase behavior. We also study active nematics, liquid crystals driven out of equilibrium by energy-dissipating active stresses. The equilibrium nematic state is unstable in these

  4. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, J.J.

    1993-04-13

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  5. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, James J.

    1993-01-01

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  6. UTILIZING A CHIRP SONAR TO ACCURATELY CHARACTERIZE NEWLY DEPOSITED MATERIAL AT THE CALCASIEU OCEAN DREDGED MATERIAL DISPOSAL SITE, LOUISIANA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The distribution of dredged sediments is measured at the Calcasieu Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS) using a chirp sonar immediately after disposal and two months later. ubbottom reflection data, generated by a chirp sonar transmitting a 4 to 20 kHz FM sweep, is proces...

  7. System for objective assessment of fetal activity.

    PubMed

    Kaluzynski, K J; Kret, T; Czajkowski, K; Sieńko, J; Zmigrodzki, J

    2011-07-01

    Fetal activity is an important indicator of fetal well-being. It is proposed to assess this activity using the pulsed wave Doppler method to collect fetal activity data and dedicated software for on-line processing. The system, addressed to 3rd trimester pregnancies, provides information on presence of pseudobreathing, the heart rate trace, the fetal movement trace, the movement velocity spectrogram, histograms of the velocity and acceleration of both the body movements and pseudobreathing, parameters of these histograms (mean values, standard deviations, shape descriptors), and cumulative counts of the velocity histograms. These parameters form the feature vector of the fetal activity. The system was validated by simultaneous echographic and cardiotocographic recordings and during oxytocin challenge tests. Feature vectors obtained from 1h recordings in 61 pregnancies were submitted to multivariate analysis of variance. Activity patterns of physiological cases and "borderline pathologies" were discriminated using reduced feature vectors, containing cumulative counts of velocity histograms. PMID:21277248

  8. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    SciTech Connect

    Lundie, P. |; McLeod, N.

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  9. Controlled Sonar Exposure Experiments on Cetaceans in Norwegian Waters: Overview of the 3S-Project.

    PubMed

    Lam, Frans-Peter A; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Miller, Patrick J O; Tyack, Peter L; Ainslie, Michael A; Curé, Charlotte; Kleivane, Lars; Sivle, Lise Doksæter; van Ijsselmuide, Sander P; Visser, Fleur; von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Dekeling, René P A

    2016-01-01

    In mitigating the risk of sonar operations, the behavioral response of cetaceans is one of the major knowledge gaps that needs to be addressed. The 3S-Project has conducted a number of controlled exposure experiments with a realistic sonar source in Norwegian waters from 2006 to 2013. In total, the following six target species have been studied: killer, long-finned pilot, sperm, humpback, minke, and northern bottlenose whales. A total of 38 controlled sonar exposures have been conducted on these species. Responses from controlled and repeated exposure runs have been recorded using acoustic and visual observations as well as with electronic tags on the target animal. So far, the first dose-response curves as well as an overview of the scored severity of responses have been revealed. In this paper, an overview is presented of the approach for the study, including the results so far as well as the current status of the ongoing analysis. PMID:26611008

  10. Behavioral Response of Reef Fish and Green Sea Turtles to Midfrequency Sonar.

    PubMed

    Watwood, Stephanie L; Iafrate, Joseph D; Reyier, Eric A; Redfoot, William E

    2016-01-01

    There is growing concern over the potential effects of high-intensity sonar on wild fish populations and commercial fisheries. Acoustic telemetry was employed to measure the movements of free-ranging reef fish and sea turtles in Port Canaveral, FL, in response to routine submarine sonar testing. Twenty-five sheepshead (Archosargus probatocephalus), 28 gray snapper (Lutjanus griseus), and 29 green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) were tagged, with movements monitored for a period of up to 4 months using an array of passive acoustic receivers. Baseline residency was examined for fish and sea turtles before, during, and after the test event. No mortality of tagged fish or sea turtles was evident from the sonar test event. There was a significant increase in the daily residency index for both sheepshead and gray snapper at the testing wharf subsequent to the event. No broad-scale movement from the study site was observed during or immediately after the test. PMID:26611089

  11. Recent ATR and fusion algorithm improvements for multiband sonar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aridgides, Tom; Fernández, Manuel

    2009-05-01

    An improved automatic target recognition processing string has been developed. The overall processing string consists of pre-processing, subimage adaptive clutter filtering, normalization, detection, data regularization, feature extraction, optimal subset feature selection, feature orthogonalization and classification processing blocks. The objects that are classified by the 3 distinct ATR strings are fused using the classification confidence values and their expansions as features, and using "summing" or log-likelihood-ratio-test (LLRT) based fusion rules. The utility of the overall processing strings and their fusion was demonstrated with new high-resolution three-frequency band sonar imagery. The ATR processing strings were individually tuned to the corresponding three-frequency band data, making use of the new processing improvement, data regularization; this improvement entails computing the input data mean, clipping the data to a multiple of its mean and scaling it, prior to feature extraction and resulted in a 3:1 reduction in false alarms. Two significant fusion algorithm improvements were made. First, a nonlinear exponential Box-Cox expansion (consisting of raising data to a to-be-determined power) feature LLRT fusion algorithm was developed. Second, a repeated application of a subset Box-Cox feature selection / feature orthogonalization / LLRT fusion block was utilized. It was shown that cascaded Box-Cox feature LLRT fusion of the ATR processing strings outperforms baseline "summing" and single-stage Box-Cox feature LLRT algorithms, yielding significant improvements over the best single ATR processing string results, and providing the capability to correctly call the majority of targets while maintaining a very low false alarm rate.

  12. Advanced piezoelectric single crystal based transducers for naval sonar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snook, Kevin A.; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Jiang, Xiaoning; Meyer, Richard J., Jr.; Markley, Douglas

    2006-03-01

    Transducers incorporating single crystal piezoelectric Pb(Mg 1/3Nb 2/3) x-1Ti xO 3 (PMN-PT) exhibit significant advantages over ceramic piezoelectrics such as PZT, including both high electromechanical coupling (k 33 > 90%) and piezoelectric coefficients (d 33 > 2000 pC/N). Conventional <001> orientation gives inherently larger bandwidth and output power than PZT ceramics, however, the anisotropy of the crystal also allows for tailoring of the performance by orienting the crystal along different crystallographic axes. This attribute combined with composition refinements can be used to improve thermal or mechanical stability, which is important in high power, high duty cycle sonar applications. By utilizing the "31" resonance mode, the high power performance of PMN-PT can be improved over traditional "33" mode single crystal transducers, due to an improved aspect ratio. Utilizing novel geometries, effective piezoelectric constants of -600 pC/N to -1200 pC/N have been measured. The phase transition point induced by temperature, pre-stress or field is close to that in the "33" mode, and since the prestress is applied perpendicular to the poling direction in "31" mode elements, they exhibit lower loss and can therefore be driven harder. The high power characteristics of tonpilz transducers can also be affected by the composition of the PMN-PT crystal. TRS modified the composition of PMN-PT to improve the thermal stability of the material, while keeping the loss as low as possible. Three dimensional modeling shows that the useable bandwidth of these novel compositions nearly equals that of conventional PMN-PT. A decrease in the source level of up to 6 dB was calculated, which can be compensated for by the higher drive voltages possible.

  13. Protection of Active Distribution Systems with DGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akila, Abdelrahman Ahmed; Helal, Ahmed; Eldesouki, Hussein

    2015-10-01

    Distribution systems are traditionally designed as radial passive systems fed from a single source. Protection coordination of such systems has been easily established assuming the system radiality. Insertion of distributed generators (DGs) into distribution systems makes the distribution system to be more active which causes redistribution of fault currents magnitudes and directions. This causes negative impacts on the original protection system coordination, since the distribution system losses its radiality and passiveness. Recently protection coordination in the presence of distributed generation has been paid a great attention. Researchers proposed various solutions to solve the protection coordination problem caused by adding DG into the distribution network. In this paper, the proposed solutions for the protection coordination problem considering the DG insertion will be illustrated, classified, and criticized.

  14. Mud Volcanism and Fluid Venting In The Eastern Mediterranean Sea: Observations From Sidescan Sonar and Submersible Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitter, T. A. C.; Huguen, C.; Woodside, J. M.; Mascle, J.; Scientific Party, Medineth/Medinaut

    Mud volcanoes in the eastern Mediterranean Sea have been identified by their distinctive acoustic signature as well as their morphology and sedimentology. They appear as circular regions of high backscatter believed to be caused principally by the clast content of the mud flows forming the mud volcano. Both the MEDINAUT and MEDINETH expeditions, conducted in 1998 and 1999 over two mud fields, the Olimpi field and the Anaximander Mountains area, in Eastern Mediterranean Sea, studied mud volcanism using a multidisciplinary approach in order to determine the relationships between the activity of the mud volcanoes (importance of degassing, associated fauna) and their geophysical signature. Mud volcanoes in Eastern Mediterranean Sea vary from conical and dome-shaped reliefs from 500m to 2km wide and 100 to 200m high to large "mud pie" types up to 6km wide. Sidescan sonar records give a very high resolution of the acoustic response, enabling to distinguish several mud flows, often flowing along tectonic lineations. A clear relationship between the occurrence of mud volcanism and cold seeps and both thrust and transcurrent faulting has been observed in both mud fields, although the tectonic settings vary from purely compressional to a more transpressional stress field. The faults are inferred to provide pathways for over- pressured fluids, and secondary faulting (transcurrent and extensional faults) may facilitate mud ascension. On the basis of sidescan sonar interpretation, other typical features have been inferred such as main feeder channels, eruptive cone centers, or brine pools. The in situ observations have been used to characterize the seafloor over numerous mud volcanoes and ground-truth the sonar data. They reveal an abundance of fluid seeps, mainly methane and methane-rich brines, as well as associated specific fauna such as tube worms, clams and chemosynthetic bacteria, and specific diagenetic phenomenon i.e. carbonate crusts. Video observations proved that

  15. Underwater simultaneous localization and mapping based on forward-looking sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiedong; Zeng, Wenjing; Wan, Lei

    2011-09-01

    A method of underwater simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) based on forward-looking sonar was proposed in this paper. Positions of objects were obtained by the forward-looking sonar, and an improved association method based on an ant colony algorithm was introduced to estimate the positions. In order to improve the precision of the positions, the extended Kalman filter (EKF) was adopted. The presented algorithm was tested in a tank, and the maximum estimation error of SLAM gained was 0.25 m. The tests verify that this method can maintain better association efficiency and reduce navigation error.

  16. Aging assessment for active fire protection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, S.B.; Nowlen, S.P.; Tanaka, T.

    1995-06-01

    This study assessed the impact of aging on the performance and reliability of active fire protection systems including both fixed fire suppression and fixed fire detection systems. The experience base shows that most nuclear power plants have an aggressive maintenance and testing program and are finding degraded fire protection system components before a failure occurs. Also, from the data reviewed it is clear that the risk impact of fire protection system aging is low. However, it is assumed that a more aggressive maintenance and testing program involving preventive diagnostics may reduce the risk impact even further.

  17. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  18. Gamma Band Activity in the Reticular Activating System

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Kezunovic, Nebojsa; Hyde, James; Simon, Christen; Beck, Paige; Garcia-Rill, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS) exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN), intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf), and pontine subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD) all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high-threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep–wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep–wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem–thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep–wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by pre-conscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the processes of

  19. Traveling and Resting Crystals in Active Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, Andreas M.; Löwen, Hartmut

    2013-02-01

    A microscopic field theory for crystallization in active systems is proposed which unifies the phase-field-crystal model of freezing with the Toner—Tu theory for self-propelled particles. A wealth of different active crystalline states are predicted and characterized. In particular, for increasing strength of self-propulsion, a transition from a resting crystal to a traveling crystalline state is found where the particles migrate collectively while keeping their crystalline order. Our predictions, which are verifiable in experiments and in particle-resolved computer simulations, provide a starting point for the design of new active materials.

  20. Distributed control system for active mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ramos, Luis F.; Williams, Mark R.; Castro, Javier; Cruz, A.; Gonzalez, Juan C.; Mack, Brian; Martin, Carlos; Pescador, German; Sanchez, Vicente; Sosa, Nicolas A.

    1994-06-01

    This paper presents the IAC (Instituto de Astrofisica de Canaries, Spain) proposal of a distributed control system intended for the active support of a 8 m mirror. The system incorporates a large number of compact `smart' force actuators, six force definers, and a mirror support computer (MSC) for interfacing with the telescope control system and for general housekeeping. We propose the use of a network for the interconnection of the actuators, definers and the MSC, which will minimize the physical complexity of the interface between the mirror support system and the MSC. The force actuator control electronics are described in detail, as is the system software architecture of the actuator and the MSC. As the network is a key point for the system, we also detail the evaluation of three candidates, before electing the CAN bus.

  1. Modular System to Enable Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to perform extravehicular activity (EVA), both human and robotic, has been identified as a key component to space missions to support such operations as assembly and maintenance of space system (e.g. construction and maintenance of the International Space Station), and unscheduled activities to repair an element of the transportation and habitation systems that can only be accessed externally and via unpressurized areas. In order to make human transportation beyond lower earth orbit (BLEO) practical, efficiencies must be incorporated into the integrated transportation systems to reduce system mass and operational complexity. Affordability is also a key aspect to be considered in space system development; this could be achieved through commonality, modularity and component reuse. Another key aspect identified for the EVA system was the ability to produce flight worthy hardware quickly to support early missions and near Earth technology demonstrations. This paper details a conceptual architecture for a modular extravehicular activity system (MEVAS) that would meet these stated needs for EVA capability that is affordable, and that could be produced relatively quickly. Operational concepts were developed to elaborate on the defined needs and define the key capabilities, operational and design constraints, and general timelines. The operational concept lead to a high level design concept for a module that interfaces with various space transportation elements and contains the hardware and systems required to support human and telerobotic EVA; the module would not be self-propelled and would rely on an interfacing element for consumable resources. The conceptual architecture was then compared to EVA Systems used in the Shuttle Orbiter, on the International Space Station to develop high level design concepts that incorporate opportunities for cost savings through hardware reuse, and quick production through the use of existing technologies and hardware designs

  2. "Near-bottom sonar mapping along the Eastern Lau Spreading Center and Valu Fa Ridge"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleeper, J. D.; Martinez, F.; Edwards, M.; Dunn, R.; Baker, E. T.

    2009-12-01

    We present results from high resolution sidescan sonar mapping at the Ridge 2000 Lau Integrated Studies Site, a back-arc spreading center in the Southwest Pacific. The survey covered segments of the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) and Valu Fa Ridge (VFR), which exhibit strong contrasts in geologic and geophysical characteristics, including variations in ridge morphology, volcanic and tectonic structures, lava composition and texture, magma production, and spreading rate. The bulk of the data were collected in 2008 aboard R/V Kilo Moana (KM0804), using the deep-towed IMI120 (DSL120A) sonar, with an array of miniature autonomous plume recorder's (MAPR's) tethered to the tow cable to detect hydrothermal plume signatures in the water column. The ELSC survey covered an area ~10 km wide by 100 km long centered on the spreading axis, with tracks spaced ~1 km apart, but as close as ~500 m in the vicinity of the ABE hydrothermal vent field, and also included the Tow Cam and Kilo Moana vent fields. The VFR survey covered a ~5 km wide by 100 km long area with ~700 m-spaced tracks, including the Vai Lili, Mariner, and Tui Malila vent sites. The IMI120 has a resolution of ~1-2 meters, giving the first detailed view of the on- and off-axis structures in the two focus regions. Navigational corrections to the sidescan data were made through feature-matching between the deep-towed data and a lower resolution background ship bathymetry grid, using software developed by the Hawaiian Mapping and Research Group. Background bathymetry and lower resolution (~100 m) sidescan data were compiled from previous cruises on R/V Kilo Moana, and an early-2009 seismic survey on R/V Marcus G. Langseth (L-SCAN). Hydrothermal plume data collected with the MAPR's are coregistered with the deep-towed sidescan data to illuminate correlations between seafloor structures and plume signatures. The axis of the VFR in the south forms a peaked ridge, inflated by abundant melt supply, and draped with

  3. Reconstructing 3-D Ship Motion for Synthetic Aperture Sonar Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, D. R.; Chadwell, C. D.; Sandwell, D.

    2004-12-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of coherent ping-to-ping processing of multibeam sonar data for high-resolution mapping and change detection in the deep ocean. Theoretical calculations suggest that standard multibeam resolution can be improved from 100 m to ~10 m through coherent summation of pings similar to synthetic aperture radar image formation. A requirement for coherent summation of pings is to correct the phase of the return echoes to an accuracy of ~3 cm at a sampling rate of ~10 Hz. In September of 2003, we conducted a seagoing experiment aboard R/V Revelle to test these ideas. Three geodetic-quality GPS receivers were deployed to recover 3-D ship motion to an accuracy of +- 3cm at a 1 Hz sampling rate [Chadwell and Bock, GRL, 2001]. Additionally, inertial navigation data (INS) from fiber-optic gyroscopes and pendulum-type accelerometers were collected at a 10 Hz rate. Independent measurements of ship orientation (yaw, pitch, and roll) from the GPS and INS show agreement to an RMS accuracy of better than 0.1 degree. Because inertial navigation hardware is susceptible to drift, these measurements were combined with the GPS to achieve both high accuracy and high sampling rate. To preserve the short-timescale accuracy of the INS and the long-timescale accuracy of the GPS measurements, time-filtered differences between the GPS and INS were subtracted from the INS integrated linear velocities. An optimal filter length of 25 s was chosen to force the RMS difference between the GPS and the integrated INS to be on the order of the accuracy of the GPS measurements. This analysis provides an upper bound on 3-D ship motion accuracy. Additionally, errors in the attitude can translate to the projections of motion for individual hydrophones. With lever arms on the order of 5m, these errors will likely be ~1mm. Based on these analyses, we expect to achieve the 3-cm accuracy requirement. Using full-resolution hydrophone data collected by a SIMRAD EM/120 echo sounder

  4. Active Annuloplasty System for Mitral Valve Insufficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; Lafont, Pilar; Rada, Ignacio; Jiménez, Antonio; Hernández, José Luis; Lorenzo-Yustos, Héctor; Muñoz-García, Julio

    Active materials are capable of responding in a controlled way to different external physical or chemical stimuli by changing some of their properties. These materials can be used to design and develop sensors, actuators and multifunctional systems with a large number of applications for developing medical devices.

  5. METALS DISTRIBUTIONS IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project developed models to predict the distribution of metals in activated sludge system process streams. The data used to develop the models were obtained through extended pilot studies from a previous project. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the effects of wa...

  6. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

  7. Design of nutrient removal activated sludge systems.

    PubMed

    Manga, J; Ferrer, J; Seco, A; Garcia-Usach, F

    2003-01-01

    A mechanistic mathematical model for nutrient and organic matter removal was used to describe the behavior of a nitrification denitrification enhanced biological phosphorus removal (NDEBPR) system. This model was implemented in a user-friendly software DESASS (design and simulation of activated sludge systems). A 484-L pilot plant was operated to verify the model results. The pilot plant was operated for three years over three different sludge ages. The validity of the model was confirmed with data from the pilot plant. Also, the utility of DESASS as a valuable tool for designing NDEBPR systems was confirmed. PMID:12906279

  8. Targeted activation in deterministic and stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhower, Bryan; Mezić, Igor

    2010-02-01

    Metastable escape is ubiquitous in many physical systems and is becoming a concern in engineering design as these designs (e.g., swarms of vehicles, coupled building energetics, nanoengineering, etc.) become more inspired by dynamics of biological, molecular and other natural systems. In light of this, we study a chain of coupled bistable oscillators which has two global conformations and we investigate how specialized or targeted disturbance is funneled in an inverse energy cascade and ultimately influences the transition process between the conformations. We derive a multiphase averaged approximation to these dynamics which illustrates the influence of actions in modal coordinates on the coarse behavior of this process. An activation condition that predicts how the disturbance influences the rate of transition is then derived. The prediction tools are derived for deterministic dynamics and we also present analogous behavior in the stochastic setting and show a divergence from Kramers activation behavior under targeted activation conditions.

  9. High resolution underwater fiber optic threat detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Alexander; Hermesh, Shalmon; Durets, Eugene; Kempen, Lothar U.

    2006-10-01

    Current underwater protection systems are complex expensive devices consisting of multiple electronic sensing elements. The detection and identification of divers and small submerged watercraft requires very high image resolution. The high price of an array of conventional piezoelectric transducers and associated electronic components makes this solution feasible for localized implementations, but the protection of large stretches of coastline requires a different approach. We present a novel multichannel sonar design that augments current active sonar transducers with a passive fiber-optic multichannel acoustic emission sensing array. The system provides continuous monitoring of the acoustic wave reflections emitted by a single projector, yielding information about the size and shape of approaching objects. A novel fiber hydrophone enclosure is utilized to dramatically enhance the sensor response to the sonar frequency, while suppressing out-of-band sound sources and noise. The ability of a fiber hydrophone to respond to acoustic emissions is based on established fiber Bragg grating sensing techniques. In this approach, the energy of an acoustic wave is converted into the modulation of the in-fiber optical transducer's optical properties. The obtained results demonstrate significant response of the designed fiber optic hydrophone to the incident acoustic wave over the frequency domain from 1-80 kHz. Our approach allows selective tuning of the sensor to a particular acoustic frequency, as well as potential extension of the spectral response to 300- 400kHz.2

  10. Green Bank Telescope active surface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasse, Richard J.

    1998-05-01

    During the design phase of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), various means of providing an accurate surface on a large aperture paraboloid, were considered. Automated jacks supporting the primary reflector were selected as the appropriate technology since they promised greater performance and potentially lower costs than a homologous or carbon fiber design, and had certain advantages over an active secondary. The design of the active surface has presented many challenges. Since the actuators are mounted on a tipping structure, it was required that they support a significant side-load. Such devices were not readily available commercially so they had to be developed. Additional actuator requirements include low backlash, repeatable positioning, and an operational life of at least 230 years. Similarly, no control system capable of controlling the 2209 actuators was commercially available. Again a prime requirement was reliability. Maintaining was also a very important consideration. The system architecture is tree-like. An active surface 'master-computer' controls interaction with the telescope control system, and controls ancillary equipment such as power supplies and temperature monitors. Two slave computers interface with the master- computer, and each closes approximately 1100 position loops. For simplicity, the servo is an 'on/off' type, yet achieves a positioning resolution of 25 microns. Each slave computer interfaces with 4 VME I/O cards, which in turn communicate with 140 control modules. The control modules read out the positions of the actuators every 0.1 sec and control the actuators' DC motors. Initial control of the active surface will be based on an elevation dependant structural model. Later, the model will be improved by holographic observations.Surface accuracy will be improved further by using laser ranging system which will actively measure the surface figure. Several tests have been conducted to assure that the system will perform as desired when

  11. Lava Morphology Classification of a Fast-Spreading Ridge Using Deep-Towed Sonar Data: East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J.; White, S.

    2005-05-01

    Classification of lava morphology on a regional scale contributes to the understanding of the distribution and extent of lava flows at a mid-ocean ridge. Seafloor classification is essential to understand the regional undersea environment at midocean ridges. In this study, the development of a classification scheme is found to identify and extract textural patterns of different lava morphologies along the East Pacific Rise using DSL-120 side-scan and ARGO camera imagery. Application of an accurate image classification technique to side-scan sonar allows us to expand upon the locally available visual ground reference data to make the first comprehensive regional maps of small-scale lava morphology present at a mid-ocean ridge. The submarine lava morphologies focused upon in this study; sheet flows, lobate flows, and pillow flows; have unique textures. Several algorithms were applied to the sonar backscatter intensity images to produce multiple textural image layers useful in distinguishing the different lava morphologies. The intensity and spatially enhanced images were then combined and applied to a hybrid classification technique. The hybrid classification involves two integrated classifiers, a rule-based expert system classifier and a machine learning classifier. The complementary capabilities of the two integrated classifiers provided a higher accuracy of regional seafloor classification compared to using either classifier alone. Once trained, the hybrid classifier can then be applied to classify neighboring images with relative ease. This classification technique has been used to map the lava morphology distribution and infer spatial variability of lava effusion rates along two segments of the East Pacific Rise, 17 deg S and 9 deg N. Future use of this technique may also be useful for attaining temporal information. Repeated documentation of morphology classification in this dynamic environment can be compared to detect regional seafloor change.

  12. Active gated imaging in driver assistance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauer, Yoav

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we shall present the active gated imaging system (AGIS) in relation to the automotive field. AGIS is based on a fast-gated camera and pulsed illuminator, synchronized in the time domain to record images of a certain range of interest. A dedicated gated CMOS imager sensor and near infra-red (NIR) pulsed laser illuminator, is presented in this paper to provide active gated technology. In recent years, we have developed these key components and learned the system parameters, which are most beneficial to nighttime (in all weather conditions) driving in terms of field of view, illumination profile, resolution, and processing power. We shall present our approach of a camera-based advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) named BrightEye™, which makes use of the AGIS technology in the automotive field.

  13. Case Study of Using Resources about Sonar Operators To Teach Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mclellan, Hilary

    1993-01-01

    Describes a fictional account of the work of a submarine sonar operator ("The Hunt for Red October" by Tom Clancy) that captures the practitioner in a complex real-world work context featuring sophisticated electronic technologies. Describes how fiction can be adapted for and used as a basis for instructional design students to explore problem…

  14. 28. SONAR CONTROL ROOM FORWARD LOOKING AFT SHOWING AN/SQS23G ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. SONAR CONTROL ROOM - FORWARD LOOKING AFT SHOWING AN/SQS-23G DETECTING-RANGING SET, MARK & CONTROL PANEL, CAN-55134 RECORDER, SPEED INDICATOR, VARIOUS ALARMS AND INTERNAL COMMUNICATION CIRCUITS. - U.S.S. HORNET, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Sinclair Inlet, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  15. Bounding the error on bottom estimation for multi-angle swath bathymetry sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, Geoff K.; Bird, John S.

    2005-04-01

    With the recent introduction of multi-angle swath bathymetry (MASB) sonar to the commercial marketplace (e.g., Benthos Inc., C3D sonar, 2004), additions must be made to the current sonar lexicon. The correct interpretation of measurements made with MASB sonar, which uses filled transducer arrays to compute angle-of-arrival information (AOA) from backscattered signal, is essential not only for mapping, but for applications such as statistical bottom classification. In this paper it is shown that aside from uncorrelated channel to channel noise, there exists a tradeoff between effects that govern the error bounds on bottom estimation for surfaces having shallow grazing angle and surfaces distributed along a radial arc centered at the transducer. In the first case, as the bottom aligns with the radial direction to the receiver, footprint shift and shallow grazing angle effects dominate the uncertainty in physical bottom position (surface aligns along a single AOA). Alternatively, if signal from a radial arc arrives, a single AOA is usually estimated (not necessarily at the average location of the surface). Through theoretical treatment, simulation, and field measurements, the aforementioned factors affecting MASB bottom mapping are examined. [Work supported by NSERC.

  16. Sonar signal feature extraction for target recognition in range-dependent environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomatam, Vikram T.; Loughlin, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    In previous work, we have given a method for obtaining propagation invariant features for classification of underwater objects from their sonar backscatter in dispersive but rangG'-independent environments. In this paper we consider the derivation of invariant features for classification in range­ dependent environments, based on the parabolic equation.

  17. EFFECTS OF GREEN MACROALGAE ON CLASSIFICATION OF SEAGRASS IN SIDE SCAN SONAR IMAGERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    High resolution maps of seagrass beds are useful for monitoring estuarine condition, managing fish habitats, and modeling estuarine processes. Side scan sonar (SSS) is one method for producing spatially accurate seagrass maps, although it has not been used widely. Our team rece...

  18. Modeling effectiveness of gradual increases in source level to mitigate effects of sonar on marine mammals.

    PubMed

    Von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Miller, Patrick J O; Tyack, Peter L; Ainslie, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    Ramp-up or soft-start procedures (i.e., gradual increase in the source level) are used to mitigate the effect of sonar sound on marine mammals, although no one to date has tested whether ramp-up procedures are effective at reducing the effect of sound on marine mammals. We investigated the effectiveness of ramp-up procedures in reducing the area within which changes in hearing thresholds can occur. We modeled the level of sound killer whales (Orcinus orca) were exposed to from a generic sonar operation preceded by different ramp-up schemes. In our model, ramp-up procedures reduced the risk of killer whales receiving sounds of sufficient intensity to affect their hearing. The effectiveness of the ramp-up procedure depended strongly on the assumed response threshold and differed with ramp-up duration, although extending the duration of the ramp up beyond 5 min did not add much to its predicted mitigating effect. The main factors that limited effectiveness of ramp up in a typical antisubmarine warfare scenario were high source level, rapid moving sonar source, and long silences between consecutive sonar transmissions. Our exposure modeling approach can be used to evaluate and optimize mitigation procedures. PMID:24471782

  19. A method to simulate synthetic aperture sonar images with parameterized autocorrelation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, J. Tory; Slatton, K. Clint; Principe, Jose

    2010-04-01

    An approach to simulate synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) images with known autocorrelation functions (ACF) and single-point statistics is presented. ACF models for generating textures with and without periodicities are defined and explained. Simulated textures of these models are compared visually with real SAS image textures. Distortion and degradation of the synthetic textures are examined for various simulation parameter choices.

  20. Final report of DOE project "Detection, Localization and Diagnosis of Performance Problems Using PerfSONAR"

    SciTech Connect

    Dovrolis, Konstantinos

    2014-04-15

    We present the development of a middleware service, called Pythia, that is able to detect, localize, and diagnose performance problems in the network paths that interconnect research sites that are of interest to DOE. The proposed service can analyze perfSONAR data collected from all participating sites.

  1. Approach to the side-scan sonar data storage based on spatial database technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Liu, Renyi; Yin, Tianhe; Liu, Nan

    2009-10-01

    Side-scan sonar is a remote sensing technology for submarine geological and geomorphological information detection, which provides acoustic imaging of the bottom at rates of up to several thousand square kilometers a day. How to manage so abundant and tremendous data has become a new problem, urgently needs to be resolved. As side-scan sonar image, also known as sonograph has an inherent geometric distortion which is so-called slant-range effect. Otherwise, the original side-scan sonar image is characterized as an order of scanning lines, without geographical position integrity and scalability. All this requirements and factors are considered and the correction of slant range distortions is outlined. This approach provides a management mechanism of raster catalog for series of sonar images of a surveying zone. Against the efficiency problem of massive image data storage, a spatial database engine is improved from such aspects as tile size setting, image resampling also called pyramid creation and spatial index establishment and so on, so as to enhance performance and improve access rate. The fact is that it archived an ideal response time and is proved to be more effective.

  2. Modular System to Enable Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to perform extravehicular activity (EVA), both human and robotic, has been identified as a key component to space missions to support such operations as assembly and maintenance of space systems (e.g. construction and maintenance of the International Space Station), and unscheduled activities to repair an element of the transportation and habitation systems that can only be accessed externally and via unpressurized areas. In order to make human transportation beyond lower Earth orbit (LEO) practical, efficiencies must be incorporated into the integrated transportation systems to reduce system mass and operational complexity. Affordability is also a key aspect to be considered in space system development; this could be achieved through commonality, modularity and component reuse. Another key aspect identified for the EVA system was the ability to produce flight worthy hardware quickly to support early missions and near Earth technology demonstrations. This paper details a conceptual architecture for a modular EVA system that would meet these stated needs for EVA capability that is affordable, and that could be produced relatively quickly. Operational concepts were developed to elaborate on the defined needs, and to define the key capabilities, operational and design constraints, and general timelines. The operational concept lead to a high level design concept for a module that interfaces with various space transportation elements and contains the hardware and systems required to support human and telerobotic EVA; the module would not be self-propelled and would rely on an interfacing element for consumable resources. The conceptual architecture was then compared to EVA Systems used in the Space Shuttle Orbiter, on the International Space Station to develop high level design concepts that incorporate opportunities for cost savings through hardware reuse, and quick production through the use of existing technologies and hardware designs. An upgrade option

  3. Making Accurate Topographic Maps of the Schoolyard Using Ideas and Techniques Learned and Adapted from Multi-beam Sonar Mapping of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, S. I.; Roberts, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Having participated in a University of Rhode Island Project Armada expedition to join the University of New Hampshire Center for Coastal and Oceanographic Studies in making multi-beam sonar contour maps of the Arctic Ocean floor, I was able to bring the principles learned from this trip to my earth science high school students and create a project in our "mapping the earth" unit. Students learn basic surveying techniques and create authentic, accurately detailed topographic maps of the schoolyard. Models of their maps are then constructed of either Styrofoam or wood which enables them to make the transition from a 2-dimensional map to a 3-dimensional representation. Even though our maps are created using sticks, line levels, compasses and GPS, the scientific concepts of using location and elevation data to draw contour lines are identical to those used in underwater mapping. Once the students understand the science in mapping and creating contour maps to scale on graph paper by hand, they are able to easily relate this knowledge to what I was doing onboard ship using multi-beam sonar and computer mapping programs. We would like to share with you the lab and techniques that we have developed to make this activity possible with minimal materials and simple technology. As a background extension, it is also possible to replicate sonar measurements using an aquarium, food coloring, and a surface grid to map the topography of a teacher created landscape on the aquarium bottom. Earth Science students using simple tools to accurately map the topography of the school grounds

  4. Optimal predator risk assessment by the sonar-jamming arctiine moth Bertholdia trigona.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Aaron J; Wagner, Ryan D; Conner, William E

    2013-01-01

    Nearly all animals face a tradeoff between seeking food and mates and avoiding predation. Optimal escape theory holds that an animal confronted with a predator should only flee when benefits of flight (increased survival) outweigh the costs (energetic costs, lost foraging time, etc.). We propose a model for prey risk assessment based on the predator's stage of attack. Risk level should increase rapidly from when the predator detects the prey to when it commits to the attack. We tested this hypothesis using a predator--the echolocating bat--whose active biosonar reveals its stage of attack. We used a prey defense--clicking used for sonar jamming by the tiger moth Bertholdia trigona--that can be readily studied in the field and laboratory and is enacted simultaneously with evasive flight. We predicted that prey employ defenses soon after being detected and targeted, and that prey defensive thresholds discriminate between legitimate predatory threats and false threats where a nearby prey is attacked. Laboratory and field experiments using playbacks of ultrasound signals and naturally behaving bats, respectively, confirmed our predictions. Moths clicked soon after bats detected and targeted them. Also, B. trigona clicking thresholds closely matched predicted optimal thresholds for discriminating legitimate and false predator threats for bats using search and approach phase echolocation--the period when bats are searching for and assessing prey. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative study to correlate the sensory stimuli that trigger defensive behaviors with measurements of signals provided by predators during natural attacks in the field. We propose theoretical models for explaining prey risk assessment depending on the availability of cues that reveal a predator's stage of attack. PMID:23671686

  5. Optimal Predator Risk Assessment by the Sonar-Jamming Arctiine Moth Bertholdia trigona

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Aaron J.; Wagner, Ryan D.; Conner, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly all animals face a tradeoff between seeking food and mates and avoiding predation. Optimal escape theory holds that an animal confronted with a predator should only flee when benefits of flight (increased survival) outweigh the costs (energetic costs, lost foraging time, etc.). We propose a model for prey risk assessment based on the predator's stage of attack. Risk level should increase rapidly from when the predator detects the prey to when it commits to the attack. We tested this hypothesis using a predator – the echolocating bat – whose active biosonar reveals its stage of attack. We used a prey defense – clicking used for sonar jamming by the tiger moth Bertholdia trigona– that can be readily studied in the field and laboratory and is enacted simultaneously with evasive flight. We predicted that prey employ defenses soon after being detected and targeted, and that prey defensive thresholds discriminate between legitimate predatory threats and false threats where a nearby prey is attacked. Laboratory and field experiments using playbacks of ultrasound signals and naturally behaving bats, respectively, confirmed our predictions. Moths clicked soon after bats detected and targeted them. Also, B. trigona clicking thresholds closely matched predicted optimal thresholds for discriminating legitimate and false predator threats for bats using search and approach phase echolocation – the period when bats are searching for and assessing prey. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative study to correlate the sensory stimuli that trigger defensive behaviors with measurements of signals provided by predators during natural attacks in the field. We propose theoretical models for explaining prey risk assessment depending on the availability of cues that reveal a predator's stage of attack. PMID:23671686

  6. Optically Active Porphyrin and Phthalocyanine Systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Kobayashi, Nagao

    2016-05-25

    This review highlights and summarizes various optically active porphyrin and phthalocyanine molecules prepared using a wide range of structural modification methods to improve the design of novel structures and their applications. The induced chirality of some illustrative achiral bis-porphyrins with a chiral guest molecule is introduced because these systems are ideal for the identification and separation of chiral biologically active substrates. In addition, the relationship between CD signal and the absolute configuration of the molecule is analyzed through an analysis of the results of molecular modeling calculations. Possible future research directions are also discussed. PMID:27186902

  7. Applications of Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory in the analysis of human-motion Doppler sonar grams.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marshall; Sabatier, James M

    2010-11-01

    Observed human-gait features in Doppler sonar grams are explained by using the Boulic-Thalmann (BT) model to predict joint angle time histories and the temporal displacements of the body center of mass. Body segments are represented as ellipsoids. Temporally dependent velocities at the proximal and distal end of key body segments are determined from BT. Doppler sonar grams are computed by mapping velocity-time dependent spectral acoustic-cross sections for the body segments onto time-velocity space, mimicking the Short Time Fourier Transform used in the Doppler sonar processing. Comparisons to measured data indicate that dominant returns come from trunk, thigh and lower leg. PMID:21110534

  8. An adaptively generated feature set for low-resolution multifrequency sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, Rodolfo; Arrieta, Lisa L.; Stack, Jason R.

    2006-05-01

    Many small Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs) currently utilize inexpensive, low resolution sonars that are either mechanically or electronically steered as their main sensors. These sonars do not provide high quality images and are quite dissimilar from the broad area search sonars that will most likely be the source of the localization data given to the UUV in a reacquisition scenario. Therefore, the acoustic data returned by the UUV in its attempt to reacquire the target will look quite different from the original wide area image. The problem then becomes how to determine that the UUV is looking at the same object. Our approach is to exploit the maneuverability of the UUV and currently unused information in the echoes returned from these Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) sonars in order to classify a presumptive target as an object of interest. The approach hinges on the ability of the UUV to maneuver around the target in order to insonify the target at different frequencies of insonification, ranges, and aspects. We show how this approach would allow the UUV to extract a feature set derived from the inversion of simple physics-based models. These models predict echo time-of-arrival and inversion of these models using the echo data allows effective classification based on estimated surface and bulk material properties. We have simulated UUV maneuvers by positioning targets at different ranges and aspects to the sonar and have then interrogated the target at different frequencies. The properties that have been extracted include longitudinal, and shear speeds of the bulk, as well as longitudinal speed, Rayleigh speed, and density of the surface. The material properties we have extracted using this approach match the tabulated material values within 8%. We also show that only a few material properties are required to effectively segregate many classes of materials.

  9. Diversified transmission multichannel detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Tournois, P.; Engelhard, P.

    1984-07-03

    A detection system for imaging by sonar or radar signals. The system associates diversified transmissions with an interferometric base. This base provides an angular channel formation means and each signal formed in this way is processed by matched filtering in a circuit containing copy signals characterizing the space coloring obtained by the diversified transmission means. The invention is particularly applicable to side or front looking detection sonars.

  10. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  11. Advanced extravehicular activity systems requirements definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A study to define the requirements for advanced extravehicular activities (AEVA) was conducted. The purpose of the study was to develop an understanding of the EVA technology requirements and to map a pathway from existing or developing technologies to an AEVA system capable of supporting long-duration missions on the lunar surface. The parameters of an AEVA system which must sustain the crewmembers and permit productive work for long periods in the lunar environment were examined. A design reference mission (DRM) was formulated and used as a tool to develop and analyze the EVA systems technology aspects. Many operational and infrastructure design issues which have a significant influence on the EVA system are identified.

  12. Active State Model for Autonomous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Han; Chien, Steve; Zak, Michail; James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Fisher, Forest

    2003-01-01

    The concept of the active state model (ASM) is an architecture for the development of advanced integrated fault-detection-and-isolation (FDI) systems for robotic land vehicles, pilotless aircraft, exploratory spacecraft, or other complex engineering systems that will be capable of autonomous operation. An FDI system based on the ASM concept would not only provide traditional diagnostic capabilities, but also integrate the FDI system under a unified framework and provide mechanism for sharing of information between FDI subsystems to fully assess the overall health of the system. The ASM concept begins with definitions borrowed from psychology, wherein a system is regarded as active when it possesses self-image, self-awareness, and an ability to make decisions itself, such that it is able to perform purposeful motions and other transitions with some degree of autonomy from the environment. For an engineering system, self-image would manifest itself as the ability to determine nominal values of sensor data by use of a mathematical model of itself, and selfawareness would manifest itself as the ability to relate sensor data to their nominal values. The ASM for such a system may start with the closed-loop control dynamics that describe the evolution of state variables. As soon as this model was supplemented with nominal values of sensor data, it would possess self-image. The ability to process the current sensor data and compare them with the nominal values would represent self-awareness. On the basis of self-image and self-awareness, the ASM provides the capability for self-identification, detection of abnormalities, and self-diagnosis.

  13. Research on an Active Seat Belt System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Takeshi

    In a car crash, permanent injury can be avoided if deformation of an occupant's rib cage is maintained within the allowable value. In order to realize this condition, the occupant's seat belt tension must be instantaneously adjusted by a feedback control system. In this study, a seat belt tension control system based on the active shock control system is proposed. The semi-active control law used is derived from the sliding mode control method. One advantage of this proposed system is that it does not require a large power actuator because the seat belt tension is controlled by a brake mechanism. The effectiveness is confirmed by numerical simulation using general parameters of a human thorax and a passenger car in a collision scenario with a wall at a velocity of 100 km/h. The feasibility is then confirmed with a control experiment using a scale model of about 1/10 scale. The relative displacement of the thorax model approaches the allowable value smoothly along the control reference and settles near this value. Thus, the proposed seat belt tension control system design is established.

  14. Multipurpose active/passive motion compensation system

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.A.; Clements, R.E.; Davenport, M.R.

    1984-05-01

    A microprocessor-controlled active/passive motion compensation system has been developed for deploying a variety of geotechnical in-situ testing devices with mobile drilling rigs from low-cost service vessels. The light-weight rotary heave compensator incorporates a hydraulic motor as the compensator actuator and a servo-controlled closed loop pump to reduce the air storage and power requirements. Unique features of the system are the use of inertial sensors to measure three components of boat motion, the ability to run the system in active/passive or passive modes, and the ability to automatically lower the drillstring at a constant velocity while maintaining motion compensation. Quantitative measurements made during sea trials offshore California yielded motion compensation accuracy approaching 98 percent which is much better than the compensation achieved with passive systems. Results are presented from offshore in-situ testing with a cone penetrometer, a vane shear device, and a suspension PS logger. The system can also be used for other offshore applications.

  15. Active laser system for sea ice control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtikhiev, Nickolay N.; Gaponov, Alexandr E.; Kuluba, Yury N.; Matous, Vladislav I.; Radominov, Oleg E.; Tuzikov, Vladimir Z.; Vargaftic, Vasiliy N.

    1997-01-01

    The airborne systems are used for complex investigations of coastline very successfully, for example it can be used to measure the depth of the sea, to discover the reefs and so on. Such information may be used in navigation too. The specific conditions of navigation in the North and Pole seas defines the necessity of exact knowledge about the ice cracks in order to find the possible direction of the ship movement. The active optical system, working in the near IR region, has many advantages before the passive one, especially if it is necessary to work during the polar night and at bad weather conditions. In this article we discuss the demands to the laser active airborne systems, that given the accurate picture of the ice with high resolution in the daytime and nighttime conditions. Such system based on the laser, mechanical scanner and avalanche photodiode is very compact, reliable and informative. The picture of the ice surface can be shown on the TV monitor, can be written to the memory and can be delivered to the processing center by the radiochannel. The experimental results are shown together with results of this system probing in the conditions of the North Pole Ocean.

  16. PCM Passive Cooling System Containing Active Subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanding, David E.; Bass, David I.

    2005-01-01

    A multistage system has been proposed for cooling a circulating fluid that is subject to intermittent intense heating. The system would be both flexible and redundant in that it could operate in a basic passive mode, either sequentially or simultaneously with operation of a first, active cooling subsystem, and either sequentially or simultaneously with a second cooling subsystem that could be active, passive, or a combination of both. This flexibility and redundancy, in combination with the passive nature of at least one of the modes of operation, would make the system more reliable, relative to a conventional cooling system. The system would include a tube-in-shell heat exchanger, within which the space between the tubes would be filled with a phase-change material (PCM). The circulating hot fluid would flow along the tubes in the heat exchanger. In the basic passive mode of operation, heat would be conducted from the hot fluid into the PCM, wherein the heat would be stored temporarily by virtue of the phase change.

  17. Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Elmiligui, Alaa A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active pylon noise control system for an aircraft includes a pylon structure connecting an engine system with an airframe surface of the aircraft and having at least one aperture to supply a gas or fluid therethrough, an intake portion attached to the pylon structure to intake a gas or fluid, a regulator connected with the intake portion via a plurality of pipes, to regulate a pressure of the gas or fluid, a plenum chamber formed within the pylon structure and connected with the regulator, and configured to receive the gas or fluid as regulated by the regulator, and a plurality of injectors in communication with the plenum chamber to actively inject the gas or fluid through the plurality of apertures of the pylon structure.

  18. Spontaneous activity in the developing auditory system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Han Chin; Bergles, Dwight E

    2015-07-01

    Spontaneous electrical activity is a common feature of sensory systems during early development. This sensory-independent neuronal activity has been implicated in promoting their survival and maturation, as well as growth and refinement of their projections to yield circuits that can rapidly extract information about the external world. Periodic bursts of action potentials occur in auditory neurons of mammals before hearing onset. This activity is induced by inner hair cells (IHCs) within the developing cochlea, which establish functional connections with spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) several weeks before they are capable of detecting external sounds. During this pre-hearing period, IHCs fire periodic bursts of Ca(2+) action potentials that excite SGNs, triggering brief but intense periods of activity that pass through auditory centers of the brain. Although spontaneous activity requires input from IHCs, there is ongoing debate about whether IHCs are intrinsically active and their firing periodically interrupted by external inhibitory input (IHC-inhibition model), or are intrinsically silent and their firing periodically promoted by an external excitatory stimulus (IHC-excitation model). There is accumulating evidence that inner supporting cells in Kölliker's organ spontaneously release ATP during this time, which can induce bursts of Ca(2+) spikes in IHCs that recapitulate many features of auditory neuron activity observed in vivo. Nevertheless, the role of supporting cells in this process remains to be established in vivo. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for generating IHC activity in the developing cochlea will help reveal how these events contribute to the maturation of nascent auditory circuits. PMID:25296716

  19. Voice activity detection for speaker verification systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowski, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Complex algorithm for speech activity detection was presented in this article. It is based on speech enhancement, features extraction and final detection algorithm. The first one was published in ETSI standard as a module of "Advanced front-end feature extraction algorithm" in distributed speech recognition system. It consists of two main parts, noise estimatiom and Wiener filtering. For the final detection modified linear prediction coefficients and spectral entropy features are extracted form denoised signal.

  20. Seafloor geology at the eastern intersection of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the Kane transform (23 deg 40 sec N): A new perspective from side-scan sonar image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dengliang

    Using Scripps Deep-Tow system, approximately 600 kmsp2 of side-scan sonar data were collected at the eastern Kane ridge-transform intersection (RTI) (MARK area, 23sp°40sp' N). These new sonar data were merged with previously-obtained geologic and SeaBeam bathymetric data, and provide new perspectives on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge extensional tectonics, volcanism, and surficial processes. Visual interpretation of side-scan sonar images, calibrated by ground geologic observations, indicates that different backscatter patterns are associated with distinctive seafloor geologic features. A distinctive "checkerboard" backscatter pattern represents gabbroic bedrock exposed on the western rift valley wall, whereas a different hummocky backscatter pattern corresponds to pillow basalt terranes within the rift valley. The contact between gabbroic outcrops and pillow basalt terranes is more clearly defined than previously possible. Arcuate reflectors suggest landslides, whereas linear reflectors indicate fault-line scarps or constructional volcanic ridges. These different geologic features formed in association with mechanical extension, magmatic construction, and surficial processes in the accretionary history of the oceanic crust at this RTI. Computer-aided side-scan sonar image analysis provides a means of automating the translation of side-scan sonar images into geologic maps. Over 50% of the western rift valley wall was mapped as gabbroic outcrops. In contrast, 90% of the rift valley floor is covered by basalts. This texture-based image analytical technique aids in the interpretation of side-scan sonar images and can be applicable to the digital image analysis in other areas. Mylonitic metagabbros, sampled from the west rift valley wall, reveal complex deformation history of a major oceanic "core complex" from a grain-scale perspective. The crystal-plastic deformation fabric was overprinted by cataclastic deformation fabrics, indicating retrogressive deformation history as

  1. Light and immune systems: activation of immunological activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zheng; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2006-02-01

    Light has been used to treat diseases for hundreds of years. Convenient and powerful light sources such as lasers make photomedicine a major branch in diseases treatment and detection. Originally, light was often used for local treatment, using photomechanical, photochemical, photothermal reactions and photomodulation as the major mechanisms. More and more investigators have become interested in the systemic effects of light, particularly in its effects on immune systems. Much work has been done to activate and/or enhance the host immune system to combat cancer, either using light as a direct tool or as an adjuvant method. Light has long been used for assisting disease detection and diagnosis. Advances in light technology have made photo-diagnostics ever more precise spatially and temporally. Many techniques facilitate observation of bio-molecule interactions and other biological processes at the cellular level, hence providing opportunities to detect and monitor immune activities. This manuscript will review recent photo-immunological research in treatment of cancer. The recent development of combination therapies involving lasers will be presented. Specifically, the results of cancer treatment using laser photothermal interaction, either with or without additional immunological stimulation will be discussed. The immunological effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT), and of its combination with immunotherapy in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Much interest has been recently concentrated in the immunological responses after laser treatment. Such responses at cellular and molecular levels will be discussed. The effect of these treatment modalities on the distant metastases also showed promise of light induced antitumor immunity. The combination therapy and induced immunological responses appear to be the key for long-term control of tumors.

  2. Measurement of Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics Using Multibeam Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, S. M.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Malzone, C.; Keevil, G.

    2007-12-01

    Multibeam Echo-Sounder (MBES) sonar systems have developed rapidly over recent decades and are now routinely deployed to provide high-resolution object detection and bathymetric surveying in a range of aquatic environments, from the deep-sea to lakes and rivers. MBES systems were developed for bottom-detection and measurement of bed morphology, and have previously discarded the received acoustic back-scatter from the water column after the bottom-detection algorithms have been performed. However, modern data handling and storage technologies have facilitated the logging of this large quantity of acoustic intensity and phase information, and commercial MBES systems are now available that provide this capability. This paper develops a novel methodology to exploit this logging capability to quantify the concentration and dynamics of suspended sediment within the water column. This development provides a multi-purpose tool for the holistic surveying of sediment transport by imaging suspended sediment concentration, associated coherent flow structures and providing concurrent high-resolution bathymetry. This paper presents methods of data analysis and results obtained from deployment of the RESON SeaBat 8125 and 7125 MBES systems in the field and during testing in a controlled environment. The field results were obtained from sites on the Paraná river, Argentina, with the aim of examining the dynamics of suspended sediment transport over dune bedforms and in the region of flow mixing between large rivers of significantly different suspended sediment concentration. Controlled testing was performed in a former ship dry-dock by creating flows density currents of known suspended sediment concentration with different types and mixes of sediment. The results demonstrate the capability of the RESON MBES systems to successfully resolve the contrast in suspended sediment concentration, and hence the spatio-temporal monitoring of the associated coherent flow structures. The

  3. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  4. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard T. (Inventor); Book, Michael L. (Inventor); Bryan, Thomas C. (Inventor); Bell, Joseph L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprising at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  5. Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Richard (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A Global Positioning System Synchronized Active Light Autonomous Docking System (GPSSALADS) for automatically docking a chase vehicle with a target vehicle comprises at least one active light emitting target which is operatively attached to the target vehicle. The target includes a three-dimensional array of concomitantly flashing lights which flash at a controlled common frequency. The GPSSALADS further comprises a visual tracking sensor operatively attached to the chase vehicle for detecting and tracking the target vehicle. Its performance is synchronized with the flash frequency of the lights by a synchronization means which is comprised of first and second internal clocks operatively connected to the active light target and visual tracking sensor, respectively, for providing timing control signals thereto, respectively. The synchronization means further includes first and second Global Positioning System receivers operatively connected to the first and second internal clocks, respectively, for repeatedly providing simultaneous synchronization pulses to the internal clocks, respectively. In addition, the GPSSALADS includes a docking process controller means which is operatively attached to the chase vehicle and is responsive to the visual tracking sensor for producing commands for the guidance and propulsion system of the chase vehicle.

  6. Dislocation boundaries and active slip systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J.A.; Hansen, N.

    1995-11-01

    Part of the dislocations which have participated in the plastic deformation of a polycrystalline metal are stored in dislocation boundaries in a two- or three-dimensional arrangement. The dislocation in such boundaries can be analyzed by determining the misorientation between neighboring crystallites and the boundary orientation. Information about the dislocations in the boundaries can also be obtained by an analysis of active slip systems based on the crystallite orientation and the imposed stress or strain state in combination with appropriate constraint conditions. In the present paper an analysis of the boundary dislocation structure and of the slip systems has been conducted for pure aluminium cold-rolled to a von Mises strain of 0.41. The results show that a substantial majority of dislocations in different types of dislocation boundaries are from the primary and conjugate slip system in the adjoining crystallites. A basis is therefore provided for integrating deformation structure observations with plastic deformation behavior.

  7. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) 101: Constellation EVA Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Nicole C.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Systems is shown. The topics include: 1) Why do we need space suits? 2) Protection From the Environment; 3) Primary Life Support System (PLSS); 4) Thermal Control; 5) Communications; 6) Helmet and Extravehicular Visor Assy; 7) Hard Upper Torso (HUT) and Arm Assy; 8) Display and Controls Module (DCM); 9) Gloves; 10) Lower Torso Assembly (LTA); 11) What Size Do You Need?; 12) Boot and Sizing Insert; 13) Boot Heel Clip and Foot Restraint; 14) Advanced and Crew Escape Suit; 15) Nominal & Off-Nominal Landing; 16) Gemini Program (mid-1960s); 17) Apollo EVA on Service Module; 18) A Bold Vision for Space Exploration, Authorized by Congress; 19) EVA System Missions; 20) Configurations; 21) Reduced Gravity Program; and 22) Other Opportunities.

  8. Exploration and discovery in Yellowstone Lake: Results from high-resolution sonar imaging, seismic reflection profiling, and submersible studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Lovalvo, D.A.; Johnson, S.Y.; Stephenson, W.J.; Pierce, K.L.; Harlan, S.S.; Finn, C.A.; Lee, G.; Webring, M.; Schulze, B.; Duhn, J.; Sweeney, R.; Balistrieri, L.

    2003-01-01

    Discoveries from multi-beam sonar mapping and seismic reflection surveys of the northern, central, and West Thumb basins of Yellowstone Lake provide new insight into the extent of post-collapse volcanism and active hydrothermal processes occurring in a large lake environment above a large magma chamber. Yellowstone Lake has an irregular bottom covered with dozens of features directly related to hydrothermal, tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary processes. Detailed bathymetric, seismic reflection, and magnetic evidence reveals that rhyolitic lava flows underlie much of Yellowstone Lake and exert fundamental control on lake bathymetry and localization of hydrothermal activity. Many previously unknown features have been identified and include over 250 hydrothermal vents, several very large (>500 m diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters, many small hydrothermal vent craters (???1-200 m diameter), domed lacustrine sediments related to hydrothermal activity, elongate fissures cutting post-glacial sediments, siliceous hydrothermal spire structures, sublacustrine landslide deposits, submerged former shorelines, and a recently active graben. Sampling and observations with a submersible remotely operated vehicle confirm and extend our understanding of the identified features. Faults, fissures, hydrothermally inflated domal structures, hydrothermal explosion craters, and sublacustrine landslides constitute potentially significant geologic hazards. Toxic elements derived from hydrothermal processes also may significantly affect the Yellowstone ecosystem. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  9. Exploration and discovery in Yellowstone Lake: results from high-resolution sonar imaging, seismic reflection profiling, and submersible studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, L. A.; Shanks, W. C.; Lovalvo, D. A.; Johnson, S. Y.; Stephenson, W. J.; Pierce, K. L.; Harlan, S. S.; Finn, C. A.; Lee, G.; Webring, M.; Schulze, B.; Dühn, J.; Sweeney, R.; Balistrieri, L.

    2003-04-01

    'No portion of the American continent is perhaps so rich in wonders as the Yellow Stone' (F.V. Hayden, September 2, 1874) Discoveries from multi-beam sonar mapping and seismic reflection surveys of the northern, central, and West Thumb basins of Yellowstone Lake provide new insight into the extent of post-collapse volcanism and active hydrothermal processes occurring in a large lake environment above a large magma chamber. Yellowstone Lake has an irregular bottom covered with dozens of features directly related to hydrothermal, tectonic, volcanic, and sedimentary processes. Detailed bathymetric, seismic reflection, and magnetic evidence reveals that rhyolitic lava flows underlie much of Yellowstone Lake and exert fundamental control on lake bathymetry and localization of hydrothermal activity. Many previously unknown features have been identified and include over 250 hydrothermal vents, several very large (>500 m diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters, many small hydrothermal vent craters (˜1-200 m diameter), domed lacustrine sediments related to hydrothermal activity, elongate fissures cutting post-glacial sediments, siliceous hydrothermal spire structures, sublacustrine landslide deposits, submerged former shorelines, and a recently active graben. Sampling and observations with a submersible remotely operated vehicle confirm and extend our understanding of the identified features. Faults, fissures, hydrothermally inflated domal structures, hydrothermal explosion craters, and sublacustrine landslides constitute potentially significant geologic hazards. Toxic elements derived from hydrothermal processes also may significantly affect the Yellowstone ecosystem.

  10. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-08-01

    We have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. The technique, termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND), follows a method used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. We have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. Results are preliminary but promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly; it also appears resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be non-thermal and penetrating. Work remains to fully explore relevant physics and optimize instrument design.

  11. Active Thermal Control System Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has been actively developing technologies that will enable future missions or will provide significant improvements over the state of the art technologies. These technologies have are targeted for application on the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), or Orion, and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  12. Assessment of bubble-borne methane emissions in the East Siberian Arctic Shelf via interpretation of sonar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernykh, D.; Leifer, I.; Shakhova, N. E.; Semiletov, I. P.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic warming is proposed to increase methane emissions from submerged permafrost driving a positive feedback. Where emissions are from shallow seas, bubbles transport much of the methane directly, while frequent Arctic storms sparge much of the remaining dissolved methane before microbes can oxidize it. Complexity arises where emissions are small bubbles or from deeper water due to dissolution below the storm-mixed layer. Given that these emissions span a wide geographic area, a promising remote sensing technology that has been used to map and estimate emissions; however, significant uncertainties exist in sonar data interpretation due to a range of parameters affecting sonar return including bubble size distribution and spatial distribution, vertical velocity, and temperature all of which are closely inter-related in a complex and at best poorly understood manner, and change as the bubble plume rises. This process was illustrated in a series of in situ calibration experiments in the East Siberian Arctic Sea (ESAS) where controlled air bubble plumes were created and observed with sonar to quantify the relationship between sonar return and bubble plume flux for a first calibration of in situ sonar bubble plume observations in the ESAS. Results highlight the importance of bubble plume dynamics to sonar return and the absence of a simple relationship between sonar return and bubble flux. Instead sonar return related to height above seabed, even accounting for dissolution and changing hydrostatic pressure, confirming earlier laboratory studies for a deeper water column. Calibrations then were applied to field data of an area of ESAS natural seepage.

  13. Advanced Active Thermal Control Systems Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Anthony J.; Ewert, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) initiated a dynamic study to determine possible improvements available through advanced technologies (not used on previous or current human vehicles), identify promising development initiatives for advanced active thermal control systems (ATCS's), and help prioritize funding and personnel distribution among many research projects by providing a common basis to compare several diverse technologies. Some technologies included were two-phase thermal control systems, light-weight radiators, phase-change thermal storage, rotary fluid coupler, and heat pumps. JSC designed the study to estimate potential benefits from these various proposed and under-development thermal control technologies for five possible human missions early in the next century. The study compared all the technologies to a baseline mission using mass as a basis. Each baseline mission assumed an internal thermal control system; an external thermal control system; and aluminum, flow-through radiators. Solar vapor compression heat pumps and light-weight radiators showed the greatest promise as general advanced thermal technologies which can be applied across a range of missions. This initial study identified several other promising ATCS technologies which offer mass savings and other savings compared to traditional thermal control systems. Because the study format compares various architectures with a commonly defined baseline, it is versatile and expandable, and is expected to be updated as needed.

  14. Noninvasive ambulatory measurement system of cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Pino, Esteban J; Chavez, Javier A P; Aqueveque, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    This work implements a noninvasive system that measures the movements caused by cardiac activity. It uses unobtrusive Electro-Mechanical Films (EMFi) on the seat and on the backrest of a regular chair. The system detects ballistocardiogram (BCG) and respiration movements. Real data was obtained from 54 volunteers. 19 of them were measured in the laboratory and 35 in a hospital waiting room. Using a BIOPAC acquisition system, the ECG was measured simultaneously to the BCG for comparison. Wavelet Transform (WT) is a better option than Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) for signal extraction and produces higher effective measurement time. In the laboratory, the best results are obtained on the seat. The correlation index was 0.9800 and the Bland-Altman limits of agreement were 0.7136 ± 4.3673 [BPM]. In the hospital waiting room, the best results are also from the seat sensor. The correlation index was 0.9840, and the limits of agreement were 0.4386 ± 3.5884 [BPM]. The system is able to measure BCG in an unobtrusive way and determine the cardiac frequency with high precision. It is simple to use, which means the system can easily be used in non-standard settings: resting in a chair or couch, at the gym, schools or in a hospital waiting room, as shown. PMID:26738057

  15. Velocity distribution in active particles systems

    PubMed Central

    Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Paoluzzi, Matteo; Maggi, Claudio; Di Leonardo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the distribution of velocities of multiple interacting active particles which we test by numerical simulations. In clear contrast with equilibrium we find that the velocities are coupled to positions. Our model shows that, even for two particles only, the individual velocities display a variance depending on the interparticle separation and the emergence of correlations between the velocities of the particles. When considering systems composed of many particles we find an analytic expression connecting the overall velocity variance to density, at the mean-field level, and to the pair distribution function valid in the limit of small noise correlation times. Finally we discuss the intriguing analogies and main differences between our effective free energy functional and the theoretical scenario proposed so far for phase-separating active particles. PMID:27001289

  16. Velocity distribution in active particles systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, Umberto Marini Bettolo; Gnan, Nicoletta; Paoluzzi, Matteo; Maggi, Claudio; di Leonardo, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    We derive an analytic expression for the distribution of velocities of multiple interacting active particles which we test by numerical simulations. In clear contrast with equilibrium we find that the velocities are coupled to positions. Our model shows that, even for two particles only, the individual velocities display a variance depending on the interparticle separation and the emergence of correlations between the velocities of the particles. When considering systems composed of many particles we find an analytic expression connecting the overall velocity variance to density, at the mean-field level, and to the pair distribution function valid in the limit of small noise correlation times. Finally we discuss the intriguing analogies and main differences between our effective free energy functional and the theoretical scenario proposed so far for phase-separating active particles.

  17. A Group Recommender System for Tourist Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Inma; Sebastia, Laura; Onaindia, Eva; Guzman, Cesar

    This paper introduces a method for giving recommendations of tourist activities to a group of users. This method makes recommendations based on the group tastes, their demographic classification and the places visited by the users in former trips. The group recommendation is computed from individual personal recommendations through the use of techniques such as aggregation, intersection or incremental intersection. This method is implemented as an extension of the e-Tourism tool, which is a user-adapted tourism and leisure application, whose main component is the Generalist Recommender System Kernel (GRSK), a domain-independent taxonomy-driven search engine that manages the group recommendation.

  18. Influenza virus activation of the interferon system

    PubMed Central

    Killip, Marian J.; Fodor, Ervin; Randall, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    The host interferon (IFN) response represents one of the first barriers that influenza viruses must surmount in order to establish an infection. Many advances have been made in recent years in understanding the interactions between influenza viruses and the interferon system. In this review, we summarise recent work regarding activation of the type I IFN response by influenza viruses, including attempts to identify the viral RNA responsible for IFN induction, the stage of the virus life cycle at which it is generated and the role of defective viruses in this process. PMID:25678267

  19. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  20. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six-inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. The experimental results for those component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  1. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. Thermal, mechanical, and structural considerations leading to the design of the tray hardware are discussed. In general, changes in the retested component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials, multilayer optical interference filters, and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  2. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  3. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  4. Spontaneous Oscillations in an Active Matter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Robert; Tsang, Boyce; Granick, Steve

    Active matter (which consumes energy to move about) can organize into dynamic structures more interesting than those possible at steady-state. Here we show spontaneous periodic self-assembly in a simple three-component system of water, oil phase, and surfactant at constant room temperature, with emphasis on one model system. Benchtop experiments show that liquid crystal oil droplets spontaneously and collectively oscillate like a `beating heart' for several hours; contract, relax, and subsequently re-contract in a petri dish at a rate of a few `beats' per minute. These oscillations, emergent from the cooperative interaction of the three components, are driven by the competition between positive and negative feedback processes. This illustration of feedback in action reveals a new way to program self-assembled structures to vary with time.

  5. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  6. Active alignment/contact verification system

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, William M.

    2000-01-01

    A system involving an active (i.e. electrical) technique for the verification of: 1) close tolerance mechanical alignment between two component, and 2) electrical contact between mating through an elastomeric interface. For example, the two components may be an alumina carrier and a printed circuit board, two mating parts that are extremely small, high density parts and require alignment within a fraction of a mil, as well as a specified interface point of engagement between the parts. The system comprises pairs of conductive structures defined in the surfaces layers of the alumina carrier and the printed circuit board, for example. The first pair of conductive structures relate to item (1) above and permit alignment verification between mating parts. The second pair of conductive structures relate to item (2) above and permit verification of electrical contact between mating parts.

  7. Active balance system and vibration balanced machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Songgang (Inventor); Augenblick, John E. (Inventor); Peterson, Allen A. (Inventor); White, Maurice A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An active balance system is provided for counterbalancing vibrations of an axially reciprocating machine. The balance system includes a support member, a flexure assembly, a counterbalance mass, and a linear motor or an actuator. The support member is configured for attachment to the machine. The flexure assembly includes at least one flat spring having connections along a central portion and an outer peripheral portion. One of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion is fixedly mounted to the support member. The counterbalance mass is fixedly carried by the flexure assembly along another of the central portion and the outer peripheral portion. The linear motor has one of a stator and a mover fixedly mounted to the support member and another of the stator and the mover fixedly mounted to the counterbalance mass. The linear motor is operative to axially reciprocate the counterbalance mass.

  8. Effect of level, duration, and inter-pulse interval of 1-2 kHz sonar signal exposures on harbor porpoise hearing.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Ronald A; Hoek, Lean; Gransier, Robin; Rambags, Martijn; Claeys, Naomi

    2014-07-01

    Safety criteria for underwater low-frequency active sonar sounds produced during naval exercises are needed to protect harbor porpoise hearing. As a first step toward defining criteria, a porpoise was exposed to sequences consisting of series of 1-s, 1-2 kHz sonar down-sweeps without harmonics (as fatiguing noise) at various combinations of average received sound pressure levels (SPLs; 144-179 dB re 1 μPa), exposure durations (1.9-240 min), and duty cycles (5%-100%). Hearing thresholds were determined for a narrow-band frequency-swept sine wave centered at 1.5 kHz before exposure to the fatiguing noise, and at 1-4, 4-8, 8-12, 48, 96, 144, and 1400 min after exposure, to quantify temporary threshold shifts (TTSs) and recovery of hearing. Results show that the inter-pulse interval of the fatiguing noise is an important parameter in determining the magnitude of noise-induced TTS. For the reported range of exposure combinations (duration and SPL), the energy of the exposure (i.e., cumulative sound exposure level; SELcum) can be used to predict the induced TTS, if the inter-pulse interval is known. Exposures with equal SELcum but with different inter-pulse intervals do not result in the same induced TTS. PMID:24993225

  9. A Summary Comparison of Active Acoustic Detections and Visual Observations of Marine Mammals in the Canadian Beaufort Sea.

    PubMed

    Pyć, Cynthia D; Geoffroy, Maxime; Knudsen, Frank R

    2016-01-01

    Fisheries sonar was used to determine the applicability of active acoustic monitoring (AAM) for marine mammal detection in the Canadian Beaufort Sea. During 170 h of simultaneous observation by marine mammal observers and active acoustic observation, 119 Balaena mysticetus (bowheads) and 4 Delphinapterus leucas (belugas) were visually sighted, while 59 acoustic signals of bowheads were detected by AAM operators. Observations and detection of seals were also recorded. Comparative results indicate that commercially available active acoustic systems can detect seals at distances up to 500 m and large baleen whales at distances up to 2 km. PMID:26611045

  10. Model-based adaptive 3D sonar reconstruction in reverberating environments.

    PubMed

    Saucan, Augustin-Alexandru; Sintes, Christophe; Chonavel, Thierry; Caillec, Jean-Marc Le

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel model-based approach for 3D underwater scene reconstruction, i.e., bathymetry, for side scan sonar arrays in complex and highly reverberating environments like shallow water areas. The presence of multipath echoes and volume reverberation generates false depth estimates. To improve the resulting bathymetry, this paper proposes and develops an adaptive filter, based on several original geometrical models. This multimodel approach makes it possible to track and separate the direction of arrival trajectories of multiple echoes impinging the array. Echo tracking is perceived as a model-based processing stage, incorporating prior information on the temporal evolution of echoes in order to reject cluttered observations generated by interfering echoes. The results of the proposed filter on simulated and real sonar data showcase the clutter-free and regularized bathymetric reconstruction. Model validation is carried out with goodness of fit tests, and demonstrates the importance of model-based processing for bathymetry reconstruction. PMID:25974936

  11. The sonar beam pattern of a flying bat as it tracks tethered insects

    PubMed Central

    Ghose, Kaushik; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of the sonar beam pattern of flying echolocating bats, Eptesicus fuscus, performing various insect capture tasks in a large laboratory flight room. The beam pattern is deduced using the signal intensity pattern from a linear array of microphones. The positions of the bat and insect prey are obtained by stereoscopic reconstruction from two camera views. Results are reported in the form of beam pattern plots and estimated direction of the beam axis. The bat centers its beam axis on the selected target with a standard deviation (σ) of 3°. The experimental error is ±1.4°. Trials conducted with two targets show that the bat consistently tracks one of the targets with its beam. These findings suggest that the axis of the bat sonar beam is a good index of selective tracking of targets and in this respect is analogous to gaze in predominantly visual animals. PMID:12942989

  12. Assessing the Effectiveness of Ramp-Up During Sonar Operations Using Exposure Models.

    PubMed

    von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Miller, Patrick J O; Tyack, Peter L; Ainslie, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Ramp-up procedures are used to mitigate the impact of sound on marine mammals. Sound exposure models combined with observations of marine mammals responding to sound can be used to assess the effectiveness of ramp-up procedures. We found that ramp-up procedures before full-level sonar operations can reduce the risk of hearing threshold shifts with marine mammals, but their effectiveness depends strongly on the responsiveness of the animals. In this paper, we investigated the effect of sonar parameters (source level, pulse-repetition time, ship speed) on sound exposure by using a simple analytical model and highlight the mechanisms that limit the effectiveness of ramp-up procedures. PMID:26611087

  13. Sidescan-sonar surveys of critical habitats in Long Island Sound, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Lewis, R.S.; Zajac, Roman; Twichell, D.C.; Knebel, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Long Island Sound estuary is located in the most densely populated region of the U.S.. Due to the enormous surrounding population, large inputs of anthropogenic wastes and toxic chemicals, benthic habitats were degraded. To address this environmental problem, sidescan-sonar mosaics are being developed within specific areas of critical concern. Detailed bathymetric and high-resolution seismic-reflection data assist in interpretations of relief, to relate bottom features to the underlying stratigraphy, and to estimate thicknesses of surficial sediments. To date, several continuous-coverage sidescan-sonar surveys have been completed. These surveys show that the sedimentary environments and benthic habitats in Long Island Sound vary spatially over short distances.

  14. A model for sonar interrogation of complex bottom and surface targets in shallow-water waveguides.

    PubMed

    Giddings, Thomas E; Shirron, Joseph J

    2008-04-01

    Many problems of current interest in underwater acoustics involve low-frequency broadband sonar interrogation of objects near the sea surface or sea floor of a shallow-water environment. When the target is situated near the upper or lower boundary of the water column the acoustic interactions with the target objects are complicated by interactions with the nearby free surface or fluid-sediment interface, respectively. A practical numerical method to address such situations is presented. The model provides high levels of accuracy with the flexibility to handle complex, three-dimensional targets in range-independent environments. The model is demonstrated using several bottom target scenarios, with and without locally undulating seabeds. The impact of interface and boundary interactions is considered with an eye toward using the sonar return signal as the basis for acoustic imaging or spectral classification. PMID:18397010

  15. The sonar beam pattern of a flying bat as it tracks tethered insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghose, Kaushik; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2003-08-01

    This paper describes measurements of the sonar beam pattern of flying echolocating bats, Eptesicus fuscus, performing various insect capture tasks in a large laboratory flight room. The beam pattern is deduced using the signal intensity across a linear array of microphones. The positions of the bat and insect prey are obtained by stereoscopic reconstruction from two camera views. Results are reported in the form of beam-pattern plots and estimated direction of the beam axis. The bat centers its beam axis on the selected target with a standard deviation (σ) of 3°. The experimental error is +/-1.4°. Trials conducted with two targets show that the bat consistently tracks one of the targets with its beam. These findings suggest that the axis of the bat sonar beam is a good index of selective tracking of targets, and in this respect is analogous to gaze in predominantly visual animals.

  16. Next Generation Active Buffet Suppression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galea, Stephen C.; Ryall, Thomas G.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Moses, Robert W.; White, Edward V.; Zimcik, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon that is common to high performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails like the F/A-18, at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. This paper describes an international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States involving the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads. The research program is being co-ordinated by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and is being conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperative Program (TTCP). This truly unique collaborative program has been developed to enable each participating country to contribute resources toward a program that coalesces a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation. This collaborative program is directed toward a full-scale test of an F/A-18 empennage, which is an extension of an earlier initial test. The current program aims at applying advanced directional piezoactuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers and advanced control strategies on a full-scale structure to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration.

  17. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-09-01

    The authors have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. They are using a Schlumberger neutron generator for the direct measurement of the fissile material content in spent fuel, in place of the indirect measures used at present. The technique they are investigating is termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND). It closely follows a method that has been used routinely in other branches of physics for the detection of very small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. They have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The results to data are preliminary but quite promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly. It also appears to be quite resilient to background neutron interference.

  18. Investigation of measureable parameters that correlate with automatic target recognition performance in synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazagnaire, Julia; Cobb, J. T.; Isaacs, Jason

    2015-05-01

    There is a desire in the Mine Counter Measure community to develop a systematic method to predict and/or estimate the performance of Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms that are detecting and classifying mine-like objects within sonar data. Ideally, parameters exist that can be measured directly from the sonar data that correlate with ATR performance. In this effort, two metrics were analyzed for their predictive potential using high frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) images. The first parameter is a measure of contrast. It is essentially the variance in pixel intensity over a fixed partition of relatively small size. An analysis was performed to determine the optimum block size for this contrast calculation. These blocks were then overlapped in the horizontal and vertical direction over the entire image. The second parameter is the one-dimensional K-shape parameter. The K-distribution is commonly used to describe sonar backscatter return from range cells that contain a finite number of scatterers. An Ada-Boosted Decision Tree classifier was used to calculate the probability of classification (Pc) and false alarm rate (FAR) for several types of targets in SAS images from three different data sets. ROC curves as a function of the measured parameters were generated and the correlation between the measured parameters in the vicinity of each of the contacts and the ATR performance was investigated. The contrast and K-shape parameters were considered separately. Additionally, the contrast and K-shape parameter were associated with background texture types using previously labeled high frequency SAS images.

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosus activity. An operational definition.

    PubMed

    Liang, M H; Stern, S; Esdaile, J M

    1988-04-01

    Improved diagnosis and treatment have reduced mortality from SLE and present us with an opportunity to consider SLE in finer distinctions than alive or dead. Although much has been learned about SLE without a gold standard of disease activity or a universally agreed-upon definition of SLE activity, standardization of one or more measures would greatly enhance our ability to compare results from different centers and to communicate more precisely. It is unlikely that any of the existing measures or any ones to be developed will completely satisfy everyone's needs but it is pointless to proliferate new ones without testing their metric properties. Some differences in concept are desirable, particularly for investigators who have specialized interests or insights, but each should meet criteria of reliability and validity and have explicit definitions of terms, rules for their ascertainment, and the time period covered. Moreover, agreement on minimum essential elements of any SLE activity measure and their operational definitions would be a boon. SLE activity is one dimension in the disease pathway of lupus and implies a continuous phenomena that is potentially reversible. Organ damage, another point in the path of causation, connotes irreversible disease. We recommend that minimum essential elements be based on their frequency of occurrence, biological sensibleness, and the likelihood that degrees of activity can be rated reliably to show a change in a clinical state. The rating should be independent of whether a therapy is employed. Since activity is always considered with severity, the two dimensions could be recognized in the scale. Severity can be used to expand a scale's gradations if a symptom or sign is present. Severity could be rated by the need to treat with immunosuppressive agents, the need to follow the patient more closely, or the functional or prognostic consequences of the manifestation. For every organ system clinical judgment should be used to decide

  20. TS-MRF sonar image segmentation based on the levels feature information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Xia, Ping; Liu, Xiaomei; Lei, Bangjun

    2015-12-01

    According to traditional methods of image segmentation on sonar image processing with less robustness and the problem of low accuracy, we propose the method of sonar image segmentation based on Tree-Structured Markov Random Field(TS-MRF), the algorithm shows better ability in using spatial information. First, using a tree structure constraint two-valued MRF sequences to model sonar image, through the node to describe local information of image, hierarchy information establish interconnected relationships through nodes, at the same time when we describe the hierarchical structure information of the image, we can preserve an image's local information effectively. Then, we define split gain coefficients to reflect the ratio that marking posterior probability division before and after the splitting on the assumption of the known image viewing features, and viewing gain coefficients of judgment as the basis for determining binary tree of node split to reduce the complexity of solving a posterior probability. Finally, during the process of image segmentation, continuing to split the leaf nodes with the maximum splitting gain, so we can get the splitting results. We add merge during the process of segmentation. Using the methods of region splitting and merging to reduce the error division, so we can obtain the final segmentation results. Experimental results show that this approach has high segmentation accuracy and robustness.

  1. Detecting submerged objects: the application of side scan sonar to forensic contexts.

    PubMed

    Schultz, John J; Healy, Carrie A; Parker, Kenneth; Lowers, Bim

    2013-09-10

    Forensic personnel must deal with numerous challenges when searching for submerged objects. While traditional water search methods have generally involved using dive teams, remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), and water scent dogs for cases involving submerged objects and bodies, law enforcement is increasingly integrating multiple methods that include geophysical technologies. There are numerous advantages for integrating geophysical technologies, such as side scan sonar and ground penetrating radar (GPR), with more traditional search methods. Overall, these methods decrease the time involved searching, in addition to increasing area searched. However, as with other search methods, there are advantages and disadvantages when using each method. For example, in instances with excessive aquatic vegetation or irregular bottom terrain, it may not be possible to discern a submersed body with side scan sonar. As a result, forensic personnel will have the highest rate of success during searches for submerged objects when integrating multiple search methods, including deploying multiple geophysical technologies. The goal of this paper is to discuss the methodology of various search methods that are employed for submerged objects and how these various methods can be integrated as part of a comprehensive protocol for water searches depending upon the type of underwater terrain. In addition, two successful case studies involving the search and recovery of a submerged human body using side scan sonar are presented to illustrate the successful application of integrating a geophysical technology with divers when searching for a submerged object. PMID:23890654

  2. PMHT Approach for Multi-Target Multi-Sensor Sonar Tracking in Clutter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohua; Li, Yaan; Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao; Dai, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Multi-sensor sonar tracking has many advantages, such as the potential to reduce the overall measurement uncertainty and the possibility to hide the receiver. However, the use of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking is challenging because of the complexity of the underwater environment, especially the low target detection probability and extremely large number of false alarms caused by reverberation. In this work, to solve the problem of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking in the presence of clutter, a novel probabilistic multi-hypothesis tracker (PMHT) approach based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed. The PMHT can efficiently handle the unknown measurements-to-targets and measurements-to-transmitters data association ambiguity. The EKF and UKF are used to deal with the high degree of nonlinearity in the measurement model. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can improve the target tracking performance in a cluttered environment greatly, and its computational load is low. PMID:26561817

  3. PMHT Approach for Multi-Target Multi-Sensor Sonar Tracking in Clutter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Li, Yaan; Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao; Dai, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Multi-sensor sonar tracking has many advantages, such as the potential to reduce the overall measurement uncertainty and the possibility to hide the receiver. However, the use of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking is challenging because of the complexity of the underwater environment, especially the low target detection probability and extremely large number of false alarms caused by reverberation. In this work, to solve the problem of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking in the presence of clutter, a novel probabilistic multi-hypothesis tracker (PMHT) approach based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed. The PMHT can efficiently handle the unknown measurements-to-targets and measurements-to-transmitters data association ambiguity. The EKF and UKF are used to deal with the high degree of nonlinearity in the measurement model. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can improve the target tracking performance in a cluttered environment greatly, and its computational load is low. PMID:26561817

  4. Investigation of the relative significance of individual environmental parameters to sonar performance prediction uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ding; Xu, Wen; Schmidt, Henrik

    2002-11-01

    A large part of sonar performance prediction uncertainty is associated with the uncertain ocean acoustic environment. Optimal in situ measurement strategy, i.e. adaptively capturing the most critical uncertain environmental parameters within operational constrains can minimize the sonar performance prediction uncertainty. Understanding the relative significance of individual environmental parameters to sonar performance prediction uncertainty is fundamental to the heuristics to determine the most critical environmental parameters. Based on this understanding, the optimal parametrization of ocean acoustic environments can be defined, which will significantly simplify the adaptively sampling pattern. As an example, the matched-field processing is used to localize an unknown sound source position in a realistic ocean environment. Typical shallow water environmental models are used with some of the properties being stochastic variables. The ratio of the main lobe peak to the maximum side lobe peak of the ambiguity function and the main lobe peak displacement due to mismatch are chosen as performance metrics, respectively, in two different scenarios. The relative significance of some environmental parameters such as sediment thickness, weights of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) has been computed. Some preliminary results are discussed.

  5. Building a 3d Reference Model for Canal Tunnel Surveying Using Sonar and Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisan, E.; Charbonnier, P.; Foucher, P.; Grussenmeyer, P.; Guillemin, S.; Koehl, M.

    2015-04-01

    Maintaining canal tunnels is not only a matter of cultural and historical preservation, but also a commercial necessity and a security issue. This contribution adresses the problem of building a full 3D reference model of a canal tunnel by merging SONAR (for underwater data recording) and LASER data (for the above-water parts). Although both scanning devices produce point clouds, their properties are rather different. In particular, SONAR data are very noisy and their processing raises several issues related to the device capacities, the acquisition setup and the tubular shape of the tunnel. The proposed methodology relies on a denoising step by meshing, followed by the registration of SONAR data with the geo-referenced LASER data. Since there is no overlap between point clouds, a 3-step procedure is proposed to robustly estimate the registration parameters. In this paper, we report a first experimental survey, which concerned the entrance of a canal tunnel. The obtained results are promising and the analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated fashion, in the limits of the involved technology.

  6. Discriminating man-made and natural objects in sidescan sonar imagery: human versus computer recognition performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, Ronald T.; Myers, Vincent L.

    2005-05-01

    Sidescan sonar is increasingly accepted as the sensor of choice for sea minehunting over large areas in shallow water. Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms are therefore being developed to assist and, in the case of autonomous vehicles, even replace the human operator as the primary recognition agent deciding whether an object in the sonar imagery is a mine or simply benign seafloor clutter. Whether ATR aids or replaces a human operator, a natural benchmark for judging the quality of ATR is the unaided human performance when ATR is not used. The benchmark can help when estimating the performance benefit (or cost) of switching from human to automatic recognition for instance, or when planning how human and machine should best interact in cooperative search operations. This paper reports a human performance study using a large library of real sonar images collected for the development and testing of ATR algorithms. The library features 234 mine-like man-made objects deployed for the purpose, as well as 105 instances of naturally occurring clutter. The human benchmark in this case is the average of ten human subjects expressed in terms of a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. An ATR algorithm for man-made/natural object discrimination is also tested and compared with the human benchmark . The implications of its relative performance for the integration of ATR are considered.

  7. Survey report of NOAA Ship McArthur II cruises AR-04-04, AR-05-05 and AR-06-03: habitat classification of side scan sonar imagery in support of deep-sea coral/sponge explorations at the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Intelmann, Steven S.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Bowlby, C. Edward; Brancato, Mary Sue; Hyland, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Habitat mapping and characterization has been defined as a high-priority management issue for the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS), especially for poorly known deep-sea habitats that may be sensitive to anthropogenic disturbance. As a result, a team of scientists from OCNMS, National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS), and other partnering institutions initiated a series of surveys to assess the distribution of deep-sea coral/sponge assemblages within the sanctuary and to look for evidence of potential anthropogenic impacts in these critical habitats. Initial results indicated that remotely delineating areas of hard bottom substrate through acoustic sensing could be a useful tool to increase the efficiency and success of subsequent ROV-based surveys of the associated deep-sea fauna. Accordingly, side scan sonar surveys were conducted in May 2004, June 2005, and April 2006 aboard the NOAA Ship McArthur II to: (1) obtain additional imagery of the seafloor for broader habitat-mapping coverage of sanctuary waters, and (2) help delineate suitable deep-sea coral-sponge habitat, in areas of both high and low commercial-fishing activities, to serve as sites for surveying-in more detail using an ROV on subsequent cruises, Several regions of the sea floor throughout the OCNMS were surveyed and mosaicked at 1-meter pixel resolution. Imagery from the side scan sonar mapping efforts was integrated with other complementary data from a towed camera sled, ROVs, sedentary samples, and bathymetry records to describe geological and biological (where possible) aspects of habitat. Using a hierarchical deep-water marine benthic classification scheme (Greene et al. 1999), we created a preliminary map of various habitat polygon features for use in a geographical information system (GIS). This report provides a description of the mapping and groundtruthing efforts as well as results of the image classification procedure for each of the areas surveyed.

  8. Operation Dominic, Shot Sword Fish. Project Officer's report - Project 1. 3b. Effects of an underwater nuclear explosion on hydroacoustic systems

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, T.; La Houssaye, W.P.; Johnson, C.T.

    1985-09-01

    The objectives of Project 1.2 were to determine and evaluate the effects of an underwater nuclear explosion on the operational capabilities of shipboard sonar and other types of hydroacoustic systems. Project 1.3b included all measurements at ranges greater than 10 nautical miles and the results of these measurements constitute the subject of this report. This report concerns the effects of the underwater nuclear explosion, Sword Fish, on: (a) Long-range active detection systems at the first convergence zone (25 to 30 miles); (b) Passive shipboard or submarine sonars at a few hundred miles; and (c) Long-range passive detection and surveillance at Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) and Missile Impact Locating System (MILS) stations at several hundred to several thousand miles. A submarine station at the first convergence zone and five shipboard stations at ranges from 200 miles to 5,000 miles recorded signals from hydrophones suspended at various depths to approximately 2,000 feet. Submarines on other assignments recorded signals on standard submarine sonar equipment on a not-to interfere basis. SOSUS and MILS stations operated normally during the period and also made special magnetic-tape and strip-chart recordings of signals from single hydrophones from before burst time to several hours after burst.

  9. A new melanoma diagnosis active support system.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, R A; Dacquino, G; Laguteta, G

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the operational performance of a new MDASS (Melanoma Diagnosis Active Support System) prototype able to distil optimal knowledge from acquired data to automatically capture and reliably discriminate and quantify the stage of disease evolution. Automated classification dermatoscopical parameters can be divided into two main classes: Size Descriptor (point size, local, and global) and Intrinsic Descriptor (morphological, geometrical, chromatic, others). Usually elementary geometric shape robust and effective characterization, invariant to environment and optical geometry transformations, on a rigorous mathematical level is a key and computational intensive problem. MDASS uses GEOGINE (GEOmetrical enGINE), a state-of-the-art OMG (Ontological Model Generator) based on n-D Tensor Moment Invariants for shape/texture effective description. MDASS main results show robust disease classification procedure with distillation of minimal reference grids for pathological cases and they ultimately achieve effective early diagnosis of melanocytic lesion. System results are validated by carefully designed experiments with certified clinical reference database. Overall system operational performance is presented. Finally, MDASS error analysis and computational complexity are addressed and discussed. PMID:17270962

  10. Activity systems in the inquiry classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortham, Donald William

    Inquiry science, as called for by reform-minded organizations such as the National Research Council (1996), offers a platform with the potential for introducing all students to the practice of science while maintaining focus on key concepts and theories. This project followed two small groups as they completed an inquiry unit on genetics at a Midwestern high school. I investigated whether levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, student-apparatus, and student-concept connections were approximately equal across all students in each of the two groups. I found differences among students in levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and student-concept connections. From a situated idiopathic perspective, these differences may indicate different levels of opportunity-to-learn. At a more abstract (nomothetic) level, these differences may be due to emergent divisions of labor (roles) within the two groups. From the perspective of Activity Theory (Leont'ev, 1978; Engestrom, 1987), roles serve as important mediators that simultaneously allow the social unit to accomplish its objectives, while shaping the development of participants. I describe three roles that capture modes of participation for students interacting in the small groups, and that may contribute to what Engestrom (2001) calls subject-producing activity systems: networked contributor, social member, and isolate. This paper also describes tools for teachers and researchers to use in identifying levels of mediation and roles as they occur in small groups.

  11. Sonar-based iceberg-relative navigation for autonomous underwater vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, Peter; Rock, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    Iceberg-relative navigation for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) will enable a new mode of data collection for studies of free-floating icebergs. Compared to current data collection methods, autonomous underwater vehicles offer substantially expanded coverage area and continuous sampling. However, because icebergs translate and rotate through inertial space, standard vehicle navigation methods which rely on inertial sensors are unable to provide iceberg-relative position estimates. Presented here is a new iceberg-relative vehicle navigation technique which is an extension of existing work in terrain-relative navigation. The technique comprises a mapping step and localization step, each of which is modified here to account for the translation and the rotation of free-floating icebergs. In the mapping step, the AUV circumnavigates the iceberg at a sequence of constant depths, collecting multibeam sonar imagery of the iceberg's submerged surface. A map is then generated in post-processing by projecting these sonar data from their corresponding vehicle positions (accounting for iceberg motion) in a frame that is fixed to the iceberg. Overlapping sonar data from the beginning and end of a circumnavigation provide the information necessary to enforce self-consistency of the iceberg map. In the localization step, the AUV uses the previously generated map to determine its position and orientation with respect to the iceberg by correlating incoming sonar ranges with the map. The estimator works by maintaining explicit estimates not only of the vehicle position and orientation, but also of the iceberg translation and rotation rates through inertial space. Results from a proof-of-concept field demonstration of this new iceberg-relative AUV navigation technique prove the feasibility of both generating a self-consistent three-dimensional map of a moving iceberg and localizing a vehicle's position with respect to that iceberg. The data for the experiment were collected

  12. Optimal spatial filtering for design of a conformal velocity sonar array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traweek, Charles M.

    In stark contrast to the ubiquitous optimization problem posed in the array processing literature, tactical hull sonar arrays have traditionally been designed using extrapolations of low spatial resolution empirical self noise data, dominated by hull noise at moderate speeds, in conjunction with assumptions regarding achievable conventional beamformer sidelobe levels by so-called Taylor shading for a time domain, delay-and-sum beamformer. That ad hoc process defaults to an extremely conservative (expensive and heavy) design for an array baffle as a means to assure environmental noise limited sonar performance. As an alternative, this dissertation formulates, implements, and demonstrates an objective function that results from the expression of the log likelihood ratio of the optimal Bayesian detector as a comparison to a threshold. Its purpose is to maximize the deflection coefficient of a square-law energy detector over an arbitrarily specified frequency band by appropriate selection of array shading weights for the generalized conformal velocity sonar array under the assumption that it will employ the traditional time domain delay-and-sum beamformer. The restrictive assumptions that must be met in order to appropriately use the deflection coefficient as a performance metric are carefully delineated. A series of conformal velocity sonar array spatial filter optimization problems was defined using a data set characterized by spatially complex structural noise from a large aperture conformal velocity sonar array experiment. The detection performance of an 80-element cylindrical array was optimized over a reasonably broad range of frequencies (from k0a = 12.95 to k 0a = 15.56) for the cases of broadside and off-broadside signal incidence. In each case, performance of the array using optimal real-valued time domain delay-and-sum beamformer weights was much better than that achieved for either uniform shading or for Taylor shading. The result is an analytical engine

  13. Acoustic habitat and shellfish mapping and monitoring in shallow coastal water - Sidescan sonar experiences in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Overmeeren, Ronnie; Craeymeersch, Johan; van Dalfsen, Jan; Fey, Frouke; van Heteren, Sytze; Meesters, Erik

    2009-11-01

    Sidescan sonar has been applied in a number of shallow water environments along the Dutch coast to map and monitor shellfish and seabed habitats. The littoral setting of these surveys may hamper data acquisition flying the towfish in zones of turbulence and waves, but also offers valuable opportunities for understanding, interpreting and validating sidescan sonar images because of the ability to ground-truth during low water periods, enabling easy identification and validation. Acoustical images of some of the mussel banks on the tidal flats of the Wadden Sea, recorded at high tide, show a marked resemblance with optical Google Earth images of the same banks. These sonar images may thus serve as ' acoustic type signatures' for the interpretation of sonar patterns recorded in deeper water where ground-truthing is more difficult and more expensive. Similarly, acoustic type signatures of (Japanese) oyster banks were obtained in the estuaries in the southwest of the Netherlands. Automated acoustic pattern recognition of different habitats and acoustical estimation of faunal cover and density are possible applications of sidescan sonar. Both require that the backscattering observed on the sidescan sonar images is directly caused by the biological component of the seafloor. Filtering offers a simple and effective pre-processing technique to separate the faunal signals from linear trends such as emanating from wave ripples or the central tracks of the towfish. Acoustically estimating the faunal density is approached by in-situ counting peaks in backscattering in unit squares. These counts must be calibrated by ground-truthing. Ground-truthing on littoral mussel banks in the Wadden Sea has been carried out by measuring their cover along lines during low tide. Due to its capacity of yielding full-cover, high resolution images of large surfaces, sidescan sonar proves to be an excellent, cost-effective tool for quantitative time-lapse monitoring of habitats.

  14. ROVER: A prototype active vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombs, David J.; Marsh, Brian D.

    1987-08-01

    The Roving Eyes project is an experiment in active vision. We present the design and implementation of a prototype that tracks colored balls in images from an on-line charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Rover is designed to keep up with its rapidly changing environment by handling best and average case conditions and ignoring the worst case. This allows Rover's techniques to be less sophisticated and consequently faster. Each of Rover's major functional units is relatively isolated from the others, and an executive which knows all the functional units directs the computation by deciding which jobs would be most effective to run. This organization is realized with a priority queue of jobs and their arguments. Rover's structure not only allows it to adapt its strategy to the environment, but also makes the system extensible. A capability can be added to the system by adding a functional module with a well defined interface and by modifying the executive to make use of the new module. The current implementation is discussed in the appendices.

  15. Mudflows in the Southwest Pass Region of the Mississippi River Delta: Results From Multibeam, Sidescan Sonar, and Subbottom Profiler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henning, A. T.; Garcia-Garcia, A.; Orange, A.; Orange, D.

    2007-12-01

    The offshore portion of the active Mississippi delta is characterized by frequent submarine mudflows, which have caused extensive damage to offshore infrastructure in the area. The slopes in this area are very gentle (typically < 1.5°) and the mudflows are thought to be triggered by deep waves during storms. The 2005 hurricane season in particular caused unprecedented levels of damage in the Gulf of Mexico. Post-hurricane surveys carried out by the industry determined that much of the damage was caused by mudflows that originated on the upper portions of the Mississippi birdsfoot delta, just outboard of Southwest Pass. Mudflows generally consist of a source area, a chute (or gully), and a downslope depositional lobe. Large erratic blocks are characteristic of the mudflow gully floor, and recently emplaced mudflow lobes show a more irregular and blocky surface topography. Gullies often form natural levees, which can give the gully a perched topographic expression. A June 2007 survey aboard the UNOLS vessel R/V Pelican focused on the upslope portion of the mudflow area with the goal of imaging the source of the mudflows. Multibeam echosounder, sidescan sonar, and subbottom profiler data were acquired over an 8 km by 2 km grid at a 100 m line spacing in order to study the possible sources of the mudflows. Multibeam and sidescan sonar data imaged the upslope portions of eight separate mudflows, including the origin of one of the flows. The five westernmost flows originate at a known dredge dump site and appear significantly wider than the three flows to the east. The eastern flows are more clearly delineated on the seafloor data and follow more tortuous downslope paths. This suggests a possible anthropogenic component to mudflow sourcing in this area. The subbottom profiler data show large blocks of material containing intact stratigraphy located within the mudflow gullies. High dips were observed in numerous blocks in both the strike and dip directions. The base of

  16. Effect of environmental uncertainty on low frequency sonar propagation in a shallow sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Shapiro, Georgy; Thain, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Underwater acoustics is widely used in navigational, scientific and military areas. The technique of coupled ocean-acoustic modelling has been of interest for many years. The predictive capability of acoustic propagation modelling is highly dependent on the marine environment and seabed properties. The direction and intensity of sound propagation is determined by the sound speed gradients in the water column, which in turn are dependent upon variations in temperature and salinity. These variations occur on a range of scales - from climatic (tens of years) to the mesoscale (days and weeks) in time and from hundreds of meters to tens of kilometres in space, especially on the continental shelf. In shallow water, extremely dynamic features such as strong density fronts, intense stratifications, eddies, filaments and other mesoscale features exist persistently. These features described above have significant impacts on underwater sound propagation and therefore must be investigated in order to improve the predictive accuracy of acoustic modelling. Uncertainties in the ocean model simulations are transferred to the acoustic field due to the usage of coupled ocean-acoustic system. The area selected for this study is the Celtic Sea, which is typical European continental shelf shallow water. It is filled with mesoscale eddies which contribute to the formation of the residual (tidally averaged) circulation pattern. The sea is strongly stratified from April to November along with bottom fronts, which adds to the formation of density driven currents. In this paper we employ the ocean model POLCOMS which has been validated for different regions of the world ocean and also been used operationally by the UK Met Office for the European Shelf seas to construct the environmental condition for the acoustic model and the sonar performance model HARCAM, which has been validated formally by the U.K. Ministry of Defence over a variety of frequencies, to generate acoustic propagation data

  17. Compiling Multibeam Sonar data for the U.S. Pacific West Coast Extended Continental Shelf Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, E.; Gardner, J. V.; Henderson, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    meters. The individual surveys were compiled to form a comprehensive grid of the entire region, which covers an area of approximately 1,110,000 square kilometers. Applications such as MB-System, Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL), Generic Mapping Tools (GMT), and Fledermaus were used to grid, compile, and visualize the data. This study focuses on the gridding methods, compilation, and pitfalls of creating a large-scale multibeam sonar grid for use on a single region of the U.S ECS project.

  18. Vocal premotor activity in the superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Shiva R; Moss, Cynthia F

    2007-01-01

    Chronic neural recordings were taken from the midbrain superior colliculus (SC) of echolocating bats while they were engaged in one of two distinct behavioral tasks: virtual target amplitude discrimination (VTAD) and real oscillating target tracking (ROTT). In the VTAD task, bats used a limited range of sonar call features to discriminate the amplitude category of echoes, whereas in the ROTT task, the bat produced dynamically modulated sonar calls to track a moving target. Newly developed methods for chronic recordings in unrestrained, behaving bats reveal two consistent bouts of SC neural activity preceding the onset of sonar vocalizations in both tasks. A short lead bout occurs tightly coupled to vocal onset (VTAD, -5.1 to -2.2 ms range, -3.6 +/- 0.7 ms mean lead time; ROTT, -3.0 to + 0.4 ms range, -1.2 +/- 1.3 ms mean lead time), and this activity may play a role in marking the time of each sonar emission. A long lead bout in SC activity occurs earlier and spreads over a longer interval (VTAD, -40.6 to -8.4 ms range, -22.2 +/- 3.9 ms mean lead time; ROTT, -29.8 to -7.1 ms range, -17.5 +/- 9.1 ms mean lead time) when compared with short lead events. In the goal-directed ROTT task, the timing of long lead event times vary with the bat's sonar call duration. This finding, along with behavioral studies demonstrating that bats adjust sonar call duration as they track targets at changing distance, suggests the bat SC contributes to range-dependent adjustments of sonar call duration. PMID:17202477

  19. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Moisan, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Pierre; Foucher, Philippe; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Guillemin, Samuel; Koehl, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part) and sonar (for its underwater part) scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology. PMID:26690444

  20. Can the elongated hindwing tails of fluttering moths serve as false sonar targets to divert bat attacks?

    PubMed

    Lee, Wu-Jung; Moss, Cynthia F

    2016-05-01

    It has long been postulated that the elongated hindwing tails of many saturniid moths have evolved to create false sonar targets to divert the attack of echolocation-guided bat predators. However, rigorous echo-acoustic evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. In this study, fluttering luna moths (Actias luna), a species with elongated hindwing tails, were ensonified with frequency modulated chirp signals from all angles of orientation and across the wingbeat cycle. High-speed stereo videography was combined with pulse compression sonar processing to characterize the echo information available to foraging bats. Contrary to previous suggestions, the results show that the tail echoes are weak and do not dominate the sonar returns, compared to the large, planar wings and the moth body. However, the distinctive twisted morphology of the tails create persistent echoes across all angles of orientation, which may induce erroneous sonar target localization and disrupt accurate tracking by echolocating bats. These findings thus suggest a refinement of the false target hypothesis to emphasize sonar localization errors induced by the twisted tails, and highlight the importance of physics-based approaches to study the sensory information involved in the evolutionary arms race between moths and their bat predators. PMID:27250152

  1. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel †

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Pierre; Foucher, Philippe; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Guillemin, Samuel; Koehl, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part) and sonar (for its underwater part) scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology. PMID:26690444

  2. Preliminary design activities for solar heating and cooling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information on the development of solar heating and cooling systems is presented. The major emphasis is placed on program organization, system size definition, site identification, system approaches, heat pump and equipment design, collector procurement, and other preliminary design activities.

  3. Time-series observations of hydrothermal discharge using an acoustic imaging sonar: a NEPTUNE observatory case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangyu; Bemis, Karen; Jackson, Darrell; Light, Russ

    2015-04-01

    One intriguing feature of a mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal system is the intimate interconnections among hydrothermal, geological, oceanic, and biological processes. The advent of the NEPTUNE observatory operated by Ocean Networks Canada at the Endeavour Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge enables scientists to study these interconnections through multidisciplinary, continuous, real-time observations. In this study, we present the time-series observations of a seafloor hydrothermal vent made using the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS). COVIS is currently connected to the NEPTUNE observatory to monitor the hydrothermal discharge from the Grotto mound on the Endeavour Segment. Since its deployment in 2010, COVIS has recorded a 3-year long dataset of the shape and outflow fluxes of the buoyant plumes above Grotto along with the areal coverage of its diffuse flow discharge. The interpretation of these data in light of contemporaneous observations of ocean currents, venting temperature, and seismicity made using other NEPTUNE observatory instruments reveals significant impacts of ocean currents and geological events on hydrothermal venting. In this study, we summarize these findings in the hope of forming a more complete understanding of the intricate interconnections among oceanic, geological, and hydrothermal processes.

  4. Mapping the Gulf of Maine with side-scan sonar: A new bottom-type classification for complex seafloors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, W.A.; Kelley, J.T.; Dickson, S.M.; Belknap, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    The bedrock-framed seafloor in the northwestern Gulf of Maine is characterized by extreme changes in bathymetric relief and covered with a wide variety of surficial materials. Traditional methods of mapping cannot accurately represent the great heterogeneity of such a glaciated region. A new mapping scheme for complex seafloors, based primarily on the interpretation of side-scan sonar imagery, utilizes four easily recognized units: rock, gravel, sand and mud. In many places, however, the seafloor exhibits a complicated mixture or extremely 'patchy' distribution of the four basic units, which are too small to map individually. Twelve composite units, each a two-component mixture of the basic units, were established to represent this patchiness at a small scale (1:100,000). Using a geographic information system, these and all other available data (seismic profiles, grab samples, submersible dives and cores) were referenced to a common geographic base, superimposed on bathymetric contours and then integrated into surficial geologic maps of the regional inner continental shelf. This digital representation of the seafloor comprises a multidimensional, interactive model complete with explicit attributes (depth, bottom type) that allow for detailed analysis of marine environments.

  5. Interaction of emitted sonar pulses and simulated echoes in a false killer whale: an evoked-potential study.

    PubMed

    Supin, Alexander Ya; Nachtigall, Paul E; Breese, Marlee

    2011-09-01

    Auditory evoked potentials (AEP) were recorded during echolocation in a false killer whale Pseudorca crassidens. An electronically synthesized and played-back (simulated) echo was triggered by an emitted biosonar pulse, and its intensity was proportional to that of the emitted click. The delay and transfer factor of the echo relative to the emitted click was controlled by the operator. The echo delay varied from 2 to 16 ms (by two-fold steps), and the transfer factor varied within ranges from -45 to -30 dB at the 2-ms delay to -60 to -45 dB at the 16-ms delay. Echo-related AEPs featured amplitude dependence both on echo delay at a constant transfer factor (the longer the delay, the higher amplitude) and on echo transfer factor at a constant delay (the higher transfer factor, the higher amplitude). Conjunctional variation of the echo transfer factor and delay kept the AEP amplitude constant when the delay to transfer factor trade was from -7.1 to -8.4 dB per delay doubling. The results confirm the hypothesis that partial forward masking of the echoes by the preceding emitted sonar pulses serves as a time-varying automatic gain control in the auditory system of echolocating odontocetes. PMID:21895108

  6. Active-imaging-based underwater navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, David; Schmitt, Gwenaël.; Fischer, Colin; Laurenzis, Martin; Christnacher, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are widely used for the localization and the navigation of unmanned and remotely operated vehicles (ROV). In contrast to ground or aerial vehicles, GNSS cannot be employed for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) without the use of a communication link to the water surface, since satellite signals cannot be received underwater. However, underwater autonomous navigation is still possible using self-localization methods which determines the relative location of an AUV with respect to a reference location using inertial measurement units (IMU), depth sensors and even sometimes radar or sonar imaging. As an alternative or a complementary solution to common underwater reckoning techniques, we present the first results of a feasibility study of an active-imaging-based localization method which uses a range-gated active-imaging system and can yield radiometric and odometric information even in turbid water.

  7. Students Soar at DECA's SoNAR Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiscus, Lyn

    2007-01-01

    Career and Technical Student organizations (CTSOs) are an effective mechanism for achieving the goals of education in the 21st century and No Child Left Behind. Through their hands-on approach to learning, CTSOs provide students with many opportunities to become actively involved in their learning and apply classroom knowledge to real-life…

  8. Use of acoustic classification of sidescan sonar data for mapping benthic habitat in the Northern Channel Islands, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, G.R.; Lafferty, K.D.

    2002-01-01

    Highly reflective seafloor features imaged by sidescan sonar in nearshore waters off the Northern Channel Islands (California, USA) have been observed in subsequent submersible dives to be areas of thin sand coverihg bedrock. Adjacent areas of rocky seafloor, suitable as habitat for endangered species of abalone and rockfish, and encrusting organisms, cannot be differentiated from the areas of thin sand on the basis of acoustic backscatter (i.e. grey level) alone. We found second-order textural analysis of sidescan sonar data useful to differentiate the bottom types where data is not degraded by near-range distortion (caused by slant-range and ground-range corrections), and where data is not degraded by far-range signal attenuation. Hand editing based on submersible observations is necessary to completely convert the sidescan sonar image to a bottom character classification map suitable for habitat mapping. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of the Performance of Deep Sea Survey Sonars from the Results of Search for a Sunken Ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Toshio; Ochi, Hiroshi; Shibata, Jun

    1999-05-01

    The Japan Marine Science & Technology Center carried out a search for the “Tsushima-maru,” a school children evacuation ship which was sunken during the World War II. In this search, we first measured the bottom surface reflection intensity over the entire sea, and narrowed down to a special point using the multi narrow beam echo sounder (SEABEAM 2112.004) equipped to the vessel bottom. Then, the vicinity of the investigated with a towing side scan sonar. Eventually, a TV camera on board an remotely operated vehicle confirming the hull of the ship. The search for the sunken ship was utilized to investigate the performance of the sonars. As a result, resolution and detection abilities of various sonar were confirmed in actual ocean operations.

  10. Relationships between autofocus methods for SAR and self-survey techniques for SONAR. [Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, D.E.; Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Ghiglia, D.C.; Eichel, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    Autofocus methods in SAR and self-survey techniques in SONAR have a common mathematical basis in that they both involve estimation and correction of phase errors introduced by sensor position uncertainties. Time delay estimation and correlation methods have been shown to be effective in solving the self-survey problem for towed SONAR arrays. Since it can be shown that platform motion errors introduce similar time-delay estimation problems in SAR imaging, the question arises as to whether such techniques could be effectively employed for autofocus of SAR imagery. With a simple mathematical model for motion errors in SAR, we will show why such correlation/time-delay techniques are not nearly as effective as established SAR autofocus algorithms such as phase gradient autofocus or sub-aperture based methods. This analysis forms an important bridge between signal processing methodologies for SAR and SONAR. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Navy sonar, cetaceans and the US Supreme Court: a review of cetacean mitigation and litigation in the US.

    PubMed

    Zirbel, K; Balint, P; Parsons, E C M

    2011-01-01

    One source of anthropogenic noise in the oceans which has attracted much concern is naval sonar. As a result of possible impacts of such sonar, several environmental NGOs have pursued legal cases in the United States criticizing environmental assessments conducted prior to exercises and proposed mitigation measures. Cases have been brought using the US National Environmental Protection Act, Marine Mammal Protection Act, Endangered Species Act, Coastal Zone Management Act and other statutes. This paper reviews the chronology and results of these various cases. During the G.W. Bush presidential administration, the legal battle went to the US Supreme Court in the case Winter vs. Natural Resources Defense Council. This case however, did not address the potential impacts of sonar on cetaceans or the effectiveness of mitigation measures. During the Obama administration, mitigation measures for naval exercises have been revised, and working groups planned, in an attempt to resolve conflict between parties. PMID:21507427

  12. Use of acoustic classification of sidescan sonar data for mapping benthic habitat in the Northern Channel Islands, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2002-03-01

    Highly reflective seafloor features imaged by sidescan sonar in nearshore waters off the Northern Channel Islands (California, USA) have been observed in subsequent submersible dives to be areas of thin sand covering bedrock. Adjacent areas of rocky seafloor, suitable as habitat for endangered species of abalone and rockfish, and encrusting organisms, cannot be differentiated from the areas of thin sand on the basis of acoustic backscatter (i.e. grey level) alone. We found second-order textural analysis of sidescan sonar data useful to differentiate the bottom types where data is not degraded by near-range distortion (caused by slant-range and ground-range corrections), and where data is not degraded by far-range signal attenuation. Hand editing based on submersible observations is necessary to completely convert the sidescan sonar image to a bottom character classification map suitable for habitat mapping.

  13. Prognosis in threatened abortion: a comparison between predictions made by sonar urinary hormone assays and clinical judgement.

    PubMed

    Duff, G B

    1975-11-01

    One hundred patients admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of threatened abortion were assessed by means of sonar, urinary oestrogen, pregnanediol and human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) assays and clinical examination. Assay of oestrogen excretion was the most accurate (86-5 per cent) in predicting the ultimate outcome of pregnancy, but did not give as much information as sonar examination which gave an accurate prognosis in 84 per cent of cases and was much quicker to perform The reasons for the sonar failures are discussed. Assay of urinary pregnanediol excretion gave an accurate indication of outcome in 74 per cent of cases and 24-hour urinary HCG in 70 per cent although random urinary HCG estimations provided an accurate prediciton in only 54-5 per cent of cases. Clinical examination presented the usual difficulties in assessing uterine size and predicting abortion from the amount of bleeding and pain. PMID:1191599

  14. Tempo and mode of antibat ultrasound production and sonar jamming in the diverse hawkmoth radiation.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Akito Y; Barber, Jesse R

    2015-05-19

    The bat-moth arms race has existed for over 60 million y, with moths evolving ultrasonically sensitive ears and ultrasound-producing organs to combat bat predation. The evolution of these defenses has never been thoroughly examined because of limitations in simultaneously conducting behavioral and phylogenetic analyses across an entire group. Hawkmoths include >1,500 species worldwide, some of which produce ultrasound using genital stridulatory structures. However, the function and evolution of this behavior remain largely unknown. We built a comprehensive behavioral dataset of hawkmoth hearing and ultrasonic reply to sonar attack using high-throughput field assays. Nearly half of the species tested (57 of 124 species) produced ultrasound to tactile stimulation or playback of bat echolocation attack. To test the function of ultrasound, we pitted big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) against hawkmoths over multiple nights and show that hawkmoths jam bat sonar. Ultrasound production was immediately and consistently effective at thwarting attack and bats regularly performed catching behavior without capturing moths. We also constructed a fossil-calibrated, multigene phylogeny to study the evolutionary history and divergence times of these antibat strategies across the entire family. We show that ultrasound production arose in multiple groups, starting in the late Oligocene (∼ 26 Ma) after the emergence of insectivorous bats. Sonar jamming and bat-detecting ears arose twice, independently, in the Miocene (18-14 Ma) either from earless hawkmoths that produced ultrasound in response to physical contact only, or from species that did not respond to touch or bat echolocation attack. PMID:25941377

  15. Tempo and mode of antibat ultrasound production and sonar jamming in the diverse hawkmoth radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Akito Y.; Barber, Jesse R.

    2015-01-01

    The bat–moth arms race has existed for over 60 million y, with moths evolving ultrasonically sensitive ears and ultrasound-producing organs to combat bat predation. The evolution of these defenses has never been thoroughly examined because of limitations in simultaneously conducting behavioral and phylogenetic analyses across an entire group. Hawkmoths include >1,500 species worldwide, some of which produce ultrasound using genital stridulatory structures. However, the function and evolution of this behavior remain largely unknown. We built a comprehensive behavioral dataset of hawkmoth hearing and ultrasonic reply to sonar attack using high-throughput field assays. Nearly half of the species tested (57 of 124 species) produced ultrasound to tactile stimulation or playback of bat echolocation attack. To test the function of ultrasound, we pitted big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) against hawkmoths over multiple nights and show that hawkmoths jam bat sonar. Ultrasound production was immediately and consistently effective at thwarting attack and bats regularly performed catching behavior without capturing moths. We also constructed a fossil-calibrated, multigene phylogeny to study the evolutionary history and divergence times of these antibat strategies across the entire family. We show that ultrasound production arose in multiple groups, starting in the late Oligocene (∼26 Ma) after the emergence of insectivorous bats. Sonar jamming and bat-detecting ears arose twice, independently, in the Miocene (18–14 Ma) either from earless hawkmoths that produced ultrasound in response to physical contact only, or from species that did not respond to touch or bat echolocation attack. PMID:25941377

  16. Portrait of an Axial Volcanic Ridge: sidescan sonar and bathymetry at three resolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achenbach, K. L.; Searle, R. C.; Le Bas, T.

    2010-12-01

    We present bathymetric and sidescan sonar results from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge between 45°20’N and 45°44’N, where the axial valley is host to a ~4km wide and ~500m high axial volcanic ridge (AVR). The AVR and surrounding seafloor was surveyed concurrently using: a) the ship-mounted Simrad EM-120 echosounder, yielding bathymetry gridded at a resolution of 50m per pixel, and b) TOBI (Towed Ocean Bottom Instrument), which collected both sidescan sonar data (resolution 3m/pixel) and phase data, which were processed to provide bathymetry with a resolution of 10m/pixel. The TOBI survey entailed two ~45km-long north-south tracks and twenty-two ~15km-long east-west tracks; thus, much of the area was surveyed from up to four orthogonal and reciprocal directions, eliminating most regions of shadow and poor image quality. Phase bathymetry was used to generate a synthetic sidescan image, which can be compared to the original sidescan image to subtract angle-of-incidence effects from the image brightness, yielding an image of seafloor reflectivity, a proxy for age. Two areas on the AVR (~4km2 and ~6km2, respectively) were surveyed using the MS2000 sonar mounted on the ROV Isis. These microbathymetry data have a resolution of ~0.5m and provide an independent check of the TOBI phase bathymetry processing techniques. Preliminary study of sidescan and bathymetry from the region suggests that the AVR consists of over 8000 individual monogenetic volcanic cones, and our seafloor reflectivity data allow us to investigate temporal variations in volcanic eruptions during the development of the AVR. The combination of comprehensive data coverage and hierarchy of resolutions of these datasets allow for an unprecedented study of the development of this AVR, which in turn allows for the development of new insights into the timing and distribution of the construction of the volcanic seafloor.

  17. Relaxor-PT single crystals for broad bandwidth, high power sonar projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherlock, Nevin P.

    2010-06-01

    The high piezoelectric response of the ferroelectric relaxor (1 - x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 - xPbTiO3 (PMNT) in single crystal form has generated significant interest in producing broad bandwidth SONAR systems. Both the piezoelectric coefficient (d33 > 2000 pC/N) and coupling coefficient (k33 > 0.90) are superior to those of conventional piezoelectric ceramics. Within the context of a high power acoustic projector, its high losses and low temperature stability have limited its development. Second generation single crystals with compositions modified from the base PMNT have been recently developed to decrease the electromechanical losses and mitigate the thermal property dependence. In this work, the electromechanical properties were measured using single crystals which have been modified in various ways. The modified crystals exhibit electromechanically "hard" behavior with lower losses (tan delta = 0.1--0.2% and QM = 230--950) than unmodified PMNT (tan delta = 0.26% and QM = 190). The measured d33 values of modified single crystals (d33 = 760--1490 pm/V) are also lower than unmodified PMNT (d33 = 1540 pm/V), but the lower piezoelectric response is compensated by the greater stability of the modified single crystals. These modified single crystal properties were also compared to conventional high power piezoelectric ceramics ( d33 = 240 pm/V and QM = 1050) to show similar losses but significantly greater response in the modified PMNT single crystals. Although most piezoelectric materials are measured under small signal conditions (small signal defined by a completely linear relationship between the input and output signals), the high power nature of SONAR projectors demands that these modified single crystals also be evaluated under high power conditions. A test procedure was developed to measure the electromechanical properties of each material as a function of applied electric field over a frequency range which includes the resonance frequency. Modified single crystals

  18. Activity Systems and Moral Reasoning: An Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wardi, Eva; Helkama, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Seventeen social educator students were taught to analyze their work activity by means of a Vygotsky-inspired method, drawing on Engeström's notion of an activity system. The method aimed at increasing the consciousness of the students of the structure of work activity system. The participants wrote two accounts of their field-work practice…

  19. New approaches to enhance active steering system functionalities: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serarslan, Benan

    2014-09-01

    An important development of the steering systems in general is active steering systems like active front steering and steer-by-wire systems. In this paper the current functional possibilities in application of active steering systems are explored. A new approach and additional functionalities are presented that can be implemented to the active steering systems without additional hardware such as new sensors and electronic control units. Commercial active steering systems are controlling the steering angle depending on the driving situation only. This paper introduce methods for enhancing active steering system functionalities depending not only on the driving situation but also vehicle parameters like vehicle mass, tyre and road condition. In this regard, adaptation of the steering ratio as a function of above mentioned vehicle parameters is presented with examples. With some selected vehicle parameter changes, the reduction of the undesired influences on vehicle dynamics of these parameter changes has been demonstrated theoretically with simulations and with real-time driving measurements.

  20. Directionality of sperm whale sonar clicks and its relation to piston radiation theory.

    PubMed

    Beedholm, Kristian; Møhl, Bertel

    2006-02-01

    This paper investigates the applicability to sperm whales of the theory of sound radiating from a piston. The theory is applied to a physical model and to a series of sperm whale clicks. Results show that wave forms of off-axis signals can be reproduced by convolving an on-axis signal with the spatial impulse response of a piston. The angle of a recorded click can be estimated as the angle producing the spatial impulse response that gives the best match with the observation when convolved with the on-axis wave form. It is concluded that piston theory applies to sperm whale sonar click emission. PMID:16521791