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Sample records for active sound control

  1. Active control of sound transmission using structural modal filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaizuka, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Nobuo; Nakano, Kimihiko

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses active sound transmission control based on structural sensors and actuators. The proposed methodology is to independently measure and control the targeted structural modes, which significantly contribute to sound transmission, with structural modal filters, i.e., modal sensors and modal actuators. The targeting is performed by using modal sound transmission coefficients before control as the criteria. The modal sound transmission coefficient enables the contribution from a structural mode to the sound transmission via the modal interaction with the other structural modes to be determined. The structural modal filters effectively facilitate decreasing the sound transmission and guarantee that the structural vibration and near-field sound, side effects of sound transmission control, will not increase. It is shown with numerical examples that sound transmission can be reduced significantly in a broad frequency band by controlling a small number of structural modes and neither the structural vibration nor near-field sound are increased.

  2. Active control of transmitted sound in buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompsett, Russell Harvey George

    The problem of noise from neighbours has increased dramatically over the last few years. Many of the noise complaints are due to the high level, low frequency noise from modern stereo equipment, and are often described in terms of the low frequency characteristics of the music; the repetitive, booming, bass beat. The objective of this research was to establish the feasibility of applying active noise control to alleviate this problem. The initial approach was to evaluate the possibility of exploiting the dominance of individual modes in the response of rooms at low frequency to effect global control. However, initial investigations using a modal model of the sound field revealed that this would be difficult due to the contribution of many acoustic modes excited off resonance. This conclusion was supported by measurements of acoustic room responses in typical buildings, illustrating a non-resonant characteristic. Consequently, attention was turned to the feasibility of using local active control systems to create zones of quiet by concentrating control at a specific location near the observers ears, for example in a seat headrest, or near the pillows of a bed. The lack of a reference signal in either approach requires the use of a feedback control strategy. With a typically non-resonant system, the predictability in the disturbance necessary for successful feedback control must be contained in the primary excitation, namely the music. Examples of different music styles were investigated and of those with the potential to be a nuisance surprisingly few were significantly more predictable than a random disturbance. As expected the most encouraging control performance simulations were found for modern dance music, with a strong repetitive beat. A real-time, local controller was demonstrated in the laboratory with such a disturbance signal and the properties of the quiet zone were measured. The subjective response when hearing the controller in operation was found to be

  3. Spherical loudspeaker array for local active control of sound.

    PubMed

    Rafaely, Boaz

    2009-05-01

    Active control of sound has been employed to reduce noise levels around listeners' head using destructive interference from noise-canceling sound sources. Recently, spherical loudspeaker arrays have been studied as multiple-channel sound sources, capable of generating sound fields with high complexity. In this paper, the potential use of a spherical loudspeaker array for local active control of sound is investigated. A theoretical analysis of the primary and secondary sound fields around a spherical sound source reveals that the natural quiet zones for the spherical source have a shell-shape. Using numerical optimization, quiet zones with other shapes are designed, showing potential for quiet zones with extents that are significantly larger than the well-known limit of a tenth of a wavelength for monopole sources. The paper presents several simulation examples showing quiet zones in various configurations.

  4. Active control of excessive sound emission on a mobile device.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Se-Woon; Youn, Dae Hee; Park, Young-cheol; Lee, Gun-Woo

    2015-04-01

    During a phone conversation, loud vocal emission from the far-end to the near-end space can disturb nearby people. In this paper, the possibility of actively controlling such unwanted sound emission using a control source placed on the mobile device is investigated. Two different approaches are tested: Global control, minimizing the potential energy measured along a volumetric space surface, and local control, minimizing the squared sound pressure at a discrete point on the phone. From the test results, both approaches can reduce the unwanted sound emission by more than 6 dB in the frequency range up to 2 kHz.

  5. Active Noise Control Experiments using Sound Energy Flu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Uli

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the latest results concerning the active noise control approach using net flow of acoustic energy. The test set-up consists of two loudspeakers simulating the engine noise and two smaller loudspeakers which belong to the active noise system. The system is completed by two acceleration sensors and one microphone per loudspeaker. The microphones are located in the near sound field of the loudspeakers. The control algorithm including the update equation of the feed-forward controller is introduced. Numerical simulations are performed with a comparison to a state of the art method minimising the radiated sound power. The proposed approach is experimentally validated.

  6. [Actuator placement for active sound and vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Two refereed journal publications and ten talks given at conferences, seminars, and colloquia resulted from research supported by NASA. They are itemized in this report. The two publications were entitled "Reactive Tabu and Search Sensor Selection in Active Structural Acoustic Control Problems" and "Quelling Cabin Noise in Turboprop Aircraft via Active Control." The conference presentations covered various aspects of actuator placement, including location problems, for active sound and vibration control of cylinders, of commuter jets, of propeller driven or turboprop aircraft, and for quelling aircraft cabin or interior noise.

  7. Quadratic Optimization in the Problems of Active Control of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loncaric, J.; Tsynkov, S. V.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We analyze the problem of suppressing the unwanted component of a time-harmonic acoustic field (noise) on a predetermined region of interest. The suppression is rendered by active means, i.e., by introducing the additional acoustic sources called controls that generate the appropriate anti-sound. Previously, we have obtained general solutions for active controls in both continuous and discrete formulations of the problem. We have also obtained optimal solutions that minimize the overall absolute acoustic source strength of active control sources. These optimal solutions happen to be particular layers of monopoles on the perimeter of the protected region. Mathematically, minimization of acoustic source strength is equivalent to minimization in the sense of L(sub 1). By contrast. in the current paper we formulate and study optimization problems that involve quadratic functions of merit. Specifically, we minimize the L(sub 2) norm of the control sources, and we consider both the unconstrained and constrained minimization. The unconstrained L(sub 2) minimization is certainly the easiest problem to address numerically. On the other hand, the constrained approach allows one to analyze sophisticated geometries. In a special case, we call compare our finite-difference optimal solutions to the continuous optimal solutions obtained previously using a semi-analytic technique. We also show that the optima obtained in the sense of L(sub 2) differ drastically from those obtained in the sense of L(sub 1).

  8. Active control of sound transmission through partitions composed of discretely controlled modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leishman, Timothy W.

    This thesis provides a detailed theoretical and experimental investigation of active segmented partitions (ASPs) for the control of sound transmission. ASPs are physically segmented arrays of interconnected acoustically and structurally small modules that are discretely controlled using electronic controllers. Theoretical analyses of the thesis first address physical principles fundamental to ASP modeling and experimental measurement techniques. Next, they explore specific module configurations, primarily using equivalent circuits. Measured normal-incidence transmission losses and related properties of experimental ASPs are determined using plane wave tubes and the two-microphone transfer function technique. A scanning laser vibrometer is also used to evaluate distributed transmitting surface vibrations. ASPs have the inherent potential to provide excellent active sound transmission control (ASTC) through lightweight structures, using very practical control strategies. The thesis analyzes several unique ASP configurations and evaluates their abilities to produce high transmission losses via global minimization of normal transmitting surface vibrations. A novel dual diaphragm configuration is shown to employ this strategy particularly well. It uses an important combination of acoustical actuation and mechano-acoustical segmentation to produce exceptionally high transmission loss (e.g., 50 to 80 dB) over a broad frequency range-including lower audible frequencies. Such performance is shown to be comparable to that produced by much more massive partitions composed of thick layers of steel or concrete and sand. The configuration uses only simple localized error sensors and actuators, permitting effective use of independent single-channel controllers in a decentralized format. This work counteracts the commonly accepted notion that active vibration control of partitions is an ineffective means of controlling sound transmission. With appropriate construction, actuation

  9. Active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    An experiment is performed to study the mechanisms of active control of sound fields in elastic cylinders via vibrational outputs. In the present method of control, a vibrational force input was used as the secondary control input to reduce the radiated acoustic field. For the frequencies considered, the active vibration technique provided good global reduction of interior sound even though only one actuator was used.

  10. Control strategies and mechanisms for active control of sound transmission into a vibro-acoustic enclosure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Guoyong; Feng, Na; Yang, Tiejun

    2011-06-01

    An analytical study was presented on active control of sound transmission into a vibro-acoustic enclosure comprising two flexible plates. Two types of actuators were used, i.e. acoustic actuator and distributed lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric (PZT) actuator instead of point force actuator. Using the modal acoustic transfer impedance-mobility matrices, the excitation and interaction in the coupled sound transmission system can be described with clear physical significance. With the control system designed to globally reduce the sound field, different control system configurations were considered, including the structural actuator on the incident plate, actuator on the receiving plate, acoustic actuator on the cavity, and their combinations. The effectiveness and performance of the control strategy corresponding to each system configuration were compared and discussed. The role and control mechanism of each type of actuator were of particular interest. It was shown that the incident plate actuator is effective in controlling the cavity-dominated modes and the structural modes dominated by the incident plate and receiving plate. Two main control mechanisms are involved in this control configuration, i.e., modal suppressing and modal rearrangement. For control system configuration with only acoustic actuator in the enclosure, the mechanism involved in this arrangement is purely modal suppression. Desirable placements of structural actuators in terms of total potential energy reduction were also discussed.

  11. Control of sound radiation with active/adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Rogers, C. A.; Robertshaw, H. H.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research is discussed in the area of active structural acoustic control with active/adaptive structures. Progress in the areas of structural acoustics, actuators, sensors, and control approaches is presented. Considerable effort has been given to the interaction of these areas with each other due to the coupled nature of the problem. A discussion is presented on actuators bonded to or embedded in the structure itself. The actuators discussed are piezoceramic actuators and shape memory alloy actuators. The sensors discussed are optical fiber sensors, Nitinol fiber sensors, piezoceramics, and polyvinylidene fluoride sensors. The active control techniques considered are state feedback control techniques and least mean square adaptive algorithms. Results presented show that significant progress has been made towards controlling structurally radiated noise by active/adaptive means applied directly to the structure.

  12. Performance of active feedforward control systems in non-ideal, synthesized diffuse sound fields.

    PubMed

    Misol, Malte; Bloch, Christian; Monner, Hans Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The acoustic performance of passive or active panel structures is usually tested in sound transmission loss facilities. A reverberant sending room, equipped with one or a number of independent sound sources, is used to generate a diffuse sound field excitation which acts as a disturbance source on the structure under investigation. The spatial correlation and coherence of such a synthesized non-ideal diffuse-sound-field excitation, however, might deviate significantly from the ideal case. This has consequences for the operation of an active feedforward control system which heavily relies on the acquisition of coherent disturbance source information. This work, therefore, evaluates the spatial correlation and coherence of ideal and non-ideal diffuse sound fields and considers the implications on the performance of a feedforward control system. The system under consideration is an aircraft-typical double panel system, equipped with an active sidewall panel (lining), which is realized in a transmission loss facility. Experimental results for different numbers of sound sources in the reverberation room are compared to simulation results of a comparable generic double panel system excited by an ideal diffuse sound field. It is shown that the number of statistically independent noise sources acting on the primary structure of the double panel system depends not only on the type of diffuse sound field but also on the sample lengths of the processed signals. The experimental results show that the number of reference sensors required for a defined control performance exhibits an inverse relationship to control filter length.

  13. Active control of multi-dimensional random sound in ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silcox, R. J.; Elliott, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated how active control may be applied to the control of random noise in ducts. These implementations, however, have been restricted to frequencies where only plane waves are propagating in the duct. In spite of this, the need for this technology at low frequencies has progressed to the point where commercial products that apply these concepts are currently available. Extending the frequency range of this technology requires the extension of current single channel controllers to multi-variate control systems as well as addressing the problems inherent in controlling higher order modes. The application of active control in the multi-dimensional propagation of random noise in waveguides is examined. An adaptive system is implemented using measured system frequency response functions. Experimental results are presented illustrating attained suppressions of 15 to 30 dB for random noise propagating in multiple modes.

  14. Feedforward control of sound transmission using an active acoustic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheer, Jordan; Daley, Stephen; McCormick, Cameron

    2017-02-01

    Metamaterials have received significant interest in recent years due to their potential ability to exhibit behaviour not found in naturally occurring materials. This includes the generation of band gaps, which are frequency regions with high levels of wave attenuation. In the context of acoustics, these band gaps can be tuned to occur at low frequencies where the acoustic wavelength is large compared to the material, and where the performance of traditional passive noise control treatments is limited. Therefore, such acoustic metamaterials have been shown to offer a significant performance advantage compared to traditional passive control treatments, however, due to their resonant behaviour, the band gaps tend to occur over a relatively narrow frequency range. A similar long wavelength performance advantage can be achieved using active noise control, but the systems in this case do not rely on resonant behaviour. This paper demonstrates how the performance of an acoustic metamaterial, consisting of an array of Helmholtz resonators, can be significantly enhanced by the integration of an active control mechanism that is facilitated by embedding loudspeakers into the resonators. Crucially, it is then also shown how the active acoustic metamaterial significantly outperforms an equivalent traditional active noise control system. In both cases a broadband feedforward control strategy is employed to minimise the transmitted pressure in a one-dimensional acoustic control problem and a new method of weighting the control effort over a targeted frequency range is described.

  15. Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels using Constrained Layer Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid passive/active noise control system utilizing constrained layer damping and model predictive feedback control is presented. This system is used to control the sound radiation of panels due to broadband disturbances. To facilitate the hybrid system design, a methodology for placement of constrained layer damping which targets selected modes based on their relative radiated sound power is developed. The placement methodology is utilized to determine two constrained layer damping configurations for experimental evaluation of a hybrid system. The first configuration targets the (4,1) panel mode which is not controllable by the piezoelectric control actuator, and the (2,3) and (5,2) panel modes. The second configuration targets the (1,1) and (3,1) modes. The experimental results demonstrate the improved reduction of radiated sound power using the hybrid passive/active control system as compared to the active control system alone.

  16. The use of an active controlled enclosure to attenuate sound radiation from a heavy radiator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Yang, Tiejun; Zhu, Minggang; Pan, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Active structural acoustical control usually experiences difficulty in the control of heavy sources or sources where direct applications of control forces are not practical. To overcome this difficulty, an active controlled enclosure, which forms a cavity with both flexible and open boundary, is employed. This configuration permits indirect implementation of active control in which the control inputs can be applied to subsidiary structures other than the sources. To determine the control effectiveness of the configuration, the vibro-acoustic behavior of the system, which consists of a top plate with an open, a sound cavity and a source panel, is investigated in this paper. A complete mathematical model of the system is formulated involving modified Fourier series formulations and the governing equations are solved using the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The coupling mechanisms of a partly opened cavity and a plate are analysed in terms of modal responses and directivity patterns. Furthermore, to attenuate sound power radiated from both the top panel and the open, two strategies are studied: minimizing the total radiated power and the cancellation of volume velocity. Moreover, three control configurations are compared, using a point force on the control panel (structural control), using a sound source in the cavity (acoustical control) and applying hybrid structural-acoustical control. In addition, the effects of boundary condition of the control panel on the sound radiation and control performance are discussed.

  17. Double panel with skyhook active damping control units for control of sound radiation.

    PubMed

    Gardonio, Paolo; Alujević, Neven

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on decentralized velocity feedback control on a double panel consisting of an external aluminum panel and a honeycomb trim panel. The decentralized feedback loops are formed by a 3x3 array of coil-magnet electrodynamic actuators that react off the trim panel and a lightweight stiff frame structure located in the air gap between the two panels. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) accelerometers are located on the opposite side of the trim panel in correspondence to the electrodynamic actuators. The grid structure is designed to provide an inertial reference to the actuators. In this way the velocity feedback control loops produce skyhook active damping on the double panel, which minimizes the vibrational response and sound radiation of the trim panel at low audio frequencies. Two configurations are considered where the grid structure is either weakly coupled or strongly coupled to the external panel. Both stability and control performance of the two configurations are analyzed experimentally. The study shows that the control configuration with the weakly coupled grid structure enables the implementation of larger stable feedback control gains, which lead to reductions of the sound radiated by the trim panel between 10 and 30 dB for the first seven resonance peaks.

  18. Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders by vibrational force inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Active control of structurally-coupled sound fields in elastic cylinders is analytically and experimentally studied. The primary (noise) field in the cylinder model is generated by the coupled dynamic response of the shell under loading by a single exterior acoustic source. Control of the interior sound field is achieved by applying vibrational force inputs directly to the shell wall. Action of the point controllers serve to increase the input impedance of select structural modes of the shell which are well-coupled to the interior acoustic cavity, thus substantially reducing sound transmission into the cavity. Spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 30 dB are demonstrated for acoustic resonant conditions within the cavity. Twin controller configurations are presented which demonstrate the ability to independently control orthogonal modes of the interior acoustic space. Benefits and drawbacks of this new methodology for noise control are discussed and clearly demonstrated.

  19. Actuator placement for active sound and vibration control of cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.

    1995-01-01

    Active structural acoustic control is a method in which the control inputs (used to reduce interior noise) are applied directly to a vibrating structural acoustic system. The control concept modeled in this work is the application of in-plane force inputs to piezoceramic patches bonded to the wall of a vibrating cylinder. The cylinder is excited by an exterior noise source -- an acoustic monopole -- located near the outside of the cylinder wall. The goal is to determine the force inputs and sites for the piezoelectric actuators so that (1) the interior noise is effectively damped; (2) the level of vibration of the cylinder shell is not increased; and (3) the power requirements needed to drive the actuators are not excessive. We studied external monopole excitations at two frequencies. A cylinder resonance of 100 Hz, where the interior acoustic field is driven in multiple, off-resonance cylinder cavity modes, and a cylinder resonance of 200 Hz are characterized by both near and off-resonance cylinder vibration modes which couple effectively with a single, dominant, low-order acoustic cavity mode at resonance. Previous work has focused almost exclusively on meeting objective (1) and solving a complex least-squares problem to arrive at an optimal force vector for a given set of actuator sites. In addition, it has been noted that when the cavity mode couples with cylinder vibration modes (our 200 Hz case) control spillover may occur in higher order cylinder shell vibrational modes. How to determine the best set of actuator sites to meet objectives (1)-(3) is the main contribution of our research effort. The selection of the best set of actuator sites from a set of potential sites is done via two metaheuristics -- simulated annealing and tabu search. Each of these metaheuristics partitions the set of potential actuator sites into two disjoint sets: those that are selected to control the noise (on) and those that are not (off). Next, each metaheuristic attempts to

  20. Active control of harmonic sound transmission into an acoustic enclosure using both structural and acoustic actuators

    PubMed

    Kim; Brennan

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes an analytical and experimental investigation into the active control of harmonic sound transmission in a structural-acoustic coupled system. A rectangular enclosure is considered that has five acoustically rigid walls and a flexible plate on the remaining side through which a harmonic sound wave is transmitted into the enclosure. The control system is designed to globally reduce the sound field inside the enclosure, and the roles of structural and acoustic actuators are of particular interest. Three control configurations, classified by the type of actuators, are compared and discussed. They are: (i) use of a single point-force actuator, (ii) use of a single acoustic piston source, and (iii) simultaneous use of both a point-force actuator and an acoustic piston source. It is shown both analytically and experimentally that the point-force actuator is effective in controlling plate-dominated modes while the acoustic source is effective in controlling cavity-dominated modes. Since the transmitted sound field is governed by both plate- and cavity-dominated modes, the hybrid use of both types of actuators is shown to be a desirable configuration for the active control of sound transmission into a structural-acoustic coupled system.

  1. Psychoacoustic active noise control with ITU-R 468 noise weighting and its sound quality analysis.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hua; Panahi, Issa M S

    2010-01-01

    Non-uniform frequency response of human hearing system requires conventional active noise control (ANC) system to be modified. Psychoacoustic active noise control (PANC) system based on filtered-E least-mean-square (FELMS) structure aims to improve the noise attenuation performance in terms of hearing perception. ITU-R 468 noise weighting reflects human hearing response to random noise. In this paper we incorporate ITU-R 468 noise weighting into PANC system. Sound quality analysis is conducted for attenuated noise with a predictive pleasantness model which combines four psychoacoustic parameters (loudness, sharpness, roughness and tonality). Simulation on realistic MRI acoustic noise shows improvement of sound quality in the new system.

  2. Anticipated Effectiveness of Active Noise Control in Propeller Aircraft Interiors as Determined by Sound Quality Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted, using sound quality engineering practices, to determine the subjective effectiveness of hypothetical active noise control systems in a range of propeller aircraft. The two tests differed by the type of judgments made by the subjects: pair comparisons in the first test and numerical category scaling in the second. Although the results of the two tests were in general agreement that the hypothetical active control measures improved the interior noise environments, the pair comparison method appears to be more sensitive to subtle changes in the characteristics of the sounds which are related to passenger preference.

  3. Effect of a fluid layer on the sound radiation of a plate and its active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Pan, Jie; Yang, Tiejun

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a baffled plate facing a layer of fluid is used to investigate the effects of the radiating environment on the plate's sound radiation and its active control. By varying the thickness of the fluid layer, different radiation environments are presented to the plate, resulting in a variation in the efficiencies and shapes of the radiation modes of the plate. As the design of feed-forward control of the radiated sound power and of feedback control of the vibration velocity or volume velocity is limited by the properties of the secondary control path (an open-loop frequency response function), the performance of the control system may be deteriorated if a controller optimally designed for one radiation environment is used for a different environment. The effects of radiation environment on the properties of the secondary control path and performance of active control are investigated.

  4. Investigation of spherical loudspeaker arrays for local active control of sound.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Tomer; Rafaely, Boaz

    2011-10-01

    Active control of sound can be employed globally to reduce noise levels in an entire enclosure, or locally around a listener's head. Recently, spherical loudspeaker arrays have been studied as multiple-channel sources for local active control of sound, presenting the fundamental theory and several active control configurations. In this paper, important aspects of using a spherical loudspeaker array for local active control of sound are further investigated. First, the feasibility of creating sphere-shaped quiet zones away from the source is studied both theoretically and numerically, showing that these quiet zones are associated with sound amplification and poor system robustness. To mitigate the latter, the design of shell-shaped quiet zones around the source is investigated. A combination of two spherical sources is then studied with the aim of enlarging the quiet zone. The two sources are employed to generate quiet zones that surround a rigid sphere, investigating the application of active control around a listener's head. A significant improvement in performance is demonstrated in this case over a conventional headrest-type system that uses two monopole secondary sources. Finally, several simulations are presented to support the theoretical work and to demonstrate the performance and limitations of the system.

  5. Active Control of Turbulent Boundary Layer Induced Sound Radiation from Multiple Aircraft Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, Gary P.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to experimentally investigate active structural acoustic control of turbulent boundary layer (TBL) induced sound radiation from multiple panels on an aircraft sidewall. One possible approach for controlling sound radiation from multiple panels is a multi-input/multi-output scheme which considers dynamic coupling between the panels. Unfortunately, this is difficult for more than a few panels, and is impractical for a typical aircraft which contains several hundred such panels. An alternative is to implement a large number of independent control systems. Results from the current work demonstrate the feasibility of reducing broadband radiation from multiple panels utilizing a single-input/single-output (SISO) controller per bay, and is the first known demonstration of active control of TBL induced sound radiation on more than two bays simultaneously. The paper compares sound reduction for fully coupled control of six panels versus independent control on each panel. An online adaptive control scheme for independent control is also demonstrated. This scheme will adjust for slow time varying dynamic systems such as fuselage response changes due to aircraft pressurization, etc.

  6. Active control of low-frequency sound radiation by cylindrical shell with piezoelectric stack force actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yin; Sun, Hongling; An, Fengyan; Li, Xiaodong

    2012-05-01

    A novel active control method of sound radiation from a cylindrical shell under axial excitations is proposed and theoretically analyzed. This control method is based on a pair of piezoelectric stack force actuators which are installed on the shell and parallel to the axial direction. The actuators are driven in phase and generate the same forces to control the vibration and the sound radiation of the cylindrical shell. The model considered is a fluid-loaded finite stiffened cylindrical shell with rigid end-caps and only low-frequency axial vibration modes are involved. Numerical simulations are performed to explore the required control forces and the optimal mounting positions of actuators under different cost functions. The results show that the proposed force actuators can reduce the radiated sound pressure of low-frequency axial modes in all directions.

  7. Active control of sound transmission/radiation from elastic plates by vibration inputs. II - Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, V. L.; Fuller, C. R.; Silcox, R. J.; Brown, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Actively controlled harmonic force inputs were applied experimentally to reduce the sound transmitted through an elastic circular plate. The control implementation used a time domain least mean square adaptive algorithm with two error sensors. The control forces were applied directly to the plate by point force vibration inputs, while the error information and performance were measured in the radiated acoustic field by microphones. Test cases were also performed in which the error sensors were accelerometers mounted on the plate. When accelerometers were used as error sensors, the controller performance was degraded; leading to the conclusion that minimizing plate motion does not necessarily lead to an associated decrease in radiated sound levels. In contrast, the results show excellent attenuation of the transmitted sound field when microphone error sensors were used. This result was consistent over a range of frequencies. In addition, the experimental results are compared to previously derived analytical results and the effect of using a point or global minimization scheme is discussed.

  8. Reduction of interior sound fields in flexible cylinders by active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of interior sound reduction through active control of a thin flexible shell's vibrational response are presently evaluated in view of an analytical model. The noise source is a single exterior acoustic monopole. The active control model is evaluated for harmonic excitation; the results obtained indicate spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 20 dB over the source plane, for acoustic resonant conditions inside the cavity.

  9. Improved training of neural networks for the nonlinear active control of sound and vibration.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, M; Paillard, B; Le Dinh, C T

    1999-01-01

    Active control of sound and vibration has been the subject of a lot of research in recent years, and examples of applications are now numerous. However, few practical implementations of nonlinear active controllers have been realized. Nonlinear active controllers may be required in cases where the actuators used in active control systems exhibit nonlinear characteristics, or in cases when the structure to be controlled exhibits a nonlinear behavior. A multilayer perceptron neural-network based control structure was previously introduced as a nonlinear active controller, with a training algorithm based on an extended backpropagation scheme. This paper introduces new heuristical training algorithms for the same neural-network control structure. The objective is to develop new algorithms with faster convergence speed (by using nonlinear recursive-least-squares algorithms) and/or lower computational loads (by using an alternative approach to compute the instantaneous gradient of the cost function). Experimental results of active sound control using a nonlinear actuator with linear and nonlinear controllers are presented. The results show that some of the new algorithms can greatly improve the learning rate of the neural-network control structure, and that for the considered experimental setup a neural-network controller can outperform linear controllers.

  10. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  11. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  12. Active control of sound radiated by a submarine in bending vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caresta, Mauro

    2011-02-01

    This paper theoretically investigates the use of inertial actuators to reduce the sound radiated by a submarine hull in bending vibration under harmonic excitation from the propeller. The radial forces from the propeller are tonal at the blade passing frequency and are transmitted to the hull through the stern end cone. The hull is modelled as a fluid loaded cylindrical shell with ring stiffeners and two equally spaced bulkheads. The cylinder is closed by end-plates and conical end caps. The actuators are arranged in circumferential arrays and attached to the prow end cone. Both Active Vibration Control and Active Structural Acoustic Control are analysed. The inertial actuators can provide control forces with a magnitude large enough to reduce the sound radiated by the vibrations of the hull in some frequency ranges.

  13. Active control of turbulent boundary layer sound transmission into a vehicle interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, A.; Alujević, N.; Pluymers, B.; Desmet, W.

    2016-09-01

    In high speed automotive, aerospace, and railway transportation, the turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is one of the most important sources of interior noise. The stochastic pressure distribution associated with the turbulence is able to excite significantly structural vibration of vehicle exterior panels. They radiate sound into the vehicle through the interior panels. Therefore, the air flow noise becomes very influential when it comes to the noise vibration and harshness assessment of a vehicle, in particular at low frequencies. Normally, passive solutions, such as sound absorbing materials, are used for reducing the TBL-induced noise transmission into a vehicle interior, which generally improve the structure sound isolation performance. These can achieve excellent isolation performance at higher frequencies, but are unable to deal with the low-frequency interior noise components. In this paper, active control of TBL noise transmission through an acoustically coupled double panel system into a rectangular cavity is examined theoretically. The Corcos model of the TBL pressure distribution is used to model the disturbance. The disturbance is rejected by an active vibration isolation unit reacting between the exterior and the interior panels. Significant reductions of the low-frequency vibrations of the interior panel and the sound pressure in the cavity are observed.

  14. Active control and sound synthesis--two different ways to investigate the influence of the modal parameters of a guitar on its sound.

    PubMed

    Benacchio, Simon; Mamou-Mani, Adrien; Chomette, Baptiste; Finel, Victor

    2016-03-01

    The vibrational behavior of musical instruments is usually studied using physical modeling and simulations. Recently, active control has proven its efficiency to experimentally modify the dynamical behavior of musical instruments. This approach could also be used as an experimental tool to systematically study fine physical phenomena. This paper proposes to use modal active control as an alternative to sound simulation to study the complex case of the coupling between classical guitar strings and soundboard. A comparison between modal active control and sound simulation investigates the advantages, the drawbacks, and the limits of these two approaches.

  15. Analogy electromagnetism-acoustics: Validation and application to local impedance active control for sound absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, L.; Furstoss, M.; Galland, M. A.

    1998-10-01

    An analogy between electromagnetism and acoustics is presented in 2D. The propagation of sound in presence of absorbing material is modeled using an open boundary microwave package. Validation is performed through analytical and experimental results. Application to local impedance active control for free field sound absorption is finally described. Une analogie entre acoustique et électromagnétisme est présentée en 2D, afin de modéliser la propagation d'ondes acoustiques, en présence de matériau absorbant et à l'aide d'un logiciel de micro-ondes en domaine ouvert. Cette analogie est validée par des résultats analytiques et expérimentaux. Une application au contrôle actif de l'impédance acoustique de surface de matériaux poreux est finalement décrite.

  16. Semi-active control of piezoelectric coating's underwater sound absorption by combining design of the shunt impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Li, Zhaohui; Huang, Aigen; Li, Qihu

    2015-10-01

    Piezoelectric shunt damping technology has been applied in the field of underwater sound absorption in recent years. In order to achieve broadband echo reduction, semi-active control of sound absorption of multi-layered piezoelectric coating by shunt damping is significant. In this paper, a practical method is proposed to control the underwater sound absorption coefficients of piezoelectric coating layers by combining design of the shunt impedance that allows certain sound absorption coefficients at setting frequencies. A one-dimensional electro-acoustic model of the piezoelectric coating and the backing is established based on the Mason equivalent circuit theory. First, the shunt impedance of the coating is derived under the constraint of sound absorption coefficient at one frequency. Then, taking the 1-3 piezoelectric composite coating as an example, the sound absorption properties of the coating shunted to the designed shunt impedance are investigated. Next, on the basis of that, an iterative method for two constrained frequencies and an optimizing algorithm for multiple constrained frequencies are provided for combining design of the shunt impedances. At last, an experimental sample with four piezoelectric material layers is manufactured, of which the sound absorption coefficients are measured in an impedance tube. The experimental results show good agreement with the finite element simulation results. It is proved that a serial R-L circuit can control the peak frequency, maximum and bandwidth of the sound absorption coefficient and the combining R-L circuits shunted to multiple layers can control the sound absorption coefficients at multiple frequencies.

  17. Controlling sound with acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummer, Steven A.; Christensen, Johan; Alù, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic metamaterials can manipulate and control sound waves in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. Metamaterials with zero, or even negative, refractive index for sound offer new possibilities for acoustic imaging and for the control of sound at subwavelength scales. The combination of transformation acoustics theory and highly anisotropic acoustic metamaterials enables precise control over the deformation of sound fields, which can be used, for example, to hide or cloak objects from incident acoustic energy. Active acoustic metamaterials use external control to create effective material properties that are not possible with passive structures and have led to the development of dynamically reconfigurable, loss-compensating and parity-time-symmetric materials for sound manipulation. Challenges remain, including the development of efficient techniques for fabricating large-scale metamaterial structures and converting laboratory experiments into useful devices. In this Review, we outline the designs and properties of materials with unusual acoustic parameters (for example, negative refractive index), discuss examples of extreme manipulation of sound and, finally, provide an overview of future directions in the field.

  18. Physical mechanisms of active control of sound transmission through rib stiffened double-panel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiyue; Chen, Kean; Ding, Shaohu; Yu, Haoxin

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an analytical investigation on physical mechanisms of actively controlling sound transmission through a rib stiffened double-panel structure using point source in the cavity. The combined modal expansion and vibro-acoustic coupling methods are applied to establish the theoretical model of such active structure. Under the condition of minimizing radiated power of the radiating ribbed plate, the physical mechanisms are interpreted in detail from the point of view of modal couplings similar as that used in existed literatures. Results obtained demonstrate that the rule of sound energy transmission and the physical mechanisms for the rib stiffened double-panel structure are all changed, and affected by the coupling effects of the rib when compared with the analytical results obtained for unribbed double-panel case. By taking the coupling effects of the rib into considerations, the cavity modal suppression and rearrangement mechanisms obtained in existed investigations are modified and supplemented for the ribbed plate case, which gives a clear interpretation for the physical nature involved in the active rib stiffened double-panel structure.

  19. Active control of sound transmission through stiff lightweight composite fuselage constructions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, D. R.; Nelson, P. A.; Pinnington, R. J.; Elliott, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Work was performed on the active control of sound transmission in composite structures. First, a model was outlined of a vibrating plate with arbitrary boundary conditions. Second, the far field was minimized to radiate acoustic power using secondary force inputs. Third, a model of a simple case of freely mounted stiff lightweight panels was used. Fourth, experimental results for aluminum honeycomb composite panels is presented. Fifth, experimental results are presented for the combination of a clamped steel plate and an aluminum honeycomb panel with secondary forces acting between the partitions. Finally, experimental results for the combination of a clamped steel plate with four secondary aluminum honeycomb panels is presented. All materials are shown in viewgraph format.

  20. Numerical investigation of sound transmission through double wall cylinders with respect to active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coats, T. J.; Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.

    1993-01-01

    Market pressure for more fuel efficient air travel has led to increased use of turboprop and higher bypass turbofan engines. The low frequency components of propeller, jet and boundary layer noise are difficult to attenuate with conventional passive techniques. Weight and geometric restrictions for sound absorbing meterials limit the amount and type of treatment that may be applied. An active noise control (ANC) method is providing to be an attractive alternative. The approach taken in this paper uses a numerical finite/boundary element method (FEM/BEM) that may be easilty adapted to arbitrary geometries. A double walled cylinder is modeled using commercially available software. The outer shell is modeled as an aluminum cylinder, similar to that of aircraft skins. The inner shell is modeled as a composite material representative of a lightweight, stiff trim panel. Two different inner shell materials are used. The first is representative of current trim structure, the second a much stiffer composite. The primary source is generated by an exterior acoustic monopole. Control fields are generated using normal force inputs to the inner cylindrical shell. A linear least mean square (LMS) algorithm is used to determine amplitudes of control forces that minimize the interior acoustic field. Coupling of acoustic and structural modes and noise reductions are discussed for each of the inner shell materials.

  1. Numerical investigation of sound transmission through double wall cylinders with respect to active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coats, T. J.; Silcox, R. J.; Lester, H. C.

    Market pressure for more fuel efficient air travel has led to increased use of turboprop and higher bypass turbofan engines. The low frequency components of propeller, jet and boundary layer noise are difficult to attenuate with conventional passive techniques. Weight and geometric restrictions for sound absorbing meterials limit the amount and type of treatment that may be applied. An active noise control (ANC) method is providing to be an attractive alternative. The approach taken in this paper uses a numerical finite/boundary element method (FEM/BEM) that may be easilty adapted to arbitrary geometries. A double walled cylinder is modeled using commercially available software. The outer shell is modeled as an aluminum cylinder, similar to that of aircraft skins. The inner shell is modeled as a composite material representative of a lightweight, stiff trim panel. Two different inner shell materials are used. The first is representative of current trim structure, the second a much stiffer composite. The primary source is generated by an exterior acoustic monopole. Control fields are generated using normal force inputs to the inner cylindrical shell. A linear least mean square (LMS) algorithm is used to determine amplitudes of control forces that minimize the interior acoustic field. Coupling of acoustic and structural modes and noise reductions are discussed for each of the inner shell materials.

  2. Hybrid Active/Passive Control of Sound Radiation from Panels with Constrained Layer Damping and Model Predictive Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2000-01-01

    make the controller adaptive. For example, a mathematical model of the plant could be periodically updated as the plant changes, and the feedback gains recomputed from the updated model. To be practical, this approach requires a simple plant model that can be updated quickly with reasonable computational requirements. A recent paper by the authors discussed one way to simplify a feedback controller, by reducing the number of actuators and sensors needed for good performance. The work was done on a tensioned aircraft-style panel excited on one side by TBL flow in a low speed wind tunnel. Actuation was provided by a piezoelectric (PZT) actuator mounted on the center of the panel. For sensing, the responses of four accelerometers, positioned to approximate the response of the first radiation mode of the panel, were summed and fed back through the controller. This single input-single output topology was found to have nearly the same noise reduction performance as a controller with fifteen accelerometers and three PZT patches. This paper extends the previous results by looking at how constrained layer damping (CLD) on a panel can be used to enhance the performance of the feedback controller thus providing a more robust and efficient hybrid active/passive system. The eventual goal is to use the CLD to reduce sound radiation at high frequencies, then implement a very simple, reduced order, low sample rate adaptive controller to attenuate sound radiation at low frequencies. Additionally this added damping smoothes phase transitions over the bandwidth which promotes robustness to natural frequency shifts. Experiments were conducted in a transmission loss facility on a clamped-clamped aluminum panel driven on one side by a loudspeaker. A generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm, which is suited to online adaptation of its parameters, was used in single input-single output and multiple input-single output configurations. Because this was a preliminary look at the potential

  3. Active sound radiation control of a thick piezolaminated smart rectangular plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasheminejad, Seyyed M.; Keshavarzpour, Hemad

    2013-09-01

    A spatial state-space formulation based on the linear three-dimensional piezoelasticity theory in conjunction with the classical Rayleigh integral acoustic radiation model is employed to obtain a semi-analytic solution for the coupled vibroacoustic response of a simply supported, arbitrarily thick, piezolaminated rectangular plate, set in an infinite rigid baffle. The smart structure is composed of an orthotropic supporting core layer integrated with matched volume velocity spatially distributed piezoelectric sensor and uniform force actuator layers. To assist controller design, a frequency-domain subspace-based identification technique is applied to estimate the coupled fluid-structure dynamics of the system. A standard linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) optimal controller is subsequently synthesized and simulated based on the identified model and the optimal control input voltage for minimizing the estimated net volume velocity (total radiated power) of the panel is calculated in both frequency and time domains. Numerical simulations demonstrate the effectiveness of the adopted volumetric sensing/actuation technique in conjunction with the optimal control strategy for suppressing the predicted sound radiation response of a three-layered (NaNb5O15/Al/PZT4) sandwich panel in both frequency and time domains. The trade-off between dynamic performance and control effort penalty is examined for two different types of loading (i.e., impulsive and broadband random disturbances). Validity of the results is demonstrated by comparison with a commercial finite element package, as well as with the data available in the literature.

  4. Reduction of the Radiating Sound of a Submerged Finite Cylindrical Shell Structure by Active Vibration Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-01-01

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water. PMID:23389344

  5. Reduction of the radiating sound of a submerged finite cylindrical shell structure by active vibration control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Soo; Sohn, Jung Woo; Jeon, Juncheol; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2013-02-06

    In this work, active vibration control of an underwater cylindrical shell structure was investigated, to suppress structural vibration and structure-borne noise in water. Finite element modeling of the submerged cylindrical shell structure was developed, and experimentally evaluated. Modal reduction was conducted to obtain the reduced system equation for the active feedback control algorithm. Three Macro Fiber Composites (MFCs) were used as actuators and sensors. One MFC was used as an exciter. The optimum control algorithm was designed based on the reduced system equations. The active control performance was then evaluated using the lab scale underwater cylindrical shell structure. Structural vibration and structure-borne noise of the underwater cylindrical shell structure were reduced significantly by activating the optimal controller associated with the MFC actuators. The results provide that active vibration control of the underwater structure is a useful means to reduce structure-borne noise in water.

  6. Wave field synthesis, adaptive wave field synthesis and ambisonics using decentralized transformed control: Potential applications to sound field reproduction and active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain; Woszczyk, Wieslaw

    2005-09-01

    Sound field reproduction finds applications in listening to prerecorded music or in synthesizing virtual acoustics. The objective is to recreate a sound field in a listening environment. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. Classical WFS, therefore, does not perform well in a real reproduction space such as room. Previous work has suggested that it is physically possible to reproduce a progressive wave field in-room situation using active control approaches. In this paper, a formulation of adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) introduces practical possibilities for an adaptive sound field reproduction combining WFS and active control (with WFS departure penalization) with a limited number of error sensors. AWFS includes WFS and closed-loop ``Ambisonics'' as limiting cases. This leads to the modification of the multichannel filtered-reference least-mean-square (FXLMS) and the filtered-error LMS (FELMS) adaptive algorithms for AWFS. Decentralization of AWFS for sound field reproduction is introduced on the basis of sources' and sensors' radiation modes. Such decoupling may lead to decentralized control of source strength distributions and may reduce computational burden of the FXLMS and the FELMS algorithms used for AWFS. [Work funded by NSERC, NATEQ, Université de Sherbrooke and VRQ.] Ultrasound/Bioresponse to

  7. Sound, Noise, and Vibration Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yerges, Lyle F.

    This working guide on the principles and techniques of controlling acoustical environment is discussed in the light of human, environmental and building needs. The nature of sound and its variables are defined. The acoustical environment and its many materials, spaces and functional requirements are described, with specific methods for planning,…

  8. Structural sensing of interior sound for active control of noise in structural-acoustic cavities.

    PubMed

    Bagha, Ashok K; Modak, S V

    2015-07-01

    This paper proposes a method for structural sensing of acoustic potential energy for active control of noise in a structural-acoustic cavity. The sensing strategy aims at global control and works with a fewer number of sensors. It is based on the established concept of radiation modes and hence does not add too many states to the order of the system. Acoustic potential energy is sensed using a combination of a Kalman filter and a frequency weighting filter with the structural response measurements as the inputs. The use of Kalman filter also makes the system robust against measurement noise. The formulation of the strategy is presented using finite element models of the system including that of sensors and actuators so that it can be easily applied to practical systems. The sensing strategy is numerically evaluated in the framework of Linear Quadratic Gaussian based feedback control of interior noise in a rectangular box cavity with a flexible plate with single and multiple pairs of piezoelectric sensor-actuator patches when broadband disturbances act on the plate. The performance is compared with an "acoustic filter" that models the complete transfer function from the structure to the acoustic domain. The sensing performance is also compared with a direct estimation strategy.

  9. Experimental Simulation of Active Control With On-line System Identification on Sound Transmission Through an Elastic Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An adaptive control algorithm with on-line system identification capability has been developed. One of the great advantages of this scheme is that an additional system identification mechanism such as an additional uncorrelated random signal generator as the source of system identification is not required. A time-varying plate-cavity system is used to demonstrate the control performance of this algorithm. The time-varying system consists of a stainless-steel plate which is bolted down on a rigid cavity opening where the cavity depth was changed with respect to time. For a given externally located harmonic sound excitation, the system identification and the control are simultaneously executed to minimize the transmitted sound in the cavity. The control performance of the algorithm is examined for two cases. First, all the water was drained, the external disturbance frequency is swept with 1 Hz/sec. The result shows an excellent frequency tracking capability with cavity internal sound suppression of 40 dB. For the second case, the water level is initially empty and then raised to 3/20 full in 60 seconds while the external sound excitation is fixed with a frequency. Hence, the cavity resonant frequency decreases and passes the external sound excitation frequency. The algorithm shows 40 dB transmitted noise suppression without compromising the system identification tracking capability.

  10. Active Control of Radiated Sound with Integrated Piezoelectric Composite Structures. Volume 3: Appendices (Concl.)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    uncontrolled) adopting a similar control design using a MIMO feedforward natural frequency. In general, the controlled system corre- controller and a recursive...The effectiveness of this 16 R. A. Burdisso, C. R. Fuller, and Z. Li, "Eigenproperties of MIMO feed-formulation is demonstrated through numerical...would represent a impractical error sensing scheme and when the radiating structure is relatively massive . V. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors gratefully

  11. Piezoelectric actuator models for active sound and vibration control of cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, Harold C.; Lefebvre, Sylvie

    1993-01-01

    Analytical models for piezoelectric actuators, adapted from flat plate concepts, are developed for noise and vibration control applications associated with vibrating circular cylinders. The loadings applied to the cylinder by the piezoelectric actuators for the bending and in-plane force models are approximated by line moment and line force distributions, respectively, acting on the perimeter of the actuator patch area. Coupling between the cylinder and interior acoustic cavity is examined by studying the modal spectra, particularly for the low-order cylinder modes that couple efficiently with the cavity at low frequencies. Within the scope of this study, the in-plane force model produced a more favorable distribution of low-order modes, necessary for efficient interior noise control, than did the bending model.

  12. Acoustics: Motion controlled by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neild, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    A simple technique has been developed that produces holograms made of sound waves. These acoustic landscapes are used to manipulate microscale objects, and offer great potential in medical imaging and selective heating. See Letter p.518

  13. Magnetic Fields Can Control Heat and Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-23

    Joseph Heremans March 23 2015, 2.48pm EDT Magnetic fields can control heat and sound AUTHOR Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering...Physics, and Materials Science & Engineering at The Ohio State University Sound is carried by periodic vibrations of atoms in gases, liquids and... sound waves, which then propagate through the air until they hit a listener’s eardrums and make them vibrate as well. From these vibrations, the listener

  14. Robust Feedback Control of Flow Induced Structural Radiation of Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heatwole, Craig M.; Bernhard, Robert J.; Franchek, Matthew A.

    1997-01-01

    A significant component of the interior noise of aircraft and automobiles is a result of turbulent boundary layer excitation of the vehicular structure. In this work, active robust feedback control of the noise due to this non-predictable excitation is investigated. Both an analytical model and experimental investigations are used to determine the characteristics of the flow induced structural sound radiation problem. The problem is shown to be broadband in nature with large system uncertainties associated with the various operating conditions. Furthermore the delay associated with sound propagation is shown to restrict the use of microphone feedback. The state of the art control methodologies, IL synthesis and adaptive feedback control, are evaluated and shown to have limited success for solving this problem. A robust frequency domain controller design methodology is developed for the problem of sound radiated from turbulent flow driven plates. The control design methodology uses frequency domain sequential loop shaping techniques. System uncertainty, sound pressure level reduction performance, and actuator constraints are included in the design process. Using this design method, phase lag was added using non-minimum phase zeros such that the beneficial plant dynamics could be used. This general control approach has application to lightly damped vibration and sound radiation problems where there are high bandwidth control objectives requiring a low controller DC gain and controller order.

  15. Salient sounds activate human visual cortex automatically

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, John J.; Störmer, Viola S.; Martinez, Antigona; Feng, Wenfeng; Hillyard, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Sudden changes in the acoustic environment enhance perceptual processing of subsequent visual stimuli that appear in close spatial proximity. Little is known, however, about the neural mechanisms by which salient sounds affect visual processing. In particular, it is unclear whether such sounds automatically activate visual cortex. To shed light on this issue, the present study examined event-related brain potentials (ERPs) that were triggered either by peripheral sounds that preceded task-relevant visual targets (Experiment 1) or were presented during purely auditory tasks (Experiments 2, 3, and 4). In all experiments the sounds elicited a contralateral ERP over the occipital scalp that was localized to neural generators in extrastriate visual cortex of the ventral occipital lobe. The amplitude of this cross-modal ERP was predictive of perceptual judgments about the contrast of co-localized visual targets. These findings demonstrate that sudden, intrusive sounds reflexively activate human visual cortex in a spatially specific manner, even during purely auditory tasks when the sounds are not relevant to the ongoing task. PMID:23699530

  16. Modular and Adaptive Control of Sound Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nort, Douglas

    This dissertation presents research into the creation of systems for the control of sound synthesis and processing. The focus differs from much of the work related to digital musical instrument design, which has rightly concentrated on the physicality of the instrument and interface: sensor design, choice of controller, feedback to performer and so on. Often times a particular choice of sound processing is made, and the resultant parameters from the physical interface are conditioned and mapped to the available sound parameters in an exploratory fashion. The main goal of the work presented here is to demonstrate the importance of the space that lies between physical interface design and the choice of sound manipulation algorithm, and to present a new framework for instrument design that strongly considers this essential part of the design process. In particular, this research takes the viewpoint that instrument designs should be considered in a musical control context, and that both control and sound dynamics must be considered in tandem. In order to achieve this holistic approach, the work presented in this dissertation assumes complementary points of view. Instrument design is first seen as a function of musical context, focusing on electroacoustic music and leading to a view on gesture that relates perceived musical intent to the dynamics of an instrumental system. The important design concept of mapping is then discussed from a theoretical and conceptual point of view, relating perceptual, systems and mathematically-oriented ways of examining the subject. This theoretical framework gives rise to a mapping design space, functional analysis of pertinent existing literature, implementations of mapping tools, instrumental control designs and several perceptual studies that explore the influence of mapping structure. Each of these reflect a high-level approach in which control structures are imposed on top of a high-dimensional space of control and sound synthesis

  17. A study of methods to predict and measure the transmission of sound through the walls of light aircraft. Numerical method for analyzing the optimal performance of active noise controllers. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollo, Christopher G.; Bernhard, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    An optimal active noise controller is formulated and analyzed for three different active noise control problems. The first problem formulated is the active control of enclosed or partially enclosed harmonic sound fields where the noise source strengths and enclosure boundary description are known. The enclosure boundary is described by either pressure, velocity, or impedance boundary conditions. The second problem formulated is the active control of the free field power radiated from a distributed noise source with a known time harmonic surface velocity. The third problem formulated is the active control of enclosed or partially enclosed harmonic sound field where the noise source strengths of enclosure boundary description may not be known. All three formulations are derived using an indirect boundary element technique. Formulation and verification of an indirect boundary element method is presented. The active noise controller formulations for enclosures are capable of analyzing systems with generalized enclosure shapes, point noise sources, and/or locally reacting impedance boundary conditions. For each formulation, representative results of optimal active noise controller case studies are presented, and some general conclusions are drawn.

  18. Issues in Humanoid Audition and Sound Source Localization by Active Audition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadai, Kazuhiro; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Kitano, Hiroaki

    In this paper, we present an active audition system which is implemented on the humanoid robot "SIG the humanoid". The audition system for highly intelligent humanoids localizes sound sources and recognizes auditory events in the auditory scene. Active audition reported in this paper enables SIG to track sources by integrating audition, vision, and motor movements. Given the multiple sound sources in the auditory scene, SIG actively moves its head to improve localization by aligning microphones orthogonal to the sound source and by capturing the possible sound sources by vision. However, such an active head movement inevitably creates motor noises.The system adaptively cancels motor noises using motor control signals and the cover acoustics. The experimental result demonstrates that active audition by integration of audition, vision, and motor control attains sound source tracking in variety of conditions.onditions.

  19. Motor area activity for action-related and nonaction-related sounds in a three-dimensional sound field reproduction system.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Koichiro; Ueno, Kanako; Shimada, Sotaro

    2015-03-25

    The motor cortical area is often activated to auditory stimuli in the human brain. In this study, we examined whether the motor area shows differential activation for action-related and nonaction-related sounds and whether it is susceptible to the quality of the sounds. A three-dimensional sound field recording and reproduction system based on the boundary surface control principle (BoSC system) was used for this purpose. We measured brain activity during hearing action-related or nonaction-related sounds with electroencephalography using mu rhythm suppression (mu-suppression) as an index of motor cortical activation. The results showed that mu-suppression was observed when the participant heard action-related sounds, but it was not evident when hearing nonaction-related sounds. Moreover, this suppression was significantly larger in the 3D sound field (62-ch loudspeaker condition), which generates a more realistic sound field, than in the 1-ch loudspeaker condition. Our results indicate that the motor area was indeed activated for action-related sounds and that its activation was enhanced with a 3D realistic sound field. We discuss our findings in relation to the mirror neuron system and the possibility of using its activity as an objective measure that reflects the subjective sense of reality in various virtual reality settings when interacting with others.

  20. Mathematically trivial control of sound using a parametric beam focusing source.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobuo; Tanaka, Motoki

    2011-01-01

    By exploiting a case regarded as trivial, this paper presents global active noise control using a parametric beam focusing source (PBFS). As with a dipole model, one is used for a primary sound source and the other for a control sound source, the control effect for minimizing a total acoustic power depends on the distance between the two. When the distance becomes zero, the total acoustic power becomes null, hence nothing less than a trivial case. Because of the constraints in practice, there exist difficulties in placing a control source close enough to a primary source. However, by projecting a sound beam of a parametric array loudspeaker onto the target sound source (primary source), a virtual sound source may be created on the target sound source, thereby enabling the collocation of the sources. In order to further ensure feasibility of the trivial case, a PBFS is then introduced in an effort to meet the size of the two sources. Reflected sound wave of the PBFS, which is tantamount to the virtual sound source output, aims to suppress the primary sound. Finally, a numerical analysis as well as an experiment is conducted, verifying the validity of the proposed methodology.

  1. Study of Vertical Sound Image Control Using Parametric Loudspeakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kazuhiro; Itou, Kouki; Aoki, Shigeaki

    A parametric loudspeaker is known as a super-directivity loudspeaker. So far, the applications have been limited monaural reproduction sound system. We had discussed characteristics of stereo reproduction with two parametric loudspeakers. In this paper, the sound localization in the vertical direction using the parametric loudspeakers was confirmed. The direction of sound localization was able to be controlled. The results were similar as in using ordinary loudspeakers. However, by setting the parametric loudspeaker 5 degrees rightward, the direction of sound localization moved about 20 degrees rightward. The measured ILD (Interaural Level Difference) using a dummy head were analyzed.

  2. Real-time control of sound diffusion parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leider, Colby

    2003-04-01

    Much electronic and computer music relies extensively on real-time diffusion of electronic sound in surround loudspeaker configurations. The most common method of sound diffusion in practice today is to use standard sound-reinforcement mixers whereby each fader controls the playback volume of a corresponding loudspeaker in a concert hall. Using the mixer this way, however, presents problems when one attempts to create sound trajectories, because complex, precise, and repeatable control of the individual faders is required. To address these interface issues, two different handheld controllers were created for real-time sound diffusion. The first controller is equipped accelerometers, force-sensing resistors, and joysticks and maps using input into diffusion parameters. The second controller mimics the operation of a standard mixer but allows more rapid movement of fader positions by replacing each fader with a bend sensor. To test the validity of each controller, twenty undergraduate music engineering students were asked to repeatedly perform various diffusion tasks (such as moving a monaural sound in a circle around the audience) using a standard mixer and each of the controllers. The accuracy and speed of their performances were tracked. The study concludes with lessons learned from the statistics gathered. [Research supported by the University of Miami.

  3. Peripheral sounds rapidly activate visual cortex: evidence from electrocorticography.

    PubMed

    Brang, David; Towle, Vernon L; Suzuki, Satoru; Hillyard, Steven A; Di Tusa, Senneca; Dai, Zhongtian; Tao, James; Wu, Shasha; Grabowecky, Marcia

    2015-11-01

    Neurophysiological studies with animals suggest that sounds modulate activity in primary visual cortex in the presence of concurrent visual stimulation. Noninvasive neuroimaging studies in humans have similarly shown that sounds modulate activity in visual areas even in the absence of visual stimuli or visual task demands. However, the spatial and temporal limitations of these noninvasive methods prevent the determination of how rapidly sounds activate early visual cortex and what information about the sounds is relayed there. Using spatially and temporally precise measures of local synaptic activity acquired from depth electrodes in humans, we demonstrate that peripherally presented sounds evoke activity in the anterior portion of the contralateral, but not ipsilateral, calcarine sulcus within 28 ms of sound onset. These results suggest that auditory stimuli rapidly evoke spatially specific activity in visual cortex even in the absence of concurrent visual stimulation or visual task demands. This rapid auditory-evoked activation of primary visual cortex is likely to be mediated by subcortical pathways or direct cortical projections from auditory to visual areas.

  4. Decentralized Control of Sound Radiation using a High-Authority/Low-Authority Control Strategy with Anisotropic Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Fuller, Chris R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a combined control strategy designed to reduce sound radiation from stiffened aircraft-style panels. The control architecture uses robust active damping in addition to high-authority linear quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control. Active damping is achieved using direct velocity feedback with triangularly shaped anisotropic actuators and point velocity sensors. While active damping is simple and robust, stability is guaranteed at the expense of performance. Therefore the approach is often referred to as low-authority control. In contrast, LQG control strategies can achieve substantial reductions in sound radiation. Unfortunately, the unmodeled interaction between neighboring control units can destabilize decentralized control systems. Numerical simulations show that combining active damping and decentralized LQG control can be beneficial. In particular, augmenting the in-bandwidth damping supplements the performance of the LQG control strategy and reduces the destabilizing interaction between neighboring control units.

  5. Sound shielding by a piezoelectric membrane and a negative capacitor with feedback control.

    PubMed

    Sluka, Tomás; Kodama, Hidekazu; Fukada, Eiichi; Mokrý, Pavel

    2008-08-01

    The design and realization of an adaptive sound-shielding system based on a method to control the effective elastic stiffness of piezoelectric materials are presented in this paper. In this system, the sound-shielding effect is achieved by a sound reflection from the piezoelectric curved membrane fixed in rigid frame and connected to an active analog circuit that behaves as a negative capacitor. The acoustic transmission loss through the curved membrane was measured for the incident sound of frequency 1.6 kHz and of acoustic pressure level 80 dB. When the negative capacitor in the system was properly adjusted, the acoustic pressure level of the transmitted sound was reduced from the initial 60 dB to 15 dB by the action of the negative capacitor. Then the system was exposed to naturally changing operational conditions, and their effect on sound-shielding efficiency was studied. It is shown that the acoustic transmission loss of the system dropped by 35 dB within 30 min from the moment of negative capacitor adjustment. Therefore, a self-adjustment of the system has been implemented by appending an additional digital control circuit to the negative capacitor. It is shown that the aforementioned deteriorating effect has been eliminated by the adjusting action of the control circuit. The long-time sustainable value of 60 dB in the acoustic transmission loss of the adaptive sound shielding system has been achieved.

  6. Decentralized control of sound radiation using iterative loop recovery.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Noah H; Cabell, Randolph H; Fuller, Chris R

    2010-10-01

    A decentralized model-based control strategy is designed to reduce low-frequency sound radiation from periodically stiffened panels. While decentralized control systems tend to be scalable, performance can be limited due to modeling error introduced by the unmodeled interaction between neighboring control units. Since bounds on modeling error are not known in advance, it is difficult to ensure the decentralized control system will be robust without making the controller overly conservative. Therefore an iterative approach is suggested, which utilizes frequency-shaped loop recovery. The approach accounts for modeling error introduced by neighboring control loops, requires no communication between subsystems, and is relatively simple. The control strategy is evaluated numerically using a model of a stiffened aluminum panel that is representative of the sidewall of an aircraft. Simulations demonstrate that the iterative approach can achieve significant reductions in radiated sound power from the stiffened panel without destabilizing neighboring control units.

  7. Decentralized Control of Sound Radiation Using Iterative Loop Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Fuller, Chris R.

    2009-01-01

    A decentralized model-based control strategy is designed to reduce low-frequency sound radiation from periodically stiffened panels. While decentralized control systems tend to be scalable, performance can be limited due to modeling error introduced by the unmodeled interaction between neighboring control units. Since bounds on modeling error are not known in advance, it is difficult to ensure the decentralized control system will be robust without making the controller overly conservative. Therefore an iterative approach is suggested, which utilizes frequency-shaped loop recovery. The approach accounts for modeling error introduced by neighboring control loops, requires no communication between subsystems, and is relatively simple. The control strategy is evaluated numerically using a model of a stiffened aluminum panel that is representative of the sidewall of an aircraft. Simulations demonstrate that the iterative approach can achieve significant reductions in radiated sound power from the stiffened panel without destabilizing neighboring control units.

  8. Sounds activate visual cortex and improve visual discrimination.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wenfeng; Störmer, Viola S; Martinez, Antigona; McDonald, John J; Hillyard, Steven A

    2014-07-16

    A recent study in humans (McDonald et al., 2013) found that peripheral, task-irrelevant sounds activated contralateral visual cortex automatically as revealed by an auditory-evoked contralateral occipital positivity (ACOP) recorded from the scalp. The present study investigated the functional significance of this cross-modal activation of visual cortex, in particular whether the sound-evoked ACOP is predictive of improved perceptual processing of a subsequent visual target. A trial-by-trial analysis showed that the ACOP amplitude was markedly larger preceding correct than incorrect pattern discriminations of visual targets that were colocalized with the preceding sound. Dipole modeling of the scalp topography of the ACOP localized its neural generators to the ventrolateral extrastriate visual cortex. These results provide direct evidence that the cross-modal activation of contralateral visual cortex by a spatially nonpredictive but salient sound facilitates the discriminative processing of a subsequent visual target event at the location of the sound. Recordings of event-related potentials to the targets support the hypothesis that the ACOP is a neural consequence of the automatic orienting of visual attention to the location of the sound.

  9. Sounds Activate Visual Cortex and Improve Visual Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Störmer, Viola S.; Martinez, Antigona; McDonald, John J.; Hillyard, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    A recent study in humans (McDonald et al., 2013) found that peripheral, task-irrelevant sounds activated contralateral visual cortex automatically as revealed by an auditory-evoked contralateral occipital positivity (ACOP) recorded from the scalp. The present study investigated the functional significance of this cross-modal activation of visual cortex, in particular whether the sound-evoked ACOP is predictive of improved perceptual processing of a subsequent visual target. A trial-by-trial analysis showed that the ACOP amplitude was markedly larger preceding correct than incorrect pattern discriminations of visual targets that were colocalized with the preceding sound. Dipole modeling of the scalp topography of the ACOP localized its neural generators to the ventrolateral extrastriate visual cortex. These results provide direct evidence that the cross-modal activation of contralateral visual cortex by a spatially nonpredictive but salient sound facilitates the discriminative processing of a subsequent visual target event at the location of the sound. Recordings of event-related potentials to the targets support the hypothesis that the ACOP is a neural consequence of the automatic orienting of visual attention to the location of the sound. PMID:25031419

  10. New facilities for magnetotelluric sounding and electromagnetic sounding with active sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymovych, Y.; Rakhlin, L.; Tregubenko, V.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) sounding and investigations that use electromagnetic sounding with active sources (SAS) are wide spread in many branch of geophysics. The main goal of their application is Earth geoelectric cross-section parameters definition. For MT sounding it was possible to carry out it mostly till the time intervals less, than 10000 sec, that does not permitted to get the sections for the depth more than some first kilometres. Last years in LCISR the new generation of MT and facilities for deep electromagnetic sounding in ultra-low frequencies periods up to 200,000 sec were designed. It became possible after the development of highly stable devices for DC magnetic and telluric measurements. The long term stability of newly created magnetometers now is better than 0.5 nT per month and temperature stability about 0.1 nT/oC. For telluric currents measurements highly stable non-polarized electrodes with long term stability better than 60 mV per month, and temperature stability about 10 mV/oC were designed. Implementation of such facilities made it possible to realize the magnetotelluric sounding to the depth 400-600 km and the experimental results have good agreement with global magnetotelluric curve. Such MT stations (LEMI-404 model) were used in BEAR (Baltic Electromagnetic Array Research) and several others projects. Their use made it possible also to prove with very high probability the existence of low-depth astenosphere in Dnepre-Donetsk Basin (Ukraine). Now a batch of these MT stations is manufactured and used in Ukrainian magnetotelluric net. This net was intended firstly for investigation of electromagnetic earthquake precursors, but after its further development - for geoelectric section circular changes too. Recently two new MT stations are developed. First one low-frequency (DC 1 Hz) inexpensive station LEMI-411 which, having as high metrological parameters as the wide-band one, costs considerebly lower. Second one is multifunctional SAS station

  11. Achievements and tasks for active noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichy, Jiri

    This short survey attempted to highlight some achievements of the latest active control applications. Except for the active control of a one-dimensional sound field in ducts and active headphones, the applications for active control technology are still being developed. Although the principles of active control are simple, their applications still require substantial research and modeling of the sound fields to find optimal solutions. There is no doubt that active control of sound field triggered extensive research of the fundamental properties of the sound field which goes beyond the textbook simplifications. Also, new hardware, particularly actuators, are under development. As more realism is brought into assessment of applicability of active control, we will see in the future increasing confidence of industry to adopt this new technology.

  12. Transparent sound screens. [and their noise control efficiency in buildings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizo, F.; Draghici, R.

    1974-01-01

    Transparent sound screens consisting of glass (organic glass) plates placed at fixed angles with respect to the floor are considered. Noise levels in the screened area depend on the cumulative effect of direct, reverberated and refracted components of sound energy radiated by the source. This effect is analyzed on the analogy of the summation of electrical impedances. Inasmuch as under given circumstances sufficient noise control can be obtained, transparent screens seem to solve the problem of unimpeded supervision of installations in noisy workshops and power plants; in administrative buildings, computing centers, design bureaus, etc., they ensure acoustic comfort without space losses and without inspiring claustrophobia.

  13. 75 FR 61857 - Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured... concerning the following information collection. Title of Proposal: Statement on Sound Practices Concerning...: Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities describes...

  14. Dispersion Control System for Sounding Rockets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-03-04

    activates the Interrupt Start which delivers a clock pulse approximately every 10 ms to the TDY-52B interrupt line. Every 10 ms the TDY-52B will increment...out- puts every 10 ms and provide an output to the canards via the Pitch & Yaw Command A&B signals. At 20 sec the 2nd State Initiate line will be...Figure 13 provides the TDY- 52B with an approximate 10 ms interrupt and a system clear signal (SYSCLR). This circuit also provides the PCM and dehounce

  15. Decentralized harmonic control of sound radiation and transmission by a plate using a virtual impedance approach.

    PubMed

    Quaegebeur, Nicolas; Micheau, Philippe; Berry, Alain

    2009-05-01

    The problem under study in this article is the active control of sound transmission and radiation of a panel under a periodic excitation. The control strategy investigated uses independent control loops between an individual polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensor and an individual lead zirconate titanate (PZT) actuator. The specific approach employed here uses the concept of virtual impedance. The aim is to determine for each frequency the optimal impedance between each PVDF sensor and the corresponding PZT actuator in order to reduce the sound power radiated by the plate. Theoretical predictions are compared to measurements of the sound radiated and transmission loss of a panel mounted with eight PZT-PVDF units. Reductions of up to 20 dB of the acoustic power can be achieved around mechanical resonances of the system, while the control strategy has little effect for off-resonance excitations.

  16. Controlled sound field with a dual layer loudspeaker array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Mincheol; Fazi, Filippo M.; Nelson, Philip A.; Hirono, Fabio C.

    2014-08-01

    Controlled sound interference has been extensively investigated using a prototype dual layer loudspeaker array comprised of 16 loudspeakers. Results are presented for measures of array performance such as input signal power, directivity of sound radiation and accuracy of sound reproduction resulting from the application of conventional control methods such as minimization of error in mean squared pressure, maximization of energy difference and minimization of weighted pressure error and energy. Procedures for selecting the tuning parameters have also been introduced. With these conventional concepts aimed at the production of acoustically bright and dark zones, all the control methods used require a trade-off between radiation directivity and reproduction accuracy in the bright zone. An alternative solution is proposed which can achieve better performance based on the measures presented simultaneously by inserting a low priority zone named as the “gray” zone. This involves the weighted minimization of mean-squared errors in both bright and dark zones together with the gray zone in which the minimization error is given less importance. This results in the production of directional bright zone in which the accuracy of sound reproduction is maintained with less required input power. The results of simulations and experiments are shown to be in excellent agreement.

  17. Regarding "Semi-active control of the rocking motion of monolithic art objects" [Journal of Sound and Vibration, 374 (2016) 1-16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartmell, Matthew P.

    2016-09-01

    The Editor wishes to make the reader aware that the paper "Semi-active control of the rocking motion of monolithic art objects" by R. Ceravolo, M.L. Pecorelli, and L.Z. Fragonara, did not contain a direct citation of the fundamental and original work by D. Konstantinidis and N. Makris entitled "Experimental and analytical studies on the seismic response of free-standing and anchored laboratory equipment", Report No. PEER 2005/07. Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) Center, University of California, Berkeley, 2005. The Editor regrets that this omission was not noted at the time that the above paper was accepted and published.

  18. Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capstick, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    1. The nature of sound; 2. Elasticity and vibrations; 3. Transverse waves; 4. Longitudinal waves; 5. Velocity of longitudinal waves; 6. Reflection and refraction. Doppler's principle; 7. Interference. Beats. Combination tones; 8. Resonance and forced vibrations; 9. Quality of musical notes; 10. Organ pipes; 11. Rods. Plates. Bells; 12. Acoustical measurements; 13. The phonograph, microphone and telephone; 14. Consonance; 15. Definition of intervals. Scales. Temperament; 16. Musical instruments; 17. Application of acoustical principles to military purposes; Questions; Answers to questions; Index.

  19. Annoyance resulting from intrusion of aircraft sounds upon various activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, W. J.; Shepherd, W. T.; Fletcher, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in which subjects were engaged in TV viewing, telephone listening, or reverie (no activity) for a 1/2-hour session. During the session, they were exposed to a series of recorded aircraft sounds at the rate of one flight every 2 minutes. Within each session, four levels of flyover noise, separated by dB increments, were presented several times in a Latin Square balanced sequence. The peak level of the noisiest flyover in any session was fixed at 95, 90, 85, 75, or 70 dBA. At the end of the test session, subjects recorded their responses to the aircraft sounds, using a bipolar scale which covered the range from very pleasant to extremely annoying. Responses to aircraft noises were found to be significantly affected by the particular activity in which the subjects were engaged. Not all subjects found the aircraft sounds to be annoying.

  20. Active noise control of a vibrating surface: Continuum and non-continuum investigations on vibroacoustic sound reduction by a secondary heat-flux source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manela, A.; Pogorelyuk, L.

    2015-12-01

    We study the effect of surface heating on sound radiation by a vibrating boundary. Focusing on a setup of an infinite planar wall interacting with a semi-infinite expanse of a gas, the system response to arbitrary (small-amplitude) vibro-thermal excitation is investigated. Starting with the case of sinusoidal actuations, the superposed effect of boundary heat-flux excitation at a common frequency ω is examined. The entire range of frequencies is considered, where, depending on the ratio between ω and gas kinetic collision frequency ωcoll, fundamentally different flow regimes follow. The two limit cases of ω ≪ωcoll (continuum-flow conditions) and ω ≫ωcoll (ballistic flow regime) are investigated analytically, based on continuum equations and collisionless Boltzmann equation, respectively. In between, an intermediate interval of frequencies ω ~ωcoll is analyzed numerically, based on the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. In search for optimal conditions for acoustic sound reduction, it is found that effective attenuation is obtained when boundary heat flux is applied at opposite phase to surface actuation. Amplitude-wise, conditions for minimization of the acoustic field vary between the limits: at low-frequency conditions, wave radiation extends over large distances from the wall, and optimal sound reduction is achieved when the ratio between wall-inserted thermal and kinetic energies |Eq/Ek|opt equals γ /(γ - 1) (with γ denoting the ratio between gas specific heat capacities). At high-frequency conditions, wall signal affects only a thin gas layer (of the order of the mean free path) in the vicinity of the boundary, and optimal attenuation is achieved when |Eq/Ek|opt = 1. The analysis is extended to consider the system response to non-periodic excitations, for the specific case of a delta-function input. Making use of the above collisionless- and continuum-limit analyses, early- and late-time system responses are computed. While conditions for

  1. 76 FR 34627 - Proposed Modification of Offshore Airspace Areas: Norton Sound Low, Control 1234L and Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... Areas: Norton Sound Low, Control 1234L and Control 1487L; Alaska AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... Sound Low, Control 1234L, and Control 1487L Offshore Airspace Areas in Alaska. The airspace floors would... Norton Sound Low, Control 1234L, and Control 1487L Offshore Airspace Areas in Alaska. The Norton...

  2. Adaptive wave field synthesis for active sound field reproduction: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Sound field reproduction has applications in music reproduction, spatial audio, sound environment reproduction, and experimental acoustics. Sound field reproduction can be used to artificially reproduce the spatial character of natural hearing. The objective is then to reproduce a sound field in a real reproduction environment. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. The room response thus reduces the quality of the physical sound field reproduction by WFS. In recent research papers, adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) was defined as a potential solution to compensate for these quality reductions from which WFS objective performance suffers. In this paper, AWFS is experimentally investigated as an active sound field reproduction system with a limited number of reproduction error sensors to compensate for the response of the listening environment. Two digital signal processing algorithms for AWFS are used for comparison purposes, one of which is based on independent radiation mode control. AWFS performed propagating sound field reproduction better than WFS in three tested reproduction spaces (hemianechoic chamber, standard laboratory space, and reverberation chamber).

  3. Auditory cortex controls sound-driven innate defense behaviour through corticofugal projections to inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaorui R.; Liang, Feixue; Zingg, Brian; Ji, Xu-ying; Ibrahim, Leena A.; Tao, Huizhong W.; Zhang, Li I.

    2015-01-01

    Defense against environmental threats is essential for animal survival. However, the neural circuits responsible for transforming unconditioned sensory stimuli and generating defensive behaviours remain largely unclear. Here, we show that corticofugal neurons in the auditory cortex (ACx) targeting the inferior colliculus (IC) mediate an innate, sound-induced flight behaviour. Optogenetic activation of these neurons, or their projection terminals in the IC, is sufficient for initiating flight responses, while the inhibition of these projections reduces sound-induced flight responses. Corticocollicular axons monosynaptically innervate neurons in the cortex of the IC (ICx), and optogenetic activation of the projections from the ICx to the dorsal periaqueductal gray is sufficient for provoking flight behaviours. Our results suggest that ACx can both amplify innate acoustic-motor responses and directly drive flight behaviours in the absence of sound input through corticocollicular projections to ICx. Such corticofugal control may be a general feature of innate defense circuits across sensory modalities. PMID:26068082

  4. Sounding rocket activities of Japan in 2003 and 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Nobuaki; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Nonaka, Satoshi; Nakajima, Takashi; Takumi, Abe; Yuichi, Tsuda; Yamagami, Takamasa

    2005-08-01

    In October 2003, a new space agency, JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) was reorganized and started as a primary space agency to promote all space activities in Japan. The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) belonged to JAXA and continued to promote space science and technologies using unique scientific satellites, sounding rockets and balloons. This paper summarizes sounding rocket and ballooning activities of ISAS in the fiscal year of 2003 and 2004, associated with satellite launch programs. In this time period, three sounding rockets and nineteen balloons were launched by ISAS. One of the sounding rocket, S-310-35 was an international collaboration between Japan and Norway, which was launched from Andoya Rocket Range (ARR), Andenes, Norway, so as to study the upper atmospheric dynamics and energetics associated with the auroral energy in the polar lower thermosphere. Through the combination with the national researchers and the cooperation with international organizations, ISAS will keep its own flight opportunities and be able to obtain many new scientific findings.

  5. 40 CFR 81.32 - Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.32 Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Washington) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound Intrastate Air...

  6. 40 CFR 81.32 - Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.32 Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Washington) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound Intrastate Air...

  7. 40 CFR 81.32 - Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.32 Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Washington) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound Intrastate Air...

  8. Aircraft panel with sensorless active sound power reduction capabilities through virtual mechanical impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulandet, R.; Michau, M.; Micheau, P.; Berry, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with an active structural acoustic control approach to reduce the transmission of tonal noise in aircraft cabins. The focus is on the practical implementation of the virtual mechanical impedances method by using sensoriactuators instead of conventional control units composed of separate sensors and actuators. The experimental setup includes two sensoriactuators developed from the electrodynamic inertial exciter and distributed over an aircraft trim panel which is subject to a time-harmonic diffuse sound field. The target mechanical impedances are first defined by solving a linear optimization problem from sound power measurements before being applied to the test panel using a complex envelope controller. Measured data are compared to results obtained with sensor-actuator pairs consisting of an accelerometer and an inertial exciter, particularly as regards sound power reduction. It is shown that the two types of control unit provide similar performance, and that here virtual impedance control stands apart from conventional active damping. In particular, it is clear from this study that extra vibrational energy must be provided by the actuators for optimal sound power reduction, mainly due to the high structural damping in the aircraft trim panel. Concluding remarks on the benefits of using these electrodynamic sensoriactuators to control tonal disturbances are also provided.

  9. Interaction Metrics for Feedback Control of Sound Radiation from Stiffened Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Cox, David E.; Gibbs, Gary P.

    2003-01-01

    Interaction metrics developed for the process control industry are used to evaluate decentralized control of sound radiation from bays on an aircraft fuselage. The metrics are applied to experimentally measured frequency response data from a model of an aircraft fuselage. The purpose is to understand how coupling between multiple bays of the fuselage can destabilize or limit the performance of a decentralized active noise control system. The metrics quantitatively verify observations from a previous experiment, in which decentralized controllers performed worse than centralized controllers. The metrics do not appear to be useful for explaining control spillover which was observed in a previous experiment.

  10. Design of virtual three-dimensional instruments for sound control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, Axel Gezienus Elith

    An environment for designing virtual instruments with 3D geometry has been prototyped and applied to real-time sound control and design. It enables a sound artist, musical performer or composer to design an instrument according to preferred or required gestural and musical constraints instead of constraints based only on physical laws as they apply to an instrument with a particular geometry. Sounds can be created, edited or performed in real-time by changing parameters like position, orientation and shape of a virtual 3D input device. The virtual instrument can only be perceived through a visualization and acoustic representation, or sonification, of the control surface. No haptic representation is available. This environment was implemented using CyberGloves, Polhemus sensors, an SGI Onyx and by extending a real- time, visual programming language called Max/FTS, which was originally designed for sound synthesis. The extension involves software objects that interface the sensors and software objects that compute human movement and virtual object features. Two pilot studies have been performed, involving virtual input devices with the behaviours of a rubber balloon and a rubber sheet for the control of sound spatialization and timbre parameters. Both manipulation and sonification methods affect the naturalness of the interaction. Informal evaluation showed that a sonification inspired by the physical world appears natural and effective. More research is required for a natural sonification of virtual input device features such as shape, taking into account possible co- articulation of these features. While both hands can be used for manipulation, left-hand-only interaction with a virtual instrument may be a useful replacement for and extension of the standard keyboard modulation wheel. More research is needed to identify and apply manipulation pragmatics and movement features, and to investigate how they are co-articulated, in the mapping of virtual object

  11. Cognitive Control of Involuntary Distraction by Deviant Sounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmentier, Fabrice B. R.; Hebrero, Maria

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that a task-irrelevant sound (deviant sound) departing from an otherwise repetitive sequence of sounds (standard sounds) elicits an involuntary capture of attention and orienting response toward the deviant stimulus, resulting in the lengthening of response times in an ongoing task. Some have argued that this type of…

  12. Decoding of the sound frequency from the steady-state neural activities in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Shiramatsu, Tomoyo I; Noda, Takahiro; Kanzaki, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hirokazu

    2013-01-01

    In the auditory cortex, onset activities have been extensively investigated as a cortical representation of sound information such as sound frequency. Yet, less attention has been paid to date to steady-state activities following the onset activities. In this study, we used machine learning to investigate whether steady-state activities in the presence of continuous sounds represent the sound frequency. Sparse Logistic Regression (SLR) decoded the sound frequency from band specific power or phase locking value (PLV) of local field potentials (LFP) from the fourth layer of the auditory cortex of anesthetized rats. Consequently, we found that SLR was able to decode the sound frequency from steady-state neural activities as well as onset activities. This result demonstrates that the steady-state activities contain information about the sound such as sound frequency.

  13. Application of sound and temperature to control boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Parikh, Paresh; Bayliss, A.; Huang, L. S.; Bryant, T. D.

    1987-01-01

    The growth and decay of a wave packet convecting in a boundary layer over a concave-convex surface and its active control by localized surface heating are studied numerically using direct computations of the Navier-Stokes equations. The resulting sound radiations are computed using linearized Euler equations with the pressure from the Navier-Stokes solution as a time-dependent boundary condition. It is shown that on the concave portion the amplitude of the wave packet increases and its bandwidth broadens while on the convex portion some of the components in the packet are stabilized. The pressure field decays exponentially away from the surface and then algebraically, exhibiting a decay characteristic of acoustic waves in two dimensions. The far-field acoustic behavior exhibits a super-directivity type of behavior with a beaming downstream. Active control by surface heating is shown to reduce the growth of the wave packet but have little effect on acoustic far field behavior for the cases considered. Active control by sound emanating from the surface of an airfoil in the vicinity of the leading edge is experimentally investigated. The purpose is to control the separated region at high angles of attack. The results show that injection of sound at shedding frequency of the flow is effective in an increase of lift and reduction of drag.

  14. [SOUND SIGNALS OF DANGER ACTIVATE THE NITRERGIC SYSTEM OF THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX].

    PubMed

    Sudorgina, P V; Saulskaya, N B

    2015-07-01

    In Sprague-Dawley rats by means of in vivo microdialysis, we have shown that presentation to rats-during conditioned fear expression of a sound conditioned stimulus previously paired with footshock (CS+) produces an increase in extracellular levels of citrulline (an NO co-product) in the medial prefrontal cortex. Presentation to the same rats of a different sound stimulus (not associated with footshock) (CS-) causes a very small increase in extracellular citrulline level. CS+ induced citrulline increase is prevented by infusions into the medial prefrontal cortex of Nomega-propyl-L-arginine (1 mM), a neuronal NO synthase inhibitor and it is not observed in control rats (same procedure, no footshock). These data indicate for the first time that sound signals of danger, but not safety signals activate nitrergic system of the medial prefrontal cortex.

  15. Active and passive electromagnetic sounding on comets and moons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przyklenk, Anita; Auster, Hans-Ulrich

    We want to present the method of electromagnetic sounding on small extraterrestrial bodies to determine interior structures of those. Our sensors are perfectly suited for rover or lander missions, because they do not weight much (sum of all devices is approximately 600g) and can be easily installed at the bottom of a rover or at lander feet. The aim is to measure the material-specific complex resistivity, which depends on the electrical resistivity and electrical permittivity, for various sounding depth. This penetration depth depends on the 2 different operating modes. In the active mode, that is the so called Capacitive Resistivity (CR) method, the sounding depth is around a few meters. The CR is a purely electrical field measurement and works with a 4 electrode array. 2 of them are transmitter electrodes. They inject AC signals with frequencies between 100 Hz and 100 kHz into the subsurface. Then 2 receiver electrodes pick up the generated potentials. And a 4-point impedance can be calculated that depends on the electrical parameters among others [Grard, 1990a and b] [Kuras, 2002]. The second operating mode is the passive one. In the so called magneto telluric method the penetration depth depends on electrical parameters and can be in range of several 100m to km. Here, for excitation natural magnetic field variations are used. The magnetic field components are measured with our Fluxgate Magnetometer (FGM) (flight heritage: Rosetta, Venus Express, Themis,…). Induced electrical field components are measured again with the CR electrode array. Then the electromagnetic impedance can be derived, which depends on electrical resistivity among others. In the end, we want to discuss advantages and disadvantages of investigations during space missions compared to surveys on earth. As examples we have a closer look at the jovian moon Ganymede, the earth moon and the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and consider the applicability of electromagnetic sounding on this objects

  16. 75 FR 77047 - Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured.... Title of Proposal: Statement on Sound Practices Concerning Elevated Risk Complex Structured Finance Activities. OMB Number: 1550-0111. Form Number: N/A. Description: Statement on Sound Practices...

  17. Analysis and control of multi-zone sound field reproduction using modal-domain approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Abhayapala, Thushara D; Betlehem, Terence; Fazi, Filippo Maria

    2016-09-01

    Multi-zone sound control aims to reproduce multiple sound fields independently and simultaneously over different spatial regions within the same space. This paper investigates the multi-zone sound control problem formulated in the modal domain using the Lagrange cost function and provides a modal-domain analysis of the problem. The Lagrange cost function is formulated to represent a quadratic objective of reproducing a desired sound field within the bright zone and with constraints on sound energy in the dark zone and global region. A fundamental problem in multi-zone reproduction is interzone sound interference, where based on the geometry of the sound zones and the desired sound field within the bright zone the achievable reproduction performance is limited. The modal-domain Lagrangian solution demonstrates the intrinsic ill-posedness of the problem, based on which a parameter, the coefficient of realisability, is developed to evaluate the reproduction limitation. The proposed reproduction method is based on controlling the interference between sound zones and sound leakage outside the sound zones, resulting in a suitable compromise between good bright zone performance and satisfactory dark zone performance. The performance of the proposed design is demonstrated through numerical simulations of two-zone reproduction in free-field and in reverberant environments.

  18. Activation of Auditory Cortex by Anticipating and Hearing Emotional Sounds: An MEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Yokosawa, Koichi; Pamilo, Siina; Hirvenkari, Lotta; Hari, Riitta; Pihko, Elina

    2013-01-01

    To study how auditory cortical processing is affected by anticipating and hearing of long emotional sounds, we recorded auditory evoked magnetic fields with a whole-scalp MEG device from 15 healthy adults who were listening to emotional or neutral sounds. Pleasant, unpleasant, or neutral sounds, each lasting for 6 s, were played in a random order, preceded by 100-ms cue tones (0.5, 1, or 2 kHz) 2 s before the onset of the sound. The cue tones, indicating the valence of the upcoming emotional sounds, evoked typical transient N100m responses in the auditory cortex. During the rest of the anticipation period (until the beginning of the emotional sound), auditory cortices of both hemispheres generated slow shifts of the same polarity as N100m. During anticipation, the relative strengths of the auditory-cortex signals depended on the upcoming sound: towards the end of the anticipation period the activity became stronger when the subject was anticipating emotional rather than neutral sounds. During the actual emotional and neutral sounds, sustained fields were predominant in the left hemisphere for all sounds. The measured DC MEG signals during both anticipation and hearing of emotional sounds implied that following the cue that indicates the valence of the upcoming sound, the auditory-cortex activity is modulated by the upcoming sound category during the anticipation period. PMID:24278270

  19. The relative contributions of the prosthetic and sound limb to balance control in unilateral transtibial amputees.

    PubMed

    Curtze, Carolin; Hof, At L; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2012-06-01

    In unilateral transtibial amputees maintenance of standing balance is compromised due to the lack of active ankle control in the prosthetic limb. The purpose of this study is to disentangle the contribution of the prosthetic and sound limb to balance control following waist-pull perturbations. We compared the contribution of the hip and ankle joints to balance control of 15 unilateral transtibial amputees and 13 able-bodied controls after been externally perturbed through release of a pulling force. Perturbations were applied in four different directions. Outcome measure was the proportion of joint moment integrated over time generated by the hip and ankle joints in order to restore static stability after perturbation. Analyses revealed that perturbations in backward/forward direction were recovered mainly by the ankle strategy. The amputees compensated for the absence of active ankle control in the prosthetic limb by increasing the ankle moment in the sound limb. Interestingly, the passive properties of the prosthetic foot contributed to balance control, which has important implications for prosthetic fitting and standing stability in lower limb amputees. Amputees and controls resisted perturbations in medio-lateral direction by generating the necessary hip moments. Finally, these findings are discussed with respect to prosthetic design and rehabilitation processes.

  20. Might as Well Jump: Sound Affects Muscle Activation in Skateboarding

    PubMed Central

    Cesari, Paola; Camponogara, Ivan; Papetti, Stefano; Rocchesso, Davide; Fontana, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to reveal the role of sound in action anticipation and performance, and to test whether the level of precision in action planning and execution is related to the level of sensorimotor skills and experience that listeners possess about a specific action. Individuals ranging from 18 to 75 years of age - some of them without any skills in skateboarding and others experts in this sport - were compared in their ability to anticipate and simulate a skateboarding jump by listening to the sound it produces. Only skaters were able to modulate the forces underfoot and to apply muscle synergies that closely resembled the ones that a skater would use if actually jumping on a skateboard. More importantly we showed that only skaters were able to plan the action by activating anticipatory postural adjustments about 200 ms after the jump event. We conclude that expert patterns are guided by auditory events that trigger proper anticipations of the corresponding patterns of movements. PMID:24619134

  1. High-Frequency Sound Interaction in Ocean Sediments: Modeling Environmental Controls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    High-Frequency Sound Interaction in Ocean Sediments: Modeling Environmental Controls Michael Richardson Kevin Briggs Dawn Lavoie Dale Bibee Naval...SUBTITLE High-Frequency Sound Interaction in Ocean Sediments: Modeling Environmental Controls 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...rectangle centered at 30° 07.23’N; 85° 47.54’W was sampled using normal-incidence echo sounding , side-scan sonar, bottom photography with stereo and

  2. Active sound reduction: A study of recent developments and some future possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindqvist, E.

    1983-11-01

    It is suggested that active sound reduction is easiest to implement and most effective at low frequencies and in a duct rather than in a room or a free field. The prospects for success are considerably improved if the sound to be attenuated is periodic. Symmetry of the sound field can sometimes be exploited. The physical mechanisms of sound attenuation include reflection of sound by secondary sources, creation of higher order sources in order to reduce the energy radiated and conversion of acoustic energy. Active techniques can also be applied to prevent transmission of sound or vibrations from one sub-field to another. Microelectronics and digital filtering techniques are expected to greatly influence active sound attenuators.

  3. 40 CFR 81.32 - Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.32 Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Puget...

  4. 40 CFR 81.32 - Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.32 Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Puget...

  5. Analyzing Activities in the Course of Science Education, According to Activity Theory: The Case of Sound

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodoraki, Xarikleia; Plakitsi, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we analyze activities on the topic of sound, which are performed in the science education laboratory lessons in the third-year students of the Department of Early Childhood Education at the University of Ioannina. The analysis of the activities is based on one of the most modern learning theories of CHAT (Cultural Historical…

  6. Application of subharmonics for active sound design of electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Doo Young; Yoon, Kiseop; Seong, Yeolwan; Lee, Soogab

    2014-12-01

    The powertrain of electric vehicles generates an unfamiliar acoustical environment for customers. This paper seeks optimal interior sound for electric vehicles based on psychoacoustic knowledge and musical harmonic theory. The concept of inserting a virtual sound, which consists of the subharmonics of an existing high-frequency component, is suggested to improve sound quality. Subjective evaluation results indicate that the impression of interior sound can be enhanced in this manner. Increased appeal is achieved through two designed stimuli, which proves the effectiveness of the method proposed.

  7. Ensemble statistics of active and reactive sound intensity in reverberation rooms.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Finn; Molares, Alfonso Rodríguez

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines fundamental statistical properties of the active and reactive sound intensity in reverberant enclosures driven with pure tones. The existing theory for sound intensity in a diffuse sound field, which is based on Waterhouse's random wave model and therefore limited to the region of high modal overlap, is extended to the region of low modal overlap by taking account of the random fluctuations of the sound power emitted by the source that generates the sound field. The validity of the extended model is confirmed by experimental and numerical results.

  8. Experiments on structural control of sound transmitted through an elastic plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Silcox, R. J.; Metcalf, V. L.; Brown, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    Active control of sound transmission through an elastic plate has been experimentally studied. The control was applied directly to the plate by point force vibration inputs, and the error information and performance was measured in the radiated acoustic field by discrete microphones. Test cases were studied in which the error sensors were accelerometers mounted on the plate. A time-domain least-mean-squares adaptive algorithm was used as the basis of the control system design. The results showed an impressive increase in plate transmission loss over a wide range of frequencies with a maximum of two control shakers. The advantages of using error information derived from the radiated acoustic field rather than structural response is demonstrated. The mechanisms behind the efficiency of this control approach are discussed.

  9. Effect of sound wave stress on antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation of Dendrobium candidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Biao; Wei, Jinmin; Wei, Xiaolan; Tang, Kun; Liang, Yilong; Shu, Kunxian; Wang, Bochu

    2008-06-01

    The effect of sound wave stress on important medicinal plant, Dendrobium candidum Wall. ex Lindl, was investigated, including the responses on malondialdehyde (MDA) content, the activities change of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). Results were found that the activities of SOD, CAT, POD and APX enhanced totally in different organs of D. candidum, as leaves, stems and roots, in response to the stress. Furthermore there happened similar shift of antioxidant enzymes activities, which increased in the initial stimulation and decreased afterwards. Data showed SOD, CAT, POD and APX activities ascended to max at day 9, 6, 9 and 12 in leaves, at day 9, 6, 12 and 9 in stems, and at day 12, 6, 9 and 9 in roots, respectively. As a lipid peroxidation parameter, MDA content in different organs increased in the beginning, dropped afterward, and increased again in the late. Anyway the total trend was the rise of MDA level compared to the control. It was interesting that the MDA content appeared the lowest levels almost when the antioxidant enzymes activities were up to the highest. Our results demonstrated the different organs of D. candidum might produce accumulation of active oxygen species (AOS) under initial treatment of sound wave stress. Later AOS might start to reduce due to the enhancement of antioxidant enzymes activities treated by the stress. The data revealed that the antioxidant metabolism was to be important in determining the ability of plants to survive in sound stress, and the up regulation of these enzymes activities would help to reduce the build up of AOS, which could protect plant cells from oxidative damage. Moreover, different cell compartments might activate different defensive system to reduce excessive amount of AOS. Finally the mechanism of this action was also discussed simply.

  10. Common Sole Larvae Survive High Levels of Pile-Driving Sound in Controlled Exposure Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Bolle, Loes J.; de Jong, Christ A. F.; Bierman, Stijn M.; van Beek, Pieter J. G.; van Keeken, Olvin A.; Wessels, Peter W.; van Damme, Cindy J. G.; Winter, Hendrik V.; de Haan, Dick; Dekeling, René P. A.

    2012-01-01

    In view of the rapid extension of offshore wind farms, there is an urgent need to improve our knowledge on possible adverse effects of underwater sound generated by pile-driving. Mortality and injuries have been observed in fish exposed to loud impulse sounds, but knowledge on the sound levels at which (sub-)lethal effects occur is limited for juvenile and adult fish, and virtually non-existent for fish eggs and larvae. A device was developed in which fish larvae can be exposed to underwater sound. It consists of a rigid-walled cylindrical chamber driven by an electro-dynamical sound projector. Samples of up to 100 larvae can be exposed simultaneously to a homogeneously distributed sound pressure and particle velocity field. Recorded pile-driving sounds could be reproduced accurately in the frequency range between 50 and 1000 Hz, at zero to peak pressure levels up to 210 dB re 1µPa2 (zero to peak pressures up to 32 kPa) and single pulse sound exposure levels up to 186 dB re 1µPa2s. The device was used to examine lethal effects of sound exposure in common sole (Solea solea) larvae. Different developmental stages were exposed to various levels and durations of pile-driving sound. The highest cumulative sound exposure level applied was 206 dB re 1µPa2s, which corresponds to 100 strikes at a distance of 100 m from a typical North Sea pile-driving site. The results showed no statistically significant differences in mortality between exposure and control groups at sound exposure levels which were well above the US interim criteria for non-auditory tissue damage in fish. Although our findings cannot be extrapolated to fish larvae in general, as interspecific differences in vulnerability to sound exposure may occur, they do indicate that previous assumptions and criteria may need to be revised. PMID:22431996

  11. Good vibrations: Controlling light with sound (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Choudhary, Amol

    2016-10-01

    One of the surprises of nonlinear optics, is that light may interact strongly with sound. Intense laser light literally "shakes" the glass in optical fibres, exciting acoustic waves (sound) in the fibre. Under the right conditions, it leads to a positive feedback loop between light and sound termed "Stimulated Brillouin Scattering," or simply SBS. This nonlinear interaction can amplify or filter light waves with extreme precision in frequency which makes it uniquely suited to solve key problems in the fields of defence, biomedicine, wireless communications, spectroscopy and imaging. We have achieved the first demonstration of SBS in compact chip-scale structures, carefully designed so that the optical fields and the acoustic fields are simultaneously confined and guided. This new platform has opened a range of new functionalities that are being applied in communications and defence with breathtaking performance and compactness. My talk will introduce this new field and review our progress and achievements, including silicon based optical phononic processor.

  12. Stimulus intensity affects early sensory processing: sound intensity modulates auditory evoked gamma-band activity in human EEG.

    PubMed

    Schadow, Jeanette; Lenz, Daniel; Thaerig, Stefanie; Busch, Niko A; Fründ, Ingo; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2007-08-01

    We studied the effect of different sound intensities on the auditory evoked gamma-band response (GBR). Previous studies observed oscillatory gamma activity in the auditory cortex of animals and humans. For the visual modality, it has been demonstrated that the GBR can be modulated by top-down (attention, memory) as well as bottom-up factors (stimulus properties). Therefore, we expected to find a sound intensity modulation for the auditory GBR. 21 healthy participants without hearing deficits were investigated in a forced-choice discrimination task. Sinusoidal tones were presented at three systematically varied sound intensities (30, 45, 60 dB hearing level). The results of the auditory evoked potentials were predominantly consistent with previous studies. Furthermore, we observed an augmentation of the evoked GBR with increasing sound intensity. The analysis indicated that this intensity difference in the GBR amplitude most likely arises from increased phase-locking. The results demonstrate a distinct dependency between sound intensity and gamma-band oscillations. Future experiments that investigate the relationship between auditory evoked GBRs and higher cognitive processes should therefore select stimuli with an adequate sound intensity and control this variable to avoid confounding effects. In addition, it seems that gamma-band activity is more sensitive to exogenous stimulus parameters than evoked potentials.

  13. Speed of sound estimation with active PZT element for thermal monitoring during ablation therapy: feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younsu; Guo, Xiaoyu; Cheng, Alexis; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    Controlling the thermal dose during ablation therapy is instrumental to successfully removing the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissue. In the practical scenario, surgeons must be able to determine the ablation completeness in the tumor region. Various methods have been proposed to monitor it, one of which uses ultrasound since it is a common intraoperative imaging modality due to its non-invasive, cost-effective, and convenient natures. In our approach, we propose to use time of flight (ToF) information to estimate speed of sound changes. Accurate speed of sound estimation is crucial because it is directly correlated with temperature change and subsequent determination of ablation completeness. We divide the region of interest in a circular fashion with a variable radius from the ablator tip. We introduce the concept of effective speed of sound in each of the sub-regions. Our active PZT element control system facilitates this unique approach by allowing us to acquire one-way ToF information between the PZT element and each of the ultrasound elements. We performed a simulation and an experiment to verify feasibility of this method. The simulation result showed that we could compute the effective speed of sound within 0.02m/s error in our discrete model. We also perform a sensitivity analysis for this model. Most of the experimental results had less than 1% error. Simulation using a Gaussian continuous model with multiple PZT elements is also demonstrated. We simulate the effect of the element location one the optimization result.

  14. Active Control by Conservation of Energy Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    2000-01-01

    Three unrelated experiments are discussed; each was extremely sensitive to initial conditions. The initial conditions are the beginnings of the origins of the information that nonlinearity displays. Initial conditions make the phenomenon unstable and unpredictable. With the knowledge of the initial conditions, active control requires far less power than that present in the system response. The first experiment is on the control of shocks from an axisymmetric supersonic jet; the second, control of a nonlinear panel response forced by turbulent boundary layer and sound; the third, control of subharmonic and harmonics of a panel forced by sound. In all three experiments, control is achieved by redistribution of periodic energy response such that the energy is nearly preserved from a previous uncontrolled state. This type of active control improves the performance of the system being controlled.

  15. Relations among pure-tone sound stimuli, neural activity, and the loudness sensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Both the physiological and psychological responses to pure-tone sound stimuli are used to derive formulas which: (1) relate the loudness, loudness level, and sound-pressure level of pure tones; (2) apply continuously over most of the acoustic regime, including the loudness threshold; and (3) contain no undetermined coefficients. Some of the formulas are fundamental for calculating the loudness of any sound. Power-law formulas relating the pure-tone sound stimulus, neural activity, and loudness are derived from published data.

  16. Superior analgesic effect of an active distraction versus pleasant unfamiliar sounds and music: the influence of emotion and cognitive style.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Eduardo A Garza; Brattico, Elvira; Vase, Lene; Østergaard, Leif; Vuust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Listening to music has been found to reduce acute and chronic pain. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood; however, emotion and cognitive mechanisms have been suggested to influence the analgesic effect of music. In this study we investigated the influence of familiarity, emotional and cognitive features, and cognitive style on music-induced analgesia. Forty-eight healthy participants were divided into three groups (empathizers, systemizers and balanced) and received acute pain induced by heat while listening to different sounds. Participants listened to unfamiliar Mozart music rated with high valence and low arousal, unfamiliar environmental sounds with similar valence and arousal as the music, an active distraction task (mental arithmetic) and a control, and rated the pain. Data showed that the active distraction led to significantly less pain than did the music or sounds. Both unfamiliar music and sounds reduced pain significantly when compared to the control condition; however, music was no more effective than sound to reduce pain. Furthermore, we found correlations between pain and emotion ratings. Finally, systemizers reported less pain during the mental arithmetic compared with the other two groups. These findings suggest that familiarity may be key in the influence of the cognitive and emotional mechanisms of music-induced analgesia, and that cognitive styles may influence pain perception.

  17. Different categories of living and non-living sound-sources activate distinct cortical networks.

    PubMed

    Engel, Lauren R; Frum, Chris; Puce, Aina; Walker, Nathan A; Lewis, James W

    2009-10-01

    With regard to hearing perception, it remains unclear as to whether, or the extent to which, different conceptual categories of real-world sounds and related categorical knowledge are differentially represented in the brain. Semantic knowledge representations are reported to include the major divisions of living versus non-living things, plus more specific categories including animals, tools, biological motion, faces, and places-categories typically defined by their characteristic visual features. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify brain regions showing preferential activity to four categories of action sounds, which included non-vocal human and animal actions (living), plus mechanical and environmental sound-producing actions (non-living). The results showed a striking antero-posterior division in cortical representations for sounds produced by living versus non-living sources. Additionally, there were several significant differences by category, depending on whether the task was category-specific (e.g. human or not) versus non-specific (detect end-of-sound). In general, (1) human-produced sounds yielded robust activation in the bilateral posterior superior temporal sulci independent of task. Task demands modulated activation of left lateralized fronto-parietal regions, bilateral insular cortices, and sub-cortical regions previously implicated in observation-execution matching, consistent with "embodied" and mirror-neuron network representations subserving recognition. (2) Animal action sounds preferentially activated the bilateral posterior insulae. (3) Mechanical sounds activated the anterior superior temporal gyri and parahippocampal cortices. (4) Environmental sounds preferentially activated dorsal occipital and medial parietal cortices. Overall, this multi-level dissociation of networks for preferentially representing distinct sound-source categories provides novel support for grounded cognition models that may underlie

  18. Different categories of living and non-living sound-sources activate distinct cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Lauren R.; Frum, Chris; Puce, Aina; Walker, Nathan A.; Lewis, James W.

    2009-01-01

    With regard to hearing perception, it remains unclear as to whether, or the extent to which, different conceptual categories of real-world sounds and related categorical knowledge are differentially represented in the brain. Semantic knowledge representations are reported to include the major divisions of living versus non-living things, plus more specific categories including animals, tools, biological motion, faces, and places—categories typically defined by their characteristic visual features. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify brain regions showing preferential activity to four categories of action sounds, which included non-vocal human and animal actions (living), plus mechanical and environmental sound-producing actions (non-living). The results showed a striking antero-posterior division in cortical representations for sounds produced by living versus non-living sources. Additionally, there were several significant differences by category, depending on whether the task was category-specific (e.g. human or not) versus non-specific (detect end-of-sound). In general, (1) human-produced sounds yielded robust activation in the bilateral posterior superior temporal sulci independent of task. Task demands modulated activation of left-lateralized fronto-parietal regions, bilateral insular cortices, and subcortical regions previously implicated in observation-execution matching, consistent with “embodied” and mirror-neuron network representations subserving recognition. (2) Animal action sounds preferentially activated the bilateral posterior insulae. (3) Mechanical sounds activated the anterior superior temporal gyri and parahippocampal cortices. (4) Environmental sounds preferentially activated dorsal occipital and medial parietal cortices. Overall, this multi-level dissociation of networks for preferentially representing distinct sound-source categories provides novel support for grounded cognition models that may

  19. Inexpensive Audio Activities: Earbud-based Sound Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Joshua; Boucher, Alex; Meggison, Dean; Hruby, Kate; Vesenka, James

    2016-11-01

    Inexpensive alternatives to a number of classic introductory physics sound laboratories are presented including interference phenomena, resonance conditions, and frequency shifts. These can be created using earbuds, economical supplies such as Giant Pixie Stix® wrappers, and free software available for PCs and mobile devices. We describe two interference laboratories (beat frequency and two-speaker interference) and two resonance laboratories (quarter- and half-wavelength). Lastly, a Doppler laboratory using rotating earbuds is explained. The audio signal captured by all experiments is analyzed on free spectral analysis software and many of the experiments incorporate the unifying theme of measuring the speed of sound in air.

  20. Cortical Activation during Attention to Sound in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funabiki, Yasuko; Murai, Toshiya; Toichi, Motomi

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) can demonstrate hypersensitivity to sounds as well as a lack of awareness of them. Several functional imaging studies have suggested an abnormal response in the auditory cortex of such subjects, but it is not known whether these subjects have dysfunction in the auditory cortex or are simply not…

  1. Noise control, sound, and the vehicle design process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavan, Paul

    2005-09-01

    For many products, noise and sound are viewed as necessary evils that need to be dealt with in order to bring the product successfully to market. They are generally not product ``exciters'' although some vehicle manufacturers do tune and advertise specific sounds to enhance the perception of their products. In this paper, influencing the design process for the ``evils,'' such as wind noise and road noise, are considered in more detail. There are three ingredients to successfully dealing with the evils in the design process. The first of these is knowing how excesses in noise effects the end customer in a tangible manner and how that effects customer satisfaction and ultimately sells. The second is having and delivering the knowledge of what is required of the design to achieve a satisfactory or even better level of noise performance. The third ingredient is having the commitment of the designers to incorporate the knowledge into their part, subsystem or system. In this paper, the elements of each of these ingredients are discussed in some detail and the attributes of a successful design process are enumerated.

  2. Low frequency sound as a control measure for zebra mussel fouling

    SciTech Connect

    Donskoy, D.M.; Ludyanskiy, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    The study of the effect of acoustic energy on zebra mussels first began in the Soviet Union over 30 years ago, where researchers indicated the feasibility of reducing Dreissena fouling, in particular on cooling systems. However, these studies were discontinued due to the successful use of chlorination and the relatively low level of technology at that time in the Soviet Union. Interest in the use of acoustic energy as a control measure has been revived, and the three major approaches are: (1) cavitation, (2) sound treatment, and (3) sound treatment. The objective of the present paper is to determine the feasibility and effectivensss of low frequency sound techniques to fight zebra mussel fouling. A number of experiments were performed, and the results are presented and discussed. It is concluded that low frequency sound can be an effective means of control of zebra mussel fouling.

  3. Prey-mediated behavioral responses of feeding blue whales in controlled sound exposure experiments.

    PubMed

    Friedlaender, A S; Hazen, E L; Goldbogen, J A; Stimpert, A K; Calambokidis, J; Southall, B L

    2016-06-01

    Behavioral response studies provide significant insights into the nature, magnitude, and consequences of changes in animal behavior in response to some external stimulus. Controlled exposure experiments (CEEs) to study behavioral response have faced challenges in quantifying the importance of and interaction among individual variability, exposure conditions, and environmental covariates. To investigate these complex parameters relative to blue whale behavior and how it may change as a function of certain sounds, we deployed multi-sensor acoustic tags and conducted CEEs using simulated mid-frequency active sonar (MFAS) and pseudo-random noise (PRN) stimuli, while collecting synoptic, quantitative prey measures. In contrast to previous approaches that lacked such prey data, our integrated approach explained substantially more variance in blue whale dive behavioral responses to mid-frequency sounds (r2 = 0.725 vs. 0.14 previously). Results demonstrate that deep-feeding whales respond more clearly and strongly to CEEs than those in other behavioral states, but this was only evident with the increased explanatory power provided by incorporating prey density and distribution as contextual covariates. Including contextual variables increases the ability to characterize behavioral variability and empirically strengthens previous findings that deep-feeding blue whales respond significantly to mid-frequency sound exposure. However, our results are only based on a single behavioral state with a limited sample size, and this analytical framework should be applied broadly across behavioral states. The increased capability to describe and account for individual response variability by including environmental variables, such as prey, that drive foraging behavior underscores the importance of integrating these and other relevant contextual parameters in experimental designs. Our results suggest the need to measure and account for the ecological dynamics of predator

  4. Maintenance of neuronal size gradient in MNTB requires sound-evoked activity

    PubMed Central

    Weatherstone, Jessica H.; Pilati, Nadia; Wang, Yuan; Forsythe, Ian D.; Rubel, Edwin W.; Tempel, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) is an important source of inhibition during the computation of sound location. It transmits fast and precisely timed action potentials at high frequencies; this requires an efficient calcium clearance mechanism, in which plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2 (PMCA2) is a key component. Deafwaddler (dfw2J) mutant mice have a null mutation in PMCA2 causing deafness in homozygotes (dfw2J/dfw2J) and high-frequency hearing loss in heterozygotes (+/dfw2J). Despite the deafness phenotype, no significant differences in MNTB volume or cell number were observed in dfw2J homozygous mutants, suggesting that PMCA2 is not required for MNTB neuron survival. The MNTB tonotopic axis encodes high to low sound frequencies across the medial to lateral dimension. We discovered a cell size gradient along this axis: lateral neuronal somata are significantly larger than medially located somata. This size gradient is decreased in +/dfw2J and absent in dfw2J/dfw2J. The lack of acoustically driven input suggests that sound-evoked activity is required for maintenance of the cell size gradient. This hypothesis was corroborated by selective elimination of auditory hair cell activity with either hair cell elimination in Pou4f3 DTR mice or inner ear tetrodotoxin (TTX) treatment. The change in soma size was reversible and recovered within 7 days of TTX treatment, suggesting that regulation of the gradient is dependent on synaptic activity and that these changes are plastic rather than permanent. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) act as fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons within the auditory brain stem. The MNTB is topographically organized, with low sound frequencies encoded laterally and high frequencies medially. We discovered a cell size gradient along this axis: lateral neurons are larger than medial neurons. The absence of this gradient in deaf mice lacking plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2 suggests an

  5. Maintenance of neuronal size gradient in MNTB requires sound-evoked activity.

    PubMed

    Weatherstone, Jessica H; Kopp-Scheinpflug, Conny; Pilati, Nadia; Wang, Yuan; Forsythe, Ian D; Rubel, Edwin W; Tempel, Bruce L

    2017-02-01

    The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) is an important source of inhibition during the computation of sound location. It transmits fast and precisely timed action potentials at high frequencies; this requires an efficient calcium clearance mechanism, in which plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2 (PMCA2) is a key component. Deafwaddler (dfw(2J) ) mutant mice have a null mutation in PMCA2 causing deafness in homozygotes (dfw(2J) /dfw(2J) ) and high-frequency hearing loss in heterozygotes (+/dfw(2J) ). Despite the deafness phenotype, no significant differences in MNTB volume or cell number were observed in dfw(2J) homozygous mutants, suggesting that PMCA2 is not required for MNTB neuron survival. The MNTB tonotopic axis encodes high to low sound frequencies across the medial to lateral dimension. We discovered a cell size gradient along this axis: lateral neuronal somata are significantly larger than medially located somata. This size gradient is decreased in +/dfw(2J) and absent in dfw(2J) /dfw(2J) The lack of acoustically driven input suggests that sound-evoked activity is required for maintenance of the cell size gradient. This hypothesis was corroborated by selective elimination of auditory hair cell activity with either hair cell elimination in Pou4f3 DTR mice or inner ear tetrodotoxin (TTX) treatment. The change in soma size was reversible and recovered within 7 days of TTX treatment, suggesting that regulation of the gradient is dependent on synaptic activity and that these changes are plastic rather than permanent.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) act as fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons within the auditory brain stem. The MNTB is topographically organized, with low sound frequencies encoded laterally and high frequencies medially. We discovered a cell size gradient along this axis: lateral neurons are larger than medial neurons. The absence of this gradient in deaf mice lacking plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2

  6. Velocity controlled sound field reproduction by non-uniformly spaced loudspeakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Mincheol; Nelson, Philip A.; Fazi, Filippo M.; Seo, Jeongil

    2016-05-01

    One approach to the reproduction of a sound field is to ensure the reproduction of the acoustic pressure on the surface bounding the volume within which reproduction is sought. However, this approach suffers from technical limitations when the loudspeakers used for the reproduction of the surface acoustic pressures are unevenly spaced. It is shown in this paper that sound field reproduction with a spatially non-uniform loudspeaker arrangement can be considerably improved by changing the physical quantity to be controlled on the bounding surface from pressure to particle velocity. One of the main advantages of the velocity control method is the simplicity with which the inverse problem can be regularized, irrespective of the direction of arrival of the sound to be reproduced. In addition, the velocity controlled sound field shows better reproduction of the time averaged intensity flow in the reproduction region which in turn appears to be closely linked with better human perception of sound localization. Furthermore, the proposed method results in smoother "panning functions" that describe the variation of the source outputs as a function of the angle of incidence of the sound to be reproduced. The performance of the velocity matching method has been evaluated by comparison to the conventional pressure matching method and through simulations with several non-uniform loudspeaker layouts. The simulated results were also verified with experiments and subjective tests.

  7. Active noise control for infant incubators.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xun; Gujjula, Shruthi; Kuo, Sen M

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an active noise control system for infant incubators. Experimental results show that global noise reduction can be achieved for infant incubator ANC systems. An audio-integration algorithm is presented to introduce a healthy audio (intrauterine) sound with the ANC system to mask the residual noise and soothe the infant. Carbon nanotube based transparent thin film speaker is also introduced in this paper as the actuator for the ANC system to generate the destructive secondary sound, which can significantly save the congested incubator space and without blocking the view of doctors and nurses.

  8. Adaptive wave field synthesis for broadband active sound field reproduction: signal processing.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Sound field reproduction is a physical approach to the reproduction of the natural spatial character of hearing. It is also useful in experimental acoustics and psychoacoustics. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. A real reflective reproduction space thus reduces the objective accuracy of WFS. Recently, adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) was defined as a combination of WFS and active compensation. AWFS is based on the minimization of reproduction errors and on the penalization of departure from the WFS solution. This paper focuses on signal processing for AWFS. A classical adaptive algorithm is modified for AWFS: filtered-reference least-mean-square. This modified algorithm and the classical equivalent leaky algorithm have similar convergence properties except that the WFS solution influences the adaptation rule of the modified algorithm. The paper also introduces signal processing for independent radiation mode control of AWFS on the basis of plant decoupling. Simulation results for AWFS are introduced for free-field and reflective spaces. The two algorithms effectively reproduce the sound field and compensate for the reproduction errors at the error sensors. The independent radiation mode control allows a more flexible tuning of the algorithm.

  9. Modeled Aeromagnetic Anomalies, Controlled By Radar Ice Sounding, As Evidence for Subglacial Volcanic Activity in the West Antarctic Rift System (WR) Beneath the Area of the Divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Thwaites and Pine Island ice shelves, buttressing the WAIS, have passed the turning point as they are eaten away by warmer ocean waters (Joghin et al., 2014; Rignot et al., 2014). There is an increasing evidence (aeromagnetic, radar ice-sounding, high heat flow, subglacial volcanic seismicity, and several exposed and subglacial active volcanoes), for volcanic activity in the WR beneath the WAIS, which flows through it. The 5-km, orthogonally line spaced, central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey defined >400 high amplitude volcanic magnetic anomalies correlated with glacial bed topography. Modeled anomalies defined magnetic properties; interpreted volcanic edifices were mostly removed by the moving ice into which they were erupted. Very high apparent susceptibility contrasts (.001->.3 SI) are typical of measured properties from volcanic exposures in the WAIS area. About 90% of the magnetic sources have normal magnetization in the present field direction. Two explanations as to why the anomalies are not approximately 50% negative: (1) Volcanic activity resulting in these anomalies occurred in a predominantly normal field (unlikely). (2) Sources are a combination of induced and remanent magnetization resulting in anomalies of low amplitude (induced cancels remanent) and are not recognized because they are <100 nT (most probable). About 18 high relief, (~600-2000 m) "volcanic centers" beneath the WAIS surface, probably were erupted subaerially when the WAIS was absent; nine of these are in the general area beneath the divide of the WAIS. A 70-km wide, ring of interpreted subglacial volcanic rocks may define a volcanic caldera underlying thedivide (Behrendt et al., 1998). A 2 km-high subaerially erupted volcano (subglacial Mt Thiel, ~78o30'S, 111oW) ~ 100 km north of the WAISCORE, could be the source an ash layer observed in the core. Models by Tulaczyk and Hossainzadeh (2011) indicate >4mm/yr basal melting beneath the WAIS, supportive of high heat flow

  10. Numerical investigation of acoustic field in enclosures: Evaluation of active and reactive components of sound intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Mirosław

    2015-03-01

    The paper focuses on a theoretical description and numerical evaluation of active and reactive components of sound intensity in enclosed spaces. As the study was dedicated to low-frequency room responses, a modal expansion of the sound pressure was used. Numerical simulations have shown that the presence of energy vortices whose size and distribution depend on the character of the room response is a distinctive feature of the active intensity field. When several modes with frequencies close to a source frequency are excited, the vortices within the room are positioned irregularly. However, if the response is determined by one or two dominant modes, a regular distribution of vortices in the room can be observed. The irrotational component of the active intensity was found using the Helmholtz decomposition theorem. As was evidenced by numerical simulations, the suppression of the vortical flow of sound energy in the nearfield permits obtaining a clear image of the sound source.

  11. Active noise control using a steerable parametric array loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobuo; Tanaka, Motoki

    2010-06-01

    Arguably active noise control enables the sound suppression at the designated control points, while the sound pressure except the targeted locations is likely to augment. The reason is clear; a control source normally radiates the sound omnidirectionally. To cope with this problem, this paper introduces a parametric array loudspeaker (PAL) which produces a spatially focused sound beam due to the attribute of ultrasound used for carrier waves, thereby allowing one to suppress the sound pressure at the designated point without causing spillover in the whole sound field. First the fundamental characteristics of PAL are overviewed. The scattered pressure in the near field contributed by source strength of PAL is then described, which is needed for the design of an active noise control system. Furthermore, the optimal control law for minimizing the sound pressure at control points is derived, the control effect being investigated analytically and experimentally. With a view to tracking a moving target point, a steerable PAL based upon a phased array scheme is presented, with the result that the generation of a moving zone of quiet becomes possible without mechanically rotating the PAL. An experiment is finally conducted, demonstrating the validity of the proposed method.

  12. Developmental changes in brain activation involved in the production of novel speech sounds in children.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Thyreau, Benjamin; Asano, Michiko; Asano, Kohei; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Jeong, Hyeonjeong; Sugiura, Motoaki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-08-01

    Older children are more successful at producing unfamiliar, non-native speech sounds than younger children during the initial stages of learning. To reveal the neuronal underpinning of the age-related increase in the accuracy of non-native speech production, we examined the developmental changes in activation involved in the production of novel speech sounds using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Healthy right-handed children (aged 6-18 years) were scanned while performing an overt repetition task and a perceptual task involving aurally presented non-native and native syllables. Productions of non-native speech sounds were recorded and evaluated by native speakers. The mouth regions in the bilateral primary sensorimotor areas were activated more significantly during the repetition task relative to the perceptual task. The hemodynamic response in the left inferior frontal gyrus pars opercularis (IFG pOp) specific to non-native speech sound production (defined by prior hypothesis) increased with age. Additionally, the accuracy of non-native speech sound production increased with age. These results provide the first evidence of developmental changes in the neural processes underlying the production of novel speech sounds. Our data further suggest that the recruitment of the left IFG pOp during the production of novel speech sounds was possibly enhanced due to the maturation of the neuronal circuits needed for speech motor planning. This, in turn, would lead to improvement in the ability to immediately imitate non-native speech.

  13. Sound conditioning protects hearing by activating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Tahera, Yeasmin; Meltser, Inna; Johansson, Peter; Salman, Hazim; Canlon, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Sound conditioning primes the auditory system to low levels of acoustic stimuli and reduces damage caused by a subsequent acoustic trauma. This priming activates the HPA axis resulting in the elevation of plasma corticosterone with a consequent upregulation of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in the cochlea and the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus in the mouse. This protective effect is blocked by adrenalectomy or pharmacological treatment with RU486 + metyrapone. Sound conditioning prevents GR down-regulation induced by acoustic trauma and subsequently enhances GR activity in spiral ganglion neurons. Increased SRC-1 expression, triggered by sound conditioning, positively correlates with the upregulation of GR in the cochlea. These findings will help to define the cellular mechanisms responsible for protecting the auditory system from hearing loss by sound conditioning.

  14. Low-frequency sound affects active micromechanics in the human inner ear.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Kathrin; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Grothe, Benedikt; Kössl, Manfred; Gürkov, Robert; Krause, Eike; Drexl, Markus

    2014-10-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss is one of the most common auditory pathologies, resulting from overstimulation of the human cochlea, an exquisitely sensitive micromechanical device. At very low frequencies (less than 250 Hz), however, the sensitivity of human hearing, and therefore the perceived loudness is poor. The perceived loudness is mediated by the inner hair cells of the cochlea which are driven very inadequately at low frequencies. To assess the impact of low-frequency (LF) sound, we exploited a by-product of the active amplification of sound outer hair cells (OHCs) perform, so-called spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. These are faint sounds produced by the inner ear that can be used to detect changes of cochlear physiology. We show that a short exposure to perceptually unobtrusive, LF sounds significantly affects OHCs: a 90 s, 80 dB(A) LF sound induced slow, concordant and positively correlated frequency and level oscillations of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions that lasted for about 2 min after LF sound offset. LF sounds, contrary to their unobtrusive perception, strongly stimulate the human cochlea and affect amplification processes in the most sensitive and important frequency range of human hearing.

  15. Digital servo control of random sound test excitation. [in reverberant acoustic chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakich, R. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A digital servocontrol system for random noise excitation of a test object in a reverberant acoustic chamber employs a plurality of sensors spaced in the sound field to produce signals in separate channels which are decorrelated and averaged. The average signal is divided into a plurality of adjacent frequency bands cyclically sampled by a time division multiplex system, converted into digital form, and compared to a predetermined spectrum value stored in digital form. The results of the comparisons are used to control a time-shared up-down counter to develop gain control signals for the respective frequency bands in the spectrum of random sound energy picked up by the microphones.

  16. Effects of Active and Passive Hearing Protection Devices on Sound Source Localization, Speech Recognition, and Tone Detection

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Andrew D.; Beemer, Brianne T.; Greene, Nathaniel T.; Argo, Theodore; Meegan, G. Douglas; Tollin, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Hearing protection devices (HPDs) such as earplugs offer to mitigate noise exposure and reduce the incidence of hearing loss among persons frequently exposed to intense sound. However, distortions of spatial acoustic information and reduced audibility of low-intensity sounds caused by many existing HPDs can make their use untenable in high-risk (e.g., military or law enforcement) environments where auditory situational awareness is imperative. Here we assessed (1) sound source localization accuracy using a head-turning paradigm, (2) speech-in-noise recognition using a modified version of the QuickSIN test, and (3) tone detection thresholds using a two-alternative forced-choice task. Subjects were 10 young normal-hearing males. Four different HPDs were tested (two active, two passive), including two new and previously untested devices. Relative to unoccluded (control) performance, all tested HPDs significantly degraded performance across tasks, although one active HPD slightly improved high-frequency tone detection thresholds and did not degrade speech recognition. Behavioral data were examined with respect to head-related transfer functions measured using a binaural manikin with and without tested HPDs in place. Data reinforce previous reports that HPDs significantly compromise a variety of auditory perceptual facilities, particularly sound localization due to distortions of high-frequency spectral cues that are important for the avoidance of front-back confusions. PMID:26313145

  17. Active noise control using a distributed mode flat panel loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Rajamani, R; Dudney, J; Stelson, K A

    2003-07-01

    A flat panel distributed mode loudspeaker (DML) has many advantages over traditional cone speakers in terms of its weight, size, and durability. However, its frequency response is uneven and complex, thus bringing its suitability for active noise control (ANC) under question. This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the effective use of panel DML speakers in an ANC application. Both feedback and feedforward control techniques are considered. Effective feedback control with a flat panel speaker could open up a whole range of new noise control applications and has many advantages over feedforward control. The paper develops a new control algorithm to attenuate tonal noise of a known frequency by feedback control. However, due to the uneven response of the speakers, feedback control is found to be only moderately effective even for this narrow-band application. Feedforward control proves to be most capable for the flat panel speaker. Using feedforward control, the sound pressure level can be significantly reduced in close proximity to an error microphone. The paper demonstrates an interesting application of the flat panel in which the panel is placed in the path of sound and effectively used to block sound transmission using feedforward control. This is a new approach to active noise control enabled by the use of flat panels and can be used to prevent sound from entering into an enclosure in the first place rather than the traditional approach of attempting to cancel sound after it enters the enclosure.

  18. Noise and Sound Control in Open Plan Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schellenberg, Ben

    This annotated bibliography includes summaries of 19 articles and reports dealing with noise control and acoustical design in school buildings. A brief introduction discusses the need for careful attention to acoustics in any school construction or remodeling project, with particular emphasis on the need for special acoustical measures in an open…

  19. Decentralized Control of Sound Radiation from an Aircraft-Style Panel Using Iterative Loop Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Fuller, Chris R.

    2008-01-01

    A decentralized LQG-based control strategy is designed to reduce low-frequency sound transmission through periodically stiffened panels. While modern control strategies have been used to reduce sound radiation from relatively simple structural acoustic systems, significant implementation issues have to be addressed before these control strategies can be extended to large systems such as the fuselage of an aircraft. For instance, centralized approaches typically require a high level of connectivity and are computationally intensive, while decentralized strategies face stability problems caused by the unmodeled interaction between neighboring control units. Since accurate uncertainty bounds are not known a priori, it is difficult to ensure the decentralized control system will be robust without making the controller overly conservative. Therefore an iterative approach is suggested, which utilizes frequency-shaped loop recovery. The approach accounts for modeling error introduced by neighboring control loops, requires no communication between subsystems, and is relatively simple. The control strategy is validated using real-time control experiments performed on a built-up aluminum test structure representative of the fuselage of an aircraft. Experiments demonstrate that the iterative approach is capable of achieving 12 dB peak reductions and a 3.6 dB integrated reduction in radiated sound power from the stiffened panel.

  20. Acoustics in Research Facilities--Control of Wanted and Unwanted Sound. Laboratory Design Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Robert B.

    Common and special acoustics problems are discussed in relation to the design and construction of research facilities. Following a brief examination of design criteria for the control of wanted and unwanted sound, the technology for achieving desired results is discussed. Emphasis is given to various design procedures and materials for the control…

  1. Intratympanic manganese administration revealed sound intensity and frequency dependent functional activity in rat auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seong-Uk; Lee, Jae-Jun; Hong, Kwan Soo; Han, Mun; Park, Jang-Woo; Lee, Hui Joong; Lee, Sangheun; Lee, Kyu-Yup; Shin, Kyung Min; Cho, Jin Ho; Cheong, Chaejoon; Chang, Yongmin

    2013-09-01

    The cochlear plays a vital role in the sense and sensitivity of hearing; however, there is currently a lack of knowledge regarding the relationships between mechanical transduction of sound at different intensities and frequencies in the cochlear and the neurochemical processes that lead to neuronal responses in the central auditory system. In the current study, we introduced manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI), a convenient in vivo imaging method, for investigation of how sound, at different intensities and frequencies, is propagated from the cochlear to the central auditory system. Using MEMRI with intratympanic administration, we demonstrated differential manganese signal enhancements according to sound intensity and frequencies in the ascending auditory pathway of the rat after administration of intratympanic MnCl2.Compared to signal enhancement without explicit sound stimuli, auditory structures in the ascending auditory pathway showed stronger signal enhancement in rats who received sound stimuli of 10 and 40 kHz. In addition, signal enhancement with a stimulation frequency of 40 kHz was stronger than that with 10 kHz. Therefore, the results of this study seem to suggest that, in order to achieve an effective response to high sound intensity or frequency, more firing of auditory neurons, or firing of many auditory neurons together for the pooled neural activity is needed.

  2. Controlling system components with a sound card: A versatile inkjet fluid testing platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bognet, Brice; Guo, Yang; Ma, Anson W. K.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate how to use a personal computer sound card to develop an experimental platform for evaluating the jettability and jetting behavior of inkjet fluids. The test fluid is driven out of a nozzle acoustically using a loudspeaker, forming a jet. The subsequent jet breakup process is then captured using a stroboscopic light source and a camera. Instead of using a delay generator as in previous work, the current setup uses a computer sound card and audio amplifier to (i) generate actuation waveforms of arbitrary shapes and (ii) synchronize the jet actuation and imaging with a time precision close to 5 μs. To correct for any signal distortions caused by the built-in high pass filters of the sound card and amplifier, a numerical filter is created and applied before sending the desired signal to the sound card. Such correction method does not require physically modifying the hardware of the sound card or amplifier and is applicable to different waveforms and filters provided that the transfer function is correctly identified. The platform has been tested using 20% (v/v) glycerol in water as a model fluid. Combining this platform with digital image analysis further enables a quantitative assessment of parameters such as the volumes and positions of the jet and drop that are important for quality control and development of new ink formulations.

  3. Amplitude and frequency modulation control of sound production in a mechanical model of the avian syrinx.

    PubMed

    Elemans, Coen P H; Muller, Mees; Larsen, Ole Naesbye; van Leeuwen, Johan L

    2009-04-01

    Birdsong has developed into one of the important models for motor control of learned behaviour and shows many parallels with speech acquisition in humans. However, there are several experimental limitations to studying the vocal organ - the syrinx - in vivo. The multidisciplinary approach of combining experimental data and mathematical modelling has greatly improved the understanding of neural control and peripheral motor dynamics of sound generation in birds. Here, we present a simple mechanical model of the syrinx that facilitates detailed study of vibrations and sound production. Our model resembles the 'starling resistor', a collapsible tube model, and consists of a tube with a single membrane in its casing, suspended in an external pressure chamber and driven by various pressure patterns. With this design, we can separately control 'bronchial' pressure and tension in the oscillating membrane and generate a wide variety of 'syllables' with simple sweeps of the control parameters. We show that the membrane exhibits high frequency, self-sustained oscillations in the audio range (>600 Hz fundamental frequency) using laser Doppler vibrometry, and systematically explore the conditions for sound production of the model in its control space. The fundamental frequency of the sound increases with tension in three membranes with different stiffness and mass. The lower-bound fundamental frequency increases with membrane mass. The membrane vibrations are strongly coupled to the resonance properties of the distal tube, most likely because of its reflective properties to sound waves. Our model is a gross simplification of the complex morphology found in birds, and more closely resembles mathematical models of the syrinx. Our results confirm several assumptions underlying existing mathematical models in a complex geometry.

  4. Data Assimilation Experiments using Quality Controlled AIRS Version 5 Temperature Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel

    2008-01-01

    The AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm has been finalized and is now operational at the Goddard DAAC in the processing (and reprocessing) of all AlRS data. Version 5 contains accurate case-by-case error estimates for most derived products, which are also used for quality control. We have conducted forecast impact experiments assimilating AlRS quality controlled temperature profiles using the NASA GEOS-5 data assimilation system, consisting of the NCEP GSI analysis coupled with the NASA FVGCM. Assimilation of quality controlled temperature profiles resulted in significantly improved forecast skill in both the Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere Extra-Tropics, compared to that obtained from analyses obtained when all data used operationally by NCEP except for AlRS data is assimilated. Experiments using different Quality Control thresholds for assimilation of AlRS temperature retrievals showed that a medium quality control threshold performed better than a tighter threshold, which provided better overall sounding accuracy; or a looser threshold, which provided better spatial coverage of accepted soundings. We are conducting more experiments to further optimize this balance of spatial coverage and sounding accuracy from the data assimilation perspective. In all cases, temperature soundings were assimilated well below cloud level in partially cloudy cases. The positive impact of assimilating AlRS derived atmospheric temperatures all but vanished when only AIRS stratospheric temperatures were assimilated. Forecast skill resulting from assimilation of AlRS radiances uncontaminated by clouds, instead of AlRS temperature soundings, was only slightly better than that resulting from assimilation of only stratospheric AlRS temperatures. This reduction in forecast skill is most likely the result of significant loss of tropospheric information when only AIRS radiances unaffected by clouds are used in the data assimilation process.

  5. Active Outer Hair Cells Affect the Sound-Evoked Vibration of the Reticular Lamina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Stefan; Fridberger, Anders

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that the organ of Corti uses active mechanisms to enhance its sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Two possible mechanisms have been identified, both capable of producing mechanical forces, which can alter the sound-evoked vibration of the hearing organ. However, little is known about the effect of these forces on the sound-evoked vibration pattern of the reticular lamina. Current injections into scala media were used to alter the amplitude of the active mechanisms in the apex of the guinea pig temporal bone. We used time-resolved confocal imaging to access the vibration pattern of individual outer hair cells. During positive current injection the the sound-evoked vibration of outer hair cell row three increased while row one showed a small decrease. Negative currents reversed the observed effect. We conclude that the outer hair cell mediated modification of reticular lamina vibration patterns could contribute to the inner hair cell stimulation.

  6. Semi-Supervised Active Learning for Sound Classification in Hybrid Learning Environments

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wenjing; Coutinho, Eduardo; Li, Haifeng; Schuller, Björn; Yu, Xiaojie; Zhu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    Coping with scarcity of labeled data is a common problem in sound classification tasks. Approaches for classifying sounds are commonly based on supervised learning algorithms, which require labeled data which is often scarce and leads to models that do not generalize well. In this paper, we make an efficient combination of confidence-based Active Learning and Self-Training with the aim of minimizing the need for human annotation for sound classification model training. The proposed method pre-processes the instances that are ready for labeling by calculating their classifier confidence scores, and then delivers the candidates with lower scores to human annotators, and those with high scores are automatically labeled by the machine. We demonstrate the feasibility and efficacy of this method in two practical scenarios: pool-based and stream-based processing. Extensive experimental results indicate that our approach requires significantly less labeled instances to reach the same performance in both scenarios compared to Passive Learning, Active Learning and Self-Training. A reduction of 52.2% in human labeled instances is achieved in both of the pool-based and stream-based scenarios on a sound classification task considering 16,930 sound instances. PMID:27627768

  7. Diversity in sound pressure levels and estimated active space of resident killer whale vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patrick J O

    2006-05-01

    Signal source intensity and detection range, which integrates source intensity with propagation loss, background noise and receiver hearing abilities, are important characteristics of communication signals. Apparent source levels were calculated for 819 pulsed calls and 24 whistles produced by free-ranging resident killer whales by triangulating the angles-of-arrival of sounds on two beamforming arrays towed in series. Levels in the 1-20 kHz band ranged from 131 to 168 dB re 1 microPa at 1 m, with differences in the means of different sound classes (whistles: 140.2+/-4.1 dB; variable calls: 146.6+/-6.6 dB; stereotyped calls: 152.6+/-5.9 dB), and among stereotyped call types. Repertoire diversity carried through to estimates of active space, with "long-range" stereotyped calls all containing overlapping, independently-modulated high-frequency components (mean estimated active space of 10-16 km in sea state zero) and "short-range" sounds (5-9 km) included all stereotyped calls without a high-frequency component, whistles, and variable calls. Short-range sounds are reported to be more common during social and resting behaviors, while long-range stereotyped calls predominate in dispersed travel and foraging behaviors. These results suggest that variability in sound pressure levels may reflect diverse social and ecological functions of the acoustic repertoire of killer whales.

  8. Experience-based Auditory Predictions Modulate Brain Activity to Silence as do Real Sounds.

    PubMed

    Chouiter, Leila; Tzovara, Athina; Dieguez, Sebastian; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Magezi, David; De Lucia, Marzia; Spierer, Lucas

    2015-10-01

    Interactions between stimuli's acoustic features and experience-based internal models of the environment enable listeners to compensate for the disruptions in auditory streams that are regularly encountered in noisy environments. However, whether auditory gaps are filled in predictively or restored a posteriori remains unclear. The current lack of positive statistical evidence that internal models can actually shape brain activity as would real sounds precludes accepting predictive accounts of filling-in phenomenon. We investigated the neurophysiological effects of internal models by testing whether single-trial electrophysiological responses to omitted sounds in a rule-based sequence of tones with varying pitch could be decoded from the responses to real sounds and by analyzing the ERPs to the omissions with data-driven electrical neuroimaging methods. The decoding of the brain responses to different expected, but omitted, tones in both passive and active listening conditions was above chance based on the responses to the real sound in active listening conditions. Topographic ERP analyses and electrical source estimations revealed that, in the absence of any stimulation, experience-based internal models elicit an electrophysiological activity different from noise and that the temporal dynamics of this activity depend on attention. We further found that the expected change in pitch direction of omitted tones modulated the activity of left posterior temporal areas 140-200 msec after the onset of omissions. Collectively, our results indicate that, even in the absence of any stimulation, internal models modulate brain activity as do real sounds, indicating that auditory filling in can be accounted for by predictive activity.

  9. Applications of Sound Spectrum Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    The physics of sound is often studied in introductory physics class experiments involving a tube of resonating air. In typical setups, pistons control the length of a cylindrical space or a microphone is moved within a tube. While these activities are useful and can be made very quantitative, they don't directly demonstrate the sounds that are…

  10. Performances of Student Activism: Sound, Silence, Gender, and Dis/ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasque, Penny A.; Vargas, Juanita Gamez

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the various performances of activism by students through sound, silence, gender, and dis/ability and how these performances connect to social change efforts around issues such as human trafficking, homeless children, hunger, and children with varying abilities.

  11. Early Fishing Peoples of Puget Sound. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNutt, Nan

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  12. Spatial Effects of Sound on Visual Activity in Human Newborns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelson, Morton J.; Haith, Marshall M.

    This study investigated the possibility of a functional relation between the auditory and visual systems in the human newborn beyond reflexive organization. Visual activity was monitored in 16 newborns through the use of infrared corneal reflection video tape recording. Infants were observed in total darkness and while monocularly viewing a…

  13. Sounds Like Fun: Activities for Developing Phonological Awareness, Revised Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spector, Cecile Cyrul

    2009-01-01

    Kids love jokes--and teachers and SLPs love fast and easy ways to improve students' phonological awareness. That's why every elementary and middle-school SLP and educator needs this playful, effective activity book, packed with jokes and riddles that increase students' awareness of the phonemes that make up words. The perfect way to avoid "drill…

  14. Perceptual demand modulates activation of human auditory cortex in response to task-irrelevant sounds.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Merav; Humphries, Colin; Verber, Matthew; Mangalathu, Jain; Desai, Anjali; Binder, Jeffrey R; Liebenthal, Einat

    2013-09-01

    In the visual modality, perceptual demand on a goal-directed task has been shown to modulate the extent to which irrelevant information can be disregarded at a sensory-perceptual stage of processing. In the auditory modality, the effect of perceptual demand on neural representations of task-irrelevant sounds is unclear. We compared simultaneous ERPs and fMRI responses associated with task-irrelevant sounds across parametrically modulated perceptual task demands in a dichotic-listening paradigm. Participants performed a signal detection task in one ear (Attend ear) while ignoring task-irrelevant syllable sounds in the other ear (Ignore ear). Results revealed modulation of syllable processing by auditory perceptual demand in an ROI in middle left superior temporal gyrus and in negative ERP activity 130-230 msec post stimulus onset. Increasing the perceptual demand in the Attend ear was associated with a reduced neural response in both fMRI and ERP to task-irrelevant sounds. These findings are in support of a selection model whereby ongoing perceptual demands modulate task-irrelevant sound processing in auditory cortex.

  15. Active Noise Control for Dishwasher noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nokhaeng; Park, Youngjin

    2016-09-01

    The dishwasher is a useful home appliance and continually used for automatically washing dishes. It's commonly placed in the kitchen with built-in style for practicality and better use of space. In this environment, people are easily exposed to dishwasher noise, so it is an important issue for the consumers, especially for the people living in open and narrow space. Recently, the sound power levels of the noise are about 40 - 50 dBA. It could be achieved by removal of noise sources and passive means of insulating acoustical path. For more reduction, such a quiet mode with the lower speed of cycle has been introduced, but this deteriorates the washing capacity. Under this background, we propose active noise control for dishwasher noise. It is observed that the noise is propagating mainly from the lower part of the front side. Control speakers are placed in the part for the collocation. Observation part of estimating sound field distribution and control part of generating the anti-noise are designed for active noise control. Simulation result shows proposed active noise control scheme could have a potential application for dishwasher noise reduction.

  16. On the electric activity of superfluid helium at the excitation of first and second sound waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pashitskii, E. A. Gurin, A. A.

    2010-01-15

    We show that the electric activity of superfluid helium (HeII) observed in the experiments [3] during the excitation of standing second sound waves in an acoustic resonator can be described in terms of the phenomenological mechanism of the inertial polarization of atoms in a dielectric, in particular, in HeII, when the polarization field induced in the medium is proportional to the mechanical acceleration, by analogy with the Stewart-Tolman effect. The variable relative velocity w = v{sub n} - v{sub s} of the normal and superfluid HeII components that emerges in the second sound wave determines the mean group velocity of rotons, V{sub g} Almost-Equal-To w, with the density of the normal component related to their equilibrium number density in the temperature range 1.3 K {<=} T {<=} 2 K. Therefore, the acceleration of the 4He atoms involved in the formation of a roton excitation is proportional to the time derivative of the relative velocity.w. In this case, the linear local relations between the variable values of the electric induction, electric field strength, and polarization vector should be taken into account. As a result, the variable displacement current induced in the bulk of HeII and the corresponding potential difference do not depend on the anomalously low polarizability of liquid helium. This allows the ratio of the amplitudes of the temperature and potential oscillations in the second sound wave, which is almost independent of T in the above temperature range, consistent with experimental data to be obtained. At the same time, the absence of an electric response during the excitation of first sound waves in the linear regime is related to an insufficient power of the sound oscillations. Based on the experimental data on the excitation of first and second sounds, we have obtained estimates for the phenomenological coefficient of proportionality between the polarization vector and acceleration and for the drag coefficient of helium atoms by rotons in the

  17. Acoustic Resonators for Far-Field Control of Sound on a Subwavelength Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoult, Fabrice; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2011-08-01

    We prove experimentally that broadband sounds can be controlled and focused at will on a subwavelength scale by using acoustic resonators. We demonstrate our approach in the audible range with soda cans, that is, Helmholtz resonators, and commercial computer speakers. We show that diffraction-limited sound fields convert efficiently into subdiffraction modes in the collection of cans that can be controlled coherently in order to obtain focal spots as thin as 1/25 of a wavelength in air. We establish that subwavelength acoustic pressure spots are responsible for a strong enhancement of the acoustic displacement at focus, which permits us to conclude with a visual experiment exemplifying the interest of our concept for subwavelength sensors and actuators.

  18. Spontaneous brain activity predicts learning ability of foreign sounds.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Campos, Noelia; Sanjuán, Ana; González, Julio; Palomar-García, María-Ángeles; Rodríguez-Pujadas, Aina; Sebastián-Gallés, Núria; Deco, Gustavo; Ávila, César

    2013-05-29

    Can learning capacity of the human brain be predicted from initial spontaneous functional connectivity (FC) between brain areas involved in a task? We combined task-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) before and after training with a Hindi dental-retroflex nonnative contrast. Previous fMRI results were replicated, demonstrating that this learning recruited the left insula/frontal operculum and the left superior parietal lobe, among other areas of the brain. Crucially, resting-state FC (rs-FC) between these two areas at pretraining predicted individual differences in learning outcomes after distributed (Experiment 1) and intensive training (Experiment 2). Furthermore, this rs-FC was reduced at posttraining, a change that may also account for learning. Finally, resting-state network analyses showed that the mechanism underlying this reduction of rs-FC was mainly a transfer in intrinsic activity of the left frontal operculum/anterior insula from the left frontoparietal network to the salience network. Thus, rs-FC may contribute to predict learning ability and to understand how learning modifies the functioning of the brain. The discovery of this correspondence between initial spontaneous brain activity in task-related areas and posttraining performance opens new avenues to find predictors of learning capacities in the brain using task-related fMRI and rs-fMRI combined.

  19. Sound Localization with Communications Headsets: Comparison of Passive and Active Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    communications muffs in active noise reduction (ANR) and talk-through-circuitry (TTC) modes and Nacre QUIETPRO communications earplugs in off (passive...UK) in active noise reduction (ANR) and talk-through circuitry (TTC) modes ofoperation and Nacre QU’IETPRO communications earplugs ( Nacre , Trondheim...externally mounted microphones [Figure 2a]. Sound level is limited to 85 dBA. The Nacre QUIETPRO device comprises two ear pieces (transducer housing

  20. Active control system trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yore, E. E.; Gunderson, D. C.

    1976-01-01

    The active control concepts which achieve the benefit of improved mission performance and lower cost and generate system trends towards improved dynamic performance, more integration, and digital fly by wire mechanization are described. Analytical issues and implementation requirements and tools and approaches developed to address the analytical and implementation issues are briefly discussed.

  1. Affection of Fundamental Brain Activity By Using Sounds For Patients With Prosodic Disorders: A Pilot Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Emiko; Katagiri, Yoshitada; Seki, Keiko; Kawamata, Toshio

    2011-06-01

    We present a neural model of the production of modulated speech streams in the brain, referred to as prosody, which indicates the limbic structure essential for producing prosody both linguistically and emotionally. This model suggests that activating the fundamental brain including monoamine neurons at the basal ganglia will potentially contribute to helping patients with prosodic disorders coming from functional defects of the fundamental brain to overcome their speech problem. To establish effective clinical treatment for such prosodic disorders, we examine how sounds affect the fundamental activity by using electroencephalographic measurements. Throughout examinations with various melodious sounds, we found that some melodies with lilting rhythms successfully give rise to the fast alpha rhythms at the electroencephalogram which reflect the fundamental brain activity without any negative feelings.

  2. Enhanced control of light and sound trajectories with three-dimensional gradient index lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T. M.; Dupont, G.; Enoch, S.; Guenneau, S.

    2012-03-01

    We numerically study the focusing and bending effects of light and sound waves through heterogeneous isotropic cylindrical and spherical devices. We first point out that transformation optics and acoustics show that the control of light requires spatially varying anisotropic permittivity and permeability, while the control of sound is achieved via spatially anisotropic density and isotropic compressibility. Moreover, homogenization theory applied to electromagnetic and acoustic periodic structures leads to such artificial (although not spatially varying) anisotropic permittivity, permeability and density. We stress that homogenization is thus a natural mathematical tool for the design of structured metamaterials. To illustrate the two-step geometric transform-homogenization approach, we consider the design of cylindrical and spherical electromagnetic and acoustic lenses displaying some artificial anisotropy along their optical axis (direction of periodicity of the structural elements). Applications are sought in the design of Eaton and Luneburg lenses bending light at angles ranging from 90° to 360°, or mimicking a Schwartzchild metric, i.e. a black hole. All of these spherical metamaterials are characterized by a refractive index varying inversely with the radius which is approximated by concentric layers of homogeneous material. We finally propose some structured cylindrical metamaterials consisting of infinitely conducting or rigid toroidal channels in a homogeneous bulk material focusing light or sound waves. The functionality of these metamaterials is demonstrated via full-wave three-dimensional computations using nodal elements in the context of acoustics, and finite edge-elements in electromagnetics.

  3. Estimating the macroanisotropy of a horizontally layered section from controlled-source radiomagnetotelluric soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlykov, A. A.; Saraev, A. K.

    2015-07-01

    The possibilities of estimating the macroanisotropic parameters of the earth by radiomagnetotelluric soundings with a controlled source in the form of a horizontal electric dipole (a cable with a finite length) are studied in the case of the measurements in the transition zone of the source, where the galvanic and induction modes of the excited electromagnetic field are both important. The forward problem for the considered high frequency band (up to 1000 kHz) is solved with allowance for the displacement currents in the ground and air. The algorithm of anisotropic 1D inversion of the sounding data is presented. The resolution parameters are estimated from the derivatives of the electromagnetic field components with respect to the model parameters. Based on the synthetic examples, it is shown that joint inversion of the impedance and tipper data in the transition zone of the source constrains the space of equivalent models and makes it possible to determine the macroanisotropy coefficient of the section.

  4. Multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control using adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators.

    PubMed

    Vipperman, J S; Clark, R L

    1999-01-01

    An experimental implementation of a multivariable feedback active structural acoustic control system is demonstrated on a piezostructure plate with pinned boundary conditions. Four adaptive piezoelectric sensoriactuators provide an array of truly colocated actuator/sensor pairs to be used as control transducers. Radiation filters are developed based on the self- and mutual-radiation efficiencies of the structure and are included into the performance cost of an H2 control law which minimizes total radiated sound power. In the cost function, control effort is balanced with reductions in radiated sound power. A similarity transform which produces generalized velocity states that are required as inputs to the radiation filters is presented. Up to 15 dB of attenuation in radiated sound power was observed at the resonant frequencies of the piezostructure.

  5. Processes controlling the remobilization of surficial sediment and formation of sedimentary furrows in north-central Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Knebel, H. J.; Lewis, R.S.; DiGiacomo-Cohen, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Sidescan sonar, bathymetric, subbottom, and bottom-photographic surveys and sediment sampling have improved our understanding of the processes that control the complex distribution of bottom sediments and benthic habitats in Long Island Sound. Although the deeper (>20 m) waters of the central Sound are long-term depositional areas characterized by relatively weak bottom-current regimes, our data reveal the localized presence of sedimentary furrows. These erosional bedforms occur in fine-grained cohesive sediments (silts and clayey silts), trend east-northeast, are irregularly spaced, and have indistinct troughs with gently sloping walls. The average width and relief of the furrows is 9.2 m and 0.4 m, respectively. The furrows average about 206 m long, but range in length from 30 m to over 1,300 m. Longitudinal ripples, bioturbation, and nutclam shell debris are common within the furrows. Although many of the furrows appear to end by gradually narrowing, some furrows show a "tuning fork" joining pattern. Most of these junctions open toward the east, indicating net westward sediment transport. However, a few junctions open toward the west suggesting that oscillating tidal currents are the dominant mechanism controlling furrow formation. Sedimentary furrows and longitudinal ripples typically form in environments which have recurring, directionally stable, and occasionally strong currents. The elongate geometry and regional bathymetry of Long Island Sound combine to constrain the dominant tidal and storm currents to east-west flow directions and permit the development of these bedforms. Through resuspension due to biological activity and the subsequent development of erosional bedforms, fine-grained cohesive sediment can be remobilized and made available for transport farther westward into the estuary.

  6. Processes controlling the remobilization of surficial sediment and formation of sedimentary furrows in North-Central Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Knebel, H. J.; Lewis, R.S.; DiGiacomo-Cohen, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Sidescan sonar, bathymetric, subbottom, and bottom-photographic surveys and sediment sampling have improved our understanding of the processes that control the complex distribution of bottom sediments and benthic habitats in Long Island Sound. Although the deeper (>20 m) waters of the central Sound are long-term depositional areas characterized by relatively weak bottom-current regimes, our data reveal the localized presence of sedimentary furrows. These erosional bedforms occur in fine-grained cohesive sediments (silts and clayey silts), trend east-northeast, are irregularly spaced, and have indistinct troughs with gently sloping walls. The average width and relief of the furrows is 9.2 m and 0.4 m, respectively. The furrows average about 206 m long, but range in length from 30 m to over 1,300 m. Longitudinal ripples, bioturbation, and nutclam shell debris are common within the furrows. Although many of the furrows appear to end by gradually narrowing, some furrows show a "tuning fork" joining pattern. Most of these junctions open toward the east, indicating net westward sediment transport. However, a few junctions open toward the west suggesting that oscillating tidal currents are the dominant mechanism controlling furrow formation. Sedimentary furrows and longitudinal ripples typically form in environments which have recurring, directionally stable, and occasionally strong currents. The elongate geometry and regional bathymetry of Long Island Sound combine to constrain the dominant tidal and storm currents to east-west flow directions and permit the development of these bedforms. Through resuspension due to biological activity and the subsequent development of erosional bedforms, fine-grained cohesive sediment can be remobilized and made available for transport farther westward into the estuary.

  7. Active control of convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Jonathan; Bau, Haim H.

    1991-12-01

    It is demonstrated theoretically that active (feedback) control can be used to alter the characteristics of thermal convection in a toroidal, vertical loop heated from below and cooled from above. As the temperature difference between the heated and cooled sections of the loop increases, the flow in the uncontrolled loop changes from no motion to steady, time-independent motion to temporally oscillatory, chaotic motion. With the use of a feedback controller effecting small perturbations in the boundary conditions, one can maintain the no-motion state at significantly higher temperature differences than the critical one corresponding to the onset of convection in the uncontrolled system. Alternatively, one can maintain steady, time-independent flow under conditions in which the flow would otherwise be chaotic. That is, the controller can be used to suppress chaos. Likewise, it is possible to stabilize periodic nonstable orbits that exist in the chaotic regime of the uncontrolled system. Finally, the controller also can be used to induce chaos in otherwise laminar (fully predictable), nonchaotic flow.

  8. Masked priming of conceptual features reveals differential brain activation during unconscious access to conceptual action and sound information.

    PubMed

    Trumpp, Natalie M; Traub, Felix; Kiefer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies suggested an involvement of sensory-motor brain systems during conceptual processing in support of grounded cognition theories of conceptual memory. However, in these studies with visible stimuli, contributions of strategic imagery or semantic elaboration processes to observed sensory-motor activity cannot be entirely excluded. In the present study, we therefore investigated the electrophysiological correlates of unconscious feature-specific priming of action- and sound-related concepts within a novel feature-priming paradigm to specifically probe automatic processing of conceptual features without the contribution of possibly confounding factors such as orthographic similarity or response congruency. Participants were presented with a masked subliminal prime word and a subsequent visible target word. In the feature-priming conditions primes as well as targets belonged to the same conceptual feature dimension (action or sound, e.g., typewriter or radio) whereas in the two non-priming conditions, either the primes or the targets consisted of matched control words with low feature relevance (e.g., butterfly or candle). Event-related potential analyses revealed unconscious feature-specific priming effects at fronto-central electrodes within 100 to 180 ms after target stimulus onset that differed with regard to topography and underlying neural generators. In congruency with previous findings under visible stimulation conditions, these differential subliminal ERP feature-priming effects demonstrate an unconscious automatic access to action versus sound features of concepts. The present results therefore support grounded cognition theory suggesting that activity in sensory and motor areas during conceptual processing can also occur unconsciously and is not mandatorily accompanied by a vivid conscious experience of the conceptual content such as in imagery.

  9. Sound production by North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) in surface active groups.

    PubMed

    Parks, Susan E; Tyack, Peter L

    2005-05-01

    The surface active group (SAG) is the most commonly observed surface social behavior of North Atlantic right whales. Recordings were made from 52 SAGs in the Bay of Fundy, Canada between July and September, from 1999 to 2002. The call types recorded from these groups were similar to those described previously for Southern right whales (Eubalaena australis), with six major call types being termed scream, gunshot, blow, upcall, warble, and downcall. The percentage of total calls of each call type depended on the group size and composition. The most common call type recorded was the scream call. The scream calls were produced by the focal female in a SAG. Production of other sound types can be attributed to whales other than the focal female, with gunshot and upcalls produced by males, and warble calls produced by female calves. The source levels for these sounds range from 137 to 162 dB rms re 1 ,tPa-m for tonal calls and 174 to 192 dB rms for broadband gunshot sounds.

  10. Sound production by North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) in surface active groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, Susan E.; Tyack, Peter L.

    2005-05-01

    The surface active group (SAG) is the most commonly observed surface social behavior of North Atlantic right whales. Recordings were made from 52 SAGs in the Bay of Fundy, Canada between July and September, from 1999 to 2002. The call types recorded from these groups were similar to those described previously for Southern right whales (Eubalaena australis), with six major call types being termed scream, gunshot, blow, upcall, warble, and downcall. The percentage of total calls of each call type depended on the group size and composition. The most common call type recorded was the scream call. The scream calls were produced by the focal female in a SAG. Production of other sound types can be attributed to whales other than the focal female, with gunshot and upcalls produced by males, and warble calls produced by female calves. The source levels for these sounds range from 137 to 162 dB rms re 1 μPa-m for tonal calls and 174 to 192 dB rms for broadband gunshot sounds. .

  11. Two recently developed guidance and control systems for sounding rockets and similar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljunge, Lars

    2003-08-01

    Saab Ericsson Space has continued its development of digital control systems, based on its previous experiences from the Maxus GCS and DS19. Two new systems now exist: The S19D guidance and control system, which uses DS19 hardware to execute S19 type guidance and control. The GCS/DMARS guidance, navigation and control system, which is a modernisation of the GCS/RIINS. The family of guidance systems provided by Saab Ericsson Space now includes: The analog S19 and the digital S19D for constant attitude guidance during the first part of a sounding rocket's powered flight. The DS19, that controls the attitude throughout the motor burn phase and navigates the vehicle to a pre-set impact point. The (Maxus) GCS with the same function as the DS19, but using thrust vector control via moveable nozzles instead of canard control. The SPINRAC and the RACS, providing exo-atmospheric impact point and attitude control by on-board thrusters.

  12. Integrated Electromechanical Devices for Active Control of Vibration and Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-11-01

    of peak power • Minimize ambient noise generation broadband and narrowband • Standard temperature (-25C--55C) with possible extended operation • Must...operate in a vacuum and in non-volatile fluids • Minimize heat generation , EMI, and outgassing • Baseline for application to flat surfaces but allow... generation . An actuator integrated in an electromechanical device could generate sufficient internal heat to affect other components, or alter its

  13. Universal mechanisms of sound production and control in birds and mammals

    PubMed Central

    Elemans, C.P.H; Rasmussen, J.H.; Herbst, C.T.; Düring, D.N.; Zollinger, S.A.; Brumm, H.; Srivastava, K.; Svane, N.; Ding, M.; Larsen, O.N.; Sober, S.J.; Švec, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    As animals vocalize, their vocal organ transforms motor commands into vocalizations for social communication. In birds, the physical mechanisms by which vocalizations are produced and controlled remain unresolved because of the extreme difficulty in obtaining in vivo measurements. Here, we introduce an ex vivo preparation of the avian vocal organ that allows simultaneous high-speed imaging, muscle stimulation and kinematic and acoustic analyses to reveal the mechanisms of vocal production in birds across a wide range of taxa. Remarkably, we show that all species tested employ the myoelastic-aerodynamic (MEAD) mechanism, the same mechanism used to produce human speech. Furthermore, we show substantial redundancy in the control of key vocal parameters ex vivo, suggesting that in vivo vocalizations may also not be specified by unique motor commands. We propose that such motor redundancy can aid vocal learning and is common to MEAD sound production across birds and mammals, including humans. PMID:26612008

  14. Discrimination of speech sounds by children with dyslexia: comparisons with chronological age and reading level controls.

    PubMed

    Bogliotti, C; Serniclaes, W; Messaoud-Galusi, S; Sprenger-Charolles, L

    2008-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that children suffering from developmental dyslexia have a deficit in categorical perception of speech sounds. The aim of the current study was to better understand the nature of this categorical perception deficit. In this study, categorical perception skills of children with dyslexia were compared with those of chronological age and reading level controls. Children identified and discriminated /do-to/ syllables along a voice onset time (VOT) continuum. Results showed that children with dyslexia discriminated among phonemically contrastive pairs less accurately than did chronological age and reading level controls and also showed higher sensitivity in the discrimination of allophonic contrasts. These results suggest that children with dyslexia perceive speech with allophonic units rather than phonemic units. The origin of allophonic perception in the course of perceptual development and its implication for reading acquisition are discussed.

  15. How does high-frequency sound or vibration activate vestibular receptors?

    PubMed

    Curthoys, I S; Grant, J W

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism by which vestibular neural phase locking occurs and how it relates to classical otolith mechanics is unclear. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that sound and vibration both cause fluid pressure waves in the inner ear and that it is these pressure waves which displace the hair bundles on vestibular receptor hair cells and result in activation of type I receptor hair cells and phase locking of the action potentials in the irregular vestibular afferents, which synapse on type I receptors. This idea has been suggested since the early neural recordings and recent results give it greater credibility.

  16. Persistent responsiveness of long-latency auditory cortical activities in response to repeated stimuli of musical timbre and vowel sounds.

    PubMed

    Kuriki, Shinya; Ohta, Keisuke; Koyama, Sachiko

    2007-11-01

    Long-latency auditory-evoked magnetic field and potential show strong attenuation of N1m/N1 responses when an identical stimulus is presented repeatedly due to adaptation of auditory cortical neurons. This adaptation is weak in subsequently occurring P2m/P2 responses, being weaker for piano chords than single piano notes. The adaptation of P2m is more suppressed in musicians having long-term musical training than in nonmusicians, whereas the amplitude of P2 is enhanced preferentially in musicians as the spectral complexity of musical tones increases. To address the key issues of whether such high responsiveness of P2m/P2 responses to complex sounds is intrinsic and common to nonmusical sounds, we conducted a magnetoencephalographic study on participants who had no experience of musical training, using consecutive trains of piano and vowel sounds. The dipole moment of the P2m sources located in the auditory cortex indicated significantly suppressed adaptation in the right hemisphere both to piano and vowel sounds. Thus, the persistent responsiveness of the P2m activity may be inherent, not induced by intensive training, and common to spectrally complex sounds. The right hemisphere dominance of the responsiveness to musical and speech sounds suggests analysis of acoustic features of object sounds to be a significant function of P2m activity.

  17. Dynamics of sensorimotor cortex activation to spatial sounds precueing ipsi- versus contralateral manual responses.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Jochen; Ulrich, Rolf; Lutzenberger, Werner

    2003-10-01

    Spatially informative visual precues give rise to event-related potential asymmetries with higher negativities over the contralateral hemisphere. However the attribution of these potentials to sensorimotor areas is still unclear. The present magnetoencephalography study assessed movement preparation processes to auditory spatial precues. Event-related desynchronization (ERD) was measured to test the hypothesis that lateralized sounds would give rise to a fast, stimulus-driven activation of motor networks independent of the precued response side. The lateralized vowels /a/ and /e/ served as precues for either ipsi- or contralateral responses, respectively, which had to be executed when an imperative stimulus was presented 1 s after precue onset. Two separate experiments were conducted with either blocked or mixed presentation of ipsi- and contralateral precues. Beta ERD over sensorimotor regions representing the stimulus side was elicited by both types of precues approximately 200 ms after their onset. For contralateral precues, a switch of beta ERD to the response hemisphere took place approximately 400 ms after trial-onset, peaking prior to the imperative stimulus (approximately 800 ms post trial-onset). Signal subspace projection demonstrated a high topographical correspondence between the early precue-related ERD and the pattern immediately preceding the response, suggesting that both were generated in similar motor networks. Apparently lateralized sounds give rise to an early activation of contralateral motor networks independent of the precued response. This suggests strong associations between space processing and action preparation networks, with fast activations preceding a detailed cortical analysis of stimulus meaning.

  18. Use of Quality Controlled AIRS Temperature Soundings to Improve Forecast Skill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Reale, Oreste; Iredell, Lena

    2010-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002, together with AMSU-A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. The primary products of AIRS/AMSU-A are twice daily global fields of atmospheric temperature-humidity profiles, ozone profiles, sea/land surface skin temperature, and cloud related parameters including OLR. Also included are the clear column radiances used to derive these products which are representative of the radiances AIRS would have seen if there were no clouds in the field of view. All products also have error estimates. The sounding goals of AIRS are to produce 1 km tropospheric layer mean temperatures with an rms error of 1K, and layer precipitable water with an rms error of 20 percent, in cases with up to 90 percent effective cloud cover. The products are designed for data assimilation purposes for the improvement of numerical weather prediction, as well as for the study of climate and meteorological processes. With regard to data assimilation, one can use either the products themselves or the clear column radiances from which the products were derived. The AIRS Version 5 retrieval algorithm is now being used operationally at the Goddard DISC in the routine generation of geophysical parameters derived from AIRS/AMSU data. A major innovation in Version 5 is the ability to generate case-by-case level-by-level error estimates for retrieved quantities and clear column radiances, and the use of these error estimates for Quality Control. The temperature profile error estimates are used to determine a case-by-case characteristic pressure pbest, down to which the profile is considered acceptable for data assimilation purposes. The characteristic pressure p(sub best) is determined by comparing the case dependent error estimate (delta)T(p) to the threshold values (Delta)T(p). The AIRS Version 5 data set provides error estimates of T(p) at all levels, and also profile dependent values of pbest based

  19. On-line Monitoring and Active Control for Transformer Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jiabi; Zhao, Tong; Tian, Chun; Wang, Xia; He, Zhenhua; Duan, Lunfeng

    This paper introduces the system for on-line monitoring and active noise control towards the transformer noise based on LabVIEW and the hardware equipment including the hardware and software. For the hardware part, it is mainly focused on the composition and the role of hardware devices, as well as the mounting location in the active noise control experiment. And the software part introduces the software flow chats, the measurement and analysis module for the sound pressure level including A, B, C weighting methods, the 1/n octave spectrum and the power spectrum, active noise control module and noise data access module.

  20. Historical Patterns and Drivers of Spatial Changes in Recreational Fishing Activity in Puget Sound, Washington

    PubMed Central

    Beaudreau, Anne H.; Whitney, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale fisheries are the primary users of many coastal fish stocks; yet, spatial and temporal patterns of recreational and subsistence fishing in coastal marine ecosystems are poorly documented. Knowledge about the spatial distribution of fishing activities can inform place-based management that balances species conservation with opportunities for recreation and subsistence. We used a participatory mapping approach to document changes in spatial fishing patterns of 80 boat-based recreational anglers from 1950 to 2010 in Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Hand-drawn fishing areas for salmon, rockfishes, flatfishes, and crabs were digitized and analyzed in a Geographic Information System. We found that recreational fishing has spanned the majority of Puget Sound since the 1950s, with the heaviest use limited to small areas of central and northern Puget Sound. People are still fishing in the same places they were decades ago, with relatively little change in specific locations despite widespread declines in salmon and bottomfish populations during the second half of the 20th century. While the location of core fishing areas remained consistent, the size of those areas and intensity of use changed over time. The size of fishing areas increased through the 2000s for salmon but declined after the 1970s and 1980s for rockfishes, flatfishes, and crabs. Our results suggest that the spatial extent of recreational bottomfishing increased after the 1960s, when the availability of motorized vessels and advanced fish-finding technologies allowed anglers to expand their scope beyond localized angling from piers and boathouses. Respondents offered a wide range of reasons for shifts in fishing areas over time, reflecting substantial individual variation in motivations and behaviors. Changes in fishing areas were most commonly attributed to changes in residence and declines in target species and least tied to fishery regulations, despite the implementation of at least 25 marine

  1. National Report Switzerland: Sounding Rocket and Balloon Activities and Related Research in Switzerland 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    , particularly in 2014. In order to keep the stations attractive to researchers from all over the world, investment in infrastructure is necessary. New instruments were recently installed at the Jungfrau East Ridge, for example, that now allow for the recording of additional climate and environmental data. A short summary of a few Swiss projects within the framework of sounding rocket and balloon activities and related research performed between 2013 and 2015 is provided in the following paragraphs.

  2. Assessing Acoustic Sound Levels Associated with Active Source Seismic Surveys in Shallow Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Thode, A.; Diebold, J. B.; Webb, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    The potential effect of active source seismic research on marine mammal populations is a topic of increasing concern, and controversy surrounding such operations has begun to impact the planning and permitting of academic surveys [e.g., Malakoff, 2002 Science]. Although no causal relationship between marine mammal strandings and seismic exploration has been proven, any circumstantial evidence must be thoroughly investigated. A 2002 stranding of two beaked whales in the Gulf of California within 50 km of a R/V Ewing seismic survey has been a subject of concern for both marine seismologists and environmentalists. In order to better understand possible received levels for whales in the vicinity of these operations, modeling is combined with ground-truth calibration measurements. A wide-angle parabolic equation model, which is capable of including shear within the sediment and basement layers, is used to generate predictive models of low-frequency transmission loss within the Gulf of California. This work incorporates range-dependent bathymetry, sediment thickness, sound velocity structure and sub-bottom properties. Oceanic sounds speed profiles are derived from the U.S. Navy's seasonal GDEM model and sediment thicknesses are taken from NOAA's worldwide database. The spectral content of the Ewing's 20-airgun seismic array is constrained by field calibration in the spring of 2003 [Tolstoy et al., 2004 GRL], indicating peak energies at frequencies below a few hundred Hz, with energy spectral density showing an approximate power-law decrease at higher frequencies (being ~40 dB below peak at 1 kHz). Transmission loss is estimated along a series of radials extending from multiple positions along the ship's track, with the directivity of the array accounted for by phase-shifting point sources that are scaled by the cube root of the individual airgun volumes. This allows the time-space history of low-frequency received levels to be reconstructed within the Gulf of California

  3. Biological effect of audible sound control on mung bean (Vigna radiate) sprout.

    PubMed

    Cai, W; He, H; Zhu, S; Wang, N

    2014-01-01

    Audible sound (20-20000 Hz) widely exists in natural world. However, the interaction between audible sound and the growth of plants is usually neglected in biophysics research. Not much effort has been put forth in studying the relation of plant and audible sound. In this work, the effect of audible sound on germination and growth of mung bean (Vigna radiate) was studied under laboratory condition. Audible sound ranging 1000-1500 Hz, 1500-2000 Hz, and 2000-2500 Hz and intensities [80 dB (A), 90 dB (A), 100 dB (A)] were used to stimulate mung bean for 72 hours. The growth of mung bean was evaluated in terms of mean germination time, total length, and total fresh weight. Experimental results indicated that the sound wave can reduce the germination period of mung bean and the mung bean under treatments of sound with intensity around 90 dB and frequency around 2000 Hz and significant increase in growth. Audible sound treatment can promote the growth of mung bean differently for distinct frequency and intensity. The study provides us with a way to understand the effects and rules of sound field on plant growth and a new way to improve the production of mung bean.

  4. Frequencies of Inaudible High-Frequency Sounds Differentially Affect Brain Activity: Positive and Negative Hypersonic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Ariko; Yagi, Reiko; Kawai, Norie; Honda, Manabu; Nishina, Emi; Oohashi, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The hypersonic effect is a phenomenon in which sounds containing significant quantities of non-stationary high-frequency components (HFCs) above the human audible range (max. 20 kHz) activate the midbrain and diencephalon and evoke various physiological, psychological and behavioral responses. Yet important issues remain unverified, especially the relationship existing between the frequency of HFCs and the emergence of the hypersonic effect. In this study, to investigate the relationship between the hypersonic effect and HFC frequencies, we divided an HFC (above 16 kHz) of recorded gamelan music into 12 band components and applied them to subjects along with an audible component (below 16 kHz) to observe changes in the alpha2 frequency component (10–13 Hz) of spontaneous EEGs measured from centro-parieto-occipital regions (Alpha-2 EEG), which we previously reported as an index of the hypersonic effect. Our results showed reciprocal directional changes in Alpha-2 EEGs depending on the frequency of the HFCs presented with audible low-frequency component (LFC). When an HFC above approximately 32 kHz was applied, Alpha-2 EEG increased significantly compared to when only audible sound was applied (positive hypersonic effect), while, when an HFC below approximately 32 kHz was applied, the Alpha-2 EEG decreased (negative hypersonic effect). These findings suggest that the emergence of the hypersonic effect depends on the frequencies of inaudible HFC. PMID:24788141

  5. Measurement of energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activities by a sounding balloon and ground observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, T.

    2015-12-01

    Energetic radiation caused by thunderstorm activity is observed at various places, such as the ground, high mountain areas, and artificial satellites. In order to investigate the radiation source and its energy distribution, we measured energetic radiation by a sounding balloon, and the ground observation. On the measurement inside/above the thundercloud, we conducted a sounding observation using a radiosonde mounted two GM tubes (for gamma-rays, and for beta/gamma-rays), in addition to meteorological instruments. The balloon passed through a region of strong echoes in a thundercloud shown by radar image, at which time an increase in counting rate of the GM tube about 2 orders of magnitude occurred at the altitude from 5 km to 7.5 km. Furthermore, the counting rate of two GM tubes indicated the tendency different depending on movement of a balloon. This result suggests that the ratio for the gamma-rays (energetic photons) of the beta-rays (energetic electrons) varies according to the place in the thundercloud. Furthermore, we carried out a ground observation of the energetic gamma rays during winter thunderstorm at a coastal area facing the Sea of Japan. Two types of the energetic radiation have been observed at this time. We report the outline of these measurements and analysis in the session of the AGU meeting.

  6. Sound localization with communications headsets: comparison of passive and active systems.

    PubMed

    Abel, Sharon M; Tsang, Suzanne; Boyne, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that conventional hearing protectors interfere with sound localization. This research examines possible benefits from advanced communications devices. Horizontal plane sound localization was compared in normal-hearing males with the ears unoccluded and fitted with Peltor H10A passive attenuation earmuffs, Racal Slimgard II communications muffs in active noise reduction (ANR) and talk-through-circuitry (TTC) modes and Nacre QUIETPRO TM communications earplugs in off (passive attenuation) and push-to-talk (PTT) modes. Localization was assessed using an array of eight loudspeakers, two in each spatial quadrant. The stimulus was 75 dB SPL, 300-ms broadband noise. One block of 120 forced-choice loudspeaker identification trials was presented in each condition. Subjects responded using a laptop response box with a set of eight microswitches in the same configuration as the speaker array. A repeated measures ANOVA was applied to the dataset. The results reveal that the overall percent correct response was highest in the unoccluded condition (94%). A significant reduction of 24% was observed for the communications devices in TTC and PTT modes and a reduction of 49% for the passive muff and plug and muff with ANR. Disruption in performance was due to an increase in front-back reversal errors for mirror image spatial positions. The results support the conclusion that communications devices with advanced technologies are less detrimental to directional hearing than conventional, passive, limited amplification and ANR devices.

  7. An experimental study on the aerodynamic feasibility of a roll-controllable sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirouzu, M.; Soga, K.; Shibato, Y.

    1986-02-01

    The aerodynamic feasibility of a roll-controllable two-stage sounding rocket is investigated experimentally. The rocket has ailerons on front-fins to generate the rolling moment for the control and free-rolling tail-fins to prevent the induced rolling moment on the tail-fins from transmitting to the fuselage. Wind tunnel tests were made at free-stream Mach numbers ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 and alpha = 0 deg, 4 deg, and 8 deg varying the deflection angle of the ailerons for the models with fixed tail-fins, with free-rolling tail-fins and without tail-fins. Aerodynamic characteristics were measured by using a six-component balance. The effectiveness of the free-rolling tail-fins for the elimination of the influence of the induced rolling moment is confirmed. It is concluded that the characteristics of the rolling moment generated by the ailerons are desirable for the control, and the rotation of the tail-fins would not raise mechanical and other aerodynamic problems.

  8. Active control of convection

    SciTech Connect

    Bau, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  9. Knowledge About Sounds-Context-Specific Meaning Differently Activates Cortical Hemispheres, Auditory Cortical Fields, and Layers in House Mice.

    PubMed

    Geissler, Diana B; Schmidt, H Sabine; Ehret, Günter

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the auditory cortex (AC) by a given sound pattern is plastic, depending, in largely unknown ways, on the physiological state and the behavioral context of the receiving animal and on the receiver's experience with the sounds. Such plasticity can be inferred when house mouse mothers respond maternally to pup ultrasounds right after parturition and naïve females have to learn to respond. Here we use c-FOS immunocytochemistry to quantify highly activated neurons in the AC fields and layers of seven groups of mothers and naïve females who have different knowledge about and are differently motivated to respond to acoustic models of pup ultrasounds of different behavioral significance. Profiles of FOS-positive cells in the AC primary fields (AI, AAF), the ultrasonic field (UF), the secondary field (AII), and the dorsoposterior field (DP) suggest that activation reflects in AI, AAF, and UF the integration of sound properties with animal state-dependent factors, in the higher-order field AII the news value of a given sound in the behavioral context, and in the higher-order field DP the level of maternal motivation and, by left-hemisphere activation advantage, the recognition of the meaning of sounds in the given context. Anesthesia reduced activation in all fields, especially in cortical layers 2/3. Thus, plasticity in the AC is field-specific preparing different output of AC fields in the process of perception, recognition and responding to communication sounds. Further, the activation profiles of the auditory cortical fields suggest the differentiation between brains hormonally primed to know (mothers) and brains which acquired knowledge via implicit learning (naïve females). In this way, auditory cortical activation discriminates between instinctive (mothers) and learned (naïve females) cognition.

  10. It's More Fun than It Sounds--Enhancing Science Concepts through Hands-on Activities for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guha, Smita

    2012-01-01

    To teach young children, teachers choose topics in science that children are curious about. Children's inquisitive nature is reflected through the activities as they make repetitive sounds to find the cause and effect relationship. Teachers can make best use of those invaluable moments by incorporating those activities into science lessons on…

  11. Active noise control: A tutorial for HVAC designers

    SciTech Connect

    Gelin, L.J.

    1997-08-01

    This article will identify the capabilities and limitations of ANC in its application to HVAC noise control. ANC can be used in ducted HVAC systems to cancel ductborne, low-frequency fan noise by injecting sound waves of equal amplitude and opposite phase into an air duct, as close as possible to the source of the unwanted noise. Destructive interference of the fan noise and injected noise results in sound cancellation. The noise problems that it solves are typically described as rumble, roar or throb, all of which are difficult to address using traditional noise control methods. This article will also contrast the use of active against passive noise control techniques. The main differences between the two noise control measures are acoustic performance, energy consumption, and design flexibility. The article will first present the fundamentals and basic physics of ANC. The application to real HVAC systems will follow.

  12. Acquired Apraxia of Speech: The Effects of Repeated Practice and Rate/Rhythm Control Treatments on Sound Production Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wambaugh, Julie L.; Nessler, Christina; Cameron, Rosalea; Mauszycki, Shannon C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This investigation was designed to elucidate the effects of repeated practice treatment on sound production accuracy in individuals with apraxia of speech (AOS) and aphasia. A secondary purpose was to determine if the addition of rate/rhythm control to treatment provided further benefits beyond those achieved with repeated practice.…

  13. Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A): Instrumentation interface control document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This Interface Control Document (ICD) defines the specific details of the complete accomodation information between the Earth Observing System (EOS) PM Spacecraft and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU-A)Instrument. This is the first submittal of the ICN: it will be updated periodically throughout the life of the program. The next update is planned prior to Critical Design Review (CDR).

  14. The production and perception of emotionally expressive walking sounds: similarities between musical performance and everyday motor activity.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Bruno L; Egermann, Hauke; Bresin, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the encoding and perception of emotional expressivity in music performance. A relevant question concerns how the ability to communicate emotions in music performance is acquired. In accordance with recent theories on the embodiment of emotion, we suggest here that both the expression and recognition of emotion in music might at least in part rely on knowledge about the sounds of expressive body movements. We test this hypothesis by drawing parallels between musical expression of emotions and expression of emotions in sounds associated with a non-musical motor activity: walking. In a combined production-perception design, two experiments were conducted, and expressive acoustical features were compared across modalities. An initial performance experiment tested for similar feature use in walking sounds and music performance, and revealed that strong similarities exist. Features related to sound intensity, tempo and tempo regularity were identified as been used similarly in both domains. Participants in a subsequent perception experiment were able to recognize both non-emotional and emotional properties of the sound-generating walkers. An analysis of the acoustical correlates of behavioral data revealed that variations in sound intensity, tempo, and tempo regularity were likely used to recognize expressed emotions. Taken together, these results lend support the motor origin hypothesis for the musical expression of emotions.

  15. The Production and Perception of Emotionally Expressive Walking Sounds: Similarities between Musical Performance and Everyday Motor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Bruno L.; Egermann, Hauke; Bresin, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have investigated the encoding and perception of emotional expressivity in music performance. A relevant question concerns how the ability to communicate emotions in music performance is acquired. In accordance with recent theories on the embodiment of emotion, we suggest here that both the expression and recognition of emotion in music might at least in part rely on knowledge about the sounds of expressive body movements. We test this hypothesis by drawing parallels between musical expression of emotions and expression of emotions in sounds associated with a non-musical motor activity: walking. In a combined production-perception design, two experiments were conducted, and expressive acoustical features were compared across modalities. An initial performance experiment tested for similar feature use in walking sounds and music performance, and revealed that strong similarities exist. Features related to sound intensity, tempo and tempo regularity were identified as been used similarly in both domains. Participants in a subsequent perception experiment were able to recognize both non-emotional and emotional properties of the sound-generating walkers. An analysis of the acoustical correlates of behavioral data revealed that variations in sound intensity, tempo, and tempo regularity were likely used to recognize expressed emotions. Taken together, these results lend support the motor origin hypothesis for the musical expression of emotions. PMID:25551392

  16. A novel BK channel-targeted peptide suppresses sound evoked activity in the mouse inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Scott, L. L.; Brecht, E. J.; Philpo, A.; Iyer, S.; Wu, N. S.; Mihic, S. J.; Aldrich, R. W.; Pierce, J.; Walton, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated (BK) channels are broadly expressed in neurons and muscle where they modulate cellular activity. Decades of research support an interest in pharmaceutical applications for modulating BK channel function. Here we report a novel BK channel-targeted peptide with functional activity in vitro and in vivo. This 9-amino acid peptide, LS3, has a unique action, suppressing channel gating rather than blocking the pore of heterologously expressed human BK channels. With an IC50 in the high picomolar range, the apparent affinity is higher than known high affinity BK channel toxins. LS3 suppresses locomotor activity via a BK channel-specific mechanism in wild-type or BK channel-humanized Caenorhabditis elegans. Topical application on the dural surface of the auditory midbrain in mouse suppresses sound evoked neural activity, similar to a well-characterized pore blocker of the BK channel. Moreover, this novel ion channel-targeted peptide rapidly crosses the BBB after systemic delivery to modulate auditory processing. Thus, a potent BK channel peptide modulator is open to neurological applications, such as preventing audiogenic seizures that originate in the auditory midbrain. PMID:28195225

  17. Active weld control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  18. Rapid frequency control of sonar sounds by the FM bat, Miniopterus fuliginosus, in response to spectral overlap.

    PubMed

    Hase, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Takara; Kobayasi, Kohta I; Hiryu, Shizuko

    2016-07-01

    In the presence of multiple flying conspecifics, echolocating bats avoid jamming by adjusting the spectral and/or temporal features of their vocalizations. However, little is known about how bats alter their pulse acoustic characteristics to adapt to an acoustically jamming situation during flight. We investigated echolocation behavior in a bat (Miniopterus fuliginosus) during free flight under acoustic jamming conditions created by downward FM jamming sounds mimicking bat echolocation sounds. In an experimental chamber, the flying bat was exposed to FM jamming sounds with different terminal frequencies (TFs) from loudspeakers. Echolocation pulses emitted by the flying bat were recorded using a telemetry microphone (Telemike) mounted on the back of the bat. The bats immediately (within 150ms) shifted the TFs of emitted pulses upward when FM jamming sounds were presented. Moreover, the amount of upward TF shift differed depending on the TF ranges of the jamming sounds presented. When the TF range was lower than or overlapped the bat's mean TF, the bat TF shifted significantly upward (by 1-2kHz, Student's t-test, P<0.05), corresponding to 3-5% of the total bandwidth of their emitted pulses. These findings indicate that bats actively avoid overlap of the narrow frequency band around the TF.

  19. Developing an active artificial hair cell using nonlinear feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2015-09-01

    The hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals. These cells have inspired a variety of artificial hair cells (AHCs) to serve as biologically inspired sound, fluid flow, and acceleration sensors and could one day replace damaged hair cells in humans. Most of these AHCs rely on passive transduction of stimulus while it is known that the biological cochlea employs active processes to amplify sound-induced vibrations and improve sound detection. In this work, an active AHC mimics the active, nonlinear behavior of the cochlea. The AHC consists of a piezoelectric bimorph beam subjected to a base excitation. A feedback control law is used to reduce the linear damping of the beam and introduce a cubic damping term which gives the AHC the desired nonlinear behavior. Model and experimental results show the AHC amplifies the response due to small base accelerations, has a higher frequency sensitivity than the passive system, and exhibits a compressive nonlinearity like that of the mammalian cochlea. This bio-inspired accelerometer could lead to new sensors with lower thresholds of detection, improved frequency sensitivities, and wider dynamic ranges.

  20. Method for generating realistic sound stimuli with given characteristics by controlled combination of audio recordings.

    PubMed

    Accolti, Ernesto; Miyara, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Audio recordings are often used to improve ecological validity of stimuli for laboratory research on effects of noise. In this paper a method is proposed for composing realistic environmental sound stimuli with (1) specified overall spectrum and (2) specified statistical distribution of sound event durations and semantic categories. The combination is addressed as a mixed integer linear programming problem. Objective measurements, for eight stimuli and a moderate-size database, validate the method. The mean error in octave bands exposure level is 2.6 dB and the statistical distribution of sound event durations and semantic categories is perfectly matched.

  1. Broadband radiation modes: estimation and active control.

    PubMed

    Berkhoff, Arthur P

    2002-03-01

    In this paper we give a formulation of the most efficiently radiating vibration patterns of a vibrating body, the radiation modes, in the time domain. The radiation modes can be used to arrive at efficient weighting schemes for an array of sensors in order to reduce the controller dimensionality. Because these particular radiation modes are optimum in a broadband sense, they are termed broadband radiation modes. Methods are given to obtain these modes from measured data. The broadband radiation modes are used for the design of an actuator array in a feedback control system to reduce the sound power radiated from a plate. Three methods for the design of the actuator are compared, taking into account the reduction of radiated sound power in the controlled frequency range, but also the possible increase of radiated sound power in the uncontrolled frequency range.

  2. Improving Forecast Skill by Assimilation of Quality Controlled AIRS Version 5 Temperature Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Reale, Oreste

    2009-01-01

    The AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm has been finalized and is now operational at the Goddard DAAC in the processing (and reprocessing) of all AIRS data. The AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm contains two significant improvements over Version 4: 1) Improved physics allows for use of AIRS observations in the entire 4.3 micron CO2 absorption band in the retrieval of temperature profile T(p) during both day and night. Tropospheric sounding 15 micron CO2 observations are now used primarily in the generation of cloud cleared radiances R(sub i). This approach allows for the generation of accurate values of R(sub i) and T(p) under most cloud conditions. 2) Another very significant improvement in Version 5 is the ability to generate accurate case-by-case, level-by-level error estimates for the atmospheric temperature profile, as well as for channel-by-channel error estimates for R(sub i). These error estimates are used for Quality Control of the retrieved products. We have conducted forecast impact experiments assimilating AIRS temperature profiles with different levels of Quality Control using the NASA GEOS-5 data assimilation system. Assimilation of Quality Controlled T(p) resulted in significantly improved forecast skill compared to that obtained from analyses obtained when all data used operationally by NCEP, except for AIRS data, is assimilated. We also conducted an experiment assimilating AIRS radiances uncontaminated by clouds, as done operationally by ECMWF and NCEP. Forecast resulting from assimilated AIRS radiances were of poorer quality than those obtained assimilating AIRS temperatures.

  3. Data Assimilation Experiments using Quality Controlled AIRS Version 5 Temperature Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SUsskind, Joel

    2008-01-01

    The AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm has been finalized and is now operational at the Goddard DAAC in the processing (and reprocessing) of all AIRS data. The AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm contains two significant improvements over Version 4: 1) Improved physics allows for use of AIRS observations in the entire 4.3 pm C02 absorption band in the retrieval of temperature profile T(p) during both day and night. Tropospheric sounding 15 pm C02 observations are now used primarily in the generation of cloud cleared radiances Ri. This approach allows for the generation of accurate values of Ri and T(p) under most cloud conditions. 2) Another very significant improvement in Version 5 is the ability to generate accurate case-by-case, level-by-level error estimates for the atmospheric temperature profile, as well as for channel-by- channel error estimates for Ri. These error estimates are used for quality control of the retrieved products. We have conducted forecast impact experiments assimilating AIRS temperature profiles with different levels of quality control using the NASA GEOS-5 data assimilation system. Assimilation of quality controlled T(p) resulted in significantly improved forecast skill compared to that obtained from analyses obtained when all data used operationally by NCEP, except for AIRS data, is assimilated. We also conducted an experiment assimilating AIRS radiances uncontaminated by clouds, as done Operationally by ECMWF and NCEP. Forecasts resulting from assimilated AIRS radiances were of poorer quality than those obtained assimilating AIRS temperatures.

  4. The Impact of Anthropogenic Activities on Ecosystems of Long Island Sound, N.Y.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauture, E.; McHugh, C. M.; Nitsche, F. O.; Kenna, T. C.

    2015-12-01

    Long Island Sound (LIS) is a tide-dominated estuary located along heavily populated regions on the eastern coast of the US. Western LIS has been impacted by heavy metals and is susceptible to hypoxic and anoxic conditions since the 1900's. As part of the Long Island Sound Cable Fund and the National Science Foundation programs, we surveyed the western and central regions of LIS in 2006 and 2013, respectively. From the R/V Hugh Sharp and the R/V Seawolf, we collected high-resolution subbottom profiles, multibeam bathymetry, sediment cores, and grabs in distinct sedimentary environments such as channels, terraces, and river mouths. The goal was to evaluate the impact of anthropogenic activities as they relate to physical processes and populated regions. Along western LIS, total organic carbon (TOC) and heavy metal concentrations are higher from the 1850s to the present, especially along locations of known high organic waste. Pre-industrial concentrations of TOC average 2.22% with maximum values of 4.75%. A similar trend is observed with heavy metals. For example, lead (Pb) increased from background levels of ~10 to 20 ppm to over 200 ppm. Benthic foraminifers seem to be influenced by these trends with changes in ecosystems. The dominant assemblage, Elphidium excavatum clavatum remains dominant with a slight decrease in their abundance during anthropogenic times. From ~1850's to the present Ammonia beccarii becomes more abundant. These shifts in foraminifer species to assemblages that tolerate low oxygen conditions reflect the increasing hypoxic conditions. In central LIS, surface sediments average TOC of 1.34% with highest values of 5.21% near the Housatonic River that drains industrialized portions of Connecticut, and lowest values of 0.073% near the Long Island coastline. Understanding the evolution of hypoxia as well as the sources of heavy metals can lead to important implications for restoration of marine ecosystems.

  5. On Quality Control Procedures Being Adopted for TRMM LBA and KWAJEX Soundings Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, B.; Halverson, Jeffrey B.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) field campaigns Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere (LBA) held in Amazonia (Brazil) in the period January- February, 1999, and the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX) held in the Republic of Marshall Islands in the period between August-September, 1999, extensive radiosonde observations (raob) were collected using VIZ and Vaisala sondes which have different response characteristics. In all, 320 raob for LBA and 972 fixed raob for KWAJEX have been obtained and are being processed. Most atmospheric sensible heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2) budget studies are based on sounding data, and the accuracy of the raob is important especially in regions of deep moist convection. A data quality control (QC) project has been initiated at GSFC by the principal investigator (JBH), and this paper addresses some of the quantitative findings for the level I and II QC procedures. Based on these quantitative assessment of sensor (or system) biases associated with each type of sonde, the initial data repair work will be started. Evidence of moisture biases between the two different sondes (VIZ and Vaisala) has been shown earlier by Halverson et al. (2000). Vaisala humidity sensors are found to have a low-level dry bias in the boundary layer, whereas above 600 mb the VIZ sensor tends to register a dryer atmosphere. All raob data were subjected to a limit check based on an algorithm already well tested for the raob data obtained during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA-COARE).

  6. Expert athletes activate somatosensory and motor planning regions of the brain when passively listening to familiar sports sounds.

    PubMed

    Woods, Elizabeth A; Hernandez, Arturo E; Wagner, Victoria E; Beilock, Sian L

    2014-06-01

    The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study examined the neural response to familiar and unfamiliar, sport and non-sport environmental sounds in expert and novice athletes. Results revealed differential neural responses dependent on sports expertise. Experts had greater neural activation than novices in focal sensorimotor areas such as the supplementary motor area, and pre- and postcentral gyri. Novices showed greater activation than experts in widespread areas involved in perception (i.e. supramarginal, middle occipital, and calcarine gyri; precuneus; inferior and superior parietal lobules), and motor planning and processing (i.e. inferior frontal, middle frontal, and middle temporal gyri). These between-group neural differences also appeared as an expertise effect within specific conditions. Experts showed greater activation than novices during the sport familiar condition in regions responsible for auditory and motor planning, including the inferior frontal gyrus and the parietal operculum. Novices only showed greater activation than experts in the supramarginal gyrus and pons during the non-sport unfamiliar condition, and in the middle frontal gyrus during the sport unfamiliar condition. These results are consistent with the view that expert athletes are attuned to only the most familiar, highly relevant sounds and tune out unfamiliar, irrelevant sounds. Furthermore, these findings that athletes show activation in areas known to be involved in action planning when passively listening to sounds suggests that auditory perception of action can lead to the re-instantiation of neural areas involved in producing these actions, especially if someone has expertise performing the actions.

  7. Inferring Meal Eating Activities in Real World Settings from Ambient Sounds: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomaz, Edison; Zhang, Cheng; Essa, Irfan; Abowd, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary self-monitoring has been shown to be an effective method for weight-loss, but it remains an onerous task despite recent advances in food journaling systems. Semi-automated food journaling can reduce the effort of logging, but often requires that eating activities be detected automatically. In this work we describe results from a feasibility study conducted in-the-wild where eating activities were inferred from ambient sounds captured with a wrist-mounted device; twenty participants wore the device during one day for an average of 5 hours while performing normal everyday activities. Our system was able to identify meal eating with an F-score of 79.8% in a person-dependent evaluation, and with 86.6% accuracy in a person-independent evaluation. Our approach is intended to be practical, leveraging off-the-shelf devices with audio sensing capabilities in contrast to systems for automated dietary assessment based on specialized sensors. PMID:25859566

  8. The influence of sound generator associated with conventional amplification for tinnitus control: randomized blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Gisele Munhoes; Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; de Medeiros, Italo Roberto Torres; Oiticcica, Jeanne; da Silva, Eleonora Csipai; Penteado, Silvio

    2014-07-23

    Hearing aids with an integrated sound generator have been used to enhance the treatment of tinnitus. The main aim of this study was to verify whether the combined use of amplification and sound generator is more effective than conventional amplification alone in reducing tinnitus annoyance by means of the use of a new hearing aid with an integrated sound generator. A total of 49 patients underwent a blind randomized clinical trial. Tinnitus annoyance was measured by Tinnitus Handicap Inventory and numerical scales, and psychoacoustic measures of tinnitus were also performed. The sound generator was set at the lowest intensity capable of providing relief from tinnitus. Results showed that 62.5% of the patients presented a reduction in tinnitus annoyance in the combined fitting group and in the group with amplification alone, 78% showed a reduction. This difference between the groups was not statistically significant.

  9. Listening to an Audio Drama Activates Two Processing Networks, One for All Sounds, Another Exclusively for Speech

    PubMed Central

    Boldt, Robert; Malinen, Sanna; Seppä, Mika; Tikka, Pia; Savolainen, Petri; Hari, Riitta; Carlson, Synnöve

    2013-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown considerable intersubject synchronization of brain activity when subjects watch the same movie or listen to the same story. Here we investigated the across-subjects similarity of brain responses to speech and non-speech sounds in a continuous audio drama designed for blind people. Thirteen healthy adults listened for ∼19 min to the audio drama while their brain activity was measured with 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). An intersubject-correlation (ISC) map, computed across the whole experiment to assess the stimulus-driven extrinsic brain network, indicated statistically significant ISC in temporal, frontal and parietal cortices, cingulate cortex, and amygdala. Group-level independent component (IC) analysis was used to parcel out the brain signals into functionally coupled networks, and the dependence of the ICs on external stimuli was tested by comparing them with the ISC map. This procedure revealed four extrinsic ICs of which two–covering non-overlapping areas of the auditory cortex–were modulated by both speech and non-speech sounds. The two other extrinsic ICs, one left-hemisphere-lateralized and the other right-hemisphere-lateralized, were speech-related and comprised the superior and middle temporal gyri, temporal poles, and the left angular and inferior orbital gyri. In areas of low ISC four ICs that were defined intrinsic fluctuated similarly as the time-courses of either the speech-sound-related or all-sounds-related extrinsic ICs. These ICs included the superior temporal gyrus, the anterior insula, and the frontal, parietal and midline occipital cortices. Taken together, substantial intersubject synchronization of cortical activity was observed in subjects listening to an audio drama, with results suggesting that speech is processed in two separate networks, one dedicated to the processing of speech sounds and the other to both speech and non-speech sounds. PMID:23734202

  10. Listening to an audio drama activates two processing networks, one for all sounds, another exclusively for speech.

    PubMed

    Boldt, Robert; Malinen, Sanna; Seppä, Mika; Tikka, Pia; Savolainen, Petri; Hari, Riitta; Carlson, Synnöve

    2013-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown considerable intersubject synchronization of brain activity when subjects watch the same movie or listen to the same story. Here we investigated the across-subjects similarity of brain responses to speech and non-speech sounds in a continuous audio drama designed for blind people. Thirteen healthy adults listened for ∼19 min to the audio drama while their brain activity was measured with 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). An intersubject-correlation (ISC) map, computed across the whole experiment to assess the stimulus-driven extrinsic brain network, indicated statistically significant ISC in temporal, frontal and parietal cortices, cingulate cortex, and amygdala. Group-level independent component (IC) analysis was used to parcel out the brain signals into functionally coupled networks, and the dependence of the ICs on external stimuli was tested by comparing them with the ISC map. This procedure revealed four extrinsic ICs of which two-covering non-overlapping areas of the auditory cortex-were modulated by both speech and non-speech sounds. The two other extrinsic ICs, one left-hemisphere-lateralized and the other right-hemisphere-lateralized, were speech-related and comprised the superior and middle temporal gyri, temporal poles, and the left angular and inferior orbital gyri. In areas of low ISC four ICs that were defined intrinsic fluctuated similarly as the time-courses of either the speech-sound-related or all-sounds-related extrinsic ICs. These ICs included the superior temporal gyrus, the anterior insula, and the frontal, parietal and midline occipital cortices. Taken together, substantial intersubject synchronization of cortical activity was observed in subjects listening to an audio drama, with results suggesting that speech is processed in two separate networks, one dedicated to the processing of speech sounds and the other to both speech and non-speech sounds.

  11. Coronal Radio Sounding Experiments with Mars Express: Scintillation Spectra during Low Solar Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Efimov, A. I.; Lukanina, L. A.; Samoznaev, L. N.; Rudash, V. K.; Chashei, I. V.; Bird, M. K.; Paetzold, M.; Tellmann, S.

    2010-03-25

    Coronal radio sounding observations were carried out with the radio science experiment MaRS on the ESA spacecraft Mars Express during the period from 25 August to 22 October 2004. Differential frequency and log-amplitude fluctuations of the dual-frequency signals were recorded during a period of low solar activity. The data are applicable to low heliographic latitudes, i.e. to slow solar wind. The mean frequency fluctuation and power law index of the frequency fluctuation temporal spectra are determined as a function of heliocentric distance. The radial dependence of the frequency fluctuation spectral index alpha reflects the previously documented flattening of the scintillation power spectra in the solar wind acceleration region. Temporal spectra of S-band and X-band normalized log-amplitude fluctuations were investigated over the range of fluctuation frequencies 0.01 Hzactivity. Ranging measurements are presented and compared with frequency and log-amplitude scintillation data. Evidence for a weak increase in the fractional electron density turbulence level is obtained in the range 10-40 solar radii.

  12. Controls Considerations for Turbine Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation discusses active control of turbine tip clearance from a control systems perspective. It is a subset of charts that were presented at the 2003 meeting of the International Society of Air Breathing Engines which was held August 31 through September 5 in Cleveland, Ohio. The associated reference paper is cited at the end of the presentation. The presentation describes active tip clearance control research being conducted by NASA to improve turbine engine systems. The target application for this effort is commercial aircraft engines. However, it is believed that the technologies developed as part of this research will benefit a broad spectrum of current and future turbomachinery. The first part of the presentation discusses the concept of tip clearance, problems associated with it, and the benefits of controlling it. It lays out a framework for implementing tip clearance controls that enables the implementation to progress from purely analytical to hardware-in-the-loop to fully experimental. And it briefly discusses how the technologies developed will be married to the previously described ACC Test Rig for hardware-in-the-loop demonstrations. The final portion of the presentation, describes one of the key technologies in some detail by presenting equations and results for a functional dynamic model of the tip clearance phenomena. As shown, the model exhibits many of the clearance dynamics found in commercial gas turbine engines. However, initial attempts to validate the model identified limitations that are being addressed to make the model more realistic.

  13. Simultaneous active control of flexural and extensional waves in beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. R.; Gibbs, G. P.; Silcox, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The simultaneous active control of flexural and extensional vibrations in elastic beams is experimentally investigated. The results demonstrate that using pairs of piezoceramic transducers, whose elements are symmetrically located and independently controlled by a multichannel adaptive controller, enables the high attenuation of both flexural and extensional response. This capability is due to the nature of the piezoceramic element, which when bonded to the surface of the structure and electrically excited, exerts a surface strain on the structure. This strain enables input of both shear forces and moments into the structural system. The results are applicable to many situations where extensional vibrations couple to large flexural vibrations and subsequently radiate significant sound levels.

  14. Enhanced auditory evoked activity to self-generated sounds is mediated by primary and supplementary motor cortices.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Daniel; Ossmy, Ori; Mukamel, Roy

    2015-02-04

    Accumulating evidence demonstrates that responses in auditory cortex to auditory consequences of self-generated actions are modified relative to the responses evoked by identical sounds generated by an external source. Such modifications have been suggested to occur through a corollary discharge sent from the motor system, although the exact neuroanatomical origin is unknown. Furthermore, since tactile input has also been shown to modify responses in auditory cortex, it is not even clear whether the source of such modifications is motor output or somatosensory feedback. We recorded functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from healthy human subjects (n = 11) while manipulating the rate at which they performed sound-producing actions with their right hand. In addition, we manipulated the amount of tactile feedback to examine the relative roles of motor and somatosensory cortices in modifying evoked activity in auditory cortex (superior temporal gyrus). We found an enhanced fMRI signal in left auditory cortex during perception of self-generated sounds relative to passive listening to identical sounds. Moreover, the signal difference between active and passive conditions in left auditory cortex covaried with the rate of sound-producing actions and was invariant to the amount of tactile feedback. Together with functional connectivity analysis, our results suggest motor output from supplementary motor area and left primary motor cortex as the source of signal modification in auditory cortex during perception of self-generated sounds. Motor signals from these regions could represent a predictive signal of the expected auditory consequences of the performed action.

  15. Controls on wetland loss during large magnitude storms: a case study in Breton Sound, LA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, N. C.; Hughes, Z. J.; Fitzgerald, D.; Georgiou, I. Y.; Kulp, M. A.; Miner, M. D.; Smith, J. M.; Barras, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    In 2005, the storm surge and wave field associated with Hurricanes Katrina and Rita eroded 527 km^2 of wetlands within the Louisiana coastal plain. Low salinity wetlands were preferentially eroded, while higher salinity wetlands remained largely intact and unchanged. Field studies were undertaken in Breton Sound, Louisiana, where both the low and high salinity wetlands experienced very similar hydrodynamic conditions during Hurricane Katrina. This site provides a natural case to study the causes of the observed land loss patterns. We observe geotechnical differences between soil profiles in high and low salinity wetlands, as controlled by vegetation, and which result in differential erosion. Low salinity wetlands contain a weak zone at a depth of ~30 cm below the marsh surface; this coincides with the base of rooting and has shear strengths as low as 500-1450 Pa. High salinity wetlands display deeper rooting, have no identifiable weak zone, and shear strengths exceed 4500 Pa throughout the upper soil profile. Results from a model (STWAVE-ADCIRC) are used to establish the hydrodynamic conditions during Hurricane Katrina (storm surge, wave height, and wave period). We calculate the potential shear stresses exerted by waves, accounting for the interaction between the oscillatory flow and the vegetation. Calculated shear stresses were in the range 425-3600 Pa, values sufficient to cause widespread erosion of the low salinity wetlands, but not the high salinity wetlands, corresponding with the observed patterns of land loss. A conceptual model is developed to illustrate the influence of rooting type and depth on the strength profile of wetlands soils and their susceptibility to erosion during large magnitude storms. These findings have implications for wetland restoration schemes involving freshwater diversions.

  16. Data Assimilation Experiments Using Quality Controlled AIRS Version 5 Temperature Soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm has been finalized and is now operational at the Goddard DAAC in the processing (and reprocessing) of all AIRS data. The AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm contains a number of significant improvements over Version 4. Two very significant improvements are described briefly below. 1) The AIRS Science Team Radiative Transfer Algorithm (RTA) has now been upgraded to accurately account for effects of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium on the AIRS observations. This allows for use of AIRS observations in the entire 4.3 micron CO2 absorption band in the retrieval algorithm during both day and night. Following theoretical considerations, tropospheric temperature profile information is obtained almost exclusively from clear column radiances in the 4.3 micron CO2 band in the AIRS Version 5 temperature profile retrieval step. These clear column radiances are a derived product that are indicative of radiances AIRS channels would have seen if the field of view were completely clear. Clear column radiances for all channels are determined using tropospheric sounding 15 micron CO2 observations. This approach allows for the generation of accurate values of clear column radiances and T(p) under most cloud conditions. 2) Another very significant improvement in Version 5 is the ability to generate accurate case-by-case, level-by-level error estimates for the atmospheric temperature profile, as well as for channel-by-channel clear column radiances. These error estimates are used for quality control of the retrieved products. Based on error estimate thresholds, each temperature profiles is assigned a characteristic pressure, pg, down to which the profile is characterized as good for use for data assimilation purposes. We have conducted forecast impact experiments assimilating AIRS quality controlled temperature profiles using the NASA GEOS-5 data assimilation system, consisting of the NCEP GSI analysis coupled with the

  17. Active Control of Noise Using Actuator/Sensor Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Winder, Patrice; Kirby, George

    1996-01-01

    Current research in smart structures is directed toward the integration of many actuators and sensors into a material. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using this instrumentation for active noise control from a vibrating structures. Current technology for reducing radiated sound is limited by the instrumentation for the control system. These control systems employ relatively small numbers of sensors and actuators. Hence, these control systems must rely on a model of the structure to estimate and control the global vibrations that contribute to the far field pressure. For complex, realistic structures the development of such a model is a formidable task. The model is a limiting factor in the continuing development of structural acoustics. In this paper we propose to increase the number of actuators and sensors of a smart material to offset the complexity of the model used for control design. The sensor arrays will be used to directly sense the shape of the structure rather than using a model of the structures to indirectly sense the shape of the structure. The actuator array is used to apply distributed forces to the structure, rather than using the structure itself as a load path. A control system for the active cancellation of sound is derived from standard control system methodologies.

  18. Active Flow Control with Thermoacoustic Actuators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-31

    dielectric barrier discharge ( DBD ) plasma actuators [4], or combustion powered actuators [5]. Compared to passive flow control techniques, such as vortex...space nor adding significant weight, which is similar to how DBD plasma actuators can be installed. 3 The sound generation mechanism, known as

  19. Active listening room compensation for massive multichannel sound reproduction systems using wave-domain adaptive filtering.

    PubMed

    Spors, Sascha; Buchner, Herbert; Rabenstein, Rudolf; Herbordt, Wolfgang

    2007-07-01

    The acoustic theory for multichannel sound reproduction systems usually assumes free-field conditions for the listening environment. However, their performance in real-world listening environments may be impaired by reflections at the walls. This impairment can be reduced by suitable compensation measures. For systems with many channels, active compensation is an option, since the compensating waves can be created by the reproduction loudspeakers. Due to the time-varying nature of room acoustics, the compensation signals have to be determined by an adaptive system. The problems associated with the successful operation of multichannel adaptive systems are addressed in this contribution. First, a method for decoupling the adaptation problem is introduced. It is based on a generalized singular value decomposition and is called eigenspace adaptive filtering. Unfortunately, it cannot be implemented in its pure form, since the continuous adaptation of the generalized singular value decomposition matrices to the variable room acoustics is numerically very demanding. However, a combination of this mathematical technique with the physical description of wave propagation yields a realizable multichannel adaptation method with good decoupling properties. It is called wave domain adaptive filtering and is discussed here in the context of wave field synthesis.

  20. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  1. PREFACE: Aerodynamic sound Aerodynamic sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishita, Sadao

    2010-02-01

    reduction of bluff-body noise. Xiaoyu Wang and Xiaofeng Sun discuss the interaction of fan stator and acoustic treatments using the transfer element method. S Saito and his colleagues in JAXA report the development of active devices for reducing helicopter noise. The paper by A Tamura and M Tsutahara proposes a brand new methodology for aerodynamic sound by applying the lattice Boltzmann finite difference method. As the method solves the fluctuation of air density directly, it has the advantage of not requiring modeling of the sound generation. M A Langthjem and M Nakano solve the hole-tone feedback cycle in jet flow by a numerical method. Y Ogami and S Akishita propose the application of a line-vortex method to the three-dimensional separated flow from a bluff body. I hope that a second issue on aerodynamic sound will be published in FDR in the not too distant future.

  2. Ecological sounds affect breath duration more than artificial sounds.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Mauro; Santoro, Ilaria; Tamburini, Giorgia; Prpic, Valter; Sors, Fabrizio; Galmonte, Alessandra; Agostini, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that auditory rhythms affect both movement and physiological functions. We hypothesized that the ecological sounds of human breathing can affect breathing more than artificial sounds of breathing, varying in tones for inspiration and expiration. To address this question, we monitored the breath duration of participants exposed to three conditions: (a) ecological sounds of breathing, (b) artificial sounds of breathing having equal temporal features as the ecological sounds, (c) no sounds (control). We found that participants' breath duration variability was reduced in the ecological sound condition, more than in the artificial sound condition. We suggest that ecological sounds captured the timing of breathing better than artificial sounds, guiding as a consequence participants' breathing. We interpreted our results according to the Theory of Event Coding, providing further support to its validity, and suggesting its possible extension in the domain of physiological functions which are both consciously and unconsciously controlled.

  3. Active control of acoustic radiation from laminated cylindrical shells integrated with a piezoelectric layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Xiongtao; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Xusheng; Jiang, Guohe

    2013-06-01

    Active control of sound radiation from piezoelectric laminated cylindrical shells is theoretically investigated in the wavenumber domain. The governing equations of the smart cylindrical shells are derived by using first-order shear deformation theory. The smart layer is divided into lots of actuator patches, each of which is coated with two very thin electrodes at its inner and outer surfaces. Proportional derivative negative feedback control is applied to the actuator patches and the stiffness of the controlled layer is derived in the wavenumber domain. The equivalent driving forces and moments generated by the piezoelectric layer can produce distinct sound radiation. Large actuator patches cause strong wavenumber conversion and fluctuation of the far-field sound pressure, and do not make any contribution to sound reduction. Nevertheless, suitable small actuator patches induce weak wavenumber conversion and play an important role in the suppression of vibration and acoustic power. The derivative gain of the active control can effectively suppress sound radiation from smart cylindrical shells. The effects of small proportional gain on the sound field can be neglected, but large proportional gain has a great impact on the acoustic radiation of cylindrical shells. The influence of different piezoelectric materials on the acoustic power is described in the numerical results.

  4. Demonstration of Active Combustion Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovett, Jeffrey A.; Teerlinck, Karen A.; Cohen, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    The primary objective of this effort was to demonstrate active control of combustion instabilities in a direct-injection gas turbine combustor that accurately simulates engine operating conditions and reproduces an engine-type instability. This report documents the second phase of a two-phase effort. The first phase involved the analysis of an instability observed in a developmental aeroengine and the design of a single-nozzle test rig to replicate that phenomenon. This was successfully completed in 2001 and is documented in the Phase I report. This second phase was directed toward demonstration of active control strategies to mitigate this instability and thereby demonstrate the viability of active control for aircraft engine combustors. This involved development of high-speed actuator technology, testing and analysis of how the actuation system was integrated with the combustion system, control algorithm development, and demonstration testing in the single-nozzle test rig. A 30 percent reduction in the amplitude of the high-frequency (570 Hz) instability was achieved using actuation systems and control algorithms developed within this effort. Even larger reductions were shown with a low-frequency (270 Hz) instability. This represents a unique achievement in the development and practical demonstration of active combustion control systems for gas turbine applications.

  5. Active Flow Control Activities at NASA Langley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Scott G.; Sellers, William L., III; Washburn, Anthony E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Langley continues to aggressively investigate the potential advantages of active flow control over more traditional aerodynamic techniques. This paper provides an update to a previous paper and describes both the progress in the various research areas and the significant changes in the NASA research programs. The goals of the topics presented are focused on advancing the state of knowledge and understanding of controllable fundamental mechanisms in fluids as well as to address engineering challenges. An organizational view of current research activities at NASA Langley in active flow control as supported by several projects is presented. On-center research as well as NASA Langley funded contracts and grants are discussed at a relatively high level. The products of this research are to be demonstrated either in bench-top experiments, wind-tunnel investigations, or in flight as part of the fundamental NASA R&D program and then transferred to more applied research programs within NASA, DOD, and U.S. industry.

  6. Using Lighting Levels to Control Sound Levels in a College Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hronek, Beth

    1997-01-01

    Many libraries have noise problems that can't be fixed with ceiling and carpet treatments, physical arrangement, or sound barriers. This study at Henderson Community College (Henderson KY) attempted to confirm results from an earlier study suggesting that reducing light levels led to reduced noise. The data showed mixed results, but overall the…

  7. Discrimination of Speech Sounds by Children with Dyslexia: Comparisons with Chronological Age and Reading Level Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogliotti, C.; Serniclaes, W.; Messaoud-Galusi, S.; Sprenger-Charolles, L.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that children suffering from developmental dyslexia have a deficit in categorical perception of speech sounds. The aim of the current study was to better understand the nature of this categorical perception deficit. In this study, categorical perception skills of children with dyslexia were compared with those of…

  8. Fractional active disturbance rejection control.

    PubMed

    Li, Dazi; Ding, Pan; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    A fractional active disturbance rejection control (FADRC) scheme is proposed to improve the performance of commensurate linear fractional order systems (FOS) and the robust analysis shows that the controller is also applicable to incommensurate linear FOS control. In FADRC, the traditional extended states observer (ESO) is generalized to a fractional order extended states observer (FESO) by using the fractional calculus, and the tracking differentiator plus nonlinear state error feedback are replaced by a fractional proportional-derivative controller. To simplify controller tuning, the linear bandwidth-parameterization method has been adopted. The impacts of the observer bandwidth ωo and controller bandwidth ωc on system performance are then analyzed. Finally, the FADRC stability and frequency-domain characteristics for linear single-input single-output FOS are analyzed. Simulation results by FADRC and ADRC on typical FOS are compared to demonstrate the superiority and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  9. Active Control of Stationary Vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Giovanni; Breidenthal, Robert; Bhide, Aditi; Sridhar, Aditya

    2016-11-01

    A system for active stationary vortex control is presented. The system uses a combination of plasma actuators, pressure sensors and electrical circuits deposited on aerodynamic surfaces using printing electronics methods. Once the pressure sensors sense a change on the intensity or on the position of the stationary vortices, its associated controller activates a set of plasma actuator to return the vortices to their original or intended positions. The forces produced by the actuators act on the secondary flow in the transverse plane, where velocities are much less than in the streamwise direction. As a demonstration case, the active vortex control system is mounted on a flat plate under low speed wind tunnel testing. Here, a set of vortex generators are used to generate the stationary vortices and the plasma actuators are used to move them. Preliminary results from the experiments are presented and compared with theoretical values. Thanks to the USAF AFOSR STTR support under contract # FA9550-15-C-0007.

  10. Sound Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Leanne, Ed.; And Others

    Sound symbolism is the study of the relationship between the sound of an utterance and its meaning. In this interdisciplinary collection of new studies, 24 leading scholars discuss the role of sound symbolism in a theory of language. Contributions and authors include the following: "Sound-Symbolic Processes" (Leanne Hinton, Johanna…

  11. Numerical Comparison of Active Acoustic and Structural Noise Control in a Stiffened Double Wall Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1996-01-01

    The active acoustic and structural noise control characteristics of a double wall cylinder with and without ring stiffeners were numerically evaluated. An exterior monopole was assumed to acoustically excite the outside of the double wall cylinder at an acoustic cavity resonance frequency. Structural modal vibration properties of the inner and outer shells were analyzed by post-processing the results from a finite element analysis. A boundary element approach was used to calculate the acoustic cavity response and the coupled structural-acoustic interaction. In the frequency region of interest, below 500 Hz, all structural resonant modes were found to be acoustically slow and the nonresonant modal response to be dominant. Active sound transmission control was achieved by control forces applied to the inner or outer shell, or acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shell. A least mean square technique was used to minimize the interior sound pressures at the nodes of a data recovery mesh. Results showed that single acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shells resulted in better sound transmission control than six distributed point forces applied to either one of the shells. Adding stiffeners to the double wall structure constrained the modal vibrations of the shells, making the double wall stiffer with associated higher modal frequencies. Active noise control obtained for the stiffened double wall configurations was less than for the unstiffened cylinder. In all cases, the acoustic control monopoles controlled the sound transmission into the interior better than the structural control forces.

  12. Hair cells use active zones with different voltage dependence of Ca2+ influx to decompose sounds into complementary neural codes

    PubMed Central

    Ohn, Tzu-Lun; Rutherford, Mark A.; Jing, Zhizi; Jung, Sangyong; Duque-Afonso, Carlos J.; Hoch, Gerhard; Picher, Maria Magdalena; Scharinger, Anja; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    For sounds of a given frequency, spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) with different thresholds and dynamic ranges collectively encode the wide range of audible sound pressures. Heterogeneity of synapses between inner hair cells (IHCs) and SGNs is an attractive candidate mechanism for generating complementary neural codes covering the entire dynamic range. Here, we quantified active zone (AZ) properties as a function of AZ position within mouse IHCs by combining patch clamp and imaging of presynaptic Ca2+ influx and by immunohistochemistry. We report substantial AZ heterogeneity whereby the voltage of half-maximal activation of Ca2+ influx ranged over ∼20 mV. Ca2+ influx at AZs facing away from the ganglion activated at weaker depolarizations. Estimates of AZ size and Ca2+ channel number were correlated and larger when AZs faced the ganglion. Disruption of the deafness gene GIPC3 in mice shifted the activation of presynaptic Ca2+ influx to more hyperpolarized potentials and increased the spontaneous SGN discharge. Moreover, Gipc3 disruption enhanced Ca2+ influx and exocytosis in IHCs, reversed the spatial gradient of maximal Ca2+ influx in IHCs, and increased the maximal firing rate of SGNs at sound onset. We propose that IHCs diversify Ca2+ channel properties among AZs and thereby contribute to decomposing auditory information into complementary representations in SGNs. PMID:27462107

  13. Active Control of Fan-Generated Tone Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on an experiment to control the noise radiated from the inlet of a ducted fan using a time domain active adaptive system. The control ,sound source consists of loudspeakers arranged in a ring around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same, when the dominant wave in the duct is a plane wave. The presence of higher order modes in the duct reduces the noise reduction efficiency, particularly near the mode cut-on where the standing wave component is strong, but the control system converges stably. The control system is stable and converges when the first circumferential mode is generated in the duct. The control system is found to reduce the fan noise in the far field on an arc around the fan inlet by as much as 20 dB with none of the sound amplification associated with mode spillover.

  14. Vocalisation Repertoire of Female Bluefin Gurnard (Chelidonichthys kumu) in Captivity: Sound Structure, Context and Vocal Activity.

    PubMed

    Radford, Craig A; Ghazali, Shahriman M; Montgomery, John C; Jeffs, Andrew G

    2016-01-01

    Fish vocalisation is often a major component of underwater soundscapes. Therefore, interpretation of these soundscapes requires an understanding of the vocalisation characteristics of common soniferous fish species. This study of captive female bluefin gurnard, Chelidonichthys kumu, aims to formally characterise their vocalisation sounds and daily pattern of sound production. Four types of sound were produced and characterised, twice as many as previously reported in this species. These sounds fit two aural categories; grunt and growl, the mean peak frequencies for which ranged between 129 to 215 Hz. This species vocalized throughout the 24 hour period at an average rate of (18.5 ± 2.0 sounds fish-1 h-1) with an increase in vocalization rate at dawn and dusk. Competitive feeding did not elevate vocalisation as has been found in other gurnard species. Bluefin gurnard are common in coastal waters of New Zealand, Australia and Japan and, given their vocalization rate, are likely to be significant contributors to ambient underwater soundscape in these areas.

  15. Vocalisation Repertoire of Female Bluefin Gurnard (Chelidonichthys kumu) in Captivity: Sound Structure, Context and Vocal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Craig A.; Ghazali, Shahriman M.; Montgomery, John C.; Jeffs, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    Fish vocalisation is often a major component of underwater soundscapes. Therefore, interpretation of these soundscapes requires an understanding of the vocalisation characteristics of common soniferous fish species. This study of captive female bluefin gurnard, Chelidonichthys kumu, aims to formally characterise their vocalisation sounds and daily pattern of sound production. Four types of sound were produced and characterised, twice as many as previously reported in this species. These sounds fit two aural categories; grunt and growl, the mean peak frequencies for which ranged between 129 to 215 Hz. This species vocalized throughout the 24 hour period at an average rate of (18.5 ± 2.0 sounds fish-1 h-1) with an increase in vocalization rate at dawn and dusk. Competitive feeding did not elevate vocalisation as has been found in other gurnard species. Bluefin gurnard are common in coastal waters of New Zealand, Australia and Japan and, given their vocalization rate, are likely to be significant contributors to ambient underwater soundscape in these areas. PMID:26890124

  16. Extended active disturbance rejection controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  17. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  18. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  19. Auditory learning through active engagement with sound: biological impact of community music lessons in at-risk children

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, Nina; Slater, Jessica; Thompson, Elaine C.; Hornickel, Jane; Strait, Dana L.; Nicol, Trent; White-Schwoch, Travis

    2014-01-01

    The young nervous system is primed for sensory learning, facilitating the acquisition of language and communication skills. Social and linguistic impoverishment can limit these learning opportunities, eventually leading to language-related challenges such as poor reading. Music training offers a promising auditory learning strategy by directing attention to meaningful acoustic elements of the soundscape. In light of evidence that music training improves auditory skills and their neural substrates, there are increasing efforts to enact community-based programs to provide music instruction to at-risk children. Harmony Project is a community foundation that has provided free music instruction to over 1000 children from Los Angeles gang-reduction zones over the past decade. We conducted an independent evaluation of biological effects of participating in Harmony Project by following a cohort of children for 1 year. Here we focus on a comparison between students who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training vs. students who took music appreciation classes. All children began with an introductory music appreciation class, but midway through the year half of the children transitioned to the instrumental training. After the year of training, the children who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training had faster and more robust neural processing of speech than the children who stayed in the music appreciation class, observed in neural responses to a speech sound /d/. The neurophysiological measures found to be enhanced in the instrumentally-trained children have been previously linked to reading ability, suggesting a gain in neural processes important for literacy stemming from active auditory learning. Despite intrinsic constraints on our study imposed by a community setting, these findings speak to the potential of active engagement with sound (i.e., music-making) to engender experience-dependent neuroplasticity and may inform the

  20. Auditory learning through active engagement with sound: biological impact of community music lessons in at-risk children.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Nina; Slater, Jessica; Thompson, Elaine C; Hornickel, Jane; Strait, Dana L; Nicol, Trent; White-Schwoch, Travis

    2014-01-01

    The young nervous system is primed for sensory learning, facilitating the acquisition of language and communication skills. Social and linguistic impoverishment can limit these learning opportunities, eventually leading to language-related challenges such as poor reading. Music training offers a promising auditory learning strategy by directing attention to meaningful acoustic elements of the soundscape. In light of evidence that music training improves auditory skills and their neural substrates, there are increasing efforts to enact community-based programs to provide music instruction to at-risk children. Harmony Project is a community foundation that has provided free music instruction to over 1000 children from Los Angeles gang-reduction zones over the past decade. We conducted an independent evaluation of biological effects of participating in Harmony Project by following a cohort of children for 1 year. Here we focus on a comparison between students who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training vs. students who took music appreciation classes. All children began with an introductory music appreciation class, but midway through the year half of the children transitioned to the instrumental training. After the year of training, the children who actively engaged with sound through instrumental music training had faster and more robust neural processing of speech than the children who stayed in the music appreciation class, observed in neural responses to a speech sound /d/. The neurophysiological measures found to be enhanced in the instrumentally-trained children have been previously linked to reading ability, suggesting a gain in neural processes important for literacy stemming from active auditory learning. Despite intrinsic constraints on our study imposed by a community setting, these findings speak to the potential of active engagement with sound (i.e., music-making) to engender experience-dependent neuroplasticity and may inform the

  1. Teacher's Guide for SST..T..T (Sound, Sense, Today, Tomorrow, Thereafter).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Offered in this teacher's guide are activity suggestions, research ideas, discussion questions, and problems to solve dealing with aviation education. Topical areas consider sound and the environment, changes and adjustments in sounds, planning and control of noise, communications, economics, and mathematical and scientific aspects of sound and…

  2. Dopamine transporter is essential for the maintenance of spontaneous activity of auditory nerve neurones and their responsiveness to sound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ruel, Jérôme; Wang, Jing; Demêmes, Danielle; Gobaille, Serge; Puel, Jean-Luc; Rebillard, Guy

    2006-04-01

    Dopamine, a neurotransmitter released by the lateral olivocochlear efferents, has been shown tonically to inhibit the spontaneous and sound-evoked activity of auditory nerve fibres. This permanent inhibition probably requires the presence of an efficient transporter to remove dopamine from the synaptic cleft. Here, we report that the dopamine transporter is located in the lateral efferent fibres both below the inner hair cells and in the inner spiral bundle. Perilymphatic perfusion of the dopamine transporter inhibitors nomifensine and N-[1-(2-benzo[b]thiophenyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine into the cochlea reduced the spontaneous neural noise and the sound-evoked compound action potential of the auditory nerve in a dose-dependent manner, leading to both neural responses being completely abolished. We observed no significant change in cochlear responses generated by sensory hair cells (cochlear microphonic, summating potential, distortion products otoacoustic emissions) or in the endocochlear potential reflecting the functional state of the stria vascularis. This is consistent with a selective action of dopamine transporter inhibitors on auditory nerve activity. Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence (EC-LIF) measurements showed that nomifensine-induced inhibition of auditory nerve responses was due to increased extracellular dopamine levels in the cochlea. Altogether, these results show that the dopamine transporter is essential for maintaining the spontaneous activity of auditory nerve neurones and their responsiveness to sound stimulation.

  3. Sound transmission reduction with intelligent panel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Chris R.; Clark, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations are performed of the use of intelligent panel systems to control the sound transmission and radiation. An intelligent structure is defined as a structural system with integrated actuators and sensors under the guidance of an adaptive, learning type controller. The system configuration is based on the Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) concept where control inputs are applied directly to the structure to minimize an error quantity related to the radiated sound field. In this case multiple piezoelectric elements are employed as sensors. The importance of optimal shape and location is demonstrated to be of the same order of influence as increasing the number of channels of control.

  4. Active control of combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Masoud, Nidal A.

    A theoretical analysis of active control of combustion thermo-acoustic instabilities is developed in this dissertation. The theoretical combustion model is based on the dynamics of a two-phase flow in a liquid-fueled propulsion system. The formulation is based on a generalized wave equation with pressure as the dependent variable, and accommodates all influences of combustion, mean flow, unsteady motions and control inputs. The governing partial differential equations are converted to an equivalent set of ordinary differential equations using Galerkin's method by expressing the unsteady pressure and velocity fields as functions of normal mode shapes of the chamber. This procedure yields a representation of the unsteady flow field as a system of coupled nonlinear oscillators that is used as a basis for controllers design. Major research attention is focused on the control of longitudinal oscillations with both linear and nonlinear processes being considered. Starting with a linear model using point actuators, the optimal locations of actuators and sensors are developed. The approach relies on the quantitative measures of the degree of controllability and component cost. These criterion are arrived at by considering the energies of the system's inputs and outputs. The optimality criteria for sensor and actuator locations provide a balance between the importance of the lower order (controlled) and the higher (residual) order modes. To address the issue of uncertainties in system's parameter, the minimax principles based controller is used. The minimax corresponds to finding the best controller for the worst parameter deviation. In other words, choosing controller parameters to minimize, and parameter deviation to maximize some quadratic performance metric. Using the minimax-based controller, a remarkable improvement in the control system's ability to handle parameter uncertainties is achieved when compared to the robustness of the regular control schemes such as LQR

  5. Bone speed of sound and physical activity levels of overweight and normal-weight girls and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yao, Mathew; Ludwa, Izabella; Corbett, Lauren; Klentrou, Panagiota; Bonsu, Peter; Gammage, Kimberley; Falk, Bareket

    2011-02-01

    Bone properties, reflected by speed of sound (SOS), and physical activity levels were examined in overweight (OW) girls (n = 19) and adolescents (n = 22), in comparison with normal-weight (NW) girls (n = 21) and adolescents (n = 13). Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was higher in NW than in OW in both age groups. Tibial SOS was lower in OW compared with NW in both age groups. MVPA correlated with tibial SOS, once age was partialed out. The results suggest that overweight girls and adolescents are characterized by low tibial SOS, which may be partially attributed to lower physical activity levels.

  6. New insights into insect's silent flight. Part II: sound source and noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qian; Geng, Biao; Zheng, Xudong; Liu, Geng; Dong, Haibo

    2016-11-01

    The flapping flight of aerial animals has excellent aerodynamic performance but meanwhile generates low noise. In this study, the unsteady flow and acoustic characteristics of the flapping wing are numerically investigated for three-dimensional (3D) models of Tibicen linnei cicada at free forward flight conditions. Single cicada wing is modelled as a membrane with prescribed motion reconstructed by Wan et al. (2015). The flow field and acoustic field around the flapping wing are solved with immersed-boundary-method based incompressible flow solver and linearized-perturbed-compressible-equations based acoustic solver. The 3D simulation allows examination of both directivity and frequency composition of the produced sound in a full space. The mechanism of sound generation of flapping wing is analyzed through correlations between acoustic signals and flow features. Along with a flexible wing model, a rigid wing model is also simulated. The results from these two cases will be compared to investigate the effects of wing flexibility on sound generation. This study is supported by NSF CBET-1313217 and AFOSR FA9550-12-1-0071.

  7. Quality-Controlled Upper-Air Sounding Dataset for DYNAMO/CINDY/AMIE: Development and Corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesielski, Paul; Yu, Hungjui; Johnson, Richard; Yoneyama, Kunio; Katsumata, Masaki; Long, Charles N.; Wang, Junhong; Loehrer, Scot; Young, Kate; Williams, S.; Brown, William; Braun, John; Van Hove, Terese

    2014-04-01

    The upper-air sounding network for DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation or MJO) has provided an unprecedented set of observations for studying the MJO over the Indian Ocean (IO) where coupling of this oscillation with deep convection first occurs. With 72 sounding sites and dropsonde data from 13 aircraft mission, the sonde network covers the tropics from Eastern African to the West Pacific. In total nearly 26,000 sondes were collected from this network during the experiment’s 6-month extended observing period (from October 2011 to March 2012). Slightly more than half of the sondes, collected from 33 sites, are at high vertical resolution. Rigorous post-field phase processing of the sonde data included several levels of quality checks and a variety of corrections which address a number of issues (e.g., daytime dry bias, baseline surface data errors, ship deck-heating effects, artificial dry spikes in slow ascent sondes). Because of the importance of an accurate description of the moisture field in meeting the scientific goals of the experiments, particular attention is given to humidity correction and its validation. The humidity corrections, though small relative to some previous field campaigns, produced high fidelity moisture analyses in which sonde precipitable water compared well with independent estimates. An assessment of model operational analyses moisture using corrected sonde data shows an overall good agreement with the exception at upper-levels where model moisture and clouds are more abundant than the sounding data would indicate.

  8. Dual control active superconductive devices

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Beyer, James B.; Nordman, James E.; Hohenwarter, Gert K. G.

    1993-07-20

    A superconducting active device has dual control inputs and is constructed such that the output of the device is effectively a linear mix of the two input signals. The device is formed of a film of superconducting material on a substrate and has two main conduction channels, each of which includes a weak link region. A first control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the first channel and a second control line extends adjacent to the weak link region in the second channel. The current flowing from the first channel flows through an internal control line which is also adjacent to the weak link region of the second channel. The weak link regions comprise small links of superconductor, separated by voids, through which the current flows in each channel. Current passed through the control lines causes magnetic flux vortices which propagate across the weak link regions and control the resistance of these regions. The output of the device taken across the input to the main channels and the output of the second main channel and the internal control line will constitute essentially a linear mix of the two input signals imposed on the two control lines. The device is especially suited to microwave applications since it has very low input capacitance, and is well suited to being formed of high temperature superconducting materials since all of the structures may be formed coplanar with one another on a substrate.

  9. An Examination of Age-Related Changes in the Control of Lexical and Sublexical Pathways in Mapping Spelling to Sound

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Shikora, Emily R.; Balota, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the extent to which young and older adults are able to direct attention to distinct lexical processes in mapping spelling onto sound. Young and older adults completed either a speeded pronunciation task (reading aloud words) or a regularization task (pronouncing words based on spelling-to-sound correspondences, e.g., pronouncing PINT such that it rhymes with HINT) in order to bias either processing of lexical, whole-word information, or sublexical, spelling-to-sound mapping, respectively. Both younger and older adults produced reduced word frequency effects and lexicality effects in the regularization task compared to the normal pronunciation task. Importantly, compared to younger adults, older adults produced exaggerated effects of task (i.e., pronunciation vs. regularization) on the observed frequency and lexicality effects. These results highlight both the flexibility of the lexical processing system and the influence of changes in the influence of the underlying lexical route due to additional 50 years of reading experience and/or changes in attentional control. PMID:26251073

  10. An examination of age-related changes in the control of lexical and sublexical pathways in mapping spelling to sound.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Shikora, Emily R; Balota, David A

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated the extent to which young and older adults are able to direct attention to distinct processes in mapping spelling onto sound. Young and older adults completed either a speeded pronunciation task (reading aloud words) or regularization task (pronouncing words based on spelling-to-sound correspondences, e.g., pronouncing PINT such that it rhymes with HINT) in order to bias processing of lexical, whole-word information, or sublexical, spelling-to-sound mapping, respectively. Both younger and older adults produced reduced word-frequency effects and lexicality effects in the regularization task compared to the normal pronunciation task. Importantly, compared to younger adults, older adults produced exaggerated effects of task (i.e., pronunciation vs. regularization) on the observed frequency and lexicality effects. These results highlight both the flexibility of the lexical processing system and changes in the influence of the underlying lexical route due to additional 50 years of reading experience and/or changes in attentional control.

  11. Sound science-A simple and robust hands-on loudspeaker activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Molly; Stonick, Virginia

    1999-09-01

    This article describes a simple and very robust loudspeaker, comprising nothing more than a cream-cheese tub with lid, a screw, a magnet, wire, and tape. When plugged into a boom-box speaker output, it generates "high-fidelity" sound and much student enthusiasm.

  12. Control of Toxic Chemicals in Puget Sound, Phase 3: Study of Atmospheric Deposition of Air Toxics to the Surface of Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Kuo, Li-Jung; Crecelius, Eric A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Gill, Gary A.; Garland, Charity R.; Williamson, J. B.; Dhammapala, R.

    2010-07-05

    The results of the Phase 1 Toxics Loading study suggested that runoff from the land surface and atmospheric deposition directly to marine waters have resulted in considerable loads of contaminants to Puget Sound (Hart Crowser et al. 2007). The limited data available for atmospheric deposition fluxes throughout Puget Sound was recognized as a significant data gap. Therefore, this study provided more recent or first reported atmospheric deposition fluxes of PAHs, PBDEs, and select trace elements for Puget Sound. Samples representing bulk atmospheric deposition were collected during 2008 and 2009 at seven stations around Puget Sound spanning from Padilla Bay south to Nisqually River including Hood Canal and the Straits of Juan de Fuca. Revised annual loading estimates for atmospheric deposition to the waters of Puget Sound were calculated for each of the toxics and demonstrated an overall decrease in the atmospheric loading estimates except for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and total mercury (THg). The median atmospheric deposition flux of total PBDE (7.0 ng/m2/d) was higher than that of the Hart Crowser (2007) Phase 1 estimate (2.0 ng/m2/d). The THg was not significantly different from the original estimates. The median atmospheric deposition flux for pyrogenic PAHs (34.2 ng/m2/d; without TCB) shows a relatively narrow range across all stations (interquartile range: 21.2- 61.1 ng/m2/d) and shows no influence of season. The highest median fluxes for all parameters were measured at the industrial location in Tacoma and the lowest were recorded at the rural sites in Hood Canal and Sequim Bay. Finally, a semi-quantitative apportionment study permitted a first-order characterization of source inputs to the atmosphere of the Puget Sound. Both biomarker ratios and a principal component analysis confirmed regional data from the Puget Sound and Straits of Georgia region and pointed to the predominance of biomass and fossil fuel (mostly liquid petroleum products such

  13. Novel Active Combustion Control Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caspermeyer, Matt

    2014-01-01

    This project presents an innovative solution for active combustion control. Relative to the state of the art, this concept provides frequency modulation (greater than 1,000 Hz) in combination with high-amplitude modulation (in excess of 30 percent flow) and can be adapted to a large range of fuel injector sizes. Existing valves often have low flow modulation strength. To achieve higher flow modulation requires excessively large valves or too much electrical power to be practical. This active combustion control valve (ACCV) has high-frequency and -amplitude modulation, consumes low electrical power, is closely coupled with the fuel injector for modulation strength, and is practical in size and weight. By mitigating combustion instabilities at higher frequencies than have been previously achieved (approximately 1,000 Hz), this new technology enables gas turbines to run at operating points that produce lower emissions and higher performance.

  14. Active controls for ride smoothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.; Thompson, G. O.

    1976-01-01

    Active controls technology offers great promise for significantly smoothing the ride, and thus improving public and air carrier acceptance, of certain types of transport aircraft. Recent findings which support this promise are presented in the following three pertinent areas: (1) Ride quality versus degree of traveler satisfaction; (2) significant findings from a feasibility study of a ride smoothing system; and (3) potential ride problems identified for several advanced transport concepts.

  15. Reprint of: Flexural controls on late Neogene basin evolution in southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Alan R. A.; Wilson, Gary S.; Jordan, Tom; Tinto, Kirsty; Blakemore, Hamish

    2012-10-01

    The basins of southern McMurdo Sound have evolved under the influence of lithospheric flexure induced by the loads of the Erebus Volcanic Province. To characterise these basins, it is important to investigate the lithosphere's flexural properties, and estimate their influence on basin architecture and evolution. Seismic and gravity data are used to constrain 3D forward modelling of the progressive development of accommodation space within the flexural basins. Elastic plate flexure was calculated for a range of effective elastic thicknesses (Te) from 0.5 to 25 km using a spectral method. Models with low, but nonzero, Te values (2 km < Te < 5 km) produce the best fit to the gravity data, although uncertainty is high due to inaccuracies in the Digital Elevation Model. The slopes of flexural horizons revealed in seismic reflection lines are consistent with this, indicating a Te of 2 km to 5 km, although the depths to these horizons are not consistent, perhaps due to a northwards slope, or step, in the pre-flexural surface. These results indicate that the lithospheric strength of southern McMurdo Sound is significantly less than estimates of the regional average (Te ~ 20 km). This low strength may reflect the weakening effects of the Terror Rift, and perhaps also the Discovery Accommodation Zone, a region of major transverse faulting. A low Te model (Te = 3) for southern McMurdo Sound predicts the development of two discrete flexural depressions, each 2-2.5 km deep. The predicted stratigraphy of the northern basin reflects flexure due to Ross Island, predominantly erupted since ca. 1.8 Ma. The predicted stratigraphy of the southern basin reflects more gradual flexure from ca. 10 Ma to ca. 2 Ma, due to the more dispersed volcanoes of the Discovery subprovince. Collectively, these two basins have the potential to preserve a remarkable stratigraphic record of Antarctic climate change through the late Neogene.

  16. Flexural controls on late Neogene basin evolution in southern McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitken, Alan R. A.; Wilson, Gary S.; Jordan, Thomas; Tinto, Kirsty; Blakemore, Hamish

    2012-01-01

    The basins of southern McMurdo Sound have evolved under the influence of lithospheric flexure induced by the loads of the Erebus Volcanic Province. To characterise these basins, it is important to investigate the lithosphere's flexural properties, and estimate their influence on basin architecture and evolution. Seismic and gravity data are used to constrain 3D forward modelling of the progressive development of accommodation space within the flexural basins. Elastic plate flexure was calculated for a range of effective elastic thicknesses (T e) from 0.5 to 25 km using a spectral method. Models with low, but nonzero, T e values (2 km < T e < 5 km) produce the best fit to the gravity data, although uncertainty is high due to inaccuracies in the Digital Elevation Model. The slopes of flexural horizons revealed in seismic reflection lines are consistent with this, indicating a T e of 2 km to 5 km, although the depths to these horizons are not consistent, perhaps due to a northwards slope, or step, in the pre-flexural surface. These results indicate that the lithospheric strength of southern McMurdo Sound is significantly less than estimates of the regional average (T e ~ 20 km). This low strength may reflect the weakening effects of the Terror Rift, and perhaps also the Discovery Accommodation Zone, a region of major transverse faulting. A low T e model (T e = 3) for southern McMurdo Sound predicts the development of two discrete flexural depressions, each 2-2.5 km deep. The predicted stratigraphy of the northern basin reflects flexure due to Ross Island, predominantly erupted since ca. 1.8 Ma. The predicted stratigraphy of the southern basin reflects more gradual flexure from ca. 10 Ma to ca. 2 Ma, due to the more dispersed volcanoes of the Discovery subprovince. Collectively, these two basins have the potential to preserve a remarkable stratigraphic record of Antarctic climate change through the late Neogene.

  17. Active Control of Panel Vibrations Induced by a Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, active and passive control of sound and vibration in aeroelastic structures have received a great deal of attention due to many potential applications to aerospace and other industries. There exists a great deal of research work done in this area. Recent advances in the control of sound and vibration can be found in the several conference proceedings. In this report we will summarize our research findings supported by the NASA grant NAG-1-1175. The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to study the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. The vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings will be presented in the next three sections. In Section II we shall describe our results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Section III is concerned with active control of the vibration and sound radiation from a nonlinear elastic panel. A detailed description of our work on the parametric vibrational control of nonlinear elastic panel will be presented in Section IV. This paper will be submitted to the Journal

  18. Optogenetic control of epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Tønnesen, Jan; Sørensen, Andreas T.; Deisseroth, Karl; Lundberg, Cecilia; Kokaia, Merab

    2009-01-01

    The optogenetic approach to gain control over neuronal excitability both in vitro and in vivo has emerged as a fascinating scientific tool to explore neuronal networks, but it also opens possibilities for developing novel treatment strategies for neurologic conditions. We have explored whether such an optogenetic approach using the light-driven halorhodopsin chloride pump from Natronomonas pharaonis (NpHR), modified for mammalian CNS expression to hyperpolarize central neurons, may inhibit excessive hyperexcitability and epileptiform activity. We show that a lentiviral vector containing the NpHR gene under the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα promoter transduces principal cells of the hippocampus and cortex and hyperpolarizes these cells, preventing generation of action potentials and epileptiform activity during optical stimulation. This study proves a principle, that selective hyperpolarization of principal cortical neurons by NpHR is sufficient to curtail paroxysmal activity in transduced neurons and can inhibit stimulation train-induced bursting in hippocampal organotypic slice cultures, which represents a model tissue of pharmacoresistant epilepsy. This study demonstrates that the optogenetic approach may prove useful for controlling epileptiform activity and opens a future perspective to develop it into a strategy to treat epilepsy. PMID:19581573

  19. Improved Temperature Sounding and Quality Control Methodology Using AIRS/AMSU Data: The AIRS Science Team Version 5 Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John M.; Iredell, Lena; Keita, Fricky

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm in terms of its three most significant improvements over the methodology used in the AIRS Science Team Version 4 retrieval algorithm. Improved physics in Version 5 allows for use of AIRS clear column radiances in the entire 4.3 micron CO2 absorption band in the retrieval of temperature profiles T(p) during both day and night. Tropospheric sounding 15 micron CO2 observations are now used primarily in the generation of clear column radiances .R(sub i) for all channels. This new approach allows for the generation of more accurate values of .R(sub i) and T(p) under most cloud conditions. Secondly, Version 5 contains a new methodology to provide accurate case-by-case error estimates for retrieved geophysical parameters and for channel-by-channel clear column radiances. Thresholds of these error estimates are used in a new approach for Quality Control. Finally, Version 5 also contains for the first time an approach to provide AIRS soundings in partially cloudy conditions that does not require use of any microwave data. This new AIRS Only sounding methodology, referred to as AIRS Version 5 AO, was developed as a backup to AIRS Version 5 should the AMSU-A instrument fail. Results are shown comparing the relative performance of the AIRS Version 4, Version 5, and Version 5 AO for the single day, January 25, 2003. The Goddard DISC is now generating and distributing products derived using the AIRS Science Team Version 5 retrieval algorithm. This paper also described the Quality Control flags contained in the DISC AIRS/AMSU retrieval products and their intended use for scientific research purposes.

  20. Active Noise Control of Radiated Noise from Jets Originating NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Michael J.; Fuller, Christopher R.; Schiller, Noah H.; Turner, Travis L.

    2013-01-01

    The reduction of jet noise using a closed-loop active noise control system with highbandwidth active chevrons was investigated. The high frequency energy introduced by piezoelectrically-driven chevrons was demonstrated to achieve a broadband reduction of jet noise, presumably due to the suppression of large-scale turbulence. For a nozzle with one active chevron, benefits of up to 0.8 dB overall sound pressure level (OASPL) were observed compared to a static chevron nozzle near the maximum noise emission angle, and benefits of up to 1.9 dB OASPL were observed compared to a baseline nozzle with no chevrons. The closed-loop actuation system was able to effectively reduce noise at select frequencies by 1-3 dB. However, integrated OASPL did not indicate further reduction beyond the open-loop benefits, most likely due to the preliminary controller design, which was focused on narrowband performance.

  1. Abdominal sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be a sign of early bowel obstruction. Causes Most of the sounds you hear in your stomach and intestines are ... a list of more serious conditions that can cause abnormal bowel sounds. Hyperactive, hypoactive, or missing bowel sounds may be ...

  2. Exploring Noise: Sound Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillo, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    Part one of a three-part series about noise pollution and its effects on humans. This section presents the background information for teachers who are preparing a unit on sound. The next issues will offer learning activities for measuring the effects of sound and some references. (SA)

  3. Inferring Human Activity Recognition with Ambient Sound on Wireless Sensor Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Salomons, Etto L.; Havinga, Paul J. M.; van Leeuwen, Henk

    2016-01-01

    A wireless sensor network that consists of nodes with a sound sensor can be used to obtain context awareness in home environments. However, the limited processing power of wireless nodes offers a challenge when extracting features from the signal, and subsequently, classifying the source. Although multiple papers can be found on different methods of sound classification, none of these are aimed at limited hardware or take the efficiency of the algorithms into account. In this paper, we compare and evaluate several classification methods on a real sensor platform using different feature types and classifiers, in order to find an approach that results in a good classifier that can run on limited hardware. To be as realistic as possible, we trained our classifiers using sound waves from many different sources. We conclude that despite the fact that the classifiers are often of low quality due to the highly restricted hardware resources, sufficient performance can be achieved when (1) the window length for our classifiers is increased, and (2) if we apply a two-step approach that uses a refined classification after a global classification has been performed. PMID:27690026

  4. Active control of spectral detail radiated by an air-loaded impacted membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollow, J. Douglas, IV

    An active control system is developed to independently operate on the vibration of individual modes of an air-loaded drum head, resulting in changes in the acoustic field radiated from the structure. The timbre of the system is investigated, and techniques for changing the characteristic frequencies by means of the control system are proposed. A feedforward control system is constructed for empirical investigation of this approach, creating a musical instrument which can produce a variety of sounds not available with strictly mechanical systems. The work is motivated by applications for actively controlled structures, active control of sound quality, and musical acoustics. The instrument consists of a Mylar timpano head stretched over an enclosure which has been outfitted with electroacoustic drivers. Sensors are arranged on the surface of the drum head and combined to measure modal vibration, and the array of drivers allows independent control of these modes. A signal processor is used to form modal control filters which can modify the loading of each mode, changing the time-dependent and spectral characteristics, and therefore the timbre, of the radiated sound. A theoretical formulation of active control of structural vibration by means of fluid-coupled actuators is expressed, and computational solutions show the effects of fluid loading and the radiated field. Experimental results with the new instrument are shown, with implementations of the control system providing a demonstrated degree of control, and illustrating several limitations of such systems.

  5. Effects of anthropogenic sound on digging behavior, metabolism, Ca2+/Mg2+ ATPase activity, and metabolism-related gene expression of the bivalve Sinonovacula constricta

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chao; Zhao, Xinguo; Liu, Saixi; Shi, Wei; Han, Yu; Guo, Cheng; Jiang, Jingang; Wan, Haibo; Shen, Tiedong; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic sound has increased significantly in the past decade. However, only a few studies to date have investigated its effects on marine bivalves, with little known about the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms. In the present study, the effects of different types, frequencies, and intensities of anthropogenic sounds on the digging behavior of razor clams (Sinonovacula constricta) were investigated. The results showed that variations in sound intensity induced deeper digging. Furthermore, anthropogenic sound exposure led to an alteration in the O:N ratios and the expression of ten metabolism-related genes from the glycolysis, fatty acid biosynthesis, tryptophan metabolism, and Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle (TCA cycle) pathways. Expression of all genes under investigation was induced upon exposure to anthropogenic sound at ~80 dB re 1 μPa and repressed at ~100 dB re 1 μPa sound. In addition, the activity of Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase in the feet tissues, which is directly related to muscular contraction and subsequently to digging behavior, was also found to be affected by anthropogenic sound intensity. The findings suggest that sound may be perceived by bivalves as changes in the water particle motion and lead to the subsequent reactions detected in razor clams. PMID:27063002

  6. Effects of anthropogenic sound on digging behavior, metabolism, Ca2+/Mg2+ ATPase activity, and metabolism-related gene expression of the bivalve Sinonovacula constricta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chao; Zhao, Xinguo; Liu, Saixi; Shi, Wei; Han, Yu; Guo, Cheng; Jiang, Jingang; Wan, Haibo; Shen, Tiedong; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic sound has increased significantly in the past decade. However, only a few studies to date have investigated its effects on marine bivalves, with little known about the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms. In the present study, the effects of different types, frequencies, and intensities of anthropogenic sounds on the digging behavior of razor clams (Sinonovacula constricta) were investigated. The results showed that variations in sound intensity induced deeper digging. Furthermore, anthropogenic sound exposure led to an alteration in the O:N ratios and the expression of ten metabolism-related genes from the glycolysis, fatty acid biosynthesis, tryptophan metabolism, and Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle (TCA cycle) pathways. Expression of all genes under investigation was induced upon exposure to anthropogenic sound at ~80 dB re 1 μPa and repressed at ~100 dB re 1 μPa sound. In addition, the activity of Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase in the feet tissues, which is directly related to muscular contraction and subsequently to digging behavior, was also found to be affected by anthropogenic sound intensity. The findings suggest that sound may be perceived by bivalves as changes in the water particle motion and lead to the subsequent reactions detected in razor clams.

  7. Effects of anthropogenic sound on digging behavior, metabolism, Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) ATPase activity, and metabolism-related gene expression of the bivalve Sinonovacula constricta.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Zhao, Xinguo; Liu, Saixi; Shi, Wei; Han, Yu; Guo, Cheng; Jiang, Jingang; Wan, Haibo; Shen, Tiedong; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-04-11

    Anthropogenic sound has increased significantly in the past decade. However, only a few studies to date have investigated its effects on marine bivalves, with little known about the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms. In the present study, the effects of different types, frequencies, and intensities of anthropogenic sounds on the digging behavior of razor clams (Sinonovacula constricta) were investigated. The results showed that variations in sound intensity induced deeper digging. Furthermore, anthropogenic sound exposure led to an alteration in the O:N ratios and the expression of ten metabolism-related genes from the glycolysis, fatty acid biosynthesis, tryptophan metabolism, and Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle (TCA cycle) pathways. Expression of all genes under investigation was induced upon exposure to anthropogenic sound at ~80 dB re 1 μPa and repressed at ~100 dB re 1 μPa sound. In addition, the activity of Ca(2+)/Mg(2+)-ATPase in the feet tissues, which is directly related to muscular contraction and subsequently to digging behavior, was also found to be affected by anthropogenic sound intensity. The findings suggest that sound may be perceived by bivalves as changes in the water particle motion and lead to the subsequent reactions detected in razor clams.

  8. Active Shielding and Control of Environmental Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, S. V.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the research project supported by NASA under grant # NAG-1-01064, we have studied the mathematical aspects of the problem of active control of sound, i.e., time-harmonic acoustic disturbances. The foundations of the methodology are described in our paper [1]. Unlike. many other existing techniques, the approach of [1] provides for the exact volumetric cancellation of the unwanted noise on a given predetermined region airspace, while leaving unaltered those components of the total acoustic field that are deemed as friendly. The key finding of the work is that for eliminating the unwanted component of the acoustic field in a given area, one needs to know relatively little; in particular, neither the locations nor structure nor strength of the exterior noise sources need to be known. Likewise, there is no need to know the volumetric properties of the supporting medium across which the acoustic signals propagate, except, maybe, in a narrow area of space near the perimeter of the protected region. The controls are built based solely on the measurements performed on the perimeter of the domain to be shielded; moreover, the controls themselves (i.e., additional sources) are concentrated also only on or near this perimeter. Perhaps as important, the measured quantities can refer to the total acoustic field rather than to its unwanted component only, and the methodology can automatically distinguish between the two. In [1], we have constructed the general solution for controls. The apparatus used for deriving this general solution is closely connected to the concepts of generalized potentials and boundary projections of Calderon's type. For a given total wave field, the application of a Calderon's projection allows one to definitively tell between its incoming and outgoing components with respect to a particular domain of interest, which may have arbitrary shape. Then, the controls are designed so that they suppress the incoming component for the domain

  9. Active structural acoustic control using the remote sensor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheer, Jordan; Daley, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Active structural acoustic control (ASAC) is an effective method of reducing the sound radiation from vibrating structures. In order to implement ASAC systems using only structural actuators and sensors, it is necessary to employ a model of the sound radiation from the structure. Such models have been presented in the literature for simple structures, such as baffled rectangular plates, and methods of determining the radiation modes of more complex practical structures using experimental data have also been explored. A similar problem arises in the context of active noise control, where cancellation of a disturbance is required at positions in space where it is not possible to locate a physical error microphone. In this case the signals at the cancellation points can be estimated from the outputs of remotely located measurement sensors using the “remote microphone method”. This remote microphone method is extended here to the ASAC problem, in which the pressures at a number of microphone locations must be estimated from measurements on the structure of the radiating system. The control and estimation strategies are described and the performance is assessed for a typical structural radiation problem.

  10. Physiographic and land cover attributes of the Puget Lowland and the active streamflow gaging network, Puget Sound Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher; Sevier, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Geospatial information for the active streamflow gaging network in the Puget Sound Basin was compiled to support regional monitoring of stormwater effects to small streams. The compilation includes drainage area boundaries and physiographic and land use attributes that affect hydrologic processes. Three types of boundaries were used to tabulate attributes: Puget Sound Watershed Characterization analysis units (AU); the drainage area of active streamflow gages; and the catchments of Regional Stream Monitoring Program (RSMP) sites. The active streamflow gaging network generally includes sites that represent the ranges of attributes for lowland AUs, although there are few sites with low elevations (less than 60 meters), low precipitation (less than 1 meter year), or high stream density (greater than 5 kilometers per square kilometers). The active streamflow gaging network can serve to provide streamflow information in some AUs and RSMP sites, particularly where the streamflow gage measures streamflow generated from a part of the AU or that drains to the RSMP site, and that part of the AU or RSMP site is a significant fraction of the drainage area of the streamgage. The maximum fraction of each AU or RSMP catchment upstream of a streamflow gage and the maximum fraction of any one gaged basin in an AU or RSMP along with corresponding codes are provided in the attribute tables.

  11. Estuarine and coastal water dynamics controlling sediment movement and plume development in Long Island Sound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggles, F. H., Jr. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. As the Connecticut River flows into Long Island Sound, large plumes develop during the mixing of ocean and estuarine waters. Plumes were delineated for July 28, October 8, October 27, and December 2, 1972, by analyzing ERTS-1 imagery with the SRI Electronic Satellite Image Analysis Console (ESIAC). Because the chemical and physical composition of the plume and ocean water were not too different, the ESIAC was utilized to expand the scenes and subject the transparencies to varying combinations of viewing techniques to identify and delineate the plumes. Best results were obtained when band 5 transparencies were used. Indications are, when the scene being analyzed is predominantly in the first two steps of the gray scale, it is best to use the negative transparencies. When the analysis is being done above the first two steps of the gray scale, it is best to use the positive transparencies.

  12. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  13. Active control of counter-rotating open rotor interior noise in a Dornier 728 experimental aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, Thomas; Unruh, Oliver; Algermissen, Stephan; Pohl, Martin

    2016-08-01

    The fuel consumption of future civil aircraft needs to be reduced because of the CO2 restrictions declared by the European Union. A consequent lightweight design and a new engine concept called counter-rotating open rotor are seen as key technologies in the attempt to reach this ambitious goals. Bearing in mind that counter-rotating open rotor engines emit very high sound pressures at low frequencies and that lightweight structures have a poor transmission loss in the lower frequency range, these key technologies raise new questions in regard to acoustic passenger comfort. One of the promising solutions for the reduction of sound pressure levels inside the aircraft cabin are active sound and vibration systems. So far, active concepts have rarely been investigated for a counter-rotating open rotor pressure excitation on complex airframe structures. Hence, the state of the art is augmented by the preliminary study presented in this paper. The study shows how an active vibration control system can influence the sound transmission of counter-rotating open rotor noise through a complex airframe structure into the cabin. Furthermore, open questions on the way towards the realisation of an active control system are addressed. In this phase, an active feedforward control system is investigated in a fully equipped Dornier 728 experimental prototype aircraft. In particular, the sound transmission through the airframe, the coupling of classical actuators (inertial and piezoelectric patch actuators) into the structure and the performance of the active vibration control system with different error sensors are investigated. It can be shown that the active control system achieves a reduction up to 5 dB at several counter-rotating open rotor frequencies but also that a better performance could be achieved through further optimisations.

  14. Active transition fixing and control of the boundary layer in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1985-01-01

    Active transition of flow over an airfoil surface and feedback control by sound is investigated in a wind tunnel at Caltech. Laminar instability forced by localized time dependent nonintrusive narrow heating strip causes abrupt changes in velocity to trigger instant transition at favorable pressure gradient. At zero and adverse pressure gradients these changes are only marginal. Feedback control by sound interaction at nearly normal incidence produces significant reduction in velocity perturbation in regions of transition. This reduction is in part at the expense of an increase in background disturbance since it is not possible to restore the flow to its undisturbed state.

  15. Active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Walter F.

    1994-01-01

    A three-channel active control system is applied to an operational turbofan engine to reduce tonal noise produced by both the fan and the high-pressure compressor. The control approach is the feedforward filtered-x least-mean-square algorithm implemented on a digital signal processing board. Reference transducers mounted on the engine case provide blade passing and harmonics frequency information to the controller. Error information is provided by large area microphones placed in the acoustic far field. To minimize the error signal, the controller actuates loudspeakers mounted on the inlet to produce destructive interference. The sound pressure level of the fundamental tone of the fan was reduced using the three-channel controller by up to 16 dB over a +/- 30-deg angle about the engine axis. A single-channel controller could produce reduction over a +/- 15-deg angle. The experimental results show the control to be robust. Outside of the areas contolled, the levels of the tone actually increased due to the generation of radial modes by the control sources. Simultaneous control of two tones is achieved with parallel controllers. The fundamental and the first harmonic tones of the fan were controlled simultaneously with reductions of 12 and 5 dBA, respectively, measured on the engine axis. Simultaneous control was also demonstrated for the fan fundamental and the high-pressure compressor fundamental tones.

  16. Sounds Alive: A Noise Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickman, Donna McCord

    Sarah Screech, Danny Decibel, Sweetie Sound and Neil Noisy describe their experiences in the world of sound and noise to elementary students. Presented are their reports, games and charts which address sound measurement, the effects of noise on people, methods of noise control, and related areas. The workbook is intended to stimulate students'…

  17. A novel mission concept for upper air water vapour observations: active limb sounding with a constellation of retroreflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, D.; Hoffmann, A.; Weitnauer, C.; Topham, R.; Romano, P.; Lohrey, S.; Kox, S.; Krings, T.; Krejci, D.; Kern, K.; Huesing, J.; Esen, B.; Deconinck, F.; Carton, J. G.; Aulinas, J.

    2011-12-01

    The topic for the Alpbach summer school 2010 was "Missions for Understanding Climate Change''. Early career scientists and engineers from many countries formed working groups to devise new space missions to tackle this challenging subject. Following the summer school, one mission concept was chosen for further development at a subsequent workshop in Obergurgl, which is described in this paper. At the core of the mission chosen for further study was a novel active limb-sounding instrument, used as part of a multi-instrument measurement approach to observing upper air water vapour. The concept combines a LiDAR in nadir-viewing mode with a LiDAR in limb sounding by occultation geometry, designed to operate as a multiple discrete wavelength, very long path system for intergrated path differential absorption measurements. This is achieved using a monostatic transmitter-receiver spacecraft flown in formation with multiple spaceborne retroreflectors. Looking through the limb of the atmosphere, this system will sample the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere and above at high vertical resolution, with a long integration path allowing detection of the low concentrations of water vapour at this height. A secondary payload of a medium resolution multispectral radiometer allows wide-swath cloud and aerosol imaging. Active limb sounding has not yet been attempted in space, and this novel concept presents significant challenges, including the performance of the lasers in space, the tracking and locking procedure between the main spacecraft and the retroreflectors, and the design of the telescopes to achieve a high enough signal-to-noise ratio for the high precision measurements. These issues are addressed in this preliminary feasibility study, which shows promising results.

  18. The emotional symbolism of two English e-sounds: /i/ as in "cheap" is pleasant and /I/ as in "chip" active.

    PubMed

    Whissell, Cynthia

    2003-02-01

    This article aligns the symbolism of the long (/i/) and short (/I/) e sounds in English with the two dimensions of emotional space-Pleasantness and Activation. On the basis of this alignment, the four quadrants of emotional space are labelled Cheerful (high /i/, high /I/), Cheerless (low /i/, low /I/), Tough (low /i/, high /I/), and Tender (high /i/, low /I/). In four phases, data from over 50 samples (mainly, poetry, song lyrics, and names) were plotted and compared in terms of their use of the two e sounds. Significant and meaningful differences among samples were discovered in all phases. The placement of samples in quadrants was additionally informative. Data samples including many long e sounds (/i/) tended to be more Pleasant and those including many short e sounds (/I/) tended to be more Active.

  19. Geologic controls on the recent evolution of oyster reefs in Apalachicola Bay and St. George Sound, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twichell, D.; Edmiston, L.; Andrews, B.; Stevenson, W.; Donoghue, J.; Poore, R.; Osterman, L.

    2010-07-01

    Apalachicola Bay and St. George Sound contain the largest oyster fishery in Florida, and the growth and distribution of the numerous oyster reefs here are the combined product of modern estuarine conditions in the bay and its late Holocene evolution. Sidescan-sonar imagery, bathymetry, high-resolution seismic profiles, and sediment cores show that oyster beds occupy the crests of a series of shoals that range from 1 to 7 km in length, trend roughly north-south perpendicular to the long axes of the bay and sound, and are asymmetrical with steeper sides facing to the west. Surface sediment samples show that the oyster beds consist of shelly sand, while much of the remainder of the bay floor is covered by mud delivered by the Apalachicola River. The present oyster reefs rest on sandy delta systems that advanced southward across the region between 6400 and 4400 yr BP when sea level was 4-6 m lower than present. Oysters started to colonize the region around 5100 yr BP and became extensive by 1200 and 2400 yr BP. Since 1200 yr BP, their aerial extent has decreased due to burial of the edges of the reefs by the prodelta mud that continues to be supplied by the Apalachicola River. Oyster reefs that are still active are narrower than the original beds, have grown vertically, and become asymmetrical in cross-section. Their internal bedding indicates they have migrated westward, suggesting a net westerly transport of sediment in the bay.

  20. Active control of fan noise from a turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Burdisso, Ricardo A.; Fuller, Christopher R.; O'Brien, Walter F.

    1993-01-01

    A three channel active control system is applied to an operational turbofan engine in order to reduce tonal noise produced by both the fan and high pressure compressor. The control approach is the feedforward filtered-x least-mean-square algorithm implemented on a digital signal processing board. Reference transducers mounted on the engine case provides blade passing and harmonics frequency information to the controller. Error information is provided by large area microphones placed in the acoustic far field. In order to minimize the error signal, the controller actuates loudspeakers mounted on the inlet to produce destructive interference. The sound pressure level of the fundamental tone of the fan was reduced using the three channel controller by up to 16 dB over a 60 deg angle about the engine axis. A single channel controller could produce reduction over a 30 deg angle. The experimental results show the control to be robust. Simultaneous control of two tones is done with parallel controllers. The fundamental and the first harmonic tones of the fan were controlled simultaneously with reductions of 12 dBA and 5 dBA, respectively, measured on the engine axis. Simultaneous control was also demonstrated for the fan fundamental and the high pressure compressor fundamental tones.

  1. National Report Germany: Sounding Rocket and Balloon Research Activities Supported by the German Space Programme in 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, R.; Gritzner, C.; Friedrichs, D.

    2015-09-01

    Mainly sounding rockets but also stratospheric balloons have played a crucial role in implementing the German Space Programme since many years. Research activities were conducted in the fields of Microgravity Research, Space Science, Earth Observation, Space Technology Development, and Education. Currently, the mesosphere and ionosphere of the Earth and the photosphere and chromosphere of the Sun are in the focus of German research activities in the field of Space Science. Microgravity related topics are studied in the disciplines of Life and Physical Sciences during ballistic TEXUS and MAPHEUS rocket flights. A lot of student activities are currently supported by the agencies SNSB and DLR under the auspices of the Swedish-German programme REXUS/BEXUS.

  2. The Sound of Silence: Activating Silent Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in Marine Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Reen, F Jerry; Romano, Stefano; Dobson, Alan D W; O'Gara, Fergal

    2015-07-31

    Unlocking the rich harvest of marine microbial ecosystems has the potential to both safeguard the existence of our species for the future, while also presenting significant lifestyle benefits for commercial gain. However, while significant advances have been made in the field of marine biodiscovery, leading to the introduction of new classes of therapeutics for clinical medicine, cosmetics and industrial products, much of what this natural ecosystem has to offer is locked in, and essentially hidden from our screening methods. Releasing this silent potential represents a significant technological challenge, the key to which is a comprehensive understanding of what controls these systems. Heterologous expression systems have been successful in awakening a number of these cryptic marine biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). However, this approach is limited by the typically large size of the encoding sequences. More recently, focus has shifted to the regulatory proteins associated with each BGC, many of which are signal responsive raising the possibility of exogenous activation. Abundant among these are the LysR-type family of transcriptional regulators, which are known to control production of microbial aromatic systems. Although the environmental signals that activate these regulatory systems remain unknown, it offers the exciting possibility of evoking mimic molecules and synthetic expression systems to drive production of potentially novel natural products in microorganisms. Success in this field has the potential to provide a quantum leap forward in medical and industrial bio-product development. To achieve these new endpoints, it is clear that the integrated efforts of bioinformaticians and natural product chemists will be required as we strive to uncover new and potentially unique structures from silent or cryptic marine gene clusters.

  3. The Sound of Silence: Activating Silent Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in Marine Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Reen, F. Jerry; Romano, Stefano; Dobson, Alan D.W.; O’Gara, Fergal

    2015-01-01

    Unlocking the rich harvest of marine microbial ecosystems has the potential to both safeguard the existence of our species for the future, while also presenting significant lifestyle benefits for commercial gain. However, while significant advances have been made in the field of marine biodiscovery, leading to the introduction of new classes of therapeutics for clinical medicine, cosmetics and industrial products, much of what this natural ecosystem has to offer is locked in, and essentially hidden from our screening methods. Releasing this silent potential represents a significant technological challenge, the key to which is a comprehensive understanding of what controls these systems. Heterologous expression systems have been successful in awakening a number of these cryptic marine biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). However, this approach is limited by the typically large size of the encoding sequences. More recently, focus has shifted to the regulatory proteins associated with each BGC, many of which are signal responsive raising the possibility of exogenous activation. Abundant among these are the LysR-type family of transcriptional regulators, which are known to control production of microbial aromatic systems. Although the environmental signals that activate these regulatory systems remain unknown, it offers the exciting possibility of evoking mimic molecules and synthetic expression systems to drive production of potentially novel natural products in microorganisms. Success in this field has the potential to provide a quantum leap forward in medical and industrial bio-product development. To achieve these new endpoints, it is clear that the integrated efforts of bioinformaticians and natural product chemists will be required as we strive to uncover new and potentially unique structures from silent or cryptic marine gene clusters. PMID:26264003

  4. A Sound Therapy-Based Intervention to Expand the Auditory Dynamic Range for Loudness among Persons with Sensorineural Hearing Losses: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Formby, Craig; Hawley, Monica L; Sherlock, LaGuinn P; Gold, Susan; Payne, JoAnne; Brooks, Rebecca; Parton, Jason M; Juneau, Roger; Desporte, Edward J; Siegle, Gregory R

    2015-05-01

    The primary aim of this research was to evaluate the validity, efficacy, and generalization of principles underlying a sound therapy-based treatment for promoting expansion of the auditory dynamic range (DR) for loudness. The basic sound therapy principles, originally devised for treatment of hyperacusis among patients with tinnitus, were evaluated in this study in a target sample of unsuccessfully fit and/or problematic prospective hearing aid users with diminished DRs (owing to their elevated audiometric thresholds and reduced sound tolerance). Secondary aims included: (1) delineation of the treatment contributions from the counseling and sound therapy components to the full-treatment protocol and, in turn, the isolated treatment effects from each of these individual components to intervention success; and (2) characterization of the respective dynamics for full, partial, and control treatments. Thirty-six participants with bilateral sensorineural hearing losses and reduced DRs, which affected their actual or perceived ability to use hearing aids, were enrolled in and completed a placebo-controlled (for sound therapy) randomized clinical trial. The 2 × 2 factorial trial design was implemented with or without various assignments of counseling and sound therapy. Specifically, participants were assigned randomly to one of four treatment groups (nine participants per group), including: (1) group 1-full treatment achieved with scripted counseling plus sound therapy implemented with binaural sound generators; (2) group 2-partial treatment achieved with counseling and placebo sound generators (PSGs); (3) group 3-partial treatment achieved with binaural sound generators alone; and (4) group 4-a neutral control treatment implemented with the PSGs alone. Repeated measurements of categorical loudness judgments served as the primary outcome measure. The full-treatment categorical-loudness judgments for group 1, measured at treatment termination, were significantly

  5. A Sound Therapy-Based Intervention to Expand the Auditory Dynamic Range for Loudness among Persons with Sensorineural Hearing Losses: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Formby, Craig; Hawley, Monica L.; Sherlock, LaGuinn P.; Gold, Susan; Payne, JoAnne; Brooks, Rebecca; Parton, Jason M.; Juneau, Roger; Desporte, Edward J.; Siegle, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this research was to evaluate the validity, efficacy, and generalization of principles underlying a sound therapy–based treatment for promoting expansion of the auditory dynamic range (DR) for loudness. The basic sound therapy principles, originally devised for treatment of hyperacusis among patients with tinnitus, were evaluated in this study in a target sample of unsuccessfully fit and/or problematic prospective hearing aid users with diminished DRs (owing to their elevated audiometric thresholds and reduced sound tolerance). Secondary aims included: (1) delineation of the treatment contributions from the counseling and sound therapy components to the full-treatment protocol and, in turn, the isolated treatment effects from each of these individual components to intervention success; and (2) characterization of the respective dynamics for full, partial, and control treatments. Thirty-six participants with bilateral sensorineural hearing losses and reduced DRs, which affected their actual or perceived ability to use hearing aids, were enrolled in and completed a placebo-controlled (for sound therapy) randomized clinical trial. The 2 × 2 factorial trial design was implemented with or without various assignments of counseling and sound therapy. Specifically, participants were assigned randomly to one of four treatment groups (nine participants per group), including: (1) group 1—full treatment achieved with scripted counseling plus sound therapy implemented with binaural sound generators; (2) group 2—partial treatment achieved with counseling and placebo sound generators (PSGs); (3) group 3—partial treatment achieved with binaural sound generators alone; and (4) group 4—a neutral control treatment implemented with the PSGs alone. Repeated measurements of categorical loudness judgments served as the primary outcome measure. The full-treatment categorical-loudness judgments for group 1, measured at treatment termination, were

  6. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  7. Human amygdala activation by the sound produced during dental treatment: A fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jen-Fang; Lee, Kun-Che; Hong, Hsiang-Hsi; Kuo, Song-Bor; Wu, Chung-De; Wai, Yau-Yau; Chen, Yi-Fen; Peng, Ying-Chin

    2015-01-01

    During dental treatments, patients may experience negative emotions associated with the procedure. This study was conducted with the aim of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to visualize cerebral cortical stimulation among dental patients in response to auditory stimuli produced by ultrasonic scaling and power suction equipment. Subjects (n = 7) aged 23-35 years were recruited for this study. All were right-handed and underwent clinical pure-tone audiometry testing to reveal a normal hearing threshold below 20 dB hearing level (HL). As part of the study, subjects initially underwent a dental calculus removal treatment. During the treatment, subjects were exposed to ultrasonic auditory stimuli originating from the scaling handpiece and salivary suction instruments. After dental treatment, subjects were imaged with fMRI while being exposed to recordings of the noise from the same dental instrument so that cerebral cortical stimulation in response to aversive auditory stimulation could be observed. The independent sample confirmatory t-test was used. Subjects also showed stimulation in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, indicating that the ultrasonic auditory stimuli elicited an unpleasant response in the subjects. Patients experienced unpleasant sensations caused by contact stimuli in the treatment procedure. In addition, this study has demonstrated that aversive auditory stimuli such as sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece also cause aversive emotions. This study was indicated by observed stimulation of the auditory cortex as well as the amygdala, indicating that noise from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece was perceived as an aversive auditory stimulus by the subjects. Subjects can experience unpleasant sensations caused by the sounds from the ultrasonic scaling handpiece based on their auditory stimuli.

  8. Sound Waves Induce Neural Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells via Ryanodine Receptor-Induced Calcium Release and Pyk2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yura; Park, Jeong-Eun; Jeong, Jong Seob; Park, Jung-Keug; Kim, Jongpil; Jeon, Songhee

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown considerable promise as an adaptable cell source for use in tissue engineering and other therapeutic applications. The aims of this study were to develop methods to test the hypothesis that human MSCs could be differentiated using sound wave stimulation alone and to find the underlying mechanism. Human bone marrow (hBM)-MSCs were stimulated with sound waves (1 kHz, 81 dB) for 7 days and the expression of neural markers were analyzed. Sound waves induced neural differentiation of hBM-MSC at 1 kHz and 81 dB but not at 1 kHz and 100 dB. To determine the signaling pathways involved in the neural differentiation of hBM-MSCs by sound wave stimulation, we examined the Pyk2 and CREB phosphorylation. Sound wave induced an increase in the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and CREB at 45 min and 90 min, respectively, in hBM-MSCs. To find out the upstream activator of Pyk2, we examined the intracellular calcium source that was released by sound wave stimulation. When we used ryanodine as a ryanodine receptor antagonist, sound wave-induced calcium release was suppressed. Moreover, pre-treatment with a Pyk2 inhibitor, PF431396, prevented the phosphorylation of Pyk2 and suppressed sound wave-induced neural differentiation in hBM-MSCs. These results suggest that specific sound wave stimulation could be used as a neural differentiation inducer of hBM-MSCs.

  9. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-08-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  10. Active control of fan-generated plane wave noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Nuckolls, William E.; Santamaria, Odillyn L.; Martinson, Scott D.

    1993-01-01

    Subsonic propulsion systems for future aircraft may incorporate ultra-high bypass ratio ducted fan engines whose dominant noise source is the fan with blade passage frequency less than 1000 Hz. This low frequency combines with the requirement of a short nacelle to diminish the effectiveness of passive duct liners. Active noise control is seen as a viable method to augment the conventional passive treatments. An experiment to control ducted fan noise using a time domain active adaptive system is reported. The control sound source consists of loudspeakers arrayed around the fan duct. The error sensor location is in the fan duct. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate that the in-duct error sensor reduces the mode spillover in the far field, thereby increasing the efficiency of the control system. In this first series of tests, the fan is configured so that predominantly zero order circumferential waves are generated. The control system is found to reduce the blade passage frequency tone significantly in the acoustic far field when the mode orders of the noise source and of the control source are the same. The noise reduction is not as great when the mode orders are not the same even though the noise source modes are evanescent, but the control system converges stably and global noise reduction is demonstrated in the far field. Further experimentation is planned in which the performance of the system will be evaluated when higher order radial and spinning modes are generated.

  11. Field validation of sound mitigation models and air pollutant emission testing in support of missile motor disposal activities.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Palmer, Glenn R; Kordich, Micheal M; Pollet, Dean A; Jensen, James A; Lindsay, Mitchell H

    2005-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense approved activities conducted at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) include both operational readiness test firing of intercontinental ballistic missile motors as well as the destruction of obsolete or otherwise unusable intercontinental ballistic missile motors through open burn/open detonation (OB/ OD). Within the Utah Division of Air Quality, these activities have been identified as having the potential to generate unacceptable noise levels, as well as significant amounts of hazardous air pollutants. Hill Air Force Base, UT, has completed a series of field tests at the UTTR in which sound-monitoring surveillance of OB/OD activities was conducted to validate the Sound Intensity Prediction System (SIPS) model. Using results generated by the SIPS model to support the decision to detonate, the UTTR successfully disposed of missile motors having an aggregate net explosive weight (NEW) of 56,500 lbs without generating adverse noise levels within populated areas. These results suggest that, under appropriate conditions, missile motors of even larger NEW may be detonated without exceeding regulatory noise limits. In conjunction with collecting noise monitoring data, air quality data was collected to support the development of air emission factors for both static missile motor firings and OB/OD activities. Through the installation of 15 ground-based air samplers, the generation of combustion fixed gases, hazardous air pollutants, and chlorides were monitored during the 56,500-lb NEW detonation event. Comparison of field measurements to predictions generated from the U.S. Navy's energetic combustion pollutant formation model, POLU4WN, indicated that, as the detonation fireball expanded from ground zero, organic compounds as well as carbon monoxide continued to oxidize as the hot gases reacted with ambient air. Hazardous air pollutant analysis of air samplers confirmed the presence of chloromethane, benzene, toluene, 1,2-propadiene, and

  12. Field verification of sound attenuation modeling and air emission testing in support of missile motor disposal activities.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Palmer, Glenn R; Rasmussen, Steve L; Kordich, Micheal M; Pollet, Dean A; Jensen, James A; Lindsay, Mitchell H

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense-approved activities conducted at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) include both operational readiness test firing of intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) motors, as well as the destruction of obsolete or otherwise unusable ICBM motors through open burn/open detonation (OB/OD). Within the Utah Division of Air Quality, these activities have been identified as having the potential to generate unacceptable noise levels, as well as significant amounts of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Hill Air Force Base, UT, has completed a series of field tests at the UTTR in which sound-monitoring surveillance of OB/OD activities was conducted to validate the Sound Intensity Prediction System (SIPS) model. Using results generated by the SIPS model to support the decision to detonate, the UTTR successfully disposed of missile motors having an aggregate net explosive weight (NEW) of 81,374 lb without generating adverse noise levels within populated areas. In conjunction with collecting noise-monitoring data, air emissions were collected to support the development of air emission factors for both static missile motor firings and OB/OD activities. Through the installation of 15 ground-based air samplers, the generation of combustion-fixed gases, VOCs, and chlorides was monitored during the 81,374-lb NEW detonation event. Comparison of field measurements to predictions generated from the US Navy energetic combustion pollutant formation model, POLU4WN, indicated that, as the detonation fire ball expanded, organic compounds, as well as CO, continued to oxidize as the combustion gases mixed with ambient air. VOC analysis of air samplers confirmed the presence of chloromethane, vinyl chloride, benzene, toluene, and 2-methyl-1-propene. Qualitative chloride analysis indicated that gaseous HCl was generated at low concentrations, if at all.

  13. Hands-free device control using sound picked up in the ear canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhatpar, Siddharth R.; Ngia, Lester; Vlach, Chris; Lin, Dong; Birkhimer, Craig; Juneja, Amit; Pruthi, Tarun; Hoffman, Orin; Lewis, Tristan

    2008-04-01

    Hands-free control of unmanned ground vehicles is essential for soldiers, bomb disposal squads, and first responders. Having their hands free for other equipment and tasks allows them to be safer and more mobile. Currently, the most successful hands-free control devices are speech-command based. However, these devices use external microphones, and in field environments, e.g., war zones and fire sites, their performance suffers because of loud ambient noise: typically above 90dBA. This paper describes the development of technology using the ear as an output source that can provide excellent command recognition accuracy even in noisy environments. Instead of picking up speech radiating from the mouth, this technology detects speech transmitted internally through the ear canal. Discreet tongue movements also create air pressure changes within the ear canal, and can be used for stealth control. A patented earpiece was developed with a microphone pointed into the ear canal that captures these signals generated by tongue movements and speech. The signals are transmitted from the earpiece to an Ultra-Mobile Personal Computer (UMPC) through a wired connection. The UMPC processes the signals and utilizes them for device control. The processing can include command recognition, ambient noise cancellation, acoustic echo cancellation, and speech equalization. Successful control of an iRobot PackBot has been demonstrated with both speech (13 discrete commands) and tongue (5 discrete commands) signals. In preliminary tests, command recognition accuracy was 95% with speech control and 85% with tongue control.

  14. Horizontal coherence of low-frequency fixed-path sound in a continental shelf region with internal-wave activity.

    PubMed

    Duda, Timothy F; Collis, Jon M; Lin, Ying-Tsong; Newhall, Arthur E; Lynch, James F; DeFerrari, Harry A

    2012-02-01

    Sound at 85 to 450 Hz propagating in approximately 80-m depth water from fixed sources to a joint horizontal/vertical line array (HLA/VLA) is analyzed. The data are from a continental shelf area east of Delaware Bay (USA) populated with tidally generated long- and short-wavelength internal waves. Sound paths are 19 km in the along-shore (along internal-wave crest) direction and 30 km in the cross-shore direction. Spatial statistics of HLA arrivals are computed as functions of beam steering angle and time. These include array gain, horizontally lagged spatial correlation function, and coherent beam power. These quantities vary widely in magnitude, and vary over a broad range of time scales. For example, correlation scale can change rapidly from forty to five wavelengths, and correlation-scale behavior is anisotropic. In addition, the vertical array can be used to predict correlation expected for adiabatic propagation with cylindrical symmetry, forming a benchmark. Observed variations are in concert with internal-wave activity. Temporal variations of three coherence measures, horizontal correlation length, array gain, and ratio of actual correlation length to predicted adiabatic-mode correlation length, are very strong, varying by almost a factor of ten as internal waves pass.

  15. Parallel language activation and inhibitory control in bimodal bilinguals

    PubMed Central

    Giezen, Marcel R.; Blumenfeld, Henrike K.; Shook, Anthony; Marian, Viorica; Emmorey, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Findings from recent studies suggest that spoken-language bilinguals engage nonlinguistic inhibitory control mechanisms to resolve cross-linguistic competition during auditory word recognition. Bilingual advantages in inhibitory control might stem from the need to resolve perceptual competition between similar-sounding words both within and between their two languages. If so, these advantages should be lessened or eliminated when there is no perceptual competition between two languages. The present study investigated the extent of inhibitory control recruitment during bilingual language comprehension by examining associations between language co-activation and nonlinguistic inhibitory control abilities in bimodal bilinguals, whose two languages do not perceptually compete. Cross-linguistic distractor activation was identified in the visual world paradigm, and correlated significantly with performance on a nonlinguistic spatial Stroop task within a group of 27 hearing ASL-English bilinguals. Smaller Stroop effects (indexing more efficient inhibition) were associated with reduced co-activation of ASL signs during the early stages of auditory word recognition. These results suggest that the role of inhibitory control in auditory word recognition is not limited to resolving perceptual linguistic competition in phonological input, but is also used to moderate competition that originates at the lexico-semantic level. PMID:25912892

  16. Active control of combustion instability

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, W.; Poinsot, T.; Candel, S.

    1987-12-01

    The principle of 'antisound' is used to construct a method for the suppression of combustion instabilities. This active instability control (AIC) method uses external acoustic excitation by a loudspeaker to suppress the oscillations of a flame. The excitation signal is provided by a microphone located upstream of the flame. This signal is filtered, processed, amplified, and sent to the loudspeaker. The AIC method is validated on a laboratory combustor. It allows the suppression of all unstable modes of the burner for any operating ratio. The influence of the microphone and loudspeaker locations on the performance of the AIC system is described. For a given configuration, domains of stability, i.e., domains where the AIC system parameters provide suppression of the oscillation, are investigated. Measurements of the electric input of the loudspeaker show that the energy consumption of the AIC system is almost negligible and suggest that this method could be used for industrial combustor stabilization. Finally, a simple model describing the effects of the AIC system is developed and its results compared to the experiment.

  17. Active thermal control system evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petete, Patricia A.; Ames, Brian E.

    1991-01-01

    The 'restructured' baseline of the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has eliminated many of the growth options for the Active Thermal Control System (ATCS). Modular addition of baseline technology to increase heat rejection will be extremely difficult. The system design and the available real estate no longer accommodate this type of growth. As the station matures during its thirty years of operation, a demand of up to 165 kW of heat rejection can be expected. The baseline configuration will be able to provide 82.5 kW at Eight Manned Crew Capability (EMCC). The growth paths necessary to reach 165 kW have been identified. Doubling the heat rejection capability of SSF will require either the modification of existing radiator wings or the attachment of growth structure to the baseline truss for growth radiator wing placement. Radiator performance can be improved by enlarging the surface area or by boosting the operating temperature with a heat pump. The optimal solution will require both modifications. The addition of growth structure would permit the addition of a parallel ATCS using baseline technology. This growth system would simplify integration. The feasibility of incorporating these growth options to improve the heat rejection capacity of SSF is under evaluation.

  18. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place in the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of highly accurate and useful system.

  19. Control of sound transmission into payload fairings using distributed vibration absorbers and Helmholtz resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteve, Simon J.

    A new passive treatment to reduce sound transmission into payload fairing at low frequency is investigated. This new solution is composed of optimally damped vibration absorbers (DVA) and optimally damped Helmholtz resonators (HR). A fully coupled structural-acoustic model of a composite cylinder excited by an external plane wave is developed as a first approximation of the system. A modal expansion method is used to describe the behavior of the cylindrical shell and the acoustic cavity; the noise reduction devices are modeled as surface impedances. All the elements are then fully coupled using an impedance matching method. This model is then refined using the digitized mode shapes and natural frequencies obtained from a fairing finite element model. For both models, the noise transmission mechanisms are highlighted and the noise reduction mechanisms are explained. Procedures to design the structural and acoustic absorbers based on single degree of freedom system are modified for the multi-mode framework. The optimization of the overall treatment parameters namely location, tuning frequency, and damping of each device is also investigated using genetic algorithm. Noise reduction of up to 9dB from 50Hz to 160Hz using 4% of the cylinder mass for the DVA and 5% of the cavity volume for the HR can be achieved. The robustness of the treatment performance to changes in the excitation, system and devices characteristics is also addressed. The model is validated by experiments done outdoors on a 10-foot long, 8-foot diameter composite cylinder. The excitation level reached 136dB at the cylinder surface comparable to real launch acoustic environment. With HRs representing 2% of the cylinder volume, the noise transmission from 50Hz to 160Hz is reduced by 3dB and the addition of DVAs representing 6.5% of the cylinder mass enhances this performance to 4.3dB. Using the fairing model, a HR+DVA treatment is designed under flight constraints and is implemented in a real Boeing

  20. Clinical trials: active control vs placebo--what is ethical?

    PubMed

    Spławiński, Jacek; Kuźniar, Jerzy

    2004-01-01

    The quest for effective medicines is very old. In modern times two important tools have been developed to evaluate efficacy of drugs, superiority and non-inferiority types of clinical trials. The former tests the null hypothesis of micro (the difference between a tested drug and comparator) < or = 0 against micro > 0; the latter tests the null hypothesis of micro < or = - delta against, micro > - delta, where delta is the clinical difference from the comparator. In a superiority trial, a new drug is tested against a placebo; in a non-inferiority trial, a new drug is tested against active treatment. In this paper, arguments are presented to show that a superiority trial against a placebo is scientifically sound but ethically unacceptable, whereas a non-inferiority trial against active treatment is ethically sound but scientifically not reliable. Switching from a superiority type of trial with placebo to a non-inferiority trial with an active-control--following the latest revision of Declaration of Helsinki--is in practice switching from the violation of the uncertainty principle to uncertainty of results. Given human and financial resources, it appears an academic question as to which is more unethical: to violate patients' rights or to produce results without scientific value. All presented considerations lead to the conclusion that the use of a superiority trial of design with an active control instead of placebo will satisfy scientific needs, expectation of patients, and the ancient quest for effective medicines. In the era of Good (Clinical, Laboratory, Manufacture) Practice, the attention of those performing clinical trials is focused on the procedure, not always on its essence. However even the excellent performance of a trial which is not worth doing is fruitless.

  1. Overview of Langley activities in active controls research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active controls technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. The activities of the Langley Research Center (laRC) in advancing active controls technology. Activities are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  2. Active structural acoustic control of a smart cylindrical shell using a virtual microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loghmani, Ali; Danesh, Mohammad; Kwak, Moon K.; Keshmiri, Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the active structural acoustic control of sound radiated from a smart cylindrical shell. The cylinder is equipped with piezoelectric sensors and actuators to estimate and control the sound pressure that radiates from the smart shell. This estimated pressure is referred to as a virtual microphone, and it can be used in control systems instead of actual microphones to attenuate noise due to structural vibrations. To this end, the dynamic model for the smart cylinder is derived using the extended Hamilton’s principle, the Sanders shell theory and the assumed mode method. The simplified Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral estimates the far-field sound pressure radiating from the baffled cylindrical shell. A modified higher harmonic controller that can cope with a harmonic disturbance is designed and experimentally evaluated. The experimental tests were carried out on a baffled cylindrical aluminum shell in an anechoic chamber. The frequency response for the theoretical virtual microphone and the experimental actual microphone are in good agreement with each other, and the results show the effectiveness of the designed virtual microphone and controller in attenuating the radiated sound.

  3. Adjoint-field errors in high fidelity compressible turbulence simulations for sound control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnampet, Ramanathan; Bodony, Daniel; Freund, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    A consistent discrete adjoint for high-fidelity discretization of the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is used to quantify the error in the sensitivity gradient predicted by the continuous adjoint method, and examine the aeroacoustic flow-control problem for free-shear-flow turbulence. A particular quadrature scheme for approximating the cost functional makes our discrete adjoint formulation for a fourth-order Runge-Kutta scheme with high-order finite differences practical and efficient. The continuous adjoint-based sensitivity gradient is shown to to be inconsistent due to discretization truncation errors, grid stretching and filtering near boundaries. These errors cannot be eliminated by increasing the spatial or temporal resolution since chaotic interactions lead them to become O (1) at the time of control actuation. Although this is a known behavior for chaotic systems, its effect on noise control is much harder to anticipate, especially given the different resolution needs of different parts of the turbulence and acoustic spectra. A comparison of energy spectra of the adjoint pressure fields shows significant error in the continuous adjoint at all wavenumbers, even though they are well-resolved. The effect of this error on the noise control mechanism is analyzed.

  4. Guidance, navigation & control systems for sounding rockets - flight results, current status and the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljunge, Lars

    2005-08-01

    At the 16th ESA Symposium on European Rockets and Balloons, two newly developed guidance and control systems by Saab Ericsson Space were presented: The S19D guidance and control system, which uses DS19 hardware to execute S19 type guidance and control. The GCS/DMARS guidance, navigation and control system, which is a modernisation of the GCS/RIINS. These two and the third recent system, the DS19, were developed as replacements for the analog S19 and the GCS/RIINS, both of which use very old technology. The design drivers or the DS19, the S19D and the GCS/DMARS are: User requirements. New technology with improved performance capability becoming available. Current technology becoming old and replacement parts hard to come by. This paper first lists some guidance related user requirements, and then discusses the performance that has been achieved in the various guidance systems, including the S19, for comparison. This is first done from a theoretical point of view and then by analyzing actual flight data. The ability of the systems to fulfil the user requirements is also discussed and finally, a look is taken into the future.

  5. Research on adaptive temperature control in sound field induced by self-focused concave spherical transducer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiwen; Qian, Shengyou; Ding, Yajun

    2010-05-01

    Temperature control of hyperthermia treatments is generally implemented with multipoint feedback system comprised of phased-array transducer, which is complicated and high cost. Our simulations to the acoustic field induced by a self-focused concave spherical transducer (0.5MHz, 9cm aperture width, 8.0cm focal length) show that the distribution of temperature can keep the same "cigar shape" in the focal region during ultrasound insonation. Based on the characteristic of the temperature change, a two-dimensional model of a "cigar shape" tumor is designed and tested through numerical simulation. One single-point on the border of the "cigar shape" tumor is selected as the control target and is controlled at the temperature of 43 degrees C by using a self-tuning regulator (STR). Considering the nonlinear effects of biological medium, an accurate state-space model obtained via the finite Fourier integral transformation to the bioheat equation is presented and used for calculating temperature. Computer simulations were performed with the perfusion rates of 2.0kg/(m(3)s) and 4.5kg/(m(3)s) to the different targets, it was found that the temperatures on the border of the "cigar shape" tumor can achieve the desired temperature of 43 degrees C by control of one single-point. A larger perfusion rate requires a higher power output to obtain the same temperature elevation under the same insonation time and needs a higher cost for compensating the energy loss carried away by blood flow after steady state. The power output increases with the controlled region while achieving the same temperature at the same time. Especially, there is no overshoot during temperature elevation and no oscillation after steady state. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach may offers a way for obtaining a single-point, low-cost hyperthermia system.

  6. Target-depth estimation in active sonar: Cramer-Rao bounds for a bilinear sound-speed profile.

    PubMed

    Mours, Alexis; Ioana, Cornel; Mars, Jérôme I; Josso, Nicolas F; Doisy, Yves

    2016-09-01

    This paper develops a localization method to estimate the depth of a target in the context of active sonar, at long ranges. The target depth is tactical information for both strategy and classification purposes. The Cramer-Rao lower bounds for the target position as range and depth are derived for a bilinear profile. The influence of sonar parameters on the standard deviations of the target range and depth are studied. A localization method based on ray back-propagation with a probabilistic approach is then investigated. Monte-Carlo simulations applied to a summer Mediterranean sound-speed profile are performed to evaluate the efficiency of the estimator. This method is finally validated on data in an experimental tank.

  7. Causal feedforward control of a stochastically excited fuselage structure with active sidewall panel.

    PubMed

    Misol, Malte; Haase, Thomas; Monner, Hans Peter; Sinapius, Michael

    2014-10-01

    This paper provides experimental results of an aircraft-relevant double panel structure mounted in a sound transmission loss facility. The primary structure of the double panel system is excited either by a stochastic point force or by a diffuse sound field synthesized in the reverberation room of the transmission loss facility. The secondary structure, which is connected to the frames of the primary structure, is augmented by actuators and sensors implementing an active feedforward control system. Special emphasis is placed on the causality of the active feedforward control system and its implications on the disturbance rejection at the error sensors. The coherence of the sensor signals is analyzed for the two different disturbance excitations. Experimental results are presented regarding the causality, coherence, and disturbance rejection of the active feedforward control system. Furthermore, the sound transmission loss of the double panel system is evaluated for different configurations of the active system. A principal result of this work is the evidence that it is possible to strongly influence the transmission of stochastic disturbance sources through double panel configurations by means of an active feedforward control system.

  8. Phytoremediation: An Environmentally Sound Technology for Pollution Prevention, Control and Remediation in Developing Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erakhrumen, Andrew Agbontalor

    2007-01-01

    The problem of environmental pollution has assumed an unprecedented proportion in many parts of the world especially in Nigeria and its Niger-Delta region in particular. This region is bedeviled with this problem perhaps owing to interplay of demographic and socio-economic forces coupled with the various activities that revolve round the…

  9. Effects of Listening to Music versus Environmental Sounds in Passive and Active Situations on Levels of Pain and Fatigue in Fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Mercadíe, Lolita; Mick, Gérard; Guétin, Stéphane; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    In fibromyalgia, pain symptoms such as hyperalgesia and allodynia are associated with fatigue. Mechanisms underlying such symptoms can be modulated by listening to pleasant music. We expected that listening to music, because of its emotional impact, would have a greater modulating effect on the perception of pain and fatigue in patients with fibromyalgia than listening to nonmusical sounds. To investigate this hypothesis, we carried out a 4-week study in which patients with fibromyalgia listened to either preselected musical pieces or environmental sounds when they experienced pain in active (while carrying out a physical activity) or passive (at rest) situations. Concomitant changes of pain and fatigue levels were evaluated. When patients listened to music or environmental sounds at rest, pain and fatigue levels were significantly reduced after 20 minutes of listening, with no difference of effect magnitude between the two stimuli. This improvement persisted 10 minutes after the end of the listening session. In active situations, pain did not increase in presence of the two stimuli. Contrary to our expectations, music and environmental sounds produced a similar relieving effect on pain and fatigue, with no benefit gained by listening to pleasant music over environmental sounds.

  10. Letter Recognition and Sound Identification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prior, Jennifer

    This lesson, which is most appropriate for kindergartners, reviews letter names and their sounds through a group letter recognition activity, a picture book activity, and alphabet practice with several online activities. During three 30-minute sessions, students will: identify the letters of the alphabet; identify the sounds of letters; identify…

  11. Active learning of novel sound-producing objects: motor reactivation and enhancement of visuo-motor connectivity.

    PubMed

    Butler, Andrew J; James, Karin Harman

    2013-02-01

    Our experience with the world commonly involves physical interaction with objects enabling us to learn associations between multisensory information perceived during an event and our actions that create an event. The interplay among active interactions during learning and multisensory integration of object properties is not well understood. To better understand how action might enhance multisensory associative recognition, we investigated the interplay among motor and perceptual systems after active learning. Fifteen participants were included in an fMRI study during which they learned visuo-auditory-motor associations between novel objects and the sounds they produce, either through self-generated actions on the objects (active learning) or by observing an experimenter produce the actions (passive learning). Immediately after learning, behavioral and BOLD fMRI measures were collected while perceiving the objects used during unisensory and multisensory training in associative perception and recognition tasks. Active learning was faster and led to more accurate recognition of audiovisual associations than passive learning. Functional ROI analyses showed that in motor, somatosensory, and cerebellar regions there was greater activation during both the perception and recognition of actively learned associations. Finally, functional connectivity between visual- and motor-related processing regions was enhanced during the presentation of actively learned audiovisual associations. Overall, the results of the current study clarify and extend our own previous work [Butler, A. J., James, T. W., & Harman James, K. Enhanced multisensory integration and motor reactivation after active motor learning of audiovisual associations. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 23, 3515-3528, 2011] by providing several novel findings and highlighting the task-based nature of motor reactivation and retrieval after active learning.

  12. Tools for active control system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, W. M., Jr.; Tiffany, S. H.; Newsom, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Efficient control law analysis and design tools which properly account for the interaction of flexible structures, unsteady aerodynamics and active controls are developed. Development, application, validation and documentation of efficient multidisciplinary computer programs for analysis and design of active control laws are also discussed.

  13. Active Control of Fan Noise by Vane Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, Alan R. D.

    1999-01-01

    An active noise control system for ducted fan noise was built that uses actuators located in stator vanes. The actuators were piezoelectric benders manufactured using the THUNDER technology and were custom designed for the application. The active noise control system was installed in the NASA ANCF rig. Four actuator array with a total of 168 actuators in 28 stator vanes were used. Simultaneous reductions of acoustic power in both the inlet and exhaust duct were demonstrated for a fan disturbance that contained two radial mode orders in both inlet and exhaust. Total power levels in the target modes were reduced by up to 9 dB in the inlet and total tone levels by over 6 dB while exhaust power levels were reduced by up to 3 dB. Far field sound pressure level reductions of up to 17 dB were observed. A simpler control system, matched to the location of the disturbance with two radial actuator arrays, was demonstrated to control total acoustic power in four disturbance modes simultaneously in inlet and exhaust. The vane actuator met the requirements given for the ANCF, although in practice the performance of the system was limited by the constraints of the power amplifiers and the presence of control spillover. The vane actuators were robust. None of the 168 vane actuators failed during the tests.

  14. Dog-appeasing pheromone collars reduce sound-induced fear and anxiety in beagle dogs: a placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, G M; Beck, A; Lopez, A; Deniaud, M; Araujo, J A; Milgram, N W

    2015-09-12

    The objective of the study was to assess the effects of a dog-appeasing pheromone (DAP) collar in reducing sound-induced fear and anxiety in a laboratory model of thunderstorm simulation. Twenty-four beagle dogs naïve to the current test were divided into two treatment groups (DAP and placebo) balanced on their fear score in response to a thunderstorm recording. Each group was then exposed to two additional thunderstorm simulation tests on consecutive days. Dogs were video-assessed by a trained observer on a 6-point scale for active, passive and global fear and anxiety (combined). Both global and active fear and anxiety scores were significantly improved during and following thunder compared with placebo on both test days. DAP significantly decreased global fear and anxiety across 'during' and 'post' thunder times when compared with baseline. There was no significant improvement in the placebo group from baseline on the test days. In addition, the DAP group showed significantly greater use of the hide box at any time with increased exposure compared with the placebo group. The DAP collar reduced the scores of fear and anxiety, and increased hide use in response to a thunder recording, possibly by counteracting noise-related increased reactivity.

  15. Dog-appeasing pheromone collars reduce sound-induced fear and anxiety in beagle dogs: a placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Landsberg, G. M.; Beck, A.; Lopez, A.; Deniaud, M.; Araujo, J. A.; Milgram, N. W.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the effects of a dog-appeasing pheromone (DAP) collar in reducing sound-induced fear and anxiety in a laboratory model of thunderstorm simulation. Twenty-four beagle dogs naïve to the current test were divided into two treatment groups (DAP and placebo) balanced on their fear score in response to a thunderstorm recording. Each group was then exposed to two additional thunderstorm simulation tests on consecutive days. Dogs were video-assessed by a trained observer on a 6-point scale for active, passive and global fear and anxiety (combined). Both global and active fear and anxiety scores were significantly improved during and following thunder compared with placebo on both test days. DAP significantly decreased global fear and anxiety across ‘during’ and ‘post’ thunder times when compared with baseline. There was no significant improvement in the placebo group from baseline on the test days. In addition, the DAP group showed significantly greater use of the hide box at any time with increased exposure compared with the placebo group. The DAP collar reduced the scores of fear and anxiety, and increased hide use in response to a thunder recording, possibly by counteracting noise-related increased reactivity. PMID:26311736

  16. Sound naming in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Chow, Maggie L; Brambati, Simona M; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Miller, Bruce L; Johnson, Julene K

    2010-04-01

    Modern cognitive neuroscientific theories and empirical evidence suggest that brain structures involved in movement may be related to action-related semantic knowledge. To test this hypothesis, we examined the naming of environmental sounds in patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), two neurodegenerative diseases associated with cognitive and motor deficits. Subjects were presented with 56 environmental sounds: 28 sounds were of objects that required manipulation when producing the sound, and 28 sounds were of objects that required no manipulation. Subjects were asked to provide the name of the object that produced the sound and also complete a sound-picture matching condition. Subjects included 33 individuals from four groups: CBD/PSP, Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, and normal controls. We hypothesized that CBD/PSP patients would exhibit impaired naming performance compared with controls, but the impairment would be most apparent when naming sounds associated with actions. We also explored neural correlates of naming environmental sounds using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) of brain MRI. As expected, CBD/PSP patients scored lower on environmental sounds naming (p<0.007) compared with the controls. In particular, the CBD/PSP patients scored the lowest when naming sounds of manipulable objects (p<0.05), but did not show deficits in naming sounds of non-manipulable objects. VBM analysis across all groups showed that performance in naming sounds of manipulable objects correlated with atrophy in the left pre-motor region, extending from area six to the middle and superior frontal gyrus. These results indicate an association between impairment in the retrieval of action-related names and the motor system, and suggest that difficulty in naming manipulable sounds may be related to atrophy in the pre-motor cortex. Our results support the hypothesis that retrieval of action-related semantic knowledge involves motor

  17. Breath sounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... are believed to occur when air opens closed air spaces. Rales can be further described as moist, dry, fine, and coarse. Rhonchi. Sounds that resemble snoring. They occur when air is blocked or air flow becomes rough through ...

  18. Sound Advice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popke, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the planning and decision-making process in acquiring sound equipment for sports stadiums that will help make the experience of fans more pleasurable. The bidding process and use of consultants is explored. (GR)

  19. Developing Internal Controls through Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, F. Herbert

    2009-01-01

    Life events can include the Tuesday afternoon cooking class with the group worker or the Saturday afternoon football game, but in the sense that Fritz Redl thought of them, these activities are only threads in a fabric of living that includes all the elements of daily life: playing, working, school-based learning, learning through activities,…

  20. Active control of panel vibrations induced by a boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1995-01-01

    The problems of active and passive control of sound and vibration has been investigated by many researchers for a number of years. However, few of the articles are concerned with the sound and vibration with flow-structure interaction. Experimental and numerical studies on the coupling between panel vibration and acoustic radiation due to flow excitation have been done by Maestrello and his associates at NASA/Langley Research Center. Since the coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations is formidable, an analytical solution to the full problem seems impossible. For this reason, we have to simplify the problem to that of the nonlinear panel vibration induced by a uniform flow or a boundary-layer flow with a given wall pressure distribution. Based on this simplified model, we have been able to consider the control and stabilization of the nonlinear panel vibration, which have not been treated satisfactorily by other authors. Although the sound radiation has not been included, the vibration suppression will clearly reduce the sound radiation power from the panel. The major research findings are presented in three sections. In section two we describe results on the boundary control of nonlinear panel vibration, with or without flow excitation. Sections three and four are concerned with some analytical and numerical results in the optimal control of the linear and nonlinear panel vibrations, respectively, excited by the flow pressure fluctuations. Finally, in section five, we draw some conclusions from research findings.

  1. Orbiter active thermal control system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laubach, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A brief description of the Orbiter Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) including (1) major functional requirements of heat load, temperature control and heat sink utilization, (2) the overall system arrangement, and (3) detailed description of the elements of the ATCS.

  2. Active Control of Open Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    UKeiley, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Open loop edge blowing was demonstrated as an effective method for reducing the broad band and tonal components of the fluctuating surface pressure in open cavities. Closed loop has been successfully applied to low Mach number open cavities. Need to push actuators that are viable for closed loop control in bandwidth and output. Need a better understanding of the effects of control on the flow through detailed measurements so better actuation strategies can be developed.

  3. Active Control of High-Frequency Combustor Instability Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2003-01-01

    To reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems, extensive research is being done in the development of lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle. However, these lean-burning combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities-high-pressure oscillations much like sound waves that can cause severe high-frequency vibrations in the combustor. These pressure waves can fatigue the combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the combustor and turbine safe operating life. Thus, suppression of the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors. Under the Propulsion and Power Program, the NASA Glenn Research Center in partnership with Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Research Center, and Georgia Institute of Technology is developing technologies for the active control of combustion instabilities.

  4. Focused beam control for ultrasound surgery with spherical-section phased array: sound field calculation and genetic optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingzhu; Wan, Mingxi; Xu, Feng; Wang, Xiaodong; Zhong, Hui

    2005-08-01

    This study aims at a sound field calculation for the spherical-section phased array and an optimization algorithm for the focus patterns of phased array ultrasound surgery. An efficient field calculation formula represented as an explicit expression is derived by the strategies of projection and binomial expansion. An optimization algorithm based on genetic algorithm is constructed by the suitable fitness function and the selection strategies. The simulation results of 256-element spherical-section phased array show the capability of controlling focus accurately and effectively with the combined method made up of the explicit expression method and the genetic optimization algorithm. The simulation results of single focus, multiple foci, on-axial focus, and off-axial focus further convince the feasibility of three-dimensional (3-D) focus steering with excellent acoustic performances. A single focus with the focus dimension of 1.25 mm x 1.25 mm x 7 mm and with the intensity of 6080 W/cm2 is formed. The multiple-focus pattern can enlarge the treatment volume 22 times larger than that of single focus with a sonication. In addition, a comparison between the explicit expression approach and the point source approach testifies to the applicability of the explicit expression approach. The experiment and simulation results of 16-element array actually confirm the feasibility of the combined method.

  5. Sound Guard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lubrication technology originally developed for a series of NASA satellites has produced a commercial product for protecting the sound fidelity of phonograph records. Called Sound Guard, the preservative is a spray-on fluid that deposits a microscopically thin protective coating which reduces friction and prevents the hard diamond stylus from wearing away the softer vinyl material of the disc. It is marketed by the Consumer Products Division of Ball Corporation, Muncie, Indiana. The lubricant technology on which Sound Guard is based originated with NASA's Orbiting Solar Observatory (OSO), an Earth-orbiting satellite designed and built by Ball Brothers Research Corporation, Boulder, Colorado, also a division of Ball Corporation. Ball Brothers engineers found a problem early in the OSO program: known lubricants were unsuitable for use on satellite moving parts that would be exposed to the vacuum of space for several months. So the company conducted research on the properties of materials needed for long life in space and developed new lubricants. They worked successfully on seven OSO flights and attracted considerable attention among other aerospace contractors. Ball Brothers now supplies its "Vac Kote" lubricants and coatings to both aerospace and non-aerospace industries and the company has produced several hundred variations of the original technology. Ball Corporation expanded its product line to include consumer products, of which Sound Guard is one of the most recent. In addition to protecting record grooves, Sound Guard's anti-static quality also retards particle accumulation on the stylus. During comparison study by a leading U.S. electronic laboratory, a record not treated by Sound Guard had to be cleaned after 50 plays and the stylus had collected a considerable number of small vinyl particles. The Sound Guard-treated disc was still clean after 100 plays, as was its stylus.

  6. Concurrent Acoustic Activation of the Medial Olivocochlear System Modifies the After-Effects of Intense Low-Frequency Sound on the Human Inner Ear.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Kathrin; Wiegrebe, Lutz; Gürkov, Robert; Krause, Eike; Drexl, Markus

    2015-12-01

    >Human hearing is rather insensitive for very low frequencies (i.e. below 100 Hz). Despite this insensitivity, low-frequency sound can cause oscillating changes of cochlear gain in inner ear regions processing even much higher frequencies. These alterations outlast the duration of the low-frequency stimulation by several minutes, for which the term 'bounce phenomenon' has been coined. Previously, we have shown that the bounce can be traced by monitoring frequency and level changes of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) over time. It has been suggested elsewhere that large receptor potentials elicited by low-frequency stimulation produce a net Ca(2+) influx and associated gain decrease in outer hair cells. The bounce presumably reflects an underdamped, homeostatic readjustment of increased Ca(2+) concentrations and related gain changes after low-frequency sound offset. Here, we test this hypothesis by activating the medial olivocochlear efferent system during presentation of the bounce-evoking low-frequency (LF) sound. The efferent system is known to modulate outer hair cell Ca(2+) concentrations and receptor potentials, and therefore, it should modulate the characteristics of the bounce phenomenon. We show that simultaneous presentation of contralateral broadband noise (100 Hz-8 kHz, 65 and 70 dB SPL, 90 s, activating the efferent system) and ipsilateral low-frequency sound (30 Hz, 120 dB SPL, 90 s, inducing the bounce) affects the characteristics of bouncing SOAEs recorded after low-frequency sound offset. Specifically, the decay time constant of the SOAE level changes is shorter, and the transient SOAE suppression is less pronounced. Moreover, the number of new, transient SOAEs as they are seen during the bounce, are reduced. Taken together, activation of the medial olivocochlear system during induction of the bounce phenomenon with low-frequency sound results in changed characteristics of the bounce phenomenon. Thus, our data provide experimental support

  7. Variation in the emission rate of sounds in a captive group of false killer whales Pseudorca crassidens during feedings: possible food anticipatory vocal activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platto, Sara; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong

    2016-11-01

    This study examines whether a group of captive false killer whales ( Pseudorca crassidens ) showed variations in the vocal rate around feeding times. The high level of motivation to express appetitive behaviors in captive animals may lead them to respond with changes of the behavioral activities during the time prior to food deliveries which are referred to as food anticipatory activity. False killer whales at Qingdao Polar Ocean World (Qingdao, China) showed significant variations of the rates of both the total sounds and sound classes (whistles, clicks, and burst pulses) around feedings. Precisely, from the Transition interval that recorded the lowest vocalization rate (3.40 s/m/d), the whales increased their acoustic emissions upon trainers' arrival (13.08 s/m/d). The high rate was maintained or intensified throughout the food delivery (25.12 s/m/d), and then reduced immediately after the animals were fed (9.91 s/m/d). These changes in the false killer whales sound production rates around feeding times supports the hypothesis of the presence of a food anticipatory vocal activity. Although sound rates may not give detailed information regarding referential aspects of the animal communication it might still shed light about the arousal levels of the individuals during different social or environmental conditions. Further experiments should be performed to assess if variations of the time of feeding routines may affect the vocal activity of cetaceans in captivity as well as their welfare.

  8. Student Activity Funds: Procedures & Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    Student activity funds may create educational opportunities for students, but they frequently create problems for business administrators. The first part of this work reviews the types of organizational issues and transactions an organized student group is likely to encounter, including establishing a constitution, participant roles,…

  9. Potential Subjective Effectiveness of Active Interior Noise Control in Propeller Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A.; Sullivan, Brenda M.

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control technology offers the potential for weight-efficient aircraft interior noise reduction, particularly for propeller aircraft. However, there is little information on how passengers respond to this type of interior noise control. This paper presents results of two experiments that use sound quality engineering practices to determine the subjective effectiveness of hypothetical active noise control (ANC) systems in a range of propeller aircraft. The two experiments differed by the type of judgments made by the subjects: pair comparisons based on preference in the first and numerical category scaling of noisiness in the second. Although the results of the two experiments were in general agreement that the hypothetical active control measures improved the interior noise environments, the pair comparison method appears to be more sensitive to subtle changes in the characteristics of the sounds which are related to passenger preference. The reductions in subjective response due to the ANC conditions were predicted with reasonable accuracy by reductions in measured loudness level. Inclusion of corrections for the sound quality characteristics of tonality and fluctuation strength in multiple regression models improved the prediction of the ANC effects.

  10. Effects of multiple congruent cues on concurrent sound segregation during passive and active listening: an event-related potential (ERP) study.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Zsuzsanna; Winkler, István; Szalárdy, Orsolya; Bendixen, Alexandra

    2014-07-01

    In two experiments, we assessed the effects of combining different cues of concurrent sound segregation on the object-related negativity (ORN) and the P400 event-related potential components. Participants were presented with sequences of complex tones, half of which contained some manipulation: one or two harmonic partials were mistuned, delayed, or presented from a different location than the rest. In separate conditions, one, two, or three of these manipulations were combined. Participants watched a silent movie (passive listening) or reported after each tone whether they perceived one or two concurrent sounds (active listening). ORN was found in almost all conditions except for location difference alone during passive listening. Combining several cues or manipulating more than one partial consistently led to sub-additive effects on the ORN amplitude. These results support the view that ORN reflects a combined, feature-unspecific assessment of the auditory system regarding the contribution of two sources to the incoming sound.

  11. Temporally Unpredictable Sounds Exert a Context-Dependent Influence on Evaluation of Unrelated Images

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Dominik R.; Seifritz, Erich; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Temporally unpredictable stimuli influence murine and human behaviour, as previously demonstrated for sequences of simple sounds with regular or irregular onset. It is unknown whether this influence is mediated by an evaluation of the unpredictable sound sequences themselves, or by an interaction with task context. Here, we find that humans evaluate unrelated neutral pictures as more negative when these are presented together with a temporally unpredictable sound sequence, compared to a predictable sequence. The same is observed for evaluation of neutral, angry and fearful face photographs. Control experiments suggest this effect is specific to interspersed presentation of negative and neutral visual stimuli. Unpredictable sounds presented on their own were evaluated as more activating, but not more aversive, and were preferred over predictable sounds. When presented alone, these sound sequences also did not elicit tonic autonomic arousal or negative mood change. We discuss how these findings might account for previous data on the effects of unpredictable sounds, in humans and rodents. PMID:26098105

  12. A mobile system for the multifrequency Doppler sounding of the modified ionosphere in active experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagno, Iu. D.; Kim, V. Iu.; Namazov, S. A.; Panchenko, V. N.; Khar'kov, I. P.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents a description of a mobile multichannel Doppler system designed for shipboard studies of the modified ionosphere. The system was used for the diagnostics of the modified ionosphere in active experiments carried out in equatorial and low-latitude regions using the MR-20 geophysical rockets as well as in satellite experiments in the framework of the CRRES project. The data processing method is discussed, and experimental data are presented.

  13. Identification of Sound Source Azimuth with Active and Passive Hearing Protectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    dichotic or independent input to the two ears; the DH-140 provides a diotic or completely correlated input to both ears. Auditory localizatio’i ’r a...in the data for subject F. Model 6 resembles the serpentine pattern seen with the dichotic active protector (Figure 11). However, closer examination...Even when aware of this enhancement of head shadow effect, subjects were unable to assign perceptual loci to the left or right. With a dichotic

  14. Active control: an investigation method for combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinsot, T.; Yip, B.; Veynante, D.; Trouvé, A.; Samaniego, J. M.; Candel, S.

    1992-07-01

    Closed-loop active control methods and their application to combustion instabilities are discussed. In these methods the instability development is impeded with a feedback control loop: the signal provided by a sensor monitoring the flame or pressure oscillations is processed and sent back to actuators mounted on the combustor or on the feeding system. Different active control systems tested on a non-premixed multiple-flame turbulent combustor are described. These systems can suppress all unstable plane modes of oscillation (i.e. low frequency modes). The active instability control (AIC) also constitutes an original and powerful technique for studies of mechanisms leading to instability or resulting from the instability. Two basic applications of this kind are described. In the first case the flame is initially controlled with AIC, the feedback loop is then switched off and the growth of the instability is analysed through high speed Schlieren cinematography and simultaneous sound pressure and reaction rate measurements. Three phases are identified during th growth of the oscillations: (1) a linear phase where acoustic waves induce a flapping motion of the flame sheets without interaction between sheets, (2) a modulation phase, where flame sheets interact randomly and (3) a nonlinear phase where the flame sheets are broken and a limit cycle is reached. In the second case we investigate different types of flame extinctions associated with combustion instability. It is shown that pressure oscillations may lead to partial or total extinctions. Extinctions occur in various forms but usually follow a rapid growth of pressure oscillations. The flame is extinguished during the modulation phase observed in the initiation experiments. In these studies devoted to transient instability phenomena, the control system constitutes a unique investigation tool because it is difficult to obtain the same information by other means. Implications for modelling and prediction of

  15. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Actively controlled mechanical seals have recently been developed for industrial use. This study investigates the feasibility of using such seals for aerospace applications. In a noncontacting mechanical seal, the film thickness depends on the geometry of the seal interface. The amount of coning, which is a measure of the radial convergence or divergence of the seal interface, has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the coning with a piezoelectric material. A mathematical model has been formulated to predict the performance of an actively controlled mechanical seal.

  16. Geophysical Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, E.

    1998-01-01

    Of the many geophysical remote-sensing techniques available today, a few are suitable for the water ice-rich, layered material expected at the north martian ice cap. Radio echo sounding has been used for several decades to determine ice thickness and internal structure. Selection of operating frequency is a tradeoff between signal attenuation (which typically increases with frequency and ice temperature) and resolution (which is proportional to wavelength). Antenna configuration and size will be additional considerations for a mission to Mars. Several configurations for ice-penetrating radar systems are discussed: these include orbiter-borne sounders, sounding antennas trailed by balloons and penetrators, and lander-borne systems. Lander-borne systems could include short-wave systems capable of resolving fine structure and layering in the upper meters beneath the lander. Spread-spectrum and deconvolution techniques can be used to increase the depth capability of a radar system. If soundings over several locations are available (e.g., with balloons, rovers, or panning short-wave systems), then it will be easier to resolve internal layering, variations in basal reflection coefficient (from which material properties may be inferred), and the geometry of nonhorizontal features. Sonic sounding has a long history in oil and gas exploration. It is, however, unlikely that large explosive charges, or even swept-frequency techniques such as Vibroseis, would be suitable for a Polar lander -- these systems are capable of penetrating several kilometers of material at frequencies of 10-200 Hz, but the energy required to generate the sound waves is large and potentially destructive. The use of audio-frequency and ultrasonic sound generated by piezoelectric crystals is discussed as a possible method to explore layering and fine features in the upper meters of the ice cap. Appropriate choice of transducer(s) will permit operation over a range of fixed or modulated frequencies

  17. Comparison of a new rapid convergent adaptive control algorithm to least mean square on an active noise control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshigoe, Shozo; Gordon, Alan; Teagle, Allen; Tsay, Ching-Hsu

    1995-04-01

    In this paper, an efficient rapid convergent control algorithm will be developed and will be compared with other adaptive control algorithms using an experimental active noise control system. Other control algorithms are Widrow's finite impulse response adaptive control algorithm, and a modified Godard's algorithm. Comparisons of the random noise attenuation capability, transient and convergence performance, and computational requirements of each algorithm will be made as the order of the controller and relevant convergence parameters are varied. The system used for these experiments is a test bed of noise suppression technology for expendable launch vehicles. It consists of a flexible plate backed by a rigid cavity. Piezoelectric actuators are mounted on the plate and polyvinylidene fluoride is used both for microphones and pressure sensors within the cavity. The plate is bombarded with an amplified random noise signal, and the control system is used to suppress the noise inside the cavity generated by the outside sound source.

  18. The functional anatomy of recovery from auditory agnosia. A PET study of sound categorization in a neurological patient and normal controls.

    PubMed

    Engelien, A; Silbersweig, D; Stern, E; Huber, W; Döring, W; Frith, C; Frackowiak, R S

    1995-12-01

    H2(15)O-PET was used to investigate the functional anatomy of recovery in a patient (J.B.) with bilateral perisylvian strokes and auditory agnosia, who partially regained the ability to recognize environmental sounds, but remained clinically word-deaf. The patient and a group of six normal volunteers were scanned in the following three conditions: (i) passive listening to environmental sounds; (ii) categorization of environmental sounds; (iii) at rest. In normal subjects, passive listening as compared with rest was associated with significant activations in the auditory cortices and posterior thalami, and in the inferior parietal lobe and anterior insula/frontal opercular region on the right. In J.B., activations were observed in the spared auditory cortex and inferior parietal lobe of the right hemisphere and in regions adjacent to the perisylvian lesion in the left hemisphere (anterior insula/frontal opercular region, middle temporal gyrus and inferior parietal lobe). The recovered function, as measured by categorization of sounds compared with passive listening, in J.B. was associated with bilateral activation of a distributed network comprising (pre)frontal, middle temporal and inferior parietal cortices, as well as the right cerebellum and the right caudate nucleus. In addition, there was a left-sided activation of the anterior cingulate gyrus. In normal subjects, the same categorization task led to activation of a network comprising (pre)frontal, middle temporal and inferior parietal cortices in the left hemisphere only. These results suggest that bilateral activation (with recruitment of areas homologous to those known to be responsible for normal function), the engagement of peri-infarct regions, and the involvement of a more widespread neocortical network, are mechanisms of functional reorganization after injury that may enable recovery from, or compensation for, cognitive deficits.

  19. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  20. Active Control of Transition and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1987-01-01

    Two active means of manipulating boundary-layer flow developed, one controlling laminar-to-turbulent transition, other controlling amplitude of turbulent fluctuation. Purpose to control skin-friction drag over surfaces inside inlets and ducts. Resulting turbulence downstream has lower skin-friction drag than equivalent flow developing over same surfaces in absence of intervention. Heating strips trigger turbulence while transition amplitude and bandwidth controlled by acoustic signal.

  1. Reliable and Affordable Control Systems Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarty, Bob; Tomondi, Chris; McGinley, Ray

    2004-01-01

    Active, closed-loop control of combustor pattern factor is a cooperative effort between Honeywell (formerly AlliedSignal) Engines and Systems and the NASA Glenn Research Center to reduce emissions and turbine-stator vane temperature variations, thereby enhancing engine performance and life, and reducing direct operating costs. Total fuel flow supplied to the engine is established by the speed/power control, but the distribution to individual atomizers will be controlled by the Active Combustor Pattern Factor Control (ACPFC). This system consist of three major components: multiple, thin-film sensors located on the turbine-stator vanes; fuel-flow modulators for individual atomizers; and control logic and algorithms within the electronic control.

  2. Multipoint observations of nightside auroral activity: the Cascades2 sounding rocket mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, K. A.; Mella, M. R.; Kintner, P. M.; Lundberg, E. T.; Lessard, M.; Jones, S.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; Hampton, D. L.; Ivchenko, N. V.; Dahlgren, H.

    2009-12-01

    Cascades2 was launched from Poker Flat Alaska on 20 Mar 2009 at 11:04 UT (roughly 30 minutes premidnight magnetic local time.) The 12 minute 43 second flight reached an apogee of 564 km over the northern coast of Alaska at 11:11:11 UT, and entered the polar cap at 11:14:40 UT before atmospheric reentry at 11:16:42 UT. The experiment array included a 5-payload suite of in situ instrumentation, ground cameras of various fields of view at three different points under the trajectory, various ground magnetometers, the PFISR radar at the launch site, and the THEMIS spacecraft in the magnetotail. The array design was chosen to address questions about (1) shears in ionospheric electric fields and their ability to drive waves; (2) proper motion of auroral structures with respect to the ambient ionosphere; and (3) quantifying parameters of dispersive Alfven wave phenomena and their effects on auroral fluxtubes. The successful flight was due to the sustained and dedicated effort of the many and varied members of our team. The Cascades2 trajectory passed through several parts of a poleward boundary intensification event, with both inverted-V type aurora and sustained Alfvenic activity seen. Other presentations will detail the ground camera, onboard DC electric fields, and onboard multipoint electron data. In this presentation we show onboard magnetometer results of current signatures both compressional and transverse. Also we present ion data showing the complex motion of low and medium energy ions in these poleward boundary events; ions are seen to be both moving upward along the field line, and then precipitating back down at higher energies with dispersion signatures.

  3. Active tectonics of the Seattle fault and central Puget sound, Washington - Implications for earthquake hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Dadisman, S.V.; Childs, J. R.; Stanley, W.D.

    1999-01-01

    We use an extensive network of marine high-resolution and conventional industry seismic-reflection data to constrain the location, shallow structure, and displacement rates of the Seattle fault zone and crosscutting high-angle faults in the Puget Lowland of western Washington. Analysis of seismic profiles extending 50 km across the Puget Lowland from Lake Washington to Hood Canal indicates that the west-trending Seattle fault comprises a broad (4-6 km) zone of three or more south-dipping reverse faults. Quaternary sediment has been folded and faulted along all faults in the zone but is clearly most pronounced along fault A, the northernmost fault, which forms the boundary between the Seattle uplift and Seattle basin. Analysis of growth strata deposited across fault A indicate minimum Quaternary slip rates of about 0.6 mm/yr. Slip rates across the entire zone are estimated to be 0.7-1.1 mm/yr. The Seattle fault is cut into two main segments by an active, north-trending, high-angle, strike-slip fault zone with cumulative dextral displacement of about 2.4 km. Faults in this zone truncate and warp reflections in Tertiary and Quaternary strata and locally coincide with bathymetric lineaments. Cumulative slip rates on these faults may exceed 0.2 mm/yr. Assuming no other crosscutting faults, this north-trending fault zone divides the Seattle fault into 30-40-km-long western and eastern segments. Although this geometry could limit the area ruptured in some Seattle fault earthquakes, a large event ca. A.D. 900 appears to have involved both segments. Regional seismic-hazard assessments must (1) incorporate new information on fault length, geometry, and displacement rates on the Seattle fault, and (2) consider the hazard presented by the previously unrecognized, north-trending fault zone.

  4. Active vibroacoustic control with multiple local feedback loops.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Stephen J; Gardonio, Paolo; Sors, Thomas C; Brennan, Michael J

    2002-02-01

    When multiple actuators and sensors are used to control the vibration of a panel, or its sound radiation, they are usually positioned so that they couple into specific modes and are all connected together with a centralized control system. This paper investigates the physical effects of having a regular array of actuator and sensor pairs that are connected only by local feedback loops. An array of 4 x 4 force actuators and velocity sensors is first simulated, for which such a decentralized controller can be shown to be unconditionally stable. Significant reductions in both the kinetic energy of the panel and in its radiated sound power can be obtained for an optimal value of feedback gain, although higher values of feedback gain can induce extra resonances in the system and degrade the performance. A more practical transducer pair, consisting of a piezoelectric actuator and velocity sensor, is also investigated and the simulations suggest that a decentralized controller with this arrangement is also stable over a wide range of feedback gains. The resulting reductions in kinetic energy and sound power are not as great as with the force actuators, due to the extra resonances being more prominent and at lower frequencies, but are still worthwhile. This suggests that an array of independent modular systems, each of which included an actuator, a sensor, and a local feedback control loop, could be a simple and robust method of controlling broadband sound transmission when integrated into a panel.

  5. A Lightweight Loudspeaker for Aircraft Communications and Active Noise Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warnaka, Glenn E.; Kleinle, Mark; Tsangaris, Parry; Oslac, Michael J.; Moskow, Harry J.

    1992-01-01

    A series of new, lightweight loudspeakers for use on commercial aircraft has been developed. The loudspeakers use NdFeB magnets and aluminum alloy frames to reduce the weight. The NdFeB magnet is virtually encapsulated by steel in the new speaker designs. Active noise reduction using internal loudspeakers was demonstrated to be effective in 1983. A weight, space, and cost efficient method for creating the active sound attenuating fields is to use the existing cabin loudspeakers for both communication and sound attenuation. This will require some additional loudspeaker design considerations.

  6. Simultaneously active pre-attentive representations of local and global rules for sound sequences in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Horváth, J; Czigler, I; Sussman, E; Winkler, I

    2001-08-01

    Regular sequences of sounds (i.e., non-random) can usually be described by several, equally valid rules. Rules allowing extrapolation from one sound to the next are termed local rules, those that define relations between temporally non-adjacent sounds are termed global rules. The aim of the present study was to determine whether both local and global rules can be simultaneously extracted from a sound sequence even when attention is directed away from the auditory stimuli. The pre-attentive representation of a sequence of two alternating tones (differing only in frequency) was investigated using the mismatch negativity (MMN) auditory event-related potential. Both local- and global-rule violations of tone alternation elicited the MMN component while subjects ignored the auditory stimuli. This finding suggests that (a) pre-attentive auditory processes can extract both local and global rules from sound sequences, and (b) that several regularity representations of a sound sequence are simultaneously maintained during the pre-attentive phase of auditory stimulus processing.

  7. Active control of buildings during earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vance, Vicki L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an overview of the different types of control systems used in buildings, to discuss the problems associated with current active control mechanisms, and to show the cost-effectiveness of applying active control to buildings. In addition, a small case study investigates the feasibility and benefits of using embedded actuators in buildings. Use of embedded actuators could solve many of the current problems associated with active control by providing a wider bandwidth of control, quicker speed of response, increased reliability and reduced power requirement. Though embedded actuators have not been developed for buildings, they have previously been used in space structures. Many similarities exist between large civil and aerospace structures indicating that direct transfer of concepts between the two disciplines may be possible. In particular, much of the Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology currently being developed could be beneficially applied to civil structures. While several buildings with active control systems have been constructed in Japan, additional research and experimental verification are necessary before active control systems become widely accepted and implemented.

  8. Controls on fire activity over the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, S.; Brücher, T.; Brovkin, V.; Wilkenskjeld, S.

    2014-11-01

    Changes in fire activity over the last 8000 years are simulated with a global fire model driven by changes in climate and vegetation cover. The changes were separated into those caused through variations in fuel availability, fuel moisture or wind speed which react differently to changes in climate. Disentangling these controlling factors helps to understand the overall climate control on fire activity over the Holocene. Globally the burned area is simulated to increase by 2.5% between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP with larger regional changes compensating on a global scale. Despite the absence of anthropogenic fire ignitions, the simulated trends in fire activity agree reasonably well with continental scale reconstructions from charcoal records, with the exception of Europe. For some regions the change in fire activity is predominantly controlled through changes in fuel availability (Australia-Monsoon, American Tropics/Subtropics). For other regions changes in fuel moisture are more important for the overall trend in fire activity (North America, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, Asia-Monsoon). In Sub-Saharan Africa, for example, changes in fuel moisture alone lead to an increase in fire activity between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP, while changes in fuel availability lead to a decrease. Overall, the fuel moisture control is dominating the simulated fire activity for Sub-Saharan Africa. The simulations clearly demonstrate that both changes in fuel availability and changes in fuel moisture are important drivers for the fire activity over the Holocene. Fuel availability and fuel moisture do, however, have different climate controls. As such observed changes in fire activity can not be related to single climate parameters such as precipitation or temperature alone. Fire models, as applied in this study, in combination with observational records can help to understand the climate control on fire activity, which is essential to project future fire activity.

  9. Controls on fire activity over the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloster, S.; Brucher, T.; Brovkin, V.; Wilkenskjeld, S.

    2015-05-01

    Changes in fire activity over the last 8000 years are simulated with a global fire model driven by changes in climate and vegetation cover. The changes were separated into those caused through variations in fuel availability, fuel moisture or wind speed, which react differently to changes in climate. Disentangling these controlling factors helps in understanding the overall climate control on fire activity over the Holocene. Globally the burned area is simulated to increase by 2.5% between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP, with larger regional changes compensating nearly evening out on a global scale. Despite the absence of anthropogenic fire ignitions, the simulated trends in fire activity agree reasonably well with continental-scale reconstructions from charcoal records, with the exception of Europe. For some regions the change in fire activity is predominantly controlled through changes in fuel availability (Australia monsoon, Central America tropics/subtropics). For other regions changes in fuel moisture are more important for the overall trend in fire activity (North America, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, Asia monsoon). In Sub-Saharan Africa, for example, changes in fuel moisture alone lead to an increase in fire activity between 8000 and 200 cal yr BP, while changes in fuel availability lead to a decrease. Overall, the fuel moisture control is dominating the simulated fire activity for Sub-Saharan Africa. The simulations clearly demonstrate that both changes in fuel availability and changes in fuel moisture are important drivers for the fire activity over the Holocene. Fuel availability and fuel moisture do, however, have different climate controls. As such, observed changes in fire activity cannot be related to single climate parameters such as precipitation or temperature alone. Fire models, as applied in this study, in combination with observational records can help in understanding the climate control on fire activity, which is essential to project future fire

  10. Active Control of Vibrations and Noise of Double Wall Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.-Y.; Vaicaitis, R.

    1998-10-01

    Active control of vibrations and noise transmissions of double wall composite cylindrical shells using pairs of spatially discrete piezoelectric actuators is investigated. The velocity feedback and sound pressure rate feedback control procedures are developed. The inner and outer shells which are separated by a soft core are modelled by Love's thin shell theory for laminate composite materials and the inputs are taken as stationary random pressures and/or random point forces. A galerkin-like procedure is used to obtain solutions of the governing structural-acoustic equations. Parametric studies are performed to demonstrate the effect of actuator placement, actuator size, control gains, spillover, structural and acoustic damping characteristics

  11. Monitoring by Control Technique - Activated Carbon Adsorber

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Activated Carbon Adsorber control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  12. Active control of turbomachine discrete tones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleeter, Sanford

    This paper was directed at active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the blade row interaction generated propagating acoustic waves. First discrete frequency noise generated by a rotor and stator in a duct was analyzed to determine the propagating acoustic pressure waves. Then a mathematical model was developed to analyze and predict the active control of discrete frequency noise generated by subsonic blade rows through cancellation of the propagating acoustic waves, accomplished by utilizing oscillating airfoil surfaces to generate additional control propagating pressure waves. These control waves interact with the propagating acoustic waves, thereby, in principle, canceling the acoustic waves and thus, the far field discrete frequency tones. This model was then applied to a fan exit guide vane to investigate active airfoil surface techniques for control of the propagating acoustic waves, and thus the far field discrete frequency tones, generated by blade row interactions.

  13. Approximate active fault detection and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škach, Jan; Punčochář, Ivo; Šimandl, Miroslav

    2014-12-01

    This paper deals with approximate active fault detection and control for nonlinear discrete-time stochastic systems over an infinite time horizon. Multiple model framework is used to represent fault-free and finitely many faulty models. An imperfect state information problem is reformulated using a hyper-state and dynamic programming is applied to solve the problem numerically. The proposed active fault detector and controller is illustrated in a numerical example of an air handling unit.

  14. Active Polymer Microfiber with Controlled Polarization Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hongyan; Wang, Ruxue; Liu, Yingying; Cheng, Junjie; Zou, Gang; Zhang, Qijin; Zhang, Douguo; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Controlled Polarization Sensitivity of an active polymer microfiber has been proposed and realized with the electrospun method. The fluorescence intensity guiding through this active polymer microfiber shows high sensitivity to the polarization state of the excitation light. What is more, the fluorescence out-coupled from tip of the microfiber can be of designed polarization state. Principle of these phenomena lies on the ordered and controlled orientation of the polydiacetylene (PDA) main chains inside polymer microfiber. PMID:27099828

  15. An extended active control for chaos synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Rong-An; Liu, Ya-Li; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2009-04-01

    By introducing a control strength matrix, the active control theory in chaotic synchronization is developed. With this extended method, chaos complete synchronization can be achieved more easily, i.e., a much smaller control signal is enough to reach synchronization in most cases. Numerical simulations on Rossler, Liu's four-scroll, and Chen system confirmed this and show that the synchronization result depends on the control strength significantly. Especially, in the case of Liu and Chen systems, the response systems' largest Lyapunov exponents' variation with the control strength is not monotone and there exist minima. It is novel for Chen system that the synchronization speed with a special small strength is higher than that of the usual active control which, as a special case of the extended method, has a much larger control strength. All these results indicate that the control strength is an important factor in the actual synchronization. So, with this extended active control, one can make a better and more practical synchronization scheme by adjusting the control strength matrix.

  16. Exploring Sound with Insects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Meyer, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Differences in insect morphology and movement during singing provide a fascinating opportunity for students to investigate insects while learning about the characteristics of sound. In the activities described here, students use a free online computer software program to explore the songs of the major singing insects and experiment with making…

  17. Crossmodal enhancement of visual orientation discrimination by looming sounds requires functional activation of primary visual areas: a case study.

    PubMed

    Cecere, Roberto; Romei, Vincenzo; Bertini, Caterina; Làdavas, Elisabetta

    2014-04-01

    Approaching or looming sounds are salient, potentially threatening stimuli with particular impact on visual processing. The early crossmodal effects by looming sounds (Romei, Murray, Cappe, & Thut, 2009) and their selective impact on visual orientation discrimination (Leo, Romei, Freeman, Ladavas, & Driver, 2011) suggest that these multisensory interactions may take place already within low-level visual cortices. To investigate this hypothesis, we tested a patient (SDV) with bilateral occipital lesion and spared residual portions of V1/V2. Accordingly, SDV׳s visual perimetry revealed blindness of the central visual field with some residual peripheral vision. In two experiments we tested for the influence of looming vs. receding and stationary sounds on SDV׳s line orientation discrimination (orientation discrimination experiment) and visual detection abilities (detection experiment) in the preserved or blind portions of the visual field, corresponding to spared and lesioned areas of V1, respectively. In the visual orientation discrimination experiment we found that SDV visual orientation sensitivity significantly improved for visual targets paired with looming sounds but only for lines presented in the partially preserved visual field. In the visual detection experiment, where SDV was required to simply detect the same stimuli presented in the orientation discrimination experiment, a generalised sound-induced visual improvement both in the intact and in blind portion of the visual field was observed. These results provide direct evidence that early visual areas are critically involved in crossmodal modulation of visual orientation sensitivity by looming sounds. Thus, a lesion in V1 prevents the enhancement of visual orientation sensitivity. In contrast, the same lesion does not prevent the visual detection enhancement by a sound, probably due to alternative visual pathways (e.g. retino-colliculo-extrastriate) which are usually spared in these patients and able to

  18. A synchrony-dependent influence of sounds on activity in visual cortex measured using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS).

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Ian M; Hartley, Douglas E H

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from human neuroimaging and animal electrophysiological studies suggests that signals from different sensory modalities interact early in cortical processing, including in primary sensory cortices. The present study aimed to test whether functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), an emerging, non-invasive neuroimaging technique, is capable of measuring such multisensory interactions. Specifically, we tested for a modulatory influence of sounds on activity in visual cortex, while varying the temporal synchrony between trains of transient auditory and visual events. Related fMRI studies have consistently reported enhanced activation in response to synchronous compared to asynchronous audiovisual stimulation. Unexpectedly, we found that synchronous sounds significantly reduced the fNIRS response from visual cortex, compared both to asynchronous sounds and to a visual-only baseline. It is possible that this suppressive effect of synchronous sounds reflects the use of an efficacious visual stimulus, chosen for consistency with previous fNIRS studies. Discrepant results may also be explained by differences between studies in how attention was deployed to the auditory and visual modalities. The presence and relative timing of sounds did not significantly affect performance in a simultaneously conducted behavioral task, although the data were suggestive of a positive relationship between the strength of the fNIRS response from visual cortex and the accuracy of visual target detection. Overall, the present findings indicate that fNIRS is capable of measuring multisensory cortical interactions. In multisensory research, fNIRS can offer complementary information to the more established neuroimaging modalities, and may prove advantageous for testing in naturalistic environments and with infant and clinical populations.

  19. Transitioning Active Flow Control to Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Horta, Lucas G.; Chen, Fang-Jenq

    1999-01-01

    Active Flow Control Programs at NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and DARPA have been initiated with the goals of obtaining revolutionary advances in aerodynamic performance and maneuvering compared to conventional approaches. These programs envision the use of actuators, sensors, and controllers on applications such as aircraft wings/tails, engine nacelles, internal ducts, nozzles, projectiles, weapons bays, and hydrodynamic vehicles. Anticipated benefits of flow control include reduced weight, part count, and operating cost and reduced fuel burn (and emissions), noise and enhanced safety if the sensors serve a dual role of flow control and health monitoring. To get from the bench-top or laboratory test to adaptive distributed control systems on realistic applications, reliable validated design tools are needed in addition to sub- and large-scale wind-tunnel and flight experiments. This paper will focus on the development of tools for active flow control applications.

  20. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect

    van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J.

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  1. Student Activity Funds: Procedures and Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuzzetto, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    An effective internal-control system can help school business administrators meet the challenges of accounting for student activity funds. Such a system should include appropriate policies and procedures, identification of key control points, self-assessments, audit trails, and internal and external audits. (MLH)

  2. GPS Sounding Rocket Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Barton

    1999-01-01

    Sounding rockets are suborbital launch vehicles capable of carrying scientific payloads several hundred miles in altitude. These missions return a variety of scientific data including; chemical makeup and physical processes taking place In the atmosphere, natural radiation surrounding the Earth, data on the Sun, stars, galaxies and many other phenomena. In addition, sounding rockets provide a reasonably economical means of conducting engineering tests for instruments and devices used on satellites and other spacecraft prior to their use in more expensive activities. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program is managed by personnel from Goddard Space Flight Center Wallops Flight Facility (GSFC/WFF) in Virginia. Typically around thirty of these rockets are launched each year, either from established ranges at Wallops Island, Virginia, Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska; White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico or from Canada, Norway and Sweden. Many times launches are conducted from temporary launch ranges in remote parts of the world requi6ng considerable expense to transport and operate tracking radars. An inverse differential GPS system has been developed for Sounding Rocket. This paper addresses the NASA Wallops Island history of GPS Sounding Rocket experience since 1994 and the development of a high accurate and useful system.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial on The Beneficial Effects of Training Letter-Speech Sound Integration on Reading Fluency in Children with Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Fraga González, Gorka; Žarić, Gojko; Tijms, Jurgen; Bonte, Milene; van der Molen, Maurits W.

    2015-01-01

    A recent account of dyslexia assumes that a failure to develop automated letter-speech sound integration might be responsible for the observed lack of reading fluency. This study uses a pre-test-training-post-test design to evaluate the effects of a training program based on letter-speech sound associations with a special focus on gains in reading fluency. A sample of 44 children with dyslexia and 23 typical readers, aged 8 to 9, was recruited. Children with dyslexia were randomly allocated to either the training program group (n = 23) or a waiting-list control group (n = 21). The training intensively focused on letter-speech sound mapping and consisted of 34 individual sessions of 45 minutes over a five month period. The children with dyslexia showed substantial reading gains for the main word reading and spelling measures after training, improving at a faster rate than typical readers and waiting-list controls. The results are interpreted within the conceptual framework assuming a multisensory integration deficit as the most proximal cause of dysfluent reading in dyslexia. Trial Registration: ISRCTN register ISRCTN12783279 PMID:26629707

  4. Effectiveness of T-shaped acoustic resonators in low-frequency sound transmission control of a finite double-panel partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deyu; Zhang, Xiao-Hong; Cheng, Li; Yu, Ganghua

    2010-10-01

    Double-panel partitions are widely used for sound insulation purposes. Their insulation efficiency is, however, deteriorated at low frequencies due to the structural and acoustic resonances. To tackle this problem, this paper proposes the use of long T-shaped acoustic resonators in a double-panel partition embedded along the edges. In order to facilitate the design and assess the performance of the structure, a general vibro-acoustic model, characterizing the interaction between the panels, air cavity, and integrated acoustic resonators, is developed. The effectiveness of the technique as well as the optimal locations of the acoustic resonators is examined at various frequencies where the system exhibits different coupling characteristics. The measured optimal locations are also compared with the predicted ones to verify the developed theory. Finally, the performance of the acoustic resonators in broadband sound transmission control is demonstrated.

  5. Sound preferences in urban open public spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2003-10-01

    This paper studies people's perception of sound, based on an intensive questionnaire survey in fourteen urban open public spaces of five European countries. The questionnaire includes identification of recognized sounds, classification of sound preference, and indication of wanted and unwanted sounds. The results indicate three facets to people's sound preferences. First, people generally prefer natural and culture-related sounds rather than artificial sounds. Vehicle sounds and construction sounds are regarded as the most unpopular, whereas sounds from human activities are normally rated as neutral. Second, cultural background and long-term environmental experience play an important role in people's judgment of sound preference. People from a similar environment may show a similar tendency on their sound preferences, which can be defined as macro-preference. Third, personal differences, such as age and gender, further influence people's sound preference, which can be defined as micro-preference. For example, with increasing age, a higher percentage of people are favorable to, or tolerate, sounds relating to nature, culture or human activities. Male and female exhibit only slight differences. [Work supported by the European Commission.

  6. Active Control of Combustor Instability Shown to Help Lower Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2002-01-01

    In a quest to reduce the environmental impact of aerospace propulsion systems, extensive research is being done in the development of lean-burning (low fuel-to-air ratio) combustors that can reduce emissions throughout the mission cycle. However, these lean-burning combustors have an increased susceptibility to thermoacoustic instabilities, or high-pressure oscillations much like sound waves, that can cause severe high-frequency vibrations in the combustor. These pressure waves can fatigue the combustor components and even the downstream turbine blades. This can significantly decrease the safe operating life of the combustor and turbine. Thus, suppression of the thermoacoustic combustor instabilities is an enabling technology for lean, low-emissions combustors. Under the Aerospace Propulsion and Power Base Research and Technology Program, the NASA Glenn Research Center, in partnership with Pratt & Whitney and United Technologies Research Center, is developing technologies for the active control of combustion instabilities. With active combustion control, the fuel is pulsed to put pressure oscillations into the system. This cancels out the pressure oscillations being produced by the instabilities. Thus, the engine can have lower pollutant emissions and long life.The use of active combustion instability control to reduce thermo-acoustic-driven combustor pressure oscillations was demonstrated on a single-nozzle combustor rig at United Technologies. This rig has many of the complexities of a real engine combustor (i.e., an actual fuel nozzle and swirler, dilution cooling, etc.). Control was demonstrated through modeling, developing, and testing a fuel-delivery system able to the 280-Hz instability frequency. The preceding figure shows the capability of this system to provide high-frequency fuel modulations. Because of the high-shear contrarotating airflow in the fuel injector, there was some concern that the fuel pulses would be attenuated to the point where they would

  7. Control of nucleus accumbens activity with neurofeedback.

    PubMed

    Greer, Stephanie M; Trujillo, Andrew J; Glover, Gary H; Knutson, Brian

    2014-08-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) plays critical roles in healthy motivation and learning, as well as in psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder). Thus, techniques that confer control of NAcc activity might inspire new therapeutic interventions. By providing second-to-second temporal resolution of activity in small subcortical regions, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can resolve online changes in NAcc activity, which can then be presented as "neurofeedback." In an fMRI-based neurofeedback experiment designed to elicit NAcc activity, we found that subjects could increase their own NAcc activity, and that display of neurofeedback significantly enhanced their ability to do so. Subjects were not as capable of decreasing their NAcc activity, however, and enhanced control did not persist after subsequent removal of neurofeedback. Further analyses suggested that individuals who recruited positive aroused affect were better able to increase NAcc activity in response to neurofeedback, and that NAcc neurofeedback also elicited functionally correlated activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Together, these findings suggest that humans can modulate their own NAcc activity and that fMRI-based neurofeedback may augment their efforts. The observed association between positive arousal and effective NAcc control further supports an anticipatory affect account of NAcc function.

  8. Active vibration control of civil structures

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, C.; Baker, W.; Fales, J.; Shevitz, D.

    1996-11-01

    This is a final report of a one year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Active vibration control (AVC) of structural and mechanical systems is one of the rapidly advancing areas of engineering research. The multifaceted nature of AVC covers many disciplines, such as sensors and instrumentation, numerical modeling, experimental mechanics, and advanced power systems. This work encompassed a review of the literature on active control of structures focusing both on active control hardware and on control algorithms, a design of an isolation systems using magneto-rheological fluid-filled (MRF) dampers and numerical simulations to study the enhanced vibration mitigation effects of this technology.

  9. CFD Modeling for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buning, Pieter G.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation describes current work under UEET Active Flow Control CFD Research Tool Development. The goal of this work is to develop computational tools for inlet active flow control design. This year s objectives were to perform CFD simulations of fully gridded vane vortex generators, micro-vortex genera- tors, and synthetic jets, and to compare flowfield results with wind tunnel tests of simple geometries with flow control devices. Comparisons are shown for a single micro-vortex generator on a flat plate, and for flow over an expansion ramp with sidewall effects. Vortex core location, pressure gradient and oil flow patterns are compared between experiment and computation. This work lays the groundwork for evaluating simplified modeling of arrays of devices, and provides the opportunity to test simple flow control device/sensor/ control loop interaction.

  10. Active vibration control in microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.

    1987-01-01

    The low gravity environment of the space station is suitable for experiments or manufacturing processes which require near zero gravity. An experiment was fabricated to test the validity of the active control process and to verify the flow and control parameters identified in a theoretical model. Zero gravity is approximated in the horizontal plane using a low friction air bearing table. An analog control system was designed to activate calibrated air jets when displacement of the test mass is sensed. The experiment demonstrates that an air jet control system introduces an effective damping factor to control oscillatory response. The amount of damping as well as the flow parameters, such as pressure drop across the valve and flow rate of air, are verified by the analytical model.

  11. Vibration control through passive constrained layer damping and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Margaretha J.; Inman, Daniel J.; Saunders, William R.

    1997-05-01

    To add damping to systems, viscoelastic materials (VEM) are added to structures. In order to enhance the damping effects of the VEM, a constraining layer is attached. When this constraining layer is an active element, the treatment is called active constrained layer damping (ACLD). Recently, the investigation of ACLD treatments has shown it to be an effective method of vibration suppression. In this paper, the treatment of a beam with a separate active element and passive constrained layer (PCLD) element is investigated. A Ritz- Galerkin approach is used to obtain discretized equations of motion. The damping is modeled using the GHM method and the system is analyzed in the time domain. By optimizing on the performance and control effort for both the active and passive case, it is shown that this treatment is capable of lower control effort with more inherent damping, and is therefore a better approach to damp vibration.

  12. Acoustic transistor: Amplification and switch of sound by sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Bin; Kan, Wei-wei; Zou, Xin-ye; Yin, Lei-lei; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2014-08-01

    We designed an acoustic transistor to manipulate sound in a manner similar to the manipulation of electric current by its electrical counterpart. The acoustic transistor is a three-terminal device with the essential ability to use a small monochromatic acoustic signal to control a much larger output signal within a broad frequency range. The output and controlling signals have the same frequency, suggesting the possibility of cascading the structure to amplify an acoustic signal. Capable of amplifying and switching sound by sound, acoustic transistors have various potential applications and may open the way to the design of conceptual devices such as acoustic logic gates.

  13. Active control of robot manipulator compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, C. C.; Pooran, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    Work performed at Catholic University on the research grant entitled Active Control of Robot Manipulator Compliance, supported by NASA/Goddard space Flight Center during the period of May 15th, 1986 to November 15th, 1986 is described. The modelling of the two-degree-of-freedom robot is first presented. Then the complete system including the robot and the hybrid controller is simulated on an IBM-XT Personal Computer. Simulation results showed that proper adjustments of controller gains enable the robot to perform successful operations. Further research should focus on developing a guideline for the controller gain design to achieve system stability.

  14. Active vehicle charging measurements in sounding rocket and space shuttle orbiter environments at Low Earth Orbit (LEO) altitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raitt, W. J.; Eccles, J. V.; Myers, N. B.; Thompson, D. C.; Banks, P. M.; Williamson, P. R.; Bush, R. I.; Hawkins, J.; Sasaki, S.; Oyama, K.-I.

    1987-01-01

    It was concluded that for electron beam emission up to 100mA, vehicle charging is not a significant problem with the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Similarly, sounding rocket payloads have no serious charging problems up to this level of beam current, provided that the maximum amount of the rocket skin is available to collect ionospheric electrons from the LEO altitude range. However, sounding rockets are marginal in their collecting area capability and other effects may occur to balance the beam current when operated at lower altitudes during the night.

  15. Assessment and evaluation of noise controls on roof bolting equipment and a method for predicting sound pressure levels in underground coal mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matetic, Rudy J.

    Over-exposure to noise remains a widespread and serious health hazard in the U.S. mining industries despite 25 years of regulation. Every day, 80% of the nation's miners go to work in an environment where the time weighted average (TWA) noise level exceeds 85 dBA and more than 25% of the miners are exposed to a TWA noise level that exceeds 90 dBA, the permissible exposure limit (PEL). Additionally, MSHA coal noise sample data collected from 2000 to 2002 show that 65% of the equipment whose operators exceeded 100% noise dosage comprise only seven different types of machines; auger miners, bulldozers, continuous miners, front end loaders, roof bolters, shuttle cars (electric), and trucks. In addition, the MSHA data indicate that the roof bolter is third among all the equipment and second among equipment in underground coal whose operators exceed 100% dosage. A research program was implemented to: (1) determine, characterize and to measure sound power levels radiated by a roof bolting machine during differing drilling configurations (thrust, rotational speed, penetration rate, etc.) and utilizing differing types of drilling methods in high compressive strength rock media (>20,000 psi). The research approach characterized the sound power level results from laboratory testing and provided the mining industry with empirical data relative to utilizing differing noise control technologies (drilling configurations and types of drilling methods) in reducing sound power level emissions on a roof bolting machine; (2) distinguish and correlate the empirical data into one, statistically valid, equation, in which, provided the mining industry with a tool to predict overall sound power levels of a roof bolting machine given any type of drilling configuration and drilling method utilized in industry; (3) provided the mining industry with several approaches to predict or determine sound pressure levels in an underground coal mine utilizing laboratory test results from a roof bolting

  16. Rotor Flapping Response to Active Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Khanh; Johnson, Wayne

    2004-01-01

    Rotor active control using higher harmonic blade pitch has been proposed as a means to reduce both rotor radiated noise and airframe vibration and to enhance rotor performance. The higher harmonic input, however, can affect rotor thrust and cyclic flapping - the basic trim characteristics of the rotor. Some of the trim changes can negate the active control benefits. For example, wind tunnel test results of a full scale BO-105 rotor with individual-blade control indicate some rotor performance improvements, accompanied with changes in rotor trim, using two-per-rev blade pitch input. The observed performance benefits could therefore be a simple manifestation of the trim change rather than an efficient redistribution of the rotor airloads. More recently, the flight test of the BO-105 helicopter equip,ped with individual-blade-control actuators also reported trim changes whenever the two-per-rev blade pitch for noise reduction was activated. The pilot had to adjust the trim control to maintain the aircraft under a constant flight path. These two cases highlight the, importance of trim considerations in the application of active control to rotorcraft.

  17. Active control of acoustic pressure fields using smart material technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview describing the use of piezoceramic patches in reducing noise in a structural acoustics setting is presented. The passive and active contributions due to patches which are bonded to an Euler-Bernoulli beam or thin shell are briefly discussed and the results are incorporated into a 2-D structural acoustics model. In this model, an exterior noise source causes structural vibrations which in turn lead to interior noise as a result of nonlinear fluid/structure coupling mechanism. Interior sound pressure levels are reduced via patches bonded to the flexible boundary (a beam in this case) which generate pure bending moments when an out-of-phase voltage is applied. Well-posedness results for the infinite dimensional system are discussed and a Galerkin scheme for approximating the system dynamics is outlined. Control is implemented by using linear quadratic regulator (LQR) optimal control theory to calculate gains for the linearized system and then feeding these gains back into the nonlinear system of interest. The effectiveness of this strategy for this problem is illustrated in an example.

  18. Active modal control simulation of vibro-acoustic response of a fluid-loaded plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Active modal control simulation of vibro-acoustic response of a fluid-loaded plate is presented. The active modal control of the vibro-acoustic response is implemented using piezoelectric actuators/sensors. The active modal damping is added to the coupled system via negative velocity feedback. The feedback gain between the piezoelectric actuators/sensors for the modal control is obtained using the in-vacuo modal matrix and the incompressible fluid-loaded modal matrix. The modal control performance of structural vibration and acoustic radiation of a baffled plate is numerically studied. It is shown that the proposed method increases the modal damping ratio and achieves reduction in the mean square velocity and the sound power for given modes of the fluid-loaded plate.

  19. Monaural Sound Localization Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    1997-01-01

    Research reported during the past few decades has revealed the importance for human sound localization of the so-called 'monaural spectral cues.' These cues are the result of the direction-dependent filtering of incoming sound waves accomplished by the pinnae. One point of view about how these cues are extracted places great emphasis on the spectrum of the received sound at each ear individually. This leads to the suggestion that an effective way of studying the influence of these cues is to measure the ability of listeners to localize sounds when one of their ears is plugged. Numerous studies have appeared using this monaural localization paradigm. Three experiments are described here which are intended to clarify the results of the previous monaural localization studies and provide new data on how monaural spectral cues might be processed. Virtual sound sources are used in the experiments in order to manipulate and control the stimuli independently at the two ears. Two of the experiments deal with the consequences of the incomplete monauralization that may have contaminated previous work. The results suggest that even very low sound levels in the occluded ear provide access to interaural localization cues. The presence of these cues complicates the interpretation of the results of nominally monaural localization studies. The third experiment concerns the role of prior knowledge of the source spectrum, which is required if monaural cues are to be useful. The results of this last experiment demonstrate that extraction of monaural spectral cues can be severely disrupted by trial-to-trial fluctuations in the source spectrum. The general conclusion of the experiments is that, while monaural spectral cues are important, the monaural localization paradigm may not be the most appropriate way to study their role.

  20. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100 C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changed suddenly.

  1. Vector control activities. Fiscal year, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Pickard, E.; Cooney, J.C.; McDuff, B.R.

    1983-06-01

    The goal of the TVA Vector Control Program is to protect the public from potential vectors of disease by controlling medically-important arthropod pests that are propagated on TVA lands or waters. In addition, freedom from annoying mosquitoes and other blood-sucking pests permits the development, use, and full enjoyment of the vast recreational opportunities offered by the many miles of freshwater lakes. To attain this goal the program is divided into operations and support studies. The support studies are designed to improve the operational effectiveness and efficiency of the control program and to identify other vector control problems that require TVA attention and study. Specifically, activities concerning water level management of TVA lakes, dewatering projects, plant growth control, drainage and insect control programs are detailed. Further, report is made of post-impoundment surveys, soil sampling studies of Mosquite larvae and ecological mosquito management studies.

  2. Smart actuators for active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourboghrat, Farzad; Daneshdoost, Morteza

    1998-07-01

    In this paper, the design and implementation of smart actuators for active vibration control of mechanical systems are considered. A smart actuator is composed of one or several layers of piezo-electric materials which work both as sensors and actuators. Such a system also includes micro- electronic or power electronic amplifiers, depending on the power requirements and applications, as well as digital signal processing systems for digital control implementation. In addition, PWM type micro/power amplifiers are used for control implementation. Such amplifiers utilize electronic switching components that allow for miniaturization, thermal efficiency, cost reduction, and precision controls that are robust to disturbances and modeling errors. An adaptive control strategy is then developed for vibration damping and motion control of cantilever beams using the proposed smart self-sensing actuators.

  3. Actively Controlling Buffet-Induced Excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Henderson, Douglas A.; Galea, Stephen C.; Manokaran, Donald S.; Zimcik, David G.; Wickramasinghe, Viresh; Pitt, Dale M.; Gamble, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    High performance aircraft, especially those with twin vertical tails, encounter unsteady buffet loads when flying at high angles of attack. These loads result in significant random stresses, which may cause fatigue damage leading to restricted capabilities and availability of the aircraft. An international collaborative research activity among Australia, Canada and the United States, conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) contributed resources toward a program that coalesced a broad range of technical knowledge and expertise into a single investigation to demonstrate the enhanced performance and capability of the advanced active BLA control system in preparation for a flight test demonstration. The research team investigated the use of active structural control to alleviate the damaging structural response to these loads by applying advanced directional piezoelectric actuators, the aircraft rudder, switch mode amplifiers, and advanced control strategies on an F/A-18 aircraft empennage. Some results of the full-scale investigation are presented herein.

  4. Sound Sequence Discrimination Learning Motivated by Reward Requires Dopaminergic D2 Receptor Activation in the Rat Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudoh, Masaharu; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2006-01-01

    We have previously reported that sound sequence discrimination learning requires cholinergic inputs to the auditory cortex (AC) in rats. In that study, reward was used for motivating discrimination behavior in rats. Therefore, dopaminergic inputs mediating reward signals may have an important role in the learning. We tested the possibility in the…

  5. Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guendogdu; Vorreiter; Seume

    2010-01-01

    Active Flow Control increases the permissible aerodynamic loading. Curved surface near the trailing edge ("Coanda surface"): a) increases turning -> higher pressure ratio. b) controls boundary layer separation -> increased surge margin. Objective: Reduce the number of vanes or compressor stages. Constraints: 1. In a real compressor, the vane must still function entirely without blowing. 2. Maintain the flow exit angle of the reference stator despite the resulting increase in stator loading.

  6. Active Control of a Moving Noise SOURCE—EFFECT of Off-Axis Source Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GUO, J.; PAN, J.; HODGSON, M.

    2002-03-01

    An optimally arranged multiple-channel active-control system is known to be able to create a large quiet zone in free space for a stationary primary noise source. When the primary noise source moves, the active control of the noise becomes much more difficult, as the primary noise field changes with time in space. In this case, the controller of the control system must respond fast enough to compensate for the change; much research has been focused on this issue. In this paper, it is shown that a moving source also causes difficulties from an acoustical perspective. A moving source not only changes continuously the strengths and phases of the sound field in the space, but also changes the wavefront of the primary sound field continuously. It is known that the efficiency of active noise control is determined mainly by the wavefront matching between the primary and control fields. To keep the control system effective in the case of a moving source, the wavefront of the control field needs to change, in order to continuously match the primary-wavefront change. This paper shows that there are limitations to the control-wavefront change. An optimally pre-arranged, multiple-channel control system is not able to construct a matching wavefront when the primary source moves outside a certain range. In other words, the control system is still able to create a large quiet zone only when the primary source moves within a range around the central axis of the control system. Both the location and the size of the quiet zone change with the location of the primary source.

  7. Active Control Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J.; Yuen, W.

    1986-01-01

    The Air Force goal is to develop vibration control techniques for large flexible spacecraft by addressing sensor, actuator, and control hardware and dynamic testing. The Active Control Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES) program will address the Air Force goal by looking at two leading control techniques and implementing them on a structural model of a flexible spacecraft under laboratory testing. The first phase in the ACES program is to review and to assess the High Authority Control/Low Authority Control (HAC/LAC) and Filter accomodated Model Error Sensitivity Suppression (FAMESS) control techniques for testing on the modified VCOSS structure. Appropriate sensors and actuators will be available for use with both techniques; locations will be the same for both techniques. The control actuators will be positioned at the midpoint and free end of the structure. The laser source for the optical sensor is mounted on the feed mast. The beam will be reflected from a mirror on the offset antenna onto the detectors mounted above the shaker table bay. The next phase is to develop an analysis simulation with the control algorithms implemented for dynamics verification. The third phase is to convert the control laws into high level computer language and test them in the NASA-MSFC facility. The final phase is to compile all analytical and test results for performance comparisons.

  8. Sound exposure of professional orchestral musicians during solitary practice.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Ian; Driscoll, Tim; Ackermann, Bronwen

    2013-10-01

    It is broadly acknowledged that professional orchestral musicians risk noise-induced hearing pathologies due to sound exposure in rehearsal and performance. While much has been published regarding orchestral sound levels, little is known of the sound exposure these musicians experience during solitary practice, despite the many hours they spend engaged in this activity. This study aimed to determine sound exposure during solitary practice of 35 professional orchestral musicians, representing players of most orchestral instruments. To allow cross-comparison, participants were assessed playing similar repertoire in a controlled environment, recording simultaneously at each ear to determine sound exposure levels. Sound levels were recorded between 60 and 107 dB L(Aeq), with peak levels between 101 and 130 dB L(C,peak). For average reported practice durations (2.1 h per day, five days a week) 53% would exceed accepted permissible daily noise exposure in solitary practice, in addition to sound exposure during orchestral rehearsals and performances. Significant inter-aural differences were noted in violin, viola, flute/piccolo, horn, trombone, and tuba. Only 40% used hearing protection at any time while practicing. These findings indicate orchestral musicians at risk of noise-induced hearing loss in ensemble face significant additional risks during solitary practice. Data presented will enable more effective and targeted management strategies for this population.

  9. Active Control of Cryogenic Propellants in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, William

    2011-01-01

    A new era of space exploration is being planned. Exploration architectures under consideration require the long term storage of cryogenic propellants in space. This requires development of active control systems to mitigate the effect of heat leak. This work summarizes current state of the art, proposes operational design strategies and presents options for future architectures. Scaling and integration of active systems will be estimated. Ideal long range spacecraft systems will be proposed with Exploration architecture benefits considered.

  10. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  11. Rolling maneuver load alleviation using active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods-Vedeler, Jessica A.; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1992-01-01

    Rolling Maneuver Load Alleviation (RMLA) was demonstrated on the Active Flexible Wing (AFW) wind tunnel model in the LaRC Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. The design objective was to develop a systematic approach for developing active control laws to alleviate wing incremental loads during roll maneuvers. Using linear load models for the AFW wind-tunnel model which were based on experimental measurements, two RMLA control laws were developed based on a single-degree-of-freedom roll model. The RMLA control laws utilized actuation of outboard control surface pairs to counteract incremental loads generated during rolling maneuvers and roll performance. To evaluate the RMLA control laws, roll maneuvers were performed in the wind tunnel at dynamic pressures of 150, 200, and 250 psf and Mach numbers of .33, .38, and .44, respectively. Loads obtained during these maneuvers were compared to baseline maneuver loads. For both RMLA controllers, the incremental torsion moments were reduced by up to 60 percent at all dynamic pressures and performance times. Results for bending moment load reductions during roll maneuvers varied. In addition, in a multiple function test, RMLA and flutter suppression system control laws were operated simultaneously during roll maneuvers at dynamic pressures 11 percent above the open-loop flutter dynamic pressure.

  12. Piezoelectric Power Requirements for Active Vibration Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, Matthew C.; McGowan, Anna-Maria Rivas

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for predicting the power consumption of piezoelectric actuators utilized for active vibration control. Analytical developments and experimental tests show that the maximum power required to control a structure using surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators is independent of the dynamics between the piezoelectric actuator and the host structure. The results demonstrate that for a perfectly-controlled system, the power consumption is a function of the quantity and type of piezoelectric actuators and the voltage and frequency of the control law output signal. Furthermore, as control effectiveness decreases, the power consumption of the piezoelectric actuators decreases. In addition, experimental results revealed a non-linear behavior in the material properties of piezoelectric actuators. The material non- linearity displayed a significant increase in capacitance with an increase in excitation voltage. Tests show that if the non-linearity of the capacitance was accounted for, a conservative estimate of the power can easily be determined.

  13. Closed-loop active optical system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, T. E.

    1980-01-01

    A control system, based on a real-time lateral shear interferometer has been developed for use in control during thermal tests and static error compensation experiments. The minicomputer which controls the interferometer and provides its service functions also controls the active system, thereby giving flexibility to the algorithm. The minicomputer system contains 288 K bytes of memory and 15 M bytes of disk storage. The interferometer system employed is composed of the measuring head and its support electronics, a video display on which wavefront contour maps are generated, and a DECwriter operator console. The versatility provided by the use of a general purpose interferometer system allows for interactive control of the closed-loop process. Various arithmetic capabilities such as the addition of wavefronts, division by a constant, and fitting of wavefront data with Zernike polynomials, allow for measurements to be averaged and for removal of alignment errors before correction is performed.

  14. Actively Controlled Shaft Seals for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salant, Richard F.; Wolff, Paul

    1995-01-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  15. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1995-07-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  16. Implementation of Active Noise Control in a Closed-Circuit Wind Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuester, Matthew; White, Edward

    2010-11-01

    Closed return wind tunnels, such as the Klebanoff--Saric Wind Tunnel (KSWT) at Texas A&M University, can provide relatively low freestream turbulence levels but include noise sources that do not exist in flight. This background noise, such as fan and motor noise, can adversely affect boundary-layer transition experiments if the frequencies are in the range of unstable Tollmien-- Schlicting waves. Passive acoustic treatments eliminate most noise propagating downstream from the fan to test section in the KSWT, but measurements showed upstream-traveling tonal noise propagating from the fan into the test section. To eliminate this, an active noise control system utilizing an adaptive filter algorithm was implemented targeting frequencies in the TS band below the planar duct mode cut off. Multiple microphones are used to detect and cancel upstream traveling sound without affecting downstream traveling sound. Microphone measurements are used to document the noise reduction at multiple locations in the test section.

  17. MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

  18. DNA-based control of protein activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelen, W.; Janssen, B. M. G.

    2016-01-01

    DNA has emerged as a highly versatile construction material for nanometer-sized structures and sophisticated molecular machines and circuits. The successful application of nucleic acid based systems greatly relies on their ability to autonomously sense and act on their environment. In this feature article, the development of DNA-based strategies to dynamically control protein activity via oligonucleotide triggers is discussed. Depending on the desired application, protein activity can be controlled by directly conjugating them to an oligonucleotide handle, or expressing them as a fusion protein with DNA binding motifs. To control proteins without modifying them chemically or genetically, multivalent ligands and aptamers that reversibly inhibit their function provide valuable tools to regulate proteins in a noncovalent manner. The goal of this feature article is to give an overview of strategies developed to control protein activity via oligonucleotide-based triggers, as well as hurdles yet to be taken to obtain fully autonomous systems that interrogate, process and act on their environments by means of DNA-based protein control. PMID:26812623

  19. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Tunable acousto-optic filters with the multiple interaction of light and sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshinov, V. B.; Magdich, L. N.; Knyazev, G. A.

    2005-11-01

    Optical multipass schemes of the interaction of light and sound, which are promising for filtration of optical beams based on tunable acousto-optic filters, are studied. The features of operation of acousto-optic filters in the rejection and transmission regimes are considered. It is proved theoretically and confirmed experimentally that the use of multiple interaction improves the spectral and energy parameters of acousto-optic devices. The collinear and transverse geometry of acousto-optic interaction in cells based on a paratellurite crystal is studied in the double-pass, three-pass, and multipass diffraction regimes.

  20. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2) metabolism coupling postmitotic outgrowth to visual and sound perception network in human left cerebrum by biocomputation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Huang, Juxiang; Jiang, Minghu; Lin, Hong

    2012-07-01

    We constructed the high-expression signal transducer and activator of transcription 2 (STAT2) metabolism coupling postmitotic outgrowth to visual and sound perception network in human left cerebrum compared with low-expression (fold change ≥2) chimpanzee left cerebrum in GEO data set by using integration of gene regulatory network inference method with gene ontology (GO) analysis of STAT2-activated up- and downstream network. Our result showed that upstream RECQL, PDIA2, ENOSF1, THBS4, RASGRP1, PER2, PDE8A, ORC2L, DCI, OGG1_2, SMA4, GPD1, etc. activated STAT2, and downstream STAT2-activated GSTM3_1, GOSR1, SH3BGR, OSBPL8, PHYH, SAPS2, C21orf33, PDIA2, TRAPPC6A, ENOSF1, CAMTA1, GTF2I_2, etc. in human left cerebrum. STAT2-activated network enhanced regulation of small GTPase-mediated signal transduction, regulation of transcription, regulation of mitosis, regulation of cell growth, positive regulation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase cascade, positive regulation of fat cell differentiation, negative regulation of DNA replication, negative regulation of progression through cell cycle, cyclic nucleotide metabolism, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, vitamin A metabolism, N-acetylglucosamine metabolism, UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine metabolism, fatty acid transport, intracellular protein transport, vesicle-mediated transport, lipid transport, retrograde transport, Ras protein signal transduction, Wnt receptor signaling pathway, nervous system development, cell extension, cell adhesion, cell differentiation, circadian rhythm, generation of precursor metabolites and energy, establishment of blood-nerve barrier, visual perception, sensory perception of sound, and poly-N-acetyllactosamine biosynthesis, as a result of inducing metabolism coupling postmitotic outgrowth to visual and sound perception in human left cerebrum.

  1. Method of sound synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Miner, Nadine E.; Caudell, Thomas P.

    2004-06-08

    A sound synthesis method for modeling and synthesizing dynamic, parameterized sounds. The sound synthesis method yields perceptually convincing sounds and provides flexibility through model parameterization. By manipulating model parameters, a variety of related, but perceptually different sounds can be generated. The result is subtle changes in sounds, in addition to synthesis of a variety of sounds, all from a small set of models. The sound models can change dynamically according to changes in the simulation environment. The method is applicable to both stochastic (impulse-based) and non-stochastic (pitched) sounds.

  2. Active control of multiple resistive wall modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsell, P. R.; Yadikin, D.; Gregoratto, D.; Paccagnella, R.; Liu, Y. Q.; Bolzonella, T.; Cecconello, M.; Drake, J. R.; Kuldkepp, M.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marrelli, L.; Martin, P.; Menmuir, S.; Ortolani, S.; Rachlew, E.; Spizzo, G.; Zanca, P.

    2005-12-01

    A two-dimensional array of saddle coils at Mc poloidal and Nc toroidal positions is used on the EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch (Brunsell P R et al 2001 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43 1457) to study active control of resistive wall modes (RWMs). Spontaneous growth of several RWMs with poloidal mode number m = 1 and different toroidal mode number n is observed experimentally, in agreement with linear MHD modelling. The measured plasma response to a controlled coil field and the plasma response computed using the linear circular cylinder MHD model are in quantitive agreement. Feedback control introduces a linear coupling of modes with toroidal mode numbers n, n' that fulfil the condition |n - n'| = Nc. Pairs of coupled unstable RWMs are present in feedback experiments with an array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 16 coils. Using intelligent shell feedback, the coupled modes are generally not controlled even though the field is suppressed at the active coils. A better suppression of coupled modes may be achieved in the case of rotating modes by using the mode control feedback scheme with individually set complex gains. In feedback with a larger array of Mc × Nc = 4 × 32 coils, the coupling effect largely disappears, and with this array, the main internal RWMs n = -11, -10, +5, +6 are all simultaneously suppressed throughout the discharge (7 8 wall times). With feedback there is a two-fold extension of the pulse length, compared to discharges without feedback.

  3. Active Control of Radiated Sound With Integrated Piezoelectric Composite Structures. Volume 2 Appendices (Concl.)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    were calculated u.mg their perimnental dat and Leo.realt=a calculations for bimorph actuators from the sme pi=oe!-ec’ic ceramics having the e dimensons...piezoelectric actuators to replace shak- rs obser toe sme ers and realize a more compact or "smart" structure. 3 radiate to the far field. One of the...Wk) (8) 9(k)=(ifrI(k) ifr 2(k) A ifrk(k)) (9) The cost function is constructed as the mean square error signal, i.e. = E[e2(k)] (10) Substituting

  4. Earth Observing System/Meteorological Satellite (EOS/METSAT). Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) Contamination Control Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, M.

    1998-01-01

    This Contamination Control Plan is submitted in response the Contract Document requirements List (CDRL) 007 under contract NAS5-32314 for the Earth Observing System (EOS) Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit A (AMSU-A). In response to the CDRL instructions, this document defines the level of cleanliness and methods/procedures to be followed to achieve adequate cleanliness/contamination control, and defines the required approach to maintain cleanliness/contamination control through shipping, observatory integration, test, and flight. This plan is also applicable to the Meteorological Satellite (METSAT) except where requirements are identified as EOS-specific. This plan is based on two key factors: a. The EOS/METSAT AMSU-A Instruments are not highly contamination sensitive. b. Potential contamination of other EOS Instruments is a key concern as addressed in Section 9/0 of the Performance Assurance Requirements for EOS/METSAT Integrated Programs AMSU-A Instrument (MR) (NASA Specification S-480-79).

  5. Controlling contagion processes in activity driven networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Suyu; Perra, Nicola; Karsai, Márton; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2014-03-21

    The vast majority of strategies aimed at controlling contagion processes on networks consider the connectivity pattern of the system either quenched or annealed. However, in the real world, many networks are highly dynamical and evolve, in time, concurrently with the contagion process. Here, we derive an analytical framework for the study of control strategies specifically devised for a class of time-varying networks, namely activity-driven networks. We develop a block variable mean-field approach that allows the derivation of the equations describing the coevolution of the contagion process and the network dynamic. We derive the critical immunization threshold and assess the effectiveness of three different control strategies. Finally, we validate the theoretical picture by simulating numerically the spreading process and control strategies in both synthetic networks and a large-scale, real-world, mobile telephone call data set.

  6. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  7. Actively controlled vibration welding system and method

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Wayne W.; Kang, Bongsu; Tan, Chin-An

    2013-04-02

    A vibration welding system includes a controller, welding horn, an active material element, and anvil assembly. The assembly may include an anvil body connected to a back plate and support member. The element, e.g., a piezoelectric stack or shape memory alloy, is positioned with respect to the assembly. The horn vibrates in a desirable first direction to form a weld on a work piece. The element controls any vibrations in a second direction by applying calibrated response to the anvil body in the second direction. A method for controlling undesirable vibrations in the system includes positioning the element with respect to the anvil assembly, connecting the anvil body to the support member through the back plate, vibrating the horn in a desirable first direction, and transmitting an input signal to the element to control vibration in an undesirable second direction.

  8. Using therapeutic sound with progressive audiologic tinnitus management.

    PubMed

    Henry, James A; Zaugg, Tara L; Myers, Paula J; Schechter, Martin A

    2008-09-01

    Management of tinnitus generally involves educational counseling, stress reduction, and/or the use of therapeutic sound. This article focuses on therapeutic sound, which can involve three objectives: (a) producing a sense of relief from tinnitus-associated stress (using soothing sound); (b) passively diverting attention away from tinnitus by reducing contrast between tinnitus and the acoustic environment (using background sound); and (c) actively diverting attention away from tinnitus (using interesting sound). Each of these goals can be accomplished using three different types of sound-broadly categorized as environmental sound, music, and speech-resulting in nine combinations of uses of sound and types of sound to manage tinnitus. The authors explain the uses and types of sound, how they can be combined, and how the different combinations are used with Progressive Audiologic Tinnitus Management. They also describe how sound is used with other sound-based methods of tinnitus management (Tinnitus Masking, Tinnitus Retraining Therapy, and Neuromonics).

  9. Sound focusing in rooms: the time-reversal approach.

    PubMed

    Yon, Sylvain; Tanter, Mickael; Fink, Mathias

    2003-03-01

    New perspectives in audible range acoustics, such as virtual sound space creation and active noise control, rely on the ability of the rendering system to recreate precisely a desired sound field. This ability to control sound in a given volume of a room is directly linked to the capacity to focus acoustical energy both in space and time. However, sound focusing in rooms remains a complicated problem, essentially because of the multiple reflections on obstacles and walls occurring during propagation. In this paper, the technique of time-reversal focusing, well known in ultrasound, is experimentally applied to audible range acoustics. Compared to classical focusing techniques such as delay law focusing, time reversal appears to considerably improve quality of both temporal and spatial focusing. This so-called super-resolution phenomenon is due to the ability of time reversal to take into account all of the different sound paths between the emitting antenna and the focal point, thus creating an adaptive spatial and temporal matched filter for the considered propagation medium. Experiments emphasize the strong robustness of time-reversal focusing towards small modifications in the medium, such as people in motion or temperature variations. Sound focusing through walls using the time-reversal approach is also experimentally demonstrated.

  10. Optogenetic feedback control of neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Jonathan P; Fong, Ming-fai; Millard, Daniel C; Whitmire, Clarissa J; Stanley, Garrett B; Potter, Steve M

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetic techniques enable precise excitation and inhibition of firing in specified neuronal populations and artifact-free recording of firing activity. Several studies have suggested that optical stimulation provides the precision and dynamic range requisite for closed-loop neuronal control, but no approach yet permits feedback control of neuronal firing. Here we present the ‘optoclamp’, a feedback control technology that provides continuous, real-time adjustments of bidirectional optical stimulation in order to lock spiking activity at specified targets over timescales ranging from seconds to days. We demonstrate how this system can be used to decouple neuronal firing levels from ongoing changes in network excitability due to multi-hour periods of glutamatergic or GABAergic neurotransmission blockade in vitro as well as impinging vibrissal sensory drive in vivo. This technology enables continuous, precise optical control of firing in neuronal populations in order to disentangle causally related variables of circuit activation in a physiologically and ethologically relevant manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07192.001 PMID:26140329

  11. Sound sensitivity of neurons in rat hippocampus during performance of a sound-guided task.

    PubMed

    Itskov, Pavel M; Vinnik, Ekaterina; Honey, Christian; Schnupp, Jan; Diamond, Mathew E

    2012-04-01

    To investigate how hippocampal neurons encode sound stimuli, and the conjunction of sound stimuli with the animal's position in space, we recorded from neurons in the CA1 region of hippocampus in rats while they performed a sound discrimination task. Four different sounds were used, two associated with water reward on the right side of the animal and the other two with water reward on the left side. This allowed us to separate neuronal activity related to sound identity from activity related to response direction. To test the effect of spatial context on sound coding, we trained rats to carry out the task on two identical testing platforms at different locations in the same room. Twenty-one percent of the recorded neurons exhibited sensitivity to sound identity, as quantified by the difference in firing rate for the two sounds associated with the same response direction. Sensitivity to sound identity was often observed on only one of the two testing platforms, indicating an effect of spatial context on sensory responses. Forty-three percent of the neurons were sensitive to response direction, and the probability that any one neuron was sensitive to response direction was statistically independent from its sensitivity to sound identity. There was no significant coding for sound identity when the rats heard the same sounds outside the behavioral task. These results suggest that CA1 neurons encode sound stimuli, but only when those sounds are associated with actions.

  12. Electromagnetic sounding of the Earth's crust in the region of superdeep boreholes of Yamal-Nenets autonomous district using the fields of natural and controlled sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhamaletdinov, A. A.; Petrishchev, M. S.; Shevtsov, A. N.; Kolobov, V. V.; Selivanov, V. N.; Barannik, M. B.; Tereshchenko, E. D.; Grigoriev, V. F.; Sergushin, P. A.; Kopytenko, E. A.; Biryulya, M. A.; Skorokhodov, A. A.; Esipko, O. A.; Damaskin, R. V.

    2013-11-01

    Electromagnetic soundings with the fields of natural (magnetotelluric (MT), and audio magnetotelluric (AMT)) and high-power controlled sources have been carried out in the region of the SG-6 (Tyumen) and SG-7 (En-Yakhin) superdeep boreholes in the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district (YaNAD). In the controlled-source soundings, the electromagnetic field was generated by the VL Urengoi-Pangody 220-kV industrial power transmission line (PTL), which has a length of 114 km, and ultralow-frequency (ULF) Zevs radiating antenna located at a distance of 2000 km from the signal recording sites. In the soundings with the Urengoi-Pangody PTL, the Energiya-2 generator capable of supplying up to 200 kW of power and Energiya-3 portable generator with a power of 2 kW were used as the sources. These generators were designed and manufactured at the Kola Science Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The soundings with the Energiya-2 generator were conducted in the frequency range from 0.38 to 175 Hz. The external generator was connected to the PTL in upon the agreement with the Yamal-Nenets Enterprise of Main Electric Networks, a branch of OAO FSK ES of Western Siberia. The connection was carried out by the wire-ground scheme during the routine maintenance of PTL in the nighttime. The highest-quality signals were recorded in the region of the SG-7 (En-Yakhin) superdeep borehole, where the industrial noise is lowest. The results of the inversion of the soundings with PTL and Zevs ULF transmitter completely agree with each other and with the data of electric logging. The MT-AMT data provide additional information about the deep structure of the region in the low-frequency range (below 1Hz). It is established that the section of SG-6 and SG-7 boreholes contains conductive layers in the depth intervals from 0.15 to 0.3 km and from 1 to 1.5 km. These layers are associated with the variations in the lithological composition, porosity, and fluid saturation of the rocks. The top of the

  13. Active vibration control using DEAP actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarban, Rahimullah; Jones, Richard W.

    2010-04-01

    Dielectric electro-active polymer (DEAP) is a new type of smart material, which has the potential to be used to provide effective actuation for a wide range of applications. The properties of DEAP material place it somewhere between those of piezoceramics and shape memory alloys. Of the range of DEAP-based actuators that have been developed those having a cylindrical configuration are among the most promising. This contribution introduces the use of a tubular type DEAP actuator for active vibration control purposes. Initially the DEAP-based tubular actuator to be used in this study, produced by Danfoss PolyPower A/S, is introduced along with the static and dynamic characteristics. Secondly an electromechanical model of the tubular actuator is briefly reviewed and its ability to model the actuator's hysteresis characteristics for a range of periodic input signals at different frequencies demonstrated. The model will be used to provide hysteresis compensation in future vibration isolation studies. Experimental active vibration control using the actuator is then examined, specifically active vibration isolation of a 250 g mass subject to shaker generated 'ground vibration'. An adaptive feedforward control strategy is used to achieve this. The ability of the tubular actuator to reject both tonal and broadband random vibratory disturbances is then demonstrated.

  14. Sounds of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurnett, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    Starting in the early 1960s, spacecraft-borne plasma wave instruments revealed that space is filled with an astonishing variety of radio and plasma wave sounds, which have come to be called "sounds of space." For over forty years these sounds have been collected and played to a wide variety of audiences, often as the result of press conferences or press releases involving various NASA projects for which the University of Iowa has provided plasma wave instruments. This activity has led to many interviews on local and national radio programs, and occasionally on programs haviang world-wide coverage, such as the BBC. As a result of this media coverage, we have been approached many times by composers requesting copies of our space sounds for use in their various projects, many of which involve electronic synthesis of music. One of these collaborations led to "Sun Rings," which is a musical event produced by the Kronos Quartet that has played to large audiences all over the world. With the availability of modern computer graphic techniques we have recently been attempting to integrate some of these sound of space into an educational audio/video web site that illustrates the scientific principles involved in the origin of space plasma waves. Typically I try to emphasize that a substantial gas pressure exists everywhere in space in the form of an ionized gas called a plasma, and that this plasma can lead to a wide variety of wave phenomenon. Examples of some of this audio/video material will be presented.

  15. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    The purpose is to develop controls for inverter-based renewable and non-renewable distributed energy systems to provide local voltage, power and power quality support for loads and the power grid. The objectives are to (1) develop adaptive controls for inverter-based distributed energy (DE) systems when there are multiple inverters on the same feeder and (2) determine the impact of high penetration high seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) air conditioning (A/C) units on power systems during sub-transmission faults which can result in an A/C compressor motor stall and assess how inverter-based DE can help to mitigate the stall event. The Distributed Energy Communications & Controls Laboratory (DECC) is a unique facility for studying dynamic voltage, active power (P), non-active power (Q) and power factor control from inverter-based renewable distributed energy (DE) resources. Conventionally, inverter-based DE systems have been designed to provide constant, close to unity power factor and thus not provide any voltage support. The DECC Lab interfaces with the ORNL campus distribution system to provide actual power system testing of the controls approach. Using mathematical software tools and the DECC Lab environment, we are developing and testing local, autonomous and adaptive controls for local voltage control and P & Q control for inverter-based DE. We successfully tested our active and non-active power (P,Q) controls at the DECC laboratory along with voltage regulation controls. The new PQ control along with current limiter controls has been tested on our existing inverter test system. We have tested both non-adaptive and adaptive control modes for the PQ control. We have completed several technical papers on the approaches and results. Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is

  16. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 3; Active Fan Noise Cancellation in the NASA Lewis Active Noise Control Fan Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G.; Hu, Ziqiang; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation (ANC) System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's (LERC) 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan (ANCF). The goal of this study is to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for global active noise cancellation of fan tones. The GE ANC system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is canceled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. Inputs to the controller are signals from a shaft encoder and from a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The key results are that the (6,0) was completely eliminated at the 920 Hz design frequency and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 6.8 dB (out of a possible 9.8 dB). Farfield reductions of 15 dB (SPL) were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB PWL decrease. The results indicate that global attenuation of PWL at the target frequency was obtained in the aft quadrant using an ANC actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct. The quality of the results depended on precise mode generation. High spillover into spurious modes generated by the ANC actuator array caused less than optimum levels of PWL reduction. The variation in spillover is believed to be due to calibration procedure, but must be confirmed in subsequent tests.

  17. Neural correlates of sound externalization.

    PubMed

    Callan, Akiko; Callan, Daniel E; Ando, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    When we listen to sounds through headphones without utilizing special transforms, sound sources seem to be located inside our heads. The sound sources are said to be lateralized to one side or the other to varying degree. This internal lateralization is different than sound source localization in the natural environment in which the sound is localized distal to the head. We used fMRI to investigate difference in neural responses between lateralization and localization. Individualized binaural recordings were used as externalized auditory stimuli and stereo recordings were used as internalized auditory stimuli. Brain activity was measured while 14 participants performed an active auditory localization task and while 12 participants performed a stimulus type identification task. Irrespective of the task condition, we observed enhanced activity in the bilateral posterior temporal gyri (pSTG) for the externalized stimuli relative to the internalized stimuli. Region of interest analysis indicated that both left and right pSTG were more sensitive to sound sources in contra- than ipsilateral hemifields. Moreover, greater back than front activity was also found in the left pSTG. Compared to impoverished spatial auditory stimuli, realistic spatial auditory stimuli enhance neural responses in the pSTG. This may be why we could observe contralateral hemifield preference in bilateral pSTG that many previous studies have failed to observe. Overall, the results indicate the importance of using ecologically valid stimuli for investigating neural processes in human cortex.

  18. Evidence for two-dimensional solitary sound waves in a lipid controlled interface and its implications for biological signalling.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Shamit; Schneider, Matthias F

    2014-08-06

    Biological membranes by virtue of their elastic properties should be capable of propagating localized perturbations analogous to sound waves. However, the existence and the possible role of such waves in communication in biology remain unexplored. Here, we report the first observations of two-dimensional solitary elastic pulses in lipid interfaces, excited mechanically and detected by FRET. We demonstrate that the nonlinearity near a maximum in the susceptibility of the lipid monolayer results in solitary pulses that also have a threshold for excitation. These experiments clearly demonstrate that the state of the interface regulates the propagation of pulses both qualitatively and quantitatively. Finally, we elaborate on the striking similarity of the observed phenomenon to nerve pulse propagation and a thermodynamic basis of cell signalling in general.

  19. Lightweight active controlled primary mirror technology demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzinghi, P.; Bratina, V.; Ferruzzi, D.; Gambicorti, L.; Simonetti, F.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.; Salinari, P.; Lisi, F.; Olivier, M.; Bursi, A.; Gallieni, D.; Biasi, R.; Pereira, J.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the design, manufacturing and test of a ground demonstrator of an innovative technology able to realize lightweight active controlled space-borne telescope mirror. This analysis is particularly devoted to applications for a large aperture space telescope for advanced LIDAR, but it can be used for any lightweight mirror. For a space-borne telescope the mirror weight is a fundamental parameter to be minimized (less than 15 Kg/m2), while maximizing the optical performances (optical quality better than λ/3). In order to guarantee these results, the best selected solution is a thin glass primary mirror coupled to a stiff CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) panel with a surface active control system. A preliminary design of this lightweight structure highlighted the critical areas that were deeply analyzed by the ground demonstrator: the 1 mm thick mirror survivability on launch and the actuator functional performances with low power consumption. To preserve the mirror glass the Electrostatic Locking technique was developed and is here described. The active optics technique, already widely used for ground based telescopes, consists of a metrology system (wave front sensor, WFS), a control algorithm and a system of actuators to slightly deform the primary mirror and/or displace the secondary, in a closed-loop control system that applies the computed corrections to the mirror's optical errors via actuators. These actuators types are properly designed and tested in order to guarantee satisfactory performances in terms of stroke, force and power consumption. The realized and tested ground demonstrator is a square CFRP structure with a flat mirror on the upper face and an active actuator beneath it. The test campaign demonstrated the technology feasibility and robustness, supporting the next step toward the large and flat surface with several actuators.

  20. Advanced Active Thermal Control Systems Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanford, Anthony J.; Ewert, Michael K.

    1996-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) initiated a dynamic study to determine possible improvements available through advanced technologies (not used on previous or current human vehicles), identify promising development initiatives for advanced active thermal control systems (ATCS's), and help prioritize funding and personnel distribution among many research projects by providing a common basis to compare several diverse technologies. Some technologies included were two-phase thermal control systems, light-weight radiators, phase-change thermal storage, rotary fluid coupler, and heat pumps. JSC designed the study to estimate potential benefits from these various proposed and under-development thermal control technologies for five possible human missions early in the next century. The study compared all the technologies to a baseline mission using mass as a basis. Each baseline mission assumed an internal thermal control system; an external thermal control system; and aluminum, flow-through radiators. Solar vapor compression heat pumps and light-weight radiators showed the greatest promise as general advanced thermal technologies which can be applied across a range of missions. This initial study identified several other promising ATCS technologies which offer mass savings and other savings compared to traditional thermal control systems. Because the study format compares various architectures with a commonly defined baseline, it is versatile and expandable, and is expected to be updated as needed.

  1. Active Thermal Control System Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has been actively developing technologies that will enable future missions or will provide significant improvements over the state of the art technologies. These technologies have are targeted for application on the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), or Orion, and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  2. Active control of electric potential of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are discussed for controlling the potential of a spacecraft by means of devices which release appropriate charged particles from the spacecraft to the environment. Attention is given to electron emitters, ion emitters, a basic electron emitter arrangement, techniques for sensing electric field or potential, and flight experiments on active potential control. It is recommended to avoid differential charging on spacecraft surfaces because it can severely affect the efficacy of emitters. Discharging the frame of a spacecraft with dielectric surfaces involves the risk of stressing the dielectric material excessively. The spacecraft should, therefore, be provided with grounded conductive surfaces. It is pointed out that particles released by control systems can return to the spacecraft.

  3. The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Sepe, Raymond B.; Rey, Daniel; Saarmaa, Erik; Crawley, Edward F.

    1993-01-01

    The Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE) is a NASA In-Step and Control Structure Interaction (CSI) Office funded Shuttle middeck experiment. The objective is to investigate the extent to which closed-loop behavior of flexible spacecraft in zero-gravity (0-g) can be predicted. This prediction becomes particularly difficult when dynamic behavior during ground testing exhibits extensive suspension and direct gravity coupling. On-orbit system identification and control reconfiguration is investigated to improve performance which would otherwise be limited due to errors in prediction. The program is presently in its preliminary design phase with launch expected in the summer of 1994. The MACE test article consists of three attitude control torque wheels, a two axis gimballing payload, inertial sensors and a flexible support structure. With the acquisition of a second payload, this will represent a multiple payload platform with significant structural flexibility. This paper presents on-going work in the areas of modelling and control of the MACE test article in the zero and one-gravity environments. Finite element models, which include suspension and gravity effects, and measurement models, derived from experimental data, are used as the basis for Linear Quadratic Gaussian controller designs. Finite element based controllers are analytically used to study the differences in closed-loop performance as the test article transitions between the 0-g and 1-g environments. Measurement based controllers are experimentally applied to the MACE test article in the 1-g environment and achieve over an order of magnitude improvement in payload pointing accuracy when disturbed by a broadband torque disturbance. The various aspects of the flight portion of the experiment are also discussed.

  4. Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE), phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Deluis, Javier; Miller, David W.

    1989-01-01

    A rationale to determine which structural experiments are sufficient to verify the design of structures employing Controlled Structures Technology was derived. A survey of proposed NASA missions was undertaken to identify candidate test articles for use in the Middeck Active Control Experiment (MACE). The survey revealed that potential test articles could be classified into one of three roles: development, demonstration, and qualification, depending on the maturity of the technology and the mission the structure must fulfill. A set of criteria was derived that allowed determination of which role a potential test article must fulfill. A review of the capabilities and limitations of the STS middeck was conducted. A reference design for the MACE test article was presented. Computing requirements for running typical closed-loop controllers was determined, and various computer configurations were studied. The various components required to manufacture the structure were identified. A management plan was established for the remainder of the program experiment development, flight and ground systems development, and integration to the carrier. Procedures for configuration control, fiscal control, and safety, reliabilty, and quality assurance were developed.

  5. Calculating Speed of Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Shalabh

    2017-01-01

    Sound is an emerging source of renewable energy but it has some limitations. The main limitation is, the amount of energy that can be extracted from sound is very less and that is because of the velocity of the sound. The velocity of sound changes as per medium. If we could increase the velocity of the sound in a medium we would be probably able to extract more amount of energy from sound and will be able to transfer it at a higher rate. To increase the velocity of sound we should know the speed of sound. If we go by the theory of classic mechanics speed is the distance travelled by a particle divided by time whereas velocity is the displacement of particle divided by time. The speed of sound in dry air at 20 °C (68 °F) is considered to be 343.2 meters per second and it won't be wrong in saying that 342.2 meters is the velocity of sound not the speed as it's the displacement of the sound not the total distance sound wave covered. Sound travels in the form of mechanical wave, so while calculating the speed of sound the whole path of wave should be considered not just the distance traveled by sound. In this paper I would like to focus on calculating the actual speed of sound wave which can help us to extract more energy and make sound travel with faster velocity.

  6. Using Therapeutic Sound With Progressive Audiologic Tinnitus Management

    PubMed Central

    Henry, James A.; Zaugg, Tara L.; Myers, Paula J.; Schechter, Martin A.

    2008-01-01

    Management of tinnitus generally involves educational counseling, stress reduction, and/or the use of therapeutic sound. This article focuses on therapeutic sound, which can involve three objectives: (a) producing a sense of relief from tinnitus-associated stress (using soothing sound); (b) passively diverting attention away from tinnitus by reducing contrast between tinnitus and the acoustic environment (using background sound); and (c) actively diverting attention away from tinnitus (using interesting sound). Each of these goals can be accomplished using three different types of sound—broadly categorized as environmental sound, music, and speech—resulting in nine combinations of uses of sound and types of sound to manage tinnitus. The authors explain the uses and types of sound, how they can be combined, and how the different combinations are used with Progressive Audiologic Tinnitus Management. They also describe how sound is used with other sound-based methods of tinnitus management (Tinnitus Masking, Tinnitus Retraining Therapy, and Neuromonics). PMID:18664499

  7. MARSIS remote sounding of localized density structures in the dayside Martian ionosphere: A study of controlling parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diéval, C.; Andrews, D. J.; Morgan, D. D.; Brain, D. A.; Gurnett, D. A.

    2015-09-01

    Enhanced topside electron densities in the dayside Martian ionosphere have been repetitively observed in areas of near-radial crustal magnetic fields, for periods of tens of days, indicating their long-term spatial and temporal stability despite changing solar wind conditions. We perform a statistical study of these density structures using the ionospheric mode of the Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionosphere Sounding (MARSIS) onboard Mars Express. We estimate the apparent extents of these structures relative to the altitude of the surrounding ionosphere. The apex of the density structures often lies higher than the surrounding ionosphere (median vertical extent of 18 km), which indicates upwellings. These structures are much wider than they are high, with latitudinal scales of several degrees. The radar reflector regions are observed above both moderate and strong magnetic anomalies, and their precise locations and latitudinal extents match quite well with the locations and latitudinal extents of magnetic structures of given magnetic polarity (oblique to vertical fields), which happen to be regions where the field lines are open part of the time. The majority of the density structures occur in regions where ionospheric plasma is dominant, indicating closed field regions shielded from shocked solar wind plasma.

  8. Understanding the brain by controlling neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Krug, Kristine; Salzman, C. Daniel; Waddell, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Causal methods to interrogate brain function have been employed since the advent of modern neuroscience in the nineteenth century. Initially, randomly placed electrodes and stimulation of parts of the living brain were used to localize specific functions to these areas. Recent technical developments have rejuvenated this approach by providing more precise tools to dissect the neural circuits underlying behaviour, perception and cognition. Carefully controlled behavioural experiments have been combined with electrical devices, targeted genetically encoded tools and neurochemical approaches to manipulate information processing in the brain. The ability to control brain activity in these ways not only deepens our understanding of brain function but also provides new avenues for clinical intervention, particularly in conditions where brain processing has gone awry. PMID:26240417

  9. Control concepts for active magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwart, Roland; Vischer, D.; Larsonneur, R.; Herzog, R.; Traxler, Alfons; Bleuler, H.; Schweitzer, G.

    1992-01-01

    Active Magnetic Bearings (AMB) are becoming increasingly significant for various industrial applications. Examples are turbo-compressors, centrifuges, high speed milling and grinding spindles, vibration isolation, linear guides, magnetically levitated trains, vacuum and space applications. Thanks to the rapid progress and drastic cost reduction in power- and micro-electronics, the number of AMB applications is growing very rapidly. Industrial uses of AMBs leads to new requirements for AMB-actuators, sensor systems, and rotor dynamics. Especially desirable are new and better control concepts to meet demand such as low cost AMB, high stiffness, high performance, high robustness, high damping up to several kHz, vibration isolation, force-free rotation, and unbalance cancellation. This paper surveys various control concepts for AMBs and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. Theoretical and experimental results are presented.

  10. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  11. Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra as Observed Using Sounding Rocket Measurements from the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), - a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, S. R.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Woods, T. N.; Jones, A. R.; Caspi, A.; Warren, H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of solar active regions (ARs) in the soft x-ray spectral range (0.5 to 3.0 nm) were made on sounding rocket flight NASA 36.290 using a modified Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a pinhole camera on the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) sounding rocket instrument. The suite of EVE rocket instruments is designed for under-flight calibrations of the orbital EVE on SDO. While the sounding rocket EVE instrument is for the most part a duplicate of the EVE on SDO, the SAM channel on the rocket version was modified in 2012 to include a free-standing transmission grating so that it could provide spectrally resolved images of the solar disk with the best signal to noise ratio for the brightest features on it, such as ARs. Calibrations of the EVE sounding rocket instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (NIST SURF) have provided a measurement of the SAM absolute spectral response function and a mapping of wavelength separation in the grating diffraction pattern. For solar observations, this spectral separation is on a similar scale to the spatial size of the AR on the CCD, so dispersed AR images associated with emission lines of similar wavelength tend to overlap. Furthermore, SAM shares a CCD detector with MEGS-A, a separate EVE spectrometer channel, and artifacts of the MEGS-A signal (a set of bright spectral lines) appear in the SAM images. For these reasons some processing and analysis of the solar images obtained by SAM must be performed in order to determine spectra of the observed ARs. We present a method for determining AR spectra from the SAM rocket images and report initial soft X-ray spectra for two of the major active regions (AR11877 and AR11875) observed on flight 36.290 on 21 October 2013 at about 18:30 UT. We also compare our results with concurrent measurements from other solar soft x-ray instrumentation.

  12. Active Aircraft Pylon Noise Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Elmiligui, Alaa A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active pylon noise control system for an aircraft includes a pylon structure connecting an engine system with an airframe surface of the aircraft and having at least one aperture to supply a gas or fluid therethrough, an intake portion attached to the pylon structure to intake a gas or fluid, a regulator connected with the intake portion via a plurality of pipes, to regulate a pressure of the gas or fluid, a plenum chamber formed within the pylon structure and connected with the regulator, and configured to receive the gas or fluid as regulated by the regulator, and a plurality of injectors in communication with the plenum chamber to actively inject the gas or fluid through the plurality of apertures of the pylon structure.

  13. Hybrid Active-Passive Systems for Control of Aircraft Interior Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Chris R.

    1999-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the large potential for hybrid active-passive systems for attenuating interior noise in aircraft fuselages. The main advantage of an active-passive system is, by utilizing the natural dynamics of the actuator system, the control actuator power and weight is markedly reduced and stability/robustness is enhanced. Three different active-passive approaches were studied in the past year. The first technique utilizes multiple tunable vibration absorbers (ATVA) for reducing narrow band sound radiated from panels and transmitted through fuselage structures. The focus is on reducing interior noise due to propeller or turbo fan harmonic excitation. Two types of tunable vibration absorbers were investigated; a solid state system based upon a piezoelectric mechanical exciter and an electromechanical system based upon a Motran shaker. Both of these systems utilize a mass-spring dynamic effect to maximize tile output force near resonance of the shaker system and so can also be used as vibration absorbers. The dynamic properties of the absorbers (i.e. resonance frequency) were modified using a feedback signal from an accelerometer mounted on the active mass, passed through a compensator and fed into the drive component of the shaker system (piezoelectric element or voice coil respectively). The feedback loop consisted of a two coefficient FIR filter, implemented on a DSP, where the input is acceleration of tile ATVA mass and the output is a force acting in parallel with the stiffness of the absorber. By separating the feedback signal into real and imaginary components, the effective natural frequency and damping of the ATVA can be altered independently. This approach gave control of the resonance frequencies while also allowing the simultaneous removal of damping from the ATVA, thus increasing the ease of controllability and effectiveness. In order to obtain a "tuned" vibration absorber the chosen resonant frequency was set to the excitation

  14. Sound Insulation in Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gösele, K.; Schröder, E.

    Sound insulation between the different rooms inside a building or to the outside is a very complex problem. First, the airborne sound insulation of ceilings, walls, doors and windows is important. Second, a sufficient structure-borne sound insulation, also called impact sound insulation, for the ceilings, has to be provided especially. Finally, the service equipment should be sufficiently quiet.

  15. Sounds Exaggerate Visual Shape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Timothy D.; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    While perceiving speech, people see mouth shapes that are systematically associated with sounds. In particular, a vertically stretched mouth produces a /woo/ sound, whereas a horizontally stretched mouth produces a /wee/ sound. We demonstrate that hearing these speech sounds alters how we see aspect ratio, a basic visual feature that contributes…

  16. The Sound of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merwade, Venkatesh; Eichinger, David; Harriger, Bradley; Doherty, Erin; Habben, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    While the science of sound can be taught by explaining the concept of sound waves and vibrations, the authors of this article focused their efforts on creating a more engaging way to teach the science of sound--through engineering design. In this article they share the experience of teaching sound to third graders through an engineering challenge…

  17. Making Sound Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Walter F., III

    2007-01-01

    Sound provides and offers amazing insights into the world. Sound waves may be defined as mechanical energy that moves through air or other medium as a longitudinal wave and consists of pressure fluctuations. Humans and animals alike use sound as a means of communication and a tool for survival. Mammals, such as bats, use ultrasonic sound waves to…

  18. Decentralized harmonic active vibration control of a flexible plate using piezoelectric actuator-sensor pairs.

    PubMed

    Baudry, Matthieu; Micheau, Philippe; Berry, Alain

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated decentralized active control of periodic panel vibration using multiple pairs combining PZT actuators and PVDF sensors distributed on the panel. By contrast with centralized MIMO controllers used to actively control the vibrations or the sound radiation of extended structures, decentralized control using independent local control loops only requires identification of the diagonal terms in the plant matrix. However, it is difficult to a priori predict the global stability of such decentralized control. In this study, the general situation of noncollocated actuator-sensor pairs was considered. Frequency domain gradient and Newton-Raphson adaptation of decentralized control were analyzed, both in terms of performance and stability conditions. The stability conditions are especially derived in terms of the adaptation coefficient and a control effort weighting coefficient. Simulations and experimental results are presented in the case of a simply supported panel with four PZT-PVDF pairs distributed on it. Decentralized vibration control is shown to be highly dependent on the frequency, but can be as effective as a fully centralized control even when the plant matrix is not diagonal-dominant or is not strictly positive real (not dissipative).

  19. The Impact of Eliminating Extraneous Sound and Light on Students' Achievement: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangipudy, Rajarajeswari

    2010-01-01

    The impact of eliminating extraneous sound and light on students' achievement was investigated under four conditions: Light and Sound controlled, Sound Only controlled, Light Only controlled and neither Light nor Sound controlled. Group, age and gender were the control variables. Four randomly selected groups of high school freshmen students with…

  20. Inducing physiological stress recovery with sounds of nature in a virtual reality forest--results from a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Annerstedt, Matilda; Jönsson, Peter; Wallergård, Mattias; Johansson, Gerd; Karlson, Björn; Grahn, Patrik; Hansen, Ase Marie; Währborg, Peter

    2013-06-13

    Experimental research on stress recovery in natural environments is limited, as is study of the effect of sounds of nature. After inducing stress by means of a virtual stress test, we explored physiological recovery in two different virtual natural environments (with and without exposure to sounds of nature) and in one control condition. Cardiovascular data and saliva cortisol were collected. Repeated ANOVA measurements indicated parasympathetic activation in the group subjected to sounds of nature in a virtual natural environment, suggesting enhanced stress recovery may occur in such surroundings. The group that recovered in virtual nature without sound and the control group displayed no particular autonomic activation or deactivation. The results demonstrate a potential mechanistic link between nature, the sounds of nature, and stress recovery, and suggest the potential importance of virtual reality as a tool in this research field.

  1. Satellite cascade attitude control via fuzzy PD controller with active force control under momentum dumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Z.; Varatharajoo, R.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, fuzzy proportional-derivative (PD) controller with active force control (AFC) scheme is studied and employed in the satellite attitude control system equipped with reaction wheels. The momentum dumping is enabled via proportional integral (PI) controller as the system is impractical without momentum dumping control. The attitude controllers are developed together with their governing equations and evaluated through numerical treatment with respect to a reference satellite mission. From the results, it is evident that the three axis attitudes accuracies can be improved up to ±0.001 degree through the fuzzy PD controller with AFC scheme for the attitude control. In addition, the three-axis wheel angular momentums are well maintained during the attitude control tasks.

  2. Suppressive competition: how sounds may cheat sight.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Christoph; Remedios, Ryan

    2012-02-23

    In this issue of Neuron, Iurilli et al. (2012) demonstrate that auditory cortex activation directly engages local GABAergic circuits in V1 to induce sound-driven hyperpolarizations in layer 2/3 and layer 6 pyramidal neurons. Thereby, sounds can directly suppress V1 activity and visual driven behavior.

  3. Moth hearing and sound communication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Active echolocation enables bats to orient and hunt the night sky for insects. As a counter-measure against the severe predation pressure many nocturnal insects have evolved ears sensitive to ultrasonic bat calls. In moths bat-detection was the principal purpose of hearing, as evidenced by comparable hearing physiology with best sensitivity in the bat echolocation range, 20-60 kHz, across moths in spite of diverse ear morphology. Some eared moths subsequently developed sound-producing organs to warn/startle/jam attacking bats and/or to communicate intraspecifically with sound. Not only the sounds for interaction with bats, but also mating signals are within the frequency range where bats echolocate, indicating that sound communication developed after hearing by "sensory exploitation". Recent findings on moth sound communication reveal that close-range (~ a few cm) communication with low-intensity ultrasounds "whispered" by males during courtship is not uncommon, contrary to the general notion of moths predominantly being silent. Sexual sound communication in moths may apply to many eared moths, perhaps even a majority. The low intensities and high frequencies explain that this was overlooked, revealing a bias towards what humans can sense, when studying (acoustic) communication in animals.

  4. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program and space sciences.

    PubMed

    Gurkin, L W

    1992-10-01

    High altitude suborbital rockets (sounding rockets) have been extensively used for space science research in the post-World War II period; the NASA Sounding Rocket Program has been on-going since the inception of the Agency and supports all space science disciplines. In recent years, sounding rockets have been utilized to provide a low gravity environment for materials processing research, particularly in the commercial sector. Sounding rockets offer unique features as a low gravity flight platform. Quick response and low cost combine to provide more frequent spaceflight opportunities. Suborbital spacecraft design practice has achieved a high level of sophistication which optimizes the limited available flight times. High data-rate telemetry, real-time ground up-link command and down-link video data are routinely used in sounding rocket payloads. Standard, off-the-shelf, active control systems are available which limit payload body rates such that the gravitational environment remains less than 10(-4) g during the control period. Operational launch vehicles are available which can provide up to 7 minutes of experiment time for experiment weights up to 270 kg. Standard payload recovery systems allow soft impact retrieval of payloads. When launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, payloads can be retrieved and returned to the launch site within hours.

  5. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program and space sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurkin, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    High altitude suborbital rockets (sounding rockets) have been extensively used for space science research in the post-World War II period; the NASA Sounding Rocket Program has been on-going since the inception of the Agency and supports all space science disciplines. In recent years, sounding rockets have been utilized to provide a low gravity environment for materials processing research, particularly in the commercial sector. Sounding rockets offer unique features as a low gravity flight platform. Quick response and low cost combine to provide more frequent spaceflight opportunities. Suborbital spacecraft design practice has achieved a high level of sophistication which optimizes the limited available flight times. High data-rate telemetry, real-time ground up-link command and down-link video data are routinely used in sounding rocket payloads. Standard, off-the-shelf, active control systems are available which limit payload body rates such that the gravitational environment remains less than 10(-4) g during the control period. Operational launch vehicles are available which can provide up to 7 minutes of experiment time for experiment weights up to 270 kg. Standard payload recovery systems allow soft impact retrieval of payloads. When launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, payloads can be retrieved and returned to the launch site within hours.

  6. Experimental investigation of different active noise control concepts applied to a passenger car equipped with an active windshield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misol, M.; Algermissen, S.; Monner, H. P.

    2012-05-01

    The main purpose of this work is the implementation and experimental investigation of different active structural acoustic control (ASAC) concepts for the reduction of interior noise in an automobile passenger compartment. For the control experiments, a medium-class test car was used, which had been equipped with an active windshield. The active windshield consists of the serial-production laminated glass pane augmented with piezoceramic patch-transducers applied to the blackened rim of the windshield. A multi-reference test provided measurement data for the identification of a local discrete-time state-space model (SSM). The subsequent acquisition of frequency response functions (FRF) by way of using the same actuators but measuring on a much finer grid provided the database for the formulation of a least-squares problem to derive a global system model. Based on the local and global discrete-time SSMs, different controllers were designed and experimentally realized. The comparison of the vibration levels in open- and closed-loop showed a global reduction of 5-7 dB in the acoustically relevant frequency band containing the second and third structural resonance of the windshield system. The occurrence of complex operational deflection shapes (ODS) was identified as the main limitation concerning the disturbance rejection of the active system. The acoustic performance of the ASAC system is reflected in a reduction up to 15 dB in sound pressure level (SPL).

  7. Amplitude Scaling of Active Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalnov, Oksana; Seifert, Avraham

    2010-01-01

    Three existing and two new excitation magnitude scaling options for active separation control at Reynolds numbers below one Million. The physical background for the scaling options was discussed and their relevance was evaluated using two different sets of experimental data. For F+ approx. 1, 2D excitation: a) The traditional VR and C(mu) - do not scale the data. b) Only the Re*C(mu) is valid. This conclusion is also limited for positive lift increment.. For F+ > 10, 3D excitation, the Re corrected C(mu), the St corrected velocity ratio and the vorticity flux coefficient, all scale the amplitudes equally well. Therefore, the Reynolds weighted C(mu) is the preferred choice, relevant to both excitation modes. Incidence also considered, using Ue from local Cp.

  8. Space Station Active Thermal Control System modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hye, Abdul; Lin, Chin H.

    1988-01-01

    The Space Station Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) has been modeled using modified SINDA/SINFLO programs to solve two-phase Thermo-fluid problems. The modifications include changes in several subroutines to incorporate implicit solution which allows larger time step as compared to that for explicit solutions. Larger time step saves computer time but involves larger computational error. Several runs were made using various time steps for the ATCS model. It has been found that for a reasonable approach, three times larger time step as compared to that used in explicit method is a good value which will reduce the computer time by approximately 50 percent and still maintain the accuracy of the output data to within 90 percent of the explicit values.

  9. Ribosome-dependent activation of stringent control

    PubMed Central

    Gordiyenko, Yuliya; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2016-01-01

    In order to survive, bacteria continually sense, and respond to, environmental fluctuations. Stringent control represents a key bacterial stress response to nutrient starvation1,2 that leads to a rapid and comprehensive reprogramming of metabolic and transcriptional patterns3. In general, transcription of genes for growth and proliferation are down-regulated, while those important for survival and virulence are favored4. Amino acid starvation is sensed by depletion of the aminoacyl-tRNA pools5, which results in accumulation of ribosomes stalled with non-aminoacylated (uncharged) tRNA in the ribosomal A-site6,7. RelA is recruited to stalled ribosomes, and activated to synthesize a hyperphosphorylated guanosine analog, (p)ppGpp8, which acts as a pleiotropic second messenger. However, structural information for how RelA recognizes stalled ribosomes and discriminates against aminoacylated tRNAs is missing. Here, we present the electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of RelA bound to the bacterial ribosome stalled with uncharged tRNA. The structure reveals that RelA utilizes a distinct binding site compared to the translational factors, with a multi-domain architecture that wraps around a highly distorted A-site tRNA. The TGS domain of RelA binds the CCA tail to orient the free 3’ hydroxyl group of the terminal adenosine towards a β-strand, such that an aminoacylated tRNA at this position would be sterically precluded. The structure supports a model where association of RelA with the ribosome suppresses auto-inhibition to activate synthesis of (p)ppGpp and initiate the stringent response. Since stringent control is responsible for the survival of pathogenic bacteria under stress conditions, and contributes to chronic infections and antibiotic tolerance, RelA represents a good target for the development of novel antibacterial therapeutics. PMID:27279228

  10. Activity-dependent transmission and integration control the timescales of auditory processing at an inhibitory synapse.

    PubMed

    Ammer, Julian J; Siveke, Ida; Felmy, Felix

    2015-06-15

    To capture the context of sensory information, neural networks must process input signals across multiple timescales. In the auditory system, a prominent change in temporal processing takes place at an inhibitory GABAergic synapse in the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL). At this synapse, inhibition outlasts the stimulus by tens of milliseconds, such that it suppresses responses to lagging sounds, and is therefore implicated in echo suppression. Here, we untangle the cellular basis of this inhibition. We demonstrate with in vivo whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in Mongolian gerbils that the duration of inhibition increases with sound intensity. Activity-dependent spillover and asynchronous release translate the high presynaptic firing rates found in vivo into a prolonged synaptic output in acute slice recordings. A key mechanism controlling the inhibitory time course is the passive integration of the hyperpolarizing inhibitory conductance. This prolongation depends on the synaptic conductance amplitude. Computational modeling shows that this prolongation is a general mechanism and relies on a non-linear effect caused by synaptic conductance saturation when approaching the GABA reversal potential. The resulting hyperpolarization generates an efficient activity-dependent suppression of action potentials without affecting the threshold or gain of the input-output function. Taken together, the GABAergic inhibition in the DNLL is adjusted to the physiologically relevant duration by passive integration of inhibition with activity-dependent synaptic kinetics. This change in processing timescale combined with the reciprocal connectivity between the DNLLs implements a mechanism to suppress the distracting localization cues of echoes and helps to localize the initial sound source reliably.

  11. New photochemical tools for controlling neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Richard H.; Fortin, Doris L.; Trauner, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Neurobiology has entered a new era in which optical methods are challenging electrophysiological techniques for their value in measuring and manipulating neuronal activity. This change is occurring largely because of the development of new photochemical tools, some synthesized by chemists and some provided by nature. This review is focused on the three types of photochemical tools for neuronal control that have emerged in recent years. Caged neurotransmitters, including caged glutamate, are synthetic molecules that enable highly localized activation of neurotransmitter receptors in response to light. Natural photosensitive proteins, including channelrhodopsin-2 and halorhodopsin, can be exogenously expressed in neurons and enable rapid photocontrol of action potential firing. Synthetic small-molecule photoswitches can bestow light-sensitivity on native or exogenously expressed proteins, including K+ channels and glutamate receptors, allowing photocontrol of action potential firing and synaptic events. At a rapid pace, these tools are being improved and new tools are being introduced, thanks to molecular biology and synthetic chemistry. The three families of photochemical tools have different capabilities and uses, but they all share in enabling precise and non-invasive exploration of neural function with light. PMID:19828309

  12. Development of a reaction wheel attitude control system for sounding rocket experiments and small Shuttle-based free flyers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, P. R.

    1986-01-01

    A three-axis reaction wheel control system is currently under development. Initial emphasis is on a magnetic field reference, although the system is easily adaptable to other positional references, e.g., the gyroscopic. The system is housed in a skin section 17.25 inches in diameter and approximately 10 inches long. Current weight estimate is 75 pounds. An orthogonal triad of dc motors forms the basis of the system. Power is provided by silver-zinc cells and controlled by an 8-bit microprocessor. The control law is presented and the dynamical equations derived. Simulation results show that a payload with a roll MOI of 4.1 sl/sq ft and a transverse MOI of 20.3 sl/sq ft can typically be reoriented 90 degrees in 20-35 seconds, depending upon the initial body rates.

  13. Exploring HF-induced ionospheric turbulence by Doppler sounding and stimulated electromagnetic emissions at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program heating facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Evgeny N.; Shindin, Alexey V.; Grach, Savely M.; Milikh, Gennady M.; Mishin, Evgeny V.; Bernhardt, Paul A.; Siefring, Carl L.; Briczinski, Stanley J.; McCarrick, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    We report on the features of the F region plasma perturbations during HF heating experiments at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program facility in March-April 2011 and May-June 2014. The diagnostics included multifrequency Doppler (phase) sounding (MDS) and stimulated electromagnetic emission (SEE). The results concern modification of the electron density profile near the reflection and upper hybrid heights, as well as correlation of the density modification with temporal behavior of narrow continuum, downshifted maximum, and broad continuum SEE spectral features. We reveal also a new SEE spectral feature which appears in the SEE spectra for the pump frequency f0 near the third and fourth electron gyroharmonics. It is located in the SEE spectrum well below the pump wave frequency, f - f0 -(40-220) kHz, occupies a wide frequency range till 100-150 kHz, and is termed the broad downshifted emission.

  14. Utility of aeromagnetic studies for mapping of potentially active faults in two forearc basins: Puget Sound, Washington, and Cook Inlet, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, R.W.; Blakely, R.J.; Haeussler, P.J.; Wells, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys over forearc basins can detect faults and folds in weakly magnetized sediments, thus providing geologic constraints on tectonic evolution and improved understanding of seismic hazards in convergent-margin settings. Puget Sound, Washington, and Cook Inlet, Alaska, provide two case histories. In each lowland region, shallow-source magnetic anomalies are related to active folds and/or faults. Mapping these structures is critical for understanding seismic hazards that face the urban regions of Seattle, Washington, and Anchorage, Alaska. Similarities in aeromagnetic anomaly patterns and magnetic stratigraphy between the two regions suggest that we can expect the aeromagnetic method to yield useful structural information that may contribute to earth-hazard and energy resource investigations in other forearc basins.

  15. Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra and Temperature Analyses based on Sounding Rocket Measurements from the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), - a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didkovsky, Leonid V.; Wieman, Seth; Woods, Thomas N.; Jones, Andrew; Moore, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Some initial results of soft x-ray spectral (0.5 to 3.0 nm) observations of active regions (AR11877 and AR11875) from a sounding rocket flight NASA 36.290 on 21 October 2013 at about 18:30 UT are reported. These observations were made by a Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a rocket version of the EUV Variability Experiment’s (EVE) channel, a pinhole camera modified for EVE rocket suite of instruments to include a free-standing transmission grating (200 nm period), which provided spectrally-resolved images of the solar disk. Intensity ratios for strong emission lines extracted from temporally averaged SAM spectral profiles of the ARs were compared to appropriately convolved modeled CHIANTI spectra. These ratios represent the AR’s temperature structures, which are compared to the structures derived from some other observations and temperature models.

  16. Threshold for Onset of Injury in Chinook Salmon from Exposure to Impulsive Pile Driving Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Casper, Brandon M.; Woodley, Christa M.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Popper, Arthur N.

    2012-01-01

    The risk of effects to fishes and other aquatic life from impulsive sound produced by activities such as pile driving and seismic exploration is increasing throughout the world, particularly with the increased exploitation of oceans for energy production. At the same time, there are few data that provide insight into the effects of these sounds on fishes. The goal of this study was to provide quantitative data to define the levels of impulsive sound that could result in the onset of barotrauma to fish. A High Intensity Controlled Impedance Fluid filled wave Tube was developed that enabled laboratory simulation of high-energy impulsive sound that were characteristic of aquatic far-field, plane-wave acoustic conditions. The sounds used were based upon the impulsive sounds generated by an impact hammer striking a steel shell pile. Neutrally buoyant juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were exposed to impulsive sounds and subsequently evaluated for barotrauma injuries. Observed injuries ranged from mild hematomas at the lowest sound exposure levels to organ hemorrhage at the highest sound exposure levels. Frequency of observed injuries were used to compute a biological response weighted index (RWI) to evaluate the physiological impact of injuries at the different exposure levels. As single strike and cumulative sound exposure levels (SELss, SELcum respectively) increased, RWI values increased. Based on the results, tissue damage associated with adverse physiological costs occurred when the RWI was greater than 2. In terms of sound exposure levels a RWI of 2 was achieved for 1920 strikes by 177 dB re 1 µPa2⋅s SELss yielding a SELcum of 210 dB re 1 µPa2⋅s, and for 960 strikes by 180 dB re 1 µPa2⋅s SELss yielding a SELcum of 210 dB re 1 µPa2⋅s. These metrics define thresholds for onset of injury in juvenile Chinook salmon. PMID:22745695

  17. Early sound symbolism for vowel sounds.

    PubMed

    Spector, Ferrinne; Maurer, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Children and adults consistently match some words (e.g., kiki) to jagged shapes and other words (e.g., bouba) to rounded shapes, providing evidence for non-arbitrary sound-shape mapping. In this study, we investigated the influence of vowels on sound-shape matching in toddlers, using four contrasting pairs of nonsense words differing in vowel sound (/i/ as in feet vs. /o/ as in boat) and four rounded-jagged shape pairs. Crucially, we used reduplicated syllables (e.g., kiki vs. koko) rather than confounding vowel sound with consonant context and syllable variability (e.g., kiki vs. bouba). Toddlers consistently matched words with /o/ to rounded shapes and words with /i/ to jagged shapes (p < 0.01). The results suggest that there may be naturally biased correspondences between vowel sound and shape.

  18. Effects of Text, Audio and Learner Control on Text-Sound Association and Cognitive Load of EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enciso Bernal, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of concurrent audio and equivalent onscreen text on the ability of learners of English as a foreign language (EFL) to form associations between textual and aural forms of target vocabulary words. The study also looked at the effects of learner control over an audio sequence on the association of textual and…

  19. Why do caterpillars whistle at birds? Insect defence sounds startle avian predators.

    PubMed

    Dookie, Amanda L; Young, Courtney A; Lamothe, Gilles; Schoenle, Laura A; Yack, Jayne E

    2017-05-01

    Many insects produce sounds when attacked by a predator, yet the functions of these signals are poorly understood. It is debated whether such sounds function as startle, warning or alarm signals, or merely serve to augment other defences. Direct evidence is limited owing to difficulties in disentangling the effects of sounds from other defences that often occur simultaneously in live insects. We conducted an experiment to test whether an insect sound can function as a deimatic (i.e. startle) display. Variations of a whistle of the walnut sphinx caterpillar (Amorpha juglandis) were presented to a predator, red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), when birds activated a sensor while feeding on mealworms (Tenebrio molitor). Birds exposed to whistles played back at natural sound levels exhibited significantly higher startle scores (by flying away, flinching, and hopping) and took longer to return to the feeding dish than during control conditions where no sounds were played. Birds habituated to sounds during a one-hour session, but after two days the startling effects were restored. Our results provide empirical evidence that an insect sound alone can function as a deimatic display against an avian predator. We discuss how whistles might be particularly effective 'acoustic eye spots' on avian predators.

  20. System identification and control of the JPL active structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J. L.; Lurie, B. J.; O'Brien, J. F.; Chu, C.-C.; Smith, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent advances in structural quieting technology as applied to active truss structures intended for high precision space based optics applications. Collocated active damping control loops are designed in order to impedance match piezoelectric active members to the structure. Noncollocated control loops are also studied in relation to controlling lightly damped structures.

  1. Sound wave transmission (image)

    MedlinePlus

    When sounds waves reach the ear, they are translated into nerve impulses. These impulses then travel to the brain where they are interpreted by the brain as sound. The hearing mechanisms within the inner ear, can ...

  2. Sounds in the Ocean at 1-100 Hz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcock, William S. D.; Stafford, Kathleen M.; Andrew, Rex K.; Odom, Robert I.

    2014-01-01

    Very-low-frequency sounds between 1 and 100 Hz propagate large distances in the ocean sound channel. Weather conditions, earthquakes, marine mammals, and anthropogenic activities influence sound levels in this band. Weather-related sounds result from interactions between waves, bubbles entrained by breaking waves, and the deformation of sea ice. Earthquakes generate sound in geologically active regions, and earthquake T waves propagate throughout the oceans. Blue and fin whales generate long bouts of sounds near 20 Hz that can dominate regional ambient noise levels seasonally. Anthropogenic sound sources include ship propellers, energy extraction, and seismic air guns and have been growing steadily. The increasing availability of long-term records of ocean sound will provide new opportunities for a deeper understanding of natural and anthropogenic sound sources and potential interactions between them.

  3. Sounds in the ocean at 1-100 Hz.

    PubMed

    Wilcock, William S D; Stafford, Kathleen M; Andrew, Rex K; Odom, Robert I

    2014-01-01

    Very-low-frequency sounds between 1 and 100 Hz propagate large distances in the ocean sound channel. Weather conditions, earthquakes, marine mammals, and anthropogenic activities influence sound levels in this band. Weather-related sounds result from interactions between waves, bubbles entrained by breaking waves, and the deformation of sea ice. Earthquakes generate sound in geologically active regions, and earthquake T waves propagate throughout the oceans. Blue and fin whales generate long bouts of sounds near 20 Hz that can dominate regional ambient noise levels seasonally. Anthropogenic sound sources include ship propellers, energy extraction, and seismic air guns and have been growing steadily. The increasing availability of long-term records of ocean sound will provide new opportunities for a deeper understanding of natural and anthropogenic sound sources and potential interactions between them.

  4. The fundamentals of sound and its measurement.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Larry F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide directors of animal care facilities with a basic understanding of some of the principles of acoustics and the measurement of sound. This knowledge likely will enable directors to work effectively with sound and hearing specialists at their institutions to monitor and control the acoustic environments of laboratory animal facilities.

  5. Active Noise Control of Low Speed Fan Rotor-Stator Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Hu, Ziqiang; Pla, Frederic G.; Heidelberg, Laurence J.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Active Noise Cancellation System designed by General Electric and tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center's 48 inch Active Noise Control Fan. The goal of this study was to assess the feasibility of using wall mounted secondary acoustic sources and sensors within the duct of a high bypass turbofan aircraft engine for active noise cancellation of fan tones. The control system is based on a modal control approach. A known acoustic mode propagating in the fan duct is cancelled using an array of flush-mounted compact sound sources. Controller inputs are signals from a shaft encoder and a microphone array which senses the residual acoustic mode in the duct. The canceling modal signal is generated by a modal controller. The key results are that the (6,0) mode was completely eliminated at 920 Hz and substantially reduced elsewhere. The total tone power was reduced 9.4 dB. Farfield 2BPF SPL reductions of 13 dB were obtained. The (4,0) and (4,1) modes were reduced simultaneously yielding a 15 dB modal PWL decrease. Global attenuation of PWL was obtained using an actuator and sensor system totally contained within the duct.

  6. Aerodynamic Control using Distributed Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    The global aerodynamic loads on a stationary and pitching airfoil at angles of attack beyond the static and dynamic stall margins, respectively are controlled in wind tunnel experiments using regulated distributed bleed driven by surface pressure differences. High-speed PIV and proper orthogonal decomposition of the vorticity flux on the static airfoil show that the bleed engenders trains of discrete vortices that advect along the surface and are associated with a local instability that is manifested by a time-averaged bifurcation of the vorticity layer near the bleed outlets and alters the vorticity flux over the airfoil and thereby the aerodynamic loads. Active bleed is used on a dynamically pitching airfoil (at reduced frequencies up to k = 0.42) to modulate the evolution of vorticity concentrations during dynamic stall. Time-periodic bleed improved the pitch stability by reducing adverse pitching moment (``negative damping'') that can precipitate structural instabilities. At the same time, the maintains the cycle-average loads to within 5% of the base flow levels by segmenting the vorticity layer during upstroke and promoting early flow attachment during downstroke segments of the pitch cycle. Supported by Georgia Tech VLRCOE.

  7. Sound Levels in East Texas Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Aaron Lynn

    A survey of sound levels was taken in several Texas schools to determine the amount of noise and sound present by size of class, type of activity, location of building, and the presence of air conditioning and large amounts of glass. The data indicate that class size and relative amounts of glass have no significant bearing on the production of…

  8. A study on transvelar coupling for non-nasalized sounds.

    PubMed

    Dang, Jianwu; Wei, Jianguo; Honda, Kiyoshi; Nakai, Takayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have found that the velum in speech production may not only serve as a binary switch with on-off states for nasal and non-nasal sounds, but also partially alter the acoustic characteristics of non-nasalized sounds. The present study investigated the unique functions of the velum in the production of non-nasalized sounds by using morphological, mechanical, and acoustical measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging movies obtained from three Japanese speakers were used to measure the behaviors of the velum and dynamic changes in the pseudo-volume of the pharyngeal cavity during utterances of voiced stops and vowels. The measurements revealed no significant enlargements in the supraglottal cavity as subjects uttered voiced stops. It is found that the velum thickness varied across utterances in a way that depended on vowels, but not on consonants. The mechanical and acoustical observations in the study suggested that the velum is actively controlled to augment the voice bars of voiced stops, and nostril-radiated sound is one of the most important sources for voice bars, just as is laryngeal wall vibration. This study also proposed a two-layer diaphragm model that simulates transvelar coupling during the production of non-nasalized speech sounds. The simulation demonstrated that the model accurately represented the basic velar functions involved in speech production.

  9. Hybrid mode-scattering/sound-absorbing segmented liner system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Edward J. (Inventor); Walker, Bruce E. (Inventor); Hersh, Alan S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A hybrid mode-scattering/sound-absorbing segmented liner system and method in which an initial sound field within a duct is steered or scattered into higher-order modes in a first mode-scattering segment such that it is more readily and effectively absorbed in a second sound-absorbing segment. The mode-scattering segment is preferably a series of active control components positioned along the annulus of the duct, each of which includes a controller and a resonator into which a piezoelectric transducer generates the steering noise. The sound-absorbing segment is positioned acoustically downstream of the mode-scattering segment, and preferably comprises a honeycomb-backed passive acoustic liner. The invention is particularly adapted for use in turbofan engines, both in the inlet and exhaust.

  10. Rocket ozone sounding network data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, D. U.; Krueger, A. J.; Foster, G. M.

    1978-01-01

    During the period December 1976 through February 1977, three regular monthly ozone profiles were measured at Wallops Flight Center, two special soundings were taken at Antigua, West Indies, and at the Churchill Research Range, monthly activities were initiated to establish stratospheric ozone climatology. This report presents the data results and flight profiles for the period covered.

  11. LaRC controls activity for LSST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Math models were developed for various types of large flexible structures. These models were used to study the uncontrolled dynamic characteristics of the structures in orbit and to devise control concepts in order to control their orientation and geometrical shape. Reduced order decoupled control of the 100 meter long free free beam were studied. The inplane orientation and shape of the beam was controlled in a decoupled manner with as few actuators as possible. Using two controllers, near each end of the beam, to produce a 0.01 radian pitch change, perfect decoupled control was achieved for the rigid body pitch theta mode and the first flexible mode A sub 1.

  12. Active noise control system incorporating psychoacoustic and spectrum-tuning features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Hua

    Acoustic noise problem is gaining more and more attention in modern society. Traditionally, passive noise control devices are used to block the undesired sound. However, they are inconvenient and costly in some situations. Instead, active noise control (ANC) technique can attenuate the noise in a more flexible and more effective way. ANC technique works on the principal of acoustic superposition with electrically controlled loudspeaker(s) sending out anti-noise signal to cancel out the undesired noise in a target zone. The core component of ANC system is the adaptive filter, which updates the filter coefficients to control the anti-noise sent out by loudspeaker(s). It should be noted that the ultimate goal of ANC is to minimize the annoyance brought by environmental noise to human being. Therefore human hearing characteristics are important factors to improve ANC performance in term of human perception. Psychoacoustics focuses on the study of human perception of sound by objective models. In this dissertation, psychoacoustic considerations are incorporated in ANC systems in two ways. Noise weightings are included in ANC system considering the non-uniform sensitivity of human hearing system. A new ANC architecture is proposed to give listeners flexibility to adjust the spectrum of residual noise considering individual discrepant preferences. In the first scheme, two typical noise weightings, A-weighting and ITU-R 468 noise weighting, are incorporated in the ANC system based on filtered-error least mean square (FELMS) structure. Instead of sound pressure level (SPL), psychoacoustic metrics are utilized to evaluate the noise attenuation performance. In the second approach, we propose a spectrum-tuning active noise control (STANC) structure which could tune the noise spectrum with a tuning filter. In the mean time, the change of tuning filter has no influence on system adaptation, which enssures the system stability and makes online tuning possible. Conventional ANC

  13. Active controllers and the time duration to learn a task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repperger, D. W.; Goodyear, C.

    1986-01-01

    An active controller was used to help train naive subjects involved in a compensatory tracking task. The controller is called active in this context because it moves the subject's hand in a direction to improve tracking. It is of interest here to question whether the active controller helps the subject to learn a task more rapidly than the passive controller. Six subjects, inexperienced to compensatory tracking, were run to asymptote root mean square error tracking levels with an active controller or a passive controller. The time required to learn the task was defined several different ways. The results of the different measures of learning were examined across pools of subjects and across controllers using statistical tests. The comparison between the active controller and the passive controller as to their ability to accelerate the learning process as well as reduce levels of asymptotic tracking error is reported here.

  14. Sounds like Team Spirit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2002-01-01

    I recently accompanied my son Dan to one of his guitar lessons. As I sat in a separate room, I focused on the music he was playing and the beautiful, robust sound that comes from a well-played guitar. Later that night, I woke up around 3 am. I tend to have my best thoughts at this hour. The trouble is I usually roll over and fall back asleep. This time I was still awake an hour later, so I got up and jotted some notes down in my study. I was thinking about the pure, honest sound of a well-played instrument. From there my mind wandered into the realm of high-performance teams and successful projects. (I know this sounds weird, but this is the sort of thing I think about at 3 am. Maybe you have your own weird thoughts around that time.) Consider a team in relation to music. It seems to me that a crack team can achieve a beautiful, perfect unity in the same way that a band of brilliant musicians can when they're in harmony with one another. With more than a little satisfaction I have to admit, I started to think about the great work performed for you by the Knowledge Sharing team, including this magazine you are reading. Over the past two years I personally have received some of my greatest pleasures as the APPL Director from the Knowledge Sharing activities - the Masters Forums, NASA Center visits, ASK Magazine. The Knowledge Sharing team expresses such passion for their work, just like great musicians convey their passion in the music they play. In the case of Knowledge Sharing, there are many factors that have made this so enjoyable (and hopefully worthwhile for NASA). Three ingredients come to mind -- ingredients that have produced a signature sound. First, through the crazy, passionate playing of Alex Laufer, Michelle Collins, Denise Lee, and Todd Post, I always know that something startling and original is going to come out of their activities. This team has consistently done things that are unique and innovative. For me, best of all is that they are always

  15. Sound field measurement in a double layer cavitation cluster by rugged miniature needle hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christian

    2016-03-01

    During multi-bubble cavitation the bubbles tend to organize themselves into clusters and thus the understanding of properties and dynamics of clustering is essential for controlling technical applications of cavitation. Sound field measurements are a potential technique to provide valuable experimental information about the status of cavitation clouds. Using purpose-made, rugged, wide band, and small-sized needle hydrophones, sound field measurements in bubble clusters were performed and time-dependent sound pressure waveforms were acquired and analyzed in the frequency domain up to 20 MHz. The cavitation clusters were synchronously observed by an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera and the relation between the sound field measurements and cluster behaviour was investigated. Depending on the driving power, three ranges could be identified and characteristic properties were assigned. At low power settings no transient and no or very low stable cavitation activity can be observed. The medium range is characterized by strong pressure peaks and various bubble cluster forms. At high power a stable double layer was observed which grew with further increasing power and became quite dynamic. The sound field was irregular and the fundamental at driving frequency decreased. Between the bubble clouds completely different sound field properties were found in comparison to those in the cloud where the cavitation activity is high. In between the sound field pressure amplitude was quite small and no collapses were detected.

  16. Sound of sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elze, H.-Thomas; Kodama, Takeshi; Rafelski, Johann

    1998-04-01

    We consider an air bubble in water under conditions of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) and evaluate the emitted sound field nonperturbatively for subsonic gas-liquid interface motion. Sound emission being the dominant damping mechanism, we also implement the nonperturbative sound damping in the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for the interface motion. We evaluate numerically the sound pulse emitted during bubble collapse and compare the nonperturbative and perturbative results, showing that the usual perturbative description leads to an overestimate of the maximal surface velocity and maximal sound pressure. The radius vs time relation for a full SBSL cycle remains deceptively unaffected.

  17. Active Control of Complex Physical Systems: An Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    release; distribution is unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maxtmum 200 words) Active control of complex systems imposes unique requirements for physical models and...months after the meeting, SPrinte In USA. Acceslon For NTIS CRA&W DTIC TAB Unlannounced ] Active Control of Complex Physical Systems Justificatton An...control strategies. Physical models This work on the active control of which are adequate to predict the influence of specific physical systems has been

  18. In-Situ Atmospheric Sounding Data Lifecycle from Data Collection, Analysis and Quality Control to Documentation, Archival and Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, K.; Voemel, H.; Morris, D.

    2015-12-01

    In-situ measurement systems are used to monitor the atmosphere whereby instruments are located in the area of interest and are in direct contact with what is being measured. Dropsondes and radiosondes are instruments used to collect high-vertical-resolution profiles of the atmosphere. The dropsondes are deployed from aircraft and, as they descend, they collect pressure, temperature and humidity data at a half-second rate, and GPS wind data at a quarter-second rate. Radiosondes are used to collect high-resolution measurements of the atmosphere, from the ground to approximately 30 kilometers. Carried by a large helium-filled balloon, they ascend upward through the atmosphere measuring pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and GPS winds at a one-second rate. Advancements in atmospheric research, technology and data assimilation techniques have contributed to driving the need for higher quality, higher resolution radiosonde and dropsonde data at an increasingly rapid rate. These data most notably represent a valuable resource for initializing numerical prediction models, calibrating and validating satellite retrieval techniques for atmospheric profiles, and for climatological research. The In-Situ Sensing Facility, at NCAR, has developed an extensive, multi-step process of quality control (QC). Traditionally, QC has been a time intensive process that involves evaluating data products using a variety of visualization tools and statistical methods. With a greater need for real-time data in the field and a reduced turn-around time for final quality controlled data, new and improved procedures for streamlining statistical analysis and QC are being implemented. Improvements have also been made on two fronts regarding implementation of a comprehensive data management plan. The first was ensuring ease of data accessibility through an intuitive centralized data archive system, that both keeps a record of data users and assigns digital object identifiers to each unique data

  19. Quasi-modal vibration control by means of active control bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonami, K.; Fleming, D. P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper investigates a design method of an active control bearing system with only velocity feedback. The study provides a new quasi-modal control method for a control system design of an active control bearing system in which feedback coefficients are determined on the basis of a modal analysis. Although the number of sensors and actuators is small, this quasi-modal control method produces a control effect close to an ideal modal control.

  20. Priming Gestures with Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Guillaume; Heller, Laurie M.; Navolio, Nicole; Zúñiga-Peñaranda, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report a series of experiments about a little-studied type of compatibility effect between a stimulus and a response: the priming of manual gestures via sounds associated with these gestures. The goal was to investigate the plasticity of the gesture-sound associations mediating this type of priming. Five experiments used a primed choice-reaction task. Participants were cued by a stimulus to perform response gestures that produced response sounds; those sounds were also used as primes before the response cues. We compared arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds (key lifts and pure tones) created during the experiment (i.e. no pre-existing knowledge) with ecological associations corresponding to the structure of the world (tapping gestures and sounds, scraping gestures and sounds) learned through the entire life of the participant (thus existing prior to the experiment). Two results were found. First, the priming effect exists for ecological as well as arbitrary associations between gestures and sounds. Second, the priming effect is greatly reduced for ecologically existing associations and is eliminated for arbitrary associations when the response gesture stops producing the associated sounds. These results provide evidence that auditory-motor priming is mainly created by rapid learning of the association between sounds and the gestures that produce them. Auditory-motor priming is therefore mediated by short-term associations between gestures and sounds that can be readily reconfigured regardless of prior knowledge. PMID:26544884

  1. Visual Presentation Effects on Identification of Multiple Environmental Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Masakura, Yuko; Ichikawa, Makoto; Shimono, Koichi; Nakatsuka, Reio

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how the contents and timing of a visual stimulus affect the identification of mixed sounds recorded in a daily life environment. For experiments, we presented four environment sounds as auditory stimuli for 5 s along with a picture or a written word as a visual stimulus that might or might not denote the source of one of the four sounds. Three conditions of temporal relations between the visual stimuli and sounds were used. The visual stimulus was presented either: (a) for 5 s simultaneously with the sound; (b) for 5 s, 1 s before the sound (SOA between the audio and visual stimuli was 6 s); or (c) for 33 ms, 1 s before the sound (SOA was 1033 ms). Participants reported all identifiable sounds for those audio–visual stimuli. To characterize the effects of visual stimuli on sound identification, the following were used: the identification rates of sounds for which the visual stimulus denoted its sound source, the rates of other sounds for which the visual stimulus did not denote the sound source, and the frequency of false hearing of a sound that was not presented for each sound set. Results of the four experiments demonstrated that a picture or a written word promoted identification of the sound when it was related to the sound, particularly when the visual stimulus was presented for 5 s simultaneously with the sounds. However, a visual stimulus preceding the sounds had a benefit only for the picture, not for the written word. Furthermore, presentation with a picture denoting a sound simultaneously with the sound reduced the frequency of false hearing. These results suggest three ways that presenting a visual stimulus affects identification of the auditory stimulus. First, activation of the visual representation extracted directly from the picture promotes identification of the denoted sound and suppresses the processing of sounds for which the visual stimulus did not denote the sound source. Second, effects based on processing of the

  2. Analysis of environmental sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keansub

    Environmental sound archives - casual recordings of people's daily life - are easily collected by MPS players or camcorders with low cost and high reliability, and shared in the web-sites. There are two kinds of user generated recordings we would like to be able to handle in this thesis: Continuous long-duration personal audio and Soundtracks of short consumer video clips. These environmental recordings contain a lot of useful information (semantic concepts) related with activity, location, occasion and content. As a consequence, the environment archives present many new opportunities for the automatic extraction of information that can be used in intelligent browsing systems. This thesis proposes systems for detecting these interesting concepts on a collection of these real-world recordings. The first system is to segment and label personal audio archives - continuous recordings of an individual's everyday experiences - into 'episodes' (relatively consistent acoustic situations lasting a few minutes or more) using the Bayesian Information Criterion and spectral clustering. The second system is for identifying regions of speech or music in the kinds of energetic and highly-variable noise present in this real-world sound. Motivated by psychoacoustic evidence that pitch is crucial in the perception and organization of sound, we develop a noise-robust pitch detection algorithm to locate speech or music-like regions. To avoid false alarms resulting from background noise with strong periodic components (such as air-conditioning), a new scheme is added in order to suppress these noises in the domain of autocorrelogram. In addition, the third system is to automatically detect a large set of interesting semantic concepts; which we chose for being both informative and useful to users, as well as being technically feasible. These 25 concepts are associated with people's activities, locations, occasions, objects, scenes and sounds, and are based on a large collection of

  3. Adaptive beam-width control of echolocation sounds by CF-FM bats, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum nippon, during prey-capture flight.

    PubMed

    Matsuta, Naohiro; Hiryu, Shizuko; Fujioka, Emyo; Yamada, Yasufumi; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2013-04-01

    The echolocation sounds of Japanese CF-FM bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum nippon) were measured while the bats pursued a moth (Goniocraspidum pryeri) in a flight chamber. Using a 31-channel microphone array system, we investigated how CF-FM bats adjust pulse direction and beam width according to prey position. During the search and approach phases, the horizontal and vertical beam widths were ±22±5 and ±13±5 deg, respectively. When bats entered the terminal phase approximately 1 m from a moth, distinctive evasive flight by G. pryeri was sometimes observed. Simultaneously, the bats broadened the beam widths of some emissions in both the horizontal (44% of emitted echolocation pulses) and vertical planes (71%). The expanded beam widths were ±36±7 deg (horizontal) and ±30±9 deg (vertical). When moths began evasive flight, the tracking accuracy decreased compared with that during the approach phase. However, in 97% of emissions during the terminal phase, the beam width was wider than the misalignment (the angular difference between the pulse and target directions). These findings indicate that bats actively adjust their beam width to retain the moving target within a spatial echolocation window during the final capture stages.

  4. The Surface Microlayer: Review of Literature and Evaluation of Potential Effects of Dredge Activities in Puget Sound.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    Heyrand. 1975. Polonium - 210 - Its vertical oceanic transport by zoo- plankton metabolic activity. Marine Chemistry 3:105-110. Collins, J. 1974. Oil and...F.A. Aulicino. 1985. Comparison of methods to detect fecal streptococci in marine waters. Water, Air and Soil 26:201- 210 . Waggott, A., and A.B

  5. 40 CFR 194.41 - Active institutional controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... controls and their effectiveness in terms of preventing or reducing radionuclide releases shall be... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Active institutional controls. 194.41... Assurance Requirements § 194.41 Active institutional controls. (a) Any compliance application shall...

  6. Active parallel redundancy for electronic integrator-type control circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    Circuit extends concept of redundant feedback control from type-0 to type-1 control systems. Inactive channels are slaves to the active channel, if latter fails, it is rejected and slave channel is activated. High reliability and elimination of single-component catastrophic failure are important in closed-loop control systems.

  7. Distinct cortical pathways for processing tool versus animal sounds.

    PubMed

    Lewis, James W; Brefczynski, Julie A; Phinney, Raymond E; Janik, John J; DeYoe, Edgar A

    2005-05-25

    Human listeners can effortlessly categorize a wide range of environmental sounds. Whereas categorizing visual object classes (e.g., faces, tools, houses, etc.) preferentially activates different regions of visually sensitive cortex, it is not known whether the auditory system exhibits a similar organization for different types or categories of complex sounds outside of human speech. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that hearing and correctly or incorrectly categorizing animal vocalizations (as opposed to hand-manipulated tool sounds) preferentially activated middle portions of the left and right superior temporal gyri (mSTG). On average, the vocalization sounds had much greater harmonic and phase-coupling content (acoustically similar to human speech sounds), which may represent some of the signal attributes that preferentially activate the mSTG regions. In contrast, correctly categorized tool sounds (and even animal sounds that were miscategorized as being tool-related sounds) preferentially activated a widespread, predominantly left hemisphere cortical "mirror network." This network directly overlapped substantial portions of motor-related cortices that were independently activated when participants pantomimed tool manipulations with their right (dominant) hand. These data suggest that the recognition processing for some sounds involves a causal reasoning mechanism (a high-level auditory "how" pathway), automatically evoked when attending to hand-manipulated tool sounds, that effectively associates the dynamic motor actions likely to have produced the sound(s).

  8. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluation of various display designs for a simple k/s sup 2 plant in a compensatory tracking task using an optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s sup 2 plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  9. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    The utility of augmenting displays to aid the human operator in controlling high order complex systems is well known. Analytical evaluations of various display designs for a simple k/s-squared plant in a compensatory tracking task using an Optimal Control Model (OCM) of human behavior is carried out. This analysis reveals that significant improvement in performance should be obtained by skillful integration of key information into the display dynamics. The cooperative control synthesis technique previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing augmented displays. The application of the cooperative control synthesis technique to the design of augmented displays is discussed for the simple k/s-squared plant. This technique is intended to provide a systematic approach to design optimally augmented displays tailored for specific tasks.

  10. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garg, S.; Schmidt, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/s(2) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multi-channel task. Utilizing the closed loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  11. Optimal cooperative control synthesis of active displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Sanjay; Schmidt, David K.

    1987-01-01

    A technique is developed that is intended to provide a systematic approach to synthesizing display augmentation for optimal manual control in complex, closed-loop tasks. A cooperative control synthesis technique, previously developed to design pilot-optimal control augmentation for the plant, is extended to incorporate the simultaneous design of performance enhancing displays. The technique utilizes an optimal control model of the man in the loop. It is applied to the design of a quickening control law for a display and a simple K/(s squared) plant, and then to an F-15 type aircraft in a multichannel task. Utilizing the closed-loop modeling and analysis procedures, the results from the display design algorithm are evaluated and an analytical validation is performed. Experimental validation is recommended for future efforts.

  12. 40 CFR 205.54-2 - Sound data acquisition system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sound data acquisition system. 205.54... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.54-2 Sound... established as equivalent to a Type I—ANSI S1.4-1971 sound level meter for use in determining compliance...

  13. 40 CFR 205.54-2 - Sound data acquisition system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Sound data acquisition system. 205.54-2... PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.54-2 Sound data... equivalent to a Type I—ANSI S1.4-1971 sound level meter for use in determining compliance with...

  14. 40 CFR 205.54-2 - Sound data acquisition system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sound data acquisition system. 205.54... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.54-2 Sound... established as equivalent to a Type I—ANSI S1.4-1971 sound level meter for use in determining compliance...

  15. 40 CFR 205.54-2 - Sound data acquisition system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sound data acquisition system. 205.54... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.54-2 Sound... established as equivalent to a Type I—ANSI S1.4-1971 sound level meter for use in determining compliance...

  16. 40 CFR 205.54-2 - Sound data acquisition system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sound data acquisition system. 205.54... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.54-2 Sound... established as equivalent to a Type I—ANSI S1.4-1971 sound level meter for use in determining compliance...

  17. Sounding Rocket Observations of Active Region Soft X-Ray Spectra Between 0.5 and 2.5 nm Using a Modified SDO/EVE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieman, Seth; Didkovsky, Leonid; Woods, Thomas; Jones, Andrew; Moore, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    Spectrally resolved measurements of individual solar active regions (ARs) in the soft X-ray (SXR) range are important for studying dynamic processes in the solar corona and their associated effects on the Earth's upper atmosphere. They are also a means of evaluating atomic data and elemental abundances used in physics-based solar spectral models. However, very few such measurements are available. We present spectral measurements of two individual ARs in the 0.5 to 2.5 nm range obtained on the NASA 36.290 sounding rocket flight of 21 October 2013 (at about 18:30 UT) using the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), a channel of the Extreme Ultaviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) payload designed for underflight calibrations of the orbital EVE on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The EVE rocket instrument is a duplicate of the EVE on SDO, except the SAM channel on the rocket version was modified in 2012 to include a freestanding transmission grating to provide spectrally resolved images of the solar disk with the best signal to noise ratio for the brightest features, such as ARs. Calibrations of the EVE sounding rocket instrument at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (NIST/SURF) have provided a measurement of the SAM absolute spectral response function and a mapping of wavelength separation in the grating diffraction pattern. We discuss techniques (incorporating the NIST/SURF data) for determining SXR spectra from the dispersed AR images as well as the resulting spectra for NOAA ARs 11877 and 11875 observed on the 2013 rocket flight. In comparisons with physics-based spectral models using the CHIANTI v8 atomic database we find that both AR spectra are in good agreement with isothermal spectra (4 MK), as well as spectra based on an AR differential emission measure (DEM) included with the CHIANTI distribution, with the exception of the relative intensities of strong Fe xvii lines associated with 2p6-2p53{s} and 2p6-2p

  18. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLaat, John C.; Breisacher, Kevin J.; Saus, Joseph R.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2000-01-01

    Lean-burning combustors are susceptible to combustion instabilities. Additionally, due to non-uniformities in the fuel-air mixing and in the combustion process, there