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Sample records for active sonar target

  1. Target-depth estimation in active sonar: Cramer-Rao bounds for a bilinear sound-speed profile.

    PubMed

    Mours, Alexis; Ioana, Cornel; Mars, Jérôme I; Josso, Nicolas F; Doisy, Yves

    2016-09-01

    This paper develops a localization method to estimate the depth of a target in the context of active sonar, at long ranges. The target depth is tactical information for both strategy and classification purposes. The Cramer-Rao lower bounds for the target position as range and depth are derived for a bilinear profile. The influence of sonar parameters on the standard deviations of the target range and depth are studied. A localization method based on ray back-propagation with a probabilistic approach is then investigated. Monte-Carlo simulations applied to a summer Mediterranean sound-speed profile are performed to evaluate the efficiency of the estimator. This method is finally validated on data in an experimental tank.

  2. Method and Apparatus for Improved Active Sonar Using Singular Value Decomposition Filtering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-26

    of both projector and receiver of the sonar, type of sonar, range resolution of the sonar, number of eigenrays striking the surface and bottom of the...sonar environment, number of eigenrays striking the target, ray trajectories to the target, and surface and bottom scattering strength as a function...the propagation channel or any other non- homogeneous responses due to channel and/or target interactions. [0052] The system for improved active sonar

  3. Timing matters: sonar call groups facilitate target localization in bats.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Ninad B; Wohlgemuth, Melville J; Hulgard, Katrine; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F

    2014-01-01

    To successfully negotiate a cluttered environment, an echolocating bat must control the timing of motor behaviors in response to dynamic sensory information. Here we detail the big brown bat's adaptive temporal control over sonar call production for tracking prey, moving predictably or unpredictably, under different experimental conditions. We studied the adaptive control of vocal-motor behaviors in free-flying big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, as they captured tethered and free-flying insects, in open and cluttered environments. We also studied adaptive sonar behavior in bats trained to track moving targets from a resting position. In each of these experiments, bats adjusted the features of their calls to separate target and clutter. Under many task conditions, flying bats produced prominent sonar sound groups identified as clusters of echolocation pulses with relatively stable intervals, surrounded by longer pulse intervals. In experiments where bats tracked approaching targets from a resting position, bats also produced sonar sound groups, and the prevalence of these sonar sound groups increased when motion of the target was unpredictable. We hypothesize that sonar sound groups produced during flight, and the sonar call doublets produced by a bat tracking a target from a resting position, help the animal resolve dynamic target location and represent the echo scene in greater detail. Collectively, our data reveal adaptive temporal control over sonar call production that allows the bat to negotiate a complex and dynamic environment.

  4. Timing matters: sonar call groups facilitate target localization in bats

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ninad B.; Wohlgemuth, Melville J.; Hulgard, Katrine; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    To successfully negotiate a cluttered environment, an echolocating bat must control the timing of motor behaviors in response to dynamic sensory information. Here we detail the big brown bat's adaptive temporal control over sonar call production for tracking prey, moving predictably or unpredictably, under different experimental conditions. We studied the adaptive control of vocal-motor behaviors in free-flying big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, as they captured tethered and free-flying insects, in open and cluttered environments. We also studied adaptive sonar behavior in bats trained to track moving targets from a resting position. In each of these experiments, bats adjusted the features of their calls to separate target and clutter. Under many task conditions, flying bats produced prominent sonar sound groups identified as clusters of echolocation pulses with relatively stable intervals, surrounded by longer pulse intervals. In experiments where bats tracked approaching targets from a resting position, bats also produced sonar sound groups, and the prevalence of these sonar sound groups increased when motion of the target was unpredictable. We hypothesize that sonar sound groups produced during flight, and the sonar call doublets produced by a bat tracking a target from a resting position, help the animal resolve dynamic target location and represent the echo scene in greater detail. Collectively, our data reveal adaptive temporal control over sonar call production that allows the bat to negotiate a complex and dynamic environment. PMID:24860509

  5. Trading detection for resolution in active sonar receivers.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nabin S; Buck, John R; Simmons, James A

    2011-09-01

    This paper proposes an active sonar receivers that offers a smooth trade-off between detection and resolution. A matched filter is the optimal detector of known signals in white Gaussian noise but may fail to resolve the targets if the time separation of targets is less than the mainlobe width of the autocorrelation function of the transmitted signal. An inverse filter achieves optimal resolution performance for multiple targets in the absence of noise, but amplifies the noise outside the signal bandwidth in a manner that makes it impractical in many realistic scenarios. The proposed active sonar receiver, the variable resolution and detection receiver (VRDR) combines the matched and inverse filter properties to achieve a smooth trade-off between detection and resolution. Simulated receiver operating characteristics demonstrate that for a range of dipole sonar targets, the performance of the VRDR is superior to the matched and inverse filter, as well as another previously proposed bandlimited inverse filter.

  6. Predicting the Environmental Impact of Active Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Alec J.; McCauley, Robert D.; Maggi, Amos L.

    2004-11-01

    The effect of active sonar on marine animals, particularly mammals, has become a hot topic in recent times. The Australian Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 obligates Defence to avoid significant environmental impacts from Navy activities including those which produce underwater sound such as active sonar. It is in the interests of all parties that these effects be modeled accurately to facilitate both the quantitative evaluation of the consequences of any proposed sonar trials, and the identification of suitable mitigation procedures. This paper discusses the received signal parameters that are of importance when predicting the effect of sonar systems on marine animals and techniques for modeling both the expected values of these parameters and their statistical fluctuations.

  7. Sonar target enhancement by shrinkage of incoherent wavelet coefficients.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Alan J; van Vossen, Robbert

    2014-01-01

    Background reverberation can obscure useful features of the target echo response in broadband low-frequency sonar images, adversely affecting detection and classification performance. This paper describes a resolution and phase-preserving means of separating the target response from the background reverberation noise using a coherence-based wavelet shrinkage method proposed recently for de-noising magnetic resonance images. The algorithm weights the image wavelet coefficients in proportion to their coherence between different looks under the assumption that the target response is more coherent than the background. The algorithm is demonstrated successfully on experimental synthetic aperture sonar data from a broadband low-frequency sonar developed for buried object detection.

  8. Enhanced Multistatic Active Sonar via Innovative Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    Grove, CA, November, 2014. [in press, refereed]. C . Gianelli, L. Xu, and J. Li, " Active Sonar Systems in the Presence of Strong Direct Blast", Oceans...3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Oct. 01, 2014-Sept. 30, 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhanced Multistatic Active Sonar via Innovative Signal... active sonar (CAS) in the presence of strong direct blast is studied for the Doppler-tolerant linear frequency modulation waveform. A receiver design

  9. Enhanced Multistatic Active Sonar via Innovative Signal Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    DATES COVERED (From - To) Oct. 01. 2013-Sept. 30, 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhanced Multistatic Active Sonar via Innovative Signal Processing 5a...DISTRIBUTION AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Pulsed active sonar ...PAS) and continuous active sonar (CAS) in the presence of strong direct blast are studied for the Doppler-tolerant linear frequency modulation

  10. Neural networks for improved target differentiation and localization with sonar.

    PubMed

    Ayrulu, B; Barshan, B

    2001-04-01

    This study investigates the processing of sonar signals using neural networks for robust differentiation of commonly encountered features in indoor robot environments. Differentiation of such features is of interest for intelligent systems in a variety of applications. Different representations of amplitude and time-of-flight measurement patterns acquired from a real sonar system are processed. In most cases, best results are obtained with the low-frequency component of the discrete wavelet transform of these patterns. Modular and non-modular neural network structures trained with the back-propagation and generating-shrinking algorithms are used to incorporate learning in the identification of parameter relations for target primitives. Networks trained with the generating-shrinking algorithm demonstrate better generalization and interpolation capability and faster convergence rate. Neural networks can differentiate more targets employing only a single sensor node, with a higher correct differentiation percentage (99%) than achieved with previously reported methods (61-90%) employing multiple sensor nodes. A sensor node is a pair of transducers with fixed separation, that can rotate and scan the target to collect data. Had the number of sensing nodes been reduced in the other methods, their performance would have been even worse. The success of the neural network approach shows that the sonar signals do contain sufficient information to differentiate all target types, but the previously reported methods are unable to resolve this identifying information. This work can find application in areas where recognition of patterns hidden in sonar signals is required. Some examples are system control based on acoustic signal detection and identification, map building, navigation, obstacle avoidance, and target-tracking applications for mobile robots and other intelligent systems.

  11. Target Images in the Sonar of Bats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    targets was regulated by controlling the delay of the echoes electronically. The bat was rewarded with a piece of a mealworm offered in forceps for each...and on the test-days each bat was run on a number of trials that was determined by its current body weight and the quantity of mealworms consumed...Naval Research in a series of meetings held in 1985 and 1986. We are grateful for having the opportunity to address them. 56 REFERENCES Altes, RA (1976

  12. Examining the robustness of automated aural classification of active sonar echoes.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stefan M; Hines, Paul C

    2014-02-01

    Active sonar systems are used to detect underwater man-made objects of interest (targets) that are too quiet to be reliably detected with passive sonar. Performance of active sonar can be degraded by false alarms caused by echoes returned from geological seabed structures (clutter) in shallow regions. To reduce false alarms, a method of distinguishing target echoes from clutter echoes is required. Research has demonstrated that perceptual-based signal features similar to those employed in the human auditory system can be used to automatically discriminate between target and clutter echoes, thereby reducing the number of false alarms and improving sonar performance. An active sonar experiment on the Malta Plateau in the Mediterranean Sea was conducted during the Clutter07 sea trial and repeated during the Clutter09 sea trial. The dataset consists of more than 95,000 pulse-compressed echoes returned from two targets and many geological clutter objects. These echoes were processed using an automatic classifier that quantifies the timbre of each echo using a number of perceptual signal features. Using echoes from 2007, the aural classifier was trained to establish a boundary between targets and clutter in the feature space. Temporal robustness was then investigated by testing the classifier on echoes from the 2009 experiment.

  13. Marine Mammal Active Sonar Test 2004 (MAST 2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Peter J.; Vandiver, Amy; Edelson, Geoffrey S.; Frankel, Adam S.; Clark, Christopher W.

    2004-05-01

    The Marine Mammal Active Sonar Test was conducted in January 2004 off the central California coast during the gray whale migration. The purpose of the test was to collect data to significantly advance active sonar detection, classification, and tracking of marine mammals out to ranges of 1 mile. The R/V NEW HORIZON was moored in the migration path. Two different sonar systems operating between 210 and 220 dB were deployed off the vessel, the IMAPS phased array sonar system that operates from 20-30 kHz and the MAST mechanical system that uses rotating parabolic transducers operating from 30 to 40 kHz. Marine mammal observers were deployed on the bluffs overlooking the experiment and aboard the NEW HORIZON. The observers tracked the whales using electronic theodelites, providing ground truth for the sonar systems. They also looked for any severe reactions from the animals, and called for a shutdown if any marine mammals were observed within 100 m of the sonar. Here, we discuss the experiment and the results to date, including any reaction of the whales to the sonar system. We will also touch on the legal battle to conduct the experiment, and lessons learned.

  14. Delphinid behavioral responses to incidental mid-frequency active sonar.

    PubMed

    Henderson, E Elizabeth; Smith, Michael H; Gassmann, Martin; Wiggins, Sean M; Douglas, Annie B; Hildebrand, John A

    2014-10-01

    Opportunistic observations of behavioral responses by delphinids to incidental mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar were recorded in the Southern California Bight from 2004 through 2008 using visual focal follows, static hydrophones, and autonomous recorders. Sound pressure levels were calculated between 2 and 8 kHz. Surface behavioral responses were observed in 26 groups from at least three species of 46 groups out of five species encountered during MFA sonar incidents. Responses included changes in behavioral state or direction of travel, changes in vocalization rates and call intensity, or a lack of vocalizations while MFA sonar occurred. However, 46% of focal groups not exposed to sonar also changed their behavior, and 43% of focal groups exposed to sonar did not change their behavior. Mean peak sound pressure levels when a behavioral response occurred were around 122 dB re: 1 μPa. Acoustic localizations of dolphin groups exhibiting a response gave insight into nighttime movement patterns and provided evidence that impacts of sonar may be mediated by behavioral state. The lack of response in some cases may indicate a tolerance of or habituation to MFA sonar by local populations; however, the responses that occur at lower received levels may point to some sensitization as well.

  15. Phase calibration of sonar systems using standard targets and dual-frequency transmission pulses.

    PubMed

    Islas-Cital, Alan; Atkins, Philip R; Foo, Kae Y; Picó, Ruben

    2011-10-01

    The phase angle component of the complex frequency response of a sonar system operating near transducer resonance is usually distorted. Interpretation and classification of the received sonar signal benefits from the preservation of waveform fidelity over the full bandwidth. A calibration process that measures the phase response in addition to the amplitude response is thus required. This paper describes an extension to the standard-target calibration method to include phase angle, without affecting the experimental apparatus, by using dual-frequency transmission pulses and frequency-domain data processing. This approach reduces the impact of unknown range and sound speed parameters upon phase calibration accuracy, as target phase is determined from the relationship of the two frequency components instead of relying on a local phase reference. Tungsten carbide spheres of various sizes were used to simultaneously calibrate the amplitude and phase response of an active sonar system in a laboratory tank. Experimental measurements of target phase spectra are in good agreement with values predicted from a theoretical model based upon full-wave analysis, over an operating frequency of 50-125 kHz.

  16. Passive Sonar Target Recognition Using a Back-Propagating Neural Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    to train our neural network. Chapter three discusses the development of the sonar target model and some of its properties and assumptions. Chapter...through noise and other disturbances. In applying this property to sonar targets, this means the ability to identify a target even when it undergoes... properties . Some applications have shown that neural networks can learn special kinship patterns among families. After memorizing the genealogies of

  17. Active sonar, beaked whales and European regional policy.

    PubMed

    Dolman, Sarah J; Evans, Peter G H; Notarbartolo-di-Sciara, Giuseppe; Frisch, Heidrun

    2011-01-01

    Various reviews, resolutions and guidance from international and regional fora have been produced in recent years that acknowledge the significance of marine noise and its potential impacts on cetaceans. Within Europe, ACCOBAMS and ASCOBANS have shown increasing attention to the issue. The literature highlights concerns surrounding the negative impacts of active sonar on beaked whales in particular, where concerns primarily relate to the use of mid-frequency active sonar (1-10kHz), as used particularly in military exercises. The authors review the efforts that European regional policies have undertaken to acknowledge and manage possible negative impacts of active sonar and how these might assist the transition from scientific research to policy implementation, including effective management and mitigation measures at a national level.

  18. Automated target classification in high resolution dual frequency sonar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aridgides, Tom; Fernández, Manuel

    2007-04-01

    An improved computer-aided-detection / computer-aided-classification (CAD/CAC) processing string has been developed. The classified objects of 2 distinct strings are fused using the classification confidence values and their expansions as features, and using "summing" or log-likelihood-ratio-test (LLRT) based fusion rules. The utility of the overall processing strings and their fusion was demonstrated with new high-resolution dual frequency sonar imagery. Three significant fusion algorithm improvements were made. First, a nonlinear 2nd order (Volterra) feature LLRT fusion algorithm was developed. Second, a Box-Cox nonlinear feature LLRT fusion algorithm was developed. The Box-Cox transformation consists of raising the features to a to-be-determined power. Third, a repeated application of a subset feature selection / feature orthogonalization / Volterra feature LLRT fusion block was utilized. It was shown that cascaded Volterra feature LLRT fusion of the CAD/CAC processing strings outperforms summing, baseline single-stage Volterra and Box-Cox feature LLRT algorithms, yielding significant improvements over the best single CAD/CAC processing string results, and providing the capability to correctly call the majority of targets while maintaining a very low false alarm rate. Additionally, the robustness of cascaded Volterra feature fusion was demonstrated, by showing that the algorithm yields similar performance with the training and test sets.

  19. Application of musical timbre discrimination features to active sonar classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Victor W.; Hines, Paul C.; Pecknold, Sean

    2005-04-01

    In musical acoustics significant effort has been devoted to uncovering the physical basis of timbre perception. Most investigations into timbre rely on multidimensional scaling (MDS), in which different musical sounds are arranged as points in multidimensional space. The Euclidean distance between points corresponds to the perceptual distance between sounds and the multidimensional axes are linked to measurable properties of the sounds. MDS has identified numerous temporal and spectral features believed to be important to timbre perception. There is reason to believe that some of these features may have wider application in the disparate field of underwater acoustics, since anecdotal evidence suggests active sonar returns from metallic objects sound different than natural clutter returns when auralized by human operators. This is particularly encouraging since attempts to develop robust automatic classifiers capable of target-clutter discrimination over a wide range of operational conditions have met with limited success. Spectral features relevant to target-clutter discrimination are believed to include click-pitch and envelope irregularity; relevant temporal features are believed to include duration, sub-band attack/decay time, and time separation pitch. Preliminary results from an investigation into the role of these timbre features in target-clutter discrimination will be presented. [Work supported by NSERC and GDC.

  20. Big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) reveal diverse strategies for sonar target tracking in clutter.

    PubMed

    Mao, Beatrice; Aytekin, Murat; Wilkinson, Gerald S; Moss, Cynthia F

    2016-09-01

    Bats actively adjust the acoustic features of their sonar calls to control echo information specific to a given task and environment. A previous study investigated how bats adapted their echolocation behavior when tracking a moving target in the presence of a stationary distracter at different distances and angular offsets. The use of only one distracter, however, left open the possibility that a bat could reduce the interference of the distracter by turning its head. Here, bats tracked a moving target in the presence of one or two symmetrically placed distracters to investigate adaptive echolocation behavior in a situation where vocalizing off-axis would result in increased interference from distracter echoes. Both bats reduced bandwidth and duration but increased sweep rate in more challenging distracter conditions, and surprisingly, made more head turns in the two-distracter condition compared to one, but only when distracters were placed at large angular offsets. However, for most variables examined, subjects showed distinct strategies to reduce clutter interference, either by (1) changing spectral or temporal features of their calls, or (2) producing large numbers of sonar sound groups and consistent head-turning behavior. The results suggest that individual bats can use different strategies for target tracking in cluttered environments.

  1. Active Fish Tracking Sonar (AFTS) for Assessing Fish Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hedgepeth, J; Johnson, Gary E. ); Skalski, John R.; Burczynski, J

    2002-11-01

    Active fish tracking sonars (AFTS) were used in 2001 to study fish movement in response to intake occlusion plates at The Dalles Dam on the Columbia River. AFTS provides three-dimensional fish tracks by aligning the axis of a split-beam transducer with a fish target. High-speed stepper motors move the transducer so that a tracked target remains on-axis. Occlusion plates with lateral extensions covered the top half of the turbine intakes to produce a fish friendly near-dam environment. Two AFTS were positioned at the center of Main Unit 1, one each for monitoring installed and removed plate conditions. A regression analysis showed that occlusion plates had pronounced effects on fish movement along the dam. The plates appeared to inhibit movement toward the spillway, movement toward the dam (especially in front of the turbine intake), and movement downward toward the turbines. Fish fate (as opposed to movement directions from regression slopes) into particular areas was determined using Markov-chain analysis. The sluiceway (a safer passage route above the turbine intake) zone of influence was larger with the occlusion plates installed, contrary to the regression results. In addition, the probability of passage out the near turbine and bottom sides of the sample volume was about 50% lower with occlusion plates installed.

  2. Digital sonar system

    DOEpatents

    Young, Kenneth K.; Wilkes, R. Jeffrey

    1995-01-01

    A transponder of an active digital sonar system identifies a multifrequency underwater activating sonar signal received from a remote sonar transmitter. The transponder includes a transducer that receives acoustic waves, including the activating sonar signal, and generates an analog electrical receipt signal. The analog electrical receipt signal is converted to a digital receipt signal and cross-correlated with a digital transmission signal pattern corresponding to the activating sonar signal. A relative peak in the cross-correlation value is indicative of the activating sonar signal having been received by the transponder. In response to identifying the activating sonar signal, the transponder transmits a responding multifrequency sonar signal.

  3. Digital sonar system

    DOEpatents

    Young, K.K.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1995-11-21

    A transponder of an active digital sonar system identifies a multifrequency underwater activating sonar signal received from a remote sonar transmitter. The transponder includes a transducer that receives acoustic waves, including the activating sonar signal, and generates an analog electrical receipt signal. The analog electrical receipt signal is converted to a digital receipt signal and cross-correlated with a digital transmission signal pattern corresponding to the activating sonar signal. A relative peak in the cross-correlation value is indicative of the activating sonar signal having been received by the transponder. In response to identifying the activating sonar signal, the transponder transmits a responding multifrequency sonar signal. 4 figs.

  4. Testing of a Composite Wavelet Filter to Enhance Automated Target Recognition in SONAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Automated Target Recognition (ATR) systems aim to automate target detection, recognition, and tracking. The current project applies a JPL ATR system to low resolution SONAR and camera videos taken from Unmanned Underwater Vehicles (UUVs). These SONAR images are inherently noisy and difficult to interpret, and pictures taken underwater are unreliable due to murkiness and inconsistent lighting. The ATR system breaks target recognition into three stages: 1) Videos of both SONAR and camera footage are broken into frames and preprocessed to enhance images and detect Regions of Interest (ROIs). 2) Features are extracted from these ROIs in preparation for classification. 3) ROIs are classified as true or false positives using a standard Neural Network based on the extracted features. Several preprocessing, feature extraction, and training methods are tested and discussed in this report.

  5. 75 FR 5055 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; U.S. Navy's Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training (AFAST)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    .... Navy's Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training (AFAST) AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS..., testing, and evaluation (RDT&E) activities to be conducted within the Atlantic Fleet Active Sonar Training... side mine hunting sonar in the AFAST Study area, which reduces use from 4474 hours annually to 0....

  6. PMHT Approach for Multi-Target Multi-Sensor Sonar Tracking in Clutter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Li, Yaan; Yu, Jing; Chen, Xiao; Dai, Miao

    2015-11-06

    Multi-sensor sonar tracking has many advantages, such as the potential to reduce the overall measurement uncertainty and the possibility to hide the receiver. However, the use of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking is challenging because of the complexity of the underwater environment, especially the low target detection probability and extremely large number of false alarms caused by reverberation. In this work, to solve the problem of multi-target multi-sensor sonar tracking in the presence of clutter, a novel probabilistic multi-hypothesis tracker (PMHT) approach based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed. The PMHT can efficiently handle the unknown measurements-to-targets and measurements-to-transmitters data association ambiguity. The EKF and UKF are used to deal with the high degree of nonlinearity in the measurement model. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can improve the target tracking performance in a cluttered environment greatly, and its computational load is low.

  7. Target re-acquisition using acoustic features with an autonomous underwater vehicle-borne sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Joseph; Schmidt, Henrik

    2003-10-01

    Concurrent mapping and localization (CML) is a technique for unsupervised feature-based mapping of unknown environments, and is an essential tool for autonomous robots. For land robots, CML can be applied using video, laser, or acoustic sensors, while for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) the only effective transducer in most situations is sonar. In the Generic Oceanographic Array Technology Sonar (GOATS) experiment series, CML was effectively demonstrated using a single AUV. A further hurdle in the full implementation of AUV minehunting is to re-acquire and identify targets of interest. Target re-acquisition allows other vehicles to be called into a target location to further investigate with adaptive sonar geometries or alternative sensor suites designed for classification. In this work, the features in the CML-generated map are extended from only spatial coordinates to include acoustic features such as spectral response. It is demonstrated that the inclusion of acoustic features aids in the global positioning within the map, although the fine positioning is still accomplished through standard CML. In addition, areas that are sparsely populated with targets, e.g., a sandy coastline, are shown to be more readily navigable using acoustic features.

  8. Investigation of measureable parameters that correlate with automatic target recognition performance in synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazagnaire, Julia; Cobb, J. T.; Isaacs, Jason

    2015-05-01

    There is a desire in the Mine Counter Measure community to develop a systematic method to predict and/or estimate the performance of Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms that are detecting and classifying mine-like objects within sonar data. Ideally, parameters exist that can be measured directly from the sonar data that correlate with ATR performance. In this effort, two metrics were analyzed for their predictive potential using high frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) images. The first parameter is a measure of contrast. It is essentially the variance in pixel intensity over a fixed partition of relatively small size. An analysis was performed to determine the optimum block size for this contrast calculation. These blocks were then overlapped in the horizontal and vertical direction over the entire image. The second parameter is the one-dimensional K-shape parameter. The K-distribution is commonly used to describe sonar backscatter return from range cells that contain a finite number of scatterers. An Ada-Boosted Decision Tree classifier was used to calculate the probability of classification (Pc) and false alarm rate (FAR) for several types of targets in SAS images from three different data sets. ROC curves as a function of the measured parameters were generated and the correlation between the measured parameters in the vicinity of each of the contacts and the ATR performance was investigated. The contrast and K-shape parameters were considered separately. Additionally, the contrast and K-shape parameter were associated with background texture types using previously labeled high frequency SAS images.

  9. Can the elongated hindwing tails of fluttering moths serve as false sonar targets to divert bat attacks?

    PubMed

    Lee, Wu-Jung; Moss, Cynthia F

    2016-05-01

    It has long been postulated that the elongated hindwing tails of many saturniid moths have evolved to create false sonar targets to divert the attack of echolocation-guided bat predators. However, rigorous echo-acoustic evidence to support this hypothesis has been lacking. In this study, fluttering luna moths (Actias luna), a species with elongated hindwing tails, were ensonified with frequency modulated chirp signals from all angles of orientation and across the wingbeat cycle. High-speed stereo videography was combined with pulse compression sonar processing to characterize the echo information available to foraging bats. Contrary to previous suggestions, the results show that the tail echoes are weak and do not dominate the sonar returns, compared to the large, planar wings and the moth body. However, the distinctive twisted morphology of the tails create persistent echoes across all angles of orientation, which may induce erroneous sonar target localization and disrupt accurate tracking by echolocating bats. These findings thus suggest a refinement of the false target hypothesis to emphasize sonar localization errors induced by the twisted tails, and highlight the importance of physics-based approaches to study the sensory information involved in the evolutionary arms race between moths and their bat predators.

  10. First direct measurements of behavioural responses by Cuvier's beaked whales to mid-frequency active sonar.

    PubMed

    DeRuiter, Stacy L; Southall, Brandon L; Calambokidis, John; Zimmer, Walter M X; Sadykova, Dinara; Falcone, Erin A; Friedlaender, Ari S; Joseph, John E; Moretti, David; Schorr, Gregory S; Thomas, Len; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-08-23

    Most marine mammal- strandings coincident with naval sonar exercises have involved Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). We recorded animal movement and acoustic data on two tagged Ziphius and obtained the first direct measurements of behavioural responses of this species to mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar signals. Each recording included a 30-min playback (one 1.6-s simulated MFA sonar signal repeated every 25 s); one whale was also incidentally exposed to MFA sonar from distant naval exercises. Whales responded strongly to playbacks at low received levels (RLs; 89-127 dB re 1 µPa): after ceasing normal fluking and echolocation, they swam rapidly, silently away, extending both dive duration and subsequent non-foraging interval. Distant sonar exercises (78-106 dB re 1 µPa) did not elicit such responses, suggesting that context may moderate reactions. The observed responses to playback occurred at RLs well below current regulatory thresholds; equivalent responses to operational sonars could elevate stranding risk and reduce foraging efficiency.

  11. Method for shaping and aiming narrow beams. [sonar mapping and target identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A sonar method and apparatus is discribed which utilizes a linear frequency chirp in a transmitter/receiver having a correlator to synthesize a narrow beamwidth pattern from otherwise broadbeam transducers when there is relative velocity between the transmitter/receiver and the target. The chirp is so produced in a generator in bandwidth, B, and time, T, as to produce a time bandwidth product, TB, that is increased for a narrower angle. A replica of the chirp produced in a generator is time delayed and Doppler shifted for use as a reference in the receiver for correlation of received chirps from targets. This reference is Doppler shifted to select targets preferentially, thereby to not only synthesize a narrow beam but also aim the beam in azimuth and elevation.

  12. Optimization of Adaboost Algorithm for Sonar Target Detection in a Multi-Stage ATR System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Tsung Han (Hank)

    2011-01-01

    JPL has developed a multi-stage Automated Target Recognition (ATR) system to locate objects in images. First, input images are preprocessed and sent to a Grayscale Optical Correlator (GOC) filter to identify possible regions-of-interest (ROIs). Second, feature extraction operations are performed using Texton filters and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Finally, the features are fed to a classifier, to identify ROIs that contain the targets. Previous work used the Feed-forward Back-propagation Neural Network for classification. In this project we investigate a version of Adaboost as a classifier for comparison. The version we used is known as GentleBoost. We used the boosted decision tree as the weak classifier. We have tested our ATR system against real-world sonar images using the Adaboost approach. Results indicate an improvement in performance over a single Neural Network design.

  13. Assessing Beaked Whale Reproduction and Stress Response Relative to Sonar Activity at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Assessing Beaked Whale Reproduction and Stress Response...both groups of animals to investigate whether there is a relationship between sonar activity, stress measures, and reproductive rates, to assess... Reproduction and Stress Response Relative to Sonar Activity at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  14. 77 FR 52317 - Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active Sonar

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Navy Record of Decision for Surveillance Towed Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active... Array Sensor System Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) sonar systems with certain...

  15. Continuous Active Sonar for Undersea Vehicles Final Report: Input of Factor Graphs into the Detection, Classification, and Localization Chain and Continuous Active SONAR in Undersea Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-31

    simply adding the two branches. Equation 50 gives the final step before substituting the previously found covanances. (50) where G ~ (v3 + crvz( c [) H ... H can be compared to c since they both are matrices relating the measurement to the state. The variable R in the Kalman filter is the covariance...Wakayama, C . (2013). Multistatic Tracking for Continuous Active Sonar using Doppler-Bearing Measurements. 16th International Conference on Information

  16. A rail system for circular synthetic aperture sonar imaging and acoustic target strength measurements: design/operation/preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, J L; Marston, T M; Lee, K; Lopes, J L; Lim, R

    2014-01-01

    A 22 m diameter circular rail, outfitted with a mobile sonar tower trolley, was designed, fabricated, instrumented with underwater acoustic transducers, and assembled on a 1.5 m thick sand layer at the bottom of a large freshwater pool to carry out sonar design and target scattering response studies. The mobile sonar tower translates along the rail via a drive motor controlled by customized LabVIEW software. The rail system is modular and assembly consists of separately deploying eight circular arc sections, measuring a nominal center radius of 11 m and 8.64 m arc length each, and having divers connect them together in the underwater environment. The system enables full scale measurements on targets of interest with 0.1° angular resolution over a complete 360° aperture, without disrupting target setup, and affording a level of control over target environment conditions and noise sources unachievable in standard field measurements. In recent use, the mobile cart carrying an instrumented sonar tower was translated along the rail in 720 equal position increments and acoustic backscatter data were acquired at each position. In addition, this system can accommodate both broadband monostatic and bistatic scattering measurements on targets of interest, allowing capture of target signature phenomena under diverse configurations to address current scientific and technical issues encountered in mine countermeasure and unexploded ordnance applications. In the work discussed here, the circular rail apparatus is used for acoustic backscatter testing, but this system also has the capacity to facilitate the acquisition of magnetic and optical sensor data from targets of interest. A brief description of the system design and operation will be presented along with preliminary processed results for data acquired from acoustic measurements conducted at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City Division Test Pond Facility. [Work Supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research and

  17. Modeling human echolocation of near-range targets with an audible sonar.

    PubMed

    Kuc, Roman; Kuc, Victor

    2016-02-01

    Blind humans echolocate nearby targets by emitting palatal clicks and perceiving echoes that the auditory system is not able to resolve temporally. The mechanism for perceiving near-range echoes is not known. This paper models the direct mouth-to-ear signal (MES) and the echo to show that the echo enhances the high-frequency components in the composite MES/echo signal with features that allow echolocation. The mouth emission beam narrows with increasing frequency and exhibits frequency-dependent transmission notches in the backward direction toward the ears as predicted by the piston-in-sphere model. The ears positioned behind the mouth detect a MES that contains predominantly the low frequencies contained in the emission. Hence the high-frequency components in the emission that are perceived by the ears are enhanced by the echoes. A pulse/echo audible sonar verifies this model by echolocating targets from 5 cm range, where the MES and echo overlap significantly, to 55 cm. The model predicts that unambiguous ranging occurs over a limited range and that there is an optimal range that produces the highest range resolution.

  18. Patterns of Occurrence and Marine Mammal Acoustic Behavior in Relation to Navy Sonar Activity Off Jacksonville, Florida.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Julie N; Norris, Thomas F; Yack, Tina M; Ferguson, Elizabeth L; Kumar, Anurag; Nissen, Jene; Bell, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Passive acoustic data collected from marine autonomous recording units deployed off Jacksonville, FL (from 13 September to 8 October 2009 and 3 December 2009 to 8 January 2010), were analyzed for detection of cetaceans and Navy sonar. Cetaceans detected included Balaenoptera acutorostrata, Eubalaena glacialis, B. borealis, Physeter macrocephalus, blackfish, and delphinids. E. glacialis were detected at shallow and, somewhat unexpectedly, deep sites. P. macrocephalus were characterized by a strong diel pattern. B. acutorostrata showed the strongest relationship between sonar activity and vocal behavior. These results provide a preliminary assessment of cetacean occurrence off Jacksonville and new insights on vocal responses to sonar.

  19. Gain control in the sonar of odontocetes.

    PubMed

    Ya Supin, Alexander; Nachtigall, Paul E

    2013-06-01

    The sonar of odontocetes processes echo-signals within a wide range of echo levels. The level of echoes varies widely by tens of decibels depending on the level of the emitted sonar pulse, the target strength, the distance to the target, and the sound absorption by the water media. The auditory system of odontocetes must be capable of effective perception, analysis, and discrimination of echo-signals within all this variability. The sonar of odontocetes has several mechanisms to compensate for the echo-level variation (gain control). To date, several mechanisms of the biosonar gain control have been revealed in odontocetes: (1) adjustment of emitted sonar pulse levels (the longer the distance to the target, the higher the level of the emitted pulse), (2) short-term variation of hearing sensitivity based on forward masking of the echo by the preceding self-heard emitted pulse and subsequent release from the masking, and (3) active long-term control of hearing sensitivity. Recent investigations with the use of the auditory evoked-potential technique have demonstrated that these mechanisms effectively minimize the variation of the response to the echo when either the emitted sonar pulse level, or the target distance, or both vary within a wide range. A short review of these data is presented herein.

  20. A Risk Function for Behavioral Disruption of Blainville’s Beaked Whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) from Mid-Frequency Active Sonar

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, David; Thomas, Len; Marques, Tiago; Harwood, John; Dilley, Ashley; Neales, Bert; Shaffer, Jessica; McCarthy, Elena; New, Leslie; Jarvis, Susan; Morrissey, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing concern about the potential effects of noise pollution on marine life in the world’s oceans. For marine mammals, anthropogenic sounds may cause behavioral disruption, and this can be quantified using a risk function that relates sound exposure to a measured behavioral response. Beaked whales are a taxon of deep diving whales that may be particularly susceptible to naval sonar as the species has been associated with sonar-related mass stranding events. Here we derive the first empirical risk function for Blainville’s beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) by combining in situ data from passive acoustic monitoring of animal vocalizations and navy sonar operations with precise ship tracks and sound field modeling. The hydrophone array at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center, Bahamas, was used to locate vocalizing groups of Blainville’s beaked whales and identify sonar transmissions before, during, and after Mid-Frequency Active (MFA) sonar operations. Sonar transmission times and source levels were combined with ship tracks using a sound propagation model to estimate the received level (RL) at each hydrophone. A generalized additive model was fitted to data to model the presence or absence of the start of foraging dives in 30-minute periods as a function of the corresponding sonar RL at the hydrophone closest to the center of each group. This model was then used to construct a risk function that can be used to estimate the probability of a behavioral change (cessation of foraging) the individual members of a Blainville’s beaked whale population might experience as a function of sonar RL. The function predicts a 0.5 probability of disturbance at a RL of 150dBrms re µPa (CI: 144 to 155) This is 15dB lower than the level used historically by the US Navy in their risk assessments but 10 dB higher than the current 140 dB step-function. PMID:24465477

  1. A risk function for behavioral disruption of Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) from mid-frequency active sonar.

    PubMed

    Moretti, David; Thomas, Len; Marques, Tiago; Harwood, John; Dilley, Ashley; Neales, Bert; Shaffer, Jessica; McCarthy, Elena; New, Leslie; Jarvis, Susan; Morrissey, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing concern about the potential effects of noise pollution on marine life in the world's oceans. For marine mammals, anthropogenic sounds may cause behavioral disruption, and this can be quantified using a risk function that relates sound exposure to a measured behavioral response. Beaked whales are a taxon of deep diving whales that may be particularly susceptible to naval sonar as the species has been associated with sonar-related mass stranding events. Here we derive the first empirical risk function for Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) by combining in situ data from passive acoustic monitoring of animal vocalizations and navy sonar operations with precise ship tracks and sound field modeling. The hydrophone array at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center, Bahamas, was used to locate vocalizing groups of Blainville's beaked whales and identify sonar transmissions before, during, and after Mid-Frequency Active (MFA) sonar operations. Sonar transmission times and source levels were combined with ship tracks using a sound propagation model to estimate the received level (RL) at each hydrophone. A generalized additive model was fitted to data to model the presence or absence of the start of foraging dives in 30-minute periods as a function of the corresponding sonar RL at the hydrophone closest to the center of each group. This model was then used to construct a risk function that can be used to estimate the probability of a behavioral change (cessation of foraging) the individual members of a Blainville's beaked whale population might experience as a function of sonar RL. The function predicts a 0.5 probability of disturbance at a RL of 150 dBrms re µPa (CI: 144 to 155) This is 15dB lower than the level used historically by the US Navy in their risk assessments but 10 dB higher than the current 140 dB step-function.

  2. Classification of elastic objects by active sonar in the vicinity of shallow sea boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaunaurd, Guillermo C.; Werby, Michael F.

    1992-09-01

    Active sonar classification of submerged elastic structures becomes increasingly difficult when the structure is close to the bottom or surface of the sea. The backscattering cross-section (BSCS) of any target, which is relatively simpler to determine in deep waters, away from boundaries, becomes substantially distorted as the structure approaches either one of these environmental boundaries. Near these interfaces the classification methodology based on echo resonances that we have used in the past (viz., Appl. Mechanics Reviews 43, 171-208, (1990)) can no longer be used. By means of the examples of a spherical shell and an elastic solid sphere insonified by plane waves, we study the above mentioned degradation in BSCS in order to assess how distant the structure should be from these boundaries before the resonance features become discernible again in the echoes, and object recognition is again possible. Our approach is based on the method of images for the construction of the appropriate Green's functions, combined with a very involved two-body scattering formulation that determines the combined T-Matrix of two insonified objects, when the T-Matrix of each individual object is known. The method is extended to the time domain. We present form-functions in the frequency domain, as well as late-time responses in the time domain for both sphere and shell as they approach the mentioned boundaries. Boundary effects seem to be confined to a 'skin layer' bounded by R

  3. Side Scan Sonar Target Detection in the Presence of Bottom Backscatter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    manifested in the form of depth contours depicted throughout the ra;ion. Whether this task is performed by hand or by machine , it inevitably remains...capability. An important contribution has been digital processing with memory for data storage which allows post- proccessing playback of tape...environmental conditions, The sonar equation is a tool to aid in that prediction. By substituting into the equation the spocific operating variables of the

  4. Target Motion Effects on Passive Sonar: An Appraisal of Basic Factors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    observation times for constant speed and heading conditions. j Keywords - DETECTION FREQUENCY DOMAIN- MONTECARLO TECHNIQUE PASSIVE SONAR’ PROBABILITY DENSITY...TIME, 14 B - MONTECARLO TECHNIQUE, 31 ii SACLANTCEN SM-192 1. Introduction The normal passive detection system involves, in general , the assumption...calculated with the method described in Sect. A.2 of Appendix A and the results are shown in Figs. 8 and 9. Results obtained using a Montecarlo

  5. The application of m-sequences to bi-static active sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deferrari, Harry A.

    2003-10-01

    The m-sequences are ideal pulse compression signals that combine the energy of CW with the resolution of a pulse. Successful applications include numerous acoustic propagation experiments and the Global Positioning System. Yet, early attempts (circa 1960) to apply m-sequences to mono-static active sonar were unsuccessful. Through the years, Birdsall, Metzger and others have developed a body of theory, numerical methods and at-sea demonstrations that establish the feasibility of a novel bi-static approach-one that holds promise in high reverberation shallow water environs. An analysis is presented here. The approach includes (1) continuous transmission of long m-sequences (2) synchronous sampling to form a CON (Complete Ortho-Normal) data set; (3) direct blast removal by HCCO (Hyperspace Cancellation by Coordinate Zeroing); and (4) a full range waveform Doppler search. Ultra-fast Hadamard Transforms speed up the direct waveform pulse m-sequence pulse compression and the inverse pulse waveform transform and thereby allow timely execution of the intensive computational burden. The result is a demonstrable approach that produces a gain of 30 dB over a simple pulse and 10 dB over other sonar signals. In the end, the approach requires continuous transmission and reception as opposed to ping and listen an awkward concept at first.

  6. 75 FR 81284 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... SONAR technologies that operate at frequencies of 50 kiloHertz (kHz) and greater from mobile platforms... proposes to use HF and UHF SONAR technology from mobile platforms nationwide. Mobile platforms include...-specific, non-mobile operating scenarios or newly developed technologies fall outside of the scope of...

  7. Potential Population Consequences of Active Sonar Disturbance in Atlantic Herring: Estimating the Maximum Risk.

    PubMed

    Sivle, Lise Doksæter; Kvadsheim, Petter Helgevold; Ainslie, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Effects of noise on fish populations may be predicted by the population consequence of acoustic disturbance (PCAD) model. We have predicted the potential risk of population disturbance when the highest sound exposure level (SEL) at which adult herring do not respond to naval sonar (SEL(0)) is exceeded. When the population density is low (feeding), the risk is low even at high sonar source levels and long-duration exercises (>24 h). With densely packed populations (overwintering), a sonar exercise might expose the entire population to levels >SEL(0) within a 24-h exercise period. However, the disturbance will be short and the response threshold used here is highly conservative. It is therefore unlikely that naval sonar will significantly impact the herring population.

  8. 78 FR 70567 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Frequency (UHF) Sound Navigation and Ranging (SONAR) Technology and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI..., day or night regardless of visibility and in air and water temperatures and thermoclines normal...

  9. The effect of active sonar for the protection of moored and anchored warships on the human hearing.

    PubMed

    Salami, Angelo; Dellepiane, Massimo; Barbierato, Mauro; Freda, Pierluigi; Crippa, Barbara; Guastini, Luca; Mora, Renzo

    2010-02-01

    This study wants to show the effects of active middle frequency sonar on a selected group of Italian Navy divers. Ten male divers with normal hearing were exposed to active sonar of the Italian Navy for more than 100 exposures, each of at least 1-h duration, in the course of 6 months. Before, at the end, and six months after the end of noise exposure, we performed pure-tone audiometry, Carhart test, Peyser test, thresholds of discomfort test (TDT), tympanometry, transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE), and auditory brainstem response (ABR). At the end of the noise exposure, the audiological tests showed a worsening of the mean air and bone audiometric thresholds at the 2,000 (1/10), 4,000 (7/10), and 8,000 Hz (6/10); a fail status of the TEOAE and DPOAE, which were previously present, in all the divers; temporary threshold shift, at the Peyser test, in 9/10 divers; discomfort for pulse tone presented at the TDT test, in all the divers; no post exposure significant differences at the Carhart and ABR tests, in any of the divers. Six months after the end of noise exposure, all the divers presented a complete recovery of their audio-vestibular functions. Our results show the temporary negative effects of repeated and lasting exposure to active sonar (Hull MF) on the divers; the last control demonstrate the absence of permanent noise-induced hearing loss in divers exposed to active sonar.

  10. Assessing Beaked Whale Reproduction and Stress Response Relative to Sonar Activity at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    England. (2001) Joint interim report Bahamas marine mammal stranding event of 15 – 16 March 2000. National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration...Relative to Sonar Activity at the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center (AUTEC) Diane Elaine Claridge Bahamas Marine Mammal Research...ADDRESS(ES) Bahamas Marine Mammal Research Organisation,P.O. Box AB-20714,Marsh Harbour,Abaco, Bahamas, 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9

  11. Effects of surveillance towed array sensor system (SURTASS) low frequency active sonar on fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popper, Arthur N.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Miller, Diane; Smith, Michael E.; Song, Jiakun; Wysocki, Lidia E.; Hastings, Mardi C.; Kane, Andrew S.; Stein, Peter

    2005-04-01

    We investigated the effects of exposure to Low Frequency Active (LFA) sonar on rainbow trout (a hearing non-specialist related to several endangered salmonids) and channel catfish (a hearing specialist), using an element of the standard SURTASS LFA source array. We measured hearing sensitivity using auditory brainstem response, effects on inner ear structure using scanning electron microscopy, effects on non-auditory tissues using general pathology and histopathology, and behavioral effects with video monitoring. Exposure to 193 dB re 1 microPa (rms received level) in the LFA frequency band for 324 seconds resulted in a TTS of 20 dB at 400 Hz in rainbow trout, with less TTS at 100 and 200 Hz. TTS in catfish ranged from 6 to 12 dB at frequencies from 200 to 1000 Hz. Both species recovered from hearing loss in several days. Inner ears sensory tissues appeared unaffected by acoustic exposure. Gross pathology indicated no damage to non-auditory tissues, including the swim bladder. Both species showed consistent startle responses at sound onsets and changed their position relative to the sound source during exposures. There was no fish death attributable to sound exposure even up to four days post-exposure. [Work supported by Chief of Naval Operations.

  12. Sidescan sonar imagery of widespread fossil and active cold seeps along the central Chilean continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaucke, Ingo; Weinrebe, Wilhelm; Linke, Peter; Kläschen, Dirk; Bialas, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    The central Chilean subduction zone between 35°S and 37°S was investigated in order to identify, document and possibly understand fluid flow and fluid venting within the forearc region. Several areas were mapped using multibeam bathymetry and backscatter, high-resolution sidescan sonar, chirp subbottom profiling and reflection seismic data. On a subsequent cruise ground-truthing observations were made using a video sled. In general, this dataset shows surprisingly little evidence of fluid venting along the mid-slope region, in contrast to other subduction zones such as Central America and New Zealand. There were abundant indications of active and predominantly fossil fluid venting along the upper slope between 36.5°S and 36.8°S at the seaward margin of an intraslope basin. Here, backscatter anomalies suggest widespread authigenic carbonate deposits, likely the result of methane-rich fluid expulsion. There is unpublished evidence that these fluids are of biogenic origin and generated within the slope sediments, similar to other accretionary margins but in contrast to the erosional margin off Central America, where fluids have geochemical signals indicating an origin from the subducting plate.

  13. Echo Statistics of Aggregations of Scatterers in a Random Waveguide: Application to Biologic Sonar Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    matched-filtered data, while lower panels show matched-filtered, split - window-normalized results. An echo that is likely from a fish school is...and non-target scatterers within the water column, often limits active sonar system performance. Fish can constitute a significant portion of sonar...by fish with resonant gas-filled swimbladders can dominate over bottom or surface reverberation. This study examines the contributions of various

  14. Stability augmentation and mosaic method of forward-scan sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Chen, Jinbo; Xu, Yuanyu

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, forward-scan sonar is widely applied to the underwater inspection, which is not subject to the influence of light and turbidity. For expanding the monitoring scope, the image sonar is generally mounted on the pan-tilt platform of a ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) or survey boat. However, there are still some problems such as: 1) The field-of-view is narrow, i.e. the horizontal view angle of DIDSON (Dual-frequency identification sonar) is 29° 2) The dynamic change of a ROV or survey boat by the water disturbances will cause the target to escape from the sonar image easily; 3) The image sonar is fixed on the pan-tilt platform, and its position and posture are unceasingly changed. As a result of these problems, the obtained images may be distorted and not on the same plane. To solve the above problems, stability augmentation of pan-tilt platform based on the principle of bionic eye movements and a mosaic method of sonar images are presented. According to the principle of the vestibule-ocular reflex, an active compensation control system of the mechanical pan-tilt platform is developed. It can compensate the sonar image instability resulting from attitude variation of a ROV or survey boat during operation. Applying multi-sensor fusion technology can rectify the sonar images with different position and posture to be on a single geodetic coordinate frame for image matching. Finally, sonar images can be mosaic. A stable large-scale sonar image can be obtained. The experimental results validate that the presented method is valid.

  15. Obstacle avoidance sonar for submarines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugas, Albert C.; Webman, Kenneth M.

    2002-05-01

    The Advanced Mine Detection Sonar (AMDS) system was designed to operate in poor environments with high biological and/or shallow-water boundary conditions. It provides increased capability for active detection of volume, close-tethered, and bottom mines, as well as submarine and surface target active/passive detection for ASW and collision avoidance. It also provides bottom topography mapping capability for precise submarine navigation in uncharted littoral waters. It accomplishes this by using advanced processing techniques with extremely narrow beamwidths. The receive array consists of 36 modules arranged in a 15-ft-diameter semicircle at the bottom of the submarine sonar dome to form a chin-mounted array. Each module consists of 40 piezoelectric rubber elements. The modules provide the necessary signal conditioning to the element data prior to signal transmission (uplink) through the hull. The elements are amplified, filtered, converted to digital signals by an A/D converter, and multiplexed prior to uplink to the inboard receiver. Each module also has a downlink over which it receives synchronization and mode/gain control. Uplink and downlink transmission is done using fiberoptic telemetry. AMDS was installed on the USS Asheville. The high-frequency chin array for Virginia class submarines is based on the Asheville design.

  16. Digitally controlled sonars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    Sonars are usually designed and constructed as stand alone instruments. That is, all elements or subsystems of the sonar are provided: power conditioning, displays, intercommunications, control, receiver, transmitter, and transducer. The sonars which are a part of the Advanced Ocean Test Development Platform (AOTDP) represent a departure from this manner of implementation and are configured more like an instrumentation system. Only the transducer, transmitter, and receiver which are unique to a particular sonar function; Up, Down, Side Scan, exist as separable subsystems. The remaining functions are reserved to the AOTDP and serve all sonars and other instrumentation in a shared manner. The organization and functions of the common AOTDP elements were described and then the interface with the sonars discussed. The techniques for software control of the sonar parameters were explained followed by the details of the realization of the sonar functions and some discussion of the performance of the side scan sonars.

  17. Aerial ultrasonic micro Doppler sonar detection range in outdoor environments.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marshall; Sabatier, James M

    2012-03-01

    Current research demonstrates that micro Doppler sonar has the capability to uniquely identify the presence of a moving human, making it an attractive component in surveillance systems for border security applications. Primary environmental factors that limit sonar performance are two-way spreading losses, ultrasonic absorption, and backscattered energy from the ground that appears at zero Doppler shift in the sonar signal processor. Spectral leakage from the backscatter component has a significant effect on sonar performance for slow moving targets. Sonar performance is shown to rapidly decay as the sensor is moved closer to the ground due to increasing surface backscatter levels.

  18. An Improved Azimuth Angle Estimation Method with a Single Acoustic Vector Sensor Based on an Active Sonar Detection System.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Anbang; Ma, Lin; Ma, Xuefei; Hui, Juan

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, an improved azimuth angle estimation method with a single acoustic vector sensor (AVS) is proposed based on matched filtering theory. The proposed method is mainly applied in an active sonar detection system. According to the conventional passive method based on complex acoustic intensity measurement, the mathematical and physical model of this proposed method is described in detail. The computer simulation and lake experiments results indicate that this method can realize the azimuth angle estimation with high precision by using only a single AVS. Compared with the conventional method, the proposed method achieves better estimation performance. Moreover, the proposed method does not require complex operations in frequencydomain and achieves computational complexity reduction.

  19. An Improved Azimuth Angle Estimation Method with a Single Acoustic Vector Sensor Based on an Active Sonar Detection System

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Anbang; Ma, Lin; Ma, Xuefei; Hui, Juan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an improved azimuth angle estimation method with a single acoustic vector sensor (AVS) is proposed based on matched filtering theory. The proposed method is mainly applied in an active sonar detection system. According to the conventional passive method based on complex acoustic intensity measurement, the mathematical and physical model of this proposed method is described in detail. The computer simulation and lake experiments results indicate that this method can realize the azimuth angle estimation with high precision by using only a single AVS. Compared with the conventional method, the proposed method achieves better estimation performance. Moreover, the proposed method does not require complex operations in frequency-domain and achieves computational complexity reduction. PMID:28230763

  20. Imaging Active and Relict Seafloor Methane Seep Sites: a Comparison of Seafloor 3D Seismic Reflectivity and Multibeam Sonar Backscatter Intensity at Omakere Ridge, Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, T. V.; Pecher, I. A.; Crutchley, G. J.; Klaeschen, D.; Papenberg, C. A.; Bialas, J.; Greinert, J.; Townend, J.; SO214 Shipboard Scientific Party

    2011-12-01

    Omakere Ridge is an anticlinal thrust ridge in water depths of 1100-1700 m on the Hikurangi Margin, east of the North Island of New Zealand, and an area of active seafloor methane seepage associated with an extensive gas hydrate province. Methane seep sites on the Hikurangi Margin are characterised by localised build-ups of hard authigenic carbonate and chemosynthetic seep fauna that exist on a seafloor otherwise characterised by soft, muddy sediments. Previous studies have shown that these seep sites appear as areas of high backscatter in sonar images, but backscatter data alone do not provide detailed information on the present level of activity of a seep site, or the thickness of the carbonate build-up. Here we present a comparison of seafloor seismic reflectivity and multibeam sonar backscatter intensity data collected from active and relict methane seep sites on Omakere Ridge. High-resolution P-Cable 3D seismic reflection data and 12 kHz EM120 multibeam sonar data were collected in March 2011 during the RV Sonne cruise SO214. Seafloor seismic amplitude maps have been derived from the shipboard post-stack migrated data cube. A pronounced acquisition artifact is manifest in the seafloor horizon slice as high and low amplitude stripes that alternate periodically in the crossline direction. We have removed this artifact from the seafloor horizon slice using Kx-Ky filtering, followed by direct sampling and deterministic removal of the very-low-frequency components in the spatial domain. The seismic amplitude map has then been transformed into a calibrated seafloor reflection coefficient map. Sonar backscatter mosaics have been created after correcting for instrument response, angular variation in backscatter and bathymetry. Several backscatter mosaics were incorporated into a stacked mosaic over the study area to attenuate random noise. The high sonar backscatter response at the seep sites is generally accompanied by high seismic reflectivity. However, the

  1. Active part of Charlie--Gibbs fracture zone: A study using sonar and other geophysical techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, R.

    1981-01-10

    A short survey with Gloria side-scan sonar and other geophysical instruments has revealed new information about Charlie--Gibbs fracture zone between 29/sup 0/ and 36 /sup 0/W. The traces of two transform faults have been clearly delineated. They fit small circles about the pole of rotation with an rms error of only about 1 km, but they do not always follow the deepest parts of the transform valleys. The transforms are joined by a short spreading center at 31 /sup 0/45 'W. The median transverse ridge appears to have been produced by normal seafloor spreading at this center and bears identifiable Vine-Matthews magnetic anomalies. A transverse ridge along the eastern inactive part of the northern transform may be an intrusive feature. Considerable thickness of sediment appear to have been deposited in the northern transform valley from Norwegian Sea overflow water passing through the fracture zone, but transverse ridges have prevented the sediment reaching the southern valley.

  2. Introduction to Sonar, Naval Education and Training Command. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Education and Training Command, Pensacola, FL.

    This Rate Training Manual (RTM) and Nonresident Career Course form a self-study package for those U.S. Navy personnel who are seeking advancement in the Sonar Technician Rating. Among the requirements of the rating are the abilities to obtain and interpret underwater data, operate and maintain upkeep of sonar equipment, and interpret target and…

  3. Navigation Hazard Survey Sonar.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    NSTL Station, Miss., NORDA Technical Note 17. Flemming, B.W. (1976). Side Scan Sonar: A Practical Guide. Int. Hydrog . Rev., 53(1), p. 65-92. Harris...Corporation, Harris Division, Westwoo, Mass., 02090, manufacturer brochure. Leenhardt, 0. (1975). Side canning Sonar -- A Theoretical Study. Int. Hydrog . Rev

  4. An autocorrelation model of bat sonar.

    PubMed

    Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2008-06-01

    Their sonar system allows echolocating bats to navigate with high skill through a complex, three- dimensional environment at high speed and low light. The auditory analysis of the echoes of their ultrasonic sounds requires a detailed comparison of the emission and echoes. Here an auditory model of bat sonar is introduced and evaluated against a set of psychophysical phantom-target, echo-acoustic experiments. The model consists of a relatively detailed simulation of auditory peripheral processing in the bat, Phyllostomus discolor, followed by a functional module consisting of a strobed, normalised, autocorrelation in each frequency channel. The model output is accumulated in a sonar image buffer. The model evaluation is based on the comparison of the image-buffer contents generated in individually simulated psychophysical trials. The model provides reasonably good predictions for both temporal and spectral behavioural sonar processing in terms of sonar delay-, roughness, and phase sensitivity and in terms of sensitivity to the temporal separations in two-front targets and the classification of spectrally divergent phantom targets.

  5. A Robust and Fast Method for Sidescan Sonar Image Segmentation Using Nonlocal Despeckling and Active Contour Model.

    PubMed

    Huo, Guanying; Yang, Simon X; Li, Qingwu; Zhou, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Sidescan sonar image segmentation is a very important issue in underwater object detection and recognition. In this paper, a robust and fast method for sidescan sonar image segmentation is proposed, which deals with both speckle noise and intensity inhomogeneity that may cause considerable difficulties in image segmentation. The proposed method integrates the nonlocal means-based speckle filtering (NLMSF), coarse segmentation using k -means clustering, and fine segmentation using an improved region-scalable fitting (RSF) model. The NLMSF is used before the segmentation to effectively remove speckle noise while preserving meaningful details such as edges and fine features, which can make the segmentation easier and more accurate. After despeckling, a coarse segmentation is obtained by using k -means clustering, which can reduce the number of iterations. In the fine segmentation, to better deal with possible intensity inhomogeneity, an edge-driven constraint is combined with the RSF model, which can not only accelerate the convergence speed but also avoid trapping into local minima. The proposed method has been successfully applied to both noisy and inhomogeneous sonar images. Experimental and comparative results on real and synthetic sonar images demonstrate that the proposed method is robust against noise and intensity inhomogeneity, and is also fast and accurate.

  6. Experimental Comparison of High Duty Cycle and Pulsed Active Sonars in a Littoral Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    objectives of TREX. Please refer to Ref. [1] for an overview of the experimental goals. 3 target) but at the cost of higher technical risk. A...environmental knowledge to identify the best window of opportunity to execute military operations and provide tactical guidance for optimal deployment of...in the comments column implies HDC-PAS runs on the same track, the same direction ( inbound or outbound), and the same ER mode and gain settings

  7. Forecasting Probability of Target Presence for Ping Control in Multistatic Sonar Networks using Detection and Tracking Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    environmental conditions, sensor performance and threat target behavior [1]. In general , control methods and tactical decision aides may be applied to address...Diego, CA, U.S.A. doug.grimmett@navy.mil Zelda B. Zabinsky Industrial & Systems Engineering University of Washington Seattle, WA, U.S.A. zelda...not immediate, tracking results must be considered in the PT map generation to obtain an accurate assessment of the present and projected operational

  8. A beam based method for target localization: inspiration from bats' directivity and binaural reception for ultrasonic sonar.

    PubMed

    Guarato, Francesco; Windmill, James; Gachagan, Anthony

    2013-06-01

    The process of echolocation is accomplished by bats partly using the beam profiles associated with their ear shapes that allow for discrimination between different echo directions. Indeed, knowledge of the emitted signal characteristic and measurement of the echo travel time from a target make it possible to compensate for attenuation due to distance, and to focus on filtering through the receivers' beam profiles by comparing received echoes to the original signal at all frequencies in the spectrum of interest. From this basis, a beam profile method to localize a target in three-dimensional space for an ultrasonic sensor system equipped with an emitter and two receivers is presented. Simulations were conducted with different noise levels, and only the contribution of the receivers' beam profiles was considered to estimate the orientation of the target with respect to the receivers. The beam pattern of the Phyllostomus discolor's ear was adopted as that of a receiver. Analyses of beam resolution and frequency ranges were conducted to enhance the accuracy of orientation estimates. The choice of appropriate resolution and frequency ranges guarantee that error mean values for most of the orientations are within [0.5°, 1.5°], even in noisy situations: Signal-to-noise ratio values considered in this work are 35 and 50 dB.

  9. Environmentally associated signal-to-interference variability in low-frequency active sonar in Korea Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, P. G.; Carey, W. M.

    2005-09-01

    An analysis has been conducted of spatial and temporal variability of target echo-to-interference measurements made during Area Characterization Test III (ACT III) in 1995 in the Korea Strait. The measurements were made over a 5-day period for five fixed bistatic geometries (spatial scale of order 200 square km) using explosive sources, bottom-mounted horizontal receiving hydrophone arrays, and passive reflector targets in 100-m-depth water under downward-refracting acoustic conditions. The bottom at the ACT III site was nearly flat, of sand-silt composition. Meteorological conditions were relatively calm over the conduction of the measurements, but the main proximate oceanographic feature, the South Korean Coastal Front, did result in a relatively varied and complex sound-speed environment. The signal-to-interference fluctuation statistics associated with a single ping was determined to give a standard deviation of order 1 dB, while the observed variability of signal-to-interference over the spatial and temporal scales of the measurements gave a standard deviation of about 2 dB. The observed variability of received signal-to-interference will be discussed in terms of physical causes and measurement error. [Work supported by ONR Code OA321.

  10. Application of the T-Matrix Method to the Numerical Modeling of a Linear Active Sonar Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    5 2.1 COMSOL Finite Element Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Piezoelectric Spherical Thin-Shell Transducer...maximize the directionality and steer optimum acoustic beams . Figure 1.1 shows two examples of volumetric sonar array applications. (a) (b) Figure 1.1...single-transducer, from such as a finite -element model (FEM). This thesis focuses on building a three- dimensional (3D) FEM of a volumetric

  11. Measurement of fish movements at depths to 6000 m using a deep-ocean lander incorporating a short base-line sonar utilizing miniature code-activated transponder technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagley, P. M.; Bradley, S.; Priede, I. G.; Gray, P.

    1999-12-01

    Most research on animal behaviour in the deep ocean (to depths of 6000 m) is restricted to the capture of dead specimens or viewing activity over small areas of the sea floor by means of cameras or submersibles. This paper describes the use of a miniature acoustic code-activated transponder (CAT) tag and short base-line sonar to track the movements of deep-sea fish in two dimensions over an area 1 km in diameter centred on a lander platform. The CAT tags and sonar are transported to the deep-sea floor by means of a subsea mooring which is ballasted so that it lands and remains on the sea floor for the duration of the tracking experiment (the lander). A description of the CAT, lander and short base-line sonar is given. Results are presented to illustrate the operation of the system.

  12. Behavioral responses by grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) to high frequency sonar.

    PubMed

    Hastie, Gordon D; Donovan, Carl; Götz, Thomas; Janik, Vincent M

    2014-02-15

    The use of high frequency sonar is now commonplace in the marine environment. Most marine mammals rely on sound to navigate, and for detecting prey, and there is the potential that the acoustic signals of sonar could cause behavioral responses. To investigate this, we carried out behavioral response tests with grey seals to two sonar systems (200 and 375 kHz systems). Results showed that both systems had significant effects on the seals behavior; when the 200 kHz sonar was active, seals spent significantly more time hauled out and, although seals remained swimming during operation of the 375 kHz sonar, they were distributed further from the sonar. The results show that although peak sonar frequencies may be above marine mammal hearing ranges, high levels of sound can be produced within their hearing ranges that elicit behavioral responses; this has clear implications for the widespread use of sonar in the marine environment.

  13. Sonar array processing borrows from geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.

    1989-09-01

    The author reports a recent advance in sonar signal processing that has potential military application. It improves signal extraction by modifying a technique devised by a geophysicist. Sonar signal processing is used to track submarine and surface targets, such as aircraft carriers, oil tankers, and, in commercial applications, schools of fish or sunken treasure. Similar signal-processing techniques help radio astronomers track galaxies, physicians see images of the body interior, and geophysicists map the ocean floor or find oil. This hydrid technique, applied in an experimental system, can help resolve strong signals as well as weak ones in the same step.

  14. Introduction to Sonar, Navy Training Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    Fundamentals of sonar systems are presented in this book, prepared for both regular navy and naval reserve personnel who are seeking advancement in rating. An introductory description is first made of submarines and antisubmarine units. Determination of underwater targets is analyzed from the background of true and relative bearings, true and…

  15. Directional Receiver for Biomimetic Sonar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarato, Francesco; Andrews, Heather; Windmill, James F.; Jackson, Joseph; Gachagan, Anthony

    An ultrasonic localization method for a sonar system equipped with an emitter and two directional receivers and inspired by bat echolocation uses knowledge of the beam pattern of the receivers to estimate target orientation. Rousettus leschenaultii's left ear constitutes the model for the design of the optimal receiver for this sonar system and 3D printing was used to fabricate receiver structures comprising of two truncated cones with an elliptical external perimeter and a parabolic flare rate in the upper part. Measurements show one receiver has a predominant lobe in the same region and with similar attenuation values as the bat ear model. The final sonar system is to be mounted on vehicular and aerial robots which require remote control for motion and sensors for estimation of each robot's location.

  16. Spatial perception and adaptive sonar behavior.

    PubMed

    Aytekin, Murat; Mao, Beatrice; Moss, Cynthia F

    2010-12-01

    Bat echolocation is a dynamic behavior that allows for real-time adaptations in the timing and spectro-temporal design of sonar signals in response to a particular task and environment. To enable detailed, quantitative analyses of adaptive sonar behavior, echolocation call design was investigated in big brown bats, trained to rest on a stationary platform and track a tethered mealworm that approached from a starting distance of about 170 cm in the presence of a stationary sonar distracter. The distracter was presented at different angular offsets and distances from the bat. The results of this study show that the distance and the angular offset of the distracter influence sonar vocalization parameters of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus. Specifically, the bat adjusted its call duration to the closer of two objects, distracter or insect target, and the magnitude of the adjustment depended on the angular offset of the distracter. In contrast, the bat consistently adjusted its call rate to the distance of the insect, even when this target was positioned behind the distracter. The results hold implications for understanding spatial information processing and perception by echolocation.

  17. How do tiger moths jam bat sonar?

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Aaron J; Barber, Jesse R; Hristov, Nickolay I; Conner, William E

    2011-07-15

    The tiger moth Bertholdia trigona is the only animal in nature known to defend itself by jamming the sonar of its predators - bats. In this study we analyzed the three-dimensional flight paths and echolocation behavior of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) attacking B. trigona in a flight room over seven consecutive nights to determine the acoustic mechanism of the sonar-jamming defense. Three mechanisms have been proposed: (1) the phantom echo hypothesis, which states that bats misinterpret moth clicks as echoes; (2) the ranging interference hypothesis, which states that moth clicks degrade the bats' precision in determining target distance; and (3) the masking hypothesis, which states that moth clicks mask the moth echoes entirely, making the moth temporarily invisible. On nights one and two of the experiment, the bats appeared startled by the clicks; however, on nights three through seven, the bats frequently missed their prey by a distance predicted by the ranging interference hypothesis (∼15-20 cm). Three-dimensional simulations show that bats did not avoid phantom targets, and the bats' ability to track clicking prey contradicts the predictions of the masking hypothesis. The moth clicks also forced the bats to reverse their stereotyped pattern of echolocation emissions during attack, even while bats continued pursuit of the moths. This likely further hinders the bats' ability to track prey. These results have implications for the evolution of sonar jamming in tiger moths, and we suggest evolutionary pathways by which sonar jamming may have evolved from other tiger moth defense mechanisms.

  18. Multiple Frequency Parametric Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-28

    300003 1 MULTIPLE FREQUENCY PARAMETRIC SONAR STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and...beams. However, the multiple nonlinear interactions are not taken advantage of in order to generate additional efficiencies, bandwidth, and SNR...array. [0050] It will be understood that many additional changes in details, materials , steps, and arrangements of parts which have been described

  19. Miniature sonar fish tag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelady, R. W.; Ferguson, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    Self-powered sonar device may be implanted in body of fish. It transmits signal that can be detected with portable tracking gear or by automatic detection-and-tracking system. Operating life of over 4000 hours may be expected. Device itself may be used almost indefinitely.

  20. Principles of Sonar Installation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-26

    4) sonar release mechanisms, (5) fish finders, (6) counter«; and trackers, and (7) telemetry systems that use acoustic beams in- stead of wire ...multiplexing (CDM). When multiplexing is not employed, a pair of twisted wires is used for each hydrophone but the method creates a very bulky cable ...the necessity of auxiliary beamforming electronics . A typical beam pattern is shown in figure 1.48; it was obtained Figure 1.47. Focusing using a

  1. Color and Grey Scale in Sonar Displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraiss, K. F.; Kuettelwesch, K. H.

    1984-01-01

    In spite of numerous publications 1 it is still rather unclear, whether color is of any help in sonar displays. The work presented here deals with a particular type of sonar data, i.e., LOFAR-grams (low frequency analysing and recording) where acoustic sensor data are continuously written as a time-frequency plot. The question to be answered quantitatively is, whether color coding does improve target detection when compared with a grey scale code. The data show significant differences in receiver-operating characteristics performance for the selected codes. In addition it turned out, that the background noise level affects the performance dramatically for some color codes, while others remain stable or even improve. Generally valid rules are presented on how to generate useful color scales for this particular application.

  2. Observing Ocean Ecosystems with Sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, Shari; Maxwell, Adam R.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Hytnen, Ross D.; Horne, John

    2016-12-01

    We present a real-time processing system for sonar to detect and track animals, and to extract water column biomass statistics in order to facilitate continuous monitoring of an underwater environment. The Nekton Interaction Monitoring System (NIMS) is built to connect to an instrumentation network, where it consumes a real-time stream of sonar data and archives tracking and biomass data.

  3. Active Targets For Capacitive Proximity Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenstrom, Del T.; Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Lightweight, low-power active targets devised for use with improved capacitive proximity sensors described in "Capacitive Proximity Sensor Has Longer Range" (GSC-13377), and "Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields" (GSC-13475). Active targets are short-distance electrostatic beacons; they generate known alternating electro-static fields used for alignment and/or to measure distances.

  4. Phase sensitivity in bat sonar revisited.

    PubMed

    Schörnich, Sven; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    An echolocating bat produces echoes consisting of the convolution of echolocation call and the impulse response (IR) of the ensonified object. A crucial question in animal sonar is whether bats are able to extract this IR from the echo. The bat inner ear generates a frequency representation of call and echo and IR extraction in the frequency domain requires accurate analysis of both magnitude and phase information. Previous studies investigating the phase sensitivity of bats using a jitter paradigm reported a temporal acuity down to 10 ns, suggesting perfect sonar phase representation. In a phantom-target playback experiment, we investigate the perceptual phase sensitivity of the bat Phyllostomus discolor using a novel approach: instead of manipulating IR phase by changing IR delay (jitter paradigm), we randomized IR phase and thus lengthened the IR over time, leaving the magnitude spectrum unchanged. Our results show that phase sensitivity, as reflected in the analysis of signal duration, appears to be much lower than phase sensitivity, as reflected in the analysis of signal onset. The current data indicate that different temporal aspects of sonar processing are encoded with very different temporal resolution and thus an overall claim of "phase sensitivity" as such cannot be maintained.

  5. Target activation by regulatory RNAs in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Papenfort, Kai; Vanderpool, Carin K.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are commonly known to repress gene expression by base pairing to target mRNAs. In many cases, sRNAs base pair with and sequester mRNA ribosome-binding sites, resulting in translational repression and accelerated transcript decay. In contrast, a growing number of examples of translational activation and mRNA stabilization by sRNAs have now been documented. A given sRNA often employs a conserved region to interact with and regulate both repressed and activated targets. However, the mechanisms underlying activation differ substantially from repression. Base pairing resulting in target activation can involve sRNA interactions with the 5′ untranslated region (UTR), the coding sequence or the 3′ UTR of the target mRNAs. Frequently, the activities of protein factors such as cellular ribonucleases and the RNA chaperone Hfq are required for activation. Bacterial sRNAs, including those that function as activators, frequently control stress response pathways or virulence-associated functions required for immediate responses to changing environments. This review aims to summarize recent advances in knowledge regarding target mRNA activation by bacterial sRNAs, highlighting the molecular mechanisms and biological relevance of regulation. PMID:25934124

  6. Security sonar for water intakes

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenbuhler, D.E.

    1987-07-01

    The security of the water approaches to nuclear facilities has been largely neglected because of the lack of solutions to the intrusion problem. This paper reviews underwater scanning sonar in general, highlights a number of problems encountered in a threat detection system using sonar and suggests some procedures that can help make such a system workable. Information is drawn from recent experience with several security projects in the governmental and private sectors, one of which was a nuclear facility.

  7. GM-PHD filter multitarget tracking in sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Daniel; Vo, Ba-Ngu; Bell, Judith

    2006-05-01

    The Gaussian Mixure Probability Hypothesis Density (GM-PHD) Multi-target Tracker was developed as an extension to the GM-PHD filter to provide track continuity. The algorithm is demonstrated on forward-looking sonar data with clutter and is compared with the results from the Particle PHD filter.

  8. Representational learning for sonar ATR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, Jason C.

    2014-06-01

    Learned representations have been shown to give hopeful results for solving a multitude of novel learning tasks, even though these tasks may be unknown when the model is being trained. A few notable examples include the techniques of topic models, deep belief networks, deep Boltzmann machines, and local discriminative Gaussians, all inspired by human learning. This self-learning of new concepts via rich generative models has emerged as a promising area of research in machine learning. Although there has been recent progress, existing computational models are still far from being able to represent, identify and learn the wide variety of possible patterns and struc- ture in real-world data. An important issue for further consideration is the use of unsupervised representations for novel underwater target recognition applications. This work will discuss and demonstrate the use of latent Dirichlet allocation and autoencoders for learning unsupervised representations of objects in sonar imagery. The objective is to make these representations more abstract and invariant to noise in the training distribution and improve performance.

  9. Range compensation for backscattering measurements in the difference-frequency nearfield of a parametric sonar.

    PubMed

    Foote, Kenneth G

    2012-05-01

    Measurement of acoustic backscattering properties of targets requires removal of the range dependence of echoes. This process is called range compensation. For conventional sonars making measurements in the transducer farfield, the compensation removes effects of geometrical spreading and absorption. For parametric sonars consisting of a parametric acoustic transmitter and a conventional-sonar receiver, two additional range dependences require compensation when making measurements in the nonlinearly generated difference-frequency nearfield: an apparently increasing source level and a changing beamwidth. General expressions are derived for range compensation functions in the difference-frequency nearfield of parametric sonars. These are evaluated numerically for a parametric sonar whose difference-frequency band, effectively 1-6 kHz, is being used to observe Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) in situ. Range compensation functions for this sonar are compared with corresponding functions for conventional sonars for the cases of single and multiple scatterers. Dependences of these range compensation functions on the parametric sonar transducer shape, size, acoustic power density, and hydrography are investigated. Parametric range compensation functions, when applied with calibration data, will enable difference-frequency echoes to be expressed in physical units of volume backscattering, and backscattering spectra, including fish-swimbladder-resonances, to be analyzed.

  10. Bats coordinate sonar and flight behavior as they forage in open and cluttered environments.

    PubMed

    Falk, Benjamin; Jakobsen, Lasse; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F

    2014-12-15

    Echolocating bats use active sensing as they emit sounds and listen to the returning echoes to probe their environment for navigation, obstacle avoidance and pursuit of prey. The sensing behavior of bats includes the planning of 3D spatial trajectory paths, which are guided by echo information. In this study, we examined the relationship between active sonar sampling and flight motor output as bats changed environments from open space to an artificial forest in a laboratory flight room. Using high-speed video and audio recordings, we reconstructed and analyzed 3D flight trajectories, sonar beam aim and acoustic sonar emission patterns as the bats captured prey. We found that big brown bats adjusted their sonar call structure, temporal patterning and flight speed in response to environmental change. The sonar beam aim of the bats predicted the flight turn rate in both the open room and the forest. However, the relationship between sonar beam aim and turn rate changed in the forest during the final stage of prey pursuit, during which the bat made shallower turns. We found flight stereotypy developed over multiple days in the forest, but did not find evidence for a reduction in active sonar sampling with experience. The temporal patterning of sonar sound groups was related to path planning around obstacles in the forest. Together, these results contribute to our understanding of how bats coordinate echolocation and flight behavior to represent and navigate their environment.

  11. Bats coordinate sonar and flight behavior as they forage in open and cluttered environments

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Benjamin; Jakobsen, Lasse; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating bats use active sensing as they emit sounds and listen to the returning echoes to probe their environment for navigation, obstacle avoidance and pursuit of prey. The sensing behavior of bats includes the planning of 3D spatial trajectory paths, which are guided by echo information. In this study, we examined the relationship between active sonar sampling and flight motor output as bats changed environments from open space to an artificial forest in a laboratory flight room. Using high-speed video and audio recordings, we reconstructed and analyzed 3D flight trajectories, sonar beam aim and acoustic sonar emission patterns as the bats captured prey. We found that big brown bats adjusted their sonar call structure, temporal patterning and flight speed in response to environmental change. The sonar beam aim of the bats predicted the flight turn rate in both the open room and the forest. However, the relationship between sonar beam aim and turn rate changed in the forest during the final stage of prey pursuit, during which the bat made shallower turns. We found flight stereotypy developed over multiple days in the forest, but did not find evidence for a reduction in active sonar sampling with experience. The temporal patterning of sonar sound groups was related to path planning around obstacles in the forest. Together, these results contribute to our understanding of how bats coordinate echolocation and flight behavior to represent and navigate their environment. PMID:25394632

  12. High-resolution seismic and side scan sonar imaging of active structures and Quaternary channels on the shallow shelf of Otago, southeastern New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorman, A. R.; Bruce, C.; Preskett, S. A.; Norris, R.; Choveaux, R.; Flemish, H.; Green, C.

    2011-12-01

    The shallow and narrow continental shelf off the coast of Otago has unique geological characteristics due to the juxtaposition of active coast-parallel contractional faults related to the nearby Pacific-Australian plate boundary and late-Miocene shield volcanism that affects the structural and sedimentological regimes of the region. For example, the offshore extent of the active Akatore Fault, a NE-SW trending reverse fault that runs along the coast SW of Dunedin, is poorly constrained to the northeast where is intersects the Dunedin Volcanic Complex. This fault is possibly associated with several other offshore coast-parallel faults based on shallow controlled-source seismic data. Historical earthquakes, including those of 1974 and 1989, are attributed these faults. The Dunedin Volcanic Complex also has impacted Quaternary erosional and sedimentation patterns on the shelf as a result of topographical features that affect drainage and sediment transport patterns. Single-channel electro-acoustic boomer seismic reflection data and side scan sonar profiles have been collected along a ~35-km-long section of the shallow shelf SW of Dunedin over the last three years. The majority of lines were collected along NW-SE azimuths (perpendicular to the coast), running from just outside the surf zone (<10 m water depth) to a maximum of 28 km offshore (~75 m water depth). Survey lines were ~250 m apart near shore and up to 5 km apart offshore. Boomer subsurface penetration is limited, primarily by the presence of multiple reflections. However, primary reflections were recorded from sub-seafloor depths of up to 100 m. Several significant structures have been imaged within the survey area, principally the Akatore and Green Island Faults. The Akatore Fault is imaged very near shore in the southern portion of the survey, and a minimum post-Miocene displacement of 55 m was calculated. Offset on the Green Island Fault, a high-angle reverse fault, was relatively well constrained to ~200

  13. Active Targets for Experiments with Rare Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2014-09-01

    Experimental studies of un-bound nuclear states and nuclear reaction rates relevant for astrophysical processes are an important area of research with rare isotope beams. Both topics require the development of specialized experimental methods to study resonant reactions. The so-called active target approach, where the target material becomes part of the detection process, promises to combine high yields from thicker targets and low background with high resolution. This presentation will describe the implementation of the active-target technique in the ANASEN detector, which was developed by researchers from Louisiana State University and Florida State University. ANASEN was used in a number of stable and rare iosotope experiments in α- and proton scattering, as well as (α , p) and (d , p) reactions at FSU's in-flight radioactive beam facility RESOLUT. ANASEN also was used to perform the first experiment, proton scattering off a 37K beam at the ReA3 facility. Another active-target detector with a very different approach is found in the Active Target Time-Projection Chamber, which was developed by a collaboration between researchers from MSU, the University of Notre Dame, Western Michigan University, LLNL, LBNL, and St. Mary's University (Canada). First experiments with an AT-TPC prototype have been reported. The talk will summarize the results from the first experiments with these systems, describe further development and future research projects. Experimental studies of un-bound nuclear states and nuclear reaction rates relevant for astrophysical processes are an important area of research with rare isotope beams. Both topics require the development of specialized experimental methods to study resonant reactions. The so-called active target approach, where the target material becomes part of the detection process, promises to combine high yields from thicker targets and low background with high resolution. This presentation will describe the implementation of the

  14. Sonar equations for planetary exploration.

    PubMed

    Ainslie, Michael A; Leighton, Timothy G

    2016-08-01

    The set of formulations commonly known as "the sonar equations" have for many decades been used to quantify the performance of sonar systems in terms of their ability to detect and localize objects submerged in seawater. The efficacy of the sonar equations, with individual terms evaluated in decibels, is well established in Earth's oceans. The sonar equations have been used in the past for missions to other planets and moons in the solar system, for which they are shown to be less suitable. While it would be preferable to undertake high-fidelity acoustical calculations to support planning, execution, and interpretation of acoustic data from planetary probes, to avoid possible errors for planned missions to such extraterrestrial bodies in future, doing so requires awareness of the pitfalls pointed out in this paper. There is a need to reexamine the assumptions, practices, and calibrations that work well for Earth to ensure that the sonar equations can be accurately applied in combination with the decibel to extraterrestrial scenarios. Examples are given for icy oceans such as exist on Europa and Ganymede, Titan's hydrocarbon lakes, and for the gaseous atmospheres of (for example) Jupiter and Venus.

  15. CFTR targeting during activation of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hang Pong; Valentine, Vincent G; Wang, Guoshun

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-activated chloride channel, plays critical roles in phagocytic host defense. However, how activated neutrophils regulate CFTR channel distribution subcellularly is not well defined. To investigate, we tested multiple Abs against different CFTR domains, to examine CFTR expression in human peripheral blood neutrophils by flow cytometry. The data confirmed that resting neutrophils had pronounced CFTR expression. Activation of neutrophils with soluble or particulate agonists did not significantly increase CFTR expression level, but induced CFTR redistribution to cell surface. Such CFTR mobilization correlated with cell-surface recruitment of formyl-peptide receptor during secretory vesicle exocytosis. Intriguingly, neutrophils from patients with ΔF508-CF, despite expression of the mutant CFTR, showed little cell-surface mobilization upon stimulation. Although normal neutrophils effectively targeted CFTR to their phagosomes, ΔF508-CF neutrophils had impairment in that process, resulting in deficient hypochlorous acid production. Taken together, activated neutrophils regulate CFTR distribution by targeting this chloride channel to the subcellular sites of activation, and ΔF508-CF neutrophils fail to achieve such targeting, thus undermining their host defense function.

  16. Marine Mammals and Active Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    small effort to look at noise impacts on Beluga whales also serves to build expertise and an understanding of the general complexities. A new...Thomas, and R. A. Kastelein. 1988. Low-frequency underwater hearing sensitivity in belugas , Delphinapterus leucas. Journal of the Acoustical Society of...C. and Farmer, D. M. 2000. Zones of impact around icebreakers affecting beluga whales in the Beaufort Sea. Journal of the Acoustical Society of

  17. Wreck finding and classifying with a sonar filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agehed, Kenneth I.; Padgett, Mary Lou; Becanovic, Vlatko; Bornich, C.; Eide, Age J.; Engman, Per; Globoden, O.; Lindblad, Thomas; Lodgberg, K.; Waldemark, Karina E.

    1999-03-01

    Sonar detection and classification of sunken wrecks and other objects is of keen interest to many. This paper describes the use of neural networks (NN) for locating, classifying and determining the alignment of objects on a lakebed in Sweden. A complex program for data preprocessing and visualization was developed. Part of this program, The Sonar Viewer, facilitates training and testing of the NN using (1) the MATLAB Neural Networks Toolbox for multilayer perceptrons with backpropagation (BP) and (2) the neural network O-Algorithm (OA) developed by Age Eide and Thomas Lindblad. Comparison of the performance of the two neural networks approaches indicates that, for this data BP generalizes better than OA, but use of OA eliminates the need for training on non-target (lake bed) images. The OA algorithm does not work well with the smaller ships. Increasing the resolution to counteract this problem would slow down processing and require interpolation to suggest data values between the actual sonar measurements. In general, good results were obtained for recognizing large wrecks and determining their alignment. The programs developed a useful tool for further study of sonar signals in many environments. Recent developments in pulse coupled neural networks techniques provide an opportunity to extend the use in real-world applications where experimental data is difficult, expensive or time consuming to obtain.

  18. A Study to Interpret the Biological Significance of Behavior Associated with 3S Experimental Sonar Exposures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    playback of killer whale sounds across the 3S species; and 3.) quantification of the possible impacts of sonar exposure on energy expenditure by linking respiration behavior and underwater activity recorded by Dtags.

  19. Sonar sound groups and increased terminal buzz duration reflect task complexity in hunting bats.

    PubMed

    Hulgard, Katrine; Ratcliffe, John M

    2016-02-09

    More difficult tasks are generally regarded as such because they demand greater attention. Echolocators provide rare insight into this relationship because biosonar signals can be monitored. Here we show that bats produce longer terminal buzzes and more sonar sound groups during their approach to prey under presumably more difficult conditions. Specifically, we found Daubenton's bats, Myotis daubentonii, produced longer buzzes when aerial-hawking versus water-trawling prey, but that bats taking revolving air- and water-borne prey produced more sonar sound groups than did the bats when taking stationary prey. Buzz duration and sonar sound groups have been suggested to be independent means by which bats attend to would-be targets and other objects of interest. We suggest that for attacking bats both should be considered as indicators of task difficulty and that the buzz is, essentially, an extended sonar sound group.

  20. Sonar sound groups and increased terminal buzz duration reflect task complexity in hunting bats

    PubMed Central

    Hulgard, Katrine; Ratcliffe, John M.

    2016-01-01

    More difficult tasks are generally regarded as such because they demand greater attention. Echolocators provide rare insight into this relationship because biosonar signals can be monitored. Here we show that bats produce longer terminal buzzes and more sonar sound groups during their approach to prey under presumably more difficult conditions. Specifically, we found Daubenton’s bats, Myotis daubentonii, produced longer buzzes when aerial-hawking versus water-trawling prey, but that bats taking revolving air- and water-borne prey produced more sonar sound groups than did the bats when taking stationary prey. Buzz duration and sonar sound groups have been suggested to be independent means by which bats attend to would-be targets and other objects of interest. We suggest that for attacking bats both should be considered as indicators of task difficulty and that the buzz is, essentially, an extended sonar sound group. PMID:26857019

  1. 3S2: Behavioral Response Studies of Cetaceans to Naval Sonar Signals in Norwegian Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    species of whales : bottlenose whales , minke whales , and humpback whales to Low Frequency Active Sonar (LFAS) and Mid Frequency Active Sonar (MFAS...our goal is to conduct experiments to test the effectiveness of ramp-up in humpback whales . OBJECTIVES In this research project, our...study of the effectiveness of ramp-up as a mitigation method with abundant and relatively easy-to-study humpback whales , Megaptera novaeangliae; 3

  2. Statistically normalized coherent change detection for synthetic aperture sonar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G-Michael, Tesfaye; Tucker, J. D.; Roberts, Rodney G.

    2016-05-01

    Coherent Change Detection (CCD) is a process of highlighting an area of activity in scenes (seafloor) under survey and generated from pairs of synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) images of approximately the same location observed at two different time instances. The problem of CCD and subsequent anomaly feature extraction/detection is complicated due to several factors such as the presence of random speckle pattern in the images, changing environmental conditions, and platform instabilities. These complications make the detection of weak target activities even more difficult. Typically, the degree of similarity between two images measured at each pixel locations is the coherence between the complex pixel values in the two images. Higher coherence indicates little change in the scene represented by the pixel and lower coherence indicates change activity in the scene. Such coherence estimation scheme based on the pixel intensity correlation is an ad-hoc procedure where the effectiveness of the change detection is determined by the choice of threshold which can lead to high false alarm rates. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for anomalous change pattern detection using the statistical normalized coherence and multi-pass coherent processing. This method may be used to mitigate shadows by reducing the false alarms resulting in the coherent map due to speckles and shadows. Test results of the proposed methods on a data set of SAS images will be presented, illustrating the effectiveness of the normalized coherence in terms statistics from multi-pass survey of the same scene.

  3. Active debris removal of multiple priority targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Vitali; Lüpken, A.; Flegel, S.; Gelhaus, J.; Möckel, M.; Kebschull, C.; Wiedemann, C.; Vörsmann, P.

    2013-05-01

    Today's space debris environment shows major concentrations of objects within distinct orbital regions for nearly all size regimes. The most critical region is found at orbital altitudes near 800 km with high declinations. Within this region many satellites are operated in so called sun-synchronous orbits (SSO). Among those, there are Earth observation, communication and weather satellites. Due to the orbital geometry in SSO, head-on encounters with relative velocities of about 15 km/s are most probable and would thus result in highly energetic collisions, which are often referred to as catastrophic collisions, leading to the complete fragmentation of the participating objects. So called feedback collisions can then be triggered by the newly generated fragments, thus leading to a further population increase in the affected orbital region. This effect is known as the Kessler syndrome.Current studies show that catastrophic collisions are not a major problem today, but will become the main process for debris generation within the SSO region in the near future, even without any further launches. In order to avoid this effect, objects with a major impact on collisional cascading have to be actively removed from the critical region after their end of life. Not having the capability to perform an end-of-life maneuver in order to transfer to a graveyard orbit or to de-orbit, many satellites and rocket bodies would have to be de-orbited within a dedicated mission. In such a mission, a service satellite would perform a de-orbit maneuver, after having docked to a specific target.In this paper, chemical and electric propulsion systems were analysed with the main focus on removing multiple targets within one single mission. The targets were chosen from a previously defined priority list in order to enhance the mission efficiency. Total mission time, ΔV and system mass were identified as key parameters to allow for an evaluation of the different concepts. It was shown that it

  4. Cetacean Social Behavioral Response to Sonar Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Cetacean social behavioral response to sonar exposure Dr...TERM GOALS The goal of this effort is to investigate cetacean social behavioral response to sonar signals. OBJECTIVES The scientific objectives...of this effort are to determine: 1) social behavioral responses of cetaceans to sonar and to tagging, to investigate the biological relevance and

  5. Sonar Test and Test Instrumentation Support.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-10

    6487 < rM SEL ECTE CO, BU 9 1 Approved for public release;distribution unlimited. 611 095 A DNAR IA ST WI EST INSTRUMENTATIONJUPPORT.J ) Quaterly ...INSTRUMENTATION TEST AND EVALUATION 17 A. Introduction 17 B. Operational Testing of the AN/WQM-7 Sonar Test Set 17 C. AN/SQM-( ) Feasibility Study 19 VII. STUDY ...AN/WQM-5 Sonar Test Set Field Support IV. Special Purpose Passive Sonar Systems Support V. Sonar Instrumentation Test and Evaluation VI. Study of

  6. Place recognition using batlike sonar.

    PubMed

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-08-02

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map.

  7. Low Frequency Sonar Signal Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-14

    participating in workshops. Task 3, Assess SST Propagation Accuracy at Low Frequencies: Determine accuracy domain of SST eigenray -based propagation model at... eigenrays ). The new algorithm, which is conceptually similar to the “point scatterer” approach, generates uncorrelated random Gaussian scattering...amplitudes for many cells (smaller than the sonar resolution) covering the bottom. These are combined with eigenray pairs and weighted by the angle

  8. Cognitive adaptation of sonar gain control in the bottlenose dolphin.

    PubMed

    Kloepper, Laura N; Smith, Adam B; Nachtigall, Paul E; Buck, John R; Simmons, James A; Pacini, Aude F

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating animals adjust the transmit intensity and receive sensitivity of their sonar in order to regulate the sensation level of their echoes; this process is often termed automatic gain control. Gain control is considered not to be under the animal's cognitive control, but previous investigations studied animals ensonifying targets or hydrophone arrays at predictable distances. To test whether animals maintain gain control at a fixed level in uncertain conditions, we measured changes in signal intensity for a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) detecting a target at three target distances (2.5, 4 and 7 m) in two types of sessions: predictable and unpredictable. Predictable sessions presented the target at a constant distance; unpredictable sessions moved the target randomly between the three target positions. In the predictable sessions the dolphin demonstrated intensity distance compensation, increasing the emitted click intensity as the target distance increased. Additionally, as trials within sessions progressed, the animal adjusted its click intensity even from the first click in a click train, which is consistent with the animal expecting a target at a certain range. In the unpredictable sessions there was no significant difference of intensity with target distance until after the 7th click in a click train. Together, these results demonstrate that the bottlenose dolphin uses learning and expectation for sonar gain control.

  9. Cognitive Adaptation of Sonar Gain Control in the Bottlenose Dolphin

    PubMed Central

    Kloepper, Laura N.; Smith, Adam B.; Nachtigall, Paul E.; Buck, John R.; Simmons, James A.; Pacini, Aude F.

    2014-01-01

    Echolocating animals adjust the transmit intensity and receive sensitivity of their sonar in order to regulate the sensation level of their echoes; this process is often termed automatic gain control. Gain control is considered not to be under the animal's cognitive control, but previous investigations studied animals ensonifying targets or hydrophone arrays at predictable distances. To test whether animals maintain gain control at a fixed level in uncertain conditions, we measured changes in signal intensity for a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) detecting a target at three target distances (2.5, 4 and 7 m) in two types of sessions: predictable and unpredictable. Predictable sessions presented the target at a constant distance; unpredictable sessions moved the target randomly between the three target positions. In the predictable sessions the dolphin demonstrated intensity distance compensation, increasing the emitted click intensity as the target distance increased. Additionally, as trials within sessions progressed, the animal adjusted its click intensity even from the first click in a click train, which is consistent with the animal expecting a target at a certain range. In the unpredictable sessions there was no significant difference of intensity with target distance until after the 7th click in a click train. Together, these results demonstrate that the bottlenose dolphin uses learning and expectation for sonar gain control. PMID:25153530

  10. Yugoslavia. "Migration" -- programme activities targeting men.

    PubMed

    Dzeletovic, A; Matovic-miljanovic, S

    1999-01-01

    In Yugoslavia, companies send their workers to different parts of the world, including countries with a high incidence of AIDS. It has been noted that it is characteristic for migrants to accommodate themselves to foreign conditions, which subsequently lead to health problems, especially with regards to reproductive and sexual health. Often, in the case of partner separation, men may seek sexual relations with an unknown partner and/or neglect to use proper protection. According to research carried out in Yugoslavia, there are critical gaps in workers' knowledge on sexual and reproductive health. Based on research results, an educational program for migrants, designed to train and strengthen individuals¿ capabilities and modify their risky behavior, was created. Program activities include production of brochures targeting those people travelling to countries with a high incidence of HIV/AIDS. In addition, a process for creating more cooperation between the state and other organizations at regional and local levels was initiated.

  11. 50 CFR 218.100 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training...-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 10865 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 2173 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)-up to 705 hours over the course of 5 years...

  12. 50 CFR 218.100 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training...-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 10865 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 2173 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)-up to 705 hours over the course of 5 years...

  13. 50 CFR 216.270 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or...) (estimated amounts below): (i) AN/SQS-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 9885 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 1977 hours per year) (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 2470...

  14. Computers improves sonar seabed maps

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-05-01

    A software package for computer aided mapping of sonar (CAMOS) has been developed in Norway. It has automatic mosaic presentation, which produces fully scale-rectified side scan sonograms automatically plotted on geographical and UTM map grids. The program is the first of its kind in the world. The maps produced by this method are more accurate and detailed than those produced by conventional methods. The main applications of CAMOS are: seafloor mapping; pipeline route surveys; pipeline inspection surveys; platform site surveys; geological mapping and geotechnical investigations. With the aerial-photograph quality of the CAMOS maps, a more accurate and visual representation of the seabed is achieved.

  15. Controlled Sonar Exposure Experiments on Cetaceans in Norwegian Waters: Overview of the 3S-Project.

    PubMed

    Lam, Frans-Peter A; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Miller, Patrick J O; Tyack, Peter L; Ainslie, Michael A; Curé, Charlotte; Kleivane, Lars; Sivle, Lise Doksæter; van Ijsselmuide, Sander P; Visser, Fleur; von Benda-Beckmann, Alexander M; Wensveen, Paul J; Dekeling, René P A

    2016-01-01

    In mitigating the risk of sonar operations, the behavioral response of cetaceans is one of the major knowledge gaps that needs to be addressed. The 3S-Project has conducted a number of controlled exposure experiments with a realistic sonar source in Norwegian waters from 2006 to 2013. In total, the following six target species have been studied: killer, long-finned pilot, sperm, humpback, minke, and northern bottlenose whales. A total of 38 controlled sonar exposures have been conducted on these species. Responses from controlled and repeated exposure runs have been recorded using acoustic and visual observations as well as with electronic tags on the target animal. So far, the first dose-response curves as well as an overview of the scored severity of responses have been revealed. In this paper, an overview is presented of the approach for the study, including the results so far as well as the current status of the ongoing analysis.

  16. Detecting submerged bodies: controlled research using side-scan sonar to detect submerged proxy cadavers.

    PubMed

    Healy, Carrie A; Schultz, John J; Parker, Kenneth; Lowers, Bim

    2015-05-01

    Forensic investigators routinely deploy side-scan sonar for submerged body searches. This study adds to the limited body of literature by undertaking a controlled project to understand how variables affect detection of submerged bodies using side-scan sonar. Research consisted of two phases using small and medium-sized pig (Sus scrofa) carcasses as proxies for human bodies to investigate the effects of terrain, body size, frequency, swath width, and state of decomposition. Results demonstrated that a clear, flat, sandy pond floor terrain was optimal for detection of the target as irregular terrain and/or vegetation are major limitations that can obscure the target. A higher frequency towfish was preferred for small bodies, and a 20 m swath width allowed greater visibility and easier maneuverability of the boat in this environment. Also, the medium-sized carcasses were discernable throughout the 81-day study period, indicating that it is possible to detect bodies undergoing decomposition with side-scan sonar.

  17. 50 CFR 218.110 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training...-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 215 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 43 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 325 hours over the course of 5 years...

  18. 50 CFR 218.110 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training...-53 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 215 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 43 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 325 hours over the course of 5 years...

  19. Place recognition using batlike sonar

    PubMed Central

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14188.001 PMID:27481189

  20. Sonar Locator Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An underwater locator device called a Pinger is attached to an airplane's flight recorder for recovery in case of a crash. Burnett Electronics Pinger Model 512 resulted from a Burnett Electronics Laboratory, Inc./Langley Research Center contract for development of a search system for underwater mines. The Pinger's battery-powered transmitter is activated when immersed in water, and sends multidirectional signals for up to 500 hours. When a surface receiver picks up the signal, a diver can retrieve the pinger and the attached airplane flight recorder. Other pingers are used to track whales, mark underwater discoveries and assist oil drilling vessels.

  1. Using vertical Sidescan Sonar as a tool for seagrass cartography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Carnero, N.; Rodríguez-Pérez, D.; Couñago, E.; Aceña, S.; Freire, J.

    2012-12-01

    An acoustic method, a vertically oriented Sidescan Sonar (SSSv), is used to detect and map Posidonia oceanica meadows in the bay of Agua Amarga (SE of the Mediterranean coast of Spain). Sidescan sonar, among other active hydroacoustic techniques, has shown its ability to detect, map and monitor seagrass based on its acoustic backscatter; however, some limitations linked to its power based approach have been reported in the literature. Our method is based on the SSSv measurement of canopy height distribution, making the most use of the SSSv acoustic data and using existing algorithms as statistical mapping methods. The results show a spatially coherent and statistically consistent classification. The comparison with groundtruthing is difficult due to the steep variations in the seafloor cover found in the area of interest, nevertheless the validation is successful (proving low-order discrimination) in a zone with a large range of depth variations (0-25 m).

  2. A Fisheries Application of a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar Acoustic Camera

    SciTech Connect

    Moursund, Russell A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Peters, Rock D.

    2003-06-01

    The uses of an acoustic camera in fish passage research at hydropower facilities are being explored by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) is a high-resolution imaging sonar that obtains near video-quality images for the identification of objects underwater. Developed originally for the Navy by the University of Washington?s Applied Physics Laboratory, it bridges the gap between existing fisheries assessment sonar and optical systems. Traditional fisheries assessment sonars detect targets at long ranges but cannot record the shape of targets. The images within 12 m of this acoustic camera are so clear that one can see fish undulating as they swim and can tell the head from the tail in otherwise zero-visibility water. In the 1.8 MHz high-frequency mode, this system is composed of 96 beams over a 29-degree field of view. This high resolution and a fast frame rate allow the acoustic camera to produce near video-quality images of objects through time. This technology redefines many of the traditional limitations of sonar for fisheries and aquatic ecology. Images can be taken of fish in confined spaces, close to structural or surface boundaries, and in the presence of entrained air. The targets themselves can be visualized in real time. The DIDSON can be used where conventional underwater cameras would be limited in sampling range to < 1 m by low light levels and high turbidity, and where traditional sonar would be limited by the confined sample volume. Results of recent testing at The Dalles Dam, on the lower Columbia River in Oregon, USA, are shown.

  3. Evolution: Fossil Ears and Underwater Sonar.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Olivier

    2016-08-22

    A key innovation in the history of whales was the evolution of a sonar system together with high-frequency hearing. Fossils of an archaic toothed whale's inner ear bones provide clues for a stepwise emergence of underwater echolocation ability.

  4. Remote characterizing diffuse hydrothermal flows using multi-beam sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakin, A. N.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-beam sonars are normally used for bottom bathymetry and backscatter intensity measurements, which provide a base for remotely characterizing the seabed. If not only sonar echo intensity (squared magnitude of acoustic pressure) but also the cross-correlation between successive echoes is measured, then temporal changes in sound speed in the near-bottom environment can be determined. This, in turn, allows estimation of the change of environmental parameters, e.g. temperature variations, as there is a simple linear relationship between sound speed and temperature changes. Stochastic modeling shows that the dependence of the echo decorrelation on the lag time has a relationship with the statistics of temperature variations above the seabed that determine their spatial and temporal scales, power spectra, and structure functions. This approach has been applied to quantify the bottom diffuse hydrothermal flow activity at the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge using the Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) connected to the Ocean Network Canada's NEPTUNE observatory. In contrast to our previous work, which was focused on spatial imaging of acoustic decorrelation at fixed lag, here the lag dependence of the acoustic structure function is measured and analyzed. This allows extraction of additional parameters of temperature fluctuation statistics. A potential to map diffuse flow using a ROV/HOV is discussed.

  5. Ceteacean Social Behavioral Response to Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    experimental sonar exposure in SOCAL-BRS (Risso’s dolphin )  Data-collection: Baseline social behavior - SOCAL-BRS projects (Risso’s dolphin ...playbacks using visual observation techniques 3 - Species evaluated: long-beaked common dolphin , bottlenose dolphin , killer whale - 2014: Design...data processing and analysis for Risso’s dolphin sonar response (SOCAL-BRS, Azores-Baseline) - Cross-study cooperation in data processing and analysis

  6. Reported Modality Preferences of Sonar Operators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    indicated a preference for the visual modality, which was similar in proportion for both STS and STG groups. On questions pertinent to sonar operation...most operators indicated a visual preference. However, on two of these items, proportionally more STS than STG operators showed an auditory...preference. Interestingly, 99% of all the subjects reported that present sonar systems are biased toward visual information. Yet, this survey showed that only

  7. AUV-12 Sonar Integration and Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-26

    extension has been granted. Expenditures Authorized Title Labor ODC Com- mitted Total Funding Balance Start End AUV Sonar - CLIN-1 $214,144...36,520 $0 $250,664 $357,473 $106,809 01/29/09 01/29/10 AUV Sonar - CLIN-2 $869 $0 $0 $869 $74,385 $73,516 11/23/09 07/22/10 Total $215,012 $36,520 $0

  8. Parametric sonars for seafloor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiti, Andrea; Bergem, Oddbjorn; Dybedal, Johnny

    1999-12-01

    Parametric sonars are instruments capable of transmitting acoustic signals in the water with a very narrow beam and almost no sidelobes. These features are exploited in this paper to define a methodology for quantitative estimation of the geo-acoustic and morphological properties of the uppermost seafloor sediment layer. The three major components of the approach are the parametric instrument itself; the modelling of the forward-propagation problem, with the use of the Kirchhoff approximation for surface scattering and of the small-perturbation theory for the volume scattering; and the definition of a criterion for comparison between data and model predictions, which is accomplished by a generalized time-frequency analysis. In this way the estimation becomes one of a model-based identification, or a model-based inverse problem. Results from a field trial in a shallow water area of the Mediterranean are shown, and compared with independently gathered ground truth.

  9. Source ranging with an underwater geographic point in non-cooperative bistatic sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Donghwa; Jung, Tae Jin; Lee, Kyun Kyung; Myung, Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Active sonar is divided into monostatic and bistatic sonar according to the relative positions of the source and the receiver. Bistatic sonar on modern submarines is classified into cooperative and non-cooperative operations. Cooperative operation uses an active signal of a friendly ship; therefore, source information is known a priori, whereas non-cooperative operation utilizes an active signal of the enemy, and hence, it is difficult to acquire source information, such as a source range, which is important for bistatic sonar operation. In order to overcome this difficulty, this paper proposes an estimation method for the source range that employs geographic information, and the utility of the source range estimation is evaluated. For the evaluation, we consider three error components. Then, the validity of the scheme is confirmed through theoretical error analysis and simulation study. The results show that geographic points that satisfy certain specific conditions can be used to estimate the source range within a range of tens of km in the simulation. Finally, we confirm that the receiver could estimate the source range from far away using non-cooperative bistatic sonar.

  10. An investigation of acoustic beam patterns for the sonar localization problem using a beam based method.

    PubMed

    Guarato, Francesco; Windmill, James; Gachagan, Anthony; Harvey, Gerald

    2013-06-01

    Target localization can be accomplished through an ultrasonic sonar system equipped with an emitter and two receivers. Time of flight of the sonar echoes allows the calculation of the distance of the target. The orientation can be estimated from knowledge of the beam pattern of the receivers and the ratio, in the frequency domain, between the emitted and the received signals after compensation for distance effects and air absorption. The localization method is described and, as its performance strongly depends on the beam pattern, the search of the most appropriate sonar receiver in order to ensure the highest accuracy of target orientation estimations is developed in this paper. The structure designs considered are inspired by the ear shapes of some bat species. Parameters like flare rate, truncation angle, and tragus are considered in the design of the receiver structures. Simulations of the localization method allow us to state which combination of those parameters could provide the best real world implementation. Simulation results show the estimates of target orientations are, in the worst case, 2° with SNR = 50 dB using the receiver structure chosen for a potential practical implementation of a sonar system.

  11. Identifying Targets from Filtering Effects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-24

    Introduction Considering a radar (or sonar) target as more than a simple point scatterer brings up the possibility of identifying the target based on the...2000. [8] M. Vespe, C. J. Baker, and H. D. Griffiths , "Automatic target regognition using multi-diversity radar," Radar, Sonar \\& Navigation, IET, vol...A. Taflove and S. C. Hagness, Computational Electrodynamics : The Finite Difference Time Domain Method. Norwood, MA: Artech House, 2005.

  12. Nuclease Target Site Selection for Maximizing On-target Activity and Minimizing Off-target Effects in Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ciaran M; Cradick, Thomas J; Fine, Eli J; Bao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The rapid advancement in targeted genome editing using engineered nucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 systems has resulted in a suite of powerful methods that allows researchers to target any genomic locus of interest. A complementary set of design tools has been developed to aid researchers with nuclease design, target site selection, and experimental validation. Here, we review the various tools available for target selection in designing engineered nucleases, and for quantifying nuclease activity and specificity, including web-based search tools and experimental methods. We also elucidate challenges in target selection, especially in predicting off-target effects, and discuss future directions in precision genome editing and its applications. PMID:26750397

  13. Targeted, noninvasive blockade of cortical neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Here we describe a novel method to noninvasively modulate targeted brain areas through the temporary disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) via focused ultrasound, enabling focal delivery of a neuroactive substance. Ultrasound was used to locally disrupt the BBB in rat somatosensory cortex, and intravenous administration of GABA then produced a dose-dependent suppression of somatosensory-evoked potentials in response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve. No suppression was observed 1-5 days afterwards or in control animals where the BBB was not disrupted. This method has several advantages over existing techniques: it is noninvasive; it is repeatable via additional GABA injections; multiple brain regions can be affected simultaneously; suppression magnitude can be titrated by GABA dose; and the method can be used with freely behaving subjects. We anticipate that the application of neuroactive substances in this way will be a useful tool for noninvasively mapping brain function, and potentially for surgical planning or novel therapies.

  14. Swath sonar mapping of Earth's submarine plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V. L.; Celnick, M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Ryan, W. B. F.

    2014-12-01

    The recent loss of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in an area of the Indian Ocean where less than 5% of the seafloor is mapped with depth sounding data (Smith and Marks, EOS 2014) highlights the striking lack of detailed knowledge of the topography of the seabed for much of the worlds' oceans. Advances in swath sonar mapping technology over the past 30 years have led to dramatic improvements in our capability to map the seabed. However, the oceans are vast and only an estimated 10% of the seafloor has been mapped with these systems. Furthermore, the available coverage is highly heterogeneous and focused within areas of national strategic priority and community scientific interest. The major plate boundaries that encircle the globe, most of which are located in the submarine environment, have been a significant focus of marine geoscience research since the advent of swath sonar mapping. While the location of these plate boundaries are well defined from satellite-derived bathymetry, significant regions remain unmapped at the high-resolutions provided by swath sonars and that are needed to study active volcanic and tectonic plate boundary processes. Within the plate interiors, some fossil plate boundary zones, major hotspot volcanoes, and other volcanic provinces have been the focus of dedicated research programs. Away from these major tectonic structures, swath mapping coverage is limited to sparse ocean transit lines which often reveal previously unknown deep-sea channels and other little studied sedimentary structures not resolvable in existing low-resolution global compilations, highlighting the value of these data even in the tectonically quiet plate interiors. Here, we give an overview of multibeam swath sonar mapping of the major plate boundaries of the globe as extracted from public archives. Significant quantities of swath sonar data acquired from deep-sea regions are in restricted-access international archives. Open access to more of these data sets would

  15. Active calibration target for bistatic radar cross-section measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienaar, M.; Odendaal, J. W.; Joubert, J.; Cilliers, J. E.; Smit, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    Either passive calibration targets are expensive and complex to manufacture or their bistatic radar cross section (RCS) levels are significantly lower than the monostatic RCS levels of targets such as spheres, dihedral, and trihedral corner reflectors. In this paper the performance of an active calibration target with relative high bistatic RCS values is illustrated as a reference target for bistatic RCS measurements. The reference target is simple to manufacture, operates over a wide frequency range, and can be configured to calibrate all four polarizations (VV, HH, HV, and VH). Bistatic RCS measurements of canonical targets, performed in a controlled environment, are calibrated with the reference target and the results are compared to simulated results using FEKO.

  16. More than the Bottom: Multibeam Sonars and Water-column Imaging (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, L. A.; Weber, T.; Gardner, J. V.; Malik, M.; Doucet, M.; Beaudoin, J.

    2010-12-01

    The past ten years have seen remarkable advances in our ability to rapidly and accurately map the seafloor. Improvements in sonar design and signal processing have dramatically increased both the spatial and temporal resolution of seafloor mapping systems as well as provided the opportunity to extract information about seafloor character through the concomitant mapping of seafloor backscatter. The latest generation of multibeam sonars, however, can now provide acoustic returns from the water-column as well as from the seafloor. When combined with powerful new visualization tools, the ability to acoustically map large volumes of the water-column opens up vast new areas of application for multibeam sonar data. When applied to the most traditional use of multibeam sonar data (seafloor mapping in support of safe navigation), water-column data afford the opportunity to see small, high-standing targets (like ship’s masts) and offer a powerful tool for critically needed, least-depth detection. Water-column data collected from multibeam sonars also provide numerous opportunities for fisheries research ranging from qualitative descriptions of fish school behavior and vessel avoidance studies (the systems can make measurements well beyond the limited, normal-incidence view of traditional fisheries sonars), to the eventual quantitative measurements of volume backscatter (as systems become more calibrated). Increases in system bandwidth will also open opportunities for target identification studies. With increased bandwith will also come the potential for tuning the systems for the mapping of watermass boundaries, offering a powerful tool for a range of physical oceanographic applications. Finally, the ability to map the water-column has great potential for quantifying the flux of methane into the ocean from natural (and un-natural) seeps. Water-column mapping has already proven a valuable asset in monitoring the Deepwater Horizon well-site for potential blow-outs or gas

  17. Automated Change Detection Using Synthetic Aperture Sonar Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    using shadow outlining, scene matching using control-point matching, and visualization capabilities. This system was developed for sidescan sonar ...surveys using instrumentation such as the high-frequency Marine Sonic Technology sidescan sonar . In this paper, the authors describe modifications to...the sidescan -based system required to perform change detection using Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS) bottom imagery. Index Terms—Acoustic signal

  18. Experiments in Coherent Change Detection for Synthetic Aperture Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    over time. ACD techniques, long used in airborne radar applications, are just beginning to be applied to sidescan sonar . In Coherent Change Detection...accurate geo- registration), the complexity of the propagation environment, and the radiometric inconsistencies of conventional sidescan sonars ...will follow suit. As conventional sidescan sonars exhibit resolution that degrades with range and are typically limited to creation of backscatter

  19. Shallow water imaging sonar system for environmental surveying. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The scope of this research is to develop a shallow water sonar system designed to detect and map the location of objects such as hazardous wastes or discarded ordnance in coastal waters. The system will use high frequency wide-bandwidth imaging sonar, mounted on a moving platform towed behind a boat, to detect and identify objects on the sea bottom. Resolved images can be obtained even if the targets are buried in an overlayer of silt. The specific technical objective of this research was to develop and test a prototype system that is capable of (1) scan at high speeds (up to 10m/s), even in shallow water (depth to ten meters), without motion blurring or loss of resolution; (2) produce images of the bottom structure that are detailed enough for unambiguous detection of objects as small as 15cm, even if they are buried up to 30cm deep in silt or sand. The critical technology involved uses an linear FM (LFM) or similar complex waveform, which has a high bandwidth for good range resolution, with a long pulse length for similar Dopper resolution. The lone duration signal deposits more energy on target than a narrower pulse, which increases the signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-clutter ratio. This in turn allows the use of cheap, lightweight, low power, piezoelectric transducers at the 30--500 kHz range.

  20. Evaluation of the Performance of the Distributed Phased-MIMO Sonar

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiang; Jiang, Jingning; Wang, Nan

    2017-01-01

    A broadband signal model is proposed for a distributed multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) sonar system consisting of two transmitters and a receiving linear array. Transmitters are widely separated to illuminate the different aspects of an extended target of interest. The beamforming technique is utilized at the reception ends for enhancement of weak target echoes. A MIMO detector is designed with the estimated target position parameters within the general likelihood rate test (GLRT) framework. For the high signal-to-noise ratio case, the detection performance of the MIMO system is better than that of the phased-array system in the numerical simulations and the tank experiments. The robustness of the distributed phased-MIMO sonar system is further demonstrated in localization of a target in at-lake experiments. PMID:28085071

  1. Evaluation of the Performance of the Distributed Phased-MIMO Sonar.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiang; Jiang, Jingning; Wang, Nan

    2017-01-11

    A broadband signal model is proposed for a distributed multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) sonar system consisting of two transmitters and a receiving linear array. Transmitters are widely separated to illuminate the different aspects of an extended target of interest. The beamforming technique is utilized at the reception ends for enhancement of weak target echoes. A MIMO detector is designed with the estimated target position parameters within the general likelihood rate test (GLRT) framework. For the high signal-to-noise ratio case, the detection performance of the MIMO system is better than that of the phased-array system in the numerical simulations and the tank experiments. The robustness of the distributed phased-MIMO sonar system is further demonstrated in localization of a target in at-lake experiments.

  2. Multibeam sonar (DIDSON) assessment of American shad (Alosa sapidissima) approaching a hydroelectric dam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grote, Ann B.; Bailey, Michael M.; Zydlewski, Joseph; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the fish community approaching the Veazie Dam on the Penobscot River, Maine, prior to implementation of a major dam removal and river restoration project. Multibeam sonar (dual-frequency identification sonar, DIDSON) surveys were conducted continuously at the fishway entrance from May to July in 2011. A 5% subsample of DIDSON data contained 43 793 fish targets, the majority of which were of Excellent (15.7%) or Good (73.01%) observation quality. Excellent quality DIDSON targets (n = 6876) were apportioned by species using a Bayesian mixture model based on four known fork length distributions (river herring (alewife,Alosa psuedoharengus, and blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis), American shad, Alosa sapidissima) and two size classes (one sea-winter and multi-sea-winter) of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). 76.2% of targets were assigned to the American shad distribution; Atlantic salmon accounted for 15.64%, and river herring 8.16% of observed targets. Shad-sized (99.0%) and salmon-sized (99.3%) targets approached the fishway almost exclusively during the day, whereas river herring-sized targets were observed both during the day (51.1%) and at night (48.9%). This approach demonstrates how multibeam sonar imaging can be used to evaluate community composition and species-specific movement patterns in systems where there is little overlap in the length distributions of target species.

  3. Prospects for using sonar for underwater archeology on the Yenisei: surveying a 19th century shipwreck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, A. E.; Mednikov, D. M.; Karelin, N. M.; Nasyrov, I. R.

    2016-11-01

    Current progress in underwater archeology is based on a rich arsenal of high-tech appliances, among which sonar technology plays a key role; it enables scientists not only to detect submerged archeological objects, but to examine them in high definition without having to conduct diving operations or use expensive underwater unmanned vehicles. While the majority of sensational scientific discoveries using sonar have been made in saltwater environments, freshwater ones, rivers in particular, have seen limited activity. The river Yenisei in central Siberia contains an unrecorded number of shipwrecks that await being discovered and studied. In this article we focus on the peculiarities of using sonar for detecting archeological sites on the Yenisei. This article is based on the results of the 2016 expedition, which has determined the location of Thames, a 19th century British steam schooner which was wrecked on the Yenisei.

  4. Changes in dive behavior during naval sonar exposure in killer whales, long-finned pilot whales, and sperm whales.

    PubMed

    Sivle, L D; Kvadsheim, P H; Fahlman, A; Lam, F P A; Tyack, P L; Miller, P J O

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic underwater sound in the environment might potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals enough to have an impact on their reproduction and survival. Diving behavior of four killer whales (Orcinus orca), seven long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), and four sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) was studied during controlled exposures to naval sonar [low frequency active sonar (LFAS): 1-2 kHz and mid frequency active sonar (MFAS): 6-7 kHz] during three field seasons (2006-2009). Diving behavior was monitored before, during and after sonar exposure using an archival tag placed on the animal with suction cups. The tag recorded the animal's vertical movement, and additional data on horizontal movement and vocalizations were used to determine behavioral modes. Killer whales that were conducting deep dives at sonar onset changed abruptly to shallow diving (ShD) during LFAS, while killer whales conducting deep dives at the onset of MFAS did not alter dive mode. When in ShD mode at sonar onset, killer whales did not change their diving behavior. Pilot and sperm whales performed normal deep dives (NDD) during MFAS exposure. During LFAS exposures, long-finned pilot whales mostly performed fewer deep dives and some sperm whales performed shallower and shorter dives. Acoustic recording data presented previously indicates that deep diving (DD) is associated with feeding. Therefore, the observed changes in dive behavior of the three species could potentially reduce the foraging efficiency of the affected animals.

  5. Changes in dive behavior during naval sonar exposure in killer whales, long-finned pilot whales, and sperm whales

    PubMed Central

    Sivle, L. D.; Kvadsheim, P. H.; Fahlman, A.; Lam, F. P. A.; Tyack, P. L.; Miller, P. J. O.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic underwater sound in the environment might potentially affect the behavior of marine mammals enough to have an impact on their reproduction and survival. Diving behavior of four killer whales (Orcinus orca), seven long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas), and four sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) was studied during controlled exposures to naval sonar [low frequency active sonar (LFAS): 1–2 kHz and mid frequency active sonar (MFAS): 6–7 kHz] during three field seasons (2006–2009). Diving behavior was monitored before, during and after sonar exposure using an archival tag placed on the animal with suction cups. The tag recorded the animal's vertical movement, and additional data on horizontal movement and vocalizations were used to determine behavioral modes. Killer whales that were conducting deep dives at sonar onset changed abruptly to shallow diving (ShD) during LFAS, while killer whales conducting deep dives at the onset of MFAS did not alter dive mode. When in ShD mode at sonar onset, killer whales did not change their diving behavior. Pilot and sperm whales performed normal deep dives (NDD) during MFAS exposure. During LFAS exposures, long-finned pilot whales mostly performed fewer deep dives and some sperm whales performed shallower and shorter dives. Acoustic recording data presented previously indicates that deep diving (DD) is associated with feeding. Therefore, the observed changes in dive behavior of the three species could potentially reduce the foraging efficiency of the affected animals. PMID:23087648

  6. Developments of thick solid neon as an active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiguchi, Nagaaki; Moriguchi, Tetsurou; Ozawa, Akira; Isimoto, Sigeru

    2009-10-01

    One of research subjects in our group is to measure reaction cross sections (σR) of RI beams. By measuring σR, we can deduce root mean square radii of unstable nuclei. In the measurements of σR, we usually used a carbon as the reaction targets (a few cm thickness). If we use the reaction target as a detector (active target), there are some advantages in the measurements; (1)The events only colliding with the reaction target can be selected. (2)If position information is available, we may define the colliding point inside the target. (3)If energy information is available, we may measure the energy loss of the beams inside the target. As the active target in the σR measurements, we noticed the solid neon. Since the neon is a noble gas, it is predicted to emit scintillations and work as an ionization chamber for charged particles. Indeed, scintillations from liquid and solid neon have been already observed. We will present production of the thick solid neon (˜30mm thickness), and observations of scintillations and ionization signals from the solid neon. We will also discuss possibility to use the sold neon as the active target in the σR measurements.

  7. Tobramycin variants with enhanced ribosome-targeting activity

    PubMed Central

    Fosso, Marina Y.; Zhu, Hongkun; Green, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    With the increased evolution of aminoglycoside (AG)-resistant bacterial strains, the need to develop AGs with (i) enhanced antimicrobial activity, (ii) the ability to evade resistance mechanisms, and (iii) the capability of targeting the ribosome with higher efficiency, is more and more pressing. The chemical derivatization of the naturally occurring tobramycin (TOB) by attachment of 37 different thioethers groups at the 6″-position led to the identification of generally poorer substrates of TOB-targeting AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs). Thirteen of these displayed better antibacterial activity than the parental TOB while retaining ribosome-targeting specificity. Analysis of these compounds in vitro shed light on the mechanism by which they act and revealed three with clearly enhanced ribosome-targeting activity. PMID:26033429

  8. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha target genes.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  9. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rakhshandehroo, Maryam; Knoch, Bianca; Müller, Michael; Kersten, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well. PMID:20936127

  10. High thresholds for avoidance of sonar by free-ranging long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas).

    PubMed

    Antunes, R; Kvadsheim, P H; Lam, F P A; Tyack, P L; Thomas, L; Wensveen, P J; Miller, P J O

    2014-06-15

    The potential effects of exposing marine mammals to military sonar is a current concern. Dose-response relationships are useful for predicting potential environmental impacts of specific operations. To reveal behavioral response thresholds of exposure to sonar, we conducted 18 exposure/control approaches to 6 long-finned pilot whales. Source level and proximity of sonar transmitting one of two frequency bands (1-2 kHz and 6-7 kHz) were increased during exposure sessions. The 2-dimensional movement tracks were analyzed using a changepoint method to identify the avoidance response thresholds which were used to estimate dose-response relationships. No support for an effect of sonar frequency or previous exposures on the probability of response was found. Estimated response thresholds at which 50% of population show avoidance (SPLmax=170 dB re 1 μPa, SELcum=173 dB re 1 μPa(2) s) were higher than previously found for other cetaceans. The US Navy currently uses a generic dose-response relationship to predict the responses of cetaceans to naval active sonar, which has been found to underestimate behavioural impacts on killer whales and beaked whales. The navy curve appears to match more closely our results with long-finned pilot whales, though it might underestimate the probability of avoidance for pilot-whales at long distances from sonar sources.

  11. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  12. Texture-based discrimination of man-made and natural objects in sidescan sonar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessel, Ronald T.

    2003-08-01

    High-resolution sidescan sonars are often used in underwater warfare for large-area surveys of the seafloor in the search for sea mines. Much effort has gone toward the automatic detection of sea mines. In its more advanced forms, such auto-detection entails pattern recognition: the automatic assignment of class labels (target/non-target) to signatures according to their distinctive features. This paper demonstrates a texture-based feature for automatically discriminating between man-made and natural objects. Real sonar data is used, and the demonstration includes performance estimates in the form of the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curves necessary (though often omitted) for evaluating detectors for operational use. The merits of redefining the allowable automatic responses-from the classes of mine targets ultimately sought, to the class of man-made objects more generally-are reviewed from both the pattern-recognition and operational perspectives.

  13. Processing of AUV Sidescan Sonar Images for Enhancement and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honsho, C.; Asada, A.; Ura, T.; Kim, K.

    2014-12-01

    An arc volcano hosting a hydrothermal field was surveyed by using an autonomous underwater vehicle equipped with a sidescan sonar system and a multibeam echo sounder. The survey area is relatively small in area but has large variations in bathymetry and geology. To correct large geometric distortions in sidescan images, actual topographic cross sections cut by fan beams were taken into consideration instead of assuming flat bottoms. Beam pattern corrections were cautiously performed in combination with theoretical radiometric corrections for slant range and incident angle. These detailed geometric and radiometric corrections were efficient to patch neighboring images and build a complete picture of the whole survey area. Three textural attributes were computed from the corrected images by means of grey level co-occurrence matrices and used for the seafloor classification. As no ground truth data were available to us, we used a cluster analysis for the classification and obtained a result that seems relevant to the geological features suggested by the topography. Moreover, slopes of the caldera wall and of the central cones are clearly differentiated in the classification result, though the difference is not immediately obvious to our eyes. As one of the classes clearly delineates a known hydrothermal field, we expect by analogy that this class will highlight hydrothermal features in the survey area, helping to detect potential targets to be specifically investigated for mineral exploration. Numerical processing of sonar images effectively complements their visual inspection with human eyes and is helpful in providing a different perspective.

  14. Model-based approach to the detection and classification of mines in sidescan sonar.

    PubMed

    Reed, Scott; Petillot, Yvan; Bell, Judith

    2004-01-10

    This paper presents a model-based approach to mine detection and classification by use of sidescan sonar. Advances in autonomous underwater vehicle technology have increased the interest in automatic target recognition systems in an effort to automate a process that is currently carried out by a human operator. Current automated systems generally require training and thus produce poor results when the test data set is different from the training set. This has led to research into unsupervised systems, which are able to cope with the large variability in conditions and terrains seen in sidescan imagery. The system presented in this paper first detects possible minelike objects using a Markov random field model, which operates well on noisy images, such as sidescan, and allows a priori information to be included through the use of priors. The highlight and shadow regions of the object are then extracted with a cooperating statistical snake, which assumes these regions are statistically separate from the background. Finally, a classification decision is made using Dempster-Shafer theory, where the extracted features are compared with synthetic realizations generated with a sidescan sonar simulator model. Results for the entire process are shown on real sidescan sonar data. Similarities between the sidescan sonar and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging processes ensure that the approach outlined here could be made applied to SAR image analysis.

  15. Shallow water benthic imaging and substrate characterization using recreational-grade sidescan-sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buscombe, Daniel D.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, lightweight, inexpensive, vessel-mounted ‘recreational grade’ sonar systems have rapidly grown in popularity among aquatic scientists, for swath imaging of benthic substrates. To promote an ongoing ‘democratization’ of acoustical imaging of shallow water environments, methods to carry out geometric and radiometric correction and georectification of sonar echograms are presented, based on simplified models for sonar-target geometry and acoustic backscattering and attenuation in shallow water. Procedures are described for automated removal of the acoustic shadows, identification of bed-water interface for situations when the water is too turbid or turbulent for reliable depth echosounding, and for automated bed substrate classification based on singlebeam full-waveform analysis. These methods are encoded in an open-source and freely-available software package, which should further facilitate use of recreational-grade sidescan sonar, in a fully automated and objective manner. The sequential correction, mapping, and analysis steps are demonstrated using a data set from a shallow freshwater environment.

  16. Transcriptionally active genome regions are preferred targets for retrovirus integration.

    PubMed Central

    Scherdin, U; Rhodes, K; Breindl, M

    1990-01-01

    We have analyzed the transcriptional activity of cellular target sequences for Moloney murine leukemia virus integration in mouse fibroblasts. At least five of the nine random, unselected integration target sequences studied showed direct evidence for transcriptional activity by hybridization to nuclear run-on transcripts prepared from uninfected cells. At least four of the sequences contained multiple recognition sites for several restriction enzymes that cut preferentially in CpG-rich islands, indicating integration into 5' or 3' ends or flanking regions of genes. Assuming that only a minor fraction (less than 20%) of the genome is transcribed in mammalian cells, we calculated the probability that this association of retroviral integration sites with transcribed sequences is due to chance to be very low (1.6 x 10(-2]. Thus, our results strongly suggest that transcriptionally active genome regions are preferred targets for retrovirus integration. Images PMID:2296087

  17. Trajectory Sonar Perception in the Ligurian Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    A typical marine robot displaces 50-500kg, transmits its sonar 3-10 times per second, and is perturbed by waves with periods on the order of 5-30...Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, PAMI-12(6):560–569, June 1990. 2. R. A. Brooks. Cambrian Intelligence: The Early History of the New

  18. Automatic seagrass pattern identification on sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnemoonfar, Maryam; Rahman, Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    Natural and human-induced disturbances are resulting in degradation and loss of seagrass. Freshwater flooding, severe meteorological events and invasive species are among the major natural disturbances. Human-induced disturbances are mainly due to boat propeller scars in the shallow seagrass meadows and anchor scars in the deeper areas. Therefore, there is a vital need to map seagrass ecosystems in order to determine worldwide abundance and distribution. Currently there is no established method for mapping the pothole or scars in seagrass. One of the most precise sensors to map the seagrass disturbance is side scan sonar. Here we propose an automatic method which detects seagrass potholes in sonar images. Side scan sonar images are notorious for having speckle noise and uneven illumination across the image. Moreover, disturbance presents complex patterns where most segmentation techniques will fail. In this paper, by applying mathematical morphology technique and calculating the local standard deviation of the image, the images were enhanced and the pothole patterns were identified. The proposed method was applied on sonar images taken from Laguna Madre in Texas. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Development of an improved active gas target design for ANASEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, Sabina; Blackmon, J. C.; Deibel, C. M.; Macon, K. T.; Rasco, B. C.; Wiedenhoever, I.

    2014-09-01

    The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged particle detector array with an active gas target-detector capability for sensitive measurements using radioactive ion beams. One of the main goals is to improve our understanding of nuclear reactions important in stellar explosions. Following initial experimental campaigns with ANASEN, we have been developing an improved active gas target design for ANASEN that incorporates an innovative cylindrical gas ionization detector for heavy ions surrounding the beam axis inside of the other ANASEN charged particle detectors. The detection of heavy ions in coincidence with lighter ions in a redesigned proportional counter will provide greater discriminating power. The new active gas target design will be presented, and its simulated performance will be compared with test data. The Array for Nuclear Astrophysics and Structure with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN) is a charged particle detector array with an active gas target-detector capability for sensitive measurements using radioactive ion beams. One of the main goals is to improve our understanding of nuclear reactions important in stellar explosions. Following initial experimental campaigns with ANASEN, we have been developing an improved active gas target design for ANASEN that incorporates an innovative cylindrical gas ionization detector for heavy ions surrounding the beam axis inside of the other ANASEN charged particle detectors. The detection of heavy ions in coincidence with lighter ions in a redesigned proportional counter will provide greater discriminating power. The new active gas target design will be presented, and its simulated performance will be compared with test data. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the Dept of Energy's Office of Science.

  20. Assessment of Modeled Received Sound Pressure Levels and Movements of Satellite-Tagged Odontocetes Exposed to Mid-Frequency Active Sonar at the Pacific Missile Range Facility: February 2011 Through February 2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-30

    PMRF so that animal movements and diving behavior could be measured both before and during sonar use. PMRF PAM data and tag data were used in this...initial analysis to estimate exposure levels for tagged animals and determine whether any large-scale movements of these animals may have occurred in...range hydrophones), ship positions at time of transmissions (provided by PMRF) and animal locations (determined from satellite tag positions) allowed

  1. 50 CFR 218.120 - Specified activity and geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high-frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources...-mounted active sonar)—up to 2,890 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 578 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 260 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of...

  2. 50 CFR 218.120 - Specified activity and geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high-frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources...-mounted active sonar)—up to 2,890 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of 578 hours per year); (ii) AN/SQS-56 (hull-mounted active sonar)—up to 260 hours over the course of 5 years (an average of...

  3. Active Targeted Drug Delivery for Microbes Using Nano-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines and antibiotics could kill or inhibit microbes, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat because of acquired resistance and adverse side effects. Nano-carriers-based technology has made significant progress for a long time and is introducing a new paradigm in drug delivery. However, it still has some challenges like lack of specificity toward targeting the infectious site. Nano-carriers utilized targeting ligands on their surface called ‘active target’ provide the promising way to solve the problems like accelerating drug delivery to infectious areas and preventing toxicity or side-effects. In this mini review, we demonstrate the recent studies using the active targeted strategy to kill or inhibit microbes. The four common nano-carriers (e.g. liposomes, nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) delivering encapsulated drugs are introduced. PMID:25877093

  4. Eliciting Production of L2 Target Structures through Priming Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Kim; Trofimovich, Pavel; Neumann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the pedagogical applications of structural priming research in an English for academic purposes (EAP) context, investigating whether priming activities are an effective tool for eliciting production of target grammatical structures. University students across four EAP classes carried out a total of 6 information-exchange…

  5. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel.

    PubMed

    Moisan, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Pierre; Foucher, Philippe; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Guillemin, Samuel; Koehl, Mathieu

    2015-12-11

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part) and sonar (for its underwater part) scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology.

  6. Adjustment of Sonar and Laser Acquisition Data for Building the 3D Reference Model of a Canal Tunnel †

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, Emmanuel; Charbonnier, Pierre; Foucher, Philippe; Grussenmeyer, Pierre; Guillemin, Samuel; Koehl, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on the construction of a full 3D model of a canal tunnel by combining terrestrial laser (for its above-water part) and sonar (for its underwater part) scans collected from static acquisitions. The modeling of such a structure is challenging because the sonar device is used in a narrow environment that induces many artifacts. Moreover, the location and the orientation of the sonar device are unknown. In our approach, sonar data are first simultaneously denoised and meshed. Then, above- and under-water point clouds are co-registered to generate directly the full 3D model of the canal tunnel. Faced with the lack of overlap between both models, we introduce a robust algorithm that relies on geometrical entities and partially-immersed targets, which are visible in both the laser and sonar point clouds. A full 3D model, visually promising, of the entrance of a canal tunnel is obtained. The analysis of the method raises several improvement directions that will help with obtaining more accurate models, in a more automated way, in the limits of the involved technology. PMID:26690444

  7. Suppression of emission rates improves sonar performance by flying bats.

    PubMed

    Adams, Amanda M; Davis, Kaylee; Smotherman, Michael

    2017-01-31

    Echolocating bats face the challenge of actively sensing their environment through their own emissions, while also hearing calls and echoes of nearby conspecifics. How bats mitigate interference is a long-standing question that has both ecological and technological implications, as biosonar systems continue to outperform man-made sonar systems in noisy, cluttered environments. We recently showed that perched bats decreased calling rates in groups, displaying a behavioral strategy resembling the back-off algorithms used in artificial communication networks to optimize information throughput at the group level. We tested whether free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) would employ such a coordinated strategy while performing challenging flight maneuvers, and report here that bats navigating obstacles lowered emission rates when hearing artificial playback of another bat's calls. We measured the impact of acoustic interference on navigation performance and show that the calculated reductions in interference rates are sufficient to reduce interference and improve obstacle avoidance. When bats flew in pairs, each bat responded to the presence of the other as an obstacle by increasing emissions, but hearing the sonar emissions of the nearby bat partially suppressed this response. This behavior supports social cohesion by providing a key mechanism for minimizing mutual interference.

  8. Suppression of emission rates improves sonar performance by flying bats

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Amanda M.; Davis, Kaylee; Smotherman, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Echolocating bats face the challenge of actively sensing their environment through their own emissions, while also hearing calls and echoes of nearby conspecifics. How bats mitigate interference is a long-standing question that has both ecological and technological implications, as biosonar systems continue to outperform man-made sonar systems in noisy, cluttered environments. We recently showed that perched bats decreased calling rates in groups, displaying a behavioral strategy resembling the back-off algorithms used in artificial communication networks to optimize information throughput at the group level. We tested whether free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) would employ such a coordinated strategy while performing challenging flight maneuvers, and report here that bats navigating obstacles lowered emission rates when hearing artificial playback of another bat’s calls. We measured the impact of acoustic interference on navigation performance and show that the calculated reductions in interference rates are sufficient to reduce interference and improve obstacle avoidance. When bats flew in pairs, each bat responded to the presence of the other as an obstacle by increasing emissions, but hearing the sonar emissions of the nearby bat partially suppressed this response. This behavior supports social cohesion by providing a key mechanism for minimizing mutual interference. PMID:28139707

  9. 50 CFR 216.170 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... incidental to the following activities: (1) The use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, or similar sources, for Navy training activities (estimated amounts below): (1) The use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency...

  10. Active helium target: Neutron scalar polarizability extraction via Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Meg Hornidge, David; Annand, John; Strandberg, Bruno

    2015-12-31

    Precise measurement of the neutron scalar polarizabilities has been a lasting challenge because of the lack of a free-neutron target. Led by the University of Glasgow and the Mount Allison University groups of the A2 collaboration in Mainz, Germany, preparations have begun to test a recent theoretical model with an active helium target with the hope of determining these elusive quantities with small statistical, systematic, and model-dependent errors. Apparatus testing and background-event simulations have been carried out, with the full experiment projected to run in 2015. Once determined, these values can be applied to help understand quantum chromodynamics in the nonperturbative region.

  11. Acoustic Image Models for Navigation with Forward-Looking Sonars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    used for altitude and velocity over ground estimation. For mapping, the REMUS uses a Marine Sonics 900 kHz sidescan sonar . The Marine Sonics 900 has...and J. Bell. An Automatic Approach to the Detection and Extraction of Mine Features in Sidescan Sonar . IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering, 28:90–105...2003. [18] S. Reed, Y. Petillot, and J. Bell. Automated approach to classication of mine-like objects in sidescan sonar using highlight and shadow

  12. Bearing Estimation Uncertainties for the Volume Search Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-31

    II bathymetric sidescan sonar system”, IEEE Journal of Oceanic Engineering, 17(3), 239-251, 1992. R. O. Nielsen, “Accuracy of angle estimation with...shows potential for detecting variations in sediment type in much the same manner that a sidescan sonar detects these variations. However, this data...code) 31/08/2009 Final / Technical 2003 - Aug. 2008 Acoustic Signal Processing for Ocean Mapping Applications With The Volume Search Sonar (VSS

  13. Modeling a 300 kHz Bathymetric Sonar System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    AD-A257 378 /7 Modeling A 300 kHz Bathymetric Sonar System by Kenneth Alan Malmquist B.S., Drexel University, Philadelphia (1985) Submitted in...Massachusetts Institute of Technology/ Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 92-28033 Vll1 Nlf • 92 BLANK PAR Modeling A 300 kIz Bathymetric Sonar System by...Deep Submergence Laboratory has developed a family of calibrated high frequency bathymetric sonar systems for underwater survey. It is useful to have a

  14. Reversible, activity-dependent targeting of profilin to neuronal nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Birbach, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.birbach@lbicr.lbg.ac.at; Verkuyl, J. Martin; Matus, Andrew . E-mail: aim@fmi.ch

    2006-07-15

    The actin cytoskeleton in pyramidal neurons plays a major role in activity-dependent processes underlying neuronal plasticity. The small actin-binding protein profilin shows NMDA receptor-dependent accumulation in dendritic spines, which is correlated with suppression of actin dynamics and long-term stabilization of synaptic morphology. Here we show that following NMDA receptor activation profilin also accumulates in the nucleus of hippocampal neurons via a process involving rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. This simultaneous targeting to dendritic spines and the cell nucleus suggests a novel mechanism of neuronal plasticity in which profilin both tags activated synapses and influences nuclear events.

  15. Mid-water Software Tools and the Application to Processing and Analysis of the Latest Generation Multibeam Sonars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, L.; Doucet, M.

    2010-12-01

    The latest generation of multibeam sonars now has the ability to map the water-column, along with the seafloor. Currently, the users of these sonars have a limited view of the mid-water data in real-time, and if they do store the data, they are restricted to replaying it only, with no ability for further analysis. The water-column data has the potential to address a number of research areas including detection of small targets (wrecks, etc.) above the seabed, mapping of fish and marine mammals and a wide range of physical oceanographic processes. However, researchers have been required to develop their own in-house software tools before they can even begin their study of the water column data. This paper describes the development of more general software tools for the full processing of raw sonar data (bathymetry, backscatter and water-column) to yield output products suitable for visualization in a 4D time-synchronized environment. The huge water-column data volumes generated by the new sonars, combined with the variety of data formats from the different sonar manufacturers, provides a significant challenge in the design and development of tools that can be applied to the wide variety of applications. The development of the mid-water tools on this project addressed this problem by using a unified way of storing the water column data in a generic water column format (GWC). The sonar data are converted into the GWC by re-integrating the water column packets with time-based navigation and attitude, such that downstream in the workflow, the tools will have access to all relevant data of any particular ping. Dependent on the application and the resolution requirements, the conversion process also allows simple sub-sampling. Additionally, each file is indexed to enable fast non-linear lookup and extraction of any packet type or packet type collection in the sonar file. These tools also fully exploit multi-core and hyper-threading technologies to maximize the throughput

  16. Salmon escapement estimates into the Togiak River using sonar, Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 1987, 1988, and 1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irving, David B.; Finn, James E.; Larson, James P.

    1995-01-01

    We began a three year study in 1987 to test the feasibility of using sonar in the Togiak River to estimate salmon escapements. Current methods rely on periodic aerial surveys and a counting tower at river kilometer 97. Escapement estimates are not available until 10 to 14 days after the salmon enter the river. Water depth and turbidity preclude relocating the tower to the lower river and affect the reliability of aerial surveys. To determine whether an alternative method could be developed to improve the timeliness and accuracy of current escapement monitoring, Bendix sonar units were operated during 1987, 1988, and 1990. Two sonar stations were set up opposite each other at river kilometer 30 and were operated 24 hours per day, seven days per week. Catches from gill nets with 12, 14, and 20 cm stretch mesh, a beach seine, and visual observations were used to estimate species composition. Length and sex data were collected from salmon caught in the nets to assess sampling bias.In 1987, sonar was used to select optimal sites and enumerate coho salmon. In 1988 and 1990, the sites identified in 1987 were used to estimate the escapement of five salmon species. Sockeye salmon escapement was estimated at 512,581 and 589,321, chinook at 7,698 and 15,098, chum at 246,144 and 134,958, coho at 78,588 and 28,290, and pink at 96,167 and 131,484. Sonar estimates of sockeye salmon were two to three times the Alaska Department of Fish and Game's escapement estimate based on aerial surveys and tower counts. The source of error was probably a combination of over-estimating the total number of targets counted by the sonar and by incorrectly estimating species composition.Total salmon escapement estimates using sonar may be feasible but several more years of development are needed. Because of the overlapped salmon run timing, estimating species composition appears the most difficult aspect of using sonar for management. Possible improvements include using a larger beach seine or

  17. Sonar sensor models and their application to mobile robot localization.

    PubMed

    Burguera, Antoni; González, Yolanda; Oliver, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to mobile robot localization using sonar sensors. This approach is based on the use of particle filters. Each particle is augmented with local environment information which is updated during the mission execution. An experimental characterization of the sonar sensors used is provided in the paper. A probabilistic measurement model that takes into account the sonar uncertainties is defined according to the experimental characterization. The experimental results quantitatively evaluate the presented approach and provide a comparison with other localization strategies based on both the sonar and the laser. Some qualitative results are also provided for visual inspection.

  18. The sonar aperture and its neural representation in bats.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Melina; Warmbold, Alexander; Hoffmann, Susanne; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2011-10-26

    As opposed to visual imaging, biosonar imaging of spatial object properties represents a challenge for the auditory system because its sensory epithelium is not arranged along space axes. For echolocating bats, object width is encoded by the amplitude of its echo (echo intensity) but also by the naturally covarying spread of angles of incidence from which the echoes impinge on the bat's ears (sonar aperture). It is unclear whether bats use the echo intensity and/or the sonar aperture to estimate an object's width. We addressed this question in a combined psychophysical and electrophysiological approach. In three virtual-object playback experiments, bats of the species Phyllostomus discolor had to discriminate simple reflections of their own echolocation calls differing in echo intensity, sonar aperture, or both. Discrimination performance for objects with physically correct covariation of sonar aperture and echo intensity ("object width") did not differ from discrimination performances when only the sonar aperture was varied. Thus, the bats were able to detect changes in object width in the absence of intensity cues. The psychophysical results are reflected in the responses of a population of units in the auditory midbrain and cortex that responded strongest to echoes from objects with a specific sonar aperture, regardless of variations in echo intensity. Neurometric functions obtained from cortical units encoding the sonar aperture are sufficient to explain the behavioral performance of the bats. These current data show that the sonar aperture is a behaviorally relevant and reliably encoded cue for object size in bat sonar.

  19. Statistical algorithms for target detection in coherent active polarimetric images.

    PubMed

    Goudail, F; Réfrégier, P

    2001-12-01

    We address the problem of small-target detection with a polarimetric imager that provides orthogonal state contrast images. Such active systems allow one to measure the degree of polarization of the light backscattered by purely depolarizing isotropic materials. To be independent of the spatial nonuniformities of the illumination beam, small-target detection on the orthogonal state contrast image must be performed without using the image of backscattered intensity. We thus propose and develop a simple and efficient target detection algorithm based on a nonlinear pointwise transformation of the orthogonal state contrast image followed by a maximum-likelihood algorithm optimal for additive Gaussian perturbations. We demonstrate the efficiency of this suboptimal technique in comparison with the optimal one, which, however, assumes a priori knowledge about the scene that is not available in practice. We illustrate the performance of this approach on both simulated and real polarimetric images.

  20. Radiation damage/activity calculation for CSNS target station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.; Liang, T. J.; Yu, Q. Z.; Jia, X. J.

    2010-03-01

    The radiation damages have been performed for Chinese spallation neutron source (CSNS) target center components that relies on Monte Carlo simulation code MCNPX. During the calculation, Bertini intranuclear cascade model, three level-density formulation GCCI, and multistage pre-equilibrium model MPM on which are provided within MCNPX are employed. We calculate the displacement per atom (DPA) and afterheat of the tungsten target, the stainless steel target vessel window and the aluminum alloy moderator vessel. As a hundred kW-level source, these spallation center components have the lifetime more than 5 year. We also give the activity for the T0 chopper of the beam line HIPD to get the primary data for making out a maintenance scenario.

  1. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Wang, Yu-Hsin; Lee, Chia-Ying; Li, Pai-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs) conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs). Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs), which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+)) and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-), which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+) is a commonly used cancer-stem-cell biomarker, our

  2. 75 FR 79342 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Navy Training Activities Conducted Within the Northwest...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... exposing them to sound from mid-frequency or high frequency active sonar (MFAS/HFAS) or to underwater... frequency active sonar (MFAS/HFAS) or underwater detonations. After submitting supplemental...

  3. Mapping with side-scan sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, D.B.; Coleman, J.M.; Roberts, H.H.

    1981-04-01

    The use of sideways scanning sonar as a technique for detailed sea-floor mapping is described in this article. Sea-floor mapping of the continental shelf is becoming increasingly necessary for the development of oil and gas resources. More recently attempts are being made to extend the survey capabilities to deeper water shelf margins, slopes, and basins. Conventional systems, digital systems, survey ranges, data processing, mosaics, and applications are discussed. (DMC)

  4. Ceteacean Social Behavioral Response to Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    responses to sonar signals and other stimuli (tagging effort, killer whale playbacks) as well as baseline behavior, are studied within the larger... killer whale vocalizations in 3S2 - Response to tagging and vessel noise exposure in Azores-Baseline - Species: Northern bottlenose whale , Risso’s...common dolphin, bottlenose dolphin, killer whale  Cross-study implementation of group sampling methodology - Protocols used in four BRS studies

  5. Sonar Transducer Reliability Improvement Program (STRIP).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    surfaces of PZT ceramic. The ceramic surface tends to be the weakest part of the insulation system of a sonar transducer. The highest typical electrical...comparable value obtained with uncoated ceramic. Also, the breakdown voltage on the surface ( flashover ) was increased only a small amount, typically less...coating/ surface interface, and some were combinations. A coating material often touted as exceptionally 3ood is Parylene, which is vacuum deposited

  6. Sonar Transducer Reliability Improvement Program FY80.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    band Threshold - less than ±2 dB variation from the specified value over operational frequency band The Sonar Transducer Reliability Improvement...were Qetiker preformed clamps, Band -It preformed clamps, and Band -It Scru-Loct retrofittable clamps. *TASK 5: Manufacture Instrumented Connectors Under...cycle 6 PRE-kORM 10 PU-U Cable bond failure, Remove from test after DSS-3 under gap in clamp cycle 5 OETIKER 11 N-G " ring leakage was Removed from

  7. Field Calibration Procedures for Multibeam Sonar Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    include multibeam sonar transducers, light detection and ranging ( LIDAR ) surveys, acoustic seafloor classification systems, sub-bottom profilers, and... DTM ) of the reference surface is created from the cleaned data, and an averaging gridding algorithm is used to smooth the data. The gridding size...should be no larger than the average footprint of the inner beams. Using large vertical exaggeration, the DTM should be observed on 3-D visualization

  8. Velocity Estimation Using Forward Looking Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Looking Sonar GPS Global Positioning System GWOT Global War on Terrorism ISR Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance LBL Long Base-Line NL...inputs from equipment such as long base-line ( LBL ) transponders, accelerometers, and gyroscopes to track how the vehicle has moved from the last known...includes a compass, the above-mentioned ADCP to provide speed over ground when ground lock is available, and an acoustic LBL system to correct

  9. Target identification with quantitative activity based protein profiling (ABPP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Wong, Yin Kwan; Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Lee, Yew-Mun; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2017-02-01

    As many small bioactive molecules fulfill their functions through interacting with protein targets, the identification of such targets is crucial in understanding their mechanisms of action (MOA) and side effects. With technological advancements in target identification, it has become possible to accurately and comprehensively study the MOA and side effects of small molecules. While small molecules with therapeutic potential were derived solely from nature in the past, the remodeling and synthesis of such molecules have now been made possible. Presently, while some small molecules have seen successful application as drugs, the majority remain undeveloped, requiring further understanding of their MOA and side effects to fully tap into their potential. Given the typical promiscuity of many small molecules and the complexity of the cellular proteome, a high-flux and high-accuracy method is necessary. While affinity chromatography approaches combined with MS have had successes in target identification, limitations associated with nonspecific results remain. To overcome these complications, quantitative chemical proteomics approaches have been developed including metabolic labeling, chemical labeling, and label-free methods. These new approaches are adopted in conjunction with activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), allowing for a rapid process and accurate results. This review will briefly introduce the principles involved in ABPP, then summarize current advances in quantitative chemical proteomics approaches as well as illustrate with examples how ABPP coupled with quantitative chemical proteomics has been used to detect the targets of drugs and other bioactive small molecules including natural products.

  10. A diamond active target for the PADME experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, G.

    2017-02-01

    The PADME (Positron Annihilation into Dark Mediator Experiment) collaboration searches for dark photons produced in the annihilation e++e-→γ+A' of accelerated positrons with atomic electrons of a fixed target at the Beam Test Facility of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati. The apparatus can detect dark photons decaying into visible A'→e+e- and invisible A'→χχ channels, where χ's are particles of a secluded sector weakly interacting and therefore undetected. In order to improve the missing mass resolution and to measure the beam flux, PADME has an active target able to reconstruct the beam spot position and the bunch multiplicity. In this work the active target is described, which is made of a detector grade polycrystalline synthetic diamond with strip electrodes on both surfaces. The electrodes segmentation allows to measure the beam profile along X and Y and evaluate the average beam position bunch per bunch. The results of beam tests for the first two diamond detector prototypes are shown. One of them holds innovative graphitic electrodes built with a custom process developed in the laboratory, and the other one with commercially available traditional Cr-Au electrodes. The front-end electronics used in the test beam is discussed and the performance observed is presented. Finally, the final design of the target to be realized at the beginning of 2017 to be ready for data taking in 2018 is illustrated.

  11. Molecular pathways: targeting MALT1 paracaspase activity in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fontán, Lorena; Melnick, Ari

    2013-12-15

    MALT1 mediates the activation of NF-κB in response to antigen receptor signaling. MALT1, in association with BCL10 and CARD11, functions as a scaffolding protein to activate the inhibitor of IκB kinase (IKK) complex. In addition, MALT1 is a paracaspase that targets key proteins in a feedback loop mediating termination of the NF-κB response, thus promoting activation of NF-κB signaling. Activated B-cell subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCL), which tend to be more resistant to chemotherapy, are often biologically dependent on MALT1 activity. Newly developed MALT1 small-molecule inhibitors suppress the growth of ABC-DLBCLs in vitro and in vivo. This review highlights the recent advances in the normal and disease-related functions of MALT1. Furthermore, recent progress targeting MALT1 proteolytic activity raises the possibility of deploying MALT1 inhibitors for the treatment of B-cell lymphomas and perhaps autoimmune diseases that involve increased B- or T-cell receptor signaling.

  12. AMPK activation: a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Kimberly A; Valentine, Rudy J; Ruderman, Neil B; Saha, Asish K

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and elevated hepatic glucose output. Over 350 million people worldwide have T2D, and the International Diabetes Federation projects that this number will increase to nearly 600 million by 2035. There is a great need for more effective treatments for maintaining glucose homeostasis and improving insulin sensitivity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase whose activation elicits insulin-sensitizing effects, making it an ideal therapeutic target for T2D. AMPK is an energy-sensing enzyme that is activated when cellular energy levels are low, and it signals to stimulate glucose uptake in skeletal muscles, fatty acid oxidation in adipose (and other) tissues, and reduces hepatic glucose production. There is substantial evidence suggesting that AMPK is dysregulated in animals and humans with metabolic syndrome or T2D, and that AMPK activation (physiological or pharmacological) can improve insulin sensitivity and metabolic health. Numerous pharmacological agents, natural compounds, and hormones are known to activate AMPK, either directly or indirectly - some of which (for example, metformin and thiazolidinediones) are currently used to treat T2D. This paper will review the regulation of the AMPK pathway and its role in T2D, some of the known AMPK activators and their mechanisms of action, and the potential for future improvements in targeting AMPK for the treatment of T2D.

  13. Radar and sonar probing of rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Unterberger, R.R.

    1983-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the research of the past sixteen years on methods of probing into solid rock. For these purposes, there are three completely different systems: radar, sonar, and nonlinear sonar. In dry salt all of the systems work. Five radar systems of different frequencies have been used to probe salt for different purposes and with different resolutions. Distances penetrated were from almost 2000 meters to under one 1 meter. With some moisture in the rock, the low frequency Alpha radar system is best because it operates at the frequency of the minimum in loss tangent for water. Sonar systems are used for even more water in the rock. Ranges of one to 300 meters have been obtained in salt with the lower ranges (to 100m) being obtainable is salt with the most water in it. Using one or more of the probing systems, the authors have detected, and ranged to, salt dome flanks, the top of salt, sandstone, anhydrite and sylvite stringers in salt, fractures in salt and water-filled fractures. We have also detected old boreholes in salt pillars, and measured the range and direction to them.

  14. Measurement of stream channel habitat using sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flug, M.; Seitz, H.; Scott, J.

    1998-01-01

    An efficient and low cost technique using a sonar system was evaluated for describing channel geometry and quantifying inundated area in a large river. The boat-mounted portable sonar equipment was used to record water depths and river width measurements for direct storage on a laptop computer. The field data collected from repeated traverses at a cross-section were evaluated to determine the precision of the system and field technique. Results from validation at two different sites showed average sample standard deviations (S.D.s) of 0.12 m for these complete cross-sections, with coefficient of variations of 10%. Validation using only the mid-channel river cross-section data yields an average sample S.D. of 0.05 m, with a coefficient of variation below 5%, at a stable and gauged river site using only measurements of water depths greater than 0.6 m. Accuracy of the sonar system was evaluated by comparison to traditionally surveyed transect data from a regularly gauged site. We observed an average mean squared deviation of 46.0 cm2, considering only that portion of the cross-section inundated by more than 0.6 m of water. Our procedure proved to be a reliable, accurate, safe, quick, and economic method to record river depths, discharges, bed conditions, and substratum composition necessary for stream habitat studies. ?? 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. 50 CFR 216.240 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Active Sonar Training (AFAST) § 216.240 Specified activity and specified geographical region. (a... Navy is only authorized if it occurs incidental to the use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, explosive sonobuoys, or similar sources,...

  16. 50 CFR 216.240 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Active Sonar Training (AFAST) § 216.240 Specified activity and specified geographical region. (a... Navy is only authorized if it occurs incidental to the use of the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources, explosive sonobuoys, or similar sources,...

  17. Brain Activation Underlying Threat Detection to Targets of Different Races

    PubMed Central

    Senholzi, Keith B.; Depue, Brendan E.; Correll, Joshua; Banich, Marie T.; Ito, Tiffany A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal underlying racial differences in threat detection. During fMRI, participants determined whether pictures of Black or White individuals held weapons. They were instructed to make shoot responses when the picture showed armed individuals but don’t shoot responses to unarmed individuals, with the cost of not shooting armed individuals being greater than that of shooting unarmed individuals. Participants were faster to shoot armed Blacks than Whites, but faster in making don’t shoot responses to unarmed Whites than Blacks. Brain activity differed to armed versus unarmed targets depending on target race, suggesting different mechanisms underlying threat versus safety decisions. Anterior cingulate cortex was preferentially engaged for unarmed Whites than Blacks. Parietal and visual cortical regions exhibited greater activity for armed Blacks than Whites. Seed-based functional connectivity of the amygdala revealed greater coherence with parietal and visual cortices for armed Blacks than Whites. Furthermore, greater implicit Black-danger associations were associated with increased amygdala activation to armed Blacks, compared to armed Whites. Our results suggest that different neural mechanisms may underlie racial differences in responses to armed versus unarmed targets. PMID:26357911

  18. Successful Targeted Treatment of Mast Cell Activation Syndrome with Tofacitinib.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Lawrence B; Fox, Roger W; Zito, Susan L; Choe, Leo; Glover, Sarah C

    2017-04-06

    Mast cell (MC) activation syndrome (MCAS) is a collection of illnesses of inappropriate MC activation with little to no neoplastic MC proliferation, distinguishing it from mastocytosis. MCAS presents as chronic, generally inflammatory multisystem polymorbidity likely driven in most by heterogeneous patterns of constitutively activating mutations in MC regulatory elements, posing challenges for identifying optimal mutation-targeted treatment in individual patients. Targeting commonly affected downstream effectors may yield clinical benefit independent of upstream mutational profile. For example, both activated KIT and numerous cytokine receptors activate the Janus kinases (JAKs). Thus, JAK-inhibiting therapies may be useful against the downstream inflammatory effects of MCAS. The oral JAK1/JAK3 inhibitor, tofacitinib, is currently approved for rheumatoid arthritis and is in clinical trials for other chronic inflammatory disorders. Herein, we report two MCAS patients who rapidly gained substantial symptomatic response to tofacitinib. Their improvement suggests need for further evaluation of this class of drugs in MCAS treatment. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Targeting Gli Transcription Activation by Small Molecule Suppresses Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bosco-Clément, Geneviève; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Zhao; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Li, Hui; Mikami, Iwao; Hirata, Tomomi; Yagui-Beltran, Adam; Lui, Natalie; Do, Hanh T.; Cheng, Tiffany; Tseng, Hsin-Hui; Choi, Helen; Fang, Li-Tai; Kim, Il-Jin; Yue, Dongsheng; Wang, Changli; Zheng, Qingfeng; Fujii, Naoaki; Mann, Michael; Jablons, David M.; He, Biao

    2014-01-01

    Targeted inhibition of Hedgehog signaling at the cell membrane has been associated with anti-cancer activity in preclinical and early clinical studies. Hedgehog signaling involves activation of Gli transcription factors that can also be induced by alternative pathways. In this study we identified an interaction between Gli proteins and a transcription co-activator TAF9, and validated its functional relevance in regulating Gli transactivation. We also describe a novel, synthetic small molecule, FN1-8, that efficiently interferes with Gli/TAF9 interaction and down-regulate Gli/TAF9 dependent transcriptional activity. More importantly, FN1-8 suppresses cancer cell proliferation in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in vivo. Our results suggest that blocking Gli transactivation, a key control point of multiple oncogenic pathways, may be an effective anti-cancer strategy. PMID:23686308

  20. Factor XI and Contact Activation as Targets for Antithrombotic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gailani, David; Bane, Charles E.; Gruber, Andras

    2015-01-01

    Summary The most commonly used anticoagulants produce therapeutic antithrombotic effects either by inhibiting thrombin or factor Xa, or by lowering the plasma levels of the precursors of these key enzymes, prothrombin and factor X. These drugs do not distinguish between thrombin generation contributing to thrombosis from thrombin generation required for hemostasis. Thus, anticoagulants increase bleeding risk, and many patients who would benefit from therapy go untreated because of comorbidities that place them at unacceptable risk for hemorrhage. Studies in animals demonstrate that components of the plasma contact activation system contribute to experimentally-induced thrombosis, despite playing little or no role in hemostasis. Attention has focused on factor XII, the zymogen of a protease (factor XIIa) that initiates contact activation when blood is exposed to foreign surfaces; and factor XI, the zymogen of the protease factor XIa, which links contact activation to the thrombin generation mechanism. In the case of factor XI, epidemiologic data indicate this protein contributes to stroke and venous thromboembolism, and perhaps myocardial infarction, in humans. A phase 2 trial showing that reduction of factor XI may be more effective than low-molecular-weight heparin at preventing venous thrombosis during knee replacement surgery provides proof of concept for the premise that an antithrombotic effect can be uncoupled from an anticoagulant effect in humans by targeting components of contact activation. Here we review data on the role of factor XI and factor XII in thrombosis, and results of pre-clinical and human trials for therapies targeting these proteins. PMID:25976012

  1. Factor XI and contact activation as targets for antithrombotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Gailani, D; Bane, C E; Gruber, A

    2015-08-01

    The most commonly used anticoagulants produce therapeutic antithrombotic effects either by inhibiting thrombin or factor Xa (FXa) or by lowering the plasma levels of the precursors of these key enzymes, prothrombin and FX. These drugs do not distinguish between thrombin generation contributing to thrombosis from thrombin generation required for hemostasis. Thus, anticoagulants increase bleeding risk, and many patients who would benefit from therapy go untreated because of comorbidities that place them at unacceptable risk for hemorrhage. Studies in animals demonstrate that components of the plasma contact activation system contribute to experimentally induced thrombosis, despite playing little or no role in hemostasis. Attention has focused on FXII, the zymogen of a protease (FXIIa) that initiates contact activation when blood is exposed to foreign surfaces, and FXI, the zymogen of the protease FXIa, which links contact activation to the thrombin generation mechanism. In the case of FXI, epidemiologic data indicate this protein contributes to stroke and venous thromboembolism, and perhaps myocardial infarction, in humans. A phase 2 trial showing that reduction of FXI may be more effective than low molecular weight heparin at preventing venous thrombosis during knee replacement surgery provides proof of concept for the premise that an antithrombotic effect can be uncoupled from an anticoagulant effect in humans by targeting components of contact activation. Here, we review data on the role of FXI and FXII in thrombosis and results of preclinical and human trials for therapies targeting these proteins.

  2. Processing of SeaMARC swath sonar imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Pratson, L.; Malinverno, A.; Edwards, M.; Ryan, W. )

    1990-05-01

    Side-scan swath sonar systems have become an increasingly important means of mapping the sea floor. Two such systems are the deep-towed, high-resolution SeaMARC I sonar, which has a variable swath width of up to 5 km, and the shallow-towed, lower-resolution SeaMARC II sonar, which has a swath width of 10 km. The sea-floor imagery of acoustic backscatter output by the SeaMARC sonars is analogous to aerial photographs and airborne side-looking radar images of continental topography. Geologic interpretation of the sea-floor imagery is greatly facilitated by image processing. Image processing of the digital backscatter data involves removal of noise by median filtering, spatial filtering to remove sonar scans of anomalous intensity, across-track corrections to remove beam patterns caused by nonuniform response of the sonar transducers to changes in incident angle, and contrast enhancement by histogram equalization to maximize the available dynamic range. Correct geologic interpretation requires submarine structural fabrics to be displayed in their proper locations and orientations. Geographic projection of sea-floor imagery is achieved by merging the enhanced imagery with the sonar vehicle navigation and correcting for vehicle attitude. Co-registration of bathymetry with sonar imagery introduces sea-floor relief and permits the imagery to be displayed in three-dimensional perspectives, furthering the ability of the marine geologist to infer the processes shaping formerly hidden subsea terrains.

  3. Haem-activated promiscuous targeting of artemisinin in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Chong-Jing; Chia, Wan Ni; Loh, Cheryl C. Y.; Li, Zhengjun; Lee, Yew Mun; He, Yingke; Yuan, Li-Xia; Lim, Teck Kwang; Liu, Min; Liew, Chin Xia; Lee, Yan Quan; Zhang, Jianbin; Lu, Nianci; Lim, Chwee Teck; Hua, Zi-Chun; Liu, Bin; Shen, Han-Ming; Tan, Kevin S. W.; Lin, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of action of artemisinin and its derivatives, the most potent of the anti-malarial drugs, is not completely understood. Here we present an unbiased chemical proteomics analysis to directly explore this mechanism in Plasmodium falciparum. We use an alkyne-tagged artemisinin analogue coupled with biotin to identify 124 artemisinin covalent binding protein targets, many of which are involved in the essential biological processes of the parasite. Such a broad targeting spectrum disrupts the biochemical landscape of the parasite and causes its death. Furthermore, using alkyne-tagged artemisinin coupled with a fluorescent dye to monitor protein binding, we show that haem, rather than free ferrous iron, is predominantly responsible for artemisinin activation. The haem derives primarily from the parasite's haem biosynthesis pathway at the early ring stage and from haemoglobin digestion at the latter stages. Our results support a unifying model to explain the action and specificity of artemisinin in parasite killing. PMID:26694030

  4. Cetaceans and Naval Sonar: Behavioral Response as a Function of Sonar Frequency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    labeled on the left, and the type of sonar exposure is shown by color. The dose - response curve below each histogram is the harassment dose - response curve currently...1) with indications that weighting the received levels do not improve the steepness of the dose - response curve . The results of this dose-response

  5. Cetaceans and Naval Sonar: Behavioral Response as a Function of Sonar Frequency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    Nowacek, D. P., Thorne , L. H., Johnston, D. W., Tyack, P. L. 2007. Responses of cetaceans to anthropogenic noise. Mammal Review 37, 81-115...Tyack PL, Bird A, Miller PJO. (submitted) Vocal matching of sonar signals by long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melas). Naturwissenschaften

  6. Offshore exploration and platform siting by imaging Sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Feder, A.M.

    1986-03-17

    Sonar, an acronym for sonic azimuth and ranging (some say ''sonic detection and ranging''), is the name of a type of remote sensor that was developed in World War II for antisubmarine warfare purposes. The principles of the sensor system are simple in that it broadcasts a focused (shaped) sonic pulse through the water (transmission medium), then receives the echo of that pulse and processes this signal for its information content. Hence, Sonar system principles are highly analagous to those of radar. Post-World War II saw development of Sonar probes that provided some success in determining sea floor materials composition and condition (e.g., subbottom profilers). The major advance, however, was with the advent of digital computation systems. These permitted the coupling of Sonar azimuth and range components to provide ''x'' and ''y'' coordinates for each echo location, or ''z'' value. This advance is seeing a proliferation of different types of imaging Sonar systems and performances.

  7. Utilization of a BGO detector as an active oxygen target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveman, R.; Gozani, T.; Bendahan, J.; Krivicich, J.; Elias, E.; Altschuler, E.

    1994-12-01

    The (n, n'γx) cross section for the 6.13 MeV state in oxygen has recently become of general interest because of the possibility of using this process to assay oxygen as a part of non-intrusive inspections. Localized densities of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are particularly useful in determining the presence of explosives and/or drugs in containers of all sizes, from suitcases to cargo containers. The presence of oxygen in BGO (Bi 4Ge 3O 12) scintillator makes this detector suitable for use as an active target for the measurement of the energy dependence of the excitation, of the first (6.049 MeV O +) and second (6.130 MeV 3 -) excited states in 16O by fast neutron interactions. An active target functions as both a target and an active device such as a detector. The de-excitations of the 6.049 and 6.130 states take place by nuclear pair production and γ-ray emission respectively. There is a large probability of absorbing all of the de-excitation energy in the scintillator in either of these cases. Since the energies deposited in the scintillator by these transitions are very close, the de-excitations are indistinguishable. However, since the cross section for the excitation of the 6.13 MeV state is believed to be larger than that of the 6.049 MeV, the major measured features of the energy variations are those related to the second state. The validity of the technique was initially tested using (MCNP) calculations. The calculations established that the detected neutron count rate in the crystal was proportional to the cross-sections used as input for the calculations, and that the constant of proportionality did not vary with neutron energy. Subsequently, measurements were made with a BGO detector as an active oxygen target. The results clearly show a strong energy dependence including several resonances.

  8. Spawning behaviour of Allis shad Alosa alosa: new insights based on imaging sonar data.

    PubMed

    Langkau, M C; Clavé, D; Schmidt, M B; Borcherding, J

    2016-06-01

    Spawning behaviour of Alosa alosa was observed by high resolution imaging sonar. Detected clouds of sexual products and micro bubbles served as a potential indicator of spawning activity. Peak spawning time was between 0130 and 0200 hours at night. Increasing detections over three consecutive nights were consistent with sounds of mating events (bulls) assessed in hearing surveys in parallel to the hydro acoustic detection. In 70% of the analysed mating events there were no additional A. alosa joining the event whilst 70% of the mating events showed one or two A. alosa leaving the cloud. In 31% of the analysed mating events, however, three or more A. alosa were leaving the clouds, indicating that matings are not restricted to a pair. Imaging sonar is suitable for monitoring spawning activity and behaviour of anadromous clupeids in their spawning habitats.

  9. Improved drug targeting of cancer cells by utilizing actively targetable folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheyu; Li, Yan; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oneill, Brian; Bi, Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres (FA-AN) have been developed to provide an actively targetable drug delivery system for improved drug targeting of cancer cells with reduced side effects. The nanospheres were prepared by conjugating folic acid onto the surface of albumin nanospheres using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a catalyst. To test the efficacy of these nanospheres as a potential delivery platform, doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanospheres (DOX-AN) and doxorubicin-loaded FA-AN (FA-DOX-AN) were prepared by entrapping DOX (an anthracycline, antibiotic drug widely used in cancer chemotherapy that works by intercalating DNA) into AN and FA-AN nanoparticles. Cell uptake of the DOX was then measured. The results show that FA-AN was incorporated into HeLa cells (tumor cells) only after 2.0h incubation, whereas HeLa cells failed to incorporate albumin nanospheres without conjugated folic acid after 4.0h incubation. When HeLa cells were treated with the DOX-AN, FA-DOX-AN nanoparticles or free DOX, cell viability decreased with increasing culture time (i.e. cell death increases with time) over a 70h period. Cell viability was always the lowest for free DOX followed by FA-DOX-AN4 and then DOX-AN. In a second set of experiments, HeLa cells washed to remove excess DOX after an initial incubation for 2h were incubated for 70h. The corresponding cell viability was slightly higher when the cells were treated with FA-DOX-AN or free DOX whilst cells treated with DOX-AN nanoparticles remained viable. The above experiments were repeated for non-cancerous, aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). As expected, cell viability of the HeLa cells (with FA receptor alpha, FRα) and AoSMC cells (without FRα) decreased rapidly with time in the presence of free DOX, but treatment with FA-DOX-AN resulted in selective killing of the tumor cells. These results indicated that FA-AN may be used as a promising actively targetable drug delivery system to improve drug

  10. Mechanical charactization of sonar window materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeTeresa, S.J.; Groves, S.E.; Harwood, P.J.; Sanchez, R.J.

    1996-03-25

    The three-dimensional mechanical behavior of thick Spectra/epoxy sonar window materials containing various special materials is summarized in this report. Three different materials, which were fabricated by two companies known as `A` and `B` were received from the Naval Warfare Center. The three materials designated `A with microspheres (A micron),` `A without microspheres (A),` and `B` were measured for all properties. The total number of tests was reduced through the assumption that the two orthogonal, in-place directions were identical. Consequently, these materials should have only six independent elastic variables. The measured constants and strengths are given.

  11. Sonar Transducer Reliability Improvement Program FY 80

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    Polyphenylene Sulfide 15,320 23,000 Nylon 6/10 14,070 26,000 High-Strength Nylon (ZYTEL) 11,270 24,000 Amorphous Nylon 14,139 25,000 PBT Polyester...transducer receiving sensitivity Goal -- less than ±1 dB variation from the specified value over operational frequency band . Threshold - less than ±2 dB...variation from the specified value over operational feequency band . rhe Sonar Transducer Reliability Impruvemen: Program (STRIP) is a part of Program

  12. Sonar Test and Test Instrumentation Support.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-29

    CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) Nool40-76-c-6487 Dudley D. Baker et al. S. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10 . PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK AREA...Date Entered) TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I. INTRODUCTION 1 II. TRF, AN/FQM- 10 (V), AND AN/WQM-5 FIELD SUPPORT 3 A. Pressure Vessel Stuffing Tubes 3 B. AN/FQM...Test Set 9 * , D. SACS Support 10 1. Hardware Documentation 10 2. Software Documentation 10 3. Sonar Controller Installation 10 4. AN/SQS-35/38 Study 11

  13. Detecting Atlantic herring by parametric sonar.

    PubMed

    Godo, Olav Rune; Foote, Kenneth G; Dybedal, Johnny; Tenningen, Eirik; Patel, Ruben

    2010-04-01

    The difference-frequency band of the Kongsberg TOPAS PS18 parametric sub-bottom profiling sonar, nominally 1-6 kHz, is being used to observe Atlantic herring. Representative TOPAS echograms of herring layers and schools observed in situ in December 2008 and November 2009 are presented. These agree well with echograms of volume backscattering strength derived simultaneously with the narrowband Simrad EK60/18- and 38-kHz scientific echo sounder, also giving insight into herring avoidance behavior in relation to survey vessel passage. Progress in rendering the TOPAS echograms quantitative is described.

  14. TRAF6 Activation in Multiple Myeloma: A Potential Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong; Tamashiro, Samantha; Baritaki, Stavroula; Penichet, Manuel; Yu, Youhua; Chen, Haiming; Berenson, James; Bonavida, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable B-lymphocyte malignancy. New therapeutic options have become available during the past several years; however nearly all patients acquire resistance to currently available therapeutic agents. Mechanisms contributing to the pathogenesis and chemoresistance of MM include genetic abnormalities, chromosomal translocations, gene mutations, the interaction between MM cells and the bone marrow microenvironment, and defects in the apoptotic signaling pathways. Survival signaling pathways associated with the pathogenesis of MM and bone marrow stromal cells play crucial roles in promoting growth, survival, adhesion, immortalization, angiogenesis, and drug resistance. The receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B/receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand/tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (RANK/RANKL-TRAF6) signal pathway mediates osteolytic bone lesions through the activation of the NF-κB and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JNK) pathways in osteoclast precursor cells and thus contributes to the main clinical manifestations of bone disease. TRAF6 has also been identified as a ligase for Akt ubiquitination and membrane recruitment and its phosphorylation on growth factor stimulation. The inhibition of TRAF6 by silencing RNA or by decoy peptides decreases MM tumor cell proliferation and increases apoptosis as well as bone resorption. Some proteasome inhibitors and benzoxadiazole derivatives showed inhibitory effects on the activity and function of TRAF6. Overall, we propose that TRAF6 may be considered as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of MM. PMID:22440007

  15. Novel strategies for ultrahigh specific activity targeted nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dong

    2012-12-13

    We have developed novel strategies optimized for preparing high specific activity radiolabeled nanoparticles, targeting nuclear imaging of low abundance biomarkers. Several compounds have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64 for radiolabeling of SCK-nanoparticles via Copper(I) catalyzed or copper-free alkyne-azide cyclolization. Novel strategies have been developed to achieve ultrahigh specific activity with administrable amount of dose for human study using copper-free chemistry. Ligands for carbonic anhydrase 12 (CA12), a low abundance extracellular biomarker for the responsiveness of breast cancer to endocrine therapie, have been labeled with F-18 and Cu-64, and one of them has been evaluated in animal models. The results of this project will lead to major improvements in the use of nanoparticles in nuclear imaging and will significantly advance their potential for detecting low abundance biomarkers of medical importance.

  16. Small Molecule Inhibitors Targeting Activator Protein 1 (AP-1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases. PMID:24831826

  17. Health Activism Targeting Corporations: A Critical Health Communication Perspective.

    PubMed

    Zoller, Heather M

    2017-02-01

    Health activists and health social movements have transformed medical treatment, promoted public health policies, and extended civil rights for people with illness and disability. This essay explores health activism that targets corporate-generated illness and risk in order to understand the unique communicative challenges involved in this area of contention. Arguing for greater critical engagement with policy, the article integrates policy research with social movements, subpolitics, and issue management literature. Drawing from activist discourse and multidisciplinary research, the article describes how a wide array of groups groups build visibility for corporate health effects, create the potential for networking and collaboration, and politicize health by attributing illness to corporate behaviors. The discussion articulates the implications of this activism for health communication theory, research, and practice.

  18. Small molecule inhibitors targeting activator protein 1 (AP-1).

    PubMed

    Ye, Na; Ding, Ye; Wild, Christopher; Shen, Qiang; Zhou, Jia

    2014-08-28

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a pivotal transcription factor that regulates a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and transformation. Accumulating evidence supports that AP-1 plays an important role in several severe disorders including cancer, fibrosis, and organ injury, as well as inflammatory disorders such as asthma, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. AP-1 has emerged as an actively pursued drug discovery target over the past decade. Excitingly, a selective AP-1 inhibitor T-5224 (51) has been investigated in phase II human clinical trials. Nevertheless, no effective AP-1 inhibitors have yet been approved for clinical use. Despite significant advances achieved in understanding AP-1 biology and function, as well as the identification of small molecules modulating AP-1 associated signaling pathways, medicinal chemistry efforts remain an urgent need to yield selective and efficacious AP-1 inhibitors as a viable therapeutic strategy for human diseases.

  19. Precise Measurement of Drift Velocities in Active-Target Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Louis

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear experiments with radioactive beams are needed to improve our understanding of nuclei structure far from stability. Radioactive beams typically have low beam rates, but active-target detectors can compensate for these low beam rates. In active-target detectors that are also Time-Projection Chambers (TPC), ionized electrons drift through an electric fieldto a detection device to imagethe trajectory of charged-particle ionization tracks within the chamber's gas volume. The measurement of the ionized electrons' drift velocity is crucial for the accurate imaging of these tracks. In order to measure this drift velocity, we will use a UV laser and photo-sensitive foil in a the ND-Cubedetector we are developing, periodically releasingelectrons from the foil at a known timesand a known distance from the electron detector, thereby precisely measuring the drift velocity in situ. We have surveyed several materials to find a material that will work well with typical solid-state UV lasers on the market. We plan to determine the best material and thickness of the foil to maximize the number of photoelectrons. The precision that will be afforded by this measurement of the drift velocity will allow us to eliminate a source of systematic uncertainty.

  20. 78 FR 35612 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Targeted Teacher Shortage Areas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Targeted Teacher Shortage Areas Nationwide... to this notice will be considered public records. Title of Collection: Targeted Teacher Shortage... Family Education Loan Programs (FFELP) regulations, which address the targeted teacher...

  1. 50 CFR 216.170 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources for U.S. Navy anti-submarine... torpedoes per year) (vi) AN/BQQ-10 (submarine mounted sonar)—up to 1000 hours over the course of 5 years...

  2. High-Resolution Multibeam Sonar Survey and Interactive 3-D Exploration of the D-Day Wrecks off Normandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, L. A.; Calder, B.; Schmidt, J. S.

    2003-12-01

    Historically, archaeological investigations use sidescan sonar and marine magnetometers as initial search tools. Targets are then examined through direct observation by divers, video, or photographs. Magnetometers can demonstrate the presence, absence, and relative susceptibility of ferrous objects but provide little indication of the nature of the target. Sidescan sonar can present a clear image of the overall nature of a target and its surrounding environment, but the sidescan image is often distorted and contains little information about the true 3-D shape of the object. Optical techniques allow precise identification of objects but suffer from very limited range, even in the best of situations. Modern high-resolution multibeam sonar offers an opportunity to cover a relatively large area from a safe distance above the target, while resolving the true three-dimensional (3-D) shape of the object with centimeter-level resolution. The combination of 3-D mapping and interactive 3-D visualization techniques provides a powerful new means to explore underwater artifacts. A clear demonstration of the applicability of high-resolution multibeam sonar to wreck and artifact investigations occurred when the Naval Historical Center (NHC), the Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping (CCOM) at the University of New Hampshire, and Reson Inc., collaborated to explore the state of preservation and impact on the surrounding environment of a series of wrecks located off the coast of Normandy, France, adjacent to the American landing sectors The survey augmented previously collected magnetometer and high-resolution sidescan sonar data using a Reson 8125 high-resolution focused multibeam sonar with 240, 0.5° (at nadir) beams distributed over a 120° swath. The team investigated 21 areas in water depths ranging from about three -to 30 meters (m); some areas contained individual targets such as landing craft, barges, a destroyer, troop carrier, etc., while others contained multiple smaller

  3. Targeting lymphocyte activation through the lymphotoxin and LIGHT pathways

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Summary Cytokines mediate key communication pathways essential for regulation of immune responses. Full activation of antigen-responding lymphocytes requires cooperating signals from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related cytokines and their specific receptors. LIGHT, a lymphotoxin-β (LTβ)-related TNF family member, modulates T-cell activation through two receptors, the herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) and indirectly through the LT-β receptor. An unexpected finding revealed a non-canonical binding site on HVEM for the immunoglobulin superfamily member, B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA), and an inhibitory signaling protein suppressing T-cell activation. Thus, HVEM can act as a molecular switch between proinflammatory and inhibitory signaling. The non-canonical HVEM-BTLA pathway also acts to counter LTβR signaling that promotes the proliferation of antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) within lymphoid tissue microenvironments. These results indicate LTβ receptor and HVEM-BTLA pathways form an integrated signaling circuit. Targeting these cytokine pathways with specific antagonists (antibody or decoy receptor) can alter lymphocyte differentiation and activation. Alternately, agonists directed at their cell surface receptors can restore homeostasis and potentially reset immune and inflammatory processes, which may be useful in treating autoimmune and infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:18613837

  4. Permanent Genetic Access to Transiently Active Neurons via TRAP: Targeted Recombination in Active Populations

    PubMed Central

    Guenthner, Casey J.; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Yang, Helen H.; Heller, H. Craig; Luo, Liqun

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Targeting genetically encoded tools for neural circuit dissection to relevant cellular populations is a major challenge in neurobiology. We developed a new approach, Targeted Recombination in Active Populations (TRAP), to obtain genetic access to neurons that were activated by defined stimuli. This method utilizes mice in which the tamoxifen-dependent recombinase CreERT2 is expressed in an activity-dependent manner from the loci of the immediate early genes Arc and Fos. Active cells that express CreERT2 can undergo recombination only when tamoxifen is present, allowing genetic access to neurons that are active during a time window of less than 12 h. We show that TRAP can selectively provide access to neurons activated by specific somatosensory, visual, and auditory stimuli, and by experience in a novel environment. When combined with tools for labeling, tracing, recording, and manipulating neurons, TRAP offers a powerful new approach for understanding how the brain processes information and generates behavior. PMID:23764283

  5. Sonar beam dynamics in leaf-nosed bats.

    PubMed

    Linnenschmidt, Meike; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2016-07-07

    Ultrasonic emissions of bats are directional and delimit the echo-acoustic space. Directionality is quantified by the aperture of the sonar beam. Recent work has shown that bats often widen their sonar beam when approaching movable prey or sharpen their sonar beam when navigating through cluttered habitats. Here we report how nose-emitting bats, Phyllostomus discolor, adjust their sonar beam to object distance. First, we show that the height and width of the bats sonar beam, as imprinted on a parabolic 45 channel microphone array, varies even within each animal and this variation is unrelated to changes in call level or spectral content. Second, we show that these animals are able to systematically decrease height and width of their sonar beam while focusing on the approaching object. Thus it appears that sonar beam sharpening is a further, facultative means of reducing search volume, likely to be employed by stationary animals when the object position is close and unambiguous. As only half of our individuals sharpened their beam onto the approaching object we suggest that this strategy is facultative, under voluntary control, and that beam formation is likely mediated by muscular control of the acoustic aperture of the bats' nose leaf.

  6. Sonar beam dynamics in leaf-nosed bats

    PubMed Central

    Linnenschmidt, Meike; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic emissions of bats are directional and delimit the echo-acoustic space. Directionality is quantified by the aperture of the sonar beam. Recent work has shown that bats often widen their sonar beam when approaching movable prey or sharpen their sonar beam when navigating through cluttered habitats. Here we report how nose-emitting bats, Phyllostomus discolor, adjust their sonar beam to object distance. First, we show that the height and width of the bats sonar beam, as imprinted on a parabolic 45 channel microphone array, varies even within each animal and this variation is unrelated to changes in call level or spectral content. Second, we show that these animals are able to systematically decrease height and width of their sonar beam while focusing on the approaching object. Thus it appears that sonar beam sharpening is a further, facultative means of reducing search volume, likely to be employed by stationary animals when the object position is close and unambiguous. As only half of our individuals sharpened their beam onto the approaching object we suggest that this strategy is facultative, under voluntary control, and that beam formation is likely mediated by muscular control of the acoustic aperture of the bats’ nose leaf. PMID:27384865

  7. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  8. Hyaluronic acid-coated liposomes for active targeting of gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Arpicco, Silvia; Lerda, Carlotta; Dalla Pozza, Elisa; Costanzo, Chiara; Tsapis, Nicolas; Stella, Barbara; Donadelli, Massimo; Dando, Ilaria; Fattal, Elias; Cattel, Luigi; Palmieri, Marta

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this work was the preparation, characterization, and preliminary evaluation of the targeting ability toward pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells of liposomes containing the gemcitabine lipophilic prodrug [4-(N)-lauroyl-gemcitabine, C12GEM]. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was selected as targeting agent since it is biodegradable, biocompatible, and can be chemically modified and its cell surface receptor CD44 is overexpressed on various tumors. For this purpose, conjugates between a phospholipid, the 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE), and HA of two different low molecular weights 4800 Da (12 disaccharidic units) and 12,000 Da (32 disaccharidic units), were prepared, characterized, and introduced in the liposomes during the preparation. Different liposomal formulations were prepared and their characteristics were analyzed: size, Z potential, and TEM analyses underline a difference in the HA-liposomes from the non-HA ones. In order to better understand the HA-liposome cellular localization and to evaluate their interaction with CD44 receptor, confocal microscopy studies were performed. The results demonstrate that HA facilitates the recognition of liposomes by MiaPaCa2 cells (CD44(+)) and that the uptake increases with increase in the polymer molecular weight. Finally, the cytotoxicity of the different preparations was evaluated and data show that incorporation of C12GEM increases their cytotoxic activity and that HA-liposomes inhibit cell growth more than plain liposomes. Altogether, the results demonstrate the specificity of C12GEM targeting toward CD44-overexpressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line using HA as a ligand.

  9. Activating frataxin expression by repeat-targeted nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liande; Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an incurable genetic disorder caused by a mutant expansion of the trinucleotide GAA within an intronic FXN RNA. This expansion leads to reduced expression of frataxin (FXN) protein and evidence suggests that transcriptional repression is caused by an R-loop that forms between the expanded repeat RNA and complementary genomic DNA. Synthetic agents that increase levels of FXN protein might alleviate the disease. We demonstrate that introducing anti-GAA duplex RNAs or single-stranded locked nucleic acids into patient-derived cells increases FXN protein expression to levels similar to analogous wild-type cells. Our data are significant because synthetic nucleic acids that target GAA repeats can be lead compounds for restoring curative FXN levels. More broadly, our results demonstrate that interfering with R-loop formation can trigger gene activation and reveal a new strategy for upregulating gene expression. PMID:26842135

  10. Arenavirus nucleoprotein targets interferon regulatory factor-activating kinase IKKε.

    PubMed

    Pythoud, Christelle; Rodrigo, W W Shanaka I; Pasqual, Giulia; Rothenberger, Sylvia; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Kunz, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    Arenaviruses perturb innate antiviral defense by blocking induction of type I interferon (IFN) production. Accordingly, the arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP) was shown to block activation and nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) in response to virus infection. Here, we sought to identify cellular factors involved in innate antiviral signaling targeted by arenavirus NP. Consistent with previous studies, infection with the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) prevented phosphorylation of IRF3 in response to infection with Sendai virus, a strong inducer of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)/mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway of innate antiviral signaling. Using a combination of coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, we found that LCMV NP associates with the IκB kinase (IKK)-related kinase IKKε but that, rather unexpectedly, LCMV NP did not bind to the closely related TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK-1). The NP-IKKε interaction was highly conserved among arenaviruses from different clades. In LCMV-infected cells, IKKε colocalized with NP but not with MAVS located on the outer membrane of mitochondria. LCMV NP bound the kinase domain (KD) of IKKε (IKBKE) and blocked its autocatalytic activity and its ability to phosphorylate IRF3, without undergoing phosphorylation. Together, our data identify IKKε as a novel target of arenavirus NP. Engagement of NP seems to sequester IKKε in an inactive complex. Considering the important functions of IKKε in innate antiviral immunity and other cellular processes, the NP-IKKε interaction likely plays a crucial role in arenavirus-host interaction.

  11. Cetaceans and Naval Sonar: Behavioral Response as a Function of Sonar Frequency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-30

    initially motivated by observations of possible killer whale (Orcinus orca) reactions to sonars, in the Vestfjord basin of Norway and the USS Shoup...that works with killer whales . The high public profile of killer whales and the overlap of their habitats with operational areas make it likely...that incidents will continue to occur worldwide. The killer whale population involved in the USS Shoup incident has been listed as endangered under the

  12. Optimal Predator Risk Assessment by the Sonar-Jamming Arctiine Moth Bertholdia trigona

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Aaron J.; Wagner, Ryan D.; Conner, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly all animals face a tradeoff between seeking food and mates and avoiding predation. Optimal escape theory holds that an animal confronted with a predator should only flee when benefits of flight (increased survival) outweigh the costs (energetic costs, lost foraging time, etc.). We propose a model for prey risk assessment based on the predator's stage of attack. Risk level should increase rapidly from when the predator detects the prey to when it commits to the attack. We tested this hypothesis using a predator – the echolocating bat – whose active biosonar reveals its stage of attack. We used a prey defense – clicking used for sonar jamming by the tiger moth Bertholdia trigona– that can be readily studied in the field and laboratory and is enacted simultaneously with evasive flight. We predicted that prey employ defenses soon after being detected and targeted, and that prey defensive thresholds discriminate between legitimate predatory threats and false threats where a nearby prey is attacked. Laboratory and field experiments using playbacks of ultrasound signals and naturally behaving bats, respectively, confirmed our predictions. Moths clicked soon after bats detected and targeted them. Also, B. trigona clicking thresholds closely matched predicted optimal thresholds for discriminating legitimate and false predator threats for bats using search and approach phase echolocation – the period when bats are searching for and assessing prey. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative study to correlate the sensory stimuli that trigger defensive behaviors with measurements of signals provided by predators during natural attacks in the field. We propose theoretical models for explaining prey risk assessment depending on the availability of cues that reveal a predator's stage of attack. PMID:23671686

  13. Quantifying Fish Backscattering using SONAR Instrument and Kirchhoff Ray Mode (KRM) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manik, Henry M.

    2016-08-01

    Sonar instrument was used to study backscattering from tuna fish. Extraction of target strength, incidence angle, and frequency dependence of the backscattered signal for individual scatterer was important for biological information. For this purpose, acoustic measurement of fish backscatter was conducted in the laboratory. Characteristics and general trends of the target strength of fish with special reference to tuna fish were investigated by using a Kirchhoff Ray Mode (KRM) model. Backscattering strength were calculated for the KRM having typical morphological and physical parameters of actual fish. Those backscattering amplitudes were shown as frequency, body length, backscattering patterns, the density and sound speed dependences, and orientation dependence. These results were compared with experimentally measured target strength data and good agreement was found. Measurement and model showed the target strength from the fish are depend on the presence of swimbladder. Target Strength increase with increasing the frequency and fish length.

  14. Tumor therapeutics by design: targeting and activation of death receptors.

    PubMed

    Wajant, Harald; Gerspach, Jeannette; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2005-02-01

    Due to their strong apoptosis-inducing capacity, the death receptor ligands CD95L, TNF and TRAIL have been widely viewed as potential cancer therapeutics. While clinical data with CD95L and TRAIL are not yet available, TNF is a registered drug, albeit only for loco-regional application in a limited number of indications. The TNF experience has told us that specific delivery and restricted action is a major challenge in the development of multifunctional, pleiotropically acting cytokines into effective cancer therapeutics. Thus, gene-therapeutic approaches and new cytokine variants have been designed over the last 10 years with the aim of increasing anti-tumoral activity and reducing systemic side effects. Here, we present our current view of the therapeutic potential of the death receptor ligands TNF, CD95L and TRAIL and of the progress made towards improving their efficacy by tumor targeting, use of gene therapy and genetic engineering. Results generated with newly designed fusion proteins suggest that enhanced tumor-directed activity and prevention of undesirable actions of death receptor ligands is possible, thereby opening up a useful therapeutic window for all of the death receptor ligands, including CD95L.

  15. A micro-Doppler sonar for acoustic surveillance in sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaonian

    Wireless sensor networks have been employed in a wide variety of applications, despite the limited energy and communication resources at each sensor node. Low power custom VLSI chips implementing passive acoustic sensing algorithms have been successfully integrated into an acoustic surveillance unit and demonstrated for detection and location of sound sources. In this dissertation, I explore active and passive acoustic sensing techniques, signal processing and classification algorithms for detection and classification in a multinodal sensor network environment. I will present the design and characterization of a continuous-wave micro-Doppler sonar to image objects with articulated moving components. As an example application for this system, we use it to image gaits of humans and four-legged animals. I will present the micro-Doppler gait signatures of a walking person, a dog and a horse. I will discuss the resolution and range of this micro-Doppler sonar and use experimental results to support the theoretical analyses. In order to reduce the data rate and make the system amenable to wireless sensor networks, I will present a second micro-Doppler sonar that uses bandpass sampling for data acquisition. Speech recognition algorithms are explored for biometric identifications from one's gait, and I will present and compare the classification performance of the two systems. The acoustic micro-Doppler sonar design and biometric identification results are the first in the field as the previous work used either video camera or microwave technology. I will also review bearing estimation algorithms and present results of applying these algorithms for bearing estimation and tracking of moving vehicles. Another major source of the power consumption at each sensor node is the wireless interface. To address the need of low power communications in a wireless sensor network, I will also discuss the design and implementation of ultra wideband transmitters in a three dimensional

  16. Multimodal integration of micro-Doppler sonar and auditory signals for behavior classification with convolutional networks.

    PubMed

    Dura-Bernal, Salvador; Garreau, Guillaume; Georgiou, Julius; Andreou, Andreas G; Denham, Susan L; Wennekers, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    The ability to recognize the behavior of individuals is of great interest in the general field of safety (e.g. building security, crowd control, transport analysis, independent living for the elderly). Here we report a new real-time acoustic system for human action and behavior recognition that integrates passive audio and active micro-Doppler sonar signatures over multiple time scales. The system architecture is based on a six-layer convolutional neural network, trained and evaluated using a dataset of 10 subjects performing seven different behaviors. Probabilistic combination of system output through time for each modality separately yields 94% (passive audio) and 91% (micro-Doppler sonar) correct behavior classification; probabilistic multimodal integration increases classification performance to 98%. This study supports the efficacy of micro-Doppler sonar systems in characterizing human actions, which can then be efficiently classified using ConvNets. It also demonstrates that the integration of multiple sources of acoustic information can significantly improve the system's performance.

  17. A Mobile Robot Sonar System with Obstacle Avoidance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    vehicle, robot, obstacle avoidance, sonar sensing 102 17. SECURITY CLASSWIFCATION 1S. SECURITY CLASINFICATION I& SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. UMITATION...WITH OBSTACLE - AVOIDANCE __ by __ Patrick Gerard Byrne March 1994 Thesis Advisor: Yutaka Kanayama Approved for public release; distribution is...SEOLY(Lae anO r Iff TDT, Master’s Thesis _____________ 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE L FUMNING NUMBR A Mobile Robot Sonar System With Obstacle Avoidance (U

  18. Computer Model of a High-Resolution Imaging Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    This is a very efficient method of obtaining imagcs in near-real-time. These sonars have found wide use in underwater vehicles and submersibles...perceived by an optical camera at the sonar location is generated by the method of range shading. This image serves as a reference for the subsequent efforts...Bhawan New Delhi, 110003 INDIA 10. Dr. V.P. Kodali Adviser Electronics Commission Lok Nayak Bhawan New Delhi, 110003 INDIA 11. Professor A.K. Jain

  19. Beaked Whales Respond to Simulated and Actual Navy Sonar

    PubMed Central

    Tyack, Peter L.; Zimmer, Walter M. X.; Moretti, David; Southall, Brandon L.; Claridge, Diane E.; Durban, John W.; Clark, Christopher W.; D'Amico, Angela; DiMarzio, Nancy; Jarvis, Susan; McCarthy, Elena; Morrissey, Ronald; Ward, Jessica; Boyd, Ian L.

    2011-01-01

    Beaked whales have mass stranded during some naval sonar exercises, but the cause is unknown. They are difficult to sight but can reliably be detected by listening for echolocation clicks produced during deep foraging dives. Listening for these clicks, we documented Blainville's beaked whales, Mesoplodon densirostris, in a naval underwater range where sonars are in regular use near Andros Island, Bahamas. An array of bottom-mounted hydrophones can detect beaked whales when they click anywhere within the range. We used two complementary methods to investigate behavioral responses of beaked whales to sonar: an opportunistic approach that monitored whale responses to multi-day naval exercises involving tactical mid-frequency sonars, and an experimental approach using playbacks of simulated sonar and control sounds to whales tagged with a device that records sound, movement, and orientation. Here we show that in both exposure conditions beaked whales stopped echolocating during deep foraging dives and moved away. During actual sonar exercises, beaked whales were primarily detected near the periphery of the range, on average 16 km away from the sonar transmissions. Once the exercise stopped, beaked whales gradually filled in the center of the range over 2–3 days. A satellite tagged whale moved outside the range during an exercise, returning over 2–3 days post-exercise. The experimental approach used tags to measure acoustic exposure and behavioral reactions of beaked whales to one controlled exposure each of simulated military sonar, killer whale calls, and band-limited noise. The beaked whales reacted to these three sound playbacks at sound pressure levels below 142 dB re 1 µPa by stopping echolocation followed by unusually long and slow ascents from their foraging dives. The combined results indicate similar disruption of foraging behavior and avoidance by beaked whales in the two different contexts, at exposures well below those used by regulators to define

  20. Development of Castor-Oil-Resistant Polyurethane Sonar Encapsulants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    7D-S? 576 DEVELOPMENT OF CASTOR- OIL -RESISTANT POLYURETHANE SONAR 1/1 ENCRPSULANTS(U) NRVAL RESEARCH LAB MASHINGTON DC UNCLSSIFED T MA3URICE ET AL. 30...ACCESSION NO. Washington, DC 23062 64503N I S0219AS (59)0584 i1 TITLE (Include Security Classification) Development of Castor- Oil -Resistant...identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Castor oil -- Sonar transducer encapsulants 11 07 - Polyurethane\\ K , 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if

  1. Beaked whales respond to simulated and actual navy sonar.

    PubMed

    Tyack, Peter L; Zimmer, Walter M X; Moretti, David; Southall, Brandon L; Claridge, Diane E; Durban, John W; Clark, Christopher W; D'Amico, Angela; DiMarzio, Nancy; Jarvis, Susan; McCarthy, Elena; Morrissey, Ronald; Ward, Jessica; Boyd, Ian L

    2011-03-14

    Beaked whales have mass stranded during some naval sonar exercises, but the cause is unknown. They are difficult to sight but can reliably be detected by listening for echolocation clicks produced during deep foraging dives. Listening for these clicks, we documented Blainville's beaked whales, Mesoplodon densirostris, in a naval underwater range where sonars are in regular use near Andros Island, Bahamas. An array of bottom-mounted hydrophones can detect beaked whales when they click anywhere within the range. We used two complementary methods to investigate behavioral responses of beaked whales to sonar: an opportunistic approach that monitored whale responses to multi-day naval exercises involving tactical mid-frequency sonars, and an experimental approach using playbacks of simulated sonar and control sounds to whales tagged with a device that records sound, movement, and orientation. Here we show that in both exposure conditions beaked whales stopped echolocating during deep foraging dives and moved away. During actual sonar exercises, beaked whales were primarily detected near the periphery of the range, on average 16 km away from the sonar transmissions. Once the exercise stopped, beaked whales gradually filled in the center of the range over 2-3 days. A satellite tagged whale moved outside the range during an exercise, returning over 2-3 days post-exercise. The experimental approach used tags to measure acoustic exposure and behavioral reactions of beaked whales to one controlled exposure each of simulated military sonar, killer whale calls, and band-limited noise. The beaked whales reacted to these three sound playbacks at sound pressure levels below 142 dB re 1 µPa by stopping echolocation followed by unusually long and slow ascents from their foraging dives. The combined results indicate similar disruption of foraging behavior and avoidance by beaked whales in the two different contexts, at exposures well below those used by regulators to define

  2. Application of mobile robot localization using sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, J.S.; Hill, K.H.

    1994-12-31

    A sonar-based mobile robot has been developed for inspection of low-level radioactive waste drums. An algorithm was developed which gives the robot the ability to refence itself to cylindrical objects. The drum-following algorithm has been demonstrated in 4-ft drum aisles at the Mobile Robotics Laboratory at the University of South Carolina. The final version has proven to be robust through extensive long-term navigation tests. Future enhancements will employ a narrow-aisle version of the Nav-master to allow navigation in 3-ft drum aisles. The final version of the inspection robot will include the drum-navigation algorithm as a low-level primitive instruction. The onboard management system will be dedicated to more of the high-level functions, such as planning, now provided by the offboard supervisory system.

  3. Automated change detection for synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G-Michael, Tesfaye; Marchand, Bradley; Tucker, J. D.; Sternlicht, Daniel D.; Marston, Timothy M.; Azimi-Sadjadi, Mahmood R.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, an automated change detection technique is presented that compares new and historical seafloor images created with sidescan synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) for changes occurring over time. The method consists of a four stage process: a coarse navigational alignment; fine-scale co-registration using the scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm to match features between overlapping images; sub-pixel co-registration to improves phase coherence; and finally, change detection utilizing canonical correlation analysis (CCA). The method was tested using data collected with a high-frequency SAS in a sandy shallow-water environment. By using precise co-registration tools and change detection algorithms, it is shown that the coherent nature of the SAS data can be exploited and utilized in this environment over time scales ranging from hours through several days.

  4. Enhanced echolocation via robust statistics and super-resolution of sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kio

    Echolocation is a process in which an animal uses acoustic signals to exchange information with environments. In a recent study, Neretti et al. have shown that the use of robust statistics can significantly improve the resiliency of echolocation against noise and enhance its accuracy by suppressing the development of sidelobes in the processing of an echo signal. In this research, the use of robust statistics is extended to problems in underwater explorations. The dissertation consists of two parts. Part I describes how robust statistics can enhance the identification of target objects, which in this case are cylindrical containers filled with four different liquids. Particularly, this work employs a variation of an existing robust estimator called an L-estimator, which was first suggested by Koenker and Bassett. As pointed out by Au et al.; a 'highlight interval' is an important feature, and it is closely related with many other important features that are known to be crucial for dolphin echolocation. A varied L-estimator described in this text is used to enhance the detection of highlight intervals, which eventually leads to a successful classification of echo signals. Part II extends the problem into 2 dimensions. Thanks to the advances in material and computer technology, various sonar imaging modalities are available on the market. By registering acoustic images from such video sequences, one can extract more information on the region of interest. Computer vision and image processing allowed application of robust statistics to the acoustic images produced by forward looking sonar systems, such as Dual-frequency Identification Sonar and ProViewer. The first use of robust statistics for sonar image enhancement in this text is in image registration. Random Sampling Consensus (RANSAC) is widely used for image registration. The registration algorithm using RANSAC is optimized for sonar image registration, and the performance is studied. The second use of robust

  5. Bistatic Sonar and Quantification of Seafloor Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloghrie, P.; BLONDEL, P.; Pace, N. G.; Heald, G. J.; Brothers, R.

    2001-12-01

    Sonar has proved the best tool for investigation of seafloor processes. Calibrated sonars provide a wealth of quantitative information unattainable through other means, but are limited to backscattering geometries, where the acoustic source and receiver are on the same platform. Recent developments in acoustic theory and design have shown the advantage of bistatic instruments, where the source and receiver(s) are physically decoupled and can be anywhere in the water column. Although there are many theoretical studies of bistatic scattering, their applicability is limited by the very low number of actual experiments. Using the large tank facilities at the University of Bath, we are currently investigating the bistatic scattering from several realistic types of seabeds and different morphologies, at high frequency (250 kHz). These studies are used in conjunction with state-of-the-art acoustic models (Blondel et al., 2001), and compared with data from complementary sea trials (Pace et al., in prep.). The results show the huge potential of bistatic systems for accurate and detailed mapping of seafloor structures and their topography. We also demonstrate how the relative contributions of surface and volume processes to acoustic scattering change with the imaging geometry, and how this can be used to maximise the information gained during mapping. Versatile and efficient, bistatic systems can be deployed from surface vessels, ROVs or AUVs. These new tools can be used for Rapid Environmental Assessment, to study sediment transport and deposition, and to access the detailed morphology of the seabed and the near sub-surface. They can in particular be used for the investigation of the small-scale structure of sand ridges and ripples, the distribution of tidal or glacial deposits on the seabed, and the quantification of multi-scale surface roughness in sedimentary and non-sedimentary terrains alike. Crown Copyright 2001 DERA. Published with the permission of the Defence

  6. 3S(expn 2): Behavioral Response Studies of Cetaceans to Navy Sonar Signals in Norwegian Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    behavioral reactions and the sound exposures required to elicit them of three species of whales : bottlenose whales , minke whales , and humpback whales to Low... humpback whales . OBJECTIVES In this research project, our objectives are to: 1.) Expand our comparative experimental dataset to include species...and relatively easy-to-study humpback whales , Megaptera novaeangliae; 3.) Record sufficient no-sonar baseline data of all target species to adequately

  7. BatSLAM: Simultaneous localization and mapping using biomimetic sonar.

    PubMed

    Steckel, Jan; Peremans, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    We propose to combine a biomimetic navigation model which solves a simultaneous localization and mapping task with a biomimetic sonar mounted on a mobile robot to address two related questions. First, can robotic sonar sensing lead to intelligent interactions with complex environments? Second, can we model sonar based spatial orientation and the construction of spatial maps by bats? To address these questions we adapt the mapping module of RatSLAM, a previously published navigation system based on computational models of the rodent hippocampus. We analyze the performance of the proposed robotic implementation operating in the real world. We conclude that the biomimetic navigation model operating on the information from the biomimetic sonar allows an autonomous agent to map unmodified (office) environments efficiently and consistently. Furthermore, these results also show that successful navigation does not require the readings of the biomimetic sonar to be interpreted in terms of individual objects/landmarks in the environment. We argue that the system has applications in robotics as well as in the field of biology as a simple, first order, model for sonar based spatial orientation and map building.

  8. Graphical derivations of radar, sonar, and communication signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altes, R. A.; Titlebaum, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    The designer of a communication system often has knowledge concerning the changes in distance between transmitter and receiver as a function of time. This information can be exploited to reduce multipath interference via proper signal design. A radar or sonar may also have good a priori information about possible target trajectories. Such knowledge can again be used to reduce the receiver's response to clutter (MTI), to enhance signal-to-noise ratio, or to simplify receiver design. There are also situations in which prior knowledge about trajectories is lacking. The system should then utilize a single-filter pair which is insensitive to the effects induced by relative motion between transmitter, receiver, and reflectors. For waveforms with large time-bandwidth products, such as long pulse trains, it is possible to graphically derive signal formats for both situations (trajectory known and unknown). Although the exact form of the signal is sometimes not specified by the graphical procedure, the problem in such cases is reduced to one which has already been solved, i.e., the generation of an impulse equivalent code.

  9. Location and Characterization of Underwater Ordnance using Resonance Scattered Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritto, R.; Korneev, V. A.

    2009-12-01

    Unexploded ordnance (UXO) present a worldwide hazard in locations of previous military confrontations and at military training facilities. In particular, the presence of unexploded ordinance in coastal regions poses a severe risk that must be addressed before sites can be turned over to the public or coastal areas made available for commercial traffic. Although progress has been made in detecting UXO in underwater areas, there still exists a need for technologies that can detect and locate UXO buried in seafloor sediments and reliably distinguish munitions from clutter. We are investigating a method based on resonance scattering using small data sets in a controlled pond environment. The use of resonance scattering allows for deeper bottom penetration than in the case of the generally used acoustic imaging, because in the former case the wavelengths are longer than the latter. Furthermore, in the resonance scattering regime the geometry is independent of the target orientation. The sonar data sets were acquired during 2006 and 2007 by the Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, at the Surface Warfare Center, Panama City, FL, and included an aluminum cylinder and sphere, as well as artillery shells and mortar rounds buried in the sandy pond bottom. Our results show that resonance scattered waves, although smaller in amplitude than the specular reflected signal, dominate much of the recorded traces in time. These signals can be used to determine the propagation velocities in the pond sediments, to locate the UXO in the subsurface and to characterize the UXO type by its size and filler velocities.

  10. On the Use of Double FM Pulses for Detection of Targets and Measurement of Their Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-15

    This report discusses the use of double FM pulses to measure the sonar path length and rate of change of sonar path length (range and range rate in...the monostatic case) and length and rate of change of length or apparent turning rate for a long thin target such as a submarine. Equations are derived

  11. Proatherogenic macrophage activities are targeted by the flavonoid quercetin.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guzman, Oscar J; Tabares-Guevara, Jorge H; Leon-Varela, Yudy M; Álvarez, Rafael M; Roldan, Miguel; Sierra, Jelver A; Londoño-Londoño, Julian A; Ramirez-Pineda, Jose R

    2012-11-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the flavonoid quercetin protects against cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related risk factors. Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of CVD, is also attenuated by oral quercetin administration in animal models. Although macrophages are key players during fatty streak formation and plaque progression and aggravation, little is known about the effects of quercetin on atherogenic macrophages. Here, we report that primary bone marrow-derived macrophages internalized less oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and accumulated less intracellular cholesterol in the presence of quercetin. This reduction of foam cell formation correlated with reduced surface expression of the oxLDL receptor CD36. Quercetin also targeted the lipopolysaccharide-dependent, oxLDL-independent pathway of lipid droplet formation in macrophages. In oxLDL-stimulated macrophages, quercetin inhibited reactive oxygen species production and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In a system that evaluated cholesterol crystal-induced IL-1β secretion via nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing protein 3 inflammasome activation, quercetin also exhibited an inhibitory effect. Dyslipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice chronically treated with intraperitoneal quercetin injections had smaller atheromatous lesions, reduced lipid deposition, and less macrophage and T cell inflammatory infiltrate in the aortic roots than vehicle-treated animals. Serum levels of total cholesterol and the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde were also reduced in these mice. Our results demonstrate that quercetin interferes with both key proatherogenic activities of macrophages, namely foam cell formation and pro-oxidant/proinflammatory responses, and these effects may explain the atheroprotective properties of this common flavonoid.

  12. Target of rapamycin activation predicts lifespan in fruit flies

    PubMed Central

    Scialò, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Naudí, Alba; Ayala, Victoria; Jové, Mariona; Pamplona, Reinald; Sanz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Aging and age-related diseases are one of the most important health issues that the world will confront during the 21st century. Only by understanding the proximal causes will we be able to find treatments to reduce or delay the onset of degenerative diseases associated with aging. Currently, the prevalent paradigm in the field is the accumulation of damage. However, a new theory that proposes an alternative explanation is gaining momentum. The hyperfunction theory proposes that aging is not a consequence of a wear and tear process, but a result of the continuation of developmental programs during adulthood. Here we use Drosophila melanogaster, where evidence supporting both paradigms has been reported, to identify which parameters that have been previously related with lifespan best predict the rate of aging in wild type flies cultured at different temperatures. We find that mitochondrial function and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation correlates with metabolic rate, but not with the rate of aging. Importantly, we find that activation of nutrient sensing pathways (i.e. insulin-PI3K/Target of rapamycin (Tor) pathway) correlates with lifespan, but not with metabolic rate. Our results, dissociate metabolic rate and lifespan in wild type flies and instead link nutrient sensing signaling with longevity as predicted by the hyperfunction theory. PMID:26259964

  13. An active electron polarized scintillating GSO target for neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiboussinov, B.; Braggio, C.; Cardini, A.; Carugno, G.; Congiu, F.; Gain, S.; Galeazzi, G.; Lai, A.; Lehman, A.; Mocci, P.; Mura, A.; Quochi, F.; Saba, M.; Saitta, B.; Sartori, G.

    2012-12-01

    The feasibility of an electron-polarized, active target to be used as detector in neutrino scattering experiments, suggested by several theoretical papers, has been investigated. We report on the properties of the paramagnetic crystal Gd2SiO5 (GSO), in which 7.7% of the total number of electrons present can be polarized by lowering the temperature and applying an intense external magnetic field. The material magnetic susceptibility has been measured down to cryogenic temperatures showing that for H=5 T and T=4 K about 80% of the maximum allowed magnetization can be attained. Also the spectral and time response of the crystal have been characterized and the scintillation process has been studied using a photomultiplier to measure the response to gamma rays irradiation and cosmic rays operating the GSO crystal at 13.5 K. An avalanche photodiode (APD) readout of the scintillation signal from the GSO crystal has also been performed, since the magnetic field-independent response of this device allows it to be placed close to the crystal in the cryogenic environment.

  14. Action Enhances Acoustic Cues for 3-D Target Localization by Echolocating Bats.

    PubMed

    Wohlgemuth, Melville J; Kothari, Ninad B; Moss, Cynthia F

    2016-09-01

    Under natural conditions, animals encounter a barrage of sensory information from which they must select and interpret biologically relevant signals. Active sensing can facilitate this process by engaging motor systems in the sampling of sensory information. The echolocating bat serves as an excellent model to investigate the coupling between action and sensing because it adaptively controls both the acoustic signals used to probe the environment and movements to receive echoes at the auditory periphery. We report here that the echolocating bat controls the features of its sonar vocalizations in tandem with the positioning of the outer ears to maximize acoustic cues for target detection and localization. The bat's adaptive control of sonar vocalizations and ear positioning occurs on a millisecond timescale to capture spatial information from arriving echoes, as well as on a longer timescale to track target movement. Our results demonstrate that purposeful control over sonar sound production and reception can serve to improve acoustic cues for localization tasks. This finding also highlights the general importance of movement to sensory processing across animal species. Finally, our discoveries point to important parallels between spatial perception by echolocation and vision.

  15. Action Enhances Acoustic Cues for 3-D Target Localization by Echolocating Bats

    PubMed Central

    Wohlgemuth, Melville J.

    2016-01-01

    Under natural conditions, animals encounter a barrage of sensory information from which they must select and interpret biologically relevant signals. Active sensing can facilitate this process by engaging motor systems in the sampling of sensory information. The echolocating bat serves as an excellent model to investigate the coupling between action and sensing because it adaptively controls both the acoustic signals used to probe the environment and movements to receive echoes at the auditory periphery. We report here that the echolocating bat controls the features of its sonar vocalizations in tandem with the positioning of the outer ears to maximize acoustic cues for target detection and localization. The bat’s adaptive control of sonar vocalizations and ear positioning occurs on a millisecond timescale to capture spatial information from arriving echoes, as well as on a longer timescale to track target movement. Our results demonstrate that purposeful control over sonar sound production and reception can serve to improve acoustic cues for localization tasks. This finding also highlights the general importance of movement to sensory processing across animal species. Finally, our discoveries point to important parallels between spatial perception by echolocation and vision. PMID:27608186

  16. "Gas and fat embolic syndrome" involving a mass stranding of beaked whales (family Ziphiidae) exposed to anthropogenic sonar signals.

    PubMed

    Fernández, A; Edwards, J F; Rodríguez, F; Espinosa de los Monteros, A; Herráez, P; Castro, P; Jaber, J R; Martín, V; Arbelo, M

    2005-07-01

    A study of the lesions of beaked whales (BWs) in a recent mass stranding in the Canary Islands following naval exercises provides a possible explanation of the relationship between anthropogenic, acoustic (sonar) activities and the stranding and death of marine mammals. Fourteen BWs were stranded in the Canary Islands close to the site of an international naval exercise (Neo-Tapon 2002) held on 24 September 2002. Strandings began about 4 hours after the onset of midfrequency sonar activity. Eight Cuvier's BWs (Ziphius cavirostris), one Blainville's BW (Mesoplodon densirostris), and one Gervais' BW (Mesoplodon europaeus) were examined postmortem and studied histopathologically. No inflammatory or neoplastic processes were noted, and no pathogens were identified. Macroscopically, whales had severe, diffuse congestion and hemorrhage, especially around the acoustic jaw fat, ears, brain, and kidneys. Gas bubble-associated lesions and fat embolism were observed in the vessels and parenchyma of vital organs. In vivo bubble formation associated with sonar exposure that may have been exacerbated by modified diving behavior caused nitrogen supersaturation above a threshold value normally tolerated by the tissues (as occurs in decompression sickness). Alternatively, the effect that sonar has on tissues that have been supersaturated with nitrogen gas could be such that it lowers the threshold for the expansion of in vivo bubble precursors (gas nuclei). Exclusively or in combination, these mechanisms may enhance and maintain bubble growth or initiate embolism. Severely injured whales died or became stranded and died due to cardiovascular collapse during beaching. The present study demonstrates a new pathologic entity in cetaceans. The syndrome is apparently induced by exposure to mid-frequency sonar signals and particularly affects deep, long-duration, repetitive-diving species like BWs.

  17. Activation and Molecular Targets of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Ligands in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nemenoff, Raphael A.; Weiser-Evans, Mary; Winn, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death, and five-year survival remains poor, raising the urgency for new treatment strategies. Activation of PPARγ represents a potential target for both the treatment and prevention of lung cancer. Numerous studies have examined the effect of thiazolidinediones such as rosiglitazone and pioglitazone on lung cancer cells in vitro and in xenograft models. These studies indicate that activation of PPARγ inhibits cancer cell proliferation as well as invasiveness and metastasis. While activation of PPARγ can occur by direct binding of pharmacological ligands to the molecule, emerging data indicate that PPARγ activation can occur through engagement of other signal transduction pathways, including Wnt signaling and prostaglandin production. Data, both from preclinical models and retrospective clinical studies, indicate that activation of PPARγ may represent an attractive chemopreventive strategy. This article reviews the existing biological and mechanistic experiments focusing on the role of PPARγ in lung cancer, focusing specifically on nonsmall cell lung cancer. PMID:18509496

  18. Artificial Chemical Reporter Targeting Strategy Using Bioorthogonal Click Reaction for Improving Active-Targeting Efficiency of Tumor.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hong Yeol; Shin, Min Lee; Shim, Man Kyu; Lee, Sangmin; Na, Jin Hee; Koo, Heebeom; Lee, Hyukjin; Kim, Jong-Ho; Lee, Kuen Yong; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan

    2017-03-15

    Biological ligands such as aptamer, antibody, glucose, and peptide have been widely used to bind specific surface molecules or receptors in tumor cells or subcellular structures to improve tumor-targeting efficiency of nanoparticles. However, this active-targeting strategy has limitations for tumor targeting due to inter- and intraheterogeneity of tumors. In this study, we demonstrated an alternative active-targeting strategy using metabolic engineering and bioorthogonal click reaction to improve tumor-targeting efficiency of nanoparticles. We observed that azide-containing chemical reporters were successfully generated onto surface glycans of various tumor cells such as lung cancer (A549), brain cancer (U87), and breast cancer (BT-474, MDA-MB231, MCF-7) via metabolic engineering in vitro. In addition, we compared tumor targeting of artificial azide reporter with bicyclononyne (BCN)-conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles (BCN-CNPs) and integrin αvβ3 with cyclic RGD-conjugated CNPs (cRGD-CNPs) in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence intensity of azide-reporter-targeted BCN-CNPs in tumor tissues was 1.6-fold higher and with a more uniform distribution compared to that of cRGD-CNPs. Moreover, even in the isolated heterogeneous U87 cells, BCN-CNPs could bind artificial azide reporters on tumor cells more uniformly (∼92.9%) compared to cRGD-CNPs. Therefore, the artificial azide-reporter-targeting strategy can be utilized for targeting heterogeneous tumor cells via bioorthogonal click reaction and may provide an alternative method of tumor targeting for further investigation in cancer therapy.

  19. Permanent genetic access to transiently active neurons via TRAP: targeted recombination in active populations.

    PubMed

    Guenthner, Casey J; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Yang, Helen H; Heller, H Craig; Luo, Liqun

    2013-06-05

    Targeting genetically encoded tools for neural circuit dissection to relevant cellular populations is a major challenge in neurobiology. We developed an approach, targeted recombination in active populations (TRAP), to obtain genetic access to neurons that were activated by defined stimuli. This method utilizes mice in which the tamoxifen-dependent recombinase CreER(T2) is expressed in an activity-dependent manner from the loci of the immediate early genes Arc and Fos. Active cells that express CreER(T2) can only undergo recombination when tamoxifen is present, allowing genetic access to neurons that are active during a time window of less than 12 hr. We show that TRAP can provide selective access to neurons activated by specific somatosensory, visual, and auditory stimuli and by experience in a novel environment. When combined with tools for labeling, tracing, recording, and manipulating neurons, TRAP offers a powerful approach for understanding how the brain processes information and generates behavior.

  20. Bypassing Protein Corona Issue on Active Targeting: Zwitterionic Coatings Dictate Specific Interactions of Targeting Moieties and Cell Receptors.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Sohi, Reihaneh; Maghari, Shokoofeh; Raoufi, Mohammad; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Hajipour, Mohammad J; Ghassempour, Alireza; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2016-09-07

    Surface functionalization strategies for targeting nanoparticles (NP) to specific organs, cells, or organelles, is the foundation for new applications of nanomedicine to drug delivery and biomedical imaging. Interaction of NPs with biological media leads to the formation of a biomolecular layer at the surface of NPs so-called as "protein corona". This corona layer can shield active molecules at the surface of NPs and cause mistargeting or unintended scavenging by the liver, kidney, or spleen. To overcome this corona issue, we have designed biotin-cysteine conjugated silica NPs (biotin was employed as a targeting molecule and cysteine was used as a zwitterionic ligand) to inhibit corona-induced mistargeting and thus significantly enhance the active targeting capability of NPs in complex biological media. To probe the targeting yield of our engineered NPs, we employed both modified silicon wafer substrates with streptavidin (i.e., biotin receptor) to simulate a target and a cell-based model platform using tumor cell lines that overexpress biotin receptors. In both cases, after incubation with human plasma (thus forming a protein corona), cellular uptake/substrate attachment of the targeted NPs with zwitterionic coatings were significantly higher than the same NPs without zwitterionic coating. Our results demonstrated that NPs with a zwitterionic surface can considerably facilitate targeting yield of NPs and provide a promising new type of nanocarriers in biological applications.

  1. Implementation and testing of a Deep Water Correlation Velocity Sonar

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, F.R.; Bookheimer, W.C.; Rhoades, K.W.

    1983-05-01

    The paper describes a new sonar designated the Magnavox MX 810 Deep Water Correlation Sonar which is under development by the General Electric Company and the Magnavox Advanced Products and Systems Company. The sonar measures ship's velocity relative to the bottom but instead of using the conventional doppler effect, it uses the correlation method described by Dickey and Edward in 1978. In this method, the narrow beams required for doppler are not needed and a low frequency that penetrates to the bottom in deep water is used. The sonar was designed with the constraint that it use a transducer that mounts through a single 12 inch gate valve. Most offshore geophysical surveys at present make use of an integrated navigation system with bottom referenced velocity input from a doppler sonar which, because of limitations on the sonar bottomtracking range, has difficulty in areas where the water depth is greater than about 500 meters. The MX 810 provides bottom tracking in regions of much greater water depth. It also may be applied as an aid in continuous positioning of a vessel over a fixed location. It also should prove useful as a more general navigation aid. The sonar is undergoing a series of tests using Magnavox's facilities for the purpose of verifying the performance and obtaining data to support and quantify planned improvements in both software and hardware. A prototype transducer of only 5 watts power output was used, but in spite of this low power, successful operation to depths of 1900 meters was obtained. Extrapolation to system parameters to be implemented in production models predicts operation to depths of 5000 meters.

  2. Target Assembly to Check Boresight Alignment of Active Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis; Scott, V. Stanley; Riris, Haris; Cavanaugh, John; Liiva, Peter; Rodriguez, Michael

    2011-01-01

    A compact and portable target assembly (Fig. 1) has been developed to measure the boresite alignment of LRO's Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument at the spacecraft level. The concept for this target assembly has evolved over many years with earlier versions used to test the Mars Observer Laser Altimeter (MOLA), the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), and the Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) space-based instruments.

  3. Performance and Preference on a Sonar Detection Task under Various Colors of Ambient Illumination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-17

    fine acuity , color vision, and dark adaptation. Due to the additional advantages of subdued white illumination, it is recommended for use in sonar...sonar systems of the increase in the number of provided primarily auditory signals visual displays. The change to for the cperator to use in the blue, in...which tried blue was so much more important than the sleeves over the light bulbs in the visual , lighting in the sonar shack sonar control room and

  4. Modeling interface roughness scattering in a layered seabed for normal-incident chirp sonar signals.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dajun; Hefner, Brian T

    2012-04-01

    Downward looking sonar, such as the chirp sonar, is widely used as a sediment survey tool in shallow water environments. Inversion of geo-acoustic parameters from such sonar data precedes the availability of forward models. An exact numerical model is developed to initiate the simulation of the acoustic field produced by such a sonar in the presence of multiple rough interfaces. The sediment layers are assumed to be fluid layers with non-intercepting rough interfaces.

  5. A Computer Simulation Study of Station Keeping by an Autonomous Submersible Using Bottom-Tracking Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    63 Figure 5.1 "Lock On" Illustration .................................................................... 68 Figure 5.2 Depth Below AUV / Sonar Range... AUV sonar scan mechanism in Earth coordinates. Given Equation (3.2), from Figure 3.8, the transformation from AUV coordinates to beam tip (end effector...0Cells inside circle = accessible cells =pi* r2 15 2 * pi = 706 accessible cells Depth Below AUV / Sonar Range Sonar Range 14.1 cell radius i RI 150 m depth

  6. Mitigation Modelling of the Leeuwin Class Hydrographic Sonars in Shoalwater Bay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    The welfare of dolphins and dugongs is the main concern in Shoalwater Bay in reference to hydrographic sonar frequencies. Modelling therefore...considered all sonars capable of radiating signals within the auditory frequency range of dolphins, 1 to 150 kHz, and dugongs , 1 to 8 kHz. Sonar operations...at frequencies above 200 kHz were not considered since the effects on dolphins and dugongs were assumed inconsequential. The sonar with the lowest

  7. Ionizing Radiation Activates AMP-Activated Kinase (AMPK): A Target for Radiosensitization of Human Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanli, Toran; Rashid, Ayesha; Liu Caiqiong

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated kinase (AMPK) is a molecular energy sensor regulated by the tumor suppressor LKB1. Starvation and growth factors activate AMPK through the DNA damage sensor ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM). We explored the regulation of AMPK by ionizing radiation (IR) and its role as a target for radiosensitization of human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells were treated with IR (2-8 Gy) after incubation with either ATM or AMPK inhibitors or the AMPK activator metformin. Then, cells were subjected to either lysis and immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, clonogenic survival assays, or cell cycle analysis. Results: IR induced a robust phosphorylation and activation of AMPK in all tumor cells, independent of LKB1. IR activated AMPK first in the nucleus, and this extended later into cytoplasm. The ATM inhibitor KU-55933 blocked IR activation of AMPK. AMPK inhibition with Compound C or anti-AMPK {alpha} subunit small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked IR induction of the cell cycle regulators p53 and p21{sup waf/cip} as well as the IR-induced G2/M arrest. Compound C caused resistance to IR, increasing the surviving fraction after 2 Gy, but the anti-diabetic drug metformin enhanced IR activation of AMPK and lowered the surviving fraction after 2 Gy further. Conclusions: We provide evidence that IR activates AMPK in human cancer cells in an LKB1-independent manner, leading to induction of p21{sup waf/cip} and regulation of the cell cycle and survival. AMPK appears to (1) participate in an ATM-AMPK-p21{sup waf/cip} pathway, (2) be involved in regulation of the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint, and (3) may be targeted by metformin to enhance IR responses.

  8. Echolocation with bat buzz emissions: model and biomimetic sonar for elevation estimation.

    PubMed

    Kuc, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Just prior to capture the Buzz II emissions of some mouth-emitting bats, such as Eptesicus fuscus, are observed to exhibit spectra having multiple peaks. This paper proposes an echolocation strategy that uses such spectra with energy concentrated in specific frequency bands for determining target elevation. A biomimetic sonar was implemented to produce a tri-modal spectrum by driving a speaker with a signal rich in harmonics. The emission magnitudes at these harmonic frequencies measured as a function of elevation in the zero-azimuth plane form distinct beams. A template was formed from the ratio of the first harmonic and fundamental magnitudes to determine elevation. The elevation estimator exhibited a sub-degree accuracy (SD = 0.4° over a 20° interval centered at the elevation at which these two beams intersect in the zero-azimuth plane. Spectral cues from -40° to +10° elevation allow a qualitative non-linear control of sonar orientation to drive the target to the beam-intersection point where quantitative elevation estimates are available.

  9. Sonar-induced temporary hearing loss in dolphins.

    PubMed

    Mooney, T Aran; Nachtigall, Paul E; Vlachos, Stephanie

    2009-08-23

    There is increasing concern that human-produced ocean noise is adversely affecting marine mammals, as several recent cetacean mass strandings may have been caused by animals' interactions with naval 'mid-frequency' sonar. However, it has yet to be empirically demonstrated how sonar could induce these strandings or cause physiological effects. In controlled experimental studies, we show that mid-frequency sonar can induce temporary hearing loss in a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). Mild-behavioural alterations were also associated with the exposures. The auditory effects were induced only by repeated exposures to intense sonar pings with total sound exposure levels of 214 dB re: 1 microPa(2) s. Data support an increasing energy model to predict temporary noise-induced hearing loss and indicate that odontocete noise exposure effects bear trends similar to terrestrial mammals. Thus, sonar can induce physiological and behavioural effects in at least one species of odontocete; however, exposures must be of prolonged, high sound exposures levels to generate these effects.

  10. Identification of orthologous target pairs with shared active compounds and comparison of organism-specific activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    A systematic search for active small molecules shared by orthologous targets was carried out, leading to the identification of 803 compound-based orthologous target pairs covering a total of 938 orthologues, 358 unique targets and 98 organisms. Many orthologous target pairs were found to have substantial compound coverage, enabling the introduction of an orthologous target pairs classification including 'organism cliffs' and 'potency-retaining' pairs. A total of 158 orthologous target pairs involving human orthologues were identified, which were typically associated with drug discovery-relevant targets, organism combinations and compound data. Orthologous target pairs with human orthologues included 83 potency-retaining orthologous target pairs covering a variety of targets and organisms. On the basis of these orthologous target pairs, the compound search was further extended and 1149 potent compounds were identified that only had reported activities for non-human orthologues of 48 therapeutic targets, but not their human counterparts, hence providing a large pool of candidate compounds for further evaluation. The complete set of orthologous target pairs identified in our analysis, the orthologous target pairs classification including associated data and all candidate compounds are made freely available.

  11. Sperm whales reduce foraging effort during exposure to 1-2 kHz sonar and killer whale sounds.

    PubMed

    Isojunno, Saana; Cure, Charlotte; Kvadsheim, Petter Helgevold; Lam, Frans-Peter Alexander; Tyack, Peter Lloyd; Wensveen, Paul Jacobus; Miller, Patrick James O'Malley

    2016-01-01

    The time and energetic costs of behavioral responses to incidental and experimental sonar exposures, as well as control stimuli, were quantified using hidden state analysis of time series of acoustic and movement data recorded by tags (DTAG) attached to 12 sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) using suction cups. Behavioral state transition modeling showed that tagged whales switched to a non-foraging, non-resting state during both experimental transmissions of low-frequency active sonar from an approaching vessel (LFAS; 1-2 kHz, source level 214 dB re 1 µPa m, four tag records) and playbacks of potential predator (killer whale, Orcinus orca) sounds broadcast at naturally occurring sound levels as a positive control from a drifting boat (five tag records). Time spent in foraging states and the probability of prey capture attempts were reduced during these two types of exposures with little change in overall locomotion activity, suggesting an effect on energy intake with no immediate compensation. Whales switched to the active non-foraging state over received sound pressure levels of 131-165 dB re 1 µPa during LFAS exposure. In contrast, no changes in foraging behavior were detected in response to experimental negative controls (no-sonar ship approach or noise control playback) or to experimental medium-frequency active sonar exposures (MFAS; 6-7 kHz, source level 199 re 1 µPa m, received sound pressure level [SPL] = 73-158 dB re 1 µPa). Similarly, there was no reduction in foraging effort for three whales exposed to incidental, unidentified 4.7-5.1 kHz sonar signals received at lower levels (SPL = 89-133 dB re 1 µPa). These results demonstrate that similar to predation risk, exposure to sonar can affect functional behaviors, and indicate that increased perception of risk with higher source level or lower frequency may modulate how sperm whales respond to anthropogenic sound.

  12. GSK621 Targets Glioma Cells via Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Shi-Kun; Pan, Yi-Xin; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang; Pan, Si-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the anti-glioma cell activity by a novel AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator GSK621. We showed that GSK621 was cytotoxic to human glioma cells (U87MG and U251MG lines), possibly via provoking caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Its cytotoxicity was alleviated by caspase inhibitors. GSK621 activated AMPK to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downregulate Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) in glioma cells. AMPK inhibition, through shRNA knockdown of AMPKα or introduction of a dominant negative (T172A) AMPKα, almost reversed GSK621-induced AMPK activation, mTOR inhibition and Tspan8 degradation. Consequently, GSK621’s cytotoxicity in glioma cells was also significantly attenuated by AMPKα knockdown or mutation. Further studies showed that GSK621, at a relatively low concentration, significantly potentiated temozolomide (TMZ)’s sensitivity and lethality against glioma cells. We summarized that GSK621 inhibits human glioma cells possibly via activating AMPK signaling. This novel AMPK activator could be a novel and promising anti-glioma cell agent. PMID:27532105

  13. Validating side scan sonar as a fish survey tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollinger, Michael A.

    Hydroacoustic methods can be used to answer a variety of questions regarding fish populations and behavior. In this study, side scan sonar methodology was developed to quantify abundance and biomass and compared to established visual observation methods on SCUBA over artificial reef structures in the western Gulf of Mexico. Side scan sonar methods were equivalent to SCUBA surveys for measuring fish abundance over the same reef areas, however, abundances were significantly higher when the larger area sampled by side scan was utilized. Side scan sonar methods were also more time efficient than SCUBA, ROV and long line fishing methods (66.7%, 33.3%, 25.9% respectively). In addition, side scan methods allowed biomass and fish size class categories to be estimated over reef sites. Side scan methods allowed five reef sites to be surveyed in one day, demonstrating the capability for macro scale comparisons of fish abundance, biomass and behavior among sites.

  14. Sonar surveys used in gas-storage cavern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, N.G.

    1998-05-04

    Natural-gas storage cavern internal configuration, inspection information, and cavern integrity data can be obtained during high-pressure operations with specialized gas-sonar survey logging techniques. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., has successfully performed these operations on several of its deepest and highest pressurized caverns. The data can determine gas-in-place inventory and assess changes in spatial volumes. These changes can result from cavern creep, shrinkage, or closure or from various downhole abnormalities such as fluid infill or collapse of the sidewall or roof. The paper discusses conventional surveys with sonar, running surveys in pressurized caverns, accuracy of the sonar survey, initial development of Cavern 5, a roof fall, Cavern 4 development, and a damaged string.

  15. Quantification of Diffuse Hydrothermal Flows Using Multibeam Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakin, A. N.; Jackson, D. R.; Bemis, K. G.; Xu, G.

    2014-12-01

    The Cabled Observatory Vent Imaging Sonar (COVIS) deployed at the Main Endeavour node of the NEPTUNE Canada observatory has provided acoustic time series extending over 2 years. This includes 3D images of plume scattering strength and Doppler velocity measurements as well as 2D images showing regions of diffuse flow. The diffuse-flow images display the level of decorrelation between sonar echos with transmissions separated by 0.2 s. The present work aims to provide further information on the strength of diffuse flows. Two approaches are used: Measurement of the dependence of decorrelation on lag and measurement of phase shift of sonar echos, with lags in 3-hour increments up to several days. The phase shifts and decorrelation are linked to variations of temperature above the seabed, which allows quantification of those variations, their magnitudes, spatial and temporal scales, and energy spectra. These techniques are illustrated using COVIS data obtained near the Grotto vent complex.

  16. Ecological echoes observed by moving biomimetic sonar characterize objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuc, Roman

    2001-05-01

    This paper examines echoes from in situ foliage, similar to those observed by flying bats. A moving sonar converts echoes into spike sequences and applies neural-computational methods to estimate passing range and travel speed. Retro-reflectors and favorably oriented planar patches generate strong echoes (SEs), identified by spike firing rate. Linear sonar trajectories cause SEs to form hyperbolic patterns, termed glints, specified by passing range and travel speed. Passing-range specific detectors compare successive SE times with values in a table and tally coincidences. A glint terminates after a sufficient number of coincidences are tallied and two consecutive mismatches occur in the maximum-count detector. SE arrival jitter necessitates a coincidence window. Short windows identify individual glints while long windows generalize extended objects. SEs from distant objects exhibit almost constant incremental delays, used to estimate sonar travel speed, necessary for robust glint detection. Passing-range estimates may explain how bats can fly through small openings without collision.

  17. Targeting of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase is strongly influenced by the sequence and structure of the targeted DNA.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong Ming; Ratnam, Sarayu; Storb, Ursula

    2005-12-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin somatic hypermutation (SHM). Since in vitro AID was shown to deaminate cytosines on single-stranded DNA or the nontranscribed strand, it remained a puzzle how in vivo AID targets both DNA strands equally. Here we investigate the roles of transcription and DNA sequence in cytosine deamination. Strikingly different results are found with different substrates. Depending on the target sequence, the transcribed DNA strand is targeted as well as or better than the nontranscribed strand. The preferential targeting is not related to the frequency of AID hot spots. Comparison of cytosine deamination by AID and bisulfite shows different targeting patterns suggesting that AID may locally unwind the DNA. We conclude that somatic hypermutation on both DNA strands is the natural outcome of AID action on a transcribed gene; furthermore, the DNA sequence or structure and topology play major roles in targeting AID in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, the lack of mutations in the first approximately 100 nucleotides and beyond about 1 to 2 kb from the promoter of immunoglobulin genes during SHM must be due to special conditions of transcription and chromatin in vivo.

  18. Folate-targeted docetaxel-lipid-based-nanosuspensions for active-targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Li, Min; Zhang, Na

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop two novel drug delivery systems based on biodegradable docetaxel-lipid-based-nanosuspensions. The first one was poly(ethylene glycol)- modified docetaxel-lipid-based-nanosuspensions (pLNS). It was developed to increase the cycle time of the drug within the body and enhance the accumulation of the drug at the tumor site. The second one was targeted docetaxel-lipid-based-nanosuspensions (tLNS) using folate as the target ligand. The tLNS could target the tumor cells that overexpressed folate receptor (FR). The morphology, particle size, and zeta potential of pLNS and tLNS were characterized, respectively. The in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation of Duopafei®, pLNS, and tLNS were performed in human hepatocellular liver carcinoma HepG2 (FR−) and B16 (FR+) cells, respectively. The in vivo antitumor efficacy and pharmacokinetics, as well as the drug tissue distribution, were evaluated in Kunming mice bearing B16 cells. The particle size of pLNS was 204.2 ± 6.18 nm and tLNS had a mean particle size of 220.6 ± 9.54 nm. Cytotoxicity of tLNS against B16 (FR+) cell lines was superior to pLNS (P < 0.05), while there was no significant difference in the half maximum inhibitory concentration values for HepG2 (FR−) cells between pLNS and tLNS. The results of the in vivo antitumor efficacy evaluation showed that tLNS exhibited higher antitumor efficacy by reducing tumor volume (P < 0.01) compared with Duopafei and pLNS, respectively. The results of the in vivo biodistribution study indicate that the better antitumor efficacy of tLNS was attributed to the increased accumulation of the drug in the tumor. PMID:22802688

  19. Selective Activation of Neuronal Targets With Sinusoidal Electric Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Daniel K.; Eddington, Donald K.; Rizzo, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    Electric stimulation of the CNS is being evaluated as a treatment modality for a variety of neurological, psychiatric, and sensory disorders. Despite considerable success in some applications, existing stimulation techniques offer little control over which cell types or neuronal substructures are activated by stimulation. The ability to more precisely control neuronal activation would likely improve the clinical outcomes associated with these applications. Here, we show that specific frequencies of sinusoidal stimulation can be used to preferentially activate certain retinal cell types: photoreceptors are activated at 5 Hz, bipolar cells at 25 Hz, and ganglion cells at 100 Hz. In addition, low-frequency stimulation (≤25 Hz) did not activate passing axons but still elicited robust synaptically mediated responses in ganglion cells; therefore, elicited neural activity is confined to within a focal region around the stimulating electrode. Our results suggest that sinusoidal stimulation provides significantly improved control over elicited neural activity relative to conventional pulsatile stimulation. PMID:20810683

  20. Quantifying methane flux from lake sediments using multibeam sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandella, B.; Urban, P.; Delwiche, K.; Greinert, J.; Hemond, H.; Ruppel, C. D.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and the production and emission of methane from sediments in wetlands, lakes and rivers both contributes to and may be exacerbated by climate change. In some of these shallow-water settings, methane fluxes may be largely controlled by episodic venting that can be triggered by drops in hydrostatic pressure. Even with better constraints on the mechanisms for gas release, quantifying these fluxes has remained a challenge due to rapid spatiotemporal changes in the patterns of bubble emissions from the sediments. The research presented here uses a fixed-location Imagenex DeltaT 837B multibeam sonar to estimate methane-venting fluxes from organic-rich lake sediments over a large area (~400 m2) and over a multi-season deployment period with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. Simpler, single-beam sonar systems have been used in the past to estimate bubble fluxes in a variety of settings. Here we extend this methodology to a multibeam system by means of: (1) detailed calibration of the sonar signal against imposed bubble streams, and (2) validation against an in situ independent record of gas flux captured by overlying bubble traps. The calibrated sonar signals then yield estimates of the methane flux with high spatial resolution (~1 m) and temporal frequency (6 Hz) from a portion of the deepwater basin of Upper Mystic Lake, MA, USA, a temperate eutrophic kettle lake. These results in turn inform mathematical models of methane transport and release from the sediments, which reproduce with high fidelity the ebullitive response to hydrostatic pressure variations. In addition, the detailed information about spatial variability of methane flux derived from sonar records is used to estimate the uncertainty associated with upscaling flux measurements from bubble traps to the scale of the sonar observation area. Taken together, these multibeam sonar measurements and analysis provide a novel quantitative approach for the assessment of

  1. Aptamers: Active Targeting Ligands for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Min; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA and RNA aptamers in cancer theranostics. The specific binding ability of aptamers to cancer-related markers and cancer cells ensured their high performance for early diagnosis of cancer. Meanwhile, the efficient targeting ability of aptamers to cancer cells and tissues provided a promising way to deliver imaging agents and drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. Furthermore, with the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, the conjugation of aptamers with functional nanomaterials paved an exciting way for the fabrication of theranostic agents for different types of cancers, which might be a powerful tool for cancer treatment. PMID:25699094

  2. Aptamers: active targeting ligands for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xu; Chen, Jiao; Wu, Min; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, including DNA, RNA and peptide aptamers, are a group of promising recognition units that can specifically bind to target molecules and cells. Due to their excellent specificity and high affinity to targets, aptamers have attracted great attention in various fields in which selective recognition units are required. They have been used in biosensing, drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy (especially for cancer treatment). In this review, we summarized recent applications of DNA and RNA aptamers in cancer theranostics. The specific binding ability of aptamers to cancer-related markers and cancer cells ensured their high performance for early diagnosis of cancer. Meanwhile, the efficient targeting ability of aptamers to cancer cells and tissues provided a promising way to deliver imaging agents and drugs for cancer imaging and therapy. Furthermore, with the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, the conjugation of aptamers with functional nanomaterials paved an exciting way for the fabrication of theranostic agents for different types of cancers, which might be a powerful tool for cancer treatment.

  3. Application of Fisher fusion techniques to improve the individual performance of sonar computer-aided detection/computer-aided classification (CAD/CAC) algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciany, Charles M.; Zurawski, William C.

    2009-05-01

    Raytheon has extensively processed high-resolution sidescan sonar images with its CAD/CAC algorithms to provide classification of targets in a variety of shallow underwater environments. The Raytheon CAD/CAC algorithm is based on non-linear image segmentation into highlight, shadow, and background regions, followed by extraction, association, and scoring of features from candidate highlight and shadow regions of interest (ROIs). The targets are classified by thresholding an overall classification score, which is formed by summing the individual feature scores. The algorithm performance is measured in terms of probability of correct classification as a function of false alarm rate, and is determined by both the choice of classification features and the manner in which the classifier rates and combines these features to form its overall score. In general, the algorithm performs very reliably against targets that exhibit "strong" highlight and shadow regions in the sonar image- i.e., both the highlight echo and its associated shadow region from the target are distinct relative to the ambient background. However, many real-world undersea environments can produce sonar images in which a significant percentage of the targets exhibit either "weak" highlight or shadow regions in the sonar image. The challenge of achieving robust performance in these environments has traditionally been addressed by modifying the individual feature scoring algorithms to optimize the separation between the corresponding highlight or shadow feature scores of targets and non-targets. This study examines an alternate approach that employs principles of Fisher fusion to determine a set of optimal weighting coefficients that are applied to the individual feature scores before summing to form the overall classification score. The results demonstrate improved performance of the CAD/CAC algorithm on at-sea data sets.

  4. Integrin Targeting and Toxicological Assessment of Peptide-Conjugated Liposome Delivery Systems to Activated Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kermanizadeh, Ali; Villadsen, Klaus; Østrem, Ragnhild G; Jensen, Knud J; Møller, Peter; Loft, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    Utilization of functionalized liposomes as the means of targeted delivery of therapeutics may enhance specific transport of biologically active drugs to target tissues, while avoiding or reducing undesired side effects. In the present investigation, peptide-conjugated cationic liposomes were constructed with the aim of targeting integrins (i.e. vitronectin and/or fibronectin receptors) on activated endothelial cells. The peptide-conjugated liposomes induced only cytotoxicity at the highest concentration in non-activated or activated endothelial cells, as well as in co-culture of endothelial cells and macrophages. There was unaltered secretion of cytokines after exposure of peptide-conjugated liposomes to endothelial cells, indicating that the materials were not inflammogenic. Liposomes with a peptide targeting the fibronectin receptor (integrin α5β1) were more effective in targeting of activated endothelial cells, as compared to a liposome with a peptide that targeted both the fibronectin and vitronectin receptors, as well as liposomes with a control peptide. The liposome targeted to the fibronectin receptor also displayed uptake in endothelial cells in co-culture with activated macrophages. Therefore, this study demonstrates the feasibility of constructing a peptide-conjugated cationic liposome, which displays targeting to activated endothelial cells at concentrations that are not cytotoxic or inflammogenic to the cells.

  5. Sidescan sonar as a tool for detection of demersal fish habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Able, Kenneth W.; Twichell, David C.; Grimes, Churchill B.; Jones, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    Sidescan sonar can be an effective tool for the determination of the habitat distribution of commercially important species.  This technique has the advantage of rapidly mapping large areas of the seafloor.  Sidescan images (sonographs) may also help to identify appropriate fishing gears for different types of seafloor or areas to be avoided with certain types of gears.  During the early stages of exploration, verification of sidescan sonar sonographs is critical to successful identification of important habitats.  Tilefishes (Lopholatilus and Caulolatilus) are especially good target species because the construct large burrows in the seafloor or live around boulders, both of which are easily detectable on sonographs.  In some special circumstances the estimates of tilefish burrow densities from sonographs can be used to estimate standing stock. In many localities the burrow and boulder habitats of tilefish are shared with other commercially important species such as American lobsters, Homarus americanus; cusk, Brosme brosme; and ocean pout, Macrozoarces americanus.

  6. SONAR Discovers RNA-Binding Proteins from Analysis of Large-Scale Protein-Protein Interactomes.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Kristopher W; Jin, Wenhao; Huelga, Stephanie C; Banks, Charles A S; Gilmore, Joshua M; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Pratt, Gabriel A; Schwinn, Marie K; Daniels, Danette L; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-10-20

    RNA metabolism is controlled by an expanding, yet incomplete, catalog of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), many of which lack characterized RNA binding domains. Approaches to expand the RBP repertoire to discover non-canonical RBPs are currently needed. Here, HaloTag fusion pull down of 12 nuclear and cytoplasmic RBPs followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) demonstrates that proteins interacting with multiple RBPs in an RNA-dependent manner are enriched for RBPs. This motivated SONAR, a computational approach that predicts RNA binding activity by analyzing large-scale affinity precipitation-MS protein-protein interactomes. Without relying on sequence or structure information, SONAR identifies 1,923 human, 489 fly, and 745 yeast RBPs, including over 100 human candidate RBPs that contain zinc finger domains. Enhanced CLIP confirms RNA binding activity and identifies transcriptome-wide RNA binding sites for SONAR-predicted RBPs, revealing unexpected RNA binding activity for disease-relevant proteins and DNA binding proteins.

  7. Intestinal inflammation targets cancer-inducing activity of the microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Janelle C.; Perez-Chanona, Ernesto; Mühlbauer, Marcus; Tomkovich, Sarah; Uronis, Joshua M.; Fan, Ting-Jia; Campbell, Barry J.; Abujamel, Turki; Dogan, Belgin; Rogers, Arlin B.; Rhodes, Jonathan M.; Stintzi, Alain; Simpson, Kenneth W.; Hansen, Jonathan J.; Keku, Temitope O.; Fodor, Anthony A.; Jobin, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation alters host physiology to promote cancer, as seen in colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CRC). Here we identify the intestinal microbiota as a target of inflammation that impacts the progression of CRC. High-throughput sequencing revealed that inflammation modifies gut microbial composition in colitis-susceptible interleukin-10-deficient (Il10−/−) mice. Monocolonization with the commensal Escherichia coli NC101 promoted invasive carcinoma in azoxymethane (AOM)-treated Il10−/− mice. Deletion of the polyketide synthase (pks) genotoxic island from E. coli NC101 decreased tumor multiplicity and invasion in AOM/Il10−/− mice, without altering intestinal inflammation. Mucosa-associated pks+ E. coli were found in a significantly high percentage of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and CRC patients. This suggests that in mice, colitis can promote tumorigenesis by altering microbial composition and inducing the expansion of microorganisms with genotoxic capabilities. PMID:22903521

  8. Nanobody conjugated PLGA nanoparticles for active targeting of African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Arias, José L; Unciti-Broceta, Juan D; Maceira, José; Del Castillo, Teresa; Hernández-Quero, José; Magez, Stefan; Soriano, Miguel; García-Salcedo, José A

    2015-01-10

    Targeted delivery of therapeutics is an alternative approach for the selective treatment of infectious diseases. The surface of African trypanosomes, the causative agents of African trypanosomiasis, is covered by a surface coat consisting of a single variant surface glycoprotein, termed VSG. This coat is recycled by endocytosis at a very high speed, making the trypanosome surface an excellent target for the delivery of trypanocidal drugs. Here, we report the design of a drug nanocarrier based on poly ethylen glycol (PEG) covalently attached (PEGylated) to poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) to generate PEGylated PLGA nanoparticles. This nanocarrier was coupled to a single domain heavy chain antibody fragment (nanobody) that specifically recognizes the surface of the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma brucei. Nanoparticles were loaded with pentamidine, the first-line drug for T. b. gambiense acute infection. An in vitro effectiveness assay showed a 7-fold decrease in the half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the formulation relative to free drug. Furthermore, in vivo therapy using a murine model of African trypanosomiasis demonstrated that the formulation cured all infected mice at a 10-fold lower dose than the minimal full curative dose of free pentamidine and 60% of mice at a 100-fold lower dose. This nanocarrier has been designed with components approved for use in humans and loaded with a drug that is currently in use to treat the disease. Moreover, this flexible nanobody-based system can be adapted to load any compound, opening a range of new potential therapies with application to other diseases.

  9. A Rolling Line Source for a Seismic Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    first used for bottom sounding and echolocation in the early 20th century by the French scientist Paul Langevin, a friend of the famous chemist Madam ...Marie Curie . Now acoustic sonars are well developed, and are an integral part of every warship, worldwide. Seismic interface waves, such as

  10. Hulu Sungai Perak Bed Sediment Mapping Using Underwater Acoustic Sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriafdi, N.; Zainon, O.; Din, U.; Rasid, A. W.; Mat Amin, Z.; Othman, R.; Mardi, A. S.; Mahmud, R.; Sulaiman, N.

    2016-09-01

    Development in acoustic survey techniques in particular side scan sonar have revolutionized the way we are able to image, map and understand the riverbed environment. It is now cost effective to image large areas of the riverbed using these techniques and the backscatter image created from surveys provides base line data from which thematic maps of the riverbed environment including maps of morphological geology, can be derived when interpreted in conjunction with in situ sampling data. This article focuses on investigation characteristics of sediments and correlation of side scan backscatter image with signal strength. The interpretation of acoustic backscatter rely on experienced interpretation by eye of grey scale images produced from the data. A 990F Starfish Side Scan Sonar was used to collect and develop a series of sonar images along 6 km of Hulu Sungai Perak. Background sediments could be delineated accurately and the image textures could be linked to the actual river floor appearance through grab sampling. A major difference was found in the acoustic returns from the two research area studies: the upstream area shows much rougher textures. This is due to an actual differences in riverbed roughness, caused by a difference in bottom currents and sediment dynamics in the two areas. The highest backscatter correlates with coarsest and roughness sediment. Result suggest that image based backscatter classification shows considerable promise for interpretation of side scan sonar data for the production of geological maps.

  11. Enhanced Sidescan-Sonar Imagery Offshore of Southeastern Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; McMullen, Kate Y.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Ackerman, Seth D.; Glomb, K.A.; Forfinski, N.A.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) have been working cooperatively to map and study the coastal sea floor. The sidescan-sonar imagery collected during NOAA hydrographic surveys has been included as part of these studies. However, the original sonar imagery contains tonal artifacts from environmental noise (for example, sea state), equipment settings (for example, power and gain changes), and processing (for example, inaccurate cross-track and line-to-line normalization), which impart a quilt-like patchwork appearance to the mosaics. These artifacts can obscure the normalized backscatter properties of the sea floor. To address this issue, sidescan-sonar imagery from surveys H11076 and H11079 offshore of southeastern Massachusetts was enhanced by matching backscatter tones of adjacent sidescan-sonar lines. These mosaics provide continuous grayscale perspectives of the backscatter, more accurately reveal the sea-floor geologic trends, and minimize the environment-, acquisition-, and processing-related noise.

  12. Estimated Tissue and Blood N(2) Levels and Risk of Decompression Sickness in Deep-, Intermediate-, and Shallow-Diving Toothed Whales during Exposure to Naval Sonar.

    PubMed

    Kvadsheim, P H; Miller, P J O; Tyack, P L; Sivle, L D; Lam, F P A; Fahlman, A

    2012-01-01

    Naval sonar has been accused of causing whale stranding by a mechanism which increases formation of tissue N(2) gas bubbles. Increased tissue and blood N(2) levels, and thereby increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS), is thought to result from changes in behavior or physiological responses during diving. Previous theoretical studies have used hypothetical sonar-induced changes in both behavior and physiology to model blood and tissue N(2) tension [Formula: see text], but this is the first attempt to estimate the changes during actual behavioral responses to sonar. We used an existing mathematical model to estimate blood and tissue N(2) tension [Formula: see text] from dive data recorded from sperm, killer, long-finned pilot, Blainville's beaked, and Cuvier's beaked whales before and during exposure to Low- (1-2 kHz) and Mid- (2-7 kHz) frequency active sonar. Our objectives were: (1) to determine if differences in dive behavior affects risk of bubble formation, and if (2) behavioral- or (3) physiological responses to sonar are plausible risk factors. Our results suggest that all species have natural high N(2) levels, with deep diving generally resulting in higher end-dive [Formula: see text] as compared with shallow diving. Sonar exposure caused some changes in dive behavior in both killer whales, pilot whales and beaked whales, but this did not lead to any increased risk of DCS. However, in three of eight exposure session with sperm whales, the animal changed to shallower diving, and in all these cases this seem to result in an increased risk of DCS, although risk was still within the normal risk range of this species. When a hypothetical removal of the normal dive response (bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction), was added to the behavioral response during model simulations, this led to an increased variance in the estimated end-dive N(2) levels, but no consistent change of risk. In conclusion, we cannot rule out the possibility that a combination

  13. Estimated Tissue and Blood N2 Levels and Risk of Decompression Sickness in Deep-, Intermediate-, and Shallow-Diving Toothed Whales during Exposure to Naval Sonar

    PubMed Central

    Kvadsheim, P. H.; Miller, P. J. O.; Tyack, P. L.; Sivle, L. D.; Lam, F. P. A.; Fahlman, A.

    2012-01-01

    Naval sonar has been accused of causing whale stranding by a mechanism which increases formation of tissue N2 gas bubbles. Increased tissue and blood N2 levels, and thereby increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS), is thought to result from changes in behavior or physiological responses during diving. Previous theoretical studies have used hypothetical sonar-induced changes in both behavior and physiology to model blood and tissue N2 tension PN2, but this is the first attempt to estimate the changes during actual behavioral responses to sonar. We used an existing mathematical model to estimate blood and tissue N2 tension PN2 from dive data recorded from sperm, killer, long-finned pilot, Blainville’s beaked, and Cuvier’s beaked whales before and during exposure to Low- (1–2 kHz) and Mid- (2–7 kHz) frequency active sonar. Our objectives were: (1) to determine if differences in dive behavior affects risk of bubble formation, and if (2) behavioral- or (3) physiological responses to sonar are plausible risk factors. Our results suggest that all species have natural high N2 levels, with deep diving generally resulting in higher end-dive PN2 as compared with shallow diving. Sonar exposure caused some changes in dive behavior in both killer whales, pilot whales and beaked whales, but this did not lead to any increased risk of DCS. However, in three of eight exposure session with sperm whales, the animal changed to shallower diving, and in all these cases this seem to result in an increased risk of DCS, although risk was still within the normal risk range of this species. When a hypothetical removal of the normal dive response (bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction), was added to the behavioral response during model simulations, this led to an increased variance in the estimated end-dive N2 levels, but no consistent change of risk. In conclusion, we cannot rule out the possibility that a combination of behavioral and physiological responses to sonar

  14. Reliability of fish size estimates obtained from multibeam imaging sonar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hightower, Joseph E.; Magowan, Kevin J.; Brown, Lori M.; Fox, Dewayne A.

    2013-01-01

    Multibeam imaging sonars have considerable potential for use in fisheries surveys because the video-like images are easy to interpret, and they contain information about fish size, shape, and swimming behavior, as well as characteristics of occupied habitats. We examined images obtained using a dual-frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) multibeam sonar for Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus, striped bass Morone saxatilis, white perch M. americana, and channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus of known size (20–141 cm) to determine the reliability of length estimates. For ranges up to 11 m, percent measurement error (sonar estimate – total length)/total length × 100 varied by species but was not related to the fish's range or aspect angle (orientation relative to the sonar beam). Least-square mean percent error was significantly different from 0.0 for Atlantic sturgeon (x̄  =  −8.34, SE  =  2.39) and white perch (x̄  = 14.48, SE  =  3.99) but not striped bass (x̄  =  3.71, SE  =  2.58) or channel catfish (x̄  = 3.97, SE  =  5.16). Underestimating lengths of Atlantic sturgeon may be due to difficulty in detecting the snout or the longer dorsal lobe of the heterocercal tail. White perch was the smallest species tested, and it had the largest percent measurement errors (both positive and negative) and the lowest percentage of images classified as good or acceptable. Automated length estimates for the four species using Echoview software varied with position in the view-field. Estimates tended to be low at more extreme azimuthal angles (fish's angle off-axis within the view-field), but mean and maximum estimates were highly correlated with total length. Software estimates also were biased by fish images partially outside the view-field and when acoustic crosstalk occurred (when a fish perpendicular to the sonar and at relatively close range is detected in the side lobes of adjacent beams). These sources of

  15. Systematic mining of analog series with related core structures in multi-target activity space.

    PubMed

    Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2013-08-01

    We have aimed to systematically extract analog series with related core structures from multi-target activity space to explore target promiscuity of closely related analogous. Therefore, a previously introduced SAR matrix structure was adapted and further extended for large-scale data mining. These matrices organize analog series with related yet distinct core structures in a consistent manner. High-confidence compound activity data yielded more than 2,300 non-redundant matrices capturing 5,821 analog series that included 4,288 series with multi-target and 735 series with multi-family activities. Many matrices captured more than three analog series with activity against more than five targets. The matrices revealed a variety of promiscuity patterns. Compound series matrices also contain virtual compounds, which provide suggestions for compound design focusing on desired activity profiles.

  16. A new antibiotic with potent activity targets MscL

    PubMed Central

    Iscla, Irene; Wray, Robin; Blount, Paul; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Conery, Annie L; Ausubel, Frederick M; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A; Cooper, Matthew A; Obregon-Henao, Andres; Orme, Ian; Tjandra, Edwin S; Stroeher, Uwe H; Brown, Melissa H; Macardle, Cindy; van Holst, Nick; Ling Tong, Chee; Slattery, Ashley D; Gibson, Christopher T; Raston, Colin L; Boulos, Ramiz A

    2015-01-01

    The growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a major threat to human health. Paradoxically, new antibiotic discovery is declining, with most of the recently approved antibiotics corresponding to new uses for old antibiotics or structurally similar derivatives of known antibiotics. We used an in silico approach to design a new class of nontoxic antimicrobials for the bacteria-specific mechanosensitive ion channel of large conductance, MscL. One antimicrobial of this class, compound 10, is effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no cytotoxicity in human cell lines at the therapeutic concentrations. As predicted from in silico modeling, we show that the mechanism of action of compound 10 is at least partly dependent on interactions with MscL. Moreover we show that compound 10 cured a methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our work shows that compound 10, and other drugs that target MscL, are potentially important therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. PMID:25649856

  17. Activation of lexical and syntactic target language properties in translation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, C; Paredes, N; Macizo, P; Bajo, M T

    2008-07-01

    Is reading for translation equal to reading in monolingual contexts? Horizontal/parallel theories of translation propose that normal reading and reading for translation differ because the translator engages in partial reformulation while reading for translating the source text. In contrast, vertical/serial theories assume that the translators first extract the meaning of the message, and only then they proceed to reformulate it. In two experiments, we manipulated lexical and syntactic properties of the target language (TL) while translators read for repetition or for translation. On-line sentence comprehension was affected by the lexical frequency of words in the TL (Experiment 1) and the syntactic congruency between the source language (SL) and TL sentences (Experiment 2). However, the influence of lexical and syntactic TL properties was restricted to the reading for translation task. According to our results, the horizontal view of translation includes code-to-code links between the SL and TL involving at least the lexical and syntactic level of processing.

  18. A new antibiotic with potent activity targets MscL.

    PubMed

    Iscla, Irene; Wray, Robin; Blount, Paul; Larkins-Ford, Jonah; Conery, Annie L; Ausubel, Frederick M; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Huang, Johnny X; Blaskovich, Mark A; Cooper, Matthew A; Obregon-Henao, Andres; Orme, Ian; Tjandra, Edwin S; Stroeher, Uwe H; Brown, Melissa H; Macardle, Cindy; van Holst, Nick; Ling Tong, Chee; Slattery, Ashley D; Gibson, Christopher T; Raston, Colin L; Boulos, Ramiz A

    2015-07-01

    The growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a major threat to human health. Paradoxically, new antibiotic discovery is declining, with most of the recently approved antibiotics corresponding to new uses for old antibiotics or structurally similar derivatives of known antibiotics. We used an in silico approach to design a new class of nontoxic antimicrobials for the bacteria-specific mechanosensitive ion channel of large conductance, MscL. One antimicrobial of this class, compound 10, is effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no cytotoxicity in human cell lines at the therapeutic concentrations. As predicted from in silico modeling, we show that the mechanism of action of compound 10 is at least partly dependent on interactions with MscL. Moreover we show that compound 10 cured a methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Our work shows that compound 10, and other drugs that target MscL, are potentially important therapeutics against antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

  19. Design and operation specifications of an active monitoring system for detecting southern resident killer whales

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Xu, Jinshan; Martinez, Jayson J.; Weiland, Mark A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Myers, Joshua R.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Before final approval is given to the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 for deploying the first tidal power devices in the United States in an open water environment, a system to manage the potential risk of injury to killer whales due to collision with moving turbine blades must be demonstrated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with establishing the performance requirements for, constructing, and testing a prototype marine animal alert system for triggering temporary turbine shutdown when there is risk of collision with a killer whale. To develop a system that relies on active sonar two critical areas must be investigated - the target strength of killer whales and the frequency content of commercially available active sonar units. PNNL studied three target strength models: a simple model, the Fourier matching model, and the Kirchoff-ray mode model. Using target strength measurements of bottlenose dolphins obtained by previous researchers and assuming killer whales share similar morphology and structure, PNNL extrapolated the target strength of an adult killer whale 7.5 m in length at a frequency of 67 kHz. To study the frequency content of a commercially available sonar unit, direct measurements of the signal transmitted by the sonar were obtained by using a hydrophone connected to a data acquisition system in both laboratory and field conditions. The measurements revealed that in addition to the primary frequency of 200 kHz, there is a secondary frequency component at 90 kHz, which is within the hearing range of killer whales. The amplitude of the 90-kHz frequency component is above the hearing threshold of killer whales but below the threshold for potential injuries.

  20. [Nutrition and physical activity: two targets for cancer prevention].

    PubMed

    Thibault, Ronan; Dupertuis, Yves M; Belabed, Linda; Pichard, Claude

    2010-05-26

    The links between nutrition and cancer onset are now well established by epidemiological studies. The scientific evidence is presented in a report of the World Cancer Research Foundation (WCRF). Protective factors towards overall cancer risk are fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity. Overweight and obesity, intakes of alcoholic beverage, fat, salt, high temperature cooked and processed red meat, increase cancer risk. In addition, beta-carotene systematic supplementation could increase lung cancer risk in smokers. As optimal controlling of these risk factors can decrease cancer mortality by 25%, nutritional counselling must be integrated in the global strategy of primary and secondary prevention of cancers.

  1. NRF2 Activation as Target to Implement Therapeutic Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocci, Velio; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2015-02-01

    A chronic increase of oxidative stress is typical of serious pathologies such as myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic limb ischemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), type II-diabetes, age-related macular degeneration leads to an epic increase of morbidity and mortality in all countries of the world. The initial inflammation followed by an excessive release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) implies a diffused cellular injury that needs to be corrected by an inducible expression of the innate detoxifying and antioxidant system. The transcription factor Nrf2, when properly activated, is able to restore a redox homeostasis and possibly improve human health.

  2. Nrf2 activation as target to implement therapeutic treatments

    PubMed Central

    Bocci, Velio; Valacchi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    A chronic increase of oxidative stress is typical of serious pathologies such as myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic limb ischemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), type II-diabetes, age-related macular degeneration leads to an epic increase of morbidity and mortality in all countries of the world. The initial inflammation followed by an excessive release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) implies a diffused cellular injury that needs to be corrected by an inducible expression of the innate detoxifying and antioxidant system. The transcription factor Nrf2, when properly activated, is able to restore a redox homeostasis and possibly improve human health. PMID:25699252

  3. 3D Chirp Sonar Images on Fluid Migration Pathways and Their Implications on Seafloor Stability East of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon Offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. W.; Liu, C. S.; Su, C. C.; Hsu, H. H.; Chen, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    This study utilizes both chirp sonar images and coring results to investigate the unstable seafloor strata east of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon offshore southwestern Taiwan. We have constructed 3D chirp sonar images from a densely surveyed block to trace the attitude of an acoustic transparent layer and features caused by fluid activities. Based on the distribution of this transparent layer and fluid-related features, we suggest that this transparent layer forms a pathway for fluid migration which induces fluid-related characters such as acoustic blanking and fluid chimneys in the 3D chirp sonar images. Cored seafloor samples are used in this study to investigate the sediment compositions. The 210Pb activity profiles of the cores show oscillating and unsteady values at about 20~25 cm from core top. The bulk densities of the core samples in the same section (about 20~25 cm from core top) give values lower than those at deeper parts of the cores. These results indicate that the water content is much higher in the shallow sediments than in the deeper strata. From core sample analyses, we deduce that the local sediments are disturbed by liquefaction. From the analyses of 3D chirp sonar images and core data, we suggest that the seafloor east of the Fangliao Submarine Canyon is in an unstable condition, if disturbed by earthquakes, submarine landslides and gravity flows could be easily triggered and cause some geohazards, like breaking submarine cables during the 2006 Pingtung earthquake event.

  4. Targeting poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mégnin-Chanet, Frédérique; Bollet, Marc A.

    2010-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a ubiquitous protein modification found in mammalian cells that modulates many cellular responses, including DNA repair. The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family catalyze the formation and addition onto proteins of negatively charged ADP-ribose polymers synthesized from NAD+. The absence of PARP-1 and PARP-2, both of which are activated by DNA damage, results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and alkylating agents. PARP inhibitors that compete with NAD+ at the enzyme’s activity site are effective chemo- and radiopotentiation agents and, in BRCA-deficient tumors, can be used as single-agent therapies acting through the principle of synthetic lethality. Through extensive drug-development programs, third-generation inhibitors have now entered clinical trials and are showing great promise. However, both PARP-1 and PARP-2 are not only involved in DNA repair but also in transcription regulation, chromatin modification, and cellular homeostasis. The impact on these processes of PARP inhibition on long-term therapeutic responses needs to be investigated. PMID:20725763

  5. Didymin: an orally active citrus flavonoid for targeting neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sharad S; Singhal, Sulabh; Singhal, Preeti; Singhal, Jyotsana; Horne, David; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2017-02-08

    Neuroblastoma, a rapidly growing yet treatment responsive cancer, is the third most common cancer of children and the most common solid tumor in infants. Unfortunately, neuroblastoma that has lost p53 function often has a highly treatment-resistant phenotype leading to tragic outcomes. In the context of neuroblastoma, the functions of p53 and MYCN (which is amplified in ~25% of neuroblastomas) are integrally linked because they are mutually transcriptionally regulated, and because they together regulate the catalytic activity of RNA polymerases. Didymin is a citrus-derived natural compound that kills p53 wild-type as well as drug-resistant p53-mutant neuroblastoma cells in culture. In addition, orally administered didymin causes regression of neuroblastoma xenografts in mouse models, without toxicity to non-malignant cells, neural tissues, or neural stem cells. RKIP is a Raf-inhibitory protein that regulates MYCN activation, is transcriptionally upregulated by didymin, and appears to play a key role in the anti-neuroblastoma actions of didymin. In this review, we discuss how didymin overcomes drug-resistance in p53-mutant neuroblastoma through RKIP-mediated inhibition of MYCN and its effects on GRK2, PKCs, Let-7 micro-RNA, and clathrin-dependent endocytosis by Raf-dependent and -independent mechanisms. In addition, we will discuss studies supporting potential clinical impact and translation of didymin as a low cost, safe, and effective oral agent that could change the current treatment paradigm for refractory neuroblastoma.

  6. The neurotensin gene is a downstream target for Ras activation.

    PubMed Central

    Evers, B M; Zhou, Z; Celano, P; Li, J

    1995-01-01

    Ras regulates novel patterns of gene expression and the differentiation of various eukaryotic cell types. Stable transfection of Ha-ras into the human colon cancer line CaCo2 results in the morphologic differentiation to a small bowel phenotype. The purpose of our study was to determine whether the Ras regulatory pathway plays a role in the expression of the neurotensin gene (NT/N), a terminally differentiated endocrine product specifically localized in the gastrointestinal tract to the adult small bowel. We found that CaCo2-ras cells, but not parental CaCo2, express high levels of the human NT/N gene and, moreover, that this increase in gene expression is regulated at the level of transcription. Transfection experiments using NT/N-CAT mutation constructs identify the proximal 200 bp of NT/N flanking sequence as sufficient for maximal Ras-mediated NT/N reporter gene induction. Furthermore, a proximal AP-1/CRE motif is crucial for this Ras-mediated NT/N activation. Wild-type Ha-ras induces NT/N gene expression, albeit at lower levels than activated Ras; a dominant-negative Raf blocks this NT/N induction, suggesting that Raf lies down-stream of Ras in this pathway. In addition, postconfluent cultures of CaCo2 cells, which are differentiated to a small bowel phenotype, express the NT/N gene by 6 d after reaching confluency; this increase of NT/N expression is associated with concomitant increases of cellular p21ras protein. We conclude that Ras (both wild-type and activated) enhances expression of the NT/N gene in the gut-derived CaCo2 cell line, suggesting an important role for the Ras signaling pathway in NT/N gene transcription. Our results underscore the possibility that tissue-specific genes (such as NT/N) expressed in distinct subpopulations of the gut may be subject to Ras regulation. Finally, we speculate that the NT/N gene and the CaCo2 and CaCo2-ras cell systems will provide unique models to further define the cellular mechanisms leading to mammalian

  7. Decoding Target Distance and Saccade Amplitude from Population Activity in the Macaque Lateral Intraparietal Area (LIP)

    PubMed Central

    Bremmer, Frank; Kaminiarz, Andre; Klingenhoefer, Steffen; Churan, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Primates perform saccadic eye movements in order to bring the image of an interesting target onto the fovea. Compared to stationary targets, saccades toward moving targets are computationally more demanding since the oculomotor system must use speed and direction information about the target as well as knowledge about its own processing latency to program an adequate, predictive saccade vector. In monkeys, different brain regions have been implicated in the control of voluntary saccades, among them the lateral intraparietal area (LIP). Here we asked, if activity in area LIP reflects the distance between fovea and saccade target, or the amplitude of an upcoming saccade, or both. We recorded single unit activity in area LIP of two macaque monkeys. First, we determined for each neuron its preferred saccade direction. Then, monkeys performed visually guided saccades along the preferred direction toward either stationary or moving targets in pseudo-randomized order. LIP population activity allowed to decode both, the distance between fovea and saccade target as well as the size of an upcoming saccade. Previous work has shown comparable results for saccade direction (Graf and Andersen, 2014a,b). Hence, LIP population activity allows to predict any two-dimensional saccade vector. Functional equivalents of macaque area LIP have been identified in humans. Accordingly, our results provide further support for the concept of activity from area LIP as neural basis for the control of an oculomotor brain-machine interface. PMID:27630547

  8. SoNar, a Highly Responsive NAD+/NADH Sensor, Allows High-Throughput Metabolic Screening of Anti-tumor Agents.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuzheng; Hu, Qingxun; Cheng, Feixiong; Su, Ni; Wang, Aoxue; Zou, Yejun; Hu, Hanyang; Chen, Xianjun; Zhou, Hai-Meng; Huang, Xinzhi; Yang, Kai; Zhu, Qian; Wang, Xue; Yi, Jing; Zhu, Linyong; Qian, Xuhong; Chen, Lixin; Tang, Yun; Loscalzo, Joseph; Yang, Yi

    2015-05-05

    The altered metabolism of tumor cells confers a selective advantage for survival and proliferation, and studies have shown that targeting such metabolic shifts may be a useful therapeutic strategy. We developed an intensely fluorescent, rapidly responsive, pH-resistant, genetically encoded sensor of wide dynamic range, denoted SoNar, for tracking cytosolic NAD(+) and NADH redox states in living cells and in vivo. SoNar responds to subtle perturbations of various pathways of energy metabolism in real time, and allowed high-throughput screening for new agents targeting tumor metabolism. Among > 5,500 unique compounds, we identified KP372-1 as a potent NQO1-mediated redox cycling agent that produced extreme oxidative stress, selectively induced cancer cell apoptosis, and effectively decreased tumor growth in vivo. This study demonstrates that genetically encoded sensor-based metabolic screening could serve as a valuable approach for drug discovery.

  9. Target design considerations for high specific activity [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Alexoff, D.L.; Schlyer, D.J.; McDonald, K.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-12-31

    In the routine preparation of {sup 11}C-labeled compounds through N-[{sup 11}C]-methylation using [{sup 11}C]H{sub 3}I, total masses are always higher than synthesis mass contribution, suggesting that the target system contributes carrier carbon to the final product mass. This conclusion prompted this evaluation of target materials and target design for [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2} production. Ultimately, one is faced with the sprospect of compromising between [{sup 11}C]O{sub 2} specific activity and the amount that can be extracted from the target after a reasonable irradiation time.

  10. In vivo monitoring of cellular energy metabolism using SoNar, a highly responsive sensor for NAD(+)/NADH redox state.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuzheng; Wang, Aoxue; Zou, Yejun; Su, Ni; Loscalzo, Joseph; Yang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    NADH and its oxidized form NAD(+) have a central role in energy metabolism, and their concentrations are often considered to be among the most important readouts of metabolic state. Here, we present a detailed protocol to image and monitor NAD(+)/NADH redox state in living cells and in vivo using a highly responsive, genetically encoded fluorescent sensor known as SoNar (sensor of NAD(H) redox). The chimeric SoNar protein was initially developed by inserting circularly permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) into the NADH-binding domain of Rex protein from Thermus aquaticus (T-Rex). It functions by binding to either NAD(+) or NADH, thus inducing protein conformational changes that affect its fluorescent properties. We first describe steps for how to establish SoNar-expressing cells, and then discuss how to use the system to quantify the intracellular redox state. This approach is sensitive, accurate, simple and able to report subtle perturbations of various pathways of energy metabolism in real time. We also detail the application of SoNar to high-throughput chemical screening of candidate compounds targeting cell metabolism in a microplate-reader-based assay, along with in vivo fluorescence imaging of tumor xenografts expressing SoNar in mice. Typically, the approximate time frame for fluorescence imaging of SoNar is 30 min for living cells and 60 min for living mice. For high-throughput chemical screening in a 384-well-plate assay, the whole procedure generally takes no longer than 60 min to assess the effects of 380 compounds on cell metabolism.

  11. Acoustic and foraging behavior of a Baird's beaked whale, Berardius bairdii, exposed to simulated sonar.

    PubMed

    Stimpert, A K; DeRuiter, S L; Southall, B L; Moretti, D J; Falcone, E A; Goldbogen, J A; Friedlaender, A; Schorr, G S; Calambokidis, J

    2014-11-13

    Beaked whales are hypothesized to be particularly sensitive to anthropogenic noise, based on previous strandings and limited experimental and observational data. However, few species have been studied in detail. We describe the underwater behavior of a Baird's beaked whale (Berardius bairdii) from the first deployment of a multi-sensor acoustic tag on this species. The animal exhibited shallow (23 ± 15 m max depth), intermediate (324 ± 49 m), and deep (1138 ± 243 m) dives. Echolocation clicks were produced with a mean inter-click interval of approximately 300 ms and peak frequency of 25 kHz. Two deep dives included presumed foraging behavior, with echolocation pulsed sounds (presumed prey capture attempts) associated with increased maneuvering, and sustained inverted swimming during the bottom phase of the dive. A controlled exposure to simulated mid-frequency active sonar (3.5-4 kHz) was conducted 4 hours after tag deployment, and within 3 minutes of exposure onset, the tagged whale increased swim speed and body movement, and continued to show unusual dive behavior for each of its next three dives, one of each type. These are the first data on the acoustic foraging behavior in this largest beaked whale species, and the first experimental demonstration of a response to simulated sonar.

  12. Acoustic and foraging behavior of a Baird's beaked whale, Berardius bairdii, exposed to simulated sonar

    PubMed Central

    Stimpert, A. K.; DeRuiter, S. L.; Southall, B. L.; Moretti, D. J.; Falcone, E. A.; Goldbogen, J. A.; Friedlaender, A.; Schorr, G. S.; Calambokidis, J.

    2014-01-01

    Beaked whales are hypothesized to be particularly sensitive to anthropogenic noise, based on previous strandings and limited experimental and observational data. However, few species have been studied in detail. We describe the underwater behavior of a Baird's beaked whale (Berardius bairdii) from the first deployment of a multi-sensor acoustic tag on this species. The animal exhibited shallow (23 ± 15 m max depth), intermediate (324 ± 49 m), and deep (1138 ± 243 m) dives. Echolocation clicks were produced with a mean inter-click interval of approximately 300 ms and peak frequency of 25 kHz. Two deep dives included presumed foraging behavior, with echolocation pulsed sounds (presumed prey capture attempts) associated with increased maneuvering, and sustained inverted swimming during the bottom phase of the dive. A controlled exposure to simulated mid-frequency active sonar (3.5–4 kHz) was conducted 4 hours after tag deployment, and within 3 minutes of exposure onset, the tagged whale increased swim speed and body movement, and continued to show unusual dive behavior for each of its next three dives, one of each type. These are the first data on the acoustic foraging behavior in this largest beaked whale species, and the first experimental demonstration of a response to simulated sonar. PMID:25391309

  13. Synthesis of a novel, sequentially active-targeted drug delivery nanoplatform for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Satsangi, Arpan; Roy, Sudipa S; Satsangi, Rajiv K; Tolcher, Anthony W; Vadlamudi, Ratna K; Goins, Beth; Ong, Joo L

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among women. Paclitaxel (PTX), an important breast cancer medicine, exhibits reduced bioavailability and therapeutic index due to high hydrophobicity and indiscriminate cytotoxicity. PTX encapsulation in one-level active targeting overcomes such barriers, but enhances toxicity to normal tissues with cancer-similar expression profiles. This research attempted to overcome this challenge by increasing selectivity of cancer cell targeting while maintaining an ability to overcome traditional pharmacological barriers. Thus, a multi-core, multi-targeting construct for tumor specific delivery of PTX was fabricated with (i) an inner-core prodrug targeting the cancer-overexpressed cathepsin B through a cathepsin B-cleavable tetrapeptide that conjugates PTX to a poly(amidoamine) dendrimer, and (ii) the encapsulation of this prodrug (PGD) in an outer core of a RES-evading, folate receptor (FR)-targeting liposome. Compared to traditional FR-targeting PTX liposomes, this sequentially active-targeted dendrosome demonstrated better prodrug retention, an increased cytotoxicity to cancer cells (latter being true when FR and cathepsin B activities were both at moderate-to-high levels) and higher tumor reduction. This research may eventually evolve a product platform with reduced systemic toxicity inherent with traditional chemotherapy and localized toxicity inherent to single-target nanoplatforms, thereby allowing for better tolerance of higher therapeutic load in advanced disease states.

  14. Targeting physical activity interventions for adults: When should intervention occur?

    PubMed

    Holliday, Katelyn M; Lin, Dan Yu; Chakladar, Sujatro; Castañeda, Sheila F; Daviglus, Martha L; Evenson, Kelly R; Marquez, David X; Qi, Qibin; Shay, Christina M; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Vidot, Denise C; Zeng, Donglin; Avery, Christy L

    2016-12-23

    Understanding demographic differences in transitions across physical activity (PA) levels is important for informing PA-promoting interventions, yet few studies have examined these transitions in contemporary multi-ethnic adult populations. We estimated age-, race/ethnicity-, and sex-specific 1-year net transition probabilities (NTPs) for National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2012, n=11,556) and Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (2008-2011, n=15,585) adult participants using novel Markov-type state transition models developed for cross-sectional data. Among populations with ideal PA (≥150min/week; ranging from 56% (non-Hispanic black females) to 88% (non-Hispanic white males) at age 20), NTPs to intermediate PA (>0-<149min/week) generally increased with age, particularly for non-Hispanic black females for whom a net 0.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.0, 0.2) transitioned from ideal to intermediate PA at age 20; by age 70, the NTP rose to 3.6% (95% CI: 2.3, 4.8). Heterogeneity in intermediate to poor (0min/week) PA NTPs also was observed, with NTPs peaking at age 20 for Hispanic/Latino males and females [age 20 NTP=3.7% (95% CI: 2.0, 5.5) for females and 5.0% (1.2, 8.7) for males], but increasing throughout adulthood for non-Hispanic blacks and whites [e.g. age 70 NTP=7.8% (95% CI: 6.1, 9.6%) for black females and 8.1% (4.7, 11.6) for black males]. Demographic differences in PA net transitions across adulthood justify further development of tailored interventions. However, innovative efforts may be required for populations in which large proportions have already transitioned from ideal PA by early adulthood.

  15. Design and Analysis of Hammerhead Ribozyme Activity Against an Artificial Gene Target

    PubMed Central

    Carter, James; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Balaraman, Velmurugan; Fraser, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro cleavage assays are routinely conducted to properly assess the catalytic activity of hammerhead ribozymes (HHR) against target RNA molecules like the dengue virus RNA genomes. These experiments are performed for initial assessment of HHR catalysis in a cell-free system and have been simplified by the substitution of agarose gel electrophoresis for SDS-PAGE. Substituting mobility assays enables the analysis of ribozymes in a more rapid fashion without radioisotopes. Here we describe the in vitro transcription of an HHR and corresponding target from T7-promoted plasmids into RNA molecules leading to the analysis of HHR activity against the RNA target by in vitro cleavage assays. PMID:24318886

  16. 50 CFR 218.120 - Specified activity and geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... paragraph (b) of this section and that occur incidental to the activities described in paragraph (c) of this.... long.; 57°16′ N. lat., 151°00′ W. long.; and 55°30′ N. lat., 142°00′ W. long. (c) The taking of marine... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high-frequency active sonar (HFAS)...

  17. 50 CFR 218.120 - Specified activity and geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... paragraph (b) of this section and that occur incidental to the activities described in paragraph (c) of this.... long.; 57°16′ N. lat., 151°00′ W. long.; and 55°30′ N. lat., 142°00′ W. long. (c) The taking of marine... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high-frequency active sonar (HFAS)...

  18. Evaluation of active and passive polarimetric electro-optic imagery for civilian and military targets discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, Daniel A.; Breton, Mélanie; Pichette, Mario; Larochelle, Vincent; Simard, Jean-Robert

    2008-04-01

    Electro-optic (EO) imaging systems are commonly used to detect civilian and military targets during surveillance operations and search and rescue missions. Adding the polarization of light as additional information to such active and passive EO imaging systems may increase the target discrimination performance, as man made objects are known to depolarized light in different manner than natural background. However, while the polarization of light has been used and studied in the past for numerous applications, the understanding of the polarization phenomenology taking place with targets used in cluttered backgrounds requires additional experimentations. Specifically, the target contrast enhancement obtained by analyzing the polarization of the reflected light from either a direct polarized laser source as encountered in active imagers, or from natural ambient illumination, needs further investigation. This paper describes an investigation of the use of polarization-based imaging sensors to discriminate civilian and military targets against different backgrounds. Measurements were carried out using two custom-designed active and passive imaging systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) and the long-wave infrared (LWIR) spectral bands. Polarimetric signatures were acquired during two distinct trials that occurred in 2007, using specific civilian and military targets such as cars and military vehicles. Results demonstrate to what extent and under which illumination and environmental conditions the exploitation of active and passive polarimetric images is suitable to enable target detection and recognition for some events of interest, according to various specific scenarios.

  19. Targeted Proteomics Approaches To Monitor Microbial Activity In Basalt Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paszczynski, A. J.; Paidisetti, R.

    2007-12-01

    Microorganisms play a major role in biogeochemical cycles of the Earth. Information regarding microbial community composition can be very useful for environmental monitoring since the short generation times of microorganisms allows them to respond rapidly to changing environmental conditions. Microbial mediated attenuation of toxic chemicals offers great potential for the restoration of contaminated environments in an ecologically acceptable manner. Current knowledge regarding the structure and functional activities of microbial communities is limited, but more information is being acquired every day through many genomic- and proteomic- based methods. As of today, only a small fraction of the Earth's microorganisms has been cultured, and so most of the information regarding the biodegradation and therapeutic potentials of these uncultured microorganisms remains unknown. Sequence analysis of DNA and/or RNA has been used for identifying specific microorganisms, to study the community composition, and to monitor gene expression providing limited information about metabolic state of given microbial system. Proteomic studies can reveal information regarding the real-time metabolic state of the microbial communities thereby aiding in understanding their interaction with the environment. In research described here the involvement of microbial communities in the degradation of anthropogenic contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE) was studied using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. The co- metabolic degradation of TCE in the groundwater of the Snake River Plain Aquifer at the Test Area North (TAN) site of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was monitored by the characterization of peptide sequences of enzymes such as methane monooxygenases (MMOs). MMOs, expressed by methanotrophic bacteria are involved in the oxidation of methane and non-specific co-metabolic oxidation of TCE. We developed a time- course cell lysis method to release proteins from complex microbial

  20. Synthetic Aperture Sonar Low Frequency vs. High Frequency Automatic Contact Generation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    resurveyed the harbor with both sidescan sonar (on REMUS) and SAS (on the SSAM AUV) provided by NAVSEA Costal Systems Command. NOMWC, NAVOCEANO and...Synthetic Aperture Sonar Low Frequency vs. High Frequency Automatic Contact Generation J. R. Dubberley and M. L. Gendron Naval Research...Laboratory Code 7440.1 Building 1005 Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 USA Abstract- Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS) bottom mapping sensors are on the

  1. Frequency Domain Beamformer for a 3-D Sediment Volume Imaging Synthetic Aperture Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Frequency Domain Beamformer for a 3-D Sediment Volume Imaging Synthetic Aperture Sonar Jonathan R. Pearson Magoon,a Matthew A. Nelson,a Daniel D...synthetic aperture sonars (SAS). The beamformer, designed for systems with receiver arrays oriented transverse to the vehicle, performs standard delay and...volume imaging synthetic aperture sonars (SAS). The beamformer is designed for systems with receiver arrays oriented transverse to the vehicle such

  2. Technology Infusion of CodeSonar into the Space Network Ground Segment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Markland J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the applicability of CodeSonar to the Space Network software. CodeSonar is a commercial off the shelf system that analyzes programs written in C, C++ or Ada for defects in the code. Software engineers use CodeSonar results as an input to the existing source code inspection process. The study is focused on large scale software developed using formal processes. The systems studied are mission critical in nature but some use commodity computer systems.

  3. Bedform Parameterization and Object Detection from Sonar Data- Application of Finger Print Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    areas with dynamic ripple bedforms and manmade structures. Our approach is to gather (1) the optical and acoustic backscatter properties of surface...sediment layers from an autonomous underwater platform and from surface vessel multibeam echosounder sonar, (2) the small scale (sub-meter) bathymetry...outputs from the finger print code (Figure 1) for use in a variety of sonar image formats (i.e. side-scan mosaic, rotary sonar images, multibeam

  4. Using targeted messaging to increase physical activity in older adults: a review.

    PubMed

    Ostrander, Rachel E; Thompson, Hilaire J; Demiris, George

    2014-09-01

    Physical activity has many benefits for older adults; however, motivating older adults to engage in and maintain optimal levels of physical activity can be challenging for health care providers. A comprehensive literature review was performed to determine whether any evidence-based methods of delivery or particular content for targeted messaging exist that result in actual improvements in physical activity of older adults. Findings of the review demonstrate that messaging directed toward older adults to be physically active resulted in improvements in physical activity up to 1 year. Across studies many different modes of message delivery were shown to be effective. Message content, whether tailored or not, resulted in significant increases in physical activity. There is evidence to support the use of environmentally mediated messaging (i.e., local walking paths) for stronger results. Targeting the client's stage of change, having an activity partner if preferred, and scheduling physical activity also contribute to improved effects.

  5. Separate evaluation of target facilitation and distractor suppression in the activity of macaque lateral intraparietal neurons during visual search.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Satoshi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Ogawa, Tadashi

    2013-12-01

    During visual search, neurons in the lateral intraparietal area (LIP) discriminate the target from distractors by exhibiting stronger activation when the target appears within the receptive field than when it appears outside the receptive field. It is generally thought that such target-discriminative activity is produced by the combination of target-related facilitation and distractor-related suppression. However, little is known about how the target-discriminative activity is constituted by these two types of neural modulation. To address this issue, we recorded activity from LIP of monkeys performing a visual search task that consisted of target-present and target-absent trials. Monkeys had to make a saccade to a target in the target-present trials, whereas they had to maintain fixation in the target-absent trials, in which only distractors were presented. By introducing the activity from the latter trials as neutral activity, we were able to separate the target-discriminative activity into target-related elevation and distractor-related reduction components. We found that the target-discriminative activity of most LIP neurons consisted of the combination of target-related elevation and distractor-related reduction or only target-related elevation. In contrast, target-discriminative activity composed of only distractor-related reduction was observed for very few neurons. We also found that, on average, target-related elevation was stronger and occurred earlier compared with distractor-related reduction. Finally, we consider possible underlying mechanisms, including lateral inhibitory interactions, responsible for target-discriminative activity in visual search. The present findings provide insight into how neuronal modulations shape target-discriminative activity during visual search.

  6. Assessment of Marine Mammal Impact Zones for Use of Military Sonar in the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Mathias H; Johansson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Military sonars are known to have caused cetaceans to strand. Navies in shallow seas use different frequencies and sonar pulses, commonly frequencies between 25 and 100 kHz, compared with most studied NATO sonar systems that have been evaluated for their environmental impact. These frequencies match the frequencies of best hearing in the harbor porpoises and seals resident in the Baltic Sea. This study uses published temporary and permanent threshold shifts, measured behavioral response thresholds, technical specifications of a sonar system, and environmental parameters affecting sound propagation common for the Baltic Sea to estimate the impact zones for harbor porpoises and seals.

  7. Algorithms for the Fusion of Two Sets of (Sonar) Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    dB ifDT= 10. ONGERUBRICEERD ONGERUBRICEERD I TNO reportI TNO-DV 2006 A518 33/51 S........ .... -@"Z sonar 2 -> sonar 1so rI- 0.9 ... theory 0.8. 0.7...pings. ONGERUBRICEERD ONGERUBRICEERD I TNO reportI TNO-DV 2006 A518 37/51 •+• -0- Fade. - false SFire.- true 0.16 -=- True-fiji.-0= Tiuesi- trus -0...assumed SNRs. ONGERUBRICEERD ONGERUBRICEERD I TNO reportI TNO-DV 2006 A518 47/51 1 t m 1 0.0 -.-.- 4 1 o,::---::: ::.: :---’ • -’"o0

  8. Drug target identification using network analysis: Taking active components in Sini decoction as an example.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Jiang, Hailong; Cao, Yan; Wang, Yun; Hu, Ziheng; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng

    2016-04-20

    Identifying the molecular targets for the beneficial effects of active small-molecule compounds simultaneously is an important and currently unmet challenge. In this study, we firstly proposed network analysis by integrating data from network pharmacology and metabolomics to identify targets of active components in sini decoction (SND) simultaneously against heart failure. To begin with, 48 potential active components in SND against heart failure were predicted by serum pharmacochemistry, text mining and similarity match. Then, we employed network pharmacology including text mining and molecular docking to identify the potential targets of these components. The key enriched processes, pathways and related diseases of these target proteins were analyzed by STRING database. At last, network analysis was conducted to identify most possible targets of components in SND. Among the 25 targets predicted by network analysis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was firstly experimentally validated in molecular and cellular level. Results indicated that hypaconitine, mesaconitine, higenamine and quercetin in SND can directly bind to TNF-α, reduce the TNF-α-mediated cytotoxicity on L929 cells and exert anti-myocardial cell apoptosis effects. We envisage that network analysis will also be useful in target identification of a bioactive compound.

  9. Drug target identification using network analysis: Taking active components in Sini decoction as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Si; Jiang, Hailong; Cao, Yan; Wang, Yun; Hu, Ziheng; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the molecular targets for the beneficial effects of active small-molecule compounds simultaneously is an important and currently unmet challenge. In this study, we firstly proposed network analysis by integrating data from network pharmacology and metabolomics to identify targets of active components in sini decoction (SND) simultaneously against heart failure. To begin with, 48 potential active components in SND against heart failure were predicted by serum pharmacochemistry, text mining and similarity match. Then, we employed network pharmacology including text mining and molecular docking to identify the potential targets of these components. The key enriched processes, pathways and related diseases of these target proteins were analyzed by STRING database. At last, network analysis was conducted to identify most possible targets of components in SND. Among the 25 targets predicted by network analysis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was firstly experimentally validated in molecular and cellular level. Results indicated that hypaconitine, mesaconitine, higenamine and quercetin in SND can directly bind to TNF-α, reduce the TNF-α-mediated cytotoxicity on L929 cells and exert anti-myocardial cell apoptosis effects. We envisage that network analysis will also be useful in target identification of a bioactive compound.

  10. Drug target identification using network analysis: Taking active components in Sini decoction as an example

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Si; Jiang, Hailong; Cao, Yan; Wang, Yun; Hu, Ziheng; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the molecular targets for the beneficial effects of active small-molecule compounds simultaneously is an important and currently unmet challenge. In this study, we firstly proposed network analysis by integrating data from network pharmacology and metabolomics to identify targets of active components in sini decoction (SND) simultaneously against heart failure. To begin with, 48 potential active components in SND against heart failure were predicted by serum pharmacochemistry, text mining and similarity match. Then, we employed network pharmacology including text mining and molecular docking to identify the potential targets of these components. The key enriched processes, pathways and related diseases of these target proteins were analyzed by STRING database. At last, network analysis was conducted to identify most possible targets of components in SND. Among the 25 targets predicted by network analysis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was firstly experimentally validated in molecular and cellular level. Results indicated that hypaconitine, mesaconitine, higenamine and quercetin in SND can directly bind to TNF-α, reduce the TNF-α-mediated cytotoxicity on L929 cells and exert anti-myocardial cell apoptosis effects. We envisage that network analysis will also be useful in target identification of a bioactive compound. PMID:27095146

  11. Human gaze stabilization during natural activities: translation, rotation, magnification, and target distance effects.

    PubMed

    Crane, B T; Demer, J L

    1997-10-01

    Stability of images on the retina was determined in 14 normal humans in response to rotational and translational perturbations during self-generated pitch and yaw, standing, walking, and running on a treadmill. The effects on image stability of target distance, vision, and spectacle magnification were examined. During locomotion the horizontal and vertical velocity of images on the retina was <4 degrees /s for a visible target located beyond 4 m. Image velocity significantly increased to >4 degrees /s during self-generated motion. For all conditions of standing and locomotion, angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) gain was less than unity and varied significantly by activity, by target distance, and among subjects. There was no significant correlation(P > 0.05) between AVOR gain and image stability during standing and walking despite significant variation among subjects. This lack of correlation is likely due to translation of the orbit. The degree of orbital translation and rotation varied significantly with activity and viewing condition in a manner suggesting an active role in gaze stabilization. Orbital translation was consistently antiphase with rotation at predominant frequencies <4 Hz. When orbital translation was neglected in computing gaze, computed image velocities increased. The compensatory effect of orbital translation allows gaze stabilization despite subunity AVOR gain during natural activities. Orbital translation decreased during close target viewing, whereas orbital rotation decreased while wearing telescopic spectacles. As the earth fixed target was moved closer, image velocity on the retina significantly increased (P < 0.05) for all activities except standing. Latency of the AVOR increased slightly with decreasing target distance but remained <10 ms for even the closest target. This latency was similar in darkness or light, indicating that the visual pursuit tracking is probably not important in gaze stabilization. Trials with a distant target

  12. Novel sonar signal processing tool using Shannon entropy

    SciTech Connect

    Quazi, A.H.

    1996-06-01

    Traditionally, conventional signal processing extracts information from sonar signals using amplitude, signal energy or frequency domain quantities obtained using spectral analysis techniques. The object is to investigate an alternate approach which is entirely different than that of traditional signal processing. This alternate approach is to utilize the Shannon entropy as a tool for the processing of sonar signals with emphasis on detection, classification, and localization leading to superior sonar system performance. Traditionally, sonar signals are processed coherently, semi-coherently, and incoherently, depending upon the a priori knowledge of the signals and noise. Here, the detection, classification, and localization technique will be based on the concept of the entropy of the random process. Under a constant energy constraint, the entropy of a received process bearing finite number of sample points is maximum when hypothesis H{sub 0} (that the received process consists of noise alone) is true and decreases when correlated signal is present (H{sub 1}). Therefore, the strategy used for detection is: (I) Calculate the entropy of the received data; then, (II) compare the entropy with the maximum value; and, finally, (III) make decision: H{sub 1} is assumed if the difference is large compared to pre-assigned threshold and H{sub 0} is otherwise assumed. The test statistics will be different between entropies under H{sub 0} and H{sub 1}. Here, we shall show the simulated results for detecting stationary and non-stationary signals in noise, and results on detection of defects in a Plexiglas bar using an ultrasonic experiment conducted by Hughes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Beaked Whales Respond to Simulated and Actual Navy Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-14

    fundamental frequency of MFA sonars, and it is possible that these harmonics may be involved in the response. Another hypothesis for why these tonal ... tonal components in the 3– 4 kHz band, a pseudorandom noise signal (PRN) with overall bandwidth and timing similar to MFA, and killer whale (ORCA...sufficient signal to noise ratio to use as stimuli. Harbor seals react to the calls of strange killer whales as a predator [33], and this is typical

  14. Function Analysis of AN/SQS-510 Hull Mounted Sonar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    Which Support Behavioural Function The hardware dependency of a function will be considered in general this is the AN SQS 510 system Superordinate...Identifying mission types • Using the preliminary function list to identify all major system functions • Organising the functions into a relationship...Humansystems Incorporated® AN SQSSlO Sonar: Function Analysis Page9 P517348.PDF [Page: 20 of 91] 4. Results The results are organised as follows

  15. Wideband Sonar Arrays for UUV and Weapon System Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    transducers find many applications in underwater vehicles. Two methods can be used to design wideband acoustic transducers . The multiply resonant transducer ...differences, and none has investigated the possible additional benefits of combining the two methods in a single transducer element for greater benefit than is...Medeiros CO-PI Information: None Abstract Wideband sonar transducers find many applications in underwater vehicles. Two methods can be used to

  16. 78 FR 70537 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Target and Missile Launch Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... U.S. Navy (Navy), Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD) for authorization to take... conducted for testing new types of targets. Missiles vary from tactical and developmental weapons to target missiles used to test defensive strategies and other weapons systems. Up to 200 missiles may be...

  17. 27 CFR 478.35 - Skeet, trap, target, and similar shooting activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Skeet, trap, target, and similar shooting activities. 478.35 Section 478.35 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF... similar shooting activities. Licensing and recordkeeping requirements, including permissible...

  18. 27 CFR 478.35 - Skeet, trap, target, and similar shooting activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Skeet, trap, target, and similar shooting activities. 478.35 Section 478.35 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF... similar shooting activities. Licensing and recordkeeping requirements, including permissible...

  19. 27 CFR 478.35 - Skeet, trap, target, and similar shooting activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Skeet, trap, target, and similar shooting activities. 478.35 Section 478.35 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF... similar shooting activities. Licensing and recordkeeping requirements, including permissible...

  20. 27 CFR 478.35 - Skeet, trap, target, and similar shooting activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Skeet, trap, target, and similar shooting activities. 478.35 Section 478.35 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF... similar shooting activities. Licensing and recordkeeping requirements, including permissible...

  1. 27 CFR 478.35 - Skeet, trap, target, and similar shooting activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Skeet, trap, target, and similar shooting activities. 478.35 Section 478.35 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF... similar shooting activities. Licensing and recordkeeping requirements, including permissible...

  2. Aptamer-mediated universal enzyme assay based on target-triggered DNA polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Soo; Lee, Chang Yeol; Kang, Kyoung Suk; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2017-02-15

    We herein describe an innovative method for a universal fluorescence turn-on enzyme assay, which relies on the target enzyme-triggered DNA polymerase activity. In the first target recognition step, the target enzyme is designed to destabilize detection probe derived from an aptamer specific to DNA polymerase containing the overhang sequence and the complementary blocker DNA, which consequently leads to the recovery of DNA polymerase activity inhibited by the detection probe. This target-triggered polymerase activity is monitored in the second signal transduction step based on primer extension reaction coupled with TaqMan probe. Utilizing this design principle, we have successfully detected the activities of two model enzymes, exonuclease I and uracil DNA glycosylase with high sensitivity and selectivity. Since this strategy is composed of separated target recognition and signal transduction modules, it could be universally employed for the sensitive determination of numerous different target enzymes by simply redesigning the overhang sequence of detection probe, while keeping TaqMan probe-based signal transduction module as a universal signaling tool.

  3. Pitchfork and Gprasp2 Target Smoothened to the Primary Cilium for Hedgehog Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bomi; Padula, Daniela; Burtscher, Ingo; Landerer, Cedric; Lutter, Dominik; Theis, Fabian; Messias, Ana C.; Geerlof, Arie; Sattler, Michael; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Boldt, Karsten; Ueffing, Marius; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The seven-transmembrane receptor Smoothened (Smo) activates all Hedgehog (Hh) signaling by translocation into the primary cilia (PC), but how this is regulated is not well understood. Here we show that Pitchfork (Pifo) and the G protein-coupled receptor associated sorting protein 2 (Gprasp2) are essential components of an Hh induced ciliary targeting complex able to regulate Smo translocation to the PC. Depletion of Pifo or Gprasp2 leads to failure of Smo translocation to the PC and lack of Hh target gene activation. Together, our results identify a novel protein complex that is regulated by Hh signaling and required for Smo ciliary trafficking and Hh pathway activation. PMID:26901434

  4. Optimized passive sonar placement to allow improved interdiction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bruce A.; Matthews, Cameron

    2016-05-01

    footprint. The resulting coverage optimizes the likelihood of encounter given an arbitrary sensor profile and threat from a free field statistical model approach. The free field statistical model is particularly applicable to worst case scenario modeling in open ocean operational profiles where targets to do not follow a particular pattern in any of the modeled dimensions. We present an algorithmic testbed which shows how to achieve approximately optimal solutions to the AGP for a network of underwater sensor nodes with or without effector systems for engagement while operating under changing environmental circumstances. The means by which we accomplish this goal are three-fold: 1) Develop a 3D model for the sonar signal propagating through the underwater environment 2) Add rigorous physics-based modeling of environmental events which can affect sensor information acquisition 3) Provide innovative solutions to the AGP which account for the environmental circumstances affecting sensor performance.

  5. Qualitative and quantitative processing of side-scan sonar data

    SciTech Connect

    Dwan, F.S.; Anderson, A.L.; Hilde, T.W.C. )

    1990-06-01

    Modern side-scan sonar systems allow vast areas of seafloor to be rapidly imaged and quantitatively mapped in detail. The application of remote sensing image processing techniques can be used to correct for various distortions inherent in raw sonography. Corrections are possible for water column, slant-range, aspect ratio, speckle and striping noise, multiple returns, power drop-off, and for georeferencing. The final products reveal seafloor features and patterns that are geometrically correct, georeferenced, and have improved signal/noise ratio. These products can be merged with other georeferenced data bases for further database management and information extraction. In order to compare data collected by different systems from a common area and to ground truth measurements and geoacoustic models, quantitative correction must be made for calibrated sonar system and bathymetry effects. Such data inversion must account for system source level, beam pattern, time-varying gain, processing gain, transmission loss, absorption, insonified area, and grazing angle effects. Seafloor classification can then be performed on the calculated back-scattering strength using Lambert's Law and regression analysis. Examples are given using both approaches: image analysis and inversion of data based on the sonar equation.

  6. Estimation and simulation of multi-beam sonar noise.

    PubMed

    Holmin, Arne Johannes; Korneliussen, Rolf J; Tjøstheim, Dag

    2016-02-01

    Methods for the estimation and modeling of noise present in multi-beam sonar data, including the magnitude, probability distribution, and spatial correlation of the noise, are developed. The methods consider individual acoustic samples and facilitate compensation of highly localized noise as well as subtraction of noise estimates averaged over time. The modeled noise is included in an existing multi-beam sonar simulation model [Holmin, Handegard, Korneliussen, and Tjøstheim, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 132, 3720-3734 (2012)], resulting in an improved model that can be used to strengthen interpretation of data collected in situ at any signal to noise ratio. Two experiments, from the former study in which multi-beam sonar data of herring schools were simulated, are repeated with inclusion of noise. These experiments demonstrate (1) the potentially large effect of changes in fish orientation on the backscatter from a school, and (2) the estimation of behavioral characteristics such as the polarization and packing density of fish schools. The latter is achieved by comparing real data with simulated data for different polarizations and packing densities.

  7. Blue whales respond to simulated mid-frequency military sonar.

    PubMed

    Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Southall, Brandon L; DeRuiter, Stacy L; Calambokidis, John; Friedlaender, Ari S; Hazen, Elliott L; Falcone, Erin A; Schorr, Gregory S; Douglas, Annie; Moretti, David J; Kyburg, Chris; McKenna, Megan F; Tyack, Peter L

    2013-08-22

    Mid-frequency military (1-10 kHz) sonars have been associated with lethal mass strandings of deep-diving toothed whales, but the effects on endangered baleen whale species are virtually unknown. Here, we used controlled exposure experiments with simulated military sonar and other mid-frequency sounds to measure behavioural responses of tagged blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) in feeding areas within the Southern California Bight. Despite using source levels orders of magnitude below some operational military systems, our results demonstrate that mid-frequency sound can significantly affect blue whale behaviour, especially during deep feeding modes. When a response occurred, behavioural changes varied widely from cessation of deep feeding to increased swimming speed and directed travel away from the sound source. The variability of these behavioural responses was largely influenced by a complex interaction of behavioural state, the type of mid-frequency sound and received sound level. Sonar-induced disruption of feeding and displacement from high-quality prey patches could have significant and previously undocumented impacts on baleen whale foraging ecology, individual fitness and population health.

  8. Blue whales respond to simulated mid-frequency military sonar

    PubMed Central

    Goldbogen, Jeremy A.; Southall, Brandon L.; DeRuiter, Stacy L.; Calambokidis, John; Friedlaender, Ari S.; Hazen, Elliott L.; Falcone, Erin A.; Schorr, Gregory S.; Douglas, Annie; Moretti, David J.; Kyburg, Chris; McKenna, Megan F.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    Mid-frequency military (1–10 kHz) sonars have been associated with lethal mass strandings of deep-diving toothed whales, but the effects on endangered baleen whale species are virtually unknown. Here, we used controlled exposure experiments with simulated military sonar and other mid-frequency sounds to measure behavioural responses of tagged blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) in feeding areas within the Southern California Bight. Despite using source levels orders of magnitude below some operational military systems, our results demonstrate that mid-frequency sound can significantly affect blue whale behaviour, especially during deep feeding modes. When a response occurred, behavioural changes varied widely from cessation of deep feeding to increased swimming speed and directed travel away from the sound source. The variability of these behavioural responses was largely influenced by a complex interaction of behavioural state, the type of mid-frequency sound and received sound level. Sonar-induced disruption of feeding and displacement from high-quality prey patches could have significant and previously undocumented impacts on baleen whale foraging ecology, individual fitness and population health. PMID:23825206

  9. Application of acoustic reflection tomography to sonar imaging.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Brian G; Wyber, Ron J

    2005-05-01

    Computer-aided tomography is a technique for providing a two-dimensional cross-sectional view of a three-dimensional object through the digital processing of many one-dimensional views (or projections) taken at different look directions. In acoustic reflection tomography, insonifying the object and then recording the backscattered signal provides the projection information for a given look direction (or aspect angle). Processing the projection information for all possible aspect angles enables an image to be reconstructed that represents the two-dimensional spatial distribution of the object's acoustic reflectivity function when projected on the imaging plane. The shape of an idealized object, which is an elliptical cylinder, is reconstructed by applying standard backprojection, Radon transform inversion (using both convolution and filtered backprojections), and direct Fourier inversion to simulated projection data. The relative merits of the various reconstruction algorithms are assessed and the resulting shape estimates compared. For bandpass sonar data, however, the wave number components of the acoustic reflectivity function that are outside the passband are absent. This leads to the consideration of image reconstruction for bandpass data. Tomographic image reconstruction is applied to real data collected with an ultra-wideband sonar transducer to form high-resolution acoustic images of various underwater objects when the sonar and object are widely separated.

  10. Quantitative control of active targeting of nanocarriers to tumor cells through optimization of folate ligand density.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhaomin; Li, Dan; Sun, Huili; Guo, Xing; Chen, Yuping; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-09-01

    The active targeting delivery system has been widely studied in cancer therapy by utilizing folate (FA) ligands to generate specific interaction between nanocarriers and folate receptors (FRs) on tumor cell. However, there is little work that has been published to investigate the influence of the definite density of the FA ligands on the active targeting of nanocarriers. In this study, we have combined magnetic-guided iron oxide nanoparticles with FA ligands, adjusted the FA ligand density and then studied the resulting effects on the active targeting ability of this dual-targeting drug delivery system to tumor cells. We have also optimized the FA ligand density of the drug delivery system for their active targeting to FR-overexpressing tumor cells in vitro. Prussian blue staining, semi-thin section of cells observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) have shown that the optimal FA density is from 2.3 × 10(18) to 2.5 × 10(18) per gram nanoparticles ((g·NPs)(-1)). We have further tried to qualitatively and quantitatively control the active targeting and delivering of drugs to tumors on 4T1-bearing BALB/c mice. As expected, the in vivo experimental results have also demonstrated that the FA density of the magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) could be optimized for a more easily binding to tumor cells via the multivalent linkages and more readily internalization through the FR-mediated endocytosis. Our study can provide a strategy to quantitatively control the active targeting of nanocarriers to tumor cells for cancer therapy.

  11. Measuring and Reducing Off-Target Activities of Programmable Nucleases Including CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Koo, Taeyoung; Lee, Jungjoon; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2015-06-01

    Programmable nucleases, which include zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and RNA-guided engineered nucleases (RGENs) repurposed from the type II clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system are now widely used for genome editing in higher eukaryotic cells and whole organisms, revolutionising almost every discipline in biological research, medicine, and biotechnology. All of these nucleases, however, induce off-target mutations at sites homologous in sequence with on-target sites, limiting their utility in many applications including gene or cell therapy. In this review, we compare methods for detecting nuclease off-target mutations. We also review methods for profiling genome-wide off-target effects and discuss how to reduce or avoid off-target mutations.

  12. Passive targeting and lung tolerability of enoxaparin microspheres for a sustained antithrombotic activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Shaimaa S; Osman, Rihab; Mortada, Nahed D; Geneidy, Ahmed-Shawky; Awad, Gehanne A S

    2017-11-01

    Pulmonary bed can retain microparticles (MP) larger than their capillaries' diameter, hence we offer a promising way for lung passive targeting following intravenous (IV) administration. In this study, enoxaparin (Enox)-albumin microspheres (Enox-Alb MS) were, optimally, developed as lung targeted sustained release MP for IV use. Lung tolerability and targeting efficiency of Enox-Alb MS were tested, and the pharmacokinetic profile following IV administration to albino rats was constructed. In vivo studies confirmed high lung targeting efficiency of Enox-Alb MS with lack of potential tissue toxicity. The anticoagulant activity of the selected Alb MS was significantly sustained for up to 38 h compared to 5 h for the market product. Alb MS are promising delivery carriers for controlled and targeted delivery of Enox to the lungs for prophylaxis and treatment of pulmonary embolism.

  13. Pharmacological Targeting of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Opportunities for Computer-Aided Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Miglianico, Marie; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Neumann, Dietbert

    2016-04-14

    As a central regulator of metabolism, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an established therapeutic target for metabolic diseases. Beyond the metabolic area, the number of medical fields that involve AMPK grows continuously, expanding the potential applications for AMPK modulators. Even though indirect AMPK activators are used in the clinics for their beneficial metabolic outcome, the few described direct agonists all failed to reach the market to date, which leaves options open for novel targeting methods. As AMPK is not actually a single molecule and has different roles depending on its isoform composition, the opportunity for isoform-specific targeting has notably come forward, but the currently available modulators fall short of expectations. In this review, we argue that with the amount of available structural and ligand data, computer-based drug design offers a number of opportunities to undertake novel and isoform-specific targeting of AMPK.

  14. MET/HGF pathway activation as a paradigm of resistance to targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Ko, Brian; He, Tianfang; Gadgeel, Shirish; Halmos, Balazs

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to targeted therapeutics is a key issue limiting the long-term utility of these medications in the management of molecularly selected subsets of cancer patients, including patients with non-small cell lung cancer harboring oncogenic alterations affecting EGFR, ALK and other genes. Bypass resistance mediated by activation of MET kinase has emerged as a frequent, validated and pivotal resistance mechanism in multiple types of cancers. Biochemical understanding is accumulating to explain the unique role of MET in such bypass pathways, providing alternate downstream activation opportunities and intricate interactions during epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Multiple diagnostic testing platforms have become available for selecting appropriate patients for MET targeting in a variety of settings. Importantly, in light of the failures of several earlier clinical studies of MET targeting agents, a large array of recent and current MET-focused trials are incorporating stricter patient selection and more robust predictive biomarkers providing hope for validation of MET targeting as a clinically impactful strategy.

  15. Feel the heat: activation, orientation and feeding responses of bed bugs to targets at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Zachary C; Mick, Russell; Schal, Coby

    2016-12-01

    Host location in bed bugs is poorly understood. Of the primary host-associated cues known to attract bed bugs - CO2, odors, heat - heat has received little attention as an independent stimulus. We evaluated the effects of target temperatures ranging from 23 to 48°C on bed bug activation, orientation and feeding. Activation and orientation responses were assessed using a heated target in a circular arena. All targets heated above ambient temperature activated bed bugs (initiated movement) and elicited oriented movement toward the target, with higher temperatures generally resulting in faster activation and orientation. The distance over which bed bugs could orient toward a heat source was measured using a 2-choice T-maze assay. Positive thermotaxis was limited to distances <3 cm. Bed bug feeding responses on an artificial feeding system increased with feeder temperature up to 38 and 43°C, and declined precipitously at 48°C. In addition, bed bugs responded to the relative difference between ambient and feeder temperatures. These results highlight the wide range of temperatures that elicit activation, orientation and feeding responses in bed bugs. In contrast, the ability of bed bugs to correctly orient towards a heated target, independently of other cues, is limited to very short distances (<3 cm). Finally, bed bug feeding is shown to be relative to ambient temperature, not an absolute response to feeder blood temperature.

  16. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein–protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  17. Targeted HIV-1 Latency Reversal Using CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Transcriptional Activator Systems.

    PubMed

    Bialek, Julia K; Dunay, Gábor A; Voges, Maike; Schäfer, Carola; Spohn, Michael; Stucka, Rolf; Hauber, Joachim; Lange, Ulrike C

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently considered the most advanced tool for targeted genome engineering. Its sequence-dependent specificity has been explored for locus-directed transcriptional modulation. Such modulation, in particular transcriptional activation, has been proposed as key approach to overcome silencing of dormant HIV provirus in latently infected cellular reservoirs. Currently available agents for provirus activation, so-called latency reversing agents (LRAs), act indirectly through cellular pathways to induce viral transcription. However, their clinical performance remains suboptimal, possibly because reservoirs have diverse cellular identities and/or proviral DNA is intractable to the induced pathways. We have explored two CRISPR/Cas9-derived activator systems as targeted approaches to induce dormant HIV-1 proviral DNA. These systems recruit multiple transcriptional activation domains to the HIV 5' long terminal repeat (LTR), for which we have identified an optimal target region within the LTR U3 sequence. Using this target region, we demonstrate transcriptional activation of proviral genomes via the synergistic activation mediator complex in various in culture model systems for HIV latency. Observed levels of induction are comparable or indeed higher than treatment with established LRAs. Importantly, activation is complete, leading to production of infective viral particles. Our data demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-derived technologies can be applied to counteract HIV latency and may therefore represent promising novel approaches in the quest for HIV elimination.

  18. Targeted HIV-1 Latency Reversal Using CRISPR/Cas9-Derived Transcriptional Activator Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bialek, Julia K.; Dunay, Gábor A.; Voges, Maike; Schäfer, Carola; Spohn, Michael; Stucka, Rolf; Hauber, Joachim; Lange, Ulrike C.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 technology is currently considered the most advanced tool for targeted genome engineering. Its sequence-dependent specificity has been explored for locus-directed transcriptional modulation. Such modulation, in particular transcriptional activation, has been proposed as key approach to overcome silencing of dormant HIV provirus in latently infected cellular reservoirs. Currently available agents for provirus activation, so-called latency reversing agents (LRAs), act indirectly through cellular pathways to induce viral transcription. However, their clinical performance remains suboptimal, possibly because reservoirs have diverse cellular identities and/or proviral DNA is intractable to the induced pathways. We have explored two CRISPR/Cas9-derived activator systems as targeted approaches to induce dormant HIV-1 proviral DNA. These systems recruit multiple transcriptional activation domains to the HIV 5’ long terminal repeat (LTR), for which we have identified an optimal target region within the LTR U3 sequence. Using this target region, we demonstrate transcriptional activation of proviral genomes via the synergistic activation mediator complex in various in culture model systems for HIV latency. Observed levels of induction are comparable or indeed higher than treatment with established LRAs. Importantly, activation is complete, leading to production of infective viral particles. Our data demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9-derived technologies can be applied to counteract HIV latency and may therefore represent promising novel approaches in the quest for HIV elimination. PMID:27341108

  19. Sonar Dome Reliability XVIII: Measured Deflections of the USS Kauffman Sonar Rubber Dome, 15-25 November 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-07

    there was insufficient room left in the existing cableways for the addition of our system control cables. Thus, we requested a new cableway be installed...between the SRD area and the sonar equipment room, shown in Figures 6 and 7, to provide a pathway for these new cables. The new cableway would also...decided that a new separate cableway was not needed; the installation of the wave height sensors was made parallel with the ships rail instead of the

  20. Active radar guides missile to its target: receptor-based targeted treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma by nanoparticulate systems.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Jun; Liao, Jia-Zhi; Lin, Ju-Sheng; He, Xing-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) usually present at advanced stages and do not benefit from surgical resection, so drug therapy should deserve a prominent place in unresectable HCC treatment. But chemotherapy agents, such as doxorubicin, cisplatin, and paclitaxel, frequently encounter important problems such as low specificity and non-selective biodistribution. Recently, the development of nanotechnology led to significant breakthroughs to overcome these problems. Decorating the surfaces of nanoparticulate-based drug carriers with homing devices has demonstrated its potential in concentrating chemotherapy agents specifically to HCC cells. In this paper, we reviewed the current status of active targeting strategies for nanoparticulate systems based on various receptors such as asialoglycoprotein receptor, transferrin receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, folate receptor, integrin, and CD44, which are abundantly expressed on the surfaces of hepatocytes or liver cancer cells. Furthermore, we pointed out their merits and defects and provided theoretical references for further research.

  1. Composite Wavelet Filters for Enhanced Automated Target Recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, Jeffrey N.; Zhang, Yuhan; Lu, Thomas T.; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Automated Target Recognition (ATR) systems aim to automate target detection, recognition, and tracking. The current project applies a JPL ATR system to low-resolution sonar and camera videos taken from unmanned vehicles. These sonar images are inherently noisy and difficult to interpret, and pictures taken underwater are unreliable due to murkiness and inconsistent lighting. The ATR system breaks target recognition into three stages: 1) Videos of both sonar and camera footage are broken into frames and preprocessed to enhance images and detect Regions of Interest (ROIs). 2) Features are extracted from these ROIs in preparation for classification. 3) ROIs are classified as true or false positives using a standard Neural Network based on the extracted features. Several preprocessing, feature extraction, and training methods are tested and discussed in this paper.

  2. Extracellularly activated nanocarriers: A new paradigm of tumor targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gullotti, Emily; Yeo, Yoon

    2009-01-01

    One of the main goals of nanomedicine is to develop a nanocarrier that can selectively deliver anti-cancer drugs to the targeted tumors. Extensive efforts have resulted in several tumor-targeted nanocarriers, some of which are approved for clinical use. Most nanocarriers achieve tumor-selective accumulation through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Targeting molecules such as antibodies, peptides, ligands, or nucleic acids attached to the nanocarriers further enhance their recognition and internalization by the target tissues. While both the stealth and targeting features are important for effective and selective drug delivery to the tumors, achieving both features simultaneously is often found to be difficult. Some of the recent targeting strategies have the potential to overcome this challenge. These strategies utilize the unique extracellular environment of tumors to change the long-circulating nanocarriers to release the drug or interact with cells in a tumor-specific manner. This review discusses the new targeting strategies with recent examples, which utilize the environmental stimuli to activate the nanocarriers. Traditional strategies for tumor-targeted nanocarriers are briefly discussed with an emphasis on their achievements and challenges. PMID:19366234

  3. Right temporoparietal junction activation by a salient contextual cue facilitates target discrimination.

    PubMed

    Geng, Joy J; Mangun, George R

    2011-01-01

    The right temporoparietal junction (R TPJ) is involved in stimulus-driven attentional control in response to the appearance of an unexpected target or a distractor that shares features with a task-relevant target. An unresolved question is whether these responses in R TPJ are due simply to the presence of a stimulus that is a potential target, or instead responds to any task-relevant information. Here, we addressed this issue by testing the sensitivity of R TPJ to a perceptually salient, non-target stimulus - a contextual cue. Although known to be a non-target, the contextual cue carried probabilistic information regarding the presence of a target in the opposite visual field. The contextual cue was therefore always of potential behavioral relevance, but only sometimes paired with a target. The appearance of the contextual cue alone increased activation in R TPJ, but more so when it appeared with a target. There was also greater connectivity between R TPJ and a network of attentional control and decision areas when the contextual cue was present. These results demonstrate that R TPJ is involved in the stimulus-driven representation of task-relevant information that can be used to engage an appropriate behavioral response.

  4. Targeting a Proteinase-Activated Receptor 4 (PAR4) Carboxyl Terminal Motif to Regulate Platelet Function.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Rithwik; Mihara, Koichiro; Thibeault, Pierre; Vanderboor, Christina M; Petri, Björn; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Bouvier, Michel; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2017-04-01

    Thrombin initiates human platelet aggregation by coordinately activating proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 4. However, targeting PAR1 with an orthosteric-tethered ligand binding-site antagonist results in bleeding, possibly owing to the important role of PAR1 activation on cells other than platelets. Because of its more restricted tissue expression profile, we have therefore turned to PAR4 as an antiplatelet target. We have identified an intracellular PAR4 C-terminal motif that regulates calcium signaling and β-arrestin interactions. By disrupting this PAR4 calcium/β-arrestin signaling process with a novel cell-penetrating peptide, we were able to inhibit both thrombin-triggered platelet aggregation in vitro and clot consolidation in vivo. We suggest that targeting PAR4 represents an attractive alternative to blocking PAR1 for antiplatelet therapy in humans.

  5. Developing, implementing, and evaluating a condom promotion program targeting sexually active adolescents.

    PubMed

    Alstead, M; Campsmith, M; Halley, C S; Hartfield, K; Goldbaum, G; Wood, R W

    1999-12-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of the Condom Campaign, a 1995 HIV prevention program promoting condom use among sexually active adolescents in three King County, Washington, urban communities. This program employed three main strategies: (a) mobilizing all levels of the target communities to support and guide program development and implementation; (b) creating and implementing a mass media campaign targeting sexually active teenagers that promoted correct condom use and favorable attitudes toward condoms; and (c) recruiting public agencies, community organizations, and businesses to distribute condoms from bins and vending machines. We evaluated the program through a series of cross-sectional interviews conducted in the three communities chosen for their elevated levels of adolescent sexual risk behavior. Overall, 73% of target youth reported exposure to the Condom Campaign; exposure did not differ by age, gender, race, or level of sexual experience. Levels of sexual activity remained stable throughout the media campaign.

  6. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Activation Increases Axonal Growth Capacity of Injured Peripheral Nerves*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Namiko; Borson, Steven H.; Gambello, Michael J.; Wang, Fan; Cavalli, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    Unlike neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), injured neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) can regenerate their axons and reinnervate their targets. However, functional recovery in the PNS often remains suboptimal, especially in cases of severe damage. The lack of regenerative ability of CNS neurons has been linked to down-regulation of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. We report here that PNS dorsal root ganglial neurons (DRGs) activate mTOR following damage and that this activity enhances axonal growth capacity. Furthermore, genetic up-regulation of mTOR activity by deletion of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) in DRGs is sufficient to enhance axonal growth capacity in vitro and in vivo. We further show that mTOR activity is linked to the expression of GAP-43, a crucial component of axonal outgrowth. However, although TSC2 deletion in DRGs facilitates axonal regrowth, it leads to defects in target innervation. Thus, whereas manipulation of mTOR activity could provide new strategies to stimulate nerve regeneration in the PNS, fine control of mTOR activity is required for proper target innervation. PMID:20615870

  7. Design of block-copolymer-based micelles for active and passive targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebouille, Jérôme G. J. L.; Leermakers, Frans A. M.; Cohen Stuart, Martien A.; Tuinier, Remco

    2016-10-01

    A self-consistent field study is presented on the design of active and passive targeting block-copolymeric micelles. These micelles form in water by self-assembly of triblock copolymers with a hydrophilic middle block and two hydrophobic outer blocks. A minority amount of diblock copolymers with the same chemistry is taken to coassemble into these micelles. At the end of the hydrophilic block of the diblock copolymers, a targeting moiety (TM) is present. Assuming that the rotation of the micelle towards the target is sufficiently fast, we can elaborate a single gradient cell model, wherein the micelle is in the center and the receptor (R) substrate exists on the outer plane of the spherical coordinate system. The distribution function of the targeting moiety corresponds to a Landau free energy with local minima and corresponding maxima. The lowest minimum, which is the ground state, shifts from within the micelle to the adsorbing state upon bringing the substrate closer to the micelle, implying a jumplike translocation of the targeting moiety. Equally deep minima represent the binodal of the phase transition, which is, due to the finite chain length, first-order like. The maximum in-between the two relevant minima implies that there is an activation barrier for the targeting moiety to reach the receptor surface. We localize the parameter space wherein the targeting moiety is (when the micelle is far from the target) preferably hidden in the stealthy hydrophilic corona of the micelle, which is desirable to avoid undesired immune responses, and still can jump out of the corona to reach the target quick enough, that is, when the barrier height is sufficiently low. The latter requirement may be identified by a spinodal condition. We found that such hidden TMs can still establish a TM-R contact at distances up to twice the corona size. The translocation transition will work best when the affinity of the TM for the core is avoided and when hydrophilic TMs are selected.

  8. The benzimidazole based drugs show good activity against T. gondii but poor activity against its proposed enoyl reductase enzyme target.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Craig; McPhillie, Martin J; Zhou, Ying; Woods, Stuart; Afanador, Gustavo A; Rawson, Shaun; Khaliq, Farzana; Prigge, Sean T; Roberts, Craig W; Rice, David W; McLeod, Rima; Fishwick, Colin W; Muench, Stephen P

    2014-02-01

    The enoyl acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR) enzyme of the apicomplexan parasite family has been intensely studied for antiparasitic drug design for over a decade, with the most potent inhibitors targeting the NAD(+) bound form of the enzyme. However, the higher affinity for the NADH co-factor over NAD(+) and its availability in the natural environment makes the NADH complex form of ENR an attractive target. Herein, we have examined a benzimidazole family of inhibitors which target the NADH form of Francisella ENR, but despite good efficacy against Toxoplasma gondii, the IC50 for T. gondii ENR is poor, with no inhibitory activity at 1 μM. Moreover similar benzimidazole scaffolds are potent against fungi which lack the ENR enzyme and as such we believe that there may be significant off target effects for this family of inhibitors.

  9. Quantifying Effects of Mid-Frequency Sonar Transmissions on Fish and Whale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    different cruises with different vessels and TOPAS parametric sonars. The first calibration trial was conducted with R/V “G. O. Sars” in the Sørfolla fjord ...sonar during the calibration exercise with R/V “G. O. Sars” in Sørfolla fjord on 10 December 2008 has been addressed in a preliminary study (Foote et al

  10. IMPACT OF TARGET MATERIAL ACTIVATION ON PERSONNEL EXPOSURE AND RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Khater, H; Epperson, P; Thacker, R; Beale, R; Kohut, T; Brereton, S

    2009-06-30

    Detailed activation analyses are performed for the different materials under consideration for use in the target capsules and hohlraums used during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility. Results of the target material activation were additionally used to estimate the levels of contamination within the NIF target chamber and the workplace controls necessary for safe operation. The analysis examined the impact of using Be-Cu and Ge-doped CH capsules on the external dose received by workers during maintenance activities. Five days following a 20 MJ shot, dose rates inside the Target Chamber (TC) due to the two proposed capsule materials are small ({approx} 1 {micro}rem/h). Gold and depleted-uranium (DU) are considered as potential hohlraum materials. Following a shot, gold will most probably get deposited on the TC first wall. On the other hand, while noble-gas precursors from the DU are expected to stay in the TC, most of the noble gases are pumped out of the chamber and end up on the cryopumps. The dose rates inside the TC due to activated gold or DU, at 5 days following a 20 MJ shot, are about 1 mrem/h. Dose rates in the vicinity of the cryo-pumps (containing noble 'fission' gases) drop-off to about 1 mrem/h during the first 12 hours following the shot. Contamination from activation of NIF targets will result in the NIF target chamber exceeding DOE surface contamination limits. Objects removed from the TC will need to be managed as radioactive material. However, the results suggest that airborne contamination from resuspension of surface contamination will not be significant and is at levels that can be managed by negative ventilation when accessing the TC attachments.

  11. A multi-layered active target for the study of neutron-unbound nuclides at NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Jessica; Gueye, Paul; Redpath, Thomas; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of neutron-unbound nuclides were investigated using a multi-layered Si/Be active target designed for use with the MoNA/LISA setup at the National Superconducting Cyclotron (NSCL). The setup consists of the MoNA/LISA arrays (for neutron detection) and a superconducting sweeper magnet (for charged separation) to identify products following the decay of neutron unbound states. The segmented target consisted of three 700 mg/cm2 beryllium targets and four 0.14 mm thick 62x62 mm2 silicon detectors. As a commissioning experiment for the target the decay of two-neutron unbound 26O populated in a one-proton removal reaction from a radioactive 27F beam was performed. The 27F secondary radioactive beam from the NSCL's Coupled Cyclotron Facility was produced from the fragmentation of a 140 MeV/u 48Ca beam incident on a thick beryllium target and then cleanly selected by the A1900 fragment separator. The energy loss and position spectra of the incoming beam and reaction products were used to calibrate the Silicon detectors to within 1.5% in both energy and position. A dedicated Geant4 model of the target was developed to simulate the energy loss within the target. A description of the experimental setup, simulation work, and energy and position calibration will be presented. DoE/NNSA - DE-NA0000979.

  12. Activity and radiation protection studies for the W-Ta target of CSNS.

    PubMed

    Yu, Q Z; Liang, T J; Yin, W

    2009-09-01

    The Chinese government initiated a conceptual design for the project of China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), which consists of an H-linear accelerator, a rapid cycling synchrotron accelerating the beam to 1.6 GeV, a target station converting proton beam into lower energy (<1 eV) neutron beam optimised to instruments for neutron scattering applications. The facility operates at 25-Hz repetition rate with an initial beam power of 100 kW. In the target station, the target-moderator-reflector (TMR) components are exposed to the intensive fluxes of high-energy hadrons and become highly radioactive as a result of long-time irradiation. In this paper, the activity of the TMR components are calculated using the Monte Carlo code system LAHET&MCNP4C&CINDER'90. Comparisons of some results with that simulated by FLUKA code are also performed. Detailed analyses of the radionuclides and their characters in the tantalum clad tungsten target (W-Ta target) are important for the radiation protection of the CSNS target station. The shielding design of the service cell for the decay gamma ray induced from the W-Ta target and its vessel shows that the ambient dose rate decreases exponentially with increasing heavy concrete thickness. And 80 cm thickness of heavy concrete for each side of the service cell can satisfy the safety requirement.

  13. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor ligand profiling reveals biased signalling and off-target activity

    PubMed Central

    Soethoudt, Marjolein; Grether, Uwe; Fingerle, Jürgen; Grim, Travis W.; Fezza, Filomena; de Petrocellis, Luciano; Ullmer, Christoph; Rothenhäusler, Benno; Perret, Camille; van Gils, Noortje; Finlay, David; MacDonald, Christa; Chicca, Andrea; Gens, Marianela Dalghi; Stuart, Jordyn; de Vries, Henk; Mastrangelo, Nicolina; Xia, Lizi; Alachouzos, Georgios; Baggelaar, Marc P.; Martella, Andrea; Mock, Elliot D.; Deng, Hui; Heitman, Laura H.; Connor, Mark; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Gertsch, Jürg; Lichtman, Aron H.; Maccarrone, Mauro; Pacher, Pal; Glass, Michelle; van der Stelt, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R) represents a promising therapeutic target for various forms of tissue injury and inflammatory diseases. Although numerous compounds have been developed and widely used to target CB2R, their selectivity, molecular mode of action and pharmacokinetic properties have been poorly characterized. Here we report the most extensive characterization of the molecular pharmacology of the most widely used CB2R ligands to date. In a collaborative effort between multiple academic and industry laboratories, we identify marked differences in the ability of certain agonists to activate distinct signalling pathways and to cause off-target effects. We reach a consensus that HU910, HU308 and JWH133 are the recommended selective CB2R agonists to study the role of CB2R in biological and disease processes. We believe that our unique approach would be highly suitable for the characterization of other therapeutic targets in drug discovery research. PMID:28045021

  14. Active target studies of the αp-process at CRIB

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, D.; Yamaguchi, H.; Michimasa, S.; Nakao, T.; Ota, S.; Tokieda, H.; Hashimoto, T.; Duy, N. N.; Khiem, L. H.; Kubono, S.; Binh, D. N.; Chen, A. A.; Cherubini, S.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Zhang, L. Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Iwasa, N.; Yamada, T.; Kwon, Y. K.; and others

    2014-05-02

    The αp-process is a sequence of (α, p)(p, γ) reactions important to the nuclear trajectory to higher masses in type I X-ray bursts. Specifically, the αp-process is schematically pure helium-burning, and thus unlike pure hydrogen-burning processes, does not require slow β{sup +} decays. Explosive helium burning is responsible for the observed short rise-times of X-ray bursts but ultimately gives way to the rp-process as the Coulomb barrier increases. Because the stellar reaction rates of these (α, p) reactions are poorly known over the relevant astrophysical energies, we performed systematic studies of the {sup 18}Ne(α,p), {sup 22}Mg(α,p) and {sup 30}S(α,p) reactions at the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) low-energy radioactive ion beam separator, called CRIB. We produce the radioactive beams in-flight and scan the center-of-mass energy down into the Gamow Window using a thick target in inverse kinematics. The helium target gas also serves as part of the detector system, an active target, which was newly designed for these measurements. The active target, which uses gas electron multiplier (GEM) foils, allows for higher beam injection rates than previous multi-sampling and tracking proportional counters (MSTPC). We present a summary of our recent results from these active target experiments at CRIB.

  15. Remote Bridge Deflection Measurement Using an Advanced Video Deflectometer and Actively Illuminated LED Targets.

    PubMed

    Tian, Long; Pan, Bing

    2016-08-23

    An advanced video deflectometer using actively illuminated LED targets is proposed for remote, real-time measurement of bridge deflection. The system configuration, fundamental principles, and measuring procedures of the video deflectometer are first described. To address the challenge of remote and accurate deflection measurement of large engineering structures without being affected by ambient light, the novel idea of active imaging, which combines high-brightness monochromatic LED targets with coupled bandpass filter imaging, is introduced. Then, to examine the measurement accuracy of the proposed advanced video deflectometer in outdoor environments, vertical motions of an LED target with precisely-controlled translations were measured and compared with prescribed values. Finally, by tracking six LED targets mounted on the bridge, the developed video deflectometer was applied for field, remote, and multipoint deflection measurement of the Wuhan Yangtze River Bridge, one of the most prestigious and most publicized constructions in China, during its routine safety evaluation tests. Since the proposed video deflectometer using actively illuminated LED targets offers prominent merits of remote, contactless, real-time, and multipoint deflection measurement with strong robustness against ambient light changes, it has great potential in the routine safety evaluation of various bridges and other large-scale engineering structures.

  16. Remote Bridge Deflection Measurement Using an Advanced Video Deflectometer and Actively Illuminated LED Targets

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Long; Pan, Bing

    2016-01-01

    An advanced video deflectometer using actively illuminated LED targets is proposed for remote, real-time measurement of bridge deflection. The system configuration, fundamental principles, and measuring procedures of the video deflectometer are first described. To address the challenge of remote and accurate deflection measurement of large engineering structures without being affected by ambient light, the novel idea of active imaging, which combines high-brightness monochromatic LED targets with coupled bandpass filter imaging, is introduced. Then, to examine the measurement accuracy of the proposed advanced video deflectometer in outdoor environments, vertical motions of an LED target with precisely-controlled translations were measured and compared with prescribed values. Finally, by tracking six LED targets mounted on the bridge, the developed video deflectometer was applied for field, remote, and multipoint deflection measurement of the Wuhan Yangtze River Bridge, one of the most prestigious and most publicized constructions in China, during its routine safety evaluation tests. Since the proposed video deflectometer using actively illuminated LED targets offers prominent merits of remote, contactless, real-time, and multipoint deflection measurement with strong robustness against ambient light changes, it has great potential in the routine safety evaluation of various bridges and other large-scale engineering structures. PMID:27563901

  17. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation

    PubMed Central

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favors the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi (ADM), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) as surround muscles during rest and tonic activation of FDI in fourteen subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under MRI-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90% to 120% of adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of FDI, CBI was significantly reduced only for FDI but not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned MEP sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI tonic activation compared to rest, despite background EMG activity increasing only for the FDI. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle. PMID:26900871

  18. Fimbrolide Natural Products Disrupt Bioluminescence of Vibrio By Targeting Autoinducer Biosynthesis and Luciferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weining; Lorenz, Nicola; Jung, Kirsten; Sieber, Stephan A

    2016-01-18

    Vibrio is a model organism for the study of quorum sensing (QS) signaling and is used to identify QS-interfering drugs. Naturally occurring fimbrolides are important tool compounds known to affect QS in various organisms; however, their cellular targets have so far remained elusive. Here we identify the irreversible fimbrolide targets in the proteome of living V. harveyi and V. campbellii via quantitative mass spectrometry utilizing customized probes. Among the major hits are two protein targets with essential roles in Vibrio QS and bioluminescence. LuxS, responsible for autoinducer 2 biosynthesis, and LuxE, a subunit of the luciferase complex, were both covalently modified at their active-site cysteines leading to inhibition of activity. The identification of LuxE unifies previous reports suggesting inhibition of bioluminescence downstream of the signaling cascade and thus contributes to a better mechanistic understanding of these QS tool compounds.

  19. Targeting glycoprotein VI and the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Stegner, David; Haining, Elizabeth J; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2014-08-01

    Coronary artery thrombosis and ischemic stroke are often initiated by the disruption of an atherosclerotic plaque and consequent intravascular platelet activation. Thus, antiplatelet drugs are central in the treatment and prevention of the initial, and subsequent, vascular events. However, novel pharmacological targets for platelet inhibition remain an important goal of cardiovascular research because of the negative effect of existing antiplatelet drugs on primary hemostasis. One promising target is the platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein VI. Blockade or antibody-mediated depletion of this receptor in circulating platelets is beneficial in experimental models of thrombosis and thrombo-inflammatory diseases, such as stroke, without impairing hemostasis. In this review, we summarize the importance of glycoprotein VI and (hem)immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling in hemostasis, thrombosis, and thrombo-inflammatory processes and discuss the targeting strategies currently under development for inhibiting glycoprotein VI and its signaling.

  20. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Signaling Pathway as a Discovery Target in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Nan, Guangxian

    2016-05-01

    Protein kinases are critical modulators of a variety of intracellular and extracellular signal transduction pathways, and abnormal phosphorylation events can contribute to disease progression in a variety of diseases. As a result, protein kinases have emerged as important new drug targets for small molecule therapeutics. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway transmits signals from the cell membrane to the nucleus in response to a variety of different stimuli. Because this pathway controls a broad spectrum of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and stress responses, it is accepted as a therapeutic target for cancer and peripheral inflammatory disorders. There is also increasing evidence that MAPK is an important regulator of ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebral vascular disease, raising the possibility that it might be a drug discovery target for stroke. In this review, we discuss the MAPK signaling pathway in association with its activation in stroke-induced brain injury.

  1. Radiation inactivation analysis of influenza virus reveals different target sizes for fusion, leakage, and neuraminidase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, S.; Jung, C.Y.; Takahashi, M.; Lenard, J.

    1986-10-07

    The size of the functional units responsible for several activities carried out by the influenza virus envelope glycoproteins was determined by radiation inactivation analysis. Neuraminidase activity, which resides in the glycoprotein NA, was inactivated exponentially with an increasing radiation dose, yielding a target size of 94 +/- 5 kilodaltons (kDa), in reasonable agreement with that of the disulfide-bonded dimer (120 kDa). All the other activities studied are properties of the HA glycoprotein and were normalized to the known molecular weight of the neuraminidase dimer. Virus-induced fusion activity was measured by two phospholipid dilution assays: relief of energy transfer between N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)dipalmitoyl-L-alpha- phosphatidylethanolamine (N-NBD-PE) and N-(lissamine rhodamine B sulfonyl)-dioleoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylethanolamine (N-Rh-PE) in target liposomes and relief of self-quenching of N-Rh-PE in target liposomes. Radiation inactivation of fusion activity proceeded exponentially with radiation dose, yielding normalized target sizes of 68 +/- 6 kDa by assay i and 70 +/- 4 kDa by assay ii. These values are close to the molecular weight of a single disulfide-bonded (HA1 + HA2) unit (75 kDa), the monomer of the HA trimer. A single monomer is thus inactivated by each radiation event, and each monomer (or some part of it) constitutes a minimal functional unit capable of mediating fusion. Virus-induced leakage of calcein from target liposomes and virus-induced leakage of hemoglobin from erythrocytes (hemolysis) both showed more complex inactivation behavior: a pronounced shoulder was present in both inactivation curves, followed by a steep drop in activity at higher radiation levels.

  2. 50 CFR 216.270 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the activities described in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) The taking of marine mammals by the.... lat.; 127°10′04″ W. long. and 24°00′01″ N. lat.; 125°00′03″ W. long. (c) The taking of marine mammals... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources,...

  3. 50 CFR 216.270 - Specified activity and specified geographical region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the activities described in paragraph (c) of this section. (b) The taking of marine mammals by the.... lat.; 127°10′04″ W. long. and 24°00′01″ N. lat.; 125°00′03″ W. long. (c) The taking of marine mammals... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and high frequency active sonar (HFAS) sources,...

  4. Binaural sonar electronic travel aid provides vibrotactile cues for landmark, reflector motion and surface texture classification.

    PubMed

    Kuc, Roman

    2002-10-01

    Electronic travel aids (ETAs) for the blind commonly employ conventional time-of-flight sonars to provide range measurements, but their wide beams prevent accurate determination of object bearing. We describe a binaural sonar that detects objects over a wider bearing interval compared with a single transducer and also determines if the object lies to the left or right of the sonar axis in a robust manner. The sonar employs a pair of Polaroid 6500 ranging modules connected to Polaroid 7000 transducers operating simultaneously in a binaural array configuration. The sonar determines which transducer detects the echo first. An outward vergence angle between the transducers improves the first-echo detection reliability by increasing the delay between the two detected echoes, a consequence of threshold detection. We exploit this left/right detection capability in an ETA that provides vibrotactile feedback. Pager motors mount on both sides of the sonar, possibly worn on the user's wrists. The motor on the same side as the reflecting object vibrates with speed inversely related to range. As the sonar or object moves, vibration patterns provide landmark, motion and texture cues. Orienting the sonar at 45 degrees relative to the travel direction and passing a right-angle corner produces a characteristic vibrational pattern. When pointing the sonar at a moving object, such as a fluttering flag, the motors alternate in a manner to give the user a perception of the object motion. When the sonar translates or rotates to scan a foliage surface, the vibrational patterns are related to the surface scatterer distribution, allowing the user to identify the foliage.

  5. Viral microRNAs Target a Gene Network, Inhibit STAT Activation, and Suppress Interferon Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, Dhivya; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) encodes 12 pre-microRNAs during latency that are processed to yield ~25 mature microRNAs (miRNAs). We were interested in identifying cellular networks that were targeted by KSHV-miRNAs and employed network building strategies using validated KSHV miRNA targets. Here, we report the identification of a gene network centering on the transcription factor- signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) that is targeted by KSHV miRNAs. KSHV miRNAs suppressed STAT3 and STAT5 activation and inhibited STAT3-dependent reporter activation upon IL6-treatment. KSHV miRNAs also repressed the induction of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes upon IFNα- treatment. Finally, we observed increased lytic reactivation of KSHV from latently infected cells upon STAT3 repression with siRNAs or a small molecule inhibitor. Our data suggest that treatment of infected cells with a STAT3 inhibitor and a viral replication inhibitor, ganciclovir, represents a possible strategy to eliminate latently infected cells without increasing virion production. Together, we show that KSHV miRNAs suppress a network of targets associated with STAT3, deregulate cytokine-mediated gene activation, suppress an interferon response, and influence the transition into the lytic phase of viral replication. PMID:28102325

  6. The Role of Specificity, Targeted Learning Activities, and Prior Knowledge for the Effects of Relevance Instructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roelle, Julian; Lehmkuhl, Nina; Beyer, Martin-Uwe; Berthold, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    In 2 experiments we examined the role of (a) specificity, (b) the type of targeted learning activities, and (c) learners' prior knowledge for the effects of relevance instructions on learning from instructional explanations. In Experiment 1, we recruited novices regarding the topic of atomic structure (N = 80) and found that "specific"…

  7. Neuronal targeting, internalization, and biological activity of a recombinant atoxic derivative of botulinum neurotoxin A

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) have the unique capacity to cross epithelial barriers, target neuromuscular junctions, and translocate active metalloprotease component to the cytosol of motor neurons. We have taken advantage of the molecular carriers responsible for this trafficking to create a family ...

  8. Characteristics of a sandy depositional lobe on the outer Mississippi fan from SeaMARC IA sidescan sonar images

    SciTech Connect

    Twichell, D.C.; Schwab, W.C. ); Nelson, C.H.; Lee, H.J. ); Kenyon, N.H. )

    1992-08-01

    SeaMARC IA sidescan sonar images of the distal reaches of a depositional lobe on the Mississippi Fan show that channelized rather than unconfined transport was the dominant transport mechanism for coarse-grained sediment during the formation of this part of the deep-sea fan. Overbank sheet flow of sands was not an important process in the transport and deposition of the sandy and silty sediment found on this fan. The dendritic distributary pattern and the high order of splaying of the channels, only one which appears to have been active at a time, suggest that coarse-grained deposits on this fan are laterally discontinuous.

  9. Potent and Targeted Activation of Latent HIV-1 Using the CRISPR/dCas9 Activator Complex.

    PubMed

    Saayman, Sheena M; Lazar, Daniel C; Scott, Tristan A; Hart, Jonathan R; Takahashi, Mayumi; Burnett, John C; Planelles, Vicente; Morris, Kevin V; Weinberg, Marc S

    2016-03-01

    HIV-1 provirus integration results in a persistent latently infected reservoir that is recalcitrant to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) with lifelong treatment being the only option. The "shock and kill" strategy aims to eradicate latent HIV by reactivating proviral gene expression in the context of cART treatment. Gene-specific transcriptional activation can be achieved using the RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system comprising single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) with a nuclease-deficient Cas9 mutant (dCas9) fused to the VP64 transactivation domain (dCas9-VP64). We engineered this system to target 23 sites within the long terminal repeat promoter of HIV-1 and identified a "hotspot" for activation within the viral enhancer sequence. Activating sgRNAs transcriptionally modulated the latent proviral genome across multiple different in vitro latency cell models including T cells comprising a clonally integrated mCherry-IRES-Tat (LChIT) latency system. We detected consistent and effective activation of latent virus mediated by activator sgRNAs, whereas latency reversal agents produced variable activation responses. Transcriptomic analysis revealed dCas9-VP64/sgRNAs to be highly specific, while the well-characterized chemical activator TNFα induced widespread gene dysregulation. CRISPR-mediated gene activation represents a novel system which provides enhanced efficiency and specificity in a targeted latency reactivation strategy and represents a promising approach to a "functional cure" of HIV/AIDS.

  10. Prosthetic systems for therapeutic optical activation and silencing of genetically-targeted neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Jacob G.; Han, Xue; Henninger, Michael A.; Ko, Emily Y.; Qian, Xiaofeng; Talei Franzesi, Giovanni; McConnell, Jackie P.; Stern, Patrick; Desimone, Robert; Boyden, Edward S.

    2008-02-01

    Many neural disorders are associated with aberrant activity in specific cell types or neural projection pathways embedded within the densely-wired, heterogeneous matter of the brain. An ideal therapy would permit correction of activity just in specific target neurons, while leaving other neurons unaltered. Recently our lab revealed that the naturally-occurring light-activated proteins channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) and halorhodopsin (Halo/NpHR) can, when genetically expressed in neurons, enable them to be safely, precisely, and reversibly activated and silenced by pulses of blue and yellow light, respectively. We here describe the ability to make specific neurons in the brain light-sensitive, using a viral approach. We also reveal the design and construction of a scalable, fully-implantable optical prosthetic capable of delivering light of appropriate intensity and wavelength to targeted neurons at arbitrary 3-D locations within the brain, enabling activation and silencing of specific neuron types at multiple locations. Finally, we demonstrate control of neural activity in the cortex of the non-human primate, a key step in the translation of such technology for human clinical use. Systems for optical targeting of specific neural circuit elements may enable a new generation of high-precision therapies for brain disorders.

  11. Range estimation of passive infrared targets through the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hoonkyung; Chun, Joohwan; Seo, Doochun; Choi, Seokweon

    2013-04-01

    Target range estimation is traditionally based on radar and active sonar systems in modern combat systems. However, jamming signals tremendously degrade the performance of such active sensor devices. We introduce a simple target range estimation method and the fundamental limits of the proposed method based on the atmosphere propagation model. Since passive infrared (IR) sensors measure IR signals radiating from objects in different wavelengths, this method has robustness against electromagnetic jamming. The measured target radiance of each wavelength at the IR sensor depends on the emissive properties of target material and various attenuation factors (i.e., the distance between sensor and target and atmosphere environment parameters). MODTRAN is a tool that models atmospheric propagation of electromagnetic radiation. Based on the results from MODTRAN and atmosphere propagation-based modeling, the target range can be estimated. To analyze the proposed method's performance statistically, we use maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and evaluate the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) via the probability density function of measured radiance. We also compare CRLB and the variance of MLE using Monte-Carlo simulation.

  12. How to Target Activated Ras Proteins: Direct Inhibition vs. Induced Mislocalization

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Ethan J.; Ji, Kyungmin; Reiners, John J.; Mattingly, Raymond R.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic Ras proteins are a driving force in a significant set of human cancers and wild-type, unmutated Ras proteins likely contribute to the malignant phenotype of many more. The overall challenge of targeting activated Ras proteins has great promise to treat cancer, but this goal has yet to be achieved. Significant efforts and resources have been committed to inhibiting Ras, but these energies have so far made little impact in the clinic. Direct attempts to target activated Ras proteins have faced many obstacles, including the fundamental nature of the gain-of-function oncogenic activity being produced by a loss-of-function at the biochemical level. Nevertheless, there has been very promising recent pre-clinical progress. The major strategy that has so far reached the clinic aimed to inhibit activated Ras indirectly through blocking its post-translational modification and inducing its mislocalization. While these efforts to indirectly target Ras through inhibition of farnesyl transferase (FTase) were rationally designed, this strategy suffered from insufficient attention to the distinctions between the isoforms of Ras. This led to subsequent failures in large-scale clinical trials targeting K-Ras driven lung, colon, and pancreatic cancers. Despite these setbacks, efforts to indirectly target activated Ras through inducing its mislocalization have persisted. It is plausible that FTase inhibitors may still have some utility in the clinic, perhaps in combination with statins or other agents. Alternative approaches for inducing mislocalization of Ras through disruption of its palmitoylation cycle or interaction with chaperone proteins are in early stages of development. PMID:26423696

  13. Target-specific control of lymphoid-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp) activity

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Zandra E.; Bishop, Anthony C.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoid-specific protein tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp), a member of the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) superfamily of enzymes, is an important mediator of human-leukocyte signaling. Lyp has also emerged as a potential anti-autoimmune therapeutic target, owing to the association of a Lyp-activating mutation with an array of autoimmune disorders. Toward the goal of generating a selective inhibitor of Lyp activity that could be used for investigating Lyp’s roles in cell signaling and autoimmune-disease progression, here we report that Lyp’s PTP domain can be readily sensitized to target-specific inhibition by a cell-permeable small molecule. Insertion of a tetracysteine-motif-containing peptide at a conserved position in Lyp’s catalytic domain generated a mutant enzyme (Lyp-CCPGCC) that retains activity comparable to that of wild-type Lyp in the absence of added ligand. Upon addition of a tetracysteine-targeting biarsenical compound (FlAsH), however, the activity of the Lyp-CCPGCC drops dramatically, as assayed with either small-molecule or phosphorylated-peptide PTP substrates. We show that FlAsH-induced Lyp-CCPGCC inhibition is potent, specific, rapid, and independent of the nature of the PTP substrate used in the inhibition assay. Moreover, we show that FlAsH can be used to specifically target overexpressed Lyp-CCPGCC in a complex proteomic mixture. Since the mammalian-cell permeability of FlAsH is well established, it is likely that FlAsH-mediated inhibition of Lyp-CCPGCC will be useful for specifically targeting Lyp activity in engineered leukocytes and autoimmune-disease models. PMID:20594861

  14. Very high specific activity ⁶⁶/⁶⁸Ga from zinc targets for PET.

    PubMed

    Engle, J W; Lopez-Rodriguez, V; Gaspar-Carcamo, R E; Valdovinos, H F; Valle-Gonzalez, M; Trejo-Ballado, F; Severin, G W; Barnhart, T E; Nickles, R J; Avila-Rodriguez, M A

    2012-08-01

    This work describes the production of very high specific activity (66/68)Ga from (nat)Zn(p,n) and (66)Zn(p,n) using proton irradiations between 7 and 16 MeV, with emphasis on (66)Ga for use with common bifunctional chelates. Principal radiometallic impurities are (65)Zn from (p,x) and (67)Ga from (p,n). Separation of radiogallium from target material is accomplished with cation exchange chromatography in hydrochloric acid solution. Efficient recycling of Zn target material is possible using electrodeposition of Zn from its chloride form, but these measures are not necessary to achieve high specific activity or near-quantitative radiolabeling yields from natural targets. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) measures less than 2 ppb non-radioactive gallium in the final product, and the reactivity of (66)Ga with common bifunctional chelates, decay corrected to the end of irradiation, is 740 GBq/μmol (20 Ci/μmol) using natural zinc as a target material. Recycling enriched (66)Zn targets increased the reactivity of (66)Ga with common bifunctional chelates.

  15. Extraction of small boat harmonic signatures from passive sonar.

    PubMed

    Ogden, George L; Zurk, Lisa M; Jones, Mark E; Peterson, Mary E

    2011-06-01

    This paper investigates the extraction of acoustic signatures from small boats using a passive sonar system. Noise radiated from a small boats consists of broadband noise and harmonically related tones that correspond to engine and propeller specifications. A signal processing method to automatically extract the harmonic structure of noise radiated from small boats is developed. The Harmonic Extraction and Analysis Tool (HEAT) estimates the instantaneous fundamental frequency of the harmonic tones, refines the fundamental frequency estimate using a Kalman filter, and automatically extracts the amplitudes of the harmonic tonals to generate a harmonic signature for the boat. Results are presented that show the HEAT algorithms ability to extract these signatures.

  16. Static analysis of a sonar dome rubber window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    The application of NASTRAN (level 16.0.1) to the static analysis of a sonar dome rubber window (SDRW) was demonstrated. The assessment of the conventional model (neglecting the enclosed fluid) for the stress analysis of the SDRW was made by comparing its results to those based on a sophisticated model (including the enclosed fluid). The fluid was modeled with isoparametric linear hexahedron elements with approximate material properties whose shear modulus was much smaller than its bulk modulus. The effect of the chosen material property for the fluid is discussed.

  17. Cost estimation for the active debris removal of multiple priority targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Vitali; Wiedemann, Carsten; Schulz, Eugen

    The increasing number of space debris objects, especially in distinct low Earth orbit (LEO) altitudes between 600 and 1000 km, leads to an increase in the potential collision risk between the objects and threatens active satellites in that region. Several recent studies show that active debris removal (ADR) has to be performed in order to prevent a collisional cascading effect, also known as the Kessler syndrome. In order to stabilize the population growth in the critical LEO region, a removal of five prioritized objects per year has been recognized as a significant figure. Various proposals are addressing the technical issues for ADR missions, including the de-orbiting of objects by means of a service satellite using a chemical or an electric propulsion system. The servicer would rendezvous with a preselected target, perform a docking maneuver and then provide a de-orbit burn to transfer the target on a trajectory where it re-enters the Earth’s atmosphere within a given time frame. In this paper the technical aspects are complemented by a cost estimation model, focusing on multi target missions, which are based on a service satellite capable of de-orbiting more than one target within a single mission. The cost model for ADR includes initial development cost, production cost, launch cost and operation cost as well as the modelling of the propulsion system of the servicer. Therefore, different scenarios are defined for chemical and electric propulsion systems as applied to multi target missions, based on a literature review of concepts currently being under discussion. The costs of multi target missions are compared to a scenario where only one target is removed. Also, the results allow to determine an optimum number of objects to be removed per mission and provide numbers which can be used in future studies, e.g. those related to ADR cost and benefit analyses.

  18. Redesign of MST enzymes to target lyase activity instead promotes mutase and dehydratase activities.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Luo, Qianyi; Lamb, Audrey L

    2013-11-01

    The isochorismate and salicylate synthases are members of the MST family of enzymes. The isochorismate synthases establish an equilibrium for the conversion chorismate to isochorismate and the reverse reaction. The salicylate synthases convert chorismate to salicylate with an isochorismate intermediate; therefore, the salicylate synthases perform isochorismate synthase and isochorismate-pyruvate lyase activities sequentially. While the active site residues are highly conserved, there are two sites that show trends for lyase-activity and lyase-deficiency. Using steady state kinetics and HPLC progress curves, we tested the "interchange" hypothesis that interconversion of the amino acids at these sites would promote lyase activity in the isochorismate synthases and remove lyase activity from the salicylate synthases. An alternative, "permute" hypothesis, that chorismate-utilizing enzymes are designed to permute the substrate into a variety of products and tampering with the active site may lead to identification of adventitious activities, is tested by more sensitive NMR time course experiments. The latter hypothesis held true. The variant enzymes predominantly catalyzed chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase activities, sequentially generating prephenate and phenylpyruvate, augmenting previously debated (mutase) or undocumented (dehydratase) adventitious activities.

  19. Redesign of MST enzymes to target lyase activity instead promotes mutase and dehydratase activities

    PubMed Central

    Meneely, Kathleen M.; Luo, Qianyi; Lamb, Audrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The isochorismate and salicylate synthases are members of the MST family of enzymes. The isochorismate synthases establish an equilibrium for the conversion chorismate to isochorismate and the reverse reaction. The salicylate synthases convert chorismate to salicylate with an isochorismate intermediate; therefore, the salicylate synthases perform isochorismate synthase and isochorismate-pyruvate lyase activities sequentially. While the active site residues are highly conserved, there are two sites that show trends for lyase-activity and lyase-deficiency. Using steady state kinetics and HPLC progress curves, we tested the “interchange” hypothesis that interconversion of the amino acids at these sites would promote lyase activity in the isochorismate synthases and remove lyase activity from the salicylate synthases. An alternative, “permute” hypothesis, that chorismate-utilizing enzymes are designed to permute the substrate into a variety of products and tampering with the active site may lead to identification of adventitious activities, is tested by more sensitive NMR time course experiments. The latter hypothesis held true. The variant enzymes predominantly catalyzed chorismate mutase-prephenate dehydratase activities, sequentially generating prephenate and phenylpyruvate, augmenting previously debated (mutase) or undocumented (dehydratase) adventitious activities. PMID:24055536

  20. 40 CFR 745.226 - Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities § 745.226 Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing... engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.226 Section...

  1. 40 CFR 745.226 - Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities § 745.226 Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing... engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.226 Section...

  2. 40 CFR 745.226 - Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities § 745.226 Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing... engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.226 Section...

  3. 40 CFR 745.226 - Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities § 745.226 Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing... engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.226 Section...

  4. 40 CFR 745.226 - Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES Lead-Based Paint Activities § 745.226 Certification of individuals and firms engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing... engaged in lead-based paint activities: target housing and child-occupied facilities. 745.226 Section...

  5. Phishing for suitable targets in the Netherlands: routine activity theory and phishing victimization.

    PubMed

    Leukfeldt, E Rutger

    2014-08-01

    This article investigates phishing victims, especially the increased or decreased risk of victimization, using data from a cybercrime victim survey in the Netherlands (n=10,316). Routine activity theory provides the theoretical perspective. According to routine activity theory, several factors influence the risk of victimization. A multivariate analysis was conducted to assess which factors actually lead to increased risk of victimization. The model included background and financial data of victims, their Internet activities, and the degree to which they were "digitally accessible" to an offender. The analysis showed that personal background and financial characteristics play no role in phishing victimization. Among eight Internet activities, only "targeted browsing" led to increased risk. As for accessibility, using popular operating systems and web browsers does not lead to greater risk, while having up-to-date antivirus software as a technically capable guardian has no effect. The analysis showed no one, clearly defined group has an increased chance of becoming a victim. Target hardening may help, but opportunities for prevention campaigns aimed at a specific target group or dangerous online activities are limited. Therefore, situational crime prevention will have to come from a different angle. Banks could play the role of capable guardian.

  6. Imaging Caspase-3 Activation as a Marker of Apoptosis-Targeted Treatment Response in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Delphine L.; Engle, Jacquelyn T.; Griffin, Elizabeth A.; Miller, J. Philip; Chu, Wenhua; Zhou, Dong; Mach, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested whether positron emission tomography (PET) with the caspase-3 targeted isatin analog [18F]WC-4-116 could image caspase-3 activation in response to an apoptosis-inducing anticancer therapy. Procedures [18F]WC-4-116 uptake was determined in etoposide-treated EL4 cells. Biodistribution studies with [18F]WC-4-116 and [18F]ICMT-18, a non-caspase-3-targeted tracer, as well as [18F]WC-4-116 microPET imaging assessed responses in Colo205 tumor bearing mice treated with death receptor 5 (DR5) targeted agonist antibodies. Immunohistochemical staining and enzyme assays confirmed caspase-3 activation. Two-way analysis of variance or Student’s t-test assessed for treatment-related changes in tracer uptake. Results [18F]WC-4-116 increased 8 ± 2-fold in etoposide-treated cells. The [18F]WC-4-116 %ID/g also increased significantly in tumors with high caspase-3 enzyme activity (p < 0.05). [18F]ICMT-18 tumor uptake did not differ in tumors with high or low caspase-3 enzyme activity. Conclusions [18F]WC-4-116 uptake in vivo reflects increased caspase-3 activation and may be useful for detecting caspase-3 mediated apoptosis treatment responses in cancer. PMID:25344147

  7. Modeling and production of 240Am by deuteron-induced activation of a 240Pu target

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Erin C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Wittman, Richard S.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Woods, Vincent T.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Metz, Lori A.; Friese, Judah I.

    2015-02-01

    A novel reaction pathway for production of 240Am is reported. Models of reaction cross-sections in EMPIRE II suggests that deuteron-induced activation of a 240Pu target produces maximum yields of 240Am from 11.5 MeV incident deuterons. This activation had not been previously reported in the literature. A 240Pu target was activated under the modeled optimum conditions to produce 240Am. The modeled cross-section for the 240Pu(d, 2n)240Am reaction is on the order of 20-30 mbarn, but the experimentally estimated value is 5.3 ± 0.2 mbarn. We discuss reasons for the discrepancy as well as production of other Am isotopes that contaminate the final product.

  8. Chetomin, targeting HIF-1α/p300 complex, exhibits antitumour activity in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Viziteu, Elena; Grandmougin, Camille; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Seckinger, Anja; Hose, Dirk; Klein, Bernard; Moreaux, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable clonal plasma cell malignancy. The constitutive expression of HIF-1α in MM suggests that inhibition of HIF-1α-mediated transcription represents an interesting target in MM. Methods: As p300 is a crucial co-activator of hypoxia-inducible transcription, disrupting the complex HIF-1α/p300 to target HIF activity appears to be an attractive strategy. Results: We reported that chetomin, an inhibitor of HIF-1α/p300 interaction, exhibits antitumour activity in human myeloma cell lines and primary MM cells from patients. Conclusions: Our data suggest that chetomin may be of clinical value in MM and especially for patients characterised by a high EP300/HIF-1α expression and a poor prognosis. PMID:26867162

  9. Targeted activation of CREB in reactive astrocytes is neuroprotective in focal acute cortical injury.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Luis; Schlüter, Agatha; Valor, Luis M; Barco, Angel; Giralt, Mercedes; Golbano, Arantxa; Hidalgo, Juan; Jia, Peilin; Zhao, Zhongming; Jové, Mariona; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Ruiz, Montserrat; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Masgrau, Roser; Pujol, Aurora; Galea, Elena

    2016-05-01

    The clinical challenge in acute injury as in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is to halt the delayed neuronal loss that occurs hours and days after the insult. Here we report that the activation of CREB-dependent transcription in reactive astrocytes prevents secondary injury in cerebral cortex after experimental TBI. The study was performed in a novel bitransgenic mouse in which a constitutively active CREB, VP16-CREB, was targeted to astrocytes with the Tet-Off system. Using histochemistry, qPCR, and gene profiling we found less neuronal death and damage, reduced macrophage infiltration, preserved mitochondria, and rescued expression of genes related to mitochondrial metabolism in bitransgenic mice as compared to wild type littermates. Finally, with meta-analyses using publicly available databases we identified a core set of VP16-CREB candidate target genes that may account for the neuroprotective effect. Enhancing CREB activity in astrocytes thus emerges as a novel avenue in acute brain post-injury therapeutics.

  10. Utilizing G2/M retention effect to enhance tumor accumulation of active targeting nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guanlian; Cun, Xingli; Ruan, Shaobo; Shi, Kairong; Wang, Yang; Kuang, Qifang; Hu, Chuan; Xiao, Wei; He, Qin; Gao, Huile

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, active targeting strategies by ligand modification have emerged to enhance tumor accumulation of NP, but their clinical application was strictly restricted due to the complex preparation procedures, poor stability and serious toxicity. An effective and clinical translational strategy is required to satisfy the current problems. Interestingly, the internalization of NP is intimately related with cell cycle and the expression of receptors is not only related with cancer types but also cell cycle progression. So the cellular uptake of ligand modified NP may be related with cell cycle. However, few investigations were reported about the relationship between cell cycle and the internalization of ligand modified NP. Herein, cellular uptake of folic acid (FA) modified NP after utilizing chemotherapeutic to retain the tumor cells in G2/M phase was studied and a novel strategy was designed to enhance the active targeting effect. In our study, docetaxel (DTX) notably synchronized cells in G2/M phase and pretreatment with DTX highly improved in vitro and in vivo tumor cell targeting effect of FA decorated NP (FANP). Since FA was a most common used tumor active targeting ligand, we believe that this strategy possesses broader prospects in clinical application for its simplicity and effectiveness. PMID:27273770

  11. From protective intelligence to threat assessment: Strategies critical to preventing targeted violence and the active shooter.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Matthew

    Acts of targeted violence - including active shooter incidents - are typically over within 15 minutes, often before the first law enforcement personnel can respond to the scene. More than a third of active shooter incidents in the USA, for example, last less than five minutes. While this stark fact is often used, with unimpeachable validity, as the cornerstone of employee security awareness training and the need for each employee to make a quick decision on whether to run, hide or fight, it also underscores the importance of another critical priority: prevention. This paper focuses on several of the most effective strategies and tactics - increasingly used across the USA, but applicable all over the world - in preventing an act of targeted violence or active shooter event. It starts with a brief discussion of the common roadblocks to prevention within enterprises today as well as the warning signs that can reveal an individual's path toward an act of violence. Next, it defines targeted violence and summarises patterns that research has helped uncover with respect to attackers' backgrounds, motives and target selection. This paper also outlines the crucial role played by protective intelligence and threat assessment protocols and provides several case studies to illustrate key concepts in real-world applications. Finally, this discussion points to several emerging trends in the USA and Europe, among other regions - such as radicalisation within the workforce - that are likely to continue to mature in 2016 and the years ahead.

  12. NF-κB signaling pathway as target for antiplatelet activity.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2016-07-01

    In different nucleated cells, NF-κB has long been considered a prototypical proinflammatory signaling pathway with the expression of proinflammatory genes. Although platelets lack a nucleus, a number of functional transcription factors are involved in activated platelets, such as NF-κB. In platelet activation NF-κB regulation events include IKKβ phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and p65 phosphorylation. Multiple pathways contribute to platelet activation and NF-κB is a common pathway in this activation. Therefore, in platelet activation the modulation of NF-κB pathway could be a potential new target in the treatment of inflammation-related vascular disease therapy (antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities).

  13. Efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka using custom-designed transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-03-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This induction of mutations occurred in a dose-dependent manner. All screened G0 fish injected with the TALENs transmitted the TALEN-induced mutations to the next generation with high efficiency (44-100%). We also confirmed that these TALENs induced site-specific mutations because none of the mutations were found at potential off-target sites. In addition, the DJ-1 protein was lost in DJ-1(Δ7/Δ7) fish that carried a TALEN-induced frameshift mutation in both alleles. We also investigated the effect of the N- and C-terminal regions of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector domain on the gene-disrupting activity of DJ1-TALENs and found that 287 amino acids at the N terminus and 63 amino acids at the C terminus of the TAL domain exhibited the highest disrupting activity in the injected embryos. Our results suggest that TALENs enable us to rapidly and efficiently establish knockout medaka strains. This is the first report of targeted mutagenesis in medaka using TALENs. The TALEN technology will expand the potential of medaka as a model system for genetics and genomics.

  14. Efficient Targeted Mutagenesis in Medaka Using Custom-Designed Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Ansai, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Uemura, Norihito; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have become powerful tools for targeted genome editing. Here we demonstrate efficient targeted mutagenesis in medaka (Oryzias latipes), which serves as an excellent vertebrate model for genetics and genomics. We designed and constructed a pair of TALENs targeting the medaka DJ-1 gene, a homolog of human DJ-1 (PARK7). These TALENs induced a number of insertions and deletions in the injected embryos with extremely high efficiency. This induction of mutations occurred in a dose-dependent manner. All screened G0 fish injected with the TALENs transmitted the TALEN-induced mutations to the next generation with high efficiency (44–100%). We also confirmed that these TALENs induced site-specific mutations because none of the mutations were found at potential off-target sites. In addition, the DJ-1 protein was lost in DJ-1Δ7/Δ7 fish that carried a TALEN-induced frameshift mutation in both alleles. We also investigated the effect of the N- and C-terminal regions of the transcription activator-like (TAL) effector domain on the gene-disrupting activity of DJ1-TALENs and found that 287 amino acids at the N terminus and 63 amino acids at the C terminus of the TAL domain exhibited the highest disrupting activity in the injected embryos. Our results suggest that TALENs enable us to rapidly and efficiently establish knockout medaka strains. This is the first report of targeted mutagenesis in medaka using TALENs. The TALEN technology will expand the potential of medaka as a model system for genetics and genomics. PMID:23288935

  15. Target cell death triggered by cytotoxic T lymphocytes: a target cell mutant distinguishes passive pore formation and active cell suicide mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Ucker, D S; Wilson, J D; Hebshi, L D

    1994-01-01

    The role of the target cell in its own death mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) has been controversial. The ability of the pore-forming granule components of CTL to induce target cell death directly has been taken to suggest an essentially passive role for the target. This view of CTL-mediated killing ascribes to the target the single role of providing an antigenic stimulus to the CTL; this signal results in the vectoral degranulation and secretion of pore-forming elements onto the target. On the other hand, by a number of criteria, target cell death triggered by CTL appears fundamentally different from death resulting from membrane damage and osmotic lysis. CTL-triggered target cell death involves primary internal lesions of the target cell that reflect a physiological cell death process. Orderly nuclear disintegration, including lamin phosphorylation and solubilization, chromatin condensation, and genome digestion, are among the earliest events, preceding the loss of plasma membrane integrity. We have tested directly the involvement of the target cell in its own death by examining whether we could isolate mutants of target cells that have retained the ability to be recognized by and provide an antigenic stimulus to CTL while having lost the capacity to respond by dying. Here, we describe one such mutant, BW87. We have used this CTL-resistant mutant to analyze the mechanisms of CTL-triggered target cell death under a variety of conditions. The identification of a mutable target cell element essential for the cell death response to CTL provides genetic evidence that target cell death reflects an active cell suicide process similar to other physiological cell deaths. PMID:8264610

  16. Performance of Passive and Active Sonars in the Philippine Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Philippine Sea Arthur B. Baggeroer Massachusetts Institute of Technology Departments of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering Cambridge, MA 02139 phone: (617...to model the features of a CZ which we observed in the PhilSea09 experiment. The data from this found very abrupt transitions and into the CZ’s and...The CZ is one of the most notable features of deep ocean sound propagation. Several models for the sound speed profile have been used to model the

  17. Optimal Sensor Placement in Active Multistatic Sonar Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    monitored in order to protect them from hostile underwater assets. We consider discrete “ cookie cutter” sensors as well as various diffuse sensor models. By... cookie cutter sensor model, we are able to exclude even more suboptimal solutions by determining range-of-the-day, source and receiver circles. To...protect them from hostile underwater assets. We consider discrete “ cookie cutter” sensors as well as various diffuse sensor models. By showing that the

  18. Performance of Passive and Active Sonars in the Philippine Sea

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    150 km, or two and one half CZ’s. We label such figures as a depth-direction sine 1Both the internal wave and RAM MATLAB codes were provided by Matt...solution reflects a CZ like behavior.) The figures have encapsulate the ray arrivals very Figure 2: Left: Directional wave spectra vs subaperture...no shallow rays near the surface. Significant energy does not appear until approximately 250 m. After this there are just two paths until 1500 m

  19. Efficient targeted gene disruption in Xenopus embryos using engineered transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs).

    PubMed

    Lei, Yong; Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Yun; Cao, Yang; Deng, Yi; Chen, Xiongfeng; Cheng, Christopher H K; Dawid, Igor B; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2012-10-23

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are an approach for directed gene disruption and have been proved to be effective in various animal models. Here, we report that TALENs can induce somatic mutations in Xenopus embryos with reliably high efficiency and that such mutations are heritable through germ-line transmission. We modified the Golden Gate method for TALEN assembly to make the product suitable for RNA transcription and microinjection into Xenopus embryos. Eight pairs of TALENs were constructed to target eight Xenopus genes, and all resulted in indel mutations with high efficiencies of up to 95.7% at the targeted loci. Furthermore, mutations induced by TALENs were highly efficiently passed through the germ line to F(1) frogs. Together with simple and reliable PCR-based approaches for detecting TALEN-induced mutations, our results indicate that TALENs are an effective tool for targeted gene editing/knockout in Xenopus.

  20. Programmed activation of cancer cell apoptosis: A tumor-targeted phototherapeutic topoisomerase I inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Weon Sup; Han, Jiyou; Kumar, Rajesh; Lee, Gyung Gyu; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Jong Seung

    2016-01-01

    We report here a tumor-targeting masked phototherapeutic agent 1 (PT-1). This system contains SN-38—a prodrug of the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan. Topoisomerase I is a vital enzyme that controls DNA topology during replication, transcription, and recombination. An elevated level of topoisomerase I is found in many carcinomas, making it an attractive target for the development of effective anticancer drugs. In addition, PT-1 contains both a photo-triggered moiety (nitrovanillin) and a cancer targeting unit (biotin). Upon light activation in cancer cells, PT-1 interferes with DNA re-ligation, diminishes the expression of topoisomerase I, and enhances the expression of inter alia mitochondrial apoptotic genes, death receptors, and caspase enzymes, inducing DNA damage and eventually leading to apoptosis. In vitro and in vivo studies showed significant inhibition of cancer growth and the hybrid system PT-1 thus shows promise as a programmed photo-therapeutic (“phototheranostic”). PMID:27374023

  1. Programmed activation of cancer cell apoptosis: A tumor-targeted phototherapeutic topoisomerase I inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Weon Sup; Han, Jiyou; Kumar, Rajesh; Lee, Gyung Gyu; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Jong Seung

    2016-07-01

    We report here a tumor-targeting masked phototherapeutic agent 1 (PT-1). This system contains SN-38—a prodrug of the topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan. Topoisomerase I is a vital enzyme that controls DNA topology during replication, transcription, and recombination. An elevated level of topoisomerase I is found in many carcinomas, making it an attractive target for the development of effective anticancer drugs. In addition, PT-1 contains both a photo-triggered moiety (nitrovanillin) and a cancer targeting unit (biotin). Upon light activation in cancer cells, PT-1 interferes with DNA re-ligation, diminishes the expression of topoisomerase I, and enhances the expression of inter alia mitochondrial apoptotic genes, death receptors, and caspase enzymes, inducing DNA damage and eventually leading to apoptosis. In vitro and in vivo studies showed significant inhibition of cancer growth and the hybrid system PT-1 thus shows promise as a programmed photo-therapeutic (“phototheranostic”).

  2. Recent Developments in Active Tumor Targeted Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Combination Chemotherapy in Cancer Treatment and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Glasgow, Micah D. K.; Chougule, Mahavir B.

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology and combination therapy are two major fields that show great promise in the treatment of cancer. The delivery of drugs via nanoparticles helps to improve drug’s therapeutic effectiveness while reducing adverse side effects associated with high dosage by improving their pharmacokinetics. Taking advantage of molecular markers over-expressing on tumor tissues compared to normal cells, an “active” molecular marker targeted approach would be beneficial for cancer therapy. These actively targeted nanoparticles would increase drug concentration at the tumor site, improving efficacy while further reducing chemo-resistance. The multidisciplinary approach may help to improve the overall efficacy in cancer therapy. This review article summarizes recent developments of targeted multifunctional nanoparticles in the delivery of various drugs for a combinational chemotherapy approach to cancer treatment and imaging. PMID:26554150

  3. Controllable Sonar Lenses and Prisms Based on ERFs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Chang, Zensheu; Bao, Xiaoqi; Paustian, Iris; Lopes, Joseph; Folds, Donald

    2004-01-01

    Sonar-beam-steering devices of the proposed type would contain no moving parts and would be considerably smaller and less power-hungry, relative to conventional multiple-beam sonar arrays. The proposed devices are under consideration for installation on future small autonomous underwater vehicles because the sizes and power demands of conventional multiple-beam arrays are excessive, and motors used in single-beam mechanically scanned systems are also not reliable. The proposed devices would include a variety of electrically controllable acoustic prisms, lenses, and prism/lens combinations both simple and compound. These devices would contain electrorheological fluids (ERFs) between electrodes. An ERF typically consists of dielectric particles floating in a dielectric fluid. When an electric field is applied to the fluid, the particles become grouped into fibrils aligned in rows, with a consequent increase in the viscosity of the fluid and a corresponding increase in the speed of sound in the fluid. The change in the speed of sound increases with an increase in the applied electric field. By thus varying the speed of sound, one varies the acoustic index of refraction, analogously to varying the index of refraction of an optical lens or prism. In the proposed acoustic devices, this effect would be exploited to control the angles of refraction of acoustic beams, thereby steering the beams and, in the case of lenses, controlling focal lengths.

  4. Broadband sonar considerations for small underwater vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Kim C.

    2003-10-01

    As underwater vehicles become more prevalent, so too does the design and integration of compact broadband sonar arrays. Rather than rely on conventional tonpilz technology, where the bandwidth is governed by the width of the transducer's mechanical resonance, designers must consider other transducer technologies that are better suited to small vehicle packaging constraints. These constraints include operational ruggedness, light weight, conformability, and low cost. This talk advocates the use of 1-3 piezocomposite and discusses the rationale behind such a selection. In going to a wideband material such as a 1-3 piezocomposite, with typical mechanical quality factors (Qm) around 2, the selection of where to place the resonance frequency differs from that of its tonpilz counterpart. For the tonpilz array, the sonar operational bandwidth is totally governed by the resonance response of the array element and is typically limited to approximately its 3-dB or half power points. Relaxor-based ferroelectric materials such as single crystal PMN-PT, which exhibit extremely large electromechanical coupling coefficients, cannot attain 3-dB bandwidths of a decade or more when configured in a tonpilz design. This presentation will discuss a 1-3 piezocomposite-based approach that places mechanical resonance near the upper band edge of an operational bandwidth of 1 decade (10-100 kHz).

  5. Evaluating Transcription Factor Activity Changes by Scoring Unexplained Target Genes in Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Berchtold, Evi; Csaba, Gergely; Zimmer, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Several methods predict activity changes of transcription factors (TFs) from a given regulatory network and measured expression data. But available gene regulatory networks are incomplete and contain many condition-dependent regulations that are not relevant for the specific expression measurement. It is not known which combination of active TFs is needed to cause a change in the expression of a target gene. A method to systematically evaluate the inferred activity changes is missing. We present such an evaluation strategy that indicates for how many target genes the observed expression changes can be explained by a given set of active TFs. To overcome the problem that the exact combination of active TFs needed to activate a gene is typically not known, we assume a gene to be explained if there exists any combination for which the predicted active TFs can possibly explain the observed change of the gene. We introduce the i-score (inconsistency score), which quantifies how many genes could not be explained by the set of activity changes of TFs. We observe that, even for these minimal requirements, published methods yield many unexplained target genes, i.e. large i-scores. This holds for all methods and all expression datasets we evaluated. We provide new optimization methods to calculate the best possible (minimal) i-score given the network and measured expression data. The evaluation of this optimized i-score on a large data compendium yields many unexplained target genes for almost every case. This indicates that currently available regulatory networks are still far from being complete. Both the presented Act-SAT and Act-A* methods produce optimal sets of TF activity changes, which can be used to investigate the difficult interplay of expression and network data. A web server and a command line tool to calculate our i-score and to find the active TFs associated with the minimal i-score is available from https://services.bio.ifi.lmu.de/i-score. PMID:27723775

  6. Microparticle Surface Modifications Targeting Dendritic Cells for Non-Activating Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jamal S.; Zaveri, Toral D.; Crooks, Charles P.; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    Microparticulate systems for delivery of therapeutics to DCs for immunotherapy have gained attention recently. However, reports addressing the optimization of DC-targeting microparticle delivery systems are limited, particularly for cases where the goal is to deliver payload to DCs in a non-activating fashion. Here, we investigate targeting DCs using poly (d lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles (MPs) in a non-stimulatory manner and assess efficacy in vitro and in vivo. We modified MPs by surface immobilizing DC receptor targeting molecules – antibodies (anti-CD11c, anti-DEC-205) or peptides (P-D2, RGD), where anti-CD11c antibody, P-D2 and RGD peptides target integrins and anti-DEC-205 antibody targets the c-type lectin receptor DEC-205. Our results demonstrate the modified MPs are neither toxic nor activating, and DC uptake of MPs in vitro is improved by the anti-DEC-205 antibody, the anti-CD11c antibody and the P-D2 peptide modifications. The P-D2 peptide MP modification significantly improved DC antigen presentation in vitro both at immediate and delayed time points. Notably, MP functionalization with P-D2 peptide and anti-CD11c antibody increased the rate and extent of MP translocation in vivo by DCs and MΦs, with the P-D2 peptide modified MPs demonstrating the highest translocation. This work informs the design of non-activating polymeric microparticulate applications such as vaccines for autoimmune diseases. PMID:22796161

  7. Engineering of Hollow Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles for Remarkably Enhanced Tumor Active Targeting Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Hong, Hao; Shi, Sixiang; Goel, Shreya; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Hernandez, Reinier; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2014-01-01

    Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticle (HMSN) has recently gained increasing interests due to their tremendous potential as an attractive nano-platform for cancer imaging and therapy. However, possibly due to the lack of efficient in vivo targeting strategy and well-developed surface engineering techniques, engineering of HMSN for in vivo active tumor targeting, quantitative tumor uptake assessment, multimodality imaging, biodistribution and enhanced drug delivery have not been achieved to date. Here, we report the in vivo tumor targeted positron emission tomography (PET)/near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) dual-modality imaging and enhanced drug delivery of HMSN using a generally applicable surface engineering technique. Systematic in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to investigate the stability, tumor targeting efficacy and specificity, biodistribution and drug delivery capability of well-functionalized HMSN nano-conjugates. The highest uptake of TRC105 (which binds to CD105 on tumor neovasculature) conjugated HMSN in the 4T1 murine breast cancer model was ~10%ID/g, 3 times higher than that of the non-targeted group, making surface engineered HMSN a highly attractive drug delivery nano-platform for future cancer theranostics. PMID:24875656

  8. Mechanisms of nonhormonal activation of adenylate cyclase based on target analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Verkman, A.S.; Ausiello, D.A.; Jung, C.Y.; Skorecki, K.L.

    1986-08-12

    Radiation inactivation was used to examine the mechanism of activation of adenylate cyclase in the cultured renal epithelial cell line LLC-PK1 with hormonal (vasopressin) and nonhormonal (GTP, forskolin, fluoride, and chloride) activating ligands. Intact cells were frozen, irradiated at -70 degrees C (0-14 Mrad), thawed, and assayed for adenylate cyclase activity in the presence of activating ligands. The ln (adenylate cyclase activity) vs. radiation dose relation was linear (target size 162 kDa) for vasopressin- (2 microM) stimulated activity and concave downward for unstimulated (10 mM Mn/sup 2 +/), NaF- (10 mM) stimulated, and NaCl- (100 mM) stimulated activities. Addition of 2 microM vasopressin did not alter the ln activity vs. dose relation for NaF- (10 mM) stimulated activity. The dose-response relations for adenylate cyclase activation and for transition in the ln activity vs. dose curve shape were measured for vasopressin and NaF. On the basis of our model for adenylate cyclase subunit interactions reported previously (Verkman, A. S., Skorecki, K. L., and Ausiello, D. A. (1986) Am. J. Physiol. 260, C103-C123) and of new mathematical analyses, activation mechanisms for each ligand are proposed. In the unstimulated state, equilibrium between alpha beta and alpha + beta favors alpha beta; dissociated alpha binds to GTP (rate-limiting step), which then combines with the catalytic (C) subunit to form active enzyme. Vasopressin binding to receptor provides a rapid pathway for GTP binding to alpha. GTP and its analogues accelerate the rate of alpha GTP formation. Forskolin inhibits the spontaneous deactivation of activated C. Activation by fluoride may occur without alpha beta dissociation or GTP addition through activation of C by an alpha beta-F complex.

  9. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation.

    PubMed

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favours the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi, flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles as surround muscles, during rest and tonic activation of the FDI muscle in 21 subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under magnetic resonance imaging-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90-120% of the adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI muscle was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of the FDI muscle, CBI was significantly reduced only for the FDI muscle, and not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned motor evoked potential sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI muscle tonic activation as compared with rest, despite background electromyography activity increasing only for the FDI muscle. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle.

  10. Targeted Genetic Disruption of Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor-δ and Colonic Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Xiangsheng; Peng, Zhanglong; Moussalli, Micheline J.; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Broaddus, Russell R.; Fischer, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-delta (PPAR-δ) is overexpressed in human colon cancer, but its contribution to colonic tumorigenesis is controversial. We generated a mouse model in which PPAR-δ was genetically disrupted in colonic epithelial cells by targeted deletion of exon 4. Elimination of colon-specific PPAR-δ expression was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR), immunoblotting, and activity assays. Mice with and without targeted PPAR-δ genetic disruption (10–11 mice per group) were tested for incidence of azoxymethane-induced colon tumors. The effects of targeted PPAR-δ deletion on vascular endothelial growth factor expression were determined by real-time RT-PCR. Targeted PPAR-δ genetic disruption inhibited colonic carcinogenesis: Mice with PPAR-δ(−/−) colons developed 98.5% fewer tumors than wild-type mice (PPAR-δ(−/−) vs wild-type, mean = 0.1 tumors per mouse vs 6.6 tumors per mouse, difference = 6.5 tumors per mouse, 95% confidence interval = 4.9 to 8.0 tumors per mouse, P < .001, two-sided test). Increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in colon tumors vs normal colon was suppressed by loss of PPAR-δ expression. These findings indicate that PPAR-δ has a crucial role in promoting colonic tumorigenesis. PMID:19436036

  11. Targeted antigen delivery and activation of dendritic cells in vivo: steps towards cost effective vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tacken, Paul J; Figdor, Carl G

    2011-02-01

    During the past decade, the immunotherapeutic potential of ex vivo generated professional antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs) has been explored in the clinic. Albeit safe, clinical results have thus far been limited. A major disadvantage of current cell-based dendritic cell (DC) therapies, preventing universal implementation of this form of immunotherapy, is the requirement that vaccines need to be tailor made for each individual. Targeted delivery of antigens to DC surface receptors in vivo would circumvent this laborious and expensive ex vivo culturing steps involved with these cell-based therapies. In addition, the opportunity to target natural and often rare DC subsets in vivo might have advantages over loading more artificial ex vivo cultured DCs. Preclinical studies show targeting antigens to DCs effectively induces humoral responses, while cellular responses are induced provided a DC maturation or activation stimulus is co-administered. Here, we discuss strategies to target antigens to distinct DC subsets and to simultaneously employ adjuvants to activate these cells to induce immunity.

  12. MET/HGF pathway activation as a paradigm of resistance to targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Brian; He, Tianfang; Gadgeel, Shirish

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to targeted therapeutics is a key issue limiting the long-term utility of these medications in the management of molecularly selected subsets of cancer patients, including patients with non-small cell lung cancer harboring oncogenic alterations affecting EGFR, ALK and other genes. Bypass resistance mediated by activation of MET kinase has emerged as a frequent, validated and pivotal resistance mechanism in multiple types of cancers. Biochemical understanding is accumulating to explain the unique role of MET in such bypass pathways, providing alternate downstream activation opportunities and intricate interactions during epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. Multiple diagnostic testing platforms have become available for selecting appropriate patients for MET targeting in a variety of settings. Importantly, in light of the failures of several earlier clinical studies of MET targeting agents, a large array of recent and current MET-focused trials are incorporating stricter patient selection and more robust predictive biomarkers providing hope for validation of MET targeting as a clinically impactful strategy. PMID:28164089

  13. Active Target-Time Projection Chambers for Reactions Induced by Rare Isotope Beams: Physics and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittig, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Weakly bound nuclear systems can be considered to represent a good testing-ground of our understanding of non-perturbative quantum systems. Great progress in experimental sensitivity has been attained by increase in rare isotope beam intensities and by the development of new high efficiency detectors. It is now possible to study reactions leading to bound and unbound states in systems with very unbalanced neutron to proton ratios. Application of Active Target-Time Projection Chambers to this domain of physics will be illustrated by experiments performed with existing detectors. The NSCL is developing an Active Target-Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC) to be used to study reactions induced by rare isotope beams at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Facility (NSCL) and at the future Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). The AT-TPC counter gas acts as both a target and detector, allowing investigations of fusion, isobaric analog states, cluster structure of light nuclei and transfer reactions to be conducted without significant loss in resolution due to the thickness of the target. The high efficiency and low threshold of the AT-TPC will allow investigations of fission barriers and giant resonances with fast fragmentation rare isotope beams. This detector type needs typically a large number of electronic channels (order of magnitude 10,000) and a high speed DAQ. A reduced size prototype detector with prototype electronics has been realized and used in several experiments. A short description of other detectors of this type under development will be given.

  14. 50 CFR 218.110 - Specified activity and specified geographical area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... paragraph (c) of this section. (b) The taking of marine mammals by the Navy is only authorized if it occurs... not included in the Offshore area). (c) The taking of marine mammals by the Navy is only authorized if... the following mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) sources, high frequency active sonar (HFAS)...

  15. A spectrophotometric assay for routine measurement of mammalian target of rapamycin activity in cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Dekter, Hinke E; Romijn, Fred P H T M; Temmink, Wouter P M; van Pelt, Johannes; de Fijter, Johan W; Smit, Nico P M

    2010-08-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important mediator in the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. mTOR is the target of immunosuppressive drugs, such as rapamycin and everolimus, that are used in transplant patients but also for the treatment of various cancers. We have developed a method for mTOR activity measurement in cell lysates that measures the phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) protocol. Using an optimized lysis composition, activity could be measured in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from blood. For the PBMCs, intra- and interassay variations of 7 and 10%, respectively, were found using one lot number of the kit. With different lot numbers, the interassay variation increased up to 21%. Activity remained constant for PBMC pool samples on storage for a period of more than 7 months. Activity could also be measured in CD3+ T-cells isolated from blood. In vitro experiments revealed maximum mTOR inhibition of 30% in PBMCs and 44% in T-cells. The in vitro inhibition in PBMCs could also be demonstrated by Western blotting. The mTOR activity measurements may be used to show in vivo inhibition in renal allograft patients during everolimus treatment and to study mTOR activity in various (tumor) cell types.

  16. Diacylglycerol Kinases (DGKs): Novel Targets for Improving T Cell Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Riese, Matthew J.; Moon, Edmund K.; Johnson, Bryon D.; Albelda, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) are a family of enzymes that catalyze the metabolism of diacylglycerol (DAG). Two isoforms of DGK, DGKα, and DGKζ, specifically regulate the pool of DAG that is generated as a second messenger after stimulation of the T cell receptor (TCR). Deletion of either isoform in mouse models results in T cells bearing a hyperresponsive phenotype and enhanced T cell activity against malignancy. Whereas, DGKζ appears to be the dominant isoform in T cells, rationale exists for targeting both isoforms individually or coordinately. Additional work is needed to rigorously identify the molecular changes that result from deletion of DGKs in order to understand how DAG contributes to T cell activation, the effect of DGK inhibition in human T cells, and to rationally develop combined immunotherapeutic strategies that target DGKs. PMID:27800476

  17. Improving target discrimination ability of active polarization imagers by spectral broadening.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Lijo; Boffety, Matthieu; Goudail, François

    2015-12-28

    Active polarization imagers using liquid crystal variable retarders (LCVR) usually operate at one given wavelength for the sake of polarimetric accuracy. However, this often requires to use narrowband filters which reduces the amount of light entering the system and thus the signal-to-noise ratio. For applications where good target/background discriminability (contrast) is required rather than polarimetric accuracy, this may not be the best choice. In this Article, we address contrast optimization in the case of broadband active polarimetric imaging for target detection applications. Through numerical and experimental studies, we show that broadening the spectrum of the light entering the system can increase the contrast between two regions of a scene. Furthermore, we show that this contrast can be further increased by taking into account the spectral dependence of the scene and of the polarimetric properties of the imaging system in the optimization of the measurement procedure.

  18. First inverse-kinematics fission measurements in a gaseous active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Farget, F.; Acosta, L.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Babo, M.; Boulay, F.; Caamaño, M.; Damoy, S.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Galaviz, D.; Grinyer, G. F.; Grinyer, J.; Harakeh, M. N.; Konczykowski, P.; Martel, I.; Pancin, J.; Randisi, G.; Renzi, F.; Roger, T.; Sánchez-Benítez, A. M.; Teubig, P.; Vandebrouck, M.

    2017-02-01

    The fission of a variety of actinides was induced by fusion and transfer reactions between a 238U beam and 12C nuclei, in the active target MAYA. The performance of MAYA was studied, as well as its capability to reconstruct the fission-fragment trajectories. Furthermore, a full characterization of the different transfer reactions was achieved, and the populated excitation-energy distributions were investigated as a function of the kinetic energy in the entrance channel. The ratio between transfer- and fusion-induced fission cross-sections was also determined, in order to investigate the competition between both reaction types and its evolution with the incident energy. The experimental results will be discussed with a view to forthcoming radioactive-ion beam facilities, and next-generation active-target setups.

  19. A mask for high-intensity heavy-ion beams in the MAYA active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Pancin, J.; Damoy, S.; Roger, T.; Babo, M.; Caamaño, M.; Farget, F.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jacquot, B.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Ramos, D.; Suzuki, D.

    2014-12-01

    The use of high-intensity and/or heavy-ion beams in active targets and time-projection chambers is often limited by the strong ionization produced by the beam. Besides the difficulties associated with the saturation of the detector and electronics, beam-related signals may hide the physical events of interest or reduce the detector performance. In addition, space-charge effects may deteriorate the homogeneity of the electric drift field and distort the subsequent reconstruction of particle trajectories. In anticipation of future projects involving such conditions, a dedicated beam mask has been developed and tested in the MAYA active target. Experimental results with a 136Xe beam are presented.

  20. 12C+p resonant elastic scattering in the Maya active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambi, S.; Raabe, R.; Borge, M. J. G.; Caamano, M.; Damoy, S.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Flavigny, F.; Fynbo, H.; Gibelin, J.; Grinyer, G. F.; Heinz, A.; Jonson, B.; Khodery, M.; Nilsson, T.; Orlandi, R.; Pancin, J.; Perez-Loureiro, D.; Randisi, G.; Ribeiro, G.; Roger, T.; Suzuki, D.; Tengblad, O.; Thies, R.; Datta, U.

    2015-03-01

    In a proof-of-principle measurement, the Maya active target detector was employed for a 12C( p, p) resonant elastic scattering experiment in inverse kinematics. The excitation energy region from 0 to 3MeV above the proton breakup threshold in 13N was investigated in a single measurement. By using the capability of the detector to localize the reaction vertex and record the tracks of the recoiling protons, data covering a large solid angle could be utilized, at the same time keeping an energy resolution comparable with that of direct-kinematics measurements. The excitation spectrum in 13N was fitted using the R-matrix formalism. The level parameters extracted are in good agreement with previous studies. The active target proved its potential for the study of resonant elastic scattering in inverse kinematics with radioactive beams, when detection efficiency is of primary importance.

  1. Resonant proton scattering on 46Ar using the Active-Target Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradt, J.; Ahn, T.; Ayyad Limonge, Y.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro Novo, S.; Carpenter, L.; Kuchera, M. P.; Lynch, W.; Mittig, W.; Rost, S.; Watwood, N.; Barney, J.; Datta, U.; Estee, J.; Gillibert, A.; Manfredi, J.; Morfouace, P.; Perez Loureiro, D.; Pollacco, E.; Sammut, J.; Sweany, S.

    2016-09-01

    A well-known technique for studying the single-particle properties of neutron-rich nuclei is to use resonant proton scattering on a parent nucleus to populate the isobaric analog states of the corresponding neutron-rich nucleus. The locations and amplitudes of these resonances are directly related to the structure of the nucleus of interest by isospin symmetry. We performed an experiment of this type at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory to commission the recently completed Active-Target Time Projection Chamber (AT-TPC). A 4.6-MeV/u radioactive beam of 46Ar was injected into the AT-TPC. The detector was filled with isobutane gas-which provided the protons for the reaction and served as the tracking medium-and placed inside a 2-T magnetic field. We will present preliminary results from this experiment and discuss the benefits of the active-target method for this type of measurement.

  2. An underwater ship fault detection method based on Sonar image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Shi; Fang-jian, Shan; Bo, Cong; Wei, Qiu

    2016-02-01

    For the research of underwater ship fault detection method in conditions of sailing on the ocean especially in poor visibility muddy sea, a fault detection method under the assist of sonar image processing was proposed. Firstly, did sonar image denoising using the algorithm of pulse coupled neural network (PCNN); secondly, edge feature extraction for the image after denoising was carried out by morphological wavelet transform; Finally, interested regions Using relevant tracking method were taken, namely fault area mapping. The simulation results presented here proved the feasibility and effectiveness of the sonar image processing in underwater fault detection system.

  3. Simulation, manufacturing, and evaluation of a sonar for a miniaturized submersible explorer.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Jonas; Edqvist, Erik; Kratz, Henrik; Almqvist, Monica; Thornell, Greger

    2010-01-01

    Single-beam side-scan sonar elements, to be fitted on a miniaturized submersible, are here simulated, manufactured, and evaluated. Finite element analysis simulations are compared with measurements, and an overall observation is that the agreement between simulations and measurements deviates from the measured values of 1.5 to 2 degrees, for the narrow lobe angle, by less than 10% for most models. An overall finding is that the lobe width along the track direction can be accurately simulated and, hence, the resolution of the sonars can be predicted. This paper presents, to the authors' knowledge, the world's smallest side-scan sonars.

  4. The Effects of Towfish Motion on Sidescan Sonar Images: Extension to a Multiple-Beam Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    Towfish Motion on Sidescan Sonar Images: Extension to a Multiple -Beam Device Acceso NTIS CRA&I S.D. Anstee u; ,-, o* , J.* ttiicatorn By "By...THE EFFECTS OF TOWFISH MOTION ON SIDESCAN SONAR IMAGES: EXTENSION TO A MULTIPLE -BEAM DEVICE S, S.D. ANSTEE 6 2 9 Nm MRL-TN-660 FEBRUARY 1994 Al DTIC...previously used to estimate the geometrical effects oftowjish motion on single-beam sidescan sonar images is modified to simulate a multiple -beam

  5. Targeting of peptide conjugated magnetic nanoparticles to urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expressing cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Line; Unmack Larsen, Esben Kjær; Nielsen, Erik Holm; Iversen, Frank; Liu, Zhuo; Thomsen, Karen; Pedersen, Michael; Skrydstrup, Troels; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Ploug, Michael; Kjems, Jørgen

    2013-08-01

    Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific targeting peptide onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) coated USPIO nanoparticles by click chemistry resulted in a five times higher uptake in vitro in a uPAR positive cell line compared to nanoparticles carrying a non-binding control peptide. In accordance with specific receptor-mediated recognition, a low uptake was observed in the presence of an excess of ATF, a natural ligand for uPAR. The uPAR specific magnetic nanoparticles can potentially provide a useful supplement for tumor patient management when combined with MRI and drug delivery.Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles are currently being used as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent in vivo, mainly by their passive accumulation in tissues of interest. However, a higher specificity can ideally be achieved when the nanoparticles are targeted towards cell specific receptors and this may also facilitate specific drug delivery by an enhanced target-mediated endocytosis. We report efficient peptide-mediated targeting of magnetic nanoparticles to cells expressing the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), a surface biomarker for poor patient prognosis shared by several cancers including breast, colorectal, and gastric cancers. Conjugation of a uPAR specific

  6. BCG vaccination induces HIV target cell activation in HIV-exposed infants in a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, Melanie A.; Hesseling, Anneke C.; Mohar, Isaac; Myer, Landon; Azenkot, Tali; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.; Hanekom, Willem; Cotton, Mark F.; Crispe, I. Nicholas; Sodora, Donald L.; Jaspan, Heather B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine is administered at birth to protect infants against tuberculosis throughout Africa, where most perinatal HIV-1 transmission occurs. We examined whether BCG vaccination alters the levels of activated HIV target T cells in HIV-exposed South African infants. METHODS. HIV-exposed infants were randomized to receive routine (at birth) or delayed (at 8 weeks) BCG vaccination. Activated and CCR5-expressing peripheral blood CD4+ T cell, monocyte, and NK cell frequencies were evaluated by flow cytometry and immune gene expression via PCR using Biomark (Fluidigm). RESULTS. Of 149 infants randomized, 92% (n = 137) were retained at 6 weeks: 71 in the routine BCG arm and 66 in the delayed arm. Routine BCG vaccination led to a 3-fold increase in systemic activation of HIV target CD4+CCR5+ T cells (HLA-DR+CD38+) at 6 weeks (0.25% at birth versus 0.08% in delayed vaccination groups; P = 0.029), which persisted until 8 weeks of age when the delayed arm was vaccinated. Vaccination of the infants in the delayed arm at 8 weeks resulted in a similar increase in activated CD4+CCR5+ T cells. The increase in activated T cells was associated with increased levels of MHC class II transactivator (CIITA), IL12RB1, and IFN-α1 transcripts within peripheral blood mononuclear cells but minimal changes in innate cells. CONCLUSION. BCG vaccination induces immune changes in HIV-exposed infants, including an increase in the proportion of activated CCR5+CD4+ HIV target cells. These findings provide insight into optimal BCG vaccine timing to minimize the risks of HIV transmissions to exposed infants while preserving potential benefits conferred by BCG vaccination. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02062580. FUNDING. This trial was sponsored by the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation (MV-00-9-900-01871-0-00) and the Thrasher Foundation (NR-0095); for details, see Acknowledgments.

  7. Cortical fMRI activation produced by attentive tracking of moving targets.

    PubMed

    Culham, J C; Brandt, S A; Cavanagh, P; Kanwisher, N G; Dale, A M; Tootell, R B

    1998-11-01

    Attention can be used to keep track of moving items, particularly when there are multiple targets of interest that cannot all be followed with eye movements. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate cortical regions involved in attentive tracking. Cortical flattening techniques facilitated within-subject comparisons of activation produced by attentive tracking, visual motion, discrete attention shifts, and eye movements. In the main task, subjects viewed a display of nine green "bouncing balls" and used attention to mentally track a subset of them while fixating. At the start of each attentive-tracking condition, several target balls (e.g., 3/9) turned red for 2 s and then reverted to green. Subjects then used attention to keep track of the previously indicated targets, which were otherwise indistinguishable from the nontargets. Attentive-tracking conditions alternated with passive viewing of the same display when no targets had been indicated. Subjects were pretested with an eye-movement monitor to ensure they could perform the task accurately while fixating. For seven subjects, functional activation was superimposed on each individual's cortically unfolded surface. Comparisons between attentive tracking and passive viewing revealed bilateral activation in parietal cortex (intraparietal sulcus, postcentral sulcus, superior parietal lobule, and precuneus), frontal cortex (frontal eye fields and precentral sulcus), and the MT complex (including motion-selective areas MT and MST). Attentional enhancement was absent in early visual areas and weak in the MT complex. However, in parietal and frontal areas, the signal change produced by the moving stimuli was more than doubled when items were tracked attentively. Comparisons between attentive tracking and attention shifting revealed essentially identical activation patterns that differed only in the magnitude of activation. This suggests that parietal cortex is involved not only in discrete

  8. Folate receptor targeted three-layered micelles and hydrogels for gene delivery to activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Mariam; Li, Ying; Abebe, Daniel G; Xie, Yuran; Kandil, Rima; Kraus, Teresa; Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; Fujiwara, Tomoko; Merkel, Olivia M

    2016-12-28

    New folic acid (FA) coupled three layered micelles (3LM) were designed to encapsulate DNA, and their application as delivery system that specifically targets activated macrophages was investigated for new treatment options in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). FA coupled poly(l-lactide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (FA-PEG-PLLA) was synthesized via the NHS-ester activated/amine coupling method. Fluorescein labeled folic acid was used for flow cytometric detection of the expression of functional folic receptor β in LPS-activated and resting macrophages. FA coupled 3LM were formulated in a two-step procedure and characterized regarding hydrodynamic diameters and zeta potentials. The presence of the targeting ligand was shown not to increase the size of the 3LM compared to their non-targeted counterparts. Targeted and non-targeted 3LM were used in vitro to optimize uptake conditions in the RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line. The amount of FA coupled polymer in the final formulation was found to be optimal at 75% FA-PEG-PLLA and 25% PLLA-PEG-PLLA. Subsequently, transgene expression in vitro in RAW 264.7 cells and ex vivo in primary activated and resting mouse macrophages was determined as a function of FR-mediated internalization of 3LM encapsulating GFP expressing plasmid. FR-overexpressing activated cells, as successfully identified by internalization of FA-fluorescein, showed significantly higher GFP expression in vitro and ex vivo than resting macrophages with only a basal level of FR expression. Lastly, injectable hydrogels as depot formulation were formed by stereocomplexation, and their degradation, DNA release profiles, and dissociation into intact 3LM were found to be beneficial for potential in vivo application. Our findings confirm that FA-3LM are taken up by activated macrophages via folate receptor mediated endocytosis and that their hydrogels release intact 3LM for efficient transfection of primary macrophages. Therefore, FA-3LM could become a promising delivery system

  9. ESAM: Endocrine inspired Sensor Activation Mechanism for multi-target tracking in WSNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adil Mahdi, Omar; Wahab, Ainuddin Wahid Abdul; Idris, Mohd Yamani Idna; Znaid, Ammar Abu; Khan, Suleman; Al-Mayouf, Yusor Rafid Bahar

    2016-10-01

    Target tracking is a significant application of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in which deployment of self-organizing and energy efficient algorithms is required. The tracking accuracy increases as more sensor nodes are activated around the target but more energy is consumed. Thus, in this study, we focus on limiting the number of sensors by forming an ad-hoc network that operates autonomously. This will reduce the energy consumption and prolong the sensor network lifetime. In this paper, we propose a fully distributed algorithm, an Endocrine inspired Sensor Activation Mechanism for multi target-tracking (ESAM) which reflecting the properties of real life sensor activation system based on the information circulating principle in the endocrine system of the human body. Sensor nodes in our network are secreting different hormones according to certain rules. The hormone level enables the nodes to regulate an efficient sleep and wake up cycle of nodes to reduce the energy consumption. It is evident from the simulation results that the proposed ESAM in autonomous sensor network exhibits a stable performance without the need of commands from a central controller. Moreover, the proposed ESAM generates more efficient and persistent results as compared to other algorithms for tracking an invading object.

  10. Identification of therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer through active tyrosine kinase profiling

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña, Alberto; Pandiella, Atanasio

    2015-01-01

    The activation status of a set of pro-oncogenic tyrosine kinases in ovarian cancer patient samples was analyzed to define potential therapeutic targets. Frequent activation of HER family receptor tyrosine kinases, especially HER2, was observed. Studies in ovarian cancer cell lines confirmed the activation of HER2. Moreover, knockdown of HER2 caused a strong inhibition of their proliferation. Analyses of the action of agents that target HER2 indicated that the antibody drug conjugate trastuzumab-emtansine (T-DM1) caused a substantial antitumoral effect in vivo and in vitro, and potentiated the action of drugs used in the therapy of ovarian cancer. T-DM1 provoked cell cycle arrest in mitosis, and caused the appearance of aberrant mitotic spindles in cells treated with the drug. Biochemical experiments confirmed accumulation of the mitotic markers phospho-Histone H3 and phospho-BUBR1 in cells treated with the drug. Prolonged treatment of ovarian cancer cells with T-DM1 provoked the appearance of multinucleated cells which later led to cell death. Together, these data indicate that HER2 represents an important oncogene in ovarian cancer, and suggest that targeting this tyrosine kinase with T-DM1 may be therapeutically effective, especially in ovarian tumors with high content of HER2. PMID:26336133

  11. Novel small molecules targeting ciliary transport of Smoothened and oncogenic Hedgehog pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bomi; Messias, Ana C.; Schorpp, Kenji; Geerlof, Arie; Schneider, Günter; Saur, Dieter; Hadian, Kamyar; Sattler, Michael; Wanker, Erich E.; Hasenöder, Stefan; Lickert, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) Smoothened (Smo) to the primary cilium (PC) is a potential target to inhibit oncogenic Hh pathway activation in a large number of tumors. One drawback is the appearance of Smo mutations that resist drug treatment, which is a common reason for cancer treatment failure. Here, we undertook a high content screen with compounds in preclinical or clinical development and identified ten small molecules that prevent constitutive active mutant SmoM2 transport into PC for subsequent Hh pathway activation. Eight of the ten small molecules act through direct interference with the G protein-coupled receptor associated sorting protein 2 (Gprasp2)-SmoM2 ciliary targeting complex, whereas one antagonist of ionotropic receptors prevents intracellular trafficking of Smo to the PC. Together, these findings identify several compounds with the potential to treat drug-resistant SmoM2-driven cancer forms, but also reveal off-target effects of established drugs in the clinics. PMID:26931153

  12. Vinculin activators target integrins from within the cell to increase melanoma sensitivity to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Elke S.; Folkmann, Andrew W.; Henry, Michael D.; DeMali, Kris A.

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is an aggressive skin disease for which there are no effective therapies. Emerging evidence indicates that melanomas can be sensitized to chemotherapy by increasing integrin function. Current integrin therapies work by targeting the extracellular domain, resulting in complete gains or losses of integrin function that lead to mechanism-based toxicities. An attractive alternative approach is to target proteins, such as vinculin, that associate with the integrin cytoplasmic domains and regulate its ligand binding properties. Here we report that a novel reagent, denoted vinculin activating peptide or VAP, increases integrin activity from within the cell, as measured by elevated: (1) numbers of active integrins, (2) adhesion of cells to extracellular matrix ligands, (3) numbers of cell-matrix adhesions, and (4) downstream signaling. These effects are dependent on both integrins and a key regulatory residue A50 in the vinculin head domain. We further show that VAP dramatically increases the sensitivity of melanomas to chemotherapy in clonal growth assays and in vivo mouse models of melanoma. Finally, we demonstrate that the increase in chemosensitivity results from increases in DNA damage-induced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. Collectively these findings demonstrate for the first time that integrin function can be manipulated from within the cell and validate integrins as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of chemoresistant melanomas. PMID:21460181

  13. Mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is required for cartilage development

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yingjie; Yang, Xu; Yang, Wentian; Charbonneau, Cherie; Chen, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical stress regulates development by modulating cell signaling and gene expression. However, the cytoplasmic components mediating mechanotransduction remain unclear. In this study, elimination of muscle contraction during chicken embryonic development resulted in a reduction in the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the cartilaginous growth plate. Inhibition of mTOR activity led to significant inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation, cartilage tissue growth, and expression of chondrogenic genes, including Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a critical mediator of mechanotransduction. Conversely, cyclic loading (1 Hz, 5% matrix deformation) of embryonic chicken growth plate chondrocytes in 3-dimensional (3D) collagen scaffolding induced sustained activation of mTOR. Mechanical activation of mTOR occurred in serum-free medium, indicating that it is independent of growth factor or nutrients. Treatment of chondrocytes with Rapa abolished mechanical activation of cell proliferation and Ihh gene expression. Cyclic loading of chondroprogenitor cells deficient in SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp2) further enhanced mechanical activation of mTOR, cell proliferation, and chondrogenic gene expression. This result suggests that Shp2 is an antagonist of mechanotransduction through inhibition of mTOR activity. Our data demonstrate that mechanical activation of mTOR is necessary for cell proliferation, chondrogenesis, and cartilage growth during bone development, and that mTOR is an essential mechanotransduction component modulated by Shp2 in the cytoplasm.—Guan, Y., Yang, X., Yang, W., Charbonneau, C., Chen, Q. Mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is required for cartilage development. PMID:25002119

  14. Adaptable active contour model with applications to infrared ship target segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Lingling; Wang, Xianghai; Wan, Yu

    2016-07-01

    Active contour model is widely and popularly used in the field of image segmentation because of its superior theoretical properties and efficient numerical methods. An algorithm to segment a ship target in infrared (IR) images using Chan-Vese (C-V) active contour model is proposed here. The method effectively integrates both image regional and boundary information by an adaptable weight function. The method can segment IR ship images, which usually contain noises, blurry boundaries, and heterogeneous regions. In addition, compared with the state-of-the-art methods, experiment results demonstrate the performance and effectiveness of this method.

  15. Alkynol natural products target ALDH2 in cancer cells by irreversible binding to the active site.

    PubMed

    Heydenreuter, Wolfgang; Kunold, Elena; Sieber, Stephan A

    2015-11-11

    Falcarinol and stipudiol are natural products with potent anti-cancer activity found in several vegetables. Here, we use a chemical proteomic strategy to identify ALDH2 as a molecular target of falcarinol in cancer cells and confirm enzyme inhibition via covalent alkylation of the active site. Furthermore, the synthesis of stipudiol led to the observation that ALDH2 exhibits preference for alkynol-based binders. Inhibition of ALDH2 impairs detoxification of reactive aldehydes and limits oxidative stress response, two crucial pathways for cellular viability.

  16. Clinical regressions and broad immune activation following combination therapy targeting human NKT cells in myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Joshua; Neparidze, Natalia; Zhang, Lin; Nair, Shiny; Monesmith, Tamara; Sundaram, Ranjini; Miesowicz, Fred; Dhodapkar, Kavita M.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer T (iNKT) cells can help mediate immune surveillance against tumors in mice. Prior studies targeting human iNKT cells were limited to therapy of advanced cancer and led to only modest activation of innate immunity. Clinical myeloma is preceded by an asymptomatic precursor phase. Lenalidomide was shown to mediate antigen-specific costimulation of human iNKT cells. We treated 6 patients with asymptomatic myeloma with 3 cycles of combination of α-galactosylceramide–loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells and low-dose lenalidomide. Therapy was well tolerated and led to reduction in tumor-associated monoclonal immunoglobulin in 3 of 4 patients with measurable disease. Combination therapy led to activation-induced decline in measurable iNKT cells and activation of NK cells with an increase in NKG2D and CD56 expression. Treatment also led to activation of monocytes with an increase in CD16 expression. Each cycle of therapy was associated with induction of eosinophilia as well as an increase in serum soluble IL2 receptor. Clinical responses correlated with pre-existing or treatment-induced antitumor T-cell immunity. These data demonstrate synergistic activation of several innate immune cells by this combination and the capacity to mediate tumor regression. Combination therapies targeting iNKT cells may be of benefit toward prevention of cancer in humans (trial registered at clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00698776). PMID:23100308

  17. Clinical regressions and broad immune activation following combination therapy targeting human NKT cells in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joshua; Neparidze, Natalia; Zhang, Lin; Nair, Shiny; Monesmith, Tamara; Sundaram, Ranjini; Miesowicz, Fred; Dhodapkar, Kavita M; Dhodapkar, Madhav V

    2013-01-17

    Natural killer T (iNKT) cells can help mediate immune surveillance against tumors in mice. Prior studies targeting human iNKT cells were limited to therapy of advanced cancer and led to only modest activation of innate immunity. Clinical myeloma is preceded by an asymptomatic precursor phase. Lenalidomide was shown to mediate antigen-specific costimulation of human iNKT cells. We treated 6 patients with asymptomatic myeloma with 3 cycles of combination of α-galactosylceramide-loaded monocyte-derived dendritic cells and low-dose lenalidomide. Therapy was well tolerated and led to reduction in tumor-associated monoclonal immunoglobulin in 3 of 4 patients with measurable disease. Combination therapy led to activation-induced decline in measurable iNKT cells and activation of NK cells with an increase in NKG2D and CD56 expression. Treatment also led to activation of monocytes with an increase in CD16 expression. Each cycle of therapy was associated with induction of eosinophilia as well as an increase in serum soluble IL2 receptor. Clinical responses correlated with pre-existing or treatment-induced antitumor T-cell immunity. These data demonstrate synergistic activation of several innate immune cells by this combination and the capacity to mediate tumor regression. Combination therapies targeting iNKT cells may be of benefit toward prevention of cancer in humans.

  18. Traumatic Brain Injury Stimulates Neural Stem Cell Proliferation via Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Seekaew, Pich

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neural stem cells in the adult brain possess the ability to remain quiescent until needed in tissue homeostasis or repair. It was previously shown that traumatic brain injury (TBI) stimulated neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in the adult hippocampus, indicating an innate repair mechanism, but it is unknown how TBI promotes NSC proliferation. In the present study, we observed dramatic activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the hippocampus of mice with TBI from controlled cortical impact (CCI). The peak of mTORC1 activation in the hippocampal subgranular zone, where NSCs reside, is 24–48 h after trauma, correlating with the peak of TBI-enhanced NSC proliferation. By use of a Nestin-GFP transgenic mouse, in which GFP is ectopically expressed in the NSCs, we found that TBI activated mTORC1 in NSCs. With 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine labeling, we observed that TBI increased mTORC1 activation in proliferating NSCs. Furthermore, administration of rapamycin abolished TBI-promoted NSC proliferation. Taken together, these data indicate that mTORC1 activation is required for NSC proliferation postinjury, and thus might serve as a therapeutic target for interventions to augment neurogenesis for brain repair after TBI. PMID:27822507

  19. Cancer Stem Cells: The Potential Targets of Chinese Medicines and Their Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ming; Tan, Hor Yue; Li, Sha; Cheung, Fan; Wang, Ning; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Feng, Yibin

    2016-01-01

    The pivotal role of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the initiation and progression of malignancies has been rigorously validated, and the specific methods for identifying and isolating the CSCs from the parental cancer population have also been rapidly developed in recent years. This review aims to provide an overview of recent research progress of Chinese medicines (CMs) and their active compounds in inhibiting tumor progression by targeting CSCs. A great deal of CMs and their active compounds, such as Antrodia camphorate, berberine, resveratrol, and curcumin have been shown to regress CSCs, in terms of reversing drug resistance, inducing cell death and inhibiting cell proliferation as well as metastasis. Furthermore, one of the active compounds in coptis, berbamine may inhibit tumor progression by modulating microRNAs to regulate CSCs. The underlying molecular mechanisms and related signaling pathways involved in these processes were also discussed and concluded in this paper. Overall, the use of CMs and their active compounds may be a promising therapeutic strategy to eradicate cancer by targeting CSCs. However, further studies are needed to clarify the potential of clinical application of CMs and their active compounds as complementary and alternative therapy in this field. PMID:27338343

  20. A novel BK channel-targeted peptide suppresses sound evoked activity in the mouse inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Scott, L. L.; Brecht, E. J.; Philpo, A.; Iyer, S.; Wu, N. S.; Mihic, S. J.; Aldrich, R. W.; Pierce, J.; Walton, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated (BK) channels are broadly expressed in neurons and muscle where they modulate cellular activity. Decades of research support an interest in pharmaceutical applications for modulating BK channel function. Here we report a novel BK channel-targeted peptide with functional activity in vitro and in vivo. This 9-amino acid peptide, LS3, has a unique action, suppressing channel gating rather than blocking the pore of heterologously expressed human BK channels. With an IC50 in the high picomolar range, the apparent affinity is higher than known high affinity BK channel toxins. LS3 suppresses locomotor activity via a BK channel-specific mechanism in wild-type or BK channel-humanized Caenorhabditis elegans. Topical application on the dural surface of the auditory midbrain in mouse suppresses sound evoked neural activity, similar to a well-characterized pore blocker of the BK channel. Moreover, this novel ion channel-targeted peptide rapidly crosses the BBB after systemic delivery to modulate auditory processing. Thus, a potent BK channel peptide modulator is open to neurological applications, such as preventing audiogenic seizures that originate in the auditory midbrain. PMID:28195225

  1. Targeting VE-PTP activates TIE2 and stabilizes the ocular vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jikui; Frye, Maike; Lee, Bonnie L.; Reinardy, Jessica L.; McClung, Joseph M.; Ding, Kun; Kojima, Masashi; Xia, Huiming; Seidel, Christopher; Silva, Raquel Lima e; Dong, Aling; Hackett, Sean F.; Wang, Jiangxia; Howard, Brian W.; Vestweber, Dietmar; Kontos, Christopher D.; Peters, Kevin G.; Campochiaro, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal and choroidal neovascularization (NV) and vascular leakage contribute to visual impairment in several common ocular diseases. The angiopoietin/TIE2 (ANG/TIE2) pathway maintains vascular integrity, and negative regulators of this pathway are potential therapeutic targets for these diseases. Here, we demonstrated that vascular endothelial-protein tyrosine phosphatase (VE-PTP), which negatively regulates TIE2 activation, is upregulated in hypoxic vascular endothelial cells, particularly in retinal NV. Intraocular injection of an anti–VE-PTP antibody previously shown to activate TIE2 suppressed ocular NV. Furthermore, a small-molecule inhibitor of VE-PTP catalytic activity (AKB-9778) activated TIE2, enhanced ANG1-induced TIE2 activation, and stimulated phosphorylation of signaling molecules in the TIE2 pathway, including AKT, eNOS, and ERK. In mouse models of neovascular age-related macular degeneration, AKB-9778 induced phosphorylation of TIE2 and strongly suppressed NV. Ischemia-induced retinal NV, which is relevant to diabetic retinopathy, was accentuated by the induction of ANG2 but inhibited by AKB-9778, even in the presence of high levels of ANG2. AKB-9778 also blocked VEGF-induced leakage from dermal and retinal vessels and prevented exudative retinal detachments in double-transgenic mice with high expression of VEGF in photoreceptors. These data support targeting VE-PTP to stabilize retinal and choroidal blood vessels and suggest that this strategy has potential for patients with a wide variety of retinal and choroidal vascular diseases PMID:25180601

  2. Evaluation of Giardia lamblia thioredoxin reductase as drug activating enzyme and as drug target.

    PubMed

    Leitsch, David; Müller, Joachim; Müller, Norbert

    2016-12-01

    The antioxidative enzyme thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) has been suggested to be a drug target in several pathogens, including the protist parasite Giardia lamblia. TrxR is also believed to catalyse the reduction of nitro drugs, e.g. metronidazole and furazolidone, a reaction required to render these compounds toxic to G. lamblia and other microaerophiles/anaerobes. It was the objective of this study to assess the potential of TrxR as a drug target in G. lamblia and to find direct evidence for the role of this enzyme in the activation of metronidazole and other nitro drugs. TrxR was overexpressed approximately 10-fold in G. lamblia WB C6 cells by placing the trxR gene behind the arginine deiminase (ADI) promoter on a plasmid. Likewise, a mutant TrxR with a defective disulphide reductase catalytic site was strongly expressed in another G. lamblia WB C6 cell line. Susceptibilities to five antigiardial drugs, i.e. metronidazole, furazolidone, nitazoxanide, albendazole and auranofin were determined in both transfectant cell lines and compared to wildtype. Further, the impact of all five drugs on TrxR activity in vivo was measured. Overexpression of TrxR rendered G. lamblia WB C6 more susceptible to metronidazole and furazolidone but not to nitazoxanide, albendazole, and auranofin. Of all five drugs tested, only auranofin had an appreciably negative effect on TrxR activity in vivo, albeit to a much smaller extent than expected. Overexpression of TrxR and mutant TrxR had hardly any impact on growth of G. lamblia WB C6, although the enzyme also exerts a strong NADPH oxidase activity which is a source of oxidative stress. Our results constitute first direct evidence for the notion that TrxR is an activator of metronidazole and furazolidone but rather question that it is a relevant drug target of presently used antigiardial drugs.

  3. Active Nerve Regeneration with Failed Target Reinnervation Drives Persistent Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Peripheral nerves can regenerate and, when injured, may cause neuropathic pain. We propose that the active regeneration process plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of neuropathic pain. In one commonly used rodent neuropathic pain model, pronounced pain behaviors follow ligation and cutting of the L5 spinal nerve. We found that the injured nerve regenerates into the sciatic nerve and functionally reinnervates target tissues: the regenerated nerve conducts electrical signals, mechanical responses, and tracers between the leg/hindpaw and axotomized sensory ganglion. The regenerating nerve is the primary source of abnormal spontaneous activity detected in vivo. Disrupting the regeneration inhibited pain. First, semaphorin 3A, an inhibitory axonal guidance molecule, reduced functional regeneration, spontaneous activity, and pain behaviors when applied to the injury site in vivo. Second, knockdown of the upregulated growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) with siRNA injected into the axotomized sensory ganglion reduced pain behaviors. We next examined the spared nerve injury model, in which pain behaviors are essentially permanent. The regeneration resulted in tangled GAP43-positive neuromas at the nerve injury site without target reinnervation. Perfusing the nerve stump with semaphorin 3A, but not removing the tangled fibers, prevented or reversed pain behaviors. This effect far outlasted the semaphorin 3A perfusion. Hence, in this model the long-lasting chronic pain may reflect the anatomical inability of regenerating nerves to successfully reinnervate target tissues, resulting in an ongoing futile regeneration process. We propose that specifically targeting the regeneration process may provide effective long-lasting pain relief in patients when functional reinnervation becomes impossible. PMID:28197545

  4. Early Results from the IMI-30 Towed Sonar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M. H.; Rognstad, M. R.; Tottori, S. N.; Davis, R. B.; Appelgate, T. B.; Johnson, P. D.; Kevis-Stirling, A.

    2006-12-01

    The Hawaii Mapping Research Group (HMRG) of the University of Hawaii has designed and built a 30 kHz deep-towed sonar, the IMI-30, which simultaneously collects interferometric bathymetry and backscatter data. The sonar is capable of being deployed to 6000 m water depth, where it is towed 100-500 m above the seafloor yielding a total swath width of 1-5 km for sidescan and somewhat less than that for bathymetry. The across-track resolution is <10 m for bathymetry depending on towing geometry and substrate type, and 0.3- 3 m for sidescan, depending on the selected transmit pulse length and tow vehicle altitude. The along-track resolution, which is dependent on vehicle speed and pulse repetition rate, varies between 0.6 and 3 meters. Here we report on data collected by the system during two different deployments in the Pacific: the IMI-30's initial field program in the Lau Basin in 2004 and the most recent survey using the system, south of Oahu in June of 2006. Between the 2004 Lau program and the June 2006 survey, several engineering improvements were made including: 1) changing the housings of the side-looking transducers from cast polyurethane to oil- filled polyethylene; 2) adding syntactic foam baffling to reduce surface bounce; 3) synchronizing sound velocimeter measurements with sonar transmit; 4) adding sub-bottom transducers and associated electronics to the tow vehicle; 5) adding two additional side-looking transducer rows per side, and 6) upgrading the surface and subsurface power supplies. This engineering effort has improved reliability of the system by eliminating transducer failures caused by seawater leakage and power supply over-temperature shutdown in tropical waters. Reducing the system noise - electrical, hydrodynamic, and acoustic - has improved data quality and extended the swath width. The addition of sub-bottom data acquisition further increases the utility of the IMI-30 system. Our presentation will document the engineering effort and

  5. TARGETING THE MITOCHONDRIA ACTIVATES TWO INDEPENDENT CELL DEATH PATHWAYS IN THE OVARIAN CANCER STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Alvero, Ayesha B.; Montagna, Michele K.; Holmberg, Jennie C.; Craveiro, Vinicius; Brown, David; Mor, Gil

    2013-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are responsible for tumor initiation and chemo-resistance. In ovarian cancer, the CD44+/MyD88+ ovarian cancer stem cells (OCSCs) are also able to repair the tumor and serve as tumor vascular progenitors. Targeting these cells is therefore necessary to improve treatment outcome and patient survival. The previous demonstration that the OCSCs are resistant to apoptotic cell death induced by conventional chemotherapy agents suggests that other forms of targeted therapy should be explored. We show in this study that targeting mitochondrial bioenergetics is a potent stimulus to induce caspase-independent cell death in a panel of OCSCs. Treatment of these cells with the novel isoflavone derivative, NV-128, significantly depressed mitochondrial function exhibited by decrease in ATP, Cox-I, and Cox-IV levels, and increase in mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. This promotes a state of “cellular starvation” that activates two independent pathways: 1) AMPKα1 pathway leading to mTOR inhibition; and 2) mitochondrial MEK/ERK pathway leading to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. The demonstration that a compound can specifically target the mitochondria to induce cell death in this otherwise chemo-resistant cell population opens a new venue for treating ovarian cancer patients. PMID:21677151

  6. Cancer Nanotechnology: The impact of passive and active targeting in the era of modern cancer biology☆

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Wu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Kamaly, Nazila; Farokhzad, Omid C

    2014-01-01

    Cancer nanotherapeutics are progressing at a steady rate; research and development in the field has experienced an exponential growth since early 2000’s. The path to the commercialization of oncology drugs is long and carries significant risk; however, there is considerable excitement that nanoparticle technologies may contribute to the success of cancer drug development. The pace at which pharmaceutical companies have formed partnerships to use proprietary nanoparticle technologies has considerably accelerated. It is now recognized that by enhancing the efficacy and/or tolerability of new drug candidates, nanotechnology can meaningfully contribute to create differentiated products and improve clinical outcome. This review describes the lessons learned since the commercialization of the first-generation nanomedicines including DOXIL® and Abraxane®. It explores our current understanding of targeted and non-targeted nanoparticles that are under various stages of development, including BIND-014 and MM-398. It highlights the opportunities and challenges faced by nanomedicines in contemporary oncology, where personalized medicine is increasingly the mainstay of cancer therapy. We revisit the fundamental concepts of enhanced permeability and retention effect (EPR) and explore the mechanisms proposed to enhance preferential “retention” in the tumor, whether using active targeting of nanoparticles, binding of drugs to their tumoral targets or the presence of tumor associated macrophages. The overall objective of this review is to enhance our understanding in the design and development of therapeutic nanoparticles for treatment of cancers. PMID:24270007

  7. Active brain targeting of a fluorescent P-gp substrate using polymeric magnetic nanocarrier system.

    PubMed

    Kirthivasan, B; Singh, D; Bommana, M M; Raut, S L; Squillante, E; Sadoqi, M

    2012-06-29

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NP) were developed for the active brain targeting of water-soluble P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate rhodamine 123 (Rh123). The NP matrix of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and methoxy poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(lactic acid) (M-PEG-PLA) was prepared by single emulsion solvent evaporation of polymers with oleic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (OAMNP) and Rh123. All formulations were characterized in terms of morphology, particle size, magnetic content and Rh123 encapsulation efficiency. The maximum encapsulation efficiency of Rh123 was 45 ± 3% and of OAMNP was 42 ± 4%. The brain targeting and biodistribution study was performed on Sprague Dawley rats (3 groups, n = 6). Rh123 (0.4 mg kg(-1)) was administered in saline form, NP containing Rh123, and NP containing Rh123 in the presence of a magnetic field (0.8 T). The fluorimetric analysis of brain homogenates revealed a significant uptake (p < 0.05) of Rh123 in the magnetically targeted group relative to controls. These results were supported by fluorescence microscopy. This study reveals the ability of magnetically targeted nanoparticles to deliver substances to the brain, the permeation of which would otherwise be inhibited by the P-gp system.

  8. Meta-analysis of primary target genes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Heinäniemi, Merja; Uski, J Oskari; Degenhardt, Tatjana; Carlberg, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are known for their critical role in the development of diseases, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer. Here, an in silico screening method is presented, which incorporates experiment- and informatics-derived evidence, such as DNA-binding data of PPAR subtypes to a panel of PPAR response elements (PPREs), PPRE location relative to the transcription start site (TSS) and PPRE conservation across multiple species, for more reliable prediction of PPREs. Results In vitro binding and in vivo functionality evidence agrees with in silico predictions, validating the approach. The experimental analysis of 30 putative PPREs in eight validated PPAR target genes indicates that each gene contains at least one functional, strong PPRE that occurs without positional bias relative to the TSS. An extended analysis of the cross-species conservation of PPREs reveals limited conservation of PPRE patterns, although PPAR target genes typically contain strong or multiple medium strength PPREs. Human chromosome 19 was screened using this method, with validation of six novel PPAR target genes. Conclusion An in silico screening approach is presented, which allows increased sensitivity of PPAR binding site and target gene detection. PMID:17650321

  9. Active brain targeting of a fluorescent P-gp substrate using polymeric magnetic nanocarrier system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirthivasan, B.; Singh, D.; Bommana, M. M.; Raut, S. L.; Squillante, E.; Sadoqi, M.

    2012-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NP) were developed for the active brain targeting of water-soluble P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate rhodamine 123 (Rh123). The NP matrix of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and methoxy poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(lactic acid) (M-PEG-PLA) was prepared by single emulsion solvent evaporation of polymers with oleic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (OAMNP) and Rh123. All formulations were characterized in terms of morphology, particle size, magnetic content and Rh123 encapsulation efficiency. The maximum encapsulation efficiency of Rh123 was 45 ± 3% and of OAMNP was 42 ± 4%. The brain targeting and biodistribution study was performed on Sprague Dawley rats (3 groups, n = 6). Rh123 (0.4 mg kg-1) was administered in saline form, NP containing Rh123, and NP containing Rh123 in the presence of a magnetic field (0.8 T). The fluorimetric analysis of brain homogenates revealed a significant uptake (p < 0.05) of Rh123 in the magnetically targeted group relative to controls. These results were supported by fluorescence microscopy. This study reveals the ability of magnetically targeted nanoparticles to deliver substances to the brain, the permeation of which would otherwise be inhibited by the P-gp system.

  10. GTPase ROP2 binds and promotes activation of target of rapamycin, TOR, in response to auxin.

    PubMed

    Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Makarian, Joelle; Srour, Ola; Geldreich, Angèle; Yang, Zhenbiao; Chicher, Johana; Hammann, Philippe; Ryabova, Lyubov A

    2017-02-28

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) promotes reinitiation at upstream ORFs (uORFs) in genes that play important roles in stem cell regulation and organogenesis in plants. Here, we report that the small GTPase ROP2, if activated by the phytohormone auxin, promotes activation of TOR, and thus translation reinitiation of uORF-containing mRNAs. Plants with high levels of active ROP2, including those expressing constitutively active ROP2 (CA-ROP2), contain high levels of active TOR ROP2 physically interacts with and, when GTP-bound, activates TOR in vitro TOR activation in response to auxin is abolished in ROP-deficient rop2 rop6 ROP4 RNAi plants. GFP-TOR can associate with endosome-like structures in ROP2-overexpressing plants, indicating that endosomes mediate ROP2 effects on TOR activation. CA-ROP2 is efficient in loading uORF-containing mRNAs onto polysomes and stimulates translation in protoplasts, and both processes are sensitive to TOR inhibitor AZD-8055. TOR inactivation abolishes ROP2 regulation of translation reinitiation, but not its effects on cytoskeleton or intracellular trafficking. These findings imply a mode of translation control whereby, as an upstream effector of TOR, ROP2 coordinates TOR function in translation reinitiation pathways in response to auxin.

  11. First results of a deep tow CHIRP sonar seafloor imaging system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parent, M.; Fang, Changle; O'Brien, Thomas F.; Danforth, William W.

    1993-01-01

    The latest and most innovative technology has been applied towards the development of a full-ocean depth multi-sensor sonar system using linear swept-FM (Chirp) technology. The seafloor imaging system (SIS- 7000) described herein uses Chirp sidescan sonar to provide high resolution imagery at long range, and Chirp subbottom sonar to provide high resolution profiles in both the near bottom and deeper subbottom. The tow vehicle contains a suite of full-ocean depth instrumentation for measuring various oceanographic parameters and for monitoring vehicle status. Top side systems include a sonar display and data logging system as well as real-time sensor status display and tow vehicle control system. This paper will present an overview of this system, describe its technology and capabilities, and present some initial results. 

  12. Mobile Robot Sonar Backscatter Algorithm for Automatically Distinguishing Walls, Fences and Hedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wen; Hinders, Mark

    2006-03-01

    An algorithm to distinguish brick walls, picket fences and hedges based on backscattered sonar echoes is described. The echo data are acquired by a mobile robot with a 50kHz computer-controlled sonar scanning system packaged as its sensor head. For several locations along a wall, fence or hedge a fan of backscatter sonar echoes are acquired and digitized as the sonar transducer is swept over a horizontal arc. Backscatter is then plotted vs. scan angle, with a series deformable templates fit to this data. The number of peaks in the best-fitting template indicates the presence and location of retro-reflectors, and allows automatic categorization of the various fences, hedges and brick walls.

  13. AUTOMATED PRODUCTION OF SEAGRASS MAPS FROM SIDESCAN SONAR IMAGERY: ACCURACY, VARIABILITY AND PATCH RESOLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maps of seagrass beds are useful for monitoring estuarine condition, managing habitats, and modeling estuarine processes. We recently developed inexpensive methods for collecting and classifying sidescan sonar (SSS) imagery for seagrass presence in turbid waters as shallow as 1-...

  14. The Cyclic Peptide Ecumicin Targeting ClpC1 Is Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Kim, Jin-Yong; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Akopian, Tatos; Hong, Seungpyo; Jin, Ying-Yu; Kandror, Olga; Kim, Jong-Woo; Lee, In-Ae; Lee, Sun-Young; McAlpine, James B.; Mulugeta, Surafel; Sunoqrot, Suhair; Wang, Yuehong; Yang, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Tae-Mi; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Pauli, Guido F.; Cho, Sanghyun

    2014-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) has lent urgency to finding new drug leads with novel modes of action. A high-throughput screening campaign of >65,000 actinomycete extracts for inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis viability identified ecumicin, a macrocyclic tridecapeptide that exerts potent, selective bactericidal activity against M. tuberculosis in vitro, including nonreplicating cells. Ecumicin retains activity against isolated multiple-drug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis. The subcutaneous administration to mice of ecumicin in a micellar formulation at 20 mg/kg body weight resulted in plasma and lung exposures exceeding the MIC. Complete inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth in the lungs of mice was achieved following 12 doses at 20 or 32 mg/kg. Genome mining of lab-generated, spontaneous ecumicin-resistant M. tuberculosis strains identified the ClpC1 ATPase complex as the putative target, and this was confirmed by a drug affinity response test. ClpC1 functions in protein breakdown with the ClpP1P2 protease complex. Ecumicin markedly enhanced the ATPase activity of wild-type (WT) ClpC1 but prevented activation of proteolysis by ClpC1. Less stimulation was observed with ClpC1 from ecumicin-resistant mutants. Thus, ClpC1 is a valid drug target against M. tuberculosis, and ecumicin may serve as a lead compound for anti-TB drug development. PMID:25421483

  15. FBXO32 Targets c-Myc for Proteasomal Degradation and Inhibits c-Myc Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Zhichao; Zhang, Dawei; Hu, Bo; Wang, Jing; Shen, Xian; Xiao, Wuhan

    2015-01-01

    FBXO32 (MAFbx/Atrogin-1) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is markedly up-regulated in muscle atrophy. Although some data indicate that FBXO32 may play an important role in tumorigenesis, the molecular mechanism of FBXO32 in tumorigenesis has been poorly understood. Here, we present evidence that FBXO32 targets the oncogenic protein c-Myc for ubiquitination and degradation through the proteasome pathway. Phosphorylation of c-Myc at Thr-58 and Ser-62 is dispensable for FBXO32 to induce c-Myc degradation. Mutation of the lysine 326 in c-Myc reduces c-Myc ubiquitination and prevents the c-Myc degradation induced by FBXO32. Furthermore, overexpression of FBXO32 suppresses c-Myc activity and inhibits cell growth, but knockdown of FBXO32 enhances c-Myc activity and promotes cell growth. Finally, we show that FBXO32 is a direct downstream target of c-Myc, highlighting a negative feedback regulation loop between c-Myc and FBXO32. Thus, FBXO32 may function by targeting c-Myc. This work explains the function of FBXO32 and highlights its mechanisms in tumorigenesis. PMID:25944903

  16. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background.

  17. Activity targets for nanostructured platinum-group-metal-free catalysts in hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setzler, Brian P.; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Wittkopf, Jarrid A.; Yan, Yushan

    2016-12-01

    Fuel cells are the zero-emission automotive power source that best preserves the advantages of gasoline automobiles: low upfront cost, long driving range and fast refuelling. To make fuel-cell cars a reality, the US Department of Energy has set a fuel cell system cost target of US$30 kW-1 in the long-term, which equates to US$2,400 per vehicle, excluding several major powertrain components (in comparison, a basic, but complete, internal combustion engine system costs approximately US$3,000). To date, most research for automotive applications has focused on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), because these systems have demonstrated the highest power density. Recently, however, an alternative technology, hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs), has gained significant attention, because of the possibility to use stable platinum-group-metal-free catalysts, with inherent, long-term cost advantages. In this Perspective, we discuss the cost profile of PEMFCs and the advantages offered by HEMFCs. In particular, we discuss catalyst development needs for HEMFCs and set catalyst activity targets to achieve performance parity with state-of-the-art automotive PEMFCs. Meeting these targets requires careful optimization of nanostructures to pack high surface areas into a small volume, while maintaining high area-specific activity and favourable pore-transport properties.

  18. Activity targets for nanostructured platinum-group-metal-free catalysts in hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Setzler, Brian P; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Wittkopf, Jarrid A; Yan, Yushan

    2016-12-06

    Fuel cells are the zero-emission automotive power source that best preserves the advantages of gasoline automobiles: low upfront cost, long driving range and fast refuelling. To make fuel-cell cars a reality, the US Department of Energy has set a fuel cell system cost target of US$30 kW(-1) in the long-term, which equates to US$2,400 per vehicle, excluding several major powertrain components (in comparison, a basic, but complete, internal combustion engine system costs approximately US$3,000). To date, most research for automotive applications has focused on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), because these systems have demonstrated the highest power density. Recently, however, an alternative technology, hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs), has gained significant attention, because of the possibility to use stable platinum-group-metal-free catalysts, with inherent, long-term cost advantages. In this Perspective, we discuss the cost profile of PEMFCs and the advantages offered by HEMFCs. In particular, we discuss catalyst development needs for HEMFCs and set catalyst activity targets to achieve performance parity with state-of-the-art automotive PEMFCs. Meeting these targets requires careful optimization of nanostructures to pack high surface areas into a small volume, while maintaining high area-specific activity and favourable pore-transport properties.

  19. Target-based identification of whole-cell active inhibitors of biotin biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Sae Woong; Casalena, Dominick E; Wilson, Daniel J; Dai, Ran; Nag, Partha P; Liu, Feng; Boyce, Jim P; Bittker, Joshua A; Schreiber, Stuart L; Finzel, Barry C; Schnappinger, Dirk; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2015-01-22

    Biotin biosynthesis is essential for survival and persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in vivo. The aminotransferase BioA, which catalyzes the antepenultimate step in the biotin pathway, has been established as a promising target due to its vulnerability to chemical inhibition. We performed high-throughput screening (HTS) employing a fluorescence displacement assay and identified a diverse set of potent inhibitors including many diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) scaffolds. To efficiently select only hits targeting biotin biosynthesis, we then deployed a whole-cell counterscreen in biotin-free and biotin-containing medium against wild-type Mtb and in parallel with isogenic bioA Mtb strains that possess differential levels of BioA expression. This counterscreen proved crucial to filter out compounds whose whole-cell activity was off target as well as identify hits with weak, but measurable whole-cell activity in BioA-depleted strains. Several of the most promising hits were cocrystallized with BioA to provide a framework for future structure-based drug design efforts.

  20. Ligand substitutions between ruthenium–cymene compounds can control protein versus DNA targeting and anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Adhireksan, Zenita; Davey, Gabriela E.; Campomanes, Pablo; Groessl, Michael; Clavel, Catherine M.; Yu, Haojie; Nazarov, Alexey A.; Yeo, Charmian Hui Fang; Ang, Wee Han; Dröge, Peter; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Dyson, Paul J.; Davey, Curt A.

    2014-01-01

    Ruthenium compounds have become promising alternatives to platinum drugs by displaying specific activities against different cancers and favourable toxicity and clearance properties. Nonetheless, their molecular targeting and mechanism of action are poorly understood. Here we study two prototypical ruthenium-arene agents—the cytotoxic antiprimary tumour compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(ethylene-diamine)Cl]PF6 and the relatively non-cytotoxic antimetastasis compound [(η6-p-cymene)Ru(1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane)Cl2]—and discover that the former targets the DNA of chromatin, while the latter preferentially forms adducts on the histone proteins. Using a novel ‘atom-to-cell’ approach, we establish the basis for the surprisingly site-selective adduct formation behaviour and distinct cellular impact of these two chemically similar anticancer agents, which suggests that the cytotoxic effects arise largely from DNA lesions, whereas the protein adducts may be linked to the other therapeutic activities. Our study shows promise for developing new ruthenium drugs, via ligand-based modulation of DNA versus protein binding and thus cytotoxic potential, to target distinguishing epigenetic features of cancer cells. PMID:24637564

  1. FBXO32 Targets c-Myc for Proteasomal Degradation and Inhibits c-Myc Activity.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhichao; Zhang, Dawei; Hu, Bo; Wang, Jing; Shen, Xian; Xiao, Wuhan

    2015-06-26

    FBXO32 (MAFbx/Atrogin-1) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is markedly up-regulated in muscle atrophy. Although some data indicate that FBXO32 may play an important role in tumorigenesis, the molecular mechanism of FBXO32 in tumorigenesis has been poorly understood. Here, we present evidence that FBXO32 targets the oncogenic protein c-Myc for ubiquitination and degradation through the proteasome pathway. Phosphorylation of c-Myc at Thr-58 and Ser-62 is dispensable for FBXO32 to induce c-Myc degradation. Mutation of the lysine 326 in c-Myc reduces c-Myc ubiquitination and prevents the c-Myc degradation induced by FBXO32. Furthermore, overexpression of FBXO32 suppresses c-Myc activity and inhibits cell growth, but knockdown of FBXO32 enhances c-Myc activity and promotes cell growth. Finally, we show that FBXO32 is a direct downstream target of c-Myc, highlighting a negative feedback regulation loop between c-Myc and FBXO32. Thus, FBXO32 may function by targeting c-Myc. This work explains the function of FBXO32 and highlights its mechanisms in tumorigenesis.

  2. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background. PMID:23630316

  3. Increased AICD generation does not result in increased nuclear translocation or activation of target gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Elaine; Isbert, Simone; Kern, Andreas; Jaeger, Sebastian; Martin, Anne M.; Hebert, Sebastien S.; Behl, Christian; Weggen, Sascha; De Strooper, Bart; Pietrzik, Claus U.

    2008-08-01

    A sequence of amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleavages culminates in the sequential release of the APP intracellular domain (AICD) and the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}) and/or p3 fragment. One of the environmental factors favouring the accumulation of AICD appears to be a rise in intracellular pH. Here we further identified the metabolism and subcellular localization of artificially expressed constructs under such conditions. We also co-examined the mechanistic lead up to the AICD accumulation and explored possible significances for its increased expression. We found that most of the AICD generated under pH neutralized conditions is likely cleaved from C83. While the AICD surplus was unable to further activate transcription of a luciferase reporter via a Gal4-DNA-binding domain, it failed entirely via the endogenous promoter regions of proposed target genes, APP and KAI1. The lack of a specific transactivation potential was also demonstrated by the unchanged levels of target gene mRNA. However, rather than translocating to the nucleus, the AICD surplus remains membrane tethered or free in the cytosol where it interacts with Fe65. Therefore we provide strong evidence that an increase in AICD generation does not directly promote gene activation of previously proposed target 0011gen.

  4. Target-Based Identification of Whole-Cell Active Inhibitors of Biotin Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sae Woong; Casalena, Dominick; Wilson, Daniel; Dai, Ran; Nag, Partha; Liu, Feng; Boyce, Jim P.; Bittker, Joshua; Schreiber, Stuart; Finzel, Barry C.; Schnappinger, Dirk; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Biotin biosynthesis is essential for survival and persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in vivo. The aminotransferase BioA, which catalyzes the antepenultimate step in the biotin pathway, has been established as a promising target due to its vulnerability to chemical inhibition. We performed high-throughput screening (HTS) employing a fluorescence displacement assay and identified a diverse set of potent inhibitors including many diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) scaffolds. To efficiently select only hits targeting biotin biosynthesis, we then deployed a whole-cell counter-screen in either biotin-free and biotin-containing medium against wild-type Mtb and in parallel with isogenic bioA Mtb strains that possess differential levels of BioA expression. This counter-screen proved crucial to filter out compounds whose whole-cell activity was off-target as well as identify hits with weak, but measurable whole-cell activity in BioA-depleted strains. Several of the most promising hits were co-crystallized with BioA to provide a framework for future structure-based drug design efforts. PMID:25556942

  5. Succinyl-CoA synthetase is a phosphate target for the activation of mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Darci; Aponte, Angel M; French, Stephanie A; Chess, David J; Balaban, Robert S

    2009-08-04

    Succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS) is the only mitochondrial enzyme capable of ATP production via substrate level phosphorylation in the absence of oxygen, but it also plays a key role in the citric acid cycle, ketone metabolism, and heme synthesis. Inorganic phosphate (P(i)) is a signaling molecule capable of activating oxidative phosphorylation at several sites, including NADH generation and as a substrate for ATP formation. In this study, it was shown that P(i) binds the porcine heart SCS alpha-subunit (SCSalpha) in a noncovalent manner and enhances its enzymatic activity, thereby providing a new target for P(i) activation in mitochondria. Coupling 32P labeling of intact mitochondria with SDS gel electrophoresis revealed that 32P labeling of SCSalpha was enhanced in substrate-depleted mitochondria. Using mitochondrial extracts and purified bacterial SCS (BSCS), we showed that this enhanced 32P labeling resulted from a simple binding of 32P, not covalent protein phosphorylation. The ability of SCSalpha to retain its 32P throughout the SDS denaturing gel process was unique over the entire mitochondrial proteome. In vitro studies also revealed a P(i)-induced activation of SCS activity by more than 2-fold when mitochondrial extracts and purified BSCS were incubated with millimolar concentrations of P(i). Since the level of 32P binding to SCSalpha was increased in substrate-depleted mitochondria, where the matrix P(i) concentration is increased, we conclude that SCS activation by P(i) binding represents another mitochondrial target for the P(i)-induced activation of oxidative phosphorylation and anaerobic ATP production in energy-limited mitochondria.

  6. The search of the target of promotion: Phenylbenzoate esterase activities in hen peripheral nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, A. . E-mail: angelo.moretto@icps.it; Nicolli, A.; Lotti, M.

    2007-03-15

    Certain esterase inhibitors, such as carbamates, phosphinates and sulfonyl halides, do not cause neuropathy as some organophosphates, but they may exacerbate chemical or traumatic insults to axons. This phenomenon is called promotion of axonopathies. Given the biochemical and toxicological characteristics of these compounds, the hypothesis was made that the target of promotion is a phenyl valerate (PV) esterase similar to neuropathy target esterase (NTE), the target of organophosphate induced delayed polyneuropathy. However, attempts to identify a PV esterase in hen peripheral nerve have been, so far, unsuccessful. We tested several esters, other than PV, as substrates of esterases from crude homogenate of the hen peripheral nerve. The ideal substrate should be poorly hydrolysed by NTE but extensively by enzyme(s) that are insensitive to non-promoters, such as mipafox, and sensitive to promoters, such as phenyl methane sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF). When phenyl benzoate (PB) was used as substrate, about 65% of total activity was resistant to the non-promoter mipafox (up to 0.5 mM, 20 min, pH 8.0), that inhibits NTE and other esterases. More than 90% of this resistant activity was sensitive to the classical promoter PMSF (1 mM, 20 min, pH 8.0) with an IC{sub 50} of about 0.08 mM (20 min, pH 8.0). On the contrary, the non-promoter p-toluene sulfonyl fluoride caused only about 10% inhibition at 0.5 mM. Several esterase inhibitors including, paraoxon, phenyl benzyl carbamate, di-n-butyl dichlorovinyl phosphate and di-isopropyl fluorophosphate, were tested both in vitro and in vivo for inhibition of this PB activity. Mipafox-resistant PMSF-sensitive PB esterase activity(ies) was inhibited by promoters but not by non promoters and neuropathic compounds.

  7. Comparing zinc finger nucleases and transcription activator-like effector nucleases for gene targeting in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Beumer, Kelly J; Trautman, Jonathan K; Christian, Michelle; Dahlem, Timothy J; Lake, Cathleen M; Hawley, R Scott; Grunwald, David J; Voytas, Daniel F; Carroll, Dana

    2013-10-03

    Zinc-finger nucleases have proven to be successful as reagents for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila melanogaster and many other organisms. Their utility has been limited, however, by the significant failure rate of new designs, reflecting the complexity of DNA recognition by zinc fingers. Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) DNA-binding domains depend on a simple, one-module-to-one-base-pair recognition code, and they have been very productively incorporated into nucleases (TALENs) for genome engineering. In this report we describe the design of TALENs for a number of different genes in Drosophila, and we explore several parameters of TALEN design. The rate of success with TALENs was substantially greater than for zinc-finger nucleases , and the frequency of mutagenesis was comparable. Knockout mutations were isolated in several genes in which such alleles were not previously available. TALENs are an effective tool for targeted genome manipulation in Drosophila.

  8. Size controlled protein nanoemulsions for active targeting of folate receptor positive cells.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Ana; Nogueira, Eugénia; Azoia, Nuno G; Sárria, Marisa P; Abreu, Ana S; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Rollett, Alexandra; Härmark, Johan; Hebert, Hans; Guebitz, Georg; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Preto, Ana; Gomes, Andreia C; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-11-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoemulsions were produced by high pressure homogenization with a tri-block copolymer (Poloxamer 407), which presents a central hydrophobic chain of polyoxypropylene (PPO) and two identical lateral hydrophilic chains of polyethylene glycol (PEG). We observed a linear correlation between tri-block copolymer concentration and size - the use of 5mg/mL of Poloxamer 407 yields nanoemulsions smaller than 100nm. Molecular dynamics and fluorescent tagging of the tri-block copolymer highlight their mechanistic role on the size of emulsions. This novel method enables the fabrication of highly stable albumin emulsions in the nano-size range, highly desirable for controlled drug delivery. Folic Acid (FA)-tagged protein nanoemulsions were shown to promote specific folate receptor (FR)-mediated targeting in FR positive cells. The novel strategy presented here enables the construction of size controlled, functionalized protein-based nanoemulsions with excellent characteristics for active targeting in cancer therapy.

  9. Angular dependence of source-target-detector in active mode standoff infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Castro-Suarez, John R.; Aparicio-Bolaños, Joaquín. A.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-06-01

    Active mode standoff measurement using infrared spectroscopy were carried out in which the angle between target and the source was varied from 0-70° with respect to the surface normal of substrates containing traces of highly energetic materials (explosives). The experiments were made using three infrared sources: a modulated source (Mod-FTIR), an unmodulated source (UnMod-FTIR) and a scanning quantum cascade laser (QCL), part of a dispersive mid infrared (MIR) spectrometer. The targets consisted of PENT 200 μg/cm2 deposited on aluminum plates placed at 1 m from the sources. The evaluation of the three modalities was aimed at verifying the influence of the highly collimated laser beam in the detection in comparison with the other sources. The Mod-FTIR performed better than QCL source in terms of the MIR signal intensity decrease with increasing angle.

  10. Antiproliferative Activity of Crocin Involves Targeting of Microtubules in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hire, Rupali R; Srivastava, Shalini; Davis, Melissa B; Kumar Konreddy, Ananda; Panda, Dulal

    2017-03-24

    Crocin, a component of saffron spice, is known to have an anticancer activity. However, the targets of crocin are not known. In this study, crocin was found to inhibit the proliferation of HCC70, HCC1806, HeLa and CCD1059sk cells by targeting microtubules. Crocin depolymerized both the interphase and mitotic microtubules of different cancer cells, inhibited mitosis and induced multipolar spindle formation in these cells. In vitro, crocin inhibited the assembly of pure tubulin as well as the assembly of microtubule-associated protein rich tubulin. Electron microscopic analysis showed that crocin inhibited microtubule assembly while it induced aggregation of tubulin at higher concentrations. Crocin co-eluted with tubulin suggesting that it binds to tubulin. Vinblastine inhibited the binding of crocin to tubulin while podophyllotoxin did not inhibit the crocin binding indicating that crocin binds at the vinblastine site on tubulin. The results suggested that crocin inhibited cell proliferation mainly by disrupting the microtubule network.

  11. Antiproliferative Activity of Crocin Involves Targeting of Microtubules in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hire, Rupali R.; Srivastava, Shalini; Davis, Melissa B.; Kumar Konreddy, Ananda; Panda, Dulal

    2017-01-01

    Crocin, a component of saffron spice, is known to have an anticancer activity. However, the targets of crocin are not known. In this study, crocin was found to inhibit the proliferation of HCC70, HCC1806, HeLa and CCD1059sk cells by targeting microtubules. Crocin depolymerized both the interphase and mitotic microtubules of different cancer cells, inhibited mitosis and induced multipolar spindle formation in these cells. In vitro, crocin inhibited the assembly of pure tubulin as well as the assembly of microtubule-associated protein rich tubulin. Electron microscopic analysis showed that crocin inhibited microtubule assembly while it induced aggregation of tubulin at higher concentrations. Crocin co-eluted with tubulin suggesting that it binds to tubulin. Vinblastine inhibited the binding of crocin to tubulin while podophyllotoxin did not inhibit the crocin binding indicating that crocin binds at the vinblastine site on tubulin. The results suggested that crocin inhibited cell proliferation mainly by disrupting the microtubule network. PMID:28337976

  12. Impact of high-risk conjunctions on Active Debris Removal target selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidtke, Aleksander A.; Lewis, Hugh G.; Armellin, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Space debris simulations show that if current space launches continue unchanged, spacecraft operations might become difficult in the congested space environment. It has been suggested that Active Debris Removal (ADR) might be necessary in order to prevent such a situation. Selection of objects to be targeted by ADR is considered important because removal of non-relevant objects will unnecessarily increase the cost of ADR. One of the factors to be used in this ADR target selection is the collision probability accumulated by every object. This paper shows the impact of high-probability conjunctions on the collision probability accumulated by individual objects as well as the probability of any collision occurring in orbit. Such conjunctions cannot be predicted far in advance and, consequently, not all the objects that will be involved in such dangerous conjunctions can be removed through ADR. Therefore, a debris remediation method that would address such events at short notice, and thus help prevent likely collisions, is suggested.

  13. Digital processing of side-scan sonar data with the Woods Hole image processing system software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paskevich, Valerie F.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1985, the Branch of Atlantic Marine Geology has been involved in collecting, processing and digitally mosaicking high and low-resolution side-scan sonar data. Recent development of a UNIX-based image-processing software system includes a series of task specific programs for processing side-scan sonar data. This report describes the steps required to process the collected data and to produce an image that has equal along- and across-track resol

  14. Comparison of Sonar Discrimination by an Echolocating Dolphin and a Counterpropagation Neural Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    AND SUBTITLE 5 FUNDING NUMBERS COMPARISON OF SONAR DISCRIMINATION BY AN ECHOLOCATING PR: MMB2 DOLPHIN AND A COUNTERPROPAGATION NEURAL NETWORK PE...COMPARISON OF SONAR DISCRIMINATION BY AN constanB-1 filter cal fe expressed as ECIHOLOCATING DOLPHIN AND A COUNTERPROPAGATION 2Q-1 NEURAL NETWORK ’ " -- 1...In this study, a counterpropagation artificial layer of N+1 elements, a Kohonen layer of N elements neural network was used to examine the broadband

  15. Quantifying Effects of Mid-Frequency Sonar Transmissions on Fish and Whale Behavior

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    on Fish and Whale Behavior Kenneth G. Foote Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution 98 Water Street Woods Hole, MA 02543 phone: (508) 289-2445...understand and quantify effects of mid-frequency (MF) sonar on fish and whale behavior through direct observation, and to investigate the potential...usefulness of MF sonar in acoustic measurements of fish , including stock assessments. OBJECTIVES The initial objectives are to prove the usefulness of

  16. Side-scan sonar imaging of the Colorado River, Grand Canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anima, Roberto; Wong, Florence L.; Hogg, David; Galanis, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents data collection methods and side-scan sonar data collected along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon in August and September of 2000. The purpose of the data collection effort was to image the distribution of sand between Glen Canyon Dam and river mile 87.4 before and after the 31,600 cfs flow of September 6-8. The side-scan sonar imaging focused on pools between rapids but included smaller rapids where possible.

  17. Dynamic Response of an Insonified Sonar Window Interacting with a Tonpilz Transducer Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-03

    NUWC-NPT Technical Report 11,781 3 January 2007 Dynamic Response of an Insonified Sonar Window Interacting with a Tonpilz Transducer Array Andrew J...Code 1516) for their discussions on Tonpilz transducer behavior Reviewed and Approved: 3 January 2007 s S. Griffin Head, Autonomous Systems and...FUNDING NUMBERS Dynamic Response of an Insonified Sonar Window Interacting with a Tonpilz Transducer Array 6. AUTHOR(S) Andrew J. Hull 7. PERFORMING

  18. Echo tracker/range finder for radars and sonars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinides, N. J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An echo tracker/range finder or altimeter is described. The pulse repetition frequency (PFR) of a predetermined plurality of transmitted pulses is adjusted so that echo pulses received from a reflecting object are positioned between transmitted pulses and divided their interpulse time interval into two time intervals having a predetermined ratio with respect to each other. The invention described provides a means whereby the arrival time of a plurality of echo pulses is defined as the time at which a composite echo pulse formed of a sum of the individual echo pulses has the highest amplitude. The invention is applicable to radar systems, sonar systems, or any other kind of system in which pulses are transmitted and echoes received therefrom.

  19. Side-looking sonar backscatter response at dual frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, William B. F.; Flood, Roger D.

    1996-12-01

    Dual-frequency side-looking sonars have the potential to be used as remote sensing tools to characterize subaqueous terrains. In one case study of the carbonate-ooze-coated Blake Plateau off-shore of Georgia, U.S.A., the difference in acoustic attenuation for 50 and 20 mm wavelengths (30 and 72 kHz frequency) permits the discrimination of sub-bottom scatterers from seabed surface textural features to reveal patchy regions where a buried hard ground had been pock-marked by karst-like depressions. In a second study of the Upper Hudson River in New York, U.S.A., related to environmental contaminates, the backscatter response at 15 and 3 mm acoustic wavelengths (100 and 500 kHz frequency) serves as a useful proxy for sediment grain size with coarser detritus distinguished from finer sediments. Sand and gravel regions inferred from the backscatter were confirmed by ground truth sampling.

  20. Processing techniques for digital sonar images from GLORIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chavez, P.S.

    1986-01-01

    Image processing techniques have been developed to handle data from one of the newest members of the remote sensing family of digital imaging systems. This paper discusses software to process data collected by the GLORIA (Geological Long Range Inclined Asdic) sonar imaging system, designed and built by the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) in England, to correct for both geometric and radiometric distortions that exist in the original 'raw' data. Preprocessing algorithms that are GLORIA-specific include corrections for slant-range geometry, water column offset, aspect ratio distortion, changes in the ship's velocity, speckle noise, and shading problems caused by the power drop-off which occurs as a function of range.-from Author