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Sample records for active source profiles

  1. Omani propolis: chemical profiling, antibacterial activity and new propolis plant sources

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Propolis (bee glue) is a resinous honeybee product having a long history of application in many countries as a traditional remedy for treating wounds, burns, soar throat, stomach disorders, etc. It has been proved to possess beneficial biological effects, including antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, antiulcer, and many others. Bees gather propolis from diverse resinous plant parts and in different phytogeographic regions its chemical composition might vary significantly. In this article we report the results of the first study on the chemical profiles of propolis from Oman, its plant origin and antibacterial activity. Results The chemical profiles of Omani propolis extracts were obtained by GC-MS analysis after silylation. Over 50 individual compounds were identified in the samples, belonging to different compound types: sugars, polyols, hydroxy acids, fatty acids, cardanols and cardols, anacardic acids, flavan derivatives, triterpenes, prenylated flavanones and chalcones. The profiles were dissimilar from other known propolis types. They demonstrate that although Oman is not a large country, the plant sources of propolis vary significantly, even in the same apiary and the same season. Based on chemical profiles, and isolation and identification of major marker compounds (new propolis constituents), new plant sources of propolis were found: Azadiracta indica (neem tree) and Acacia spp. (most probably A. nilotica). The ethanol extracts of the studied propolis samples demonstrated activity against S. aureus (MIC < 100 μg. mL-1) and E. coli (MIC < 380 μg. mL-1). Conclusion Omani propolis is different form the known propolis types and demonstrates significant chemical diversity. Its most important plant source is the resin of Azadirachta indica, and as a result its typical components are С5-prenyl flavanones. Other plant sources have been identified, too, playing some role in resin collection by bees in Oman: Acacia spp

  2. Assessing Sources of Stress to Aquatic Ecosystems: Using Biomarkers and Bioindicators to Characterize Exodure-Response Profiles of Anthropogenic Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, S.M.

    1999-03-29

    Establishing causal relationships between sources of environmental stressors and aquatic ecosystem health if difficult because of the many biotic and abiotic factors which can influence or modify responses of biological systems to stress, the orders of magnitude involved in extrapolation over both spatial and temporal scales, and compensatory mechanisms such as density-dependent responses that operate in populations. To address the problem of establishing causality between stressors and effects on aquatic systems, a diagnostic approach, based on exposure-response profiles for various anthropogenic activities, was developed to help identify sources of stress responsible for effects on aquatic systems at ecological significant levels of biological organization (individual, population, community). To generate these exposure-effects profiles, biomarkers of exposure were plotted against bioindicators of corresponding effects for several major anthropogenic activities including petrochemical , pulp and paper, domestic sewage, mining operations, land-development activities, and agricultural activities. Biomarkers of exposure to environmental stressors varied depending on the type of anthropogenic activity involved. Bioindicator effects, however, including histopathological lesions, bioenergetic status, individual growth, reproductive impairment, and community-level responses were similar among many of the major anthropogenic activities. This approach is valuable to help identify and diagnose sources of stressors in environments impacted by multiple stressors. By identifying the types and sources of environmental stressors, aquatic ecosystems can be more effectively protected and managed to maintain acceptable levels of environmental quality and ecosystem fitness.

  3. Sources of variation and genetic profile of spontaneous, out-of-season ovulatory activity in the Chios sheep

    PubMed Central

    Avdi, Melpomeni; Banos, Georgios; Kouttos, Athanasios; Bodin, Loys; Chemineau, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Organising the breeding plan of a seasonally breeding species, such as sheep, presents a challenge to farmers and the industry as a whole, since both economical and biological considerations need to be carefully balanced. Understanding the breeding activity of individual animals becomes a prerequisite for a successful breeding program. This study set out to investigate the sources of variation and the genetic profile of the spontaneous, out-of-season ovulatory activity of ewes of the Chios dairy sheep breed in Greece. The definition of the trait was based on blood progesterone levels, measured before exposing the ewes to rams, which marks the onset of the usual breeding season. Data were 707 records, taken over two consecutive years, of 435 ewes kept at the Agricultural Research Station of Chalkidiki in northern Greece. When all available pedigree was included, the total number of animals involved was 1068. On average, 29% of all ewes exhibited spontaneous, out-of-season ovulatory activity, with no substantial variation between the years. Significant sources of systematic variation were the ewe age and live weight, and the month of previous lambing. Older, heavier ewes, that had lambed early the previous autumn, exhibited more frequent activity. Heritability estimates were 0.216 (± 0.084) with a linear and 0.291 with a threshold model. The latter better accounts for the categorical nature of the trait. The linear model repeatability was 0.230 (± 0.095). The results obtained in this study support the notion that spontaneous out-of-season ovulatory activity can be considered in the development of a breeding plan for the Chios sheep breed. PMID:12605851

  4. Crustal Structure Across the Okavango Rift Zone, Botswana: Initial Results From the PRIDE-SEISORZ Active-Source Seismic Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canales, J. P.; Moffat, L.; Lizarralde, D.; Laletsang, K.; Harder, S. H.; Kaip, G.; Modisi, M.

    2015-12-01

    The PRIDE project aims to understand the processes of continental rift initiation and evolution by analyzing along-axis trends in the southern portion of the East Africa Rift System, from Botswana through Zambia and Malawi. The SEISORZ active-source seismic component of PRIDE focused on the Okavango Rift Zone (ORZ) in northwestern Botswana, with the main goal of imaging the crustal structure across the ORZ. This will allow us to estimate total crustal extension, determine the pattern and amount of thinning, assess the possible presence of melt within the rift zone, and assess the contrasts in crustal blocks across the rift, which closely follows the trend of a fold belt. In November 2014 we conducted a crustal-scale, 450-km-long seismic refraction/wide-angle reflection profile consisting of 19 sources (shots in 30-m-deep boreholes) spaced ~25 km apart from each other, and 900 receivers (IRIS/PASSCAL "Texan" dataloggers and 4.5Hz geophones) with ~500 m spacing. From NW to SE, the profile crosses several tectonic domains: the Congo craton, the Damara metamorphic belt and the Ghanzi-Chobe fold belt where the axis of the ORZ is located, and continues into the Kalahari craton. The record sections display clear crustal refraction (Pg) and wide-angle Moho reflection (PmP) phases for all 17 of the good-quality shots, and a mantle refraction arrival (Pn), with the Pg-PmP-Pn triplication appearing at 175 km offset. There are distinct changes in the traveltime and amplitude of these phases along the transect, and on either side of the axis, that seem to correlate with sharp transitions across tectonic terrains. Initial modeling suggests: (1) the presence of a sedimentary half-graben structure at the rift axis beneath the Okavango delta, bounded to the SE by the Kunyere-Thamalakane fault system; (2) faster crustal Vp in the domains to the NW of the ORZ; and (3) thicker crust (45-50 km) at both ends of the profile within the Congo and Kalahari craton domains than at the ORZ and

  5. The thickness and structural characteristics of the crust across Tibetan plateau from active-sources seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiusheng; Gao, Rui; Lu, Zhanwu; Guan, Ye; Zhang, Jisheng; Li, Pengwu; Wang, Haiyan; He, Rizheng; Karplus, Marianne

    2009-02-01

    The Tibetan plateau as one of the youngest orogen on the Earth was considered as the result of continent-continent collision between the Eurasian and Indian plates. The thickness and structure of the crust beneath Tibetan plateau is essential to understand deformation behavior of the plateau. Active-source seismic profiling is most available geophysical method for imaging the structure of the continental crust. The results from more than 25 active-sources seismic profiles carried out in the past twenty years were reviewed in this article. A preliminary cross crustal pattern of the Tibetan Plateau was presented and discussed. The Moho discontinuity buries at the range of 60-80 km on average and have steep ramps located roughly beneath the sutures that are compatible with the successive stacking/accretion of the former Cenozoic blocks northeastward. The deepest Moho (near 80 km) appears closely near IYS and the crustal scale thrust system beneath southern margin of Tibetan plateau suggests strong dependence on collision and non-distributed deformation there. However, the ˜20 km order of Moho offsets hardly reappears in the inline section across northern Tibetan plateau. Without a universally accepted, convincing dynamic explanation model accommodated the all of the facts seen in controlled seismic sections, but vertical thickening and northeastern shorten of the crust is quite evident and interpretable to a certain extent as the result of continent-continent collision. Simultaneously, weak geophysical signature of the BNS suggests that convergence has been accommodated perhaps partially through pure-shear thickening accompanied by removal of lower crustal material by lateral escape. Recent years the result of Moho with ˜7 km offset and long extend in south-dip angle beneath the east Kunlun orogen and a grand thrust fault at the northern margin of Qilian orogen has attract more attention to action from the northern blocks. The broad lower-velocity area in the upper

  6. Active beam position stabilization of pulsed lasers for long-distance ion profile diagnostics at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

    PubMed

    Hardin, Robert A; Liu, Yun; Long, Cary; Aleksandrov, Alexander; Blokland, Willem

    2011-02-14

    A high peak-power Q-switched laser has been used to monitor the ion beam profiles in the superconducting linac at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The laser beam suffers from position drift due to movement, vibration, or thermal effects on the optical components in the 250-meter long laser beam transport line. We have designed, bench-tested, and implemented a beam position stabilization system by using an Ethernet CMOS camera, computer image processing and analysis, and a piezo-driven mirror platform. The system can respond at frequencies up to 30 Hz with a high position detection accuracy. With the beam stabilization system, we have achieved a laser beam pointing stability within a range of 2 μrad (horizontal) to 4 μrad (vertical), corresponding to beam drifts of only 0.5 mm × 1 mm at the furthest measurement station located 250 meters away from the light source.

  7. Sensitivity of source apportionment results to mobile source profiles.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tianqi; Schauer, James J; Huang, Wei; Fang, Dongqing; Shang, Jing; Wang, Yuqin; Zhang, Yuanxun

    2016-12-01

    The sensitivity of a source apportionment model to mobile source profiles was examined to determine the impact of using non-local mobile source profiles in chemical mass balance (CMB) models. We examined the impact of USA and Chinese mobile source profiles on source apportionment results in St. Louis, Missouri, and Beijing. The results showed that the use of non-local mobile source profiles did not impact the model apportionment results for vegetative detritus and biomass burning, but other primary source contributions were influenced by the use of non-local source profiles. Secondary organic carbon (SOC) contributions estimated by the CMB models with local and non-local profiles were compared to estimate of SOC from the EC tracer method and were found to be consistent with little bias. The results also showed that it is feasible to use the USA mobile profiles in China while model results were biased by using Chinese mobile profiles in the USA. Monthly and annual average concentrations of molecular markers in the source apportionment model showed lower sensitivity to source profiles than daily measurements, which has implications to the design of source apportionment studies.

  8. Separation of uncompromised whole blood mixtures for single source STR profiling using fluorescently-labeled human leukocyte antigen (HLA) probes and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS).

    PubMed

    Dean, Lee; Kwon, Ye Jin; Philpott, M Katherine; Stanciu, Cristina E; Seashols-Williams, Sarah J; Dawson Cruz, Tracey; Sturgill, Jamie; Ehrhardt, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    Analysis of biological mixtures is a significant problem for forensic laboratories, particularly when the mixture contains only one cell type. Contributions from multiple individuals to biologic evidence can complicate DNA profile interpretation and often lead to a reduction in the probative value of DNA evidence or worse, its total loss. To address this, we have utilized an analytical technique that exploits the intrinsic immunological variation among individuals to physically separate cells from different sources in a mixture prior to DNA profiling. Specifically, we applied a fluorescently labeled antibody probe to selectively bind to one contributor in a mixture through allele-specific interactions with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins that are expressed on the surfaces of most nucleated cells. Once the contributor's cells were bound to the probe, they were isolated from the mixture using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)-a high throughput technique for separating cell populations based on their optical properties-and then subjected to STR analysis. We tested this approach on two-person and four-person whole blood mixtures where one contributor possessed an HLA allele (A*02) that was not shared by other contributors to the mixture. Results showed that hybridization of the mixture with a fluorescently-labeled antibody probe complimentary to the A*02 allele's protein product created a cell population with a distinct optical profile that could be easily differentiated from other cells in the mixture. After sorting the cells with FACS, genetic analysis showed that the STR profile of this cell population was consistent with that of the contributor who possessed the A*02 allele. Minor peaks from the A*02 negative contributor(s) were observed but could be easily distinguished from the profile generated from A*02 positive cells. Overall, this indicates that HLA antibody probes coupled to FACS may be an effective approach for generating STR profiles of

  9. Multi-Frequency Microwaves Plasma Production for Active Profile Control of Ion Beams on a Large Bore ECR Ion Source with Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Naoki; Kato, Yushi; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-07

    A new concept on magnetic field of plasma production and confinement by using permanent magnets, i.e. cylindrically comb-shaped magnets, has been proposed to enhance efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for broad and dense ion beam source under the low pressure and also the low microwave power. The resonance zones corresponding to the fundamental ECR for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequency are constructed at different positions. The profiles of the plasma parameters in the ECR ion source are different from each frequency of microwave. Large bore extractor is set at the opposite side against the microwave feeds. It is found that differences of their profiles also appear at those of ion beam profiles. We conducted to launch simultaneously multiplex frequency microwaves controlled individually, and tried to control the profiles of the plasma parameters and then those of extracted ion beam.

  10. Production of electron cyclotron resonance plasma by using multifrequencies microwaves and active beam profile control on a large bore electron cyclotron resonance ion source with permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yushi; Watanabe, Takeyoshi; Matsui, Yuuki; Hirai, Yoshiaki; Kutsumi, Osamu; Sakamoto, Naoki; Sato, Fuminobu; Iida, Toshiyuki

    2010-02-01

    A new concept on magnetic field with all magnets on plasma production and confinement has been proposed to enhance efficiency of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma for broad and dense ion beam source under the low pressure. The magnetic field configuration is constructed by a pair of magnets assembly, i.e., comb-shaped magnet which cylindrically surrounds the plasma chamber. The resonance zones corresponding to the fundamental ECR for 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz frequencies are constructed at different positions. The profiles of the plasma parameters in the ECR ion source are different from each frequency of microwave. Large bore extractor is set at the opposite side against the microwave feeds. It is found that differences of their profiles also appear at those of ion beam profiles. We conducted to launch simultaneously multiplex frequencies microwaves controlled individually, and tried to control the profiles of the plasma parameters and then those of extracted ion beam.

  11. The Middle AsiaN Active Source (MANAS) Profile: Preliminary Results From A Deep Seismic Transect in the Tien Shan of Kyrgyzstan and China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, J. H.; Roecker, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Schelochkov, G.; He, R.

    2007-12-01

    New near-vertical deep seismic reflection data, acquired during the summer of 2007, constitute an ~350 km lithospheric transect from the northwestern Tarim Basin in China to the central Tien Shan of Kyrgyzstan. Recognized as one of the highest, youngest, and most active orogenic systems on Earth, the Tien Shan are situated internal to the Eurasian continent, removed up to 3000 km from the former plate boundary with the Indian subcontinent. Existing geologic constraints imply that up to 200 km of shortening may have occurred in Late Tertiary to Recent time. Additionally, geologic, topographic, and gravimetric data suggest that continental lithosphere of the Tarim basin may presently be subducting beneath the southern margin of the Tien Shan, in the absence of an oceanic slab. While geodetic measurements document that the Tien Shan currently record about half of the shortening between India and Eurasia, geologic data dictate that active faults are restricted to only several of the individual ranges that make up the mountain belt. Passive-source seismological studies have shown the surprising result that the orogenic crust is thickest (65-70 km) at both the southern and northern margins of the Tien Shan, and thins dramatically to ~35 km within the internal part of the orogen. Key targets of the MANAS (Middle AsiaN Active Source) Profile include (1) the top of the Tarim crust as it descends beneath the southern Tien Shan, (2) an inferred crustal-scale frontal ramp, representing where the continental plate may have broken and is now descending into the upper mantle, (3) the geometry of demonstrably active faults below the shallow depths to which they can be inferred from surface geologic constraints, (4) the topography and seismic reflection signature of the Moho, especially given the unexpected variations in crustal thickness across the orogen, and (5) the significance of both crustal and upper mantle conductivity anomalies previously identified through magnetotelluric

  12. Evaluation of antioxidant potential, enzyme inhibition activity and phenolic profile of Lathyrus cicera and Lathyrus digitatus: Potential sources of bioactive compounds for the food industry.

    PubMed

    Llorent-Martínez, E J; Ortega-Barrales, P; Zengin, G; Mocan, A; Simirgiotis, M J; Ceylan, R; Uysal, S; Aktumsek, A

    2017-03-02

    The genus Lathyrus has great importance in terms of food and agricultural areas. In this study, the in vitro antioxidant activity (phosphomolybdenum, DPPH, ABTS, FRAP, CUPRAC and metal chelating) and enzyme inhibitory activity evaluation (acetyl cholinesterase, butyryl cholinesterase, α-amylase and α-glucosidase) of L. cicera and L. digitatus were investigated, as well as their phytochemical profiles. The screening of the main phytochemical compounds in aerial parts of L. cicera and L. digitatus was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection (HPLC-ESI-MS(n)), observing that flavonoids represent the highest percentage of identified compounds, with abundance of tri- and tetra-glycosilated flavonoids, including acylated ones, especially in L. cicera. Generally, L. digitatus exhibited stronger antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory activities in correlation with its higher level of phenolics. The high number of phenolic compounds and the results of the antioxidant and enzyme assays suggest that these plants may be further used as sources of bioactive compounds, and for the preparation of new nutraceuticals.

  13. Antioxidant Activities, Metabolic Profiling, Proximate Analysis, Mineral Nutrient Composition of Salvadora persica Fruit Unravel a Potential Functional Food and a Natural Source of Pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Asha; Parida, Asish K; Rangani, Jaykumar; Panda, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Salvadora persica is a medicinally important plant mainly used in oral hygiene. However, little attention has been given towards the nutritional prominence of this plant. This study encloses the proximate and mineral nutrient contents, amino acid composition, metabolite profiling and antioxidant potential of S. persica fruit. The ripen fruit contained substantial amount of sugars, mineral nutrients, carotenoids, polyphenols and flavonoids. The metabolic profiling of the fruit extract by GC-MS revealed a total of 22 metabolites comprising of sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids, organic base, and aromatic silica compound. The identified metabolites have been previously reported to have potential antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-hyperglycemic, and antitumor properties. The GC-MS analysis indicated high glucose and glucopyranose (247.62 and 42.90 mg g(-1) FW respectively) contents in fruit of S. persica. The fruit extract demonstrated a significantly higher antioxidant and ROS scavenging properties along with high contents of mineral nutrients and essential amino acids. HPLC analysis revealed presence of essential and non-essential amino acid required for healthy body metabolism. The cysteine was found to be in highest amount (733.69 mg 100 g(-1) DW) among all amino acids quantified. Specifically, compared to similar medicinal plants, previously reported as a source of non-conventional food and with some of the commercially important fruits, S. persica fruit appears to be a potential source of essential mineral nutrients, amino acids, vitamins (ascorbic acid and carotenoid) and pharmaceutically important metabolites contributing towards fulfilling the recommended daily requirement of these for a healthy human being. This is the first report establishing importance of S. persica fruit as nutraceuticals. The data presented here proposed that fruit of S. persica may be used as functional food or reinvigorating ingredient for processed food to reduce deficiency of

  14. Antioxidant Activities, Metabolic Profiling, Proximate Analysis, Mineral Nutrient Composition of Salvadora persica Fruit Unravel a Potential Functional Food and a Natural Source of Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Asha; Parida, Asish K.; Rangani, Jaykumar; Panda, Ashok

    2017-01-01

    Salvadora persica is a medicinally important plant mainly used in oral hygiene. However, little attention has been given towards the nutritional prominence of this plant. This study encloses the proximate and mineral nutrient contents, amino acid composition, metabolite profiling and antioxidant potential of S. persica fruit. The ripen fruit contained substantial amount of sugars, mineral nutrients, carotenoids, polyphenols and flavonoids. The metabolic profiling of the fruit extract by GC-MS revealed a total of 22 metabolites comprising of sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids, organic base, and aromatic silica compound. The identified metabolites have been previously reported to have potential antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-hyperglycemic, and antitumor properties. The GC-MS analysis indicated high glucose and glucopyranose (247.62 and 42.90 mg g-1 FW respectively) contents in fruit of S. persica. The fruit extract demonstrated a significantly higher antioxidant and ROS scavenging properties along with high contents of mineral nutrients and essential amino acids. HPLC analysis revealed presence of essential and non-essential amino acid required for healthy body metabolism. The cysteine was found to be in highest amount (733.69 mg 100 g-1 DW) among all amino acids quantified. Specifically, compared to similar medicinal plants, previously reported as a source of non-conventional food and with some of the commercially important fruits, S. persica fruit appears to be a potential source of essential mineral nutrients, amino acids, vitamins (ascorbic acid and carotenoid) and pharmaceutically important metabolites contributing towards fulfilling the recommended daily requirement of these for a healthy human being. This is the first report establishing importance of S. persica fruit as nutraceuticals. The data presented here proposed that fruit of S. persica may be used as functional food or reinvigorating ingredient for processed food to reduce deficiency of nutrients

  15. Simultaneous ion beam profile scan using a single laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Long, C.; Huang, C.; Dickson, R.; Aleksandrov, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the world’s first experiment of a simultaneous profile scan of the hydrogen ion (H-) beam using a laser wire system. The system was developed and brought to operational level of application at the superconducting linac of the Spallation Neutron Source accelerator complex. The laser wire profile scanner is based on a photodetachment process and therefore can be conducted on a 1-MW neutron production H- beam in a nonintrusive manner. The new simultaneous profile scanning system allows one to simultaneously measure profiles of the H- beam at nine different locations of the linac with high speed and accuracy, and therefore provides a unique tool for accelerator tuning and physics study. This paper describes the design, optical system and software platform developments, and measurement results of the simultaneous profile scanning system.

  16. Characterising Active Fault Earthquake Sources Beneath the Coastal Environments of Christchurch and Wellington Cities, New Zealand, Using Seismic Reflection Profiles and Fault Displacement Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, P.; Nodder, S.; Gorman, A. R.; Woelz, S.; Orpin, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal cities of Christchurch and Wellington, New Zealand, lie in different tectonic settings within the obliquely convergent Pacific-Australian plate boundary zone. Both cities have experienced damaging earthquakes in the last three years, which highlight the importance of locating and characterising hidden active faults close to urban areas. The devastating and geologically complex Canterbury earthquake sequence of 2010-2012 developed on the periphery of the plate boundary, and reactivated several previously unidentified strike-slip and reverse faults. Major aftershocks initially beneath land, generally migrated eastward over time, and finally advanced offshore into Pegasus Bay. A study of active submarine faulting beneath the bay highlights the role of inherited crustal structure and inversion tectonics. Marine seismic reflection data reveals that faults have very low slip rate and negligible post-glacial (<15 ka) deformation, which is consistent with inferred long recurrence intervals between large magnitude (Mw>6) earthquakes. Wellington City is surrounded by numerous high-slip rate strike-slip faults overlying the Hikurangi subduction zone. A dense network of secondary basement structures previously recognised throughout the region, mainly from tectonic geomorphology, have, until recently, been considered mostly inactive and excluded from seismic hazard models. We used high-resolution geophysical, bathymetric and sediment-core data to determine the structure, earthquake history and earthquake potential of a newly discovered active reverse fault beneath the inner reaches of Wellington Harbour. The fault has a slip rate of ~0.6 ± 0.3 mm/y, and a vertical displacement history indicating at least two large magnitude (Mw 6.3-7.1), surface-rupturing earthquakes in the last 10 ka. We infer that the fault extends southwards onshore beneath the city and potentially into Cook Strait, and represents a significant previously unrecognised seismic hazard.

  17. Wilderness Adventure Programs: An Activity Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenstein, Daniel H.

    Focusing upon the adventure aspect of wilderness programs, this paper presents a profile of those program activities which create a number of challenges and often stressful situations as the means of attaining specified goals and which can best be incorporated under the term "Wilderness Adventure Program" (WAP). Providing information of…

  18. Source Identification Of Airborne Antimony On The Basis Of The Field Monitoring And The Source Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, A.; Sato, K.; Fujitani, Y.; Fujimori, E.; Tanabe, K.; Ohara, T.; Shimoda, M.; Kozawa, K.; Furuta, N.

    2008-12-01

    The results of the long-term monitoring of airborne particulate matter (APM) in Tokyo indicated that APM have been extremely enriched with antimony (Sb) compared to crustal composition. This observation suggests that the airborne Sb is distinctly derived from human activities. According to the material flow analysis, automotive brake abrasion dust and fly ash from waste incinerator were suspected as the significant Sb sources. To clarify the emission sources of the airborne Sb, elemental composition, particle size distribution, and morphological profiles of dust particles collected from two possible emission sources were characterized and compared to the field observation data. Brake abrasion dust samples were generated by using a brake dynamometer. During the abrasion test, particle size distribution was measured by an aerodynamic particle sizer spectrometer. Concurrently, size- classified dust particles were collected by an Andersen type air sampler. Fly ash samples were collected from several municipal waste incinerators, and the bulk ash samples were re-dispersed into an enclosed chamber. The measurement of particle size distribution and the collection of size-classified ash particles were conducted by the same methodologies as described previously. Field observations of APM were performed at a roadside site and a residential site by using an Andersen type air sampler. Chemical analyses of metallic elements were performed by an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometr. Morphological profiling of the individual particle was conducted by a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. High concentration of Sb was detected from both of two possible sources. Particularly, Sb concentrations in a brake abrasion dust were extremely high compared to that in an ambient APM, suggesting that airborne Sb observed at the roadside might have been largely derived from

  19. IMPROVING SOURCE PROFILES AND APPORTIONMENT OF COMBUSTION SOURCES USING THERMAL CARBON FRACTIONS IN MULTIVARIATE RECEPTOR MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this study was to improve combustion source profiles and apportionment of a PM2.5 urban aerosol by using 7 individual organic and elemental carbon thermal fractions in place of total organic and elemental carbon. This study used 3 years (96-99) of speciated data...

  20. CMBACT: CMB from ACTive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogosian, Levon; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2011-06-01

    This code is based on the cosmic string model described in this paper by Pogosian and Vachaspati, as well as on the CMBFAST code created by Uros Seljak and Matias Zaldarriaga. It contains an integrator for the vector contribution to the CMB temperature and polarization. The code is reconfigured to make it easier to use with or without active sources. To produce inflationary CMB spectra one simply sets the string tension to zero (gmu=0.0d0). For a non-zero value of tension only the string contribution is calculated. An option is added to randomize the directions of velocities of consolidated segments as they evolve in time. In the original segment model, which is still the default version (irandomv=0), each segment is given a random velocity initially, but then continues to move in a straight line for the rest of its life. The new option (irandomv=1) allows to additionally randomize velocities of each segment at roughly each Hubble time. However, the merits of this new option are still under investigation. The default version (irandomv=0) is strongly recommended, since it actually gives reasonable unequal time correlators. For each Fourier mode, k, the string stress-energy components are now evaluated on a time grid sufficiently fine for that k.

  1. Line profile asymmetries in chromospherically active stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Robert C.; Bopp, Bernard W.; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Granados, Arno F.; Henry, Gregory W.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1992-01-01

    A powerful, new probe of chromospheric activity, cross-correlation, has been developed and applied to a variety of stars. In this particular application, an entire CCD spectrum of an active star is correlated with the spectrum of a narrow-line, inactive star of similar spectral type and luminosity class. Using a number of strong lines in this manner enables the detection of absorption profile asymmetries at moderate resolution (lambda/Delta lambda about 40,000) and S/N 150:1. This technique has been applied to 14 systems mostly RS CVn's, with 10 not greater than nu sin i not greater than 50 km/s and P not less than 7 d. Distortions were detected for the first time in five systems: Sigma Gem, IM Peg, GX Lib, UV Crb, and Zeta And. Detailed modeling, incorporating both spectral line profiles and broad-band photometry, is applied to Sigma Gem. Profile asymmetries for this star are fitted by two high-latitude spots covering 5 percent of the stellar surface. The derived spot temperature of 3400 K is lower than found in previous studies. In addition, two well-known systems have been studied: HD 199178 and V711 Tau. Polar spots are found on both.

  2. An Investigation of Activity Profiles of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Michelle; Lee, Yung Soo; Greenfield, Jennifer C.; Inoue, Megumi; Chen, Huajuan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. In this study, we advance knowledge about activity engagement by considering many activities simultaneously to identify profiles of activity among older adults. Further, we use cross-sectional data to explore factors associated with activity profiles and prospective data to explore activity profiles and well-being outcomes. Method. We used the core survey data from the years 2008 and 2010, as well as the 2009 Health and Retirement Study Consumption and Activities Mail Survey (HRS CAMS). The HRS CAMS includes information on types and amounts of activities. We used factor analysis and latent class analysis to identify activity profiles and regression analyses to assess antecedents and outcomes associated with activity profiles. Results. We identified 5 activity profiles: Low Activity, Moderate Activity, High Activity, Working, and Physically Active. These profiles varied in amount and type of activities. Demographic and health factors were related to profiles. Activity profiles were subsequently associated with self-rated health and depression symptoms. Discussion. The use of a 5-level categorical activity profile variable may allow more complex analyses of activity that capture the “whole person.” There is clearly a vulnerable group of low-activity individuals as well as a High Activity group that may represent the “active ageing” vision. PMID:24526690

  3. Neutral Helium Profile Measurements in the WVU Helicon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, Amy; Hardin, Robert; Scime, Earl; Connor, Spencer

    2006-10-01

    We report spatially resolved measurements of excited state neutral helium density, temperature, and flow velocities in the WVU helicon plasma source (HELIX). While ion dynamics are studied extensively, neutral particle characteristics such as density and temperature are frequently neglected in low temperature plasmas and assumed to be spatially uniform. Measurement of the neutral flow is also important, specifically for researchers who use line integrated spectroscopy, since flows along the line of sight can artificially broaden the line width of emission lines. Recent work by Holland et al. on spontaneous flow shear illustrates the need for spatially resolved measurement profiles of the neutral particle parameters. Inclusion of a spatially varying ion-neutral momentum dampening parameter in theoretical models would not only give a more comprehensive understanding of the physics, but could lead to increased shear. Profile measurements were made using the 2D stage described in Hardin et al. C. Holland, J. H. Yu, A. James et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195002 (2006). R. Hardin, X. Sun, E. Scime, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 4091 (2004).

  4. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Microbes

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-02-01

    Activity-Based Protein Profiling (ABPP) in conjunction with multimodal characterization techniques has yielded impactful findings in microbiology, particularly in pathogen, bioenergy, drug discovery, and environmental research. Using small molecule chemical probes that react irreversibly with specific proteins or protein families in complex systems has provided insights in enzyme functions in central metabolic pathways, drug-protein interactions, and regulatory protein redox, for systems ranging from photoautotrophic cyanobacteria to mycobacteria, and combining live cell or cell extract ABPP with proteomics, molecular biology, modeling, and other techniques has greatly expanded our understanding of these systems. New opportunities for application of ABPP to microbial systems include: enhancing protein annotation, characterizing protein activities in myriad environments, and reveal signal transduction and regulatory mechanisms in microbial systems.

  5. Gamma source for active interrogation

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Barletta, William A.

    2009-09-29

    A cylindrical gamma generator includes a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A hydrogen plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical gamma generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which has many openings. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired.

  6. Gamma source for active interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Barletta, William A.

    2012-10-02

    A cylindrical gamma generator includes a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A hydrogen plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical gamma generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which has many openings. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired.

  7. Universal Temporal Profile of Replication Origin Activation in Eukaryotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldar, Arach

    2011-03-01

    The complete and faithful transmission of eukaryotic genome to daughter cells involves the timely duplication of mother cell's DNA. DNA replication starts at multiple chromosomal positions called replication origin. From each activated replication origin two replication forks progress in opposite direction and duplicate the mother cell's DNA. While it is widely accepted that in eukaryotic organisms replication origins are activated in a stochastic manner, little is known on the sources of the observed stochasticity. It is often associated to the population variability to enter S phase. We extract from a growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae population the average rate of origin activation in a single cell by combining single molecule measurements and a numerical deconvolution technique. We show that the temporal profile of the rate of origin activation in a single cell is similar to the one extracted from a replicating cell population. Taking into account this observation we exclude the population variability as the origin of observed stochasticity in origin activation. We confirm that the rate of origin activation increases in the early stage of S phase and decreases at the latter stage. The population average activation rate extracted from single molecule analysis is in prefect accordance with the activation rate extracted from published micro-array data, confirming therefore the homogeneity and genome scale invariance of dynamic of replication process. All these observations point toward a possible role of replication fork to control the rate of origin activation.

  8. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

    2001-04-01

    This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

  9. The safety profile of drotrecogin alfa (activated)

    PubMed Central

    Fumagalli, Roberto; Mignini, Mariano A

    2007-01-01

    Continued safety assessment is essential for any newly approved therapy. Drotrecogin alfa (activated; DrotAA), which is approved for use in severe sepsis, has undergone clinical trials with corresponding safety analyses since 1995. However, the only comprehensive review of all trials is that reported in 2003 by Bernard and coworkers. This is an important review that focuses on the safety profile of DrotAA in all published studies (six randomized clinical trials and five national registry studies) and in previously unpublished data. DrotAA treatment is associated with an increased risk for bleeding (which in general is manageable). Nevertheless, the available evidence shows that any adverse effects of DrotAA are outweighed by its benefits in patients with severe sepsis who are at high risk for death. So far, more than 9,000 patients have been enrolled in clinical trials involving DrotAA, providing a valuable safety database. It is of note that although DrotAA does increase the risk of bleeding, this has not been associated with an overall increase in the rate of all severe adverse events. PMID:18269693

  10. The central power source in active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ptak, Roger; Stoner, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    Potential sources for the central power in AGN are examined. The continuum, emission line profiles, and time variability and broad emission line region for AGN are analyzed. The supermassive black hole hypothesis, the supermassive magnetized core model of Kundt (1978), and the model of Stoner and Ptak (1984) in which the supermassive stars maintain a kind of long-term quasi-stability, but accretion is balanced by mass loss and spherical bursts rather than in jets are considered. It is argued that the hypothesis that the supermassive blackholes are the central engines for AGN is based on theoretical principles; however, AGN emission line profiles and variability suggest a spherical geometry for the observed components of these engines. Also the supermassive black hole models do not account for all the AGN observations.

  11. Profiling Students' Multiple Source Use by Question Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    List, Alexandra; Grossnickle, Emily M.; Alexander, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined undergraduate students' multiple source use in response to two different types of academic questions, one discrete and one open-ended. Participants (N = 240) responded to two questions using a library of eight digital sources, varying in source type (e.g., newspaper article) and reliability (e.g., authors' credentials).…

  12. Lunar seismic profiling experiment natural activity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    The Lunar Seismic Experiment Natural Activity Study has provided a unique opportunity to study the high frequency (4-20 Hz) portion to the seismic spectrum on the moon. The data obtained from the LSPE was studied to evaluate the origin and importance of the process that generates thermal moonquakes and the characteristics of the seismic scattering zone at the lunar surface. The detection of thermal moonquakes by the LSPE array made it possible to locate the sources of many events and determine that they are definitely not generated by astronaut activities but are the result of a natural process on the moon. The propagation of seismic waves in the near-surface layers was studied in a qualitative manner. In the absence of an adequate theoretical model for the propagation of seismic waves in the moon, it is not possible to assign a depth for the scattering layer. The LSPE data does define several parameters which must be satisfied by any model developed in the future.

  13. Source Profiles for Nonmethane Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere of Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Doskey, Paul V; Fukui, Yoshiko; Sultan, Mohamed; Al Maghraby, Ashraf; Taher, Amany

    1999-07-01

    Profiles of the sources of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) were developed for emissions from vehicles, petroleum fuels (gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas [LPG], and natural gas), a petroleum refinery, a smelter, and a cast iron factory in Cairo, Egypt. More than 100 hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons were tentatively identified and quantified. Gasoline-vapor and whole-gasoline profiles could be distinguished from the other profiles by high concentrations of the C5 and C6 saturated hydrocarbons. The vehicle emission profile was similar to the whole-gasoline profile, with the exception of the unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, which were present at higher concentrations in the vehicle emission profile. High levels of the C2-C4 saturated hydrocarbons, particularly n-butane, were characteristic features of the petroleum refinery emissions. The smelter and cast iron factory emissions were similar to the refinery emissions; however, the levels of benzene and toluene were greater in the former two sources. The LPG and natural gas emissions contained high concentrations of n-butane and ethane, respectively. The NMOC source profiles for Cairo were distinctly different from profiles for U.S. sources, indicating that NMOC source profiles are sensitive to the particular composition of petroleum fuels that are used in a location.

  14. Chemical transformations that yield compounds with distinct activity profiles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2011-07-14

    We have systematically searched for chemical changes that generate compounds with distinct biological activity profiles. For this purpose, activity profiles were generated for ∼42000 compounds active against human targets. Unique activity profiles involving multiple target proteins were determined, and all possible matched molecular pairs (MMPs) were identified for compounds representing these profiles. An MMP is defined as a pair of compounds that are distinguished from each other only at a single site such as an R group or ring system. For example, in an MMP, a hydroxyl group might be replaced by a halogen atom or a benzene ring by an amide group. From ∼37500 MMPs, more than 300 nonredundant chemical transformations were isolated that yielded compounds with distinct activity profiles. None of these transformations was found in pairs of compounds with overlapping activity profiles. These transformations were ranked according to the number of MMPs, the number of activity profiles, and the total number of targets that they covered. In many instances, prioritized transformations involved ring systems of varying complexity. All transformations that were found to switch activity profiles are provided to enable further analysis and aid in compound design efforts.

  15. Building on Student Diversity: Profiles and Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowdery, Joy R.; Rogness, Linda Ingling; Morrow, Linda E.; Wilson, Vicki A.

    2006-01-01

    This text captures the profiles and cumulative records of six diverse students at early childhood, middle childhood, and then high school level. Intended for the preservice teacher, this book illustrates how to create a caring school environment; accommodate for special learning needs in instructional and assessments; and interact with families…

  16. Social network profiles as information sources for adolescents' offline relations.

    PubMed

    Courtois, Cédric; All, Anissa; Vanwynsberghe, Hadewijch

    2012-06-01

    This article presents the results of a study concerning the use of online profile pages by adolescents to know more about "offline" friends and acquaintances. Previous research has indicated that social networking sites (SNSs) are used to gather information on new online contacts. However, several studies have demonstrated a substantial overlap between offline and online social networks. Hence, we question whether online connections are meaningful in gathering information on offline friends and acquaintances. First, the results indicate that a combination of passive uncertainty reduction (monitoring a target's profile) and interactive uncertainty reduction (communication through the target's profile) explains a considerable amount of variance in the level of uncertainty about both friends and acquaintances. More specifically, adolescents generally get to know much more about their acquaintances. Second, the results of online uncertainty reduction positively affect the degree of self-disclosure, which is imperative in building a solid friend relation. Further, we find that uncertainty reduction strategies positively mediate the effect of social anxiety on the level of certainty about friends. This implies that socially anxious teenagers benefit from SNSs by getting the conditions right to build a more solid relation with their friends. Hence, we conclude that SNSs play a substantial role in today's adolescents' everyday interpersonal communication.

  17. Magnetoencephalographic accuracy profiles for the detection of auditory pathway sources.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Martin; Trahms, Lutz; Sander, Tilmann

    2015-04-01

    The detection limits for cortical and brain stem sources associated with the auditory pathway are examined in order to analyse brain responses at the limits of the audible frequency range. The results obtained from this study are also relevant to other issues of auditory brain research. A complementary approach consisting of recordings of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data and simulations of magnetic field distributions is presented in this work. A biomagnetic phantom consisting of a spherical volume filled with a saline solution and four current dipoles is built. The magnetic fields outside of the phantom generated by the current dipoles are then measured for a range of applied electric dipole moments with a planar multichannel SQUID magnetometer device and a helmet MEG gradiometer device. The inclusion of a magnetometer system is expected to be more sensitive to brain stem sources compared with a gradiometer system. The same electrical and geometrical configuration is simulated in a forward calculation. From both the measured and the simulated data, the dipole positions are estimated using an inverse calculation. Results are obtained for the reconstruction accuracy as a function of applied electric dipole moment and depth of the current dipole. We found that both systems can localize cortical and subcortical sources at physiological dipole strength even for brain stem sources. Further, we found that a planar magnetometer system is more suitable if the position of the brain source can be restricted in a limited region of the brain. If this is not the case, a helmet-shaped sensor system offers more accurate source estimation.

  18. PM 2.5 source profiles for black and organic carbon emission inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Lowenthal, Douglas H.; Antony Chen, L.-W.; Motallebi, Nehzat

    2011-10-01

    Emission inventories for black or elemental (BC or EC) and organic (OC) carbon can be derived by multiplying PM 2.5 emission estimates by mass fractions of these species in representative source profiles. This study examines the variability of source profiles and its effect on EC emission estimates. An examination of available profiles shows that EC and OC ranged from 6-13% and 35-40% for agricultural burning, 4-33% and 22-68% for residential wood combustion, 6-38% and 24-75% for on-road gasoline vehicles, and 33-74% and 20-47% for on-road heavy-duty diesel vehicles, respectively. Source profiles from the U.S. EPA SPECIATE data base were applied to PM 2.5 emissions from the U.S. EPA National Emissions Inventory for 2005. The total estimated EC emissions of 432 Gg yr -1 was apportioned as 42.5% from biomass burning, 35.4% from non-road mobile sources, 15% from on-road mobile sources, 5.4% from fossil fuel (e.g., coal, oil, and natural gas) combustion in stationary sources, 1% from other stationary industrial sources, and 0.5% from fugitive dust. Considering the variability in available source profiles, BC emission estimates for major sources such as open fires and non-road diesels ranged from 42 to 133 (a factor of 3) and 25 to 100 (a factor of 4) Gg yr -1, respectively. The choice of source profiles can be a major source of uncertainty in national and global BC/EC emission inventories.

  19. Similarities and differences in PM 10 chemical source profiles for geological dust from the San Joaquin Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Judith C.; Watson, John G.; Ashbaugh, Lowell L.; Magliano, Karen L.

    A systematic sampling and analysis approach was followed to acquire chemical source profiles for six types of geological dust in California's San Joaquin Valley. Forty-seven samples from 37 locations included: (1) urban and rural paved roads, (2) residential and agricultural unpaved roads and parking areas, (3) almond, cotton, grape, safflower, and tomato fields, (4) dairy and feedlot surfaces, (5) salt-laden lake and irrigation canal drainage deposits, and (6) building and roadway construction/earthmoving soil. These samples were dried, sieved, resuspended, sampled through a PM 10 inlet onto filters, and chemically analyzed to construct PM 10 source profiles (fractional mass abundances and uncertainties) for 40 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Ba, La, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, and U), 7 ions (Cl -, NO 3-, PO 42-, SO 42-, Na +, K +, and NH 4+), organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), 8 carbon fractions (OC1, OC2, OC3, OC4, OP, EC1, EC2, and EC3), and carbonate carbon. Individual source profiles with analytical precisions were averaged and compared to quantify differences in chemical abundances for: (1) duplicate laboratory resuspension sampling, (2) multiple sampling within the same agricultural field, (3) sampling at different locations for the same land-use activity, (4) sampling of different activities regardless of location, and (5) grouping of different activities into generalized emission inventory source categories. Distinguishing features were found among composite source profiles of six source types. Elemental carbon and Pb marked paved road dust; Na +, Na, S, and SO 42- marked salt deposits; OC, PO 42-, P, K +, K, and Ca characterized animal husbandry; and several metals (Ti, V, Mn) marked construction soil, with abundances 2-10 times higher than those of other profiles. High-sensitivity X-ray fluorescence analysis resulted in detectable alkali and rare earth

  20. Random source generating far field with elliptical flat-topped beam profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongtao; Cai, Yangjian

    2014-07-01

    Circular and rectangular multi-Gaussian Schell-model (MGSM) sources which generate far fields with circular and rectangular flat-topped beam profiles were introduced just recently (Sahin and Korotkova 2012 Opt. Lett. 37 2970; Korotkova 2014 Opt. Lett. 39 64). In this paper, a random source named an elliptical MGSM source is introduced. An analytical expression for the propagation factor of an elliptical MGSM beam is derived. Furthermore, an analytical propagation formula for an elliptical MGSM beam passing through a stigmatic ABCD optical system is derived, and its propagation properties in free space are studied. It is interesting to find that an elliptical MGSM source generates a far field with an elliptical flat-topped beam profile, being qualitatively different from that of circular and rectangular MGSM sources. The ellipticity and the flatness of the elliptical flat-topped beam profile in the far field are determined by the initial coherence widths and the beam index, respectively.

  1. Data sources for in vivo molecular profiling of human phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Timothy; Gupta, Priyanka; Ni, Eric; Young, Lauren M; Tivon, Doreen; Felsovalyi, Klara

    2016-11-01

    Molecular profiling of human diseases has been approached at the genetic (DNA), expression (RNA), and proteomic (protein) levels. An important goal of these efforts is to map observed molecular patterns to specific, mechanistic organic entities, such as loci in the genome, individual RNA molecules or defined proteins or protein assemblies. Importantly, such maps have been historically approached in the more intuitive context of a theoretical individual cell, but diseases are better described in reality using an in vivo framework, namely a library of several tissue-specific maps. In this article, we review the existing data atlases that can be used for this purpose and identify critical gaps that could move the field forward from cellular to in vivo dimensions. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:472-484. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  2. Compilation of a source profile database for hydrocarbon and OVOC emissions in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ziwei; Shao, Min; Lu, Sihua

    2016-10-01

    Source profiles are essential for quantifying the role of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in air pollution. This study compiled a database of VOC source profiles in China, with 75 species drawn from five major categories: transportation, solvent use, biomass burning, fossil fuel burning, and industrial processes. Source profiles were updated for diesel vehicles, biomass burning, and residential coal burning by measuring both hydrocarbons and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), while other source profiles were derived from the available literature. The OVOCs contributed 53.8% of total VOCs in the profiles of heavy - duty diesel vehicle exhaust and 12.4%-46.3% in biomass and residential coal burning, which indicated the importance of primary OVOCs emissions from combustion-related sources. Taking the national emission inventory from 2008 as an example, we established an approach for assigning source profiles to develop a speciation-specific VOC and OVOC emission inventory. The results showed that aromatics contributed 30% of the total 26 Tg VOCs, followed by alkanes (24%), alkenes (19%) and OVOCs (12%). Aromatics (7.9 Tg) were much higher than in previous results (1.1 Tg and 3.4 Tg), while OVOCs (3.1 Tg) were comparable with the 3.3 Tg and 4.3 Tg reported in studies using profiles from the US. The current emission inventories were built based on emission factors from non-methane hydrocarbon measurements, and therefore the proportions from OVOC emissions was neglected, leading to up to 30% underestimation of total VOC emissions. As a result, there is a need to deploy appropriate emission factors and source profiles that include OVOC measurements to reduce the uncertainty of estimated emissions and chemical reactivity potential.

  3. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 1998.

    SciTech Connect

    ROTHMAN,E.

    1999-05-01

    thereafter for half of the running time in FY 1998. In combination with the development of narrow gap undulators this mode opens the possibility of new undulators which could produce hard X-rays in the fundamental, perhaps up to 10 keV. On 27 September 1998, a low horizontal emittance lattice became operational at 2.584 GeV. This results in approximately a 50% decrease in the horizontal beam-size on dipole bending magnet beamlines, and somewhat less of a decrease on the insertion device lines. The beam lifetime is not degraded by the low emittance lattice. This represents an important achievement, enhancing for all users the x-ray ring brightness. The reduced horizontal emittance electron beam will produce brighter x-ray beams for all the beamlines, both bending magnets and insertion devices, adding to other recent increases in the X-Ray ring brightness. During FY 1999 users will gain experience of the new running mode and plans are in place to do the same at 2.8GeV during further studies sessions. Independent evidence of the reduced emittance is shown in Figure 2. This is a pinhole camera scan showing the X-ray beam profile, obtained on the diagnostic beamline X28. Finally, work has begun to update and refine the proposal of the Phase III upgrade endorsed by the Birgeneau panel and BESAC last year. With the whole NSLS facility in teenage years and with many demonstrated enhancements available, the time has come to herald in the next stage of life at the Light Source.

  4. Digital image profilers for detecting faint sources which have bright companions, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Elena; Flint, Graham

    1991-01-01

    A breadboard image profiling system developed for the first phase of this project demonstrated the potential for detecting extremely faint optical sources in the presence of light companions. Experimental data derived from laboratory testing of the device supports the theory that image profilers of this type may approach the theoretical limit imposed by photon statistics. The objective of Phase 2 of this program is the development of a ground-based multichannel image profiling system capable of detecting faint stellar objects slightly displaced from brighter stars. We have finalized the multichannel image profiling system and attempted three field tests.

  5. Sources of solar wind over the solar activity cycle

    PubMed Central

    Poletto, Giannina

    2012-01-01

    Fast solar wind has been recognized, about 40 years ago, to originate in polar coronal holes (CHs), that, since then, have been identified with sources of recurrent high speed wind streams. As of today, however, there is no general consensus about whether there are, within CHs, preferential locations where the solar wind is accelerated. Knowledge of slow wind sources is far from complete as well. Slow wind observed in situ can be traced back to its solar source by backward extrapolation of magnetic fields whose field lines are streamlines of the outflowing plasma. However, this technique often has not the necessary precision for an indisputable identification of the region where wind originates. As the Sun progresses through its activity cycle, different wind sources prevail and contribute to filling the heliosphere. Our present knowledge of different wind sources is here summarized. Also, a Section addresses the problem of wind acceleration in the low corona, as inferred from an analysis of UV data, and illustrates changes between fast and slow wind profiles and possible signatures of changes along the solar cycle. A brief reference to recent work about the deep roots of solar wind and their changes over different solar cycles concludes the review. PMID:25685421

  6. Sources of solar wind over the solar activity cycle.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Giannina

    2013-05-01

    Fast solar wind has been recognized, about 40 years ago, to originate in polar coronal holes (CHs), that, since then, have been identified with sources of recurrent high speed wind streams. As of today, however, there is no general consensus about whether there are, within CHs, preferential locations where the solar wind is accelerated. Knowledge of slow wind sources is far from complete as well. Slow wind observed in situ can be traced back to its solar source by backward extrapolation of magnetic fields whose field lines are streamlines of the outflowing plasma. However, this technique often has not the necessary precision for an indisputable identification of the region where wind originates. As the Sun progresses through its activity cycle, different wind sources prevail and contribute to filling the heliosphere. Our present knowledge of different wind sources is here summarized. Also, a Section addresses the problem of wind acceleration in the low corona, as inferred from an analysis of UV data, and illustrates changes between fast and slow wind profiles and possible signatures of changes along the solar cycle. A brief reference to recent work about the deep roots of solar wind and their changes over different solar cycles concludes the review.

  7. Sensitivity of a Chemical Mass Balance model to different molecular marker traffic source profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Pallavi; Yin, Jianxin; Harrison, Roy M.

    2014-01-01

    Use of the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model for aerosol source apportionment requires the input of source profiles of chemical constituents. Such profiles derived from studies in North America are relatively abundant, but are very scarce from European studies. In particular, there is a lack of data from European road vehicles. This study reports results from a comparison of road traffic source profiles derived from (1) US dynamometer studies of individual vehicles with (2) a traffic profile derived from measurements in a road tunnel in France and (3) new data derived from a twin-site study in London in which concentrations at an urban background site are subtracted from those measured at a busy roadside to derive a traffic increment profile. The dynamometer data are input as a diesel exhaust, gasoline exhaust and smoking engine profile, or alternatively as just a diesel exhaust and gasoline exhaust profile. Running the CMB model with the various traffic profiles together with profiles for other sources of organic carbon gives variable estimates of the contribution of traffic to organic carbon and to PM2.5 concentrations. These are tested in two ways. Firstly, unassigned organic carbon in the output from the CMB model, assumed to be secondary organic carbon, is compared to secondary organic carbon estimated independently using the elemental carbon tracer method. Secondly, the estimated traffic contribution to organic carbon and PM2.5 is compared with an estimate derived simply from the measured elemental carbon concentrations, and the effect on aerosol mass closure is investigated. In both cases the CMB model results correlate well with the independent measures, but there are marked differences according to the traffic source profile employed. As a general observation, it appears that the use of dynamometer data with inclusion of a smoking engine profile has a tendency to over-estimate traffic emissions at some sites whereas the tunnel profile shows a tendency to

  8. Nature of the source of vortex sound flowing around a cylindrical profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenova, L. A.; Semenov, A. G.

    2014-11-01

    This paper is devoted to refining the nature of a vortex sound source and validly estimating the parameters of the region of source origination in a wake behind a cylindrical profile depending on the incoming flow velocity and profile diameter. Based on experimental measurements of the rms values of pressure pulsations on the surface and in the wake behind the profile and hydrodynamic laws for 2D fluid flows, the position of the origin of the vortex street in the wake and the size of the region where the street is still irregular are estimated. In this region, the street dimensions and pressure pulsation amplitudes change with distance from the profile. It is found that the maximum of the pressure pulsation in the wake approaches the profile surface in the range of Reynolds numbers (4.7 × 103-1.5 × 104); the amplitude of pressure pulsations on the profile and vortex sound intensity also increase. Based on the relationship between the source's position and size and the width of the vortex street, as well as taking into account the decay of vortex circulation in the street with increasing distance to the profile, it is shown that the distance from the source to the surface of the profile should not exceed two gages. It is shown that an obstacle in the wake in the region of its irregularity causes a decrease in pressure pulsations on the profile and attenuation of emitted sound. Sound emission ceases completely when the obstacle comes in direct contact with the region of origination of the vortex street. Theoretical estimates satisfactorily agree with the measurement results.

  9. Criminal profiling as a plotting activity based on abductive processes.

    PubMed

    Verde, Alfredo; Nurra, Antonio

    2010-10-01

    In this article the authors analyze the nature and aims of criminal profiling from a theoretical point of view. The need to become increasingly "scientific" has given rise to the modern approaches of profiling, which have been particularly successful in cases of serial homicides and sex crimes, given that compulsive (perverse) acts, because of their ritual nature, have been described as being more easily foreseeable and presumably linkable to the psychological and even personal characteristics of a given criminal. On this basis, the authors analyze profiling from an epistemological point of view and show how, in the concrete activity of profiling, profilers depart from the "certainty" of the scientific models (those that are based on deductive-inductive processes); the epistemological basis of reasoning changes as there is no longer an induction-deduction model but rather an abductive model (as conceived and explained by Peirce) in which the importance of plotting (the weaving of a narrative) becomes greater.

  10. Comparison of Metalloproteinase Protein and Activity Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Giricz, Orsi; Lauer, Janelle L.; Fields, Gregg B.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes play fundamental roles in many biological processes. Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family have been shown to take part in processes crucial in disease progression. The present study used the ExcelArray Human MMP/TIMP Array to quantify MMP and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) production in the lysates and media of 14 cancer and one normal cell line. The overall patterns were very similar in terms of which MMPs and TIMPs were secreted in the media versus associated with the cells in the individual samples. However, more MMP was found in the media, both in amount and in variety. TIMP-1 was produced in all cell lines. MMP activity assays with three different FRET substrates were then utilized to determine if protein production correlated with function for the WM-266-4 and BJ cell lines. Metalloproteinase activity was observed for both cell lines with a general MMP substrate (Knight SSP), consistent with protein production data. However, although both cell lines promoted the hydrolysis of a more selective MMP substrate (NFF-3), metalloproteinase activity was only confirmed in the BJ cell line. The use of inhibitors to confirm metalloproteinase activities pointed to the strengths and weaknesses of in situ FRET substrate assays. PMID:20920458

  11. Perfluorinated acid isomer profiling in water and quantitative assessment of manufacturing source.

    PubMed

    Benskin, Jonathan P; Yeung, Leo W Y; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Taniyasu, Sachi; Lam, Paul K S; Martin, Jonathan W

    2010-12-01

    A method for isomer profiling of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in water was developed and applied to quantitatively assess the contributions from electrochemical (ECF) and telomer manufacturing processes around source regions of North America, Asia, and Europe. With the exception of 3 sites in Japan, over 80% of total perfluorooctanoate (PFOA, C(7)F(15)COO(-)) was from ECF, with the balance attributable to strictly linear (presumably telomer) manufacturing source(s). Comparing PFOA isomer profiles in samples from China, with PFOA obtained from a local Chinese manufacturer, indicated <3% difference in overall branched isomer content; thus, exclusive contribution from local ECF production cannot be ruled out. In Tokyo Bay, ECF, linear-telomer, and isopropyl-telomer sources contributed to 33%, 53%, and 14% of total PFOA, respectively. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, C(8)F(17)SO(3)(-)) isomer profiles were enriched in branched content (i.e., >50% branched) in the Mississippi River but in all other locations were similar or only slightly enriched in branched content relative to historical ECF PFOS. Isomer profiles of other PFCs are also reported. Overall, these data suggest that, with the exception of Tokyo Bay, ECF manufacturing has contributed to the bulk of contamination around these source regions, but other sources are significant, and remote sites should be monitored.

  12. Proposed neutron activation analysis facilities in the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.; Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    A number of analytical chemistry experimental facilities are being proposed for the Advanced Neutron Source. Experimental capabilities will include gamma-ray analysis and neutron depth profiling. This paper describes the various systems proposed and some of their important characteristics.

  13. Determination of transit dose profile for a {sup 192}Ir HDR source

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca, G. P.; Antunes, P. C. G.; Yoriyaz, H.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Several studies have reported methodologies to calculate and correct the transit dose component of the moving radiation source for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy planning systems. However, most of these works employ the average source speed, which varies significantly with the measurement technique used, and does not represent a realistic speed profile, therefore, providing an inaccurate dose determination. In this work, the authors quantified the transit dose component of a HDR unit based on the measurement of the instantaneous source speed to produce more accurate dose values. Methods: The Nucletron microSelectron-HDR Ir-192 source was characterized considering the Task Group 43 (TG-43U1) specifications. The transit dose component was considered through the calculation of the dose distribution using a Monte Carlo particle transport code, MCNP5, for each source position and correcting it by the source speed. The instantaneous source speed measurements were performed in a previous work using two optical fibers connected to a photomultiplier and an oscilloscope. Calculated doses were validated by comparing relative dose profiles with those obtained experimentally using radiochromic films. Results: TG-43U1 source parameters were calculated to validate the Monte Carlo simulations. These agreed with the literature, with differences below 1% for the majority of the points. Calculated dose profiles without transit dose were also validated by comparison with ONCENTRA{sup Registered-Sign} Brachy v. 3.3 dose values, yielding differences within 1.5%. Dose profiles obtained with MCNP5 corrected using the instantaneous source speed profile showed differences near dwell positions of up to 800% in comparison to values corrected using the average source speed, but they are in good agreement with the experimental data, showing a maximum discrepancy of approximately 3% of the maximum dose. Near a dwell position the transit dose is about 22% of the dwell dose delivered

  14. Occurrence and profiling of multiple nitrosamines in source water and drinking water of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanfeng; Yu, Jianwei; An, Wei; Yang, Min

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence of multiple nitrosamines was investigated in 54 drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) from 30 cities across major watersheds of China, and the formation potential (FP) and cancer risk of the dominant nitrosamines were studied for profiling purposes. The results showed that N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) and N-nitrosodi-n-butylamine (NDBA) were the most abundant in DWTPs, and the concentrations in source water and finished water samples were not detected (ND) -53.6ng/L (NDMA), ND -68.5ng/L (NDEA), ND -48.2ng/L (NDBA). The frequencies of detection in source waters were 64.8%, 61.1% and 51.8%, and 57.4%, 53.7%, and 37% for finished waters, respectively. Further study indicated that the FPs of the three main nitrosamines during chloramination were higher than those during chlorination and in drinking water. The results of Principal Components Analysis (PCA) showed that ammonia was the most closely associated factor in nitrosamine formation in the investigated source water; however, there was no significant correlation between nitrosamine-FPs and the values of dominant water-quality parameters. The advanced treatment units (i.e., ozonation and biological activated carbon) used in DWTPs were able to control the nitrosamine-FPs effectively after disinfection. The target pollutants posed median and maximum cancer risks of 2.99×10(-5) and 35.5×10(-5) to the local populations due to their occurrence in drinking water.

  15. Impurity Profiling to Match a Nerve Agent to Its Precursor Source for Chemical Forensics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Carlos G.; Perez Acosta, Gabriel A.; Crenshaw, Michael D.; Wallace, Krys; Mong, Gary M.; Colburn, Heather A.

    2011-10-31

    Chemical forensics is an emerging field in homeland security that aims to attribute a weaponized toxic chemical or related material to its source. Herein, for the first time, trace impurities originating from a chemical precursor were used to match a synthesized nerve agent to its precursor source. Specifically, multiple batches of sarin and its intermediate were synthesized from two commercial stocks of methylphosphonic dichloride (DC) and were then matched by impurity profiling to their DC stocks from out of five possible stocks. This was possible because each DC stock had a unique impurity profile that, for the tested stocks, persisted through synthesis, decontamination, and sample preparation. This work may form a basis for using impurity profiling to help find and prosecute perpetrators of chemical attacks.

  16. Quantitative genetic activity graphical profiles for use in chemical evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, M.D.; Stack, H.F.; Garrett, N.E.; Jackson, M.A.

    1990-12-31

    A graphic approach, terms a Genetic Activity Profile (GAP), was developed to display a matrix of data on the genetic and related effects of selected chemical agents. The profiles provide a visual overview of the quantitative (doses) and qualitative (test results) data for each chemical. Either the lowest effective dose or highest ineffective dose is recorded for each agent and bioassay. Up to 200 different test systems are represented across the GAP. Bioassay systems are organized according to the phylogeny of the test organisms and the end points of genetic activity. The methodology for producing and evaluating genetic activity profile was developed in collaboration with the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Data on individual chemicals were compiles by IARC and by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data are available on 343 compounds selected from volumes 1-53 of the IARC Monographs and on 115 compounds identified as Superfund Priority Substances. Software to display the GAPs on an IBM-compatible personal computer is available from the authors. Structurally similar compounds frequently display qualitatively and quantitatively similar profiles of genetic activity. Through examination of the patterns of GAPs of pairs and groups of chemicals, it is possible to make more informed decisions regarding the selection of test batteries to be used in evaluation of chemical analogs. GAPs provided useful data for development of weight-of-evidence hazard ranking schemes. Also, some knowledge of the potential genetic activity of complex environmental mixtures may be gained from an assessment of the genetic activity profiles of component chemicals. The fundamental techniques and computer programs devised for the GAP database may be used to develop similar databases in other disciplines. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Distinct Metal Isoforms Underlie Promiscuous Activity Profiles of Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Baier, Florian; Chen, John; Solomonson, Matthew; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2015-07-17

    Within a superfamily, functionally diverged metalloenzymes often favor different metals as cofactors for catalysis. One hypothesis is that incorporation of alternative metals expands the catalytic repertoire of metalloenzymes and provides evolutionary springboards toward new catalytic functions. However, there is little experimental evidence that incorporation of alternative metals changes the activity profile of metalloenzymes. Here, we systematically investigate how metals alter the activity profiles of five functionally diverged enzymes of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. Each enzyme was reconstituted in vitro with six different metals, Cd(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+), and assayed against eight catalytically distinct hydrolytic reactions (representing native functions of MBL enzymes). We reveal that each enzyme metal isoform has a significantly different activity level for native and promiscuous reactions. Moreover, metal preferences for native versus promiscuous activities are not correlated and, in some cases, are mutually exclusive; only particular metal isoforms disclose cryptic promiscuous activities but often at the expense of the native activity. For example, the L1 B3 β-lactamase displays a 1000-fold catalytic preference for Zn(2+) over Ni(2+) for its native activity but exhibits promiscuous thioester, phosphodiester, phosphotriester, and lactonase activity only with Ni(2+). Furthermore, we find that the five MBL enzymes exist as an ensemble of various metal isoforms in vivo, and this heterogeneity results in an expanded activity profile compared to a single metal isoform. Our study suggests that promiscuous activities of metalloenzymes can stem from an ensemble of metal isoforms in the cell, which could facilitate the functional divergence of metalloenzymes.

  18. Antiorthostatic suspension stimulates profiles of macrophage activation in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, E. S.; Bates, R. A.; Koebel, D. A.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1999-01-01

    The antiorthostatic suspension model simulates certain physiological effects of spaceflight. We have previously reported BDF1 mice suspended by the tail in the antiorthostatic orientation for 4 days express high levels of resistance to virulent Listeria monocytogenesinfection. In the present study, we examined whether the increased resistance to this organism correlates with profiles of macrophage activation, given the role of the macrophage in killing this pathogen in vivo. We infected BDF1 mice with a lethal dose of virulent L. monocytogenes on day 4 of antiorthostatic suspension and 24 h later constructed profiles of macrophage activation. Viable listeria could not be detected in mice suspended in the antiorthostatic orientation 24 h after infection. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the numbers of granulocytes and mononuclear phagocytes in the spleen of infected mice were not significantly altered as a result of antiorthostatic suspension. Splenocytes from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice produced increased titers of IL-1. Serum levels of neopterin, a nucleotide metabolite secreted by activated macrophages, were enhanced in mice infected during antiorthostatic suspension, but not in antiorthostatically suspended naive mice. Splenic macrophages from mice infected on day 4 of suspension produced enhanced levels of lysozyme. In contrast to the results from antiorthostatically suspended infected mice, macrophages from antiorthostatically suspended uninfected mice did not express enhanced bactericidal activities. The collective results indicate that antiorthostatic suspension can stimulate profiles of macrophage activation which correlate with increased resistance to infection by certain classes of pathogenic bacteria.

  19. An Analysis of Gamma-ray Burst Time Profiles from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lestrade, John Patrick

    1996-01-01

    This proposal requested funding to measure the durations of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) in the 4B catalog as well as to study the structure of GRB time profiles returned by the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. The duration (T90) was to be measured using the same techniques and algorithms developed by the principal investigator for the 3B data. The profile structure studies fall into the two categories of variability and fractal analyses.

  20. Chemoproteomic profiling of host and pathogen enzymes active in cholera

    PubMed Central

    Hatzios, Stavroula K.; Hubbard, Troy; Sasabe, Jumpei; Munera, Diana; Clark, Lars; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T.; Davis, Brigid M.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is a chemoproteomic tool for detecting active enzymes in complex biological systems. We used ABPP to identify secreted bacterial and host serine hydrolases that are active in animals infected with the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Four V. cholerae proteases were consistently active in infected rabbits, and one, VC0157 (renamed IvaP), was also active in human cholera stool. Inactivation of IvaP influenced the activity of other secreted V. cholerae and rabbit enzymes in vivo, while genetic disruption of all four proteases increased the abundance and binding of an intestinal lectin—intelectin—to V. cholerae in infected rabbits. Intelectin also bound to other enteric bacterial pathogens, suggesting it may constitute a previously unrecognized mechanism of bacterial surveillance in the intestine that is inhibited by pathogen-secreted proteases. Our work demonstrates the power of activity-based proteomics to reveal host-pathogen enzymatic dialogue in an animal model of infection. PMID:26900865

  1. Activity profile of high-level Australian lacrosse players.

    PubMed

    Polley, Chris S; Cormack, Stuart J; Gabbett, Tim J; Polglaze, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Despite lacrosse being one of the fastest growing team sports in the world, there is a paucity of information detailing the activity profile of high-level players. Microtechnology systems (global positioning systems and accelerometers) provide the opportunity to obtain detailed information on the activity profile in lacrosse. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the activity profile of lacrosse match-play using microtechnology. Activity profile variables assessed relative to minutes of playing time included relative distance (meter per minute), distance spent standing (0-0.1 m·min), walking (0.2-1.7 m·min), jogging (1.8-3.2 m·min), running (3.3-5.6 m·min), sprinting (≥5.7 m·min), number of high, moderate, low accelerations and decelerations, and player load (PL per minute), calculated as the square root of the sum of the squared instantaneous rate of change in acceleration in 3 vectors (medio-lateral, anterior-posterior, and vertical). Activity was recorded from 14 lacrosse players over 4 matches during a national tournament. Players were separated into positions of attack, midfield, or defense. Differences (effect size [ES] ± 90% confidence interval) between positions and periods of play were considered likely positive when there was ≥75% likelihood of the difference exceeding an ES threshold of 0.2. Midfielders had likely covered higher (mean ± SD) meters per minute (100 ± 11) compared with attackers (87 ± 14; ES = 0.89 ± 1.04) and defenders (79 ± 14; ES = 1.54 ± 0.94) and more moderate and high accelerations and decelerations. Almost all variables across positions were reduced in quarter 4 compared with quarter 1. Coaches should accommodate for positional differences when preparing lacrosse players for competition.

  2. Characterization of PM 10 source profiles for fugitive dust in Fushun-a city famous for coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shaofei; Ji, Yaqin; Lu, Bing; Chen, Li; Han, Bin; Li, Zhiyong; Bai, Zhipeng

    2011-09-01

    A total of 120 fugitive dust samples were collected to acquire chemical source profiles of PM 10 in Fushun including 27 soil dust samples, 32 road dust samples, 19 construction dust samples, 13 coal storage pile samples, 2 cement production samples, 13 coal-fired power plant fly ash samples, 5 fly ash samples from iron smelt plant and 9 samples from industrial raw material and production piles. The samples were classified as 20 subtypes. The dust samples were dried, sieved, resuspended and sampled through a PM 10 inlet onto filters, and then chemically analyzed. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, ion chromatograph and thermal/optical reflectance methods were adopted for analyzing twenty elements including Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Pb and Hg and nine ions including Na +, NH 4+, K +, Mg 2+, Ca 2+, F -, Cl -, NO 3- and SO 42- as well as OC and EC, respectively. The chemical compositions were compared for 20 subtypes. Si and Ca were the most abundant elements in all the fugitive dust profiles. Enrichment factors of elements in fly ashes compared to raw coal were calculated with Fe as reference element. The highest enriched elements were Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb. Significant difference existed among PM 10 profiles with the coefficient of divergence values ranging from 0.28 to 0.78. Profiles were compared with others. Si exhibited lower content in this study for soil and road dust while EC and Cr showed much higher content compared to others indicating the influence of coal mining and industries activities in Fushun. This was validated by source signatures analysis which indicated almost all the fugitive dust were relative to coal and may also be influenced by metallurgy. The ratios of Mn/V, V/Ni, Zn/Pb and Zn/Cd were calculated for source identification. Elemental ratios may vary widely even for the same source types with different processing courses. Chemical profiles of fugitive dust should be established based

  3. Size-differentiated source profiles for fugitive dust in the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, J. J.; Chow, J. C.; Watson, J. G.; Wu, F.; Han, Y. M.; Jin, Z. D.; Shen, Z. X.; An, Z. S.

    Size-differentiated fugitive dust chemical source profiles are determined for the Chinese Loess Plateau, a major source of Asian dust. Fifteen loess samples at five sites (Yulin, Yanchi, Huanxian, Luochuan, and Xi'an) were collected, dried, sieved, resuspended, and sampled through TSP, PM 10, PM 2.5, and PM 1 inlets onto filters for analysis of 40 major and trace elements (Na to U), six ions (Cl -, NO 3-, SO 42-, Na +, K +, and NH 4+), organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC), and carbonate carbon (CO 3-C). The abundances of major species (>1%) include Al, Si, K, Ca, Fe, OC and CO 3-C, in four size-differentiated source profiles. OC accounted for ˜90% of total carbon in four size fractions for most of the profiles. Enrichment factors indicated that the 18 elements (Na, Mg, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba) found in the samples were dominated by crustal sources. Enrichment factors for Co, As, Se, Mo, Cd, In, Sb, and Tl are one to two orders of magnitude larger than crustal-derived elements, suggesting the influence of anthropogenic pollution sources. Compared with loess samples, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sb, SO 42-, and NO 3- are enriched in ambient PM 2.5 aerosol samples, implying that Asian dust contains pollution components in downwind regions of the desert. The elemental ratios of Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe to Al in Asian dust source regions compared well with those found at downwind regions such as Korea, Japan, and the North Pacific. These ratios can be used as fingerprints to trace the transport path of Asian dust.

  4. Digital image profilers for detecting faint sources which have bright companions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Elena; Flint, Graham; Slavey, Robert

    1992-01-01

    For this program, an image profiling system was developed which offers the potential for detecting extremely faint optical sources that are located in close proximity to bright companions. The approach employed is novel in three respects. First, it does not require an optical system wherein extraordinary measures must be taken to minimize diffraction and scatter. Second, it does not require detectors possessing either extreme uniformity in sensitivity or extreme temporal stability. Finally, the system can readily be calibrated, or nulled, in space by testing against an unresolved singular stellar source.

  5. Synthesis of virtual Brillouin frequency shift profiles in BOTDA sensors using optical source dithering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urricelqui, Javier; Sagues, Mikel; Loayssa, Alayn

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrate a novel concept for Brillouin optical time domain analysis sensors that is based on synthesizing a virtual Brillouin frequency shift profile along the sensing fiber. The technique is based on modulating the wavelength of the optical source with a periodic waveform that is synchronized to the pump pulse. Application of this new tool to the compensation of non-local effects and Brillouin-induced noise in distributed sensors is experimentally demonstrated.

  6. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori

    2003-06-12

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

  7. Evaluation of mixed-source, low-template DNA profiles in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Balding, David J

    2013-07-23

    Enhancements in sensitivity now allow DNA profiles to be obtained from only tens of picograms of DNA, corresponding to a few cells, even for samples subject to degradation from environmental exposure. However, low-template DNA (LTDNA) profiles are subject to stochastic effects, such as "dropout" and "dropin" of alleles, and highly variable stutter peak heights. Although the sensitivity of the newly developed methods is highly appealing to crime investigators, courts are concerned about the reliability of the underlying science. High-profile cases relying on LTDNA evidence have collapsed amid controversy, including the case of Hoey in the United Kingdom and the case of Knox and Sollecito in Italy. I argue that rather than the reliability of the science, courts and commentators should focus on the validity of the statistical methods of evaluation of the evidence. Even noisy DNA evidence can be more powerful than many traditional types of evidence, and it can be helpful to a court as long as its strength is not overstated. There have been serious shortcomings in statistical methods for the evaluation of LTDNA profile evidence, however. Here, I propose a method that allows for multiple replicates with different rates of dropout, sporadic dropins, different amounts of DNA from different contributors, relatedness of suspected and alternate contributors, "uncertain" allele designations, and degradation. R code implementing the method is open source, facilitating wide scrutiny. I illustrate its good performance using real cases and simulated crime scene profiles.

  8. Evaluation of mixed-source, low-template DNA profiles in forensic science

    PubMed Central

    Balding, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancements in sensitivity now allow DNA profiles to be obtained from only tens of picograms of DNA, corresponding to a few cells, even for samples subject to degradation from environmental exposure. However, low-template DNA (LTDNA) profiles are subject to stochastic effects, such as “dropout” and “dropin” of alleles, and highly variable stutter peak heights. Although the sensitivity of the newly developed methods is highly appealing to crime investigators, courts are concerned about the reliability of the underlying science. High-profile cases relying on LTDNA evidence have collapsed amid controversy, including the case of Hoey in the United Kingdom and the case of Knox and Sollecito in Italy. I argue that rather than the reliability of the science, courts and commentators should focus on the validity of the statistical methods of evaluation of the evidence. Even noisy DNA evidence can be more powerful than many traditional types of evidence, and it can be helpful to a court as long as its strength is not overstated. There have been serious shortcomings in statistical methods for the evaluation of LTDNA profile evidence, however. Here, I propose a method that allows for multiple replicates with different rates of dropout, sporadic dropins, different amounts of DNA from different contributors, relatedness of suspected and alternate contributors, “uncertain” allele designations, and degradation. R code implementing the method is open source, facilitating wide scrutiny. I illustrate its good performance using real cases and simulated crime scene profiles. PMID:23818643

  9. Calorimetric method for determination of 51Cr neutrino source activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veretenkin, E. P.; Gavrin, V. N.; Danshin, S. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kozlova, Yu. P.; Mirmov, I. N.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental study of nonstandard neutrino properties using high-intensity artificial neutrino sources requires the activity of the sources to be determined with high accuracy. In the BEST project, a calorimetric system for measurement of the activity of high-intensity (a few MCi) neutrino sources based on 51Cr with an accuracy of 0.5-1% is created. In the paper, the main factors affecting the accuracy of determining the neutrino source activity are discussed. The calorimetric system design and the calibration results using a thermal simulator of the source are presented.

  10. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3

  11. Tomographic reconstruction of the beam emissivity profile in the negative ion source NIO1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonnesu, N.; Agostini, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.

    2016-12-01

    A versatile negative hydrogen ion source named NIO1 of a moderate size (130 mA total extracted H- current, 9 apertures, 60 kV total acceleration) has been developed and installed at Consorzio RFX. It will allow great experimental flexibility, very beneficial for studying several important issues related to beam extraction, optics and performance optimization, in view of SPIDER and MITICA, the two full-scale experiments for the ITER neutral beam injector under construction at RFX. The main target of emission tomography applied to an ion beam is the reconstruction of the emissivity profile, from which the ion density distribution can be obtained. The measurement of the beam density profile and of its uniformity throughout the pulse duration with a non-invasive diagnostic, such as tomography, would represent an effective method for monitoring the ion source operation and for malfunction detection. The application of this diagnostic to the NIO1 beam will represent the experimental verification of the possibility to reconstruct a multi-beamlet profile, in the interest of the next tomography systems for SPIDER and MITICA. In this paper, a feasibility study of the tomographic diagnostic for NIO1 is presented. A tomography code based on algebraic reconstruction techniques has been developed for this purpose and the transport of the nine H- beamlets is simulated with a Monte Carlo particle tracking code from the ion source to the tomography plane, where the beam emissivity profile to be reconstructed is calculated. The reference emissivity profile is reconstructed by the tomography code considering different possible layouts of the detection system, in order to find the best compromise between the quality of reconstructions and the complexity of the diagnostic. Results show that a tomography system based on six linear CCD cameras should be capable of reconstructing the NIO1 emissivity profile with an rms error lower than 10%. How instrumental noise in the integrated

  12. Universal Temporal Profile of Replication Origin Activation in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Goldar, Arach; Marsolier-Kergoat, Marie-Claude; Hyrien, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Although replication proteins are conserved among eukaryotes, the sequence requirements for replication initiation differ between species. In all species, however, replication origins fire asynchronously throughout S phase. The temporal program of origin firing is reproducible in cell populations but largely probabilistic at the single-cell level. The mechanisms and the significance of this program are unclear. Replication timing has been correlated with gene activity in metazoans but not in yeast. One potential role for a temporal regulation of origin firing is to minimize fluctuations in replication end time and avoid persistence of unreplicated DNA in mitosis. Here, we have extracted the population-averaged temporal profiles of replication initiation rates for S. cerevisiae, S. pombe, D. melanogaster, X. laevis and H. sapiens from genome-wide replication timing and DNA combing data. All the profiles have a strikingly similar shape, increasing during the first half of S phase then decreasing before its end. A previously proposed minimal model of stochastic initiation modulated by accumulation of a recyclable, limiting replication-fork factor and fork-promoted initiation of new origins, quantitatively described the observed profiles without requiring new implementations. The selective pressure for timely completion of genome replication and optimal usage of replication proteins that must be imported into the cell nucleus can explain the generic shape of the profiles. We have identified a universal behavior of eukaryotic replication initiation that transcends the mechanisms of origin specification. The population-averaged efficiency of replication origin usage changes during S phase in a strikingly similar manner in a highly diverse set of eukaryotes. The quantitative model previously proposed for origin activation in X. laevis can be generalized to explain this evolutionary conservation. PMID:19521533

  13. Marine Actinobacteria as a source of compounds for phytopathogen control: An integrative metabolic-profiling / bioactivity and taxonomical approach

    PubMed Central

    Betancur, Luz A.; Naranjo-Gaybor, Sandra J.; Vinchira-Villarraga, Diana M.; Moreno-Sarmiento, Nubia C.; Maldonado, Luis A.; Suarez-Moreno, Zulma R.; Acosta-González, Alejandro; Padilla-Gonzalez, Gillermo F.; Puyana, Mónica; Castellanos, Leonardo; Ramos, Freddy A.

    2017-01-01

    Marine bacteria are considered as promising sources for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds. In this study, samples of sediment, invertebrate and algae were collected from the Providencia and Santa Catalina coral reef (Colombian Caribbean Sea) with the aim of isolating Actinobateria-like strain able to produce antimicrobial and quorum quenching compounds against pathogens. Several approaches were used to select actinobacterial isolates, obtaining 203 strains from all samples. According to their 16S rRNA gene sequencing, a total of 24 strains was classified within Actinobacteria represented by three genera: Streptomyces, Micromonospora, and Gordonia. In order to assess their metabolic profiles, the actinobacterial strains were grown in liquid cultures, and LC-MS-based analyses from ethyl acetate fractions were performed. Based on taxonomical classification, screening information of activity against phytopathogenic strains and quorum quenching activity, as well as metabolic profiling, six out of the 24 isolates were selected for follow-up with chemical isolation and structure identification analyses of putative metabolites involved in antimicrobial activities. PMID:28225766

  14. Marine Actinobacteria as a source of compounds for phytopathogen control: An integrative metabolic-profiling / bioactivity and taxonomical approach.

    PubMed

    Betancur, Luz A; Naranjo-Gaybor, Sandra J; Vinchira-Villarraga, Diana M; Moreno-Sarmiento, Nubia C; Maldonado, Luis A; Suarez-Moreno, Zulma R; Acosta-González, Alejandro; Padilla-Gonzalez, Gillermo F; Puyana, Mónica; Castellanos, Leonardo; Ramos, Freddy A

    2017-01-01

    Marine bacteria are considered as promising sources for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds. In this study, samples of sediment, invertebrate and algae were collected from the Providencia and Santa Catalina coral reef (Colombian Caribbean Sea) with the aim of isolating Actinobateria-like strain able to produce antimicrobial and quorum quenching compounds against pathogens. Several approaches were used to select actinobacterial isolates, obtaining 203 strains from all samples. According to their 16S rRNA gene sequencing, a total of 24 strains was classified within Actinobacteria represented by three genera: Streptomyces, Micromonospora, and Gordonia. In order to assess their metabolic profiles, the actinobacterial strains were grown in liquid cultures, and LC-MS-based analyses from ethyl acetate fractions were performed. Based on taxonomical classification, screening information of activity against phytopathogenic strains and quorum quenching activity, as well as metabolic profiling, six out of the 24 isolates were selected for follow-up with chemical isolation and structure identification analyses of putative metabolites involved in antimicrobial activities.

  15. Biological spectra analysis: Linking biological activity profiles to molecular structure

    PubMed Central

    Fliri, Anton F.; Loging, William T.; Thadeio, Peter F.; Volkmann, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Establishing quantitative relationships between molecular structure and broad biological effects has been a longstanding challenge in science. Currently, no method exists for forecasting broad biological activity profiles of medicinal agents even within narrow boundaries of structurally similar molecules. Starting from the premise that biological activity results from the capacity of small organic molecules to modulate the activity of the proteome, we set out to investigate whether descriptor sets could be developed for measuring and quantifying this molecular property. Using a 1,567-compound database, we show that percent inhibition values, determined at single high drug concentration in a battery of in vitro assays representing a cross section of the proteome, provide precise molecular property descriptors that identify the structure of molecules. When broad biological activity of molecules is represented in spectra form, organic molecules can be sorted by quantifying differences between biological spectra. Unlike traditional structure–activity relationship methods, sorting of molecules by using biospectra comparisons does not require knowledge of a molecule's putative drug targets. To illustrate this finding, we selected as starting point the biological activity spectra of clotrimazole and tioconazole because their putative target, lanosterol demethylase (CYP51), was not included in the bioassay array. Spectra similarity obtained through profile similarity measurements and hierarchical clustering provided an unbiased means for establishing quantitative relationships between chemical structures and biological activity spectra. This methodology, which we have termed biological spectra analysis, provides the capability not only of sorting molecules on the basis of biospectra similarity but also of predicting simultaneous interactions of new molecules with multiple proteins. PMID:15625110

  16. Botanical origin causes changes in nutritional profile and antioxidant activity of fermented products obtained from honey.

    PubMed

    Dezmirean, Graţia I; Mărghitaş, Liviu A; Bobiş, Otilia; Dezmirean, Daniel S; Bonta, Victoriţa; Erler, Silvio

    2012-08-15

    Honey as rich source of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants serves as health-promoting nutrient in the human body. Here, we present the first time a comparative study of nutritional profiles (e.g., acidities, sugar, organic acid profile, total polyphenolic, flavonoid content) for different unifloral, multifloral honeys and their fermented products, in correlation with their antioxidant activity. Additionally, an optimized method for HPLC separation of organic acids from honey was established. The total phenolic content of honey samples varied widely among the honey types compared to fermented products. High amounts of total flavonoids were quantified in heather honey, followed by raspberry, multifloral, black locust, and linden honey. A positive correlation between the content of polyphenols, flavonoids, and antioxidant activity was observed in honey samples. After fermentation, the flavonoid content of dark honey fermented products decreased significantly. Black locust and linden honeys are more suitable for fermentation because the decrease in antioxidant substances is less pronounced.

  17. Spatially resolved measurements of electron cyclotron resonance ion source beam profile characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Panitzsch, Lauri; Stalder, Michael; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2011-03-15

    Simulations predict that the concentric rings and the triangular structures in the profiles of strongly focused ion beams that are found in different experiments should be dominated by ion species with the same or at least similar m/q-ratio. To verify these theoretical predictions we have tuned our ECR ion source to deliver a beam consisting of multiple ion species whose particular m/q-depending focusing ranges from weakly focused to overfocused. We then recorded spatially resolved charge-state distributions of the beam profile at characteristic positions in the plane perpendicular to the beam line. The results validate theoretical predictions and are summarized in this paper. To achieve the required beam profile characteristics we moved the extraction along the beam line to achieve stronger focusing than by only changing the extraction voltage. To fit the regions of interest of the beam profile into the transmission area of the sector magnet, we steered the beam by moving the extraction in the plane perpendicular to the beam axis. The results of both investigations, beam focusing and beam steering by using a 3D-movable extraction, are also reported in this paper. A brief overview of the new beam monitor extensively used during these measurements, the Faraday cup array, is also given.

  18. Calcium Activation Profile In Electrically Stimulated Intact Rat Heart Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geerts, Hugo; Nuydens, Rony; Ver Donck, Luc; Nuyens, Roger; De Brabander, Marc; Borgers, Marcel

    1988-06-01

    Recent advances in fluorescent probe technology and image processing equipment have made available the measurement of calcium in living systems on a real-time basis. We present the use of the calcium indicator Fura-2 in intact normally stimulated rat heart cells for the spatial and dynamic measurement of the calcium excitation profile. After electric stimulation (1 Hz), the activation proceeds from the center of the myocyte toward the periphery. Within two frame times (80 ms), the whole cell is activated. The activation is slightly faster in the center of the cell than in the periphery. The mean recovery time is 200-400 ms. There is no difference along the cell's long axis. The effect of a beta-agonist and of a calcium antagonist is described.

  19. Global Profiling of Carbohydrate Active Enzymes in Human Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Mande, Sharmila S.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation Carbohydrate Active enzyme (CAZyme) families, encoded by human gut microflora, play a crucial role in breakdown of complex dietary carbohydrates into components that can be absorbed by our intestinal epithelium. Since nutritional wellbeing of an individual is dependent on the nutrient harvesting capability of the gut microbiome, it is important to understand how CAZyme repertoire in the gut is influenced by factors like age, geography and food habits. Results This study reports a comprehensive in-silico analysis of CAZyme profiles in the gut microbiomes of 448 individuals belonging to different geographies, using similarity searches of the corresponding gut metagenomic contigs against the carbohydrate active enzymes database. The study identifies a core group of 89 CAZyme families that are present across 85% of the gut microbiomes. The study detects several geography/age-specific trends in gut CAZyme repertoires of the individuals. Notably, a group of CAZymes having a positive correlation with BMI has been identified. Further this group of BMI-associated CAZymes is observed to be specifically abundant in the Firmicutes phyla. One of the major findings from this study is identification of three distinct groups of individuals, referred to as 'CAZotypes', having similar CAZyme profiles. Distinct taxonomic drivers for these CAZotypes as well as the probable dietary basis for such trends have also been elucidated. The results of this study provide a global view of CAZyme profiles across individuals of various geographies and age-groups. These results re-iterate the need of a more precise understanding of the role of carbohydrate active enzymes in human nutrition. PMID:26544883

  20. Active Control of Aerodynamic Noise Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    Aerodynamic noise sources become important when propulsion noise is relatively low, as during aircraft landing. Under these conditions, aerodynamic noise from high-lift systems can be significant. The research program and accomplishments described here are directed toward reduction of this aerodynamic noise. Progress toward this objective include correction of flow quality in the Low Turbulence Water Channel flow facility, development of a test model and traversing mechanism, and improvement of the data acquisition and flow visualization capabilities in the Aero. & Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. These developments are described in this report.

  1. Kinase activity profiling of gram-negative pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Hoogendijk, Arie J; Diks, Sander H; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Van Der Poll, Tom; Wieland, Catharina W

    2011-01-01

    Pneumonia is a severe disease with high morbidity and mortality. A major causative pathogen is the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella (K.) pneumoniae. Kinases play an integral role in the transduction of intracellular signaling cascades and regulate a diverse array of biological processes essential to immune cells. The current study explored signal transduction events during murine Gram-negative pneumonia using a systems biology approach. Kinase activity arrays enable the analysis of 1,024 consensus sequences of protein kinase substrates. Using a kinase activity array on whole lung lysates, cellular kinase activities were determined in a mouse model of K. pneumoniae pneumonia. Notable kinase activities also were validated with phospho-specific Western blots. On the basis of the profiling data, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling via p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p42) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) activity were reduced during infection, whereas v-src sarcoma (Schmidt-Ruppin A-2) viral oncogene homolog (avian) (SRC) activity generally was enhanced. AKT signaling was represented in both metabolic and inflammatory (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2 [MKK], apoptosis signal-regulating kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 5 [ASK] and v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 [b-RAF]) context. This study reaffirms the importance of classic inflammation pathways, such as MAPK and TGFβ signaling and reveals less known involvement of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β), AKT and SRC signaling cassettes in pneumonia.

  2. Temperature Profiles Along the Root with Gutta-percha Warmed through Different Heat Sources

    PubMed Central

    Simeone, Michele; Santis, Roberto De; Ametrano, Gianluca; Prisco, Davide; Borrelli, Marino; Paduano, Sergio; Riccitiello, Francesco; Spagnuolo, Gianrico

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate temperature profiles developing in the root during warm compaction of gutta-percha with the heat sources System B and System MB Obtura (Analityc Technology, Redmond, WA, USA). Thirty extracted human incisor teeth were used. Root canals were cleaned and shaped by means of Protaper rotary files (Dentsply-Maillefer, Belgium), and imaging was performed by micro-CT (Skyscan 1072, Aartselaar, Belgium). Methods: Teeth were instrumented with K-type thermocouples, and the roots were filled with thermoplastic gutta-percha. Vertical compaction was achieved through the heat sources System B and System MB, and temperature profiles were detect-ed by means of NI Dac Interface controlled by the LabView System. With both heat sources, higher temperature levels were recorded in the region of the root far from the apex. When the warm plugger tip was positioned at a distance of 3 mm from the root apex, temperature levels of about 180°C were used to soften gutta-percha, and no statistically significant differences were observed between peak temperatures developed by the two heating sources at the root apex. However, a temperature level higher than 40°C was maintained for a longer time with System MB. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed in peak temperature levels recorded far from the root apex. Thus, with a temperature of about 180°C and the warm plugger positioned at 3 mm from the root apex, both heating sources led to a temperature slightly higher than 40°C at the apex of the root, suggesting that the gutta-percha was properly softened. Significance: A temperature level higher than 40°C was maintained for a longer time with System MB, thus providing an ad-equate time for warm compaction of the gutta-percha. PMID:25614768

  3. Advanced Light Source: Activity report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) produces the world`s brightest light in the ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions of the spectrum. The first low-energy third-generation synchrotron source in the world, the ALS provides unprecedented opportunities for research in science and technology not possible anywhere else. This year marked the beginning of operations and the start of the user research program at the ALS, which has already produced numerous high quality results. A national user facility located at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California, the ALS is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. This report contains the following: (1) director`s message; (2) operations overview; (3) user program; (4) users` executive committee; (5) industrial outreach; (6) accelerator operations; (7) beamline control system; (8) insertion devices; (9) experimental systems; (10) beamline engineering; (11) first results from user beamlines; (12) beamlines for 1994--1995; (13) special events; (14) publications; (15) advisory panels; and (16) ALS staff.

  4. Source Attribution of Cyanides using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Carman, April J.; Moran, James J.

    2016-01-08

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs) are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. In a previous study, anionic impurity profiles developed using high performance ion chromatography (HPIC) were demonstrated as CAS for matching samples from eight potassium cyanide (KCN) stocks to their reported countries of origin. Herein, a larger number of solid KCN stocks (n = 13) and, for the first time, solid sodium cyanide (NaCN) stocks (n = 15) were examined to determine what additional sourcing information can be obtained through anion, carbon stable isotope, and elemental analyses of cyanide stocks by HPIC, isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), respectively. The HPIC anion data was evaluated using the variable selection methods of Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least squares (iPLS), and genetic algorithm-based partial least squares (GAPLS) and the classification methods of partial least squares discriminate analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminate analysis (SVMDA). In summary, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported country of origins resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three country groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries with known solid cyanide factories. Both the anion and elemental CAS are believed to originate from the aqueous alkali hydroxides used in cyanide manufacture. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). The carbon isotope CAS is believed to

  5. Profile Coating for KB Mirror Applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Assoufid, L.; Macrander, A.; Ice, G.; Tischler, J.

    2002-01-01

    For microfocusing x-ray mirrors, an ellipse shape is desirable for aberration-free optics. However, it is difficult to polish elliptical mirrors to x-ray quality smoothness. A differential coating method to convert a cylindrical mirror to an elliptical one has been previously reported The differential coating was obtained by varying the sputter source power while the mirror was passed through. Here we report a new method of profile coating to achieve the same goal more effectively. In the profile coating, the sputter source power is kept constant, while the substrate is passed over a contoured mask at a constant speed. The mask is placed very close to the substrate level (within 1.0 mm) on a shield-can over the sputter gun. Four-inch-diameter Si wafers were coated through a 100-mm-long by 152-mm-wide aperture on the top of the shield-can. The thickness distribution was then obtained using a spectroscopic ellipsometer with computer-controlled X-Y translation stages. A model has been developed to fit the measured thickness distribution of stationary growth. The relative thickness weightings are then digitized at every point 1 mm apart for the entire open area of the aperture. When the substrate is moving across the shield-can during a deposition, the film thickness is directly proportional to the length of the opening on the can along the moving direction. By equating the summation of relative weighting to the required relative thickness at the same position, the length of the opening at that position can be determined. By repeating the same process for the whole length of the required profile, a contour can be obtained for a desired thickness profile. The contoured mask is then placed on the opening of the shield-can. The number of passes and the moving speed of the substrate are determined according to the required thickness and the growth-rate calibration. The mirror coating profile is determined from the ideal surface figure of a focus ellipse and that obtained

  6. Profile coating for KB mirror applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chian; Assoufid, L.; Macrander, Albert T.; Ice, Gene E.; Tischler, J. Z.

    2002-12-01

    For microfocusing x-ray mirrors, an ellipse shape is desirable for aberration-free optics. However, it is difficult to polish elliptical mirrors to x-ray quality smoothness. A differential coating method to convert a cylindrical mirror to an elliptical one has been previously reported The differential coating was obtained by varying the sputter source power while the mirror was passed through. Here we report a new method of profile coating to achieve the same goal more effectively. In the profile coating, the sputter source power is kept constant, while the substrate is passed over a contoured mask at a constant speed. The mask is placed very close to the substrate level (within 1.0 mm) on a shield-can over the sputter gun. Four-inch-diameter Si wafers were coated through a 100-mm-long by 152-mm-wide aperture on the top of the shield-can. The thickness distribution was then obtained using a spectroscopic ellipsometer with computer-controlled X-Y translation stages. A model has been developed to fit the measured thickness distribution of stationary growth. The relative thickness weightings are then digitized at every point 1 mm apart for the entire open area of the aperture. When the substrate is moving across the shield-can during a deposition, the film thickness is directly proportional to the length of the opening on the can along the moving direction. By equating the summation of relative weighting to the required relative thickness at the same position, the length of the opening at that position can be determined. By repeating the same process for the whole length of the required profile, a contour can be obtained for a desired thickness profile. The contoured mask is then placed on the opening of the shield-can. The number of passes and the moving speed of the substrate are determined according to the required thickness and the growth-rate calibration. The mirror coating profile is determined from the ideal surface figure of a focus ellipse and that obtained

  7. Industrial sector-based volatile organic compound (VOC) source profiles measured in manufacturing facilities in the Pearl River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Junyu; Yu, Yufan; Mo, Ziwei; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Xinming; Yin, Shasha; Peng, Kang; Yang, Yang; Feng, Xiaoqiong; Cai, Huihua

    2013-07-01

    Industrial sector-based VOC source profiles are reported for the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China, based source samples (stack emissions and fugitive emissions) analyzed from sources operating under normal conditions. The industrial sectors considered are printing (letterpress, offset and gravure printing processes), wood furniture coating, shoemaking, paint manufacturing and metal surface coating. More than 250 VOC species were detected following US EPA methods TO-14 and TO-15. The results indicated that benzene and toluene were the major species associated with letterpress printing, while ethyl acetate and isopropyl alcohol were the most abundant compounds of other two printing processes. Acetone and 2-butanone were the major species observed in the shoemaking sector. The source profile patterns were found to be similar for the paint manufacturing, wood furniture coating, and metal surface coating sectors, with aromatics being the most abundant group and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) as the second largest contributor in the profiles. While OVOCs were one of the most significant VOC groups detected in these five industrial sectors in the PRD region, they have not been reported in most other source profile studies. Such comparisons with other studies show that there are differences in source profiles for different regions or countries, indicating the importance of developing local source profiles.

  8. The Enlightenment Revisited: Sources & Interpretations. Learning Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donato, Clorinda; And Others

    This resource book provides 26 learning activities with background materials for teaching about the Enlightenment. Topics include: (1) "What Was the Enlightenment?"; (2) "An Introduction to the Philosophes"; (3) "Was the Enlightenment a Revolt Against Rationalism?"; (4) "Were the Philosophes Democrats? A…

  9. Analysis of communicative behaviour: profiling roles and activities.

    PubMed

    Sørby, Inger Dybdahl; Nytrø, Oystein

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss how profiles of communicative behaviour can be used to present and analyse information about role activity recorded through structured observation of specific situations. The role activities are encoded as distinctive speech acts. Example profiles resulting from the analysis of three clinicians' communicative behaviour during pre-rounds meetings and ward rounds are given. The examples are based on an observational study performed at a Norwegian university hospital. One fifth-year medical student spent 20 days in two different hospital wards, following 7 physicians from one to seven days each. The observer recorded data from several ward situations such as pre-rounds meetings, ward rounds, and discharge situations. The data was recorded by means of an observation form consisting of a mixture of codes and free-text fields. The data has been post-processed by associating each event with one communicative act. The approach is an efficient and useful means for studying clinicians' information and communication patterns in hospital wards, which can serve as an important tool in the design of new clinical information systems.

  10. Measurement of Turbulence with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers - Sources of Error and Laboratory Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, E.A.; Oberg, K.A.; Rehmann, C.R.; ,

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a promising method for measuring surface-water turbulence because they can provide data from a large spatial range in a relatively short time with relative ease. Some potential sources of errors in turbulence measurements made with ADCPs include inaccuracy of Doppler-shift measurements, poor temporal and spatial measurement resolution, and inaccuracy of multi-dimensional velocities resolved from one-dimensional velocities measured at separate locations. Results from laboratory measurements of mean velocity and turbulence statistics made with two pulse-coherent ADCPs in 0.87 meters of water are used to illustrate several of inherent sources of error in ADCP turbulence measurements. Results show that processing algorithms and beam configurations have important effects on turbulence measurements. ADCPs can provide reasonable estimates of many turbulence parameters; however, the accuracy of turbulence measurements made with commercially available ADCPs is often poor in comparison to standard measurement techniques.

  11. Shear source multiazimuth near- and far-offset vertical seismic profiles, Asal Rift, Republic of Djibouti

    SciTech Connect

    Hirn, A.; Magnier, S.A. )

    1992-12-10

    A three-component borehole seismic data set obtained in the Asal rift zone shows that azimuthal anisotropy may be present with the fast propagation direction aligned with the present-day rift axis. This is seen on the near- and far-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) data from the two source points lying parallel to the rift axis. The third orthogonal source point gives propagation times characteristic of near-horizontal paths along the detected slow direction. The reflected VSP wave field contains both P and S energy. The main P and S reflections correlate well and correspond to thin clay and siltstone layers interspersed within the lava flow series. Some evidence exists for a change with depth of the amount or direction of the anisotropy found in the uppermost 400 m.

  12. Sample storage for soil enzyme activity and bacterial community profiles.

    PubMed

    Wallenius, K; Rita, H; Simpanen, S; Mikkonen, A; Niemi, R M

    2010-04-01

    Storage of samples is often an unavoidable step in environmental data collection, since available analytical capacity seldom permits immediate processing of large sample sets needed for representative data. In microbiological soil studies, sample pretreatments may have a strong influence on measurement results, and thus careful consideration is required in the selection of storage conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the suitability of prolonged (up to 16 weeks) frozen or air-dried storage for divergent soil materials. The samples selected to this study were mineral soil (clay loam) from an agricultural field, humus from a pine forest and compost from a municipal sewage sludge composting field. The measured microbiological parameters included functional profiling with ten different hydrolysing enzyme activities determined by artificial fluorogenic substrates, and structural profiling with bacterial 16S rDNA community fingerprints by amplicon length heterogeneity analysis (LH-PCR). Storage of samples affected the observed fluorescence intensity of the enzyme assay's fluorophor standards dissolved in soil suspension. The impact was highly dependent on the soil matrix and storage method, making it important to use separate standardisation for each combination of matrix type, storage method and time. Freezing proved to be a better storage method than air-drying for all the matrices and enzyme activities studied. The effect of freezing on the enzyme activities was small (<20%) in clay loam and forest humus and moderate (generally 20-30%) in compost. The most dramatic decreases (>50%) in activity were observed in compost after air-drying. The bacterial LH-PCR community fingerprints were unaffected by frozen storage in all matrices. The effect of storage treatments was tested using a new statistical method based on showing similarity rather than difference of results.

  13. New and highly active microbial phosphotriesterase sources.

    PubMed

    Santillan, Julia Y; Dettorre, Lucas A; Lewkowicz, Elizabeth S; Iribarren, Adolfo M

    2016-12-01

    Many toxic insecticides used worldwide as well as some chemical warfare agents are phosphotriester derivatives. Therefore, detoxification of organophosphorus compounds has become the subject of many studies and in particular bioremediation, based on the phosphotriesterase catalysed hydrolysis of these compounds, has shown to be an effective and ecological methodology. In order to identify new bacterial phosphotriesterases, a simple and sensitive fluorimetric screening method on solid media was employed that allowed the selection of six strains with phosphotriesterase activity. Since pH and temperature are important parameters for bioremediation of contaminated soils and waters, the influence of these variables on the rate of the enzymatic hydrolysis was assessed. This study afforded notable results, being the most remarkable one the increased activity exhibited by Nocardia asteroides and Streptomyces setonii strains at 50°C, 7 and 30 times higher than at 30°C, respectively. Compared with the results obtained with Brevundimonas diminuta, whose activity is usually considered as reference, an increase of 26 and 75 times is observed, respectively.

  14. Phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activity of adlay varieties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Chen, Jingyi; Xie, Huihui; Ju, Xingrong; Liu, Rui Hai

    2013-05-29

    Consumption of whole grains has been associated with reduced risk of developing major chronic diseases. These health benefits have been attributed in part to their unique phytochemicals. Little is known about the complete profiles of phytochemicals and antioxidant activities of different adlay varieties. The objectives of this study were to determine the phytochemicals profiles of the three adlay varieties, including both free and bound of total phenolics and total flavonoids, and to determine the total antioxidant activity of adlay. The free, bound, and total phenolic contents of adlay samples ranged from 31.23 to 45.19 mg of gallic acid equiv/100 g of sample, from 28.07 to 30.86 mg of gallic acid equiv/100 g of sample, and from 59.30 to 76.04 mg of gallic acid equiv/100 g of sample, respectively. On average, the bound phenolics contributed 45.3% of total phenolic content of the adlay varieties analyzed. The free, bound, and total flavonoid contents of adlay samples ranged from 6.21 to 18.24 mg of catechin equiv/100 g, from 18.68 to 35.27 mg of catechin equiv/100 g, and from 24.88 to 52.86 mg of catechin equiv/100 g, respectively. The average values of bound flavonoids contributed 71.1% of total flavonoids of the adlay varieties analyzed. The percentage contribution of flavonoid content to phenolic content of free, bound, and total ranged from 11.6 to 35.2%, from 50.5 to 66.8%, and from 24.6 to 50.5%. The free, bound, and total oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) values of adlay samples ranged from 231.9 to 316.6 mg of Trolox equiv/100 g, from 209.0 to 351.4 mg of Trolox equiv/100 g, and from 440.9 to 668.0 mg of Trolox equiv/100 g, respectively. The average ORAC values of bound phytochemicals contributed 48.1% of total antioxidant activity of the adlay varieties analyzed. The content of total polyphenol and the antioxidant capacity are obviously different among different species. Liaoning 5 adlay and Longyi 1 adlay are significantly better than Guizhou

  15. Advanced light source. Activity report 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    The ALS Activity Report is designed to share the breadth, variety, and interest of the scientific program and ongoing R&D efforts in a form that is accessible to a broad audience. Recent research results are presented in six sections, each representing an important theme in ALS science. These results are designed to demonstrate the capabilities of the ALS, rather than to give a comprehensive review of 1995 experiments. Although the scientific program and facilities report are separate sections, in practice the achievements and accomplishments of users and ALS staff are interdependent. This user-staff collaboration is essential to help us direct our efforts toward meeting the needs of the user community, and to ensure the continued success of the ALS as a premier facility.

  16. Source Attribution of Cyanides Using Anionic Impurity Profiling, Stable Isotope Ratios, Trace Elemental Analysis and Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Mirjankar, Nikhil S; Fraga, Carlos G; Carman, April J; Moran, James J

    2016-02-02

    Chemical attribution signatures (CAS) for chemical threat agents (CTAs), such as cyanides, are being investigated to provide an evidentiary link between CTAs and specific sources to support criminal investigations and prosecutions. Herein, stocks of KCN and NaCN were analyzed for trace anions by high performance ion chromatography (HPIC), carbon stable isotope ratio (δ(13)C) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The collected analytical data were evaluated using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), Fisher-ratio (F-ratio), interval partial least-squares (iPLS), genetic algorithm-based partial least-squares (GAPLS), partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA), K nearest neighbors (KNN), and support vector machines discriminant analysis (SVMDA). HCA of anion impurity profiles from multiple cyanide stocks from six reported countries of origin resulted in cyanide samples clustering into three groups, independent of the associated alkali metal (K or Na). The three groups were independently corroborated by HCA of cyanide elemental profiles and corresponded to countries each having one known solid cyanide factory: Czech Republic, Germany, and United States. Carbon stable isotope measurements resulted in two clusters: Germany and United States (the single Czech stock grouped with United States stocks). Classification errors for two validation studies using anion impurity profiles collected over five years on different instruments were as low as zero for KNN and SVMDA, demonstrating the excellent reliability associated with using anion impurities for matching a cyanide sample to its factory using our current cyanide stocks. Variable selection methods reduced errors for those classification methods having errors greater than zero; iPLS-forward selection and F-ratio typically provided the lowest errors. Finally, using anion profiles to classify cyanides to a specific stock

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for work

  18. Metabolomic profiling and antioxidant activity of some Acacia species

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Farid, I.B.; Sheded, M.G.; Mohamed, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic profiling of different parts (leaves, flowers and pods) of Acacia species (Acacia nilotica, Acacia seyal and Acacia laeta) was evaluated. The multivariate data analyses such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to differentiate the distribution of plant metabolites among different species or different organs of the same species. A.nilotica was characterized with a high content of saponins and A.seyal was characterized with high contents of proteins, phenolics, flavonoids and anthocyanins. A.laeta had a higher content of carbohydrates than A. nilotica and A. seyal. On the basis of these results, total antioxidant capacity, DPPH free radical scavenging activity and reducing power of the methanolic extracts of studied parts were evaluated. A.nilotica and A.seyal extracts showed less inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) compared to A.laeta extracts which means that these two species have the strongest radical scavenging activity whereas A. laeta extracts have the lowest radical scavenging activity. A positive correlation between saponins and flavonoids with total antioxidant capacity and DPPH radical scavenging activity was observed. Based on these results, the potentiality of these plants as antioxidants was discussed. PMID:25313274

  19. The Integrated Epidemiologic Profile: Using Multiple Data Sources in Developing Profiles to Inform HIV Prevention and Care Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitmore, Suzanne K.; Zaidi, Irum F.; Dean, Hazel D.

    2005-01-01

    HIV/AIDS epidemiologic profiles describe the HIV/AIDS epidemic among state and local populations. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Health Resources Services Administration collaborated to develop one set of guidelines for developing epidemiologic profiles that would serve as the basis for both prevention and care planning.…

  20. Solar activity effects on the equatorial thermosphere temperature profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arduini, C.; Laneve, G.; Nobile, L.

    In this paper we present the effects of solar activity on the temperature profiles of the equatorial thermosphere as derived from the neutral density data collected by the San Marco 5 (SM5) satellite. This satellite flew during the increasing part of the solar cycle 22 (1988). It had a quasi-equatorial orbit, with inclination lower than 3 deg. The range of measurements, from April to December, allows the inference of seasonal and diurnal effects on the temperature profiles. The density data are collected every second along arcs of orbit lasting up to 50 minutes. The analysis of these densities has been already partially presented and provided evidence for several interesting features, in particular the vertical structure of the diurnal harmonic content and its seasonal variations. The temperatures derived from the same data set provide a useful complement to this picture. The SM5 satellite carried on board 5 instruments for studying the equatorial ionosphere and thermosphere, among them, the Drag Balance Instrument (DBI) for measuring the neutral density and the Ion Drift Meter and Potential Retarding Analyzer (IVI) that allow the evaluation of ions concentration, velocity and temperature. It is possible, therefore, to compare the neutral temperature derived from the neutral density data with the ion temperature given by the IVI.

  1. Active flow control for a NACA-0012 Profile: Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oualli, H.; Makadem, M.; Ouchene, H.; Ferfouri, A.; Bouabdallah, A.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2016-11-01

    Active flow control is applied to a NACA-0012 profile. The experiments are conducted in a wind tunnel. Using a high-resolution visible-light camera and tomography, flow visualizations are carried out. LES finite-volume 3D code is used to complement the physical experiments. The symmetric wing is clipped into two parts, and those parts extend and retract along the chord according to the same sinusoidal law we optimized last year for the same profile but clipped at an angle of 60 deg, instead of the original 90 deg. The Reynolds number range is extended to 500,000, thus covering the flying regimes of micro-UAVs, UAVs, as well as small aircraft. When the nascent cavity is open and the attack angle is 30 deg, the drag coefficient is increased by 1,300%, as compared to the uncontrolled case. However, when the cavity is covered and Re <=105 , a relatively small frequency, f <= 30 Hz, is required for the drag coefficient to drop to negative values. At the maximum Reynolds number, thrust is generated but only at much higher frequencies, 12 <= f <= 16 kHz.

  2. Profiling of hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids in plant extracts using in-source CID fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Ádám; Abrankó, László

    2016-12-01

    Hydroxycinnamoylquinic acids (HCQAs) are a major class of phenolic plant secondary metabolites, belonging to the chlorogenic acid family. Various health-beneficial properties of HCQAs have been shown, which has drawn interest for HCQA profiling in plants of human consumption. However, this task remains challenging, because several isomeric HCQAs can be present in the sample with identical molecular formulae and the limited availability of reference standards poses additional challenges to their identification. In the present work, a high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-Q/TOF-MS) method accompanied with an effective data filtering protocol is presented, which is shown to be suitable for the identification of HCQAs in plant materials in a non-targeted manner. Both collision-induced dissociation (CID) fragmentation performed in a collision cell and in-source (CID) fragmentation were used to produce accurate mass fragments. It was shown that fragmentation characteristics required for identification of regio-isomers of HCQAs can be achieved with in-source CID fragmentation, enabling the use of a single-stage MS system with in-source fragmentation for convincing identification of HCQAs. Based on a thorough validation of identified HCQA compounds using coffee bean extracts as reference samples, comprehensive profiling of HCQAs in two apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) genotypes ('Preventa' and 'Gönci magyarkajszi') was carried out for the first time and the following 10 HCQAs were shown to be present in apricot fruit: 3-caffeoylquinic acid (CQA), cis-3-CQA, 4-CQA, 5-CQA, cis-5-CQA, 3,5-diCQA, 3-p-coumaroylquinic acid (pCoQA), 4-pCoQA, 3-feruloylquinic acid (FQA) and cis-3-FQA. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Agent-based power sharing scheme for active hybrid power sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenhua

    The active hybridization technique provides an effective approach to combining the best properties of a heterogeneous set of power sources to achieve higher energy density, power density and fuel efficiency. Active hybrid power sources can be used to power hybrid electric vehicles with selected combinations of internal combustion engines, fuel cells, batteries, and/or supercapacitors. They can be deployed in all-electric ships to build a distributed electric power system. They can also be used in a bulk power system to construct an autonomous distributed energy system. An important aspect in designing an active hybrid power source is to find a suitable control strategy that can manage the active power sharing and take advantage of the inherent scalability and robustness benefits of the hybrid system. This paper presents an agent-based power sharing scheme for active hybrid power sources. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed agent-based power sharing scheme, simulation studies are performed for a hybrid power source that can be used in a solar car as the main propulsion power module. Simulation results clearly indicate that the agent-based control framework is effective to coordinate the various energy sources and manage the power/voltage profiles.

  4. Influence of Saline on Temperature Profile of Laser Lithotripsy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Igor N.; Donalisio da Silva, Rodrigo; Gustafson, Diedra; Sehrt, David; Kim, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: We established an ex vivo model to evaluate the temperature profile of the ureter during laser lithotripsy, the influence of irrigation on temperature, and thermal spread during lithotripsy with the holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: Two ex vivo models of Ovis aries urinary tract and human calcium oxalate calculi were used. The Open Ureteral Model was opened longitudinally to measure the thermal profile of the urothelium. On the Clinical Model, anterograde ureteroscopy was performed in an intact urinary system. Temperatures were measured on the external portion of the ureter and the urothelium during lithotripsy and intentional perforation. The lithotripsy group (n=20) was divided into irrigated (n=10) and nonirrigated (n=10), which were compared for thermal spread length and values during laser activation. The intentional perforation group (n=10) was evaluated under saline flow. The Ho:YAG laser with a 365 μm laser fiber and power at 10W was used (1J/Pulse at 10 Hz). Infrared Fluke Ti55 Thermal Imager was used for evaluation. Maximum temperature values were recorded and compared. Results: On the Clinical Model, the external ureteral wall obtained a temperature of 37.4°C±2.5° and 49.5°C±2.3° (P=0.003) and in the Open Ureteral Model, 49.7°C and 112.4°C with and without irrigation, respectively (P<0.05). The thermal spread along the external ureter wall was not statically significant with or without irrigation (P=0.065). During intentional perforation, differences in temperatures were found between groups (opened with and without irrigation): 81.8°±8.8° and 145.0°±15.0°, respectively (P<0.005). Conclusion: There is an increase in the external ureteral temperature during laser activation, but ureteral thermal values decreased when saline flow was applied. Ureter thermal spread showed no difference between irrigated and nonirrigated subgroups. This is the first laser lithotripsy thermography study

  5. Circadian Neuron Feedback Controls the Drosophila Sleep-Activity Profile

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang; Yu, Junwei; Jung, Hyung Jae; Abruzzi, Katharine C.; Luo, Weifei; Griffith, Leslie C.; Rosbash, Michael

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Little is known about the ability of Drosophila circadian neurons to promote sleep. We show here with optogenetic manipulations and video recording that a subset of dorsal clock neurons (DN1s) are potent sleep-promoting cells, releasing glutamate to directly inhibit key pacemaker neurons. These pacemakers promote morning arousal by activating these same DN1s, implying that there is a late-day feedback circuit to drive siesta and nighttime sleep. To address more plastic aspects of the sleep program, we used a novel calcium assay to monitor and compared the real-time DN1 activity of freely behaving males and females. It revealed a dramatic sexual dimorphism, which parallels the well-known difference in daytime sleep. DN1 activity is also enhanced by elevated temperature, consistent with its known effect on sleep. These new approaches indicate that the DN1s have a major impact on the fly sleep-wake profile and integrate environmental information with the circadian molecular program. PMID:27479324

  6. Profile and antioxidant activity of phenolic extracts from 10 crabapples (Malus wild species).

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Shi, Junling; Wang, Kun

    2014-01-22

    Phenolic products are highly demanded by the food and cosmetics industries and consumers due to their high antioxidant activities. To evaluate the potential of crabapples (Malus wild species) in preparing phenolic extracts, fruits of 10 crabapples grown in China were separately extracted with 80% (v/v) ethanol and ethyl acetate and the phenolic profiles, polyphenol (PC) and flavonoid contents (FC), and antioxidant activities of the extracts were analyzed. Chlorogenic acid, (-)-epicatechin, rutin, hyperin, and phlorizin appeared as the major phenolic compounds in all phenolic extracts. Ethanol extracts had PC of 302.83-1265.94 mg GAE/100g and FC of 352.45-2351.74 mg RE/100g, being 4.17 and 4.49 times those obtained in ethyl acetate extracts and much higher than those previously reported in apples. Malus wild species appeared as rich sources of phenolic compounds with high antioxidant activity, especially when high chlorogenic acid and rutin contents are emphasized.

  7. Comparison of advanced plasma sources for etching applications. V. Polysilicon etching rate, uniformity, profile control, and bulk plasma properties in a helical resonator plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.T.; Layadi, N.; Guinn, K.V.; Maynard, H.L.; Klemens, F.P.; Ibbotson, D.E.; Tepermeister, I.; Egan, P.O.; Richardson, R.A.

    1996-07-01

    Etching of polysilicon features using a helical resonator plasma source is evaluated. Performance metrics consist of etching rate, etching rate uniformity, and profile control using HBr/O{sub 2}{endash}He gas-phase chemistry. The effect of source power, rf-bias power, and reactor pressure on etching rate and uniformity is examined using a response surface experiment. Feature profile control is determined by examining nested and isolated lines and trenches using oxide mask/polysilicon/oxide structures. Good uniformity and vertical profiles are obtained at low reactor pressures, high source power, and rf-bias between 50 and 60 W. The operating point for best uniformity is at 3.5 mTorr, 3000 W source power, and 53 W rf-bias power. At this point, the etching rate is 3700 A/min and the nonuniformity is less than 1.0{percent}, over 125-mm-diam wafers. Radial profiles of electron temperature and ion density near the wafer surface are presented as a function of source power, rf-bias power, and reactor pressure. The ion density was found to be in the mid-10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3} range and electron temperatures were 5{endash}7 eV. An increase in source power and reactor pressure results in an increase in ion density; however, the electron temperature shows a weaker dependence. Finally, these results are compared to those using helicon and multipole electron cyclotron resonance plasma sources evaluated in previous studies. We found that all three plasma sources provide high ion density at low pressures to meet performance demands for polysilicon etching; however, the helical resonator source offers somewhat higher etching rate and better bulk plasma uniformity. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  8. Multiple Frequency Contrast Source Inversion Method for Vertical Electromagnetic Profiling: 2D Simulation Results and Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinghe; Song, Linping; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-02-01

    A simultaneous multiple frequency contrast source inversion (CSI) method is applied to reconstructing hydrocarbon reservoir targets in a complex multilayered medium in two dimensions. It simulates the effects of a salt dome sedimentary formation in the context of reservoir monitoring. In this method, the stabilized biconjugate-gradient fast Fourier transform (BCGS-FFT) algorithm is applied as a fast solver for the 2D volume integral equation for the forward computation. The inversion technique with CSI combines the efficient FFT algorithm to speed up the matrix-vector multiplication and the stable convergence of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI in the iteration process. As a result, this method is capable of making quantitative conductivity image reconstruction effectively for large-scale electromagnetic oil exploration problems, including the vertical electromagnetic profiling (VEP) survey investigated here. A number of numerical examples have been demonstrated to validate the effectiveness and capacity of the simultaneous multiple frequency CSI method for a limited array view in VEP.

  9. Studies of longitudinal profile of electron bunches and impedance measurements at Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Akash Deep; Yadav, S.; Kumar, Mukesh; Shrivastava, B. B.; Karnewar, A. K.; Ojha, A.; Puntambekar, T. A.

    2016-04-01

    Indus-2 is a 3rd generation synchrotron radiation source at the Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT) in India. We study the longitudinal profile of electrons in Indus-2 by using dual sweep synchroscan streak camera at visible diagnostic beamline. In this paper, the longitudinal profiles of electron bunch are analyzed by filling beam current in a single bunch mode. These studies are carried at injection energy (550 MeV) and at ramped beam energy (2.5 GeV). The effects of the wakefield generated interactions between the circulating electrons and the surrounding vacuum chamber are analyzed in terms of measured effects on longitudinal beam distribution. The impedance of the storage ring is obtained by fitting the solutions of Haissinski equation to the measured bunch lengthening with different impedance models. The impedance of storage ring obtained by a series R+L impedance model indicates a resistance (R) of 1350±125 Ω, an inductance (L) of 180±25 nH and broadband impedance of 2.69 Ω. These results are also compared with the values obtained from measured synchronous phase advancing and scaling laws. These studies are very useful in better understanding and control of the electromagnetic interactions.

  10. A high repetition rate transverse beam profile diagnostic for laser-plasma proton sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dover, Nicholas; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Sakaki, Hironao; Kando, Masaki; Nishitani, Keita

    2016-10-01

    The recently upgraded J-KAREN-P laser can provide PW peak power and intensities approaching 1022 Wcm-2 at 0.1 Hz. Scaling of sheath acceleration to such high intensities predicts generation of protons to near 100 MeV, but changes in electron heating mechanisms may affect the emitted proton beam properties, such as divergence and pointing. High repetition rate simultaneous measurement of the transverse proton distribution and energy spectrum are therefore key to understanding and optimising the source. Recently plastic scintillators have been used to measure online proton beam transverse profiles, removing the need for time consuming post-processing. We are therefore developing a scintillator based transverse proton beam profile diagnostic for use in ion acceleration experiments using the J-KAREN-P laser. Differential filtering provides a coarse energy spectrum measurement, and time-gating allows differentiation of protons from other radiation. We will discuss the design and implementation of the diagnostic, as well as proof-of-principle results from initial experiments on the J-KAREN-P system demonstrating the measurement of sheath accelerated proton beams up to 20 MeV.

  11. Electrothermal theory of photomodulated optical reflectance on active doping profiles in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanowicz, Janusz; Dortu, Fabian; Clarysse, Trudo; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Salnik, Alex

    2010-11-01

    The electrical characterization of the source and drain extension regions of complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistors is highlighted in the international technology roadmap for semiconductors (ITRS) as a major challenge for future technology nodes. In practice, there is a clear need for techniques which are simultaneously accurate, nondestructive, fast, local, and highly reproducible. The photomodulated optical reflectance (PMOR) technique has shown to be a very promising candidate to solve this need. However, even though this technique has been widely studied on homogeneous bulk material and on as-implanted (i.e., unannealed) doping profiles, the extension toward active doping profiles requires a detailed investigation (due to the presence of a built-in electric field). In this paper, after performing an in-depth investigation of the optical and transport models involved in a PMOR experiment, we derive an analytical theory to explain the PMOR signal behavior observed on active doping profiles. In the optical model, we show that only the electrorefractive Drude and thermorefractive effects are to be considered for red and near-infrared wavelengths on Si. In the transport model, we begin the discussion with the study of homogeneous Si substrates. We show that, due to the high carrier injection induced by the lasers, the only important effects are, for the free carriers, the Auger recombinations, the (ambipolar) diffusion and the bandgap narrowing-induced quasidrift; the thermoelectric effects being negligible. Based on the results on homogeneous substrates and on the assumption that the quasi-Fermi levels are flat through the space-charge region, we derive an analytical formula for PMOR signals on active doping profiles. We discuss this formula based on experimental PMOR data measured on active doping profiles with a simple boxlike shape. This formula proves to be in good qualitative agreement with the experimental data both when the power of the

  12. Molecular Detection, Quantification, and Toxigenicity Profiling of Aeromonas spp. in Source- and Drinking-Water.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Boakai K; Harden, Carol; Selvaraju, Suresh B; Pradhan, Suman; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2014-01-01

    Aeromonas is ubiquitous in aquatic environments and has been associated with a number of extra-gastrointestinal and gastrointestinal illnesses. This warrants monitoring of raw and processed water sources for pathogenic and toxigenic species of this human pathogen. In this study, a total of 17 different water samples [9 raw and 8 treated samples including 4 basin water (partial sand filtration) and 4 finished water samples] were screened for Aeromonas using selective culturing and a genus-specific real-time quantitative PCR assay. The selective culturing yielded Aeromonas counts ranging 0 - 2 x 10(3)CFU/ml and 15 Aeromonas isolates from both raw and treated water samples. The qPCR analysis indicated presence of a considerable nonculturable population (3.4 x 10(1) - 2.4 x 10(4) cells/ml) of Aeromonas in drinking water samples. Virulence potential of the Aeromonas isolates was assessed by multiplex/singleplex PCR-based profiling of the hemolysin and enterotoxin genes viz cytotoxic heat-labile enterotoxin (act), heat-labile cytotonic enterotoxin (alt), heat-stable cytotonic enterotoxin (ast), and aerolysin (aerA) genes. The water isolates yielded five distinct toxigenicity profiles, viz. act, alt, act+alt, aerA+alt, and aerA+alt+act. The alt gene showed the highest frequency of occurrence (40%), followed by the aerA (20%), act (13%), and ast (0%) genes. Taken together, the study demonstrated the occurrence of a considerable population of nonculturable Aeromonads in water and prevalence of toxigenic Aeromonas spp. potentially pathogenic to humans. This emphasizes the importance of routine monitoring of both source and drinking water for this human pathogen and role of the developed molecular approaches in improving the Aeromonas monitoring scheme for water.

  13. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)

  14. Biological activities and phytochemical profiles of extracts from different parts of bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akinobu; Zhu, Qinchang; Tan, Hui; Horiba, Hiroki; Ohnuki, Koichiro; Mori, Yasuhiro; Yamauchi, Ryoko; Ishikawa, Hiroya; Iwamoto, Akira; Kawahara, Hiroharu; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2014-06-18

    Besides being a useful building material, bamboo also is a potential source of bioactive substances. Although some studies have been performed to examine its use in terms of the biological activity, only certain parts of bamboo, especially the leaves or shoots, have been studied. Comprehensive and comparative studies among different parts of bamboo would contribute to a better understanding and application of this knowledge. In this study, the biological activities of ethanol and water extracts from the leaves, branches, outer culm, inner culm, knots, rhizomes and roots of Phyllostachys pubescens, the major species of bamboo in Japan, were comparatively evaluated. The phytochemical profiles of these extracts were tentatively determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. The results showed that extracts from different parts of bamboo had different chemical compositions and different antioxidative, antibacterial and antiallergic activities, as well as on on melanin biosynthesis. Outer culm and inner culm were found to be the most important sources of active compounds. 8-C-Glucosylapigenin, luteolin derivatives and chlorogenic acid were the most probable compounds responsible for the anti-allergy activity of these bamboo extracts. Our study suggests the potential use of bamboo as a functional ingredient in cosmetics or other health-related products.

  15. Antioxidant activity of some Moroccan marine microalgae: Pufa profiles, carotenoids and phenolic content.

    PubMed

    Maadane, Amal; Merghoub, Nawal; Ainane, Tarik; El Arroussi, Hicham; Benhima, Redouane; Amzazi, Saaid; Bakri, Youssef; Wahby, Imane

    2015-12-10

    In order to promote Moroccan natural resources, this study aims to evaluate the potential of microalgae isolated from Moroccan coastlines, as new source of natural antioxidants. Different extracts (ethanolic, ethanol/water and aqueous) obtained from 9 microalgae strains were screened for their in vitro antioxidant activity using DPPH free radical-scavenging assay. The highest antioxidant potentials were obtained in Dunalliela sp., Tetraselmis sp. and Nannochloropsis gaditana extracts. The obtained results indicate that ethanol extract of all microalgae strains exhibit higher antioxidant activity, when compared to water and ethanol/water extracts. Therefore, total phenolic and carotenoid content measurement were performed in active ethanol extracts. The PUFA profiles of ethanol extracts were also determined by GC/MS analysis. The studied microalgae strains displayed high PUFA content ranging from 12.9 to 76.9 %, total carotenoids content varied from 1.9 and 10.8mg/g of extract and total polyphenol content varied from 8.1 to 32.0mg Gallic acid Equivalent/g of extract weight. The correlation between the antioxidant capacities and the phenolic content and the carotenoids content were found to be insignificant, indicating that these compounds might not be major contributor to the antioxidant activity of these microalgae. The microalgae extracts exerting the high antioxidant activity are potential new source of natural antioxidants.

  16. Determination of Antiproliferative Activities of Volatile Contents and HPLC Profiles of Dicranum scoparium (Dicranaceae, Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    Abay, Gökhan; Altun, Muhammed; Koldaş, Serkan; Tüfekçi, Ali Rıza; Demirtas, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the anticancer activities and phytochemical profiles of Dicranum scoparium against HeLa cell lines. The bio-guided fractionation studies of dichloromethane extract have high antiproliferative activities. Fractions 7, 9, 19, 20 are rich source of unsaturated fatty acids, and- in the case of Fr-19 may improve the antiproliferative activities as well as increase the unsaturated fatty acid content. The effect of proliferative activities in hexane extract can be attributed to the saturated fatty acid composition of D. scoparium. The Fr-9 exhibited strong antiproliferative activity at concentrations of 100 and 50 μg mL(-1) compared to 5-FU. The fractions of 7, 9, 19 and 20 from dichloromethane extracts exhibited antiproliferative activities at a concentration of 100 μg mL(-1). The HPLC-TOF/MS studies gave nine compounds from the most active fraction of dichloromethane at concentrations of 250 and 100 μg mL(-1). The lower activities were obtained from the fractions including steroid derivatives.

  17. Transcriptional profiling of biomass degradation-related genes during Trichoderma reesei growth on different carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiuzhen; Luo, Yingfeng; Yu, Hongtao; Sun, Yuhui; Wu, Hong; Song, Shuhui; Hu, Songnian; Dong, Zhiyang

    2014-03-10

    To identify all the gene products involved in cellulosic biomass degradation, we employed RNA sequencing technology to perform a genome-wide comparison of gene expression during growth of Trichoderma reesei QM9414 on cellulose or glucose. Due to their important role in lignocellulose decomposition, we focused on CAZymes and other secreted proteins. In total, 122 CAZymes showed at least a two-fold change in mRNA abundance, and 97 of those were highly induced by cellulose. Compared to the well-characterized cellulases and hemicellulases, a majority of the other upregulated CAZymes showed lower transcriptional levels. In addition, 64 secreted proteins, including oxidoreductases, exhibited at least two-fold upregulation on cellulose medium. To better understand the potential roles of low-abundance CAZymes in cellulose breakdown, we compared the expression patterns of 25 glycoside hydrolase genes under different conditions via real-time PCR. Substantial differences for the 25 genes were observed for individual strains grown on different carbon sources, and between QM9414 and RUTC30 when grown on the same carbon source. Moreover, we identified 3 genes that are coregulated with known cellulases. Collectively, this study highlights a comprehensive transcriptional profile for biomass degradation-related proteins and provides a first step toward the identification of candidates to construct optimized enzyme cocktails.

  18. Vertical Profiles of Ammonia in the Colorado Front Range: Impacts of Source Region and Meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tevlin, A.; Kaushik, A.; Noone, D. C.; Ortega, J. V.; Smith, J. N.; Brophy, P.; Kirkland, J.; Link, M. F.; Farmer, D. K.; Wolfe, D. E.; Dube, W. P.; McDuffie, E. E.; Brown, S. S.; Zaragoza, J.; Fischer, E. V.; Murphy, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric ammonia plays an important role in aerosol particle formation and growth, as well as in nitrogen deposition to sensitive ecosystems. However, significant uncertainties are associated with the distribution and strength of emission sources, and many of the processes that control its atmospheric fate are not fully understood. The high density of agricultural and urban sources located in close proximity to more pristine mountainous areas to the west make the Colorado Front Range a unique area for studying atmospheric ammonia. The meteorology of the region, where heavy monsoon rains can be followed by rapid evaporation, can also impact surface-atmosphere partitioning of ammonia. As part of the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment (FRAPPÉ), vertical profiles of ammonia were measured throughout the boundary layer aboard a moveable platform on the 300 m Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) tower. Changes in ammonia concentration and its vertical structure were driven not only by changes in wind direction and estimated source region, but also by fluctuations in surface and atmosphere water content. For example, large increases in atmospheric ammonia mixing ratios were observed following rain events. This may be explained by surface-atmosphere exchange of wet-deposited ammonia associated with rapid evaporation following the event, and likely impacts particle formation. This may also play a role in transport from ammonia-rich agricultural areas towards the mountainous regions to the west during periods of upslope flow. The vertical ammonia concentration gradients observed throughout the structured early morning boundary layer also provide insight into the possible causes of early morning spikes in ammonia - a phenomenon that has been well-documented in many other locations. A box model was used to assess the relative importance of surface emissions due to the evaporation of morning dew versus entrainment of ammonia-rich air from above the

  19. Substrate-Competitive Activity-Based Profiling of Ester Prodrug Activating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hao; Majmudar, Jaimeen D; Davda, Dahvid; Ghanakota, Phani; Kim, Ki H; Carlson, Heather A; Showalter, Hollis D; Martin, Brent R; Amidon, Gordon L

    2015-09-08

    Understanding the mechanistic basis of prodrug delivery and activation is critical for establishing species-specific prodrug sensitivities necessary for evaluating preclinical animal models and potential drug-drug interactions. Despite significant adoption of prodrug methodologies for enhanced pharmacokinetics, functional annotation of prodrug activating enzymes is laborious and often unaddressed. Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) describes an emerging chemoproteomic approach to assay active site occupancy within a mechanistically similar enzyme class in native proteomes. The serine hydrolase enzyme family is broadly reactive with reporter-linked fluorophosphonates, which have shown to provide a mechanism-based covalent labeling strategy to assay the activation state and active site occupancy of cellular serine amidases, esterases, and thioesterases. Here we describe a modified ABPP approach using direct substrate competition to identify activating enzymes for an ethyl ester prodrug, the influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir. Substrate-competitive ABPP analysis identified carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) as an oseltamivir-activating enzyme in intestinal cell homogenates. Saturating concentrations of oseltamivir lead to a four-fold reduction in the observed rate constant for CES1 inactivation by fluorophosphonates. WWL50, a reported carbamate inhibitor of mouse CES1, blocked oseltamivir hydrolysis activity in human cell homogenates, confirming CES1 is the primary prodrug activating enzyme for oseltamivir in human liver and intestinal cell lines. The related carbamate inhibitor WWL79 inhibited mouse but not human CES1, providing a series of probes for analyzing prodrug activation mechanisms in different preclinical models. Overall, we present a substrate-competitive activity-based profiling approach for broadly surveying candidate prodrug hydrolyzing enzymes and outline the kinetic parameters for activating enzyme discovery, ester prodrug design, and

  20. Illustrating the Effect of pH on Enzyme Activity Using Gibbs Energy Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearne, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Gibbs energy profiles provide students with a visual representation of the energy changes that occur during enzyme catalysis, making such profiles useful as teaching and learning tools. Traditional kinetic topics, such as the effect of pH on enzyme activity, are often not discussed in terms of Gibbs energy profiles. Herein, the symbolism of Gibbs…

  1. Evolving Hox Activity Profiles Govern Diversity in Locomotor Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Heekyung; Mazzoni, Esteban O.; Soshnikova, Natalia; Hanley, Olivia; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Duboule, Denis; Dasen, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The emergence of limb-driven locomotor behaviors was a key event in the evolution of vertebrates and fostered the transition from aquatic to terrestrial life. We show that the generation of limb-projecting lateral motor column (LMC) neurons in mice relies on a transcriptional autoregulatory module initiated via transient activity of multiple genes within the HoxA and HoxC clusters. Repression of this module at thoracic levels restricts expression of LMC determinants, thus dictating LMC position relative to the limbs. This suppression is mediated by a key regulatory domain that is specifically found in the Hoxc9 proteins of appendage-bearing vertebrates. The profile of Hoxc9 expression inversely correlates with LMC position in land vertebrates, and likely accounts for the absence of LMC neurons in limbless species such as snakes. Thus, modulation of both Hoxc9 protein function and Hoxc9 gene expression likely contributed to evolutionary transitions between undulatory and ambulatory motor circuit connectivity programs. PMID:24746670

  2. Target identification with quantitative activity based protein profiling (ABPP).

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Wong, Yin Kwan; Wang, Jigang; Zhang, Jianbin; Lee, Yew-Mun; Shen, Han-Ming; Lin, Qingsong; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2017-02-01

    As many small bioactive molecules fulfill their functions through interacting with protein targets, the identification of such targets is crucial in understanding their mechanisms of action (MOA) and side effects. With technological advancements in target identification, it has become possible to accurately and comprehensively study the MOA and side effects of small molecules. While small molecules with therapeutic potential were derived solely from nature in the past, the remodeling and synthesis of such molecules have now been made possible. Presently, while some small molecules have seen successful application as drugs, the majority remain undeveloped, requiring further understanding of their MOA and side effects to fully tap into their potential. Given the typical promiscuity of many small molecules and the complexity of the cellular proteome, a high-flux and high-accuracy method is necessary. While affinity chromatography approaches combined with MS have had successes in target identification, limitations associated with nonspecific results remain. To overcome these complications, quantitative chemical proteomics approaches have been developed including metabolic labeling, chemical labeling, and label-free methods. These new approaches are adopted in conjunction with activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), allowing for a rapid process and accurate results. This review will briefly introduce the principles involved in ABPP, then summarize current advances in quantitative chemical proteomics approaches as well as illustrate with examples how ABPP coupled with quantitative chemical proteomics has been used to detect the targets of drugs and other bioactive small molecules including natural products.

  3. Non-Destructive Characterization of Activated Ion-Implanted Doping Profiles Based on Photomodulated Optical Reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanowicz, Janusz; Clarysse, Trudo; Moussa, Alain; Mody, Jay; Eyben, Pierre; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Rosseel, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The accurate characterization of free carrier profiles in ultra-shallow junctions, such as the source and drain extension regions, is one of the major challenges of metrology in modern silicon Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor technology. Currently, only destructive and time-consuming techniques, such as Scanning Spreading Resistance Microscopy, have shown the ability to solve this need. However, there is still a clear absence of an accurate, fast, non-destructive technique. For this purpose, we study the capabilities of the Photomodulated Optical Reflectance (PMOR) technique, such as implemented in the Therma-Probe® (TP) tool. PMOR is a pump-probe technique, wherein the probe laser measures, through reflection, the modulated pump-laser-induced change in refractive index. In this paper, we investigate PMOR measurements on sub-20 nm activated implantation profiles. By combining the PMOR signal with the simultaneously measured DC probe reflectance, we show that it is possible to reconstruct the underlying free carrier profile. Except for an overestimated depth (˜25%), the results are in good agreement with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry and Scanning Spreading Resistance Microscopy measurements.

  4. Pharmacokinetic profiles of the active metamizole metabolites in healthy horses.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, M; Aupanun, S; Lee, H-K; Poapolathep, A; Rychshanova, R; Vullo, C; Faillace, V; Laus, F

    2017-04-01

    Metamizole (MT) is an analgesic and antipyretic drug labelled for use in humans, horses, cattle, swine and dogs. MT is rapidly hydrolysed to the active primary metabolite 4-methylaminoantipyrine (MAA). MAA is formed in much larger amounts compared with other minor metabolites. Among the other secondary metabolites, 4-aminoantipyrine (AA) is also relatively active. The aim of this research was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profiles of MAA and AA after dose of 25 mg/kg MT by intravenous (i.v.) and intramuscular (i.m.) routes in healthy horses. Six horses were randomly allocated to two equally sized treatment groups according to a 2 × 2 crossover study design. Blood was collected at predetermined times within 24 h, and plasma was analysed by a validated HPLC-UV method. No behavioural changes or alterations in health parameters were observed in the i.v. or i.m. groups of animals during or after (up to 7 days) drug administration. Plasma concentrations of MAA after i.v. and i.m. administrations of MT were detectable from 5 min to 10 h in all the horses. Plasma concentrations of AA were detectable in the same range of time, but in smaller amounts. Maximum concentration (Cmax ), time to maximum concentration (Tmax ) and AUMC0-last of MAA were statistically different between the i.v. and i.m. groups. The AUCIM /AUCIV ratio of MAA was 1.06. In contrast, AUC0-last of AA was statistically different between the groups (P < 0.05) with an AUCIM /AUCIV ratio of 0.54. This study suggested that the differences in the MAA and AA plasma concentrations found after i.m. and i.v. administrations of MT might have minor consequences on the pharmacodynamics of the drug.

  5. Biochemical assays on plasminogen activators and hormones from kidney sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Grant H.; Lewis, Marian L.; Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations were established for the purpose of analyzing the conditioned media from human embryonic kidney cell subpopulations separated in space by electrophoresis. This data is based on the experiments performed on STS-8 on the continuous flow electrophoresis system. The primary biological activity that was analyzed was plasminogen activator activity, but some assays for erythropoeitin and human granulocyte colony stimulating activity were also performed. It is concluded that a battery of assays are required to completely define the plasminogen activator profile of a conditioned media from cell culture. Each type of assay measures different parts of the mixture and are influenced by different parameters. The functional role of each assay is given along with an indication of which combination of assays are required to answer specific questions. With this type of information it is possible by combinations of assays with mathematical analysis to pinpoint a specific component of the system.

  6. Phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of three Potentilla species

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracts from Potentilla species have been applied in traditional medicine and exhibit antioxidant, hypoglycemic, anti-inflammatory, antitumor and anti-ulcerogenic properties, but little has been known about the diversity of phytochemistry and pharmacology on this genus. This study investigated and compared the phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of leaf extracts from three Potentilla species (Potentilla fruticosa, Potentilla glabra and Potentilla parvifolia) in order to discover new resources for lead structures and pharmaceutical products. Methods Chemical composition and content of six phenolic compounds were evaluated and determined by RP-HPLC; Total phenolic and total flavonoid content were determined using Folin-Ciocalteau colourimetric method and sodium borohydride/chloranil-based method (SBC); Antioxidant activities were determined using DPPH, ABTS and FRAP assays; Antimicrobial properties were investigated by agar dilution and mycelial growth rate method. Results The results showed hyperoside was the predominant phenolic compound in three Potentilla species by RP-HPLC assay, with the content of 8.86 (P. fruticosa), 2.56 (P. glabra) and 2.68 mg/g (P. parvifolia), respectively. The highest content of total identified phenolic compounds (hyperoside, (+)-catechin, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, rutin and ellagic acid) was observed in P. parvifolia (14.17 mg/g), follow by P. fruticosa (10.01 mg/g) and P. glabra (7.01 mg/g). P. fruticosa possessed the highest content of total phenolic (84.93 ± 0.50 mmol gallic acid equivalent/100 g) and total flavonoid (84.14 ± 0.03 mmol quercetin equivalent/100 g), which were in good correlation with its significant DPPHIC50 (16.87 μg/mL), ABTS (2763.48 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) and FRAP (1398.70 μmol Trolox equivalent/g) capacities. Furthermore, the effective methodology to distinguish the different species of Potentilla was also established by chromatographic fingerprint analysis for

  7. Subunit-selective proteasome activity profiling uncovers uncoupled proteasome subunit activities during bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Misas-Villamil, Johana C; van der Burgh, Aranka M; Grosse-Holz, Friederike; Bach-Pages, Marcel; Kovács, Judit; Kaschani, Farnusch; Schilasky, Sören; Emon, Asif Emran Khan; Ruben, Mark; Kaiser, Markus; Overkleeft, Hermen S; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2017-01-24

    The proteasome is a nuclear - cytoplasmic proteolytic complex involved in nearly all regulatory pathways in plant cells. The three different catalytic activities of the proteasome can have different functions but tools to monitor and control these subunits selectively are not yet available in plant science. Here, we introduce subunit-selective inhibitors and dual-color fluorescent activity-based probes for studying two of the three active catalytic subunits of the plant proteasome. We validate these tools in two model plants and use this to study the proteasome during plant-microbe interactions. Our data reveals that Nicotiana benthamiana incorporates two different paralogs of each catalytic subunit into active proteasomes. Interestingly, both β1 and β5 activities are significantly increased upon infection with pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 lacking hopQ1-1 (PtoDC3000(ΔhQ)) whilst the activity profile of the β1 subunit changes. Infection with wild-type PtoDC3000 causes proteasome activities that range from strongly induced β1 and β5 activities to strongly suppressed β5 activities, revealing that β1 and β5 activities can be uncoupled during bacterial infection. These selective probes and inhibitors are now available to the plant science community and can be widely and easily applied to study the activity and role of the different catalytic subunits of the proteasome in different plant species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Groundwater source contamination mechanisms: Physicochemical profile clustering, risk factor analysis and multivariate modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynds, Paul; Misstear, Bruce D.; Gill, Laurence W.; Murphy, Heather M.

    2014-04-01

    An integrated domestic well sampling and "susceptibility assessment" programme was undertaken in the Republic of Ireland from April 2008 to November 2010. Overall, 211 domestic wells were sampled, assessed and collated with local climate data. Based upon groundwater physicochemical profile, three clusters have been identified and characterised by source type (borehole or hand-dug well) and local geological setting. Statistical analysis indicates that cluster membership is significantly associated with the prevalence of bacteria (p = 0.001), with mean Escherichia coli presence within clusters ranging from 15.4% (Cluster-1) to 47.6% (Cluster-3). Bivariate risk factor analysis shows that on-site septic tank presence was the only risk factor significantly associated (p < 0.05) with bacterial presence within all clusters. Point agriculture adjacency was significantly associated with both borehole-related clusters. Well design criteria were associated with hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas characterised by high permeability subsoils, while local geological setting was significant for hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas dominated by low/moderate permeability subsoils. Multivariate susceptibility models were developed for all clusters, with predictive accuracies of 84% (Cluster-1) to 91% (Cluster-2) achieved. Septic tank setback was a common variable within all multivariate models, while agricultural sources were also significant, albeit to a lesser degree. Furthermore, well liner clearance was a significant factor in all models, indicating that direct surface ingress is a significant well contamination mechanism. Identification and elucidation of cluster-specific contamination mechanisms may be used to develop improved overall risk management and wellhead protection strategies, while also informing future remediation and maintenance efforts.

  9. Groundwater source contamination mechanisms: physicochemical profile clustering, risk factor analysis and multivariate modelling.

    PubMed

    Hynds, Paul; Misstear, Bruce D; Gill, Laurence W; Murphy, Heather M

    2014-04-01

    An integrated domestic well sampling and "susceptibility assessment" programme was undertaken in the Republic of Ireland from April 2008 to November 2010. Overall, 211 domestic wells were sampled, assessed and collated with local climate data. Based upon groundwater physicochemical profile, three clusters have been identified and characterised by source type (borehole or hand-dug well) and local geological setting. Statistical analysis indicates that cluster membership is significantly associated with the prevalence of bacteria (p=0.001), with mean Escherichia coli presence within clusters ranging from 15.4% (Cluster-1) to 47.6% (Cluster-3). Bivariate risk factor analysis shows that on-site septic tank presence was the only risk factor significantly associated (p<0.05) with bacterial presence within all clusters. Point agriculture adjacency was significantly associated with both borehole-related clusters. Well design criteria were associated with hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas characterised by high permeability subsoils, while local geological setting was significant for hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas dominated by low/moderate permeability subsoils. Multivariate susceptibility models were developed for all clusters, with predictive accuracies of 84% (Cluster-1) to 91% (Cluster-2) achieved. Septic tank setback was a common variable within all multivariate models, while agricultural sources were also significant, albeit to a lesser degree. Furthermore, well liner clearance was a significant factor in all models, indicating that direct surface ingress is a significant well contamination mechanism. Identification and elucidation of cluster-specific contamination mechanisms may be used to develop improved overall risk management and wellhead protection strategies, while also informing future remediation and maintenance efforts.

  10. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 1997/1998

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, Annette

    1999-03-01

    This Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source (ALS) activity report for 1997/98 discusses the following topics: Introduction and Overview; Science Highlights; Facility Report; Special Events; ALS Advisory Panels 1997/98; ALS Staff 1997/98 and Facts and Figures for the year.

  11. Profile of new green fluorescent protein transgenic Jinhua pigs as an imaging source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Hirao, Atsushi; Azuma, Sadahiro; Otake, Masayoshi; Shibata, Masatoshi; Tsuchiya, Seiko; Enosawa, Shin; Takeuchi, Koichi; Konno, Kenjiro; Hakamata, Yoji; Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Wakai, Takuya; Ookawara, Shigeo; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Murakami, Takashi

    2009-09-01

    Animal imaging sources have become an indispensable material for biological sciences. Specifically, gene-encoded biological probes serve as stable and high-performance tools to visualize cellular fate in living animals. We use a somatic cell cloning technique to create new green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Jinhua pigs with a miniature body size, and characterized the expression profile in various tissues/organs and ex vivo culture conditions. The born GFP-transgenic pig demonstrate an organ/tissue-dependent expression pattern. Strong GFP expression is observed in the skeletal muscle, pancreas, heart, and kidney. Regarding cellular levels, bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, hepatocytes, and islet cells of the pancreas also show sufficient expression with the unique pattern. Moreover, the cloned pigs demonstrate normal growth and fertility, and the introduced GFP gene is stably transmitted to pigs in subsequent generations. The new GFP-expressing Jinhua pigs may be used as new cellular/tissue light resources for biological imaging in preclinical research fields such as tissue engineering, experimental regenerative medicine, and transplantation.

  12. Large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture, seismic profiling on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarchow, Craig M.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Lutter, William J.

    1994-01-01

    Clear subsurface seismic images have been obtained at low cost on the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The Columbia Plateau is perhaps the most notorious of all 'bad-data' areas because large impedance contrasts in surface flood basalts severely degrade the seismic wavefield. This degradation was mitigated in this study via a large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture shooting method.The shooting method emphasizes the wide-angle portion of the wavefield, where Fermat's principle guarantees reverberation will not interfere with the seismic manifestations of crucial geologic interfaces. The basalt diving wave, normally discarded in standard common midpoint (CMP) seismic profiling, can be used to image basalt velocity structure via traveltime inversion. Maximum depth-penetration of the diving wave tightly constrains basalt-sediment interface depth. An arrival observed only at shot-receiver offsets greater than 15 km can be used to determine the velocity and geometry of basement via simultaneous inversion.The results from this study suggest that previous geologic hypotheses and hydrocarbon play concepts for the Columbia Plateau may have been in error.

  13. Large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture, seismic profiling on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Jarchow, C.M. . Dept. of Geophysics); Catchings, R.D.; Lutter, W.J. )

    1994-02-01

    Clear subsurface seismic images have been obtained at low cost on the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The Columbia Plateau is perhaps the most notorious of all bad-data'' areas because large impedance contrasts in surface flood basalts severely degrade the seismic wavefield. This degradation was mitigated in this study via a large-explosive source, wide-recording aperture shooting method. The shooting method emphasizes the wide-angle portion of the wavefield, where Fermat's principle guarantees reverberation will not interfere with the seismic manifestations of crucial geologic interfaces. The basalt diving wave, normally discarded in standard common midpoint (CMP) seismic profiling, can be used to image basalt velocity structure via travel-time inversion. Maximum depth-penetration of the diving wave tightly constrains basalt-sediment interface depth. An arrival observed only at shot-receiver offsets greater than 15 km can be used to determine the velocity and geometry of basement via simultaneous inversion. The results from this study suggest that previous geologic hypotheses and hydrocarbon play concepts for the Columbia Plateau may have been in error.

  14. Metabolic profiling of Escherichia coli by ion mobility-mass spectrometry with MALDI ion source.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Prabha; Puzon, Geoffery; Tam, Maggie; Langlais, Denis; Jackson, Shelley; Kaplan, Kimberly; Siems, William F; Schultz, Albert J; Xun, Luying; Woods, Amina; Hill, Herbert H

    2010-12-01

    Comprehensive metabolome analysis using mass spectrometry (MS) often results in a complex mass spectrum and difficult data analysis resulting from the signals of numerous small molecules in the metabolome. In addition, MS alone has difficulty measuring isobars and chiral, conformational and structural isomers. When a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) source is added, the difficulty and complexity are further increased. Signal interference between analyte signals and matrix ion signals produced by MALDI in the low mass region (<1500 Da) cause detection and/or identification of metabolites difficult by MS alone. However, ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) coupled with MS (IM-MS) provides a rapid analytical tool for measuring subtle structural differences in chemicals. IMS separates gas-phase ions based on their size-to-charge ratio. This study, for the first time, reports the application of MALDI to the measurement of small molecules in a biological matrix by ion mobility-time of flight mass spectrometry (IM-TOFMS) and demonstrates the advantage of ion-signal dispersion in the second dimension. Qualitative comparisons between metabolic profiling of the Escherichia coli metabolome by MALDI-TOFMS, MALDI-IM-TOFMS and electrospray ionization (ESI)-IM-TOFMS are reported. Results demonstrate that mobility separation prior to mass analysis increases peak-capacity through added dimensionality in measurement. Mobility separation also allows detection of metabolites in the matrix-ion dominated low-mass range (m/z < 1500 Da) by separating matrix signals from non-matrix signals in mobility space.

  15. Quantification of mid and late evoked sinks in laminar current source density profiles of columns in the primary auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Markus K; Hechavarría, Julio C; Kössl, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Current source density (CSD) analysis assesses spatiotemporal synaptic activations at somatic and/or dendritic levels in the form of depolarizing current sinks. Whereas many studies have focused on the short (<50 ms) latency sinks, associated with thalamocortical projections, sinks with longer latencies have received less attention. Here, we analyzed laminar CSD patterns for the first 600 ms after stimulus onset in the primary auditory cortex of Mongolian gerbils. By applying an algorithm for contour calculation, three distinct mid and four late evoked sinks were identified in layers I, III, Va, VIa, and VIb. Our results further showed that the patterns of intracortical information-flow remained qualitatively similar for low and for high sound pressure level stimuli at the characteristic frequency (CF) as well as for stimuli ± 1 octave from CF. There were, however, differences associated with the strength, vertical extent, onset latency, and duration of the sinks for the four stimulation paradigms used. Stimuli one octave above the most sensitive frequency evoked a new, and quite reliable, sink in layer Va whereas low level stimulation led to the disappearance of the layer VIb sink. These data indicate the presence of input sources specifically activated in response to level and/or frequency parameters. Furthermore, spectral integration above vs. below the CF of neurons is asymmetric as illustrated by CSD profiles. These results are important because synaptic feedback associated with mid and late sinks-beginning at 50 ms post stimulus latency-is likely crucial for response modulation resulting from higher order processes like memory, learning or cognitive control.

  16. Antioxidant activity, cytotoxic activity and metabolic profiling of juices obtained from saffron (Crocus sativus L.) floral by-products.

    PubMed

    Tuberoso, Carlo I G; Rosa, Antonella; Montoro, Paola; Fenu, Maurizio Antonio; Pizza, Cosimo

    2016-05-15

    Juices obtained from cold-pressed saffron (Crocus sativus L.) floral by-products were evaluated as a potential source of compounds with antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. Floral by-products were split in two batches for extraction 24 and 48h after flower harvesting, respectively. The in vitro anti-oxidant activity of these extracts was tested using the FRAP and DPPH assays, and two biological models of lipid oxidation (activity in preventing cholesterol degradation and protection against Cu(2+)-mediated degradation of the liposomal unsaturated fatty acids). The cytotoxic activity was evaluated using the MTT assay. The results show that extracts obtained 48h post-harvest contained higher levels of total polar phenols and had the highest antioxidant activity in all of the performed assays. The LC-DAD and LC-ESI-(HR)MS(n) metabolic profiles showed high levels of kaempferol derivatives and anthocyanins. This study suggests that juices from saffron floral by-products could potentially be used to develop new products for the food and health industry.

  17. Public health genetic counselors: activities, skills, and sources of learning.

    PubMed

    McWalter, Kirsty M; Sdano, Mallory R; Dave, Gaurav; Powell, Karen P; Callanan, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    Specialization within genetic counseling is apparent, with 29 primary specialties listed in the National Society of Genetic Counselors' 2012 Professional Status Survey (PSS). PSS results show a steady proportion of genetic counselors primarily involved in public health, yet do not identify all those performing public health activities. Little is known about the skills needed to perform activities outside of "traditional" genetic counselor roles and the expertise needed to execute those skills. This study aimed to identify genetic counselors engaging in public health activities, the skills used, and the most influential sources of learning for those skills. Participants (N = 155) reported involvement in several public health categories: (a) Education of Public and/or Health Care Providers (n = 80, 52 %), (b) Population-Based Screening Programs (n = 70, 45 %), (c) Lobbying/Public Policy (n = 62, 40 %), (d) Public Health Related Research (n = 47, 30 %), and (e) State Chronic Disease Programs (n = 12, 8 %). Regardless of category, "on the job" was the most common primary source of learning. Genetic counseling training program was the most common secondary source of learning. Results indicate that the number of genetic counselors performing public health activities is likely higher than PSS reports, and that those who may not consider themselves "public health genetic counselors" do participate in public health activities. Genetic counselors learn a diverse skill set in their training programs; some skills are directly applicable to public health genetics, while other public health skills require additional training and/or knowledge.

  18. Source analysis of MEG activities during sleep (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, S.; Iramina, K.

    1991-04-01

    The present study focuses on magnetic fields of the brain activities during sleep, in particular on K-complexes, vertex waves, and sleep spindles in human subjects. We analyzed these waveforms based on both topographic EEG (electroencephalographic) maps and magnetic fields measurements, called MEGs (magnetoencephalograms). The components of magnetic fields perpendicular to the surface of the head were measured using a dc SQUID magnetometer with a second derivative gradiometer. In our computer simulation, the head is assumed to be a homogeneous spherical volume conductor, with electric sources of brain activity modeled as current dipoles. Comparison of computer simulations with the measured data, particularly the MEG, suggests that the source of K-complexes can be modeled by two current dipoles. A source for the vertex wave is modeled by a single current dipole which orients along the body axis out of the head. By again measuring the simultaneous MEG and EEG signals, it is possible to uniquely determine the orientation of this dipole, particularly when it is tilted slightly off-axis. In sleep stage 2, fast waves of magnetic fields consistently appeared, but EEG spindles appeared intermittently. The results suggest that there exist sources which are undetectable by electrical measurement but are detectable by magnetic-field measurement. Such source can be described by a pair of opposing dipoles of which directions are oppositely oriented.

  19. Pyrethroid Activity-Based Probes for Profiling Cytochrome P450 Activities Associated with Insecticide Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Hanafy M.; O'Neill, Paul M.; Hong, David; Finn, Robert; Henderson, Colin; Wright, Aaron T.; Cravatt, Benjamin; Hemingway, Janet; Paine, Mark J.

    2014-01-18

    Pyrethroid insecticides are used to control a diverse spectrum of diseases spread by arthropods. We have developed a suite of pyrethroid mimetic activity based probes (PyABPs) to selectively label and identify P450s associated with pyrethroid metabolism. The probes were screened against pyrethroid metabolizing and non-metabolizing mosquito P450s, as well as rodent microsomes to measure labeling specificity, plus CPR and b5 knockout mouse livers to validate P450 activation and establish the role for b5 in probe activation. Using a deltamethrin mimetic PyABP we were able to profile active enzymes in rat liver microsomes and identify pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes in the target tissue. The most reactive enzyme was a P450, CYP2C11, which is known to metabolize deltamethrin. Furthermore, several other pyrethroid metabolizers were identified (CYPs 2C6, 3A4, 2C13 and 2D1) along with related detoxification enzymes, notably UDP-g’s 2B1 - 5, suggesting a network of associated pyrethroid metabolizing enzymes, or ‘pyrethrome’. Considering the central role that P450s play in metabolizing insecticides, we anticipate that PyABPs will aid the identification and profiling of P450s associated with insecticide pharmacology in a wide range of species, improving understanding of P450-insecticide interactions and aiding the development of new tools for disease control.

  20. Energy in Mexico: a profile of solar energy activity in its national context

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, D.

    1980-04-01

    The geopolitical, economic, and cultural aspects of the United States of Mexico are presented. Mexico's energy profile includes the following: energy policy objectives, government energy structure, organizations for implementation, indigeneous energy sources, imported energy sources, solar energy research and development, solar energy organizations and solar energy related legislation and administrative policies. International agreements, contacts, manufacturers, and projects are listed. (MRH)

  1. Biodiversity, Anti-Trypanosomal Activity Screening, and Metabolomic Profiling of Actinomycetes Isolated from Mediterranean Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng; MacIntyre, Lynsey; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Horn, Hannes; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N.; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Hentschel, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponge–associated actinomycetes are considered as promising sources for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds. In the present study, a total of 64 actinomycetes were isolated from 12 different marine sponge species that had been collected offshore the islands of Milos and Crete, Greece, eastern Mediterranean. The isolates were affiliated to 23 genera representing 8 different suborders based on nearly full length 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Four putatively novel species belonging to genera Geodermatophilus, Microlunatus, Rhodococcus and Actinomycetospora were identified based on a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of < 98.5% to currently described strains. Eight actinomycete isolates showed bioactivities against Trypanosma brucei brucei TC221 with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values <20 μg/mL. Thirty four isolates from the Milos collection and 12 isolates from the Crete collection were subjected to metabolomic analysis using high resolution LC-MS and NMR for dereplication purposes. Two isolates belonging to the genera Streptomyces (SBT348) and Micromonospora (SBT687) were prioritized based on their distinct chemistry profiles as well as their anti-trypanosomal activities. These findings demonstrated the feasibility and efficacy of utilizing metabolomics tools to prioritize chemically unique strains from microorganism collections and further highlight sponges as rich source for novel and bioactive actinomycetes. PMID:26407167

  2. Biodiversity, Anti-Trypanosomal Activity Screening, and Metabolomic Profiling of Actinomycetes Isolated from Mediterranean Sponges.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; MacIntyre, Lynsey; Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Horn, Hannes; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Edrada-Ebel, RuAngelie; Hentschel, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Marine sponge-associated actinomycetes are considered as promising sources for the discovery of novel biologically active compounds. In the present study, a total of 64 actinomycetes were isolated from 12 different marine sponge species that had been collected offshore the islands of Milos and Crete, Greece, eastern Mediterranean. The isolates were affiliated to 23 genera representing 8 different suborders based on nearly full length 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Four putatively novel species belonging to genera Geodermatophilus, Microlunatus, Rhodococcus and Actinomycetospora were identified based on a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of < 98.5% to currently described strains. Eight actinomycete isolates showed bioactivities against Trypanosma brucei brucei TC221 with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values <20 μg/mL. Thirty four isolates from the Milos collection and 12 isolates from the Crete collection were subjected to metabolomic analysis using high resolution LC-MS and NMR for dereplication purposes. Two isolates belonging to the genera Streptomyces (SBT348) and Micromonospora (SBT687) were prioritized based on their distinct chemistry profiles as well as their anti-trypanosomal activities. These findings demonstrated the feasibility and efficacy of utilizing metabolomics tools to prioritize chemically unique strains from microorganism collections and further highlight sponges as rich source for novel and bioactive actinomycetes.

  3. Antibiotic resistance profiles to determine sources of fecal contamination in a rural Virginia watershed.

    PubMed

    Graves, Alexandria K; Hagedorn, Charles; Teetor, Alison; Mahal, Michelle; Booth, Amy M; Reneau, Raymond B

    2002-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance analysis (ARA) was used to determine if enterococci of human origin were present in a stream (Spout Run) that passes through a rural nonsewered community (Millwood, VA). Millwood consists of 82 homes, all served by individual septic systems, and Spout Run drains a 5,800-ha karst topography watershed that contains large populations of livestock and wildlife. Periodic monitoring by state regulatory officials had resulted in Spout Run being placed on the Virginia impaired stream list and Millwood being categorized as an at-risk community. Stream samples were collected monthly and analyzed for fecal coliforms and enterococci (May 1999-May 2000); ARA was performed on enterococci stream isolates on a quarterly basis. All 117 stream samples were positive for fecal coliforms, and 32% exceeded the Virginia recreational water standard (1,000 fecal coliforms/100 mL). A library of 1,174 known source Enterococcus isolate antibiotic resistance profiles was constructed, and yielded correct classification rates of 94.6% for 203 human isolates, 93.7% for 734 livestock isolates, and 87.8% for 237 wildlife isolates. Antibiotic resistance analysis of 2,012 enterococcal isolates recovered from stream samples indicated isolates of human origin appeared throughout the stream as it passed through Millwood, with a yearly average of approximately 10% human, 40% wildlife, and 50% livestock. There were no human origin isolates in samples collected upstream from Millwood, and the percent human origin isolates declined downstream from Millwood. While a human signature was found in Spout Run, it was small compared with the proportion of isolates from livestock and wildlife.

  4. Protein profiling of mouse livers with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha activation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ruiyin; Lim, Hanjo; Brumfield, Laura; Liu, Hong; Herring, Chris; Ulintz, Peter; Reddy, Janardan K; Davison, Matthew

    2004-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is important in the induction of cell-specific pleiotropic responses, including the development of liver tumors, when it is chronically activated by structurally diverse synthetic ligands such as Wy-14,643 or by unmetabolized endogenous ligands resulting from the disruption of the gene encoding acyl coenzyme A (CoA) oxidase (AOX). Alterations in gene expression patterns in livers with PPARalpha activation were delineated by using a proteomic approach to analyze liver proteins of Wy-14,643-treated and AOX(-/-) mice. We identified 46 differentially expressed proteins in mouse livers with PPARalpha activation. Up-regulated proteins, including acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, and carnitine O-octanoyltransferase, are involved in fatty acid metabolism, whereas down-regulated proteins, including ketohexokinase, formiminotransferase-cyclodeaminase, fructose-bisphosphatase aldolase B, sarcosine dehydrogenase, and cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase, are involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Among stress response and xenobiotic metabolism proteins, selenium-binding protein 2 and catalase showed a dramatic approximately 18-fold decrease in expression and a modest approximately 6-fold increase in expression, respectively. In addition, glycine N-methyltransferase, pyrophosphate phosphohydrolase, and protein phosphatase 1D were down-regulated with PPARalpha activation. These observations establish proteomic profiles reflecting a common and predictable pattern of differential protein expression in livers with PPARalpha activation. We conclude that livers with PPARalpha activation are transcriptionally geared towards fatty acid combustion.

  5. Phytochemical Profiles and Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of the Leaves of Zanthoxylum bungeanum

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ziwen; Wang, Dongmei; He, Fengyuan; Li, Dengwu

    2014-01-01

    The ethanol crude extracts (ECE) and their subfractions from Zanthoxylum bungeanum leaves were prepared and their phytochemical profiles and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities were investigated. Moreover, the effective HPLC procedure for simultaneous quantification of twelve compounds in Z. bungeanum leaves was established. The correlation between the phytochemicals and antioxidant activity was also discussed. The ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) had the highest total phenolic (97.29 mmol GAE/100 g) and flavonoid content (67.93 mmol QE/100 g), while the greatest total alkaloid content (4.39 mmol GAE/100 g) was observed in the chloroform fraction (CF). Twelve compounds were quantified by RP-HPLC assay. EAF exhibited the highest content of quercitrin, kaempferol-3-rhamnoside, quercetin, sesamin, and nitidine chloride (125.21, 54.95, 24.36, 26.24, and 0.20 mg/g); acetone fraction (AF) contained the highest content of chlorogenic acid, rutin, hyperoside, and trifolin (5.87, 29.94, 98.33, and 31.24 mg/g), while kaempferol-3-rhamnoside, xanthyletin, and sesamin were rich in CF. EAF and AF exhibited significant DPPH, ABTS radical scavenging abilities and reducing power (FRAP), whereas CF exhibited significant antifungal activity. Moreover, EAF also showed stronger antibacterial activity. In conclusion, Z. bungeanum leaves have health benefits when consumed and could be served as an accessible source for production of functional food ingredients and medicinal exploration. PMID:25147836

  6. Activity Profile of an FDA-Approved Compound Library against Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Panic, Gordana; Vargas, Mireille; Scandale, Ivan; Keiser, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Background As plans to expand mass drug treatment campaigns to fight schistosomiasis form, worries about reliance on praziquantel as the sole available treatment motivate the investigation for novel antischistosomal compounds. Drug repurposing might be an inexpensive and effective source of novel antischistosomal leads. Methodology 1600 FDA approved compounds were first assayed against Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula at a concentration of 10 µM. Active compounds identified from this screen were advanced to the adult worm screen at 33.33 µM, followed by hit characterization. Leads with complementary pharmacokinetic and toxicity profiles were then selected for in vivo studies. Principal Findings The in vitro screen identified 121 and 36 compounds active against the schistosomula and adult stage, respectively. Further, in vitro characterization and comparison with already available pharmacokinetic and toxicity data identified 11 in vivo candidates. Doramectin (10 mg/kg) and clofazimine (400 mg/kg) were found to be active in vivo with worm burden reductions of 60.1% and 82.7%, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The work presented here expands the knowledge of antischistosomal properties of already approved compounds and underscores variations observed between target-based and phenotypic approaches and among laboratories. The two in vivo-active drugs identified in this study, doramectin and clofazimine are widely available and present as novel drug classes as starting points for further investigation. PMID:26230921

  7. A computerized system for localizing sources of cardiac activation.

    PubMed

    Salu, Y; Mehrotra, P

    1984-06-01

    A noninvasive method for locating a source of cardiac electrical activity is described. The data acquisition and its preliminary processing is done with the aid of a microcomputer, while lengthier calculations are done on a large computer. The method was tested on 18 patients, and the results indicate that it is reliable, and with further technical refinements it could be used in research and clinical settings.

  8. Obsidian sources characterized by neutron-activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Gordus, A A; Wright, G A; Griffin, J B

    1968-07-26

    Concentrations of elements such as manganese, scandium, lanthanum, rubidium, samarium, barium, and zirconium in obsidian samples from different flows show ranges of 1000 percent or more, whereas the variation in element content in obsidian samples from a single flow appears to be less than 40 percent. Neutron-activation analysis of these elements, as well as of sodium and iron, provides a means of identifying the geologic source of an archeological artifact of obsidian.

  9. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    PubMed Central

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  10. Metabolomic Profiling of Prostate Cancer Progression During Active Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    that the profile captures the phenotype of Gleason grade 4 we will use clinically significant tumors from men who underwent immediate surgery (i.e. not...matched tumor and benign tissue samples from 5 open prostatectomy (RRP) cases and 5 robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RAL) cases (including 3...criteria, collection of sufficient frozen tissue from the prostatectomy, matched to serum and urine collected prior to surgery , and collection of clinical

  11. Phenolic profile and antioxidant activity from non-toxic Mexican Jatropha curcas L. shell methanolic extracts.

    PubMed

    Perea-Domínguez, Xiomara Patricia; Espinosa-Alonso, Laura Gabriela; Hosseinian, Farah; HadiNezhad, Mehri; Valdez-Morales, Maribel; Medina-Godoy, Sergio

    2017-03-01

    Jatropha curcas seed shells are the by-product obtained during oil extraction process. Recently, its chemical composition has gained attention since its potential applications. The aim of this study was to identify phenolic compounds profile from a non-toxic J. curcas shell from Mexico, besides, evaluate J. curcas shell methanolic extract (JcSME) antioxidant activity. Free, conjugate and bound phenolics were fractionated and quantified (606.7, 193.32 and 909.59 μg/g shell, respectively) and 13 individual phenolic compounds were detected by HPLC. The radical-scavenging activity of JcSME was similar to Trolox and ascorbic acid by DPPH assay while by ABTS assay it was similar to BHT. Effective antioxidant capacity by ORAC was found (426.44 ± 53.39 μmol Trolox equivalents/g shell). The Mexican non-toxic J. curcas shell is rich in phenolic compounds with high antioxidant activity; hence, it could be considerate as a good source of natural antioxidants.

  12. Energy Intake, Profile, and Dietary Sources in the Spanish Population: Findings of the ANIBES Study.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Emma; Ávila, José Manuel; Valero, Teresa; del Pozo, Susana; Rodriguez, Paula; Aranceta-Bartrina, Javier; Gil, Ángel; González-Gross, Marcela; Ortega, Rosa M; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2015-06-12

    Energy intake, and the foods and beverages contributing to that, are considered key to understanding the high obesity prevalence worldwide. The relative contributions of energy intake and expenditure to the obesity epidemic, however, remain poorly defined in Spain. The purpose of this study was to contribute to updating data of dietary energy intake and its main sources from food and beverages, according to gender and age. These data were derived from the ANIBES ("Anthropometry, Intake, and Energy Balance in Spain") study, a cross-sectional study of a nationally representative sample of the Spanish population (from 9-75 years old). A three-day dietary record, collected by means of a tablet device, was used to obtain information about food and beverage consumption and leftovers. The final sample comprised 2009 individuals (1,013 men, 996 women). The observed mean dietary energy intake was 7.6 ± 2.11 MJ/day (8.2 ± 2.22 MJ/day for men and 6.9 ± 1.79 MJ/day for women). The highest intakes were observed among adolescents aged 13-17 years (8.4 MJ/day), followed by children 9-12 years (8.2 ± 1.80 MJ/day), adults aged 18-64 (7.6 ± 2.14 MJ/day) and older adults aged 65-75 years (6.8 ± 1.88 MJ/day). Cereals or grains (27.4%), meats and derivatives (15.2%), oils and fats (12.3%), and milk and dairy products (11.8%) contributed most to daily energy intake. Energy contributions from non-alcoholic beverages (3.9%), fish and shellfish (3.6%), sugars and sweets (3.3%) and alcoholic beverages (2.6%) were moderate to minor. Contributions to caloric profile were 16.8%E from proteins; 41.1%E from carbohydrates, including 1.4%E from fiber; 38.5%E from fats; and 1.9%E from alcohol intake. We can conclude that energy intake is decreasing in the Spanish population. A variety of food and beverage groups contribute to energy intake; however, it is necessary to reinforce efforts for better adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet.

  13. Energy Intake, Profile, and Dietary Sources in the Spanish Population: Findings of the ANIBES Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Emma; Ávila, José Manuel; Valero, Teresa; del Pozo, Susana; Rodriguez, Paula; Aranceta-Bartrina, Javier; Gil, Ángel; González-Gross, Marcela; Ortega, Rosa M.; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2015-01-01

    Energy intake, and the foods and beverages contributing to that, are considered key to understanding the high obesity prevalence worldwide. The relative contributions of energy intake and expenditure to the obesity epidemic, however, remain poorly defined in Spain. The purpose of this study was to contribute to updating data of dietary energy intake and its main sources from food and beverages, according to gender and age. These data were derived from the ANIBES (“Anthropometry, Intake, and Energy Balance in Spain”) study, a cross-sectional study of a nationally representative sample of the Spanish population (from 9–75 years old). A three-day dietary record, collected by means of a tablet device, was used to obtain information about food and beverage consumption and leftovers. The final sample comprised 2009 individuals (1,013 men, 996 women). The observed mean dietary energy intake was 7.6 ± 2.11 MJ/day (8.2 ± 2.22 MJ/day for men and 6.9 ± 1.79 MJ/day for women). The highest intakes were observed among adolescents aged 13–17 years (8.4 MJ/day), followed by children 9–12 years (8.2 ± 1.80 MJ/day), adults aged 18–64 (7.6 ± 2.14 MJ/day) and older adults aged 65–75 years (6.8 ± 1.88 MJ/day). Cereals or grains (27.4%), meats and derivatives (15.2%), oils and fats (12.3%), and milk and dairy products (11.8%) contributed most to daily energy intake. Energy contributions from non-alcoholic beverages (3.9%), fish and shellfish (3.6%), sugars and sweets (3.3%) and alcoholic beverages (2.6%) were moderate to minor. Contributions to caloric profile were 16.8%E from proteins; 41.1%E from carbohydrates, including 1.4%E from fiber; 38.5%E from fats; and 1.9%E from alcohol intake. We can conclude that energy intake is decreasing in the Spanish population. A variety of food and beverage groups contribute to energy intake; however, it is necessary to reinforce efforts for better adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet. PMID:26076230

  14. Single Particle Source Profiles of Gasoline and Diesel Powered Vehicles, Biomass Burning and Coal Combustion Exhaust Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, D. T.; Prather, K. A.; Schauer, J.; Cass, G. R.

    2001-12-01

    be used to determine the relative fractions of these particle types to the overall particulate mass emissions from these tests. These results will be presented in terms of single particle source profiles for these environmentally important combustion aerosol sources.

  15. Subthreshold Current and Swing Modeling of Gate Underlap DG MOSFETs with a Source/Drain Lateral Gaussian Doping Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kunal; Kumar, Sanjay; Goel, Ekta; Singh, Balraj; Kumar, Mirgender; Dubey, Sarvesh; Jit, Satyabrata

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new model for the subthreshold current and swing of the short-channel symmetric underlap ultrathin double gate metal oxide field effect transistors with a source/drain lateral Gaussian doping profile. The channel potential model already reported earlier has been utilized to formulate the closed form expression for the subthreshold current and swing of the device. The effects of the lateral straggle and geometrical parameters such as the channel length, channel thickness, and oxide thickness on the off current and subthreshold slope have been demonstrated. The devices with source/drain lateral Gaussian doping profiles in the underlap structure are observed to be highly resistant to short channel effects while improving the current drive. The proposed model is validated by comparing the results with the numerical simulation data obtained by using the commercially available ATLAS™, a two-dimensional (2-D) device simulator from SILVACO.

  16. Saharan Desert Dust Sources: New Insights Based on Aerosol Vertical Profiles Retrieved from Thermal Infrared Measurements by IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbussche, S.; Kumps, N.; Vandaele, A. C.; De Maziere, M.

    2015-11-01

    Desert dust is a major actor in the climate and one of the least characterized with respect to its radiative forcing, both direct and indirect. Studies of dust atmospheric load and sources are therefore of great scientific interest. In the last years, we have developed and improved a retrieval strategy to obtain desert dust aerosols vertical profiles, from thermal infrared measurements by IASI. This strategy has been used to process significant amount of IASI data above North Africa. This dataset allows a new insight in the study of Saharan desert dust sources: it provides twice a day, at interesting times considering the dust emission diurnal cycle, vertical profiles of desert dust (not only optical depth), making possible to distinguish local emissions from transported dust.

  17. Prevalent flucocorticoid and androgen activity in US water sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stavreva, Diana A.; George, Anuja A.; Klausmeyer, Paul; Varticovski, Lyuba; Sack, Daniel; Voss, Ty C.; Schiltz, R. Louis; Blazer, Vicki; Iwanowiczl, Luke R.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of the environment with endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is a major health concern. The presence of estrogenic compounds in water and their deleterious effect are well documented. However, detection and monitoring of other classes of EDCs is limited. Here we utilize a high-throughput live cell assay based on sub-cellular relocalization of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid and androgen receptors (GFP-GR and GFP-AR), in combination with gene transcription analysis, to screen for glucocorticoid and androgen activity in water samples. We report previously unrecognized glucocorticoid activity in 27%, and androgen activity in 35% of tested water sources from 14 states in the US. Steroids of both classes impact body development, metabolism, and interfere with reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems. This prevalent contamination could negatively affect wildlife and human populations.

  18. Time evolution of negative ion profile in a large cesiated negative ion source applicable to fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, M. Hanada, M.; Kojima, A.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Hiratsuka, J.; Ichikawa, M.; Watanabe, K.; Grisham, L.R.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.

    2016-02-15

    To understand the physics of the cesium (Cs) recycling in the large Cs-seeded negative ion sources relevant to ITER and JT-60SA with ion extraction area of 45-60 cm × 110-120 cm, the time evolution of the negative ion profile was precisely measured in JT-60SA where the ion extraction area is longitudinally segmented into 5. The Cs was seeded from the oven at 180 °C to the ion source. After 1 g of Cs input, surface production of the negative ions appeared only in the central segment where a Cs nozzle was located. Up to 2 g of Cs, the negative ion profile was longitudinally expanded over full ion extraction area. The measured time evolution of the negative ion profile has the similar tendency of distribution of the Cs atoms that is calculated. From the results, it is suggested that Cs atom distribution is correlated with the formation of the negative ion profile.

  19. Dose profile modeling of Idaho National Laboratory's active neutron interrogation laboratory.

    PubMed

    Chichester, D L; Seabury, E H; Zabriskie, J M; Wharton, J; Caffrey, A J

    2009-06-01

    A new laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 10(8) n/s), deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (1 x 10(7) n/s), and (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron sources (6.96 x 10(7) n/s, 30 microg). Shielding at the laboratory is comprised of modular concrete shield blocks 0.76 m thick with tongue-in-groove features to prevent radiation streaming, arranged into one small and one large test vault. The larger vault is designed to allow operation of the DT generator and has walls 3.8m tall, an entrance maze, and a fully integrated electrical interlock system; the smaller test vault is designed for (252)Cf and DD neutron sources and has walls 1.9 m tall and a simple entrance maze. Both analytical calculations and numerical simulations were used in the design process for the building to assess the performance of the shielding walls and to ensure external dose rates are within required facility limits. Dose rate contour plots have been generated for the facility to visualize the effectiveness of the shield walls and entrance mazes and to illustrate the spatial profile of the radiation dose field above the facility and the effects of skyshine around the vaults.

  20. Study of the beam profile and position instability of a post-accelerated pseudospark-sourced electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Yin, H.; Zhang, L.; Shu, G.; He, W.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Cross, A. W.; Pang, L.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-03-01

    A pseudospark-sourced electron beam is a promising candidate for driving a THz millimeter wave radiation source. However, the physics governing the electron beam density profile and the beam center deviation from the axis of the structure, which may be caused by the randomness in the pseudospark discharge process, remains still unclear especially for the high energy component of the pseudospark-sourced electron beam, which is usually non-mono-energetic. It is essential to study the electron beam density profile and the beam center position distribution for optimizing the pseudospark discharge configuration. In this paper, images of some single-shot electron beam pulses have been captured using a 50 μm thickness stopping copper foil and a phosphor screen coated with a P47 scintillator to study the electron beam density profile and the beam center position distribution of the high energy component of the electron beam. The experiments have been carried out on two pseudospark discharge configurations with two different size hollow cathode cavities. The influence of the cathode aperture of each configuration has also been studied according to the beam images. Experimental results show that the beam profile of the high energy component has a Lorentzian distribution and is much smaller than the axial aperture size with the beam centers dispersing within a certain range around the axis of the discharge structure. The pseudospark-sourced electron beam with a larger hollow cathode cavity shows a smaller full width at half maximum radius and a more concentrated beam center distribution.

  1. Methodology for a bounding estimate of activation source-term.

    PubMed

    Culp, Todd

    2013-02-01

    Sandia National Laboratories' Z-Machine is the world's most powerful electrical device, and experiments have been conducted that make it the world's most powerful radiation source. Because Z-Machine is used for research, an assortment of materials can be placed into the machine; these materials can be subjected to a range of nuclear reactions, producing an assortment of activation products. A methodology was developed to provide a systematic approach to evaluate different materials to be introduced into the machine as wire arrays. This methodology is based on experiment specific characteristics, physical characteristics of specific radionuclides, and experience with Z-Machine. This provides a starting point for bounding calculations of radionuclide source-term that can be used for work planning, development of work controls, and evaluating materials for introduction into the machine.

  2. Development and Validation of a Method for Profiling Post-Translational Modification Activities Using Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Widschwendter, Martin; Sun, Dahui; Sieburg, Hans B.; Spruck, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Background Post-translational modifications (PTMs) impact on the stability, cellular location, and function of a protein thereby achieving a greater functional diversity of the proteome. To fully appreciate how PTMs modulate signaling networks, proteome-wide studies are necessary. However, the evaluation of PTMs on a proteome-wide scale has proven to be technically difficult. To facilitate these analyses we have developed a protein microarray-based assay that is capable of profiling PTM activities in complex biological mixtures such as whole-cell extracts and pathological specimens. Methodology/Principal Findings In our assay, protein microarrays serve as a substrate platform for in vitro enzymatic reactions in which a recombinant ligase, or extracts prepared from whole cells or a pathological specimen is overlaid. The reactions include labeled modifiers (e.g., ubiquitin, SUMO1, or NEDD8), ATP regenerating system, and other required components (depending on the assay) that support the conjugation of the modifier. In this report, we apply this methodology to profile three molecularly complex PTMs (ubiquitylation, SUMOylation, and NEDDylation) using purified ligase enzymes and extracts prepared from cultured cell lines and pathological specimens. We further validate this approach by confirming the in vivo modification of several novel PTM substrates identified by our assay. Conclusions/Significance This methodology offers several advantages over currently used PTM detection methods including ease of use, rapidity, scale, and sample source diversity. Furthermore, by allowing for the intrinsic enzymatic activities of cell populations or pathological states to be directly compared, this methodology could have widespread applications for the study of PTMs in human diseases and has the potential to be directly applied to most, if not all, basic PTM research. PMID:20596523

  3. 5.0. Depletion, activation, and spent fuel source terms

    SciTech Connect

    Wieselquist, William A.

    2016-04-01

    SCALE’s general depletion, activation, and spent fuel source terms analysis capabilities are enabled through a family of modules related to the main ORIGEN depletion/irradiation/decay solver. The nuclide tracking in ORIGEN is based on the principle of explicitly modeling all available nuclides and transitions in the current fundamental nuclear data for decay and neutron-induced transmutation and relies on fundamental cross section and decay data in ENDF/B VII. Cross section data for materials and reaction processes not available in ENDF/B-VII are obtained from the JEFF-3.0/A special purpose European activation library containing 774 materials and 23 reaction channels with 12,617 neutron-induced reactions below 20 MeV. Resonance cross section corrections in the resolved and unresolved range are performed using a continuous-energy treatment by data modules in SCALE. All nuclear decay data, fission product yields, and gamma-ray emission data are developed from ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluations. Decay data include all ground and metastable state nuclides with half-lives greater than 1 millisecond. Using these data sources, ORIGEN currently tracks 174 actinides, 1149 fission products, and 974 activation products. The purpose of this chapter is to describe the stand-alone capabilities and underlying methodology of ORIGEN—as opposed to the integrated depletion capability it provides in all coupled neutron transport/depletion sequences in SCALE, as described in other chapters.

  4. Sediment Core Contaminant Profiling in Site Assessment: Implications for Atmospheric Deposition of Contaminants Versus Point Source Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, A. A.; Johnston, M. J.; Nelson, T.; Desrocher, S.; Bergquist, B.; Slater, G. F.

    2009-05-01

    Differentiating between point source industrial contamination and regional atmospheric deposition is integral to accurately implementing effective monitoring, mitigation and remediation programs. This study evaluates polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) profiles in sediment cores retrieved from two northern Ontario lakes. One lake (Lake A) has an industrial facility located close to the shore, while the other (Lake B) located 3 km away does not. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the use of contaminant concentration profiling in sediment cores as a tool for differentiating atmospheric versus point source industrial inputs to lake sediments. Concentration profiles for Pb, Hg and PAH from both lakes were consistent with atmospheric deposition as observed in other lakes lacking industrial sources. Hg concentrations increased from 0.18 µg/g at a depositional date of approximately 1900 to 0.26 µg/g in the uppermost sediments. Concurrently, Pb concentrations increased from 5 ug/g at a depositional date of approximately 1900 to 25 ug/g and 26 ug/g in the most recent sediment of Lakes A and B respectfully. Both of these profiles were similar to other remote lakes. The range in concentrations of individual PAHs from both lakes (0.1 ug/g to 0.17 ug/g) were also within the range of concentrations found in other remote areas, however, they were significantly lower than those observed in nearby Siskiwit Lake. This difference was explained by the configuration of regional combustion sources and prevailing wind patterns that indicated Siskiwit Lake was receiving inputs from coal fired power generation plants which do not appear to be impacting the lakes in this study. In addition, comparison of cores collected proximal to the industrial site and in the middle of the lake revealed no relationship regarding increasing concentrations with proximity to the industrial facility. Thus the observed concentrations in these sediments were concluded to

  5. [Source profile and chemical reactivity of volatile organic compounds from vehicle exhaust].

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yue-Zhen; Wang, Hong-Li; Huang, Cheng; Chen, Chang-Hong; Su, Lei-Yan; Zhou, Min; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Gang-Feng; Chen, Yi-Ran; Li, Li; Chen, Ming-Hua; Huang, Hai-Ying

    2012-04-01

    Light-duty gasoline taxis (LDGT) and passenger cars (LDGV), heavy-duty diesel buses (HDDB) and trucks (HDDT), gasoline motorcycles (MC) and LPG scooters (LPGS), were selected for tailpipe volatile organic compounds (VOCs) samplings by using transient dynamometer and on road test combined with SUMMA canisters technology. The samples were tested by GC-MS to analyze the concentration and species composition of VOCs. The results indicate that light-duty gasoline automobiles have higher fractions of aromatic hydrocarbons, which account for 43.38%-44.45% of the total VOCs, the main aromatic hydrocarbons are toluene and xylenes. Heavy-duty diesel vehicles have higher fractions of alkanes, which constitute 46.86%-48.57% of the total VOCs, the main alkanes are propane, n-dodecane and n-undecane. In addition, oxy-organics account for 13.28%-15.01% of the VOCs, the main oxy-organics is acetone. The major compound from MC and LPGS exhaust is acetylene, it accounts for 39.75% and 76.67% of the total VOCs, respectively. VOCs exhaust from gasoline motorcycles and light-duty gasoline automobiles has a significantly higher chemical reactivity than those from heavy-duty diesel vehicles, which contribute 55% and 44% to the atmospheric chemical reactivity in Shanghai. The gasoline motorcycles and light-duty gasoline automobiles are the key pollution sources affecting city and region ambient oxidation, and the key active species of toluene, xylenes, propylene, and styrene make the greatest contribution.

  6. Active and retired public employees' health insurance: potential data sources.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Melinda Sandler

    2014-12-01

    Employer-provided health insurance for public sector workers is a significant public policy issue. Underfunding and the growing costs of benefits may hinder the fiscal solvency of state and local governments. Findings from the private sector may not be applicable because many public sector workers are covered by union contracts or salary schedules and often benefit modifications require changes in legislation. Research has been limited by the difficulty in obtaining sufficiently large and representative data on public sector employees. This article highlights data sources researchers might utilize to investigate topics concerning health insurance for active and retired public sector employees.

  7. Verification of Minimum Detectable Activity for Radiological Threat Source Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Hannah; Myjak, Mitchell; Baciak, James; Detwiler, Rebecca; Seifert, Carolyn

    2015-10-01

    The Department of Homeland Security's Domestic Nuclear Detection Office is working to develop advanced technologies that will improve the ability to detect, localize, and identify radiological and nuclear sources from airborne platforms. The Airborne Radiological Enhanced-sensor System (ARES) program is developing advanced data fusion algorithms for analyzing data from a helicopter-mounted radiation detector. This detector platform provides a rapid, wide-area assessment of radiological conditions at ground level. The NSCRAD (Nuisance-rejection Spectral Comparison Ratios for Anomaly Detection) algorithm was developed to distinguish low-count sources of interest from benign naturally occurring radiation and irrelevant nuisance sources. It uses a number of broad, overlapping regions of interest to statistically compare each newly measured spectrum with the current estimate for the background to identify anomalies. We recently developed a method to estimate the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of NSCRAD in real time. We present this method here and report on the MDA verification using both laboratory measurements and simulated injects on measured backgrounds at or near the detection limits. This work is supported by the US Department of Homeland Security, Domestic Nuclear Detection Office, under competitively awarded contract/IAA HSHQDC-12-X-00376. This support does not constitute an express or implied endorsement on the part of the Gov't.

  8. Stable Isotope Profiling of Internet-Sourced Viagra® and 'generic- Viagra' Tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Helen; Meier-Augenstein, Wolfram

    2013-04-01

    Viagra® manufactured by Pfizer was the first prescription drug for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED), a condition that is estimated to affect 1 in 10 men at some stage in their lives (1). Viagra® contains the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) sildenafil, as the citrate salt. Sildenafil, along with Tadalafil and Vardenafil belong to a class of drugs known as phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors. Since its first production in 1998, Viagra® has generated well in excess of 10 billion US dollars in sales (2) and with Pfizers' patent extended to April 2020 (3) it still remains the only sildenafil-based treatment option for sufferers of ED in the US. There are no legal 'generic-Viagra' formulations available in the US. However, formulations containing sildenafil citrate as API are widely available over the internet and often sold as 'generic Viagra'. These cheaper alternatives are often manufactured under less than ideal conditions with little or no QA/QC procedures in place. The World Health Organisation recognised the scale of the problem in its 2010 bulletin "Growing threat from counterfeit medicines" (4) and quotes a Dutch study cited in the International Journal of Clinical Practice in which from a cohort of 370 seized Viagra® samples, only 10 were genuine. We sourced a variety of tablets sold for the treatment of ED which claimed to have sildenafil citrate as API. Viagra®, 'generic-Viagra', Kamagra, Silagra and Filagra tablets were ordered via the internet and supplied from both UK-based pharmacies as well as overseas suppliers (Hong Kong, India, Vanuata). In this small-scale pilot study, we present results from bulk 2H/18O and 13C/15N stable isotope analysis performed on crushed tablets from 23 samples of internet-sourced tablets sold for the treatment of ED and purported to contain sildenafil citrate as API. References 1. www.healthcare.org.uk 2. www.moneynews.com 3. US Patent & trademark office (www.uspto.gov) 4. WHO bulletin 2010; 88:247-248

  9. Phenolic Profiles and Contribution of Individual Compounds to Antioxidant Activity of Apple Powders.

    PubMed

    Raudone, Lina; Raudonis, Raimondas; Liaudanskas, Mindaugas; Viskelis, Jonas; Pukalskas, Audrius; Janulis, Valdimaras

    2016-05-01

    Apples (Malus domestica L.) are the most common source of phenolic compounds in northern European diet. Besides pectins, dietary fibers, vitamins, and oligosaccharides they contain phenolic compounds of different classes. Apple powders are convenient functional forms retaining significant amounts of phenolic antioxidants. In this study reducing and radical scavenging profiles of freeze-dried powders of "Aldas,ˮ "Auksis,ˮ "Connel Red,ˮ "Ligol,ˮ "Lodel,ˮ and "Rajkaˮ were determined and phenolic constituents were identified using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole and time-of-flight mass spectrometers. A negative ionization mode was applied and seventeen compounds: phenolic acids (coumaroylquinic, chlorogenic), flavonoids (quercetin derivatives), and procyanidin derivatives (B1, B2, and C1) were identified in all tested apple samples. Total values of Trolox equivalents varied from 7.72 ± 0.32 up to 20.02 ± 0.52 and from 11.10 ± 0.57 up to 21.42 ± 0.75 μmol/g of dry weight of apple powder in FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power) and ABTS (2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) postcolumn assays, respectively. The greatest Trolox equivalent values were determined for apples of "Aldasˮ cultivar. Chlorogenic acid and procyanidin C1 were the most significant contributors to total reducing and radical scavenging activity in all apple cultivars tested, therefore they could be considered as markers of antioxidant activity.

  10. Source profiles of particulate matter emissions from a pilot-scale boiler burning North American coal blends.

    PubMed

    Lee, S W

    2001-11-01

    Recent awareness of suspected adverse health effects from ambient particulate matter (PM) emission has prompted publication of new standards for fine PM with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 microm (PM2.5). However, scientific data on fine PM emissions from various point sources and their characteristics are very limited. Source apportionment methods are applied to identify contributions of individual regional sources to tropospheric particulate concentrations. The existing industrial database developed using traditional source measurement techniques provides total emission rates only, with no details on chemical nature or size characteristics of particulates. This database is inadequate, in current form, to address source-receptor relationships. A source dilution system was developed for sampling and characterization of total PM, PM2.5, and PM10 (i.e., PM with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 pm) from residual oil and coal combustion. This new system has automatic control capabilities for key parameters, such as relative humidity (RH), temperature, and sample dilution. During optimization of the prototype equipment, three North American coal blends were burned using a 0.7-megawatt thermal (MWt) pulverized coal-fired, pilot-scale boiler. Characteristic emission profiles, including PM2.5 and total PM soluble acids, and elemental and carbon concentrations for three coal blends are presented. Preliminary results indicate that volatile trace elements such as Pb, Zn, Ti, and Se are preferentially enriched in PM2.5. PM2.5 is also more concentrated in soluble sulfates relative to total PM. Coal fly ash collected at the outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) contains about 85-90% PM10 and 30-50% PM2.5. Particles contain the highest elemental concentrations of Si and Al while Ca, Fe, Na, Ba, and K also exist as major elements. Approximately 4-12% of the materials exists as soluble sulfates in fly ash generated by coal blends containing 0.2-0.8% sulfur by mass

  11. Monitoring seismic wave speed by an active seismic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Kawakata, H.; Doi, I.; Okubo, M.; Saiga, A.

    2012-12-01

    Decreases in elastic wave speed around cracked zones prior to faulting in rock fracture experiments have been reported (e.g., Yukutake, 1989; Yoshimitsu et al., 2009). These decreases in wave speed have been considered to be associated with crack and fault growth based on non-destructive observation using X-ray CT scan (Kawakata et al., 1999). Meanwhile, there were some reports on the decreases in seismic wave speed along paths that cross the hypocentral area in periods including some large earthquakes. Uchida et al. (2002) analyzed seismic waveform with explosive sources before and after the 1998 northern Iwate prefecture earthquake, and they showed that the decrease in seismic wave speed approximately 0.1-0.9 % by the earthquake occurrence. Justin et al. (2007) reported the reduction in seismic wave speed accompanied with the 2003 Tokachi oki earthquake around the rupture area by using the four repeating earthquakes that occurred before and after the 2003 Tokachi oki earthquake. However, seismograms of explosive sources or repeating earthquakes are hard to be frequently recorded, which makes the time intervals of estimated seismic wave speed be too long to distinguish preseismic changes from coseismic and post seismic changes. In order to monitor crustal structures and detecting the variation of rock properties in the crust, a kind of active seismic source systems ACROSS (Accurately Controlled Routinely Operated Signal System) has been developed(e.g., Kunitomo and Kumazawa, 2004). We used the controlled seismic source ACROSS, which installed at the Tono mine, Gifu prefecture, central Japan and has been routinely operated by Tono Geoscience center of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency), automatically. Frequency modulated seismic waves are continuously radiated from approximately 10-20 Hz by eccentric rotation of the source. In order to investigate the stability of ACROSS signals, we used seismograms recorded at the 110m depth of Shobasama observing site, which is

  12. Active plasma source formation in the MAP diode

    SciTech Connect

    Lamppa, K.P.; Stinnett, R.W.; Renk, T.J.

    1995-07-01

    The Ion Beam Surface Treatment (IBEST) program is exploring using ion beams to treat the surface of a wide variety of materials. These experiments have shown that improved corrosion resistance, surface hardening, grain size modification, polishing and surface cleaning can all be achieved using a pulsed 0.4-0.8 MeV ion beam delivering 1-10 J/cm{sup 2}. The Magnetically-confined Anode Plasma (MAP) diode, developed at Cornell University, produces an active plasma which can be used to treat the surfaces of materials. The diode consists of a fast puff valve as the source of gas to produce the desired ions and two capacitively driven B-fields. A slow magnetic field is used for electron insulation and a fast field is used to both ionize the puffed gas and to position the plasma in the proper spatial location in the anode prior to the accelerator pulse. The relative timing between subsystems is an important factor in the effective production of the active plasma source for the MAP diode system. The MAP diode has been characterized using a Langmuir probe to measure plasma arrival times at the anode annulus for hydrogen gas. This data was then used to determine the optimum operating point for the MAP diode on RHEPP-1 accelerator shots. Operation of the MAP diode system to produce an ion beam of 500 kV, 12 kA with 40% efficiency (measured at the diode) has been demonstrated.

  13. Use of focused ultrasonication in activity-based profiling of deubiquitinating enzymes in tissue.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Bindu; Shack, Leslie A; Rai, Aswathy N; Epperson, William B; Baumgartner, Wes; Schmidt, Ty B; Edelmann, Mariola J

    2016-12-15

    To develop a reproducible tissue lysis method that retains enzyme function for activity-based protein profiling, we compared four different methods to obtain protein extracts from bovine lung tissue: focused ultrasonication, standard sonication, mortar & pestle method, and homogenization combined with standard sonication. Focused ultrasonication and mortar & pestle methods were sufficiently effective for activity-based profiling of deubiquitinases in tissue, and focused ultrasonication also had the fastest processing time. We used focused-ultrasonicator for subsequent activity-based proteomic analysis of deubiquitinases to test the compatibility of this method in sample preparation for activity-based chemical proteomics.

  14. Applying the seismic interferometry method to vertical seismic profile data using tunnel excavation noise as source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Teixido, Teresa; Martin, Elena; Segarra, Miguel; Segura, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    In the frame of the research conducted to develop efficient strategies for investigation of rock properties and fluids ahead of tunnel excavations the seismic interferometry method was applied to analyze the data acquired in boreholes instrumented with geophone strings. The results obtained confirmed that seismic interferometry provided an improved resolution of petrophysical properties to identify heterogeneities and geological structures ahead of the excavation. These features are beyond the resolution of other conventional geophysical methods but can be the cause severe problems in the excavation of tunnels. Geophone strings were used to record different types of seismic noise generated at the tunnel head during excavation with a tunnelling machine and also during the placement of the rings covering the tunnel excavation. In this study we show how tunnel construction activities have been characterized as source of seismic signal and used in our research as the seismic source signal for generating a 3D reflection seismic survey. The data was recorded in vertical water filled borehole with a borehole seismic string at a distance of 60 m from the tunnel trace. A reference pilot signal was obtained from seismograms acquired close the tunnel face excavation in order to obtain best signal-to-noise ratio to be used in the interferometry processing (Poletto et al., 2010). The seismic interferometry method (Claerbout 1968) was successfully applied to image the subsurface geological structure using the seismic wave field generated by tunneling (tunnelling machine and construction activities) recorded with geophone strings. This technique was applied simulating virtual shot records related to the number of receivers in the borehole with the seismic transmitted events, and processing the data as a reflection seismic survey. The pseudo reflective wave field was obtained by cross-correlation of the transmitted wave data. We applied the relationship between the transmission

  15. Solar energy in Italy: a profile of renewable energy activity in its national context

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, C.A.

    1980-12-01

    The following are included: country overview; energy summary; Italian Republic-geopolitical, economic, and cultural aspects; the energy profile; imported energy sources; solar energy research and development; solar energy organizations; solar energy related legislation and administration policies; and international agreements, contacts, manufacturers, and projects. (MHR)

  16. Solar energy in Italy: A profile of renewable energy activity in its national context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, C. A.

    1980-12-01

    The energy profile includes: imported energy sources; solar research and development; solar energy organizations; solar energy related legislation and administration policies; and international agreements, contacts, manufacturers, and projects. The country overview includes: Italian Republic geopolitical analysis; economic analysis; and cultural aspects.

  17. Custom E-Learning Experiences: Working with Profiles for Multiple Content Sources Access and Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferretti, Stefano; Roccetti, Marco; Salomoni, Paola; Mirri, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    It is a common belief that the problem of extracting learners' profiles to be used for delivering custom learning experiences is a closed case. Yet, practical solutions do not completely cope with the complex issue of capturing all the features of users, especially those of heterogeneous learners, who may have special needs or characteristics…

  18. Distinct phosphatase activity profiles in two strains of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Morales-Neto, R; Hulshof, L; Ferreira, C V; Gadelha, F R

    2009-12-01

    Phosphorylation of parasite proteins plays a key role in the process of cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas' disease. In this sense, characterization of parasite kinases and phosphatases could open new possibilities for the rational design of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of Chagas' disease. In this work, we analyzed phosphatase activities in T. cruzi homogenates from 2 strains belonging to different lineages and with different resistance to oxidative stress. Tulahuen 2 cells (Lineage I) showed higher phosphatase activities and specificity constants when compared to the Y strain (Lineage II). Tulahuen 2 had an optimum phosphatase activity at pH 4.0 and the Y strain at pH 7.0. In both cases, neutral–basic, but not acid, phosphatase activities were increased in the presence of Mg2+. Although calcium had an inhibitory effect at a pH of 7.0 and 8.0 in the Y strain, this inhibition was restricted to pH 8.0 in the other strain. Different substrates and acid phosphotyrosine and alkaline phosphatase inhibitors exhibited distinct effects on the phosphatase activity of both strains. Our results provide a better understanding of T. cruzi phosphatases and reinforce the notion of heterogeneity among T. cruzi populations.

  19. Garlic sprouting is associated with increased antioxidant activity and concomitant changes in the metabolite profile.

    PubMed

    Zakarova, Alexandra; Seo, Ji Yeon; Kim, Hyang Yeon; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Shin, Jung-Hye; Cho, Kye Man; Lee, Choong Hwan; Kim, Jong-Sang

    2014-02-26

    Although garlic (Allium sativum) has been extensively studied for its health benefits, sprouted garlic has received little attention. We hypothesized that sprouting garlic would stimulate the production of various phytochemicals that improve health. Ethanolic extracts from garlic sprouted for different periods had variable antioxidant activities when assessed with in vitro assays, including the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity assay and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay. Extracts from garlic sprouted for 5 days had the highest antioxidant activity, whereas extracts from raw garlic had relatively low antioxidant activity. Furthermore, sprouting changed the metabolite profile of garlic: the metabolite profile of garlic sprouted for 5-6 days was distinct from the metabolite profile of garlic sprouted for 0-4 days, which is consistent with the finding that garlic sprouted for 5 days had the highest antioxidant activity. Therefore, sprouting may be a useful way to improve the antioxidant potential of garlic.

  20. Artichoke and milk thistle pills and syrups as sources of phenolic compounds with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; José Alves, Maria; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-07-13

    Dietary supplements based on hepatoprotective plants have been increasingly used in the prevention of liver injuries. In the present work, the aim was to study the phenolic profile and possibly relate it to the in vitro antimicrobial activity of two different formulations (pills and syrups) of artichoke and milk thistle, the antioxidant and anti-hepatocellular carcinoma activities of which were previously reported by our research group. The phenolic profiles were obtained by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS, and the antimicrobial activity evaluation was performed with the clinical isolates of multiresistant bacteria (Escherichia coli, extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Artichoke syrup revealed the presence of vanillic acid and luteolin-7-O-glucoside while the pills possessed higher concentrations of 4-O-caffeoylquinic, 5-O-caffeoylquinic and 1,3-O-dicaffeoylquinic acids, this latest being able to inhibit the growth of MRSA. Regarding milk thistle formulations, the syrup presented isorhamnetin-O-deoxyhexoside-O-dihexoside, isorhamnetin-O-deoxyhexoside-O-hexoside and isorhamnetin-3-O-rutinoside as the major phenolic constituents whereas the pills were richer in taxifolin, silymarin derivatives and hydroxylated silibinin; the syrup revealed antimicrobial activity against all the studied bacteria with the exception of Proteus mirabilis whereas the pills revealed activity against ESBL producing Escherichia coli. Overall, all of the studied formulations revealed to be a good source of phenolic compounds, among which milk thistle syrup presented the highest variety and concentration of flavonoids, which is possibly related to its strongest antimicrobial activity.

  1. Beach Profiles and Transects. Ocean Related Curriculum Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Claire

    The ocean affects all of our lives. Therefore, awareness of and information about the interconnections between humans and oceans are prerequisites to making sound decisions for the future. Project ORCA (Ocean Related Curriculum Activities) has developed interdisciplinary curriculum materials designed to meet the needs of students and teachers…

  2. Profiling glycosyltransferase activities by tritium imaging of glycan microarrays.

    PubMed

    Serna, Sonia; Hokke, Cornelis H; Weissenborn, Martin; Flitsch, Sabine; Martin-Lomas, Manuel; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2013-05-10

    High-throughput microarray technology has been combined with ultrasensitive and high-resolution tritium autoradiography to create a new platform for the quantitative detection of glycosyltransferase activity on glycan arrays. In addition, we show full compatibility with the use of fluorescently labeled lectins to help with the stereochemical assignment of newly formed glycoside linkages.

  3. Phytochemical profile and apoptotic activity of Onopordum cynarocephalum.

    PubMed

    Formisano, Carmen; Rigano, Daniela; Russo, Alessandra; Cardile, Venera; Caggia, Silvia; Apostolides Arnold, Nelly; Mari, Angela; Piacente, Sonia; Rosselli, Sergio; Senatore, Felice; Bruno, Maurizio

    2012-10-01

    A phytochemical investigation of acetone and chloroform extracts of the aerial parts of Onopordum cynarocephalum Boiss. et Blanche was carried out. It led to the isolation of two new sesquiterpenes, the elemane aldehyde (2) and the eudesmane (11), together with 15 known compounds: two lignans (1 and 15) and 13 sesquiterpenes (3-10, 12-14, 16, 17). The structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, especially 1D and 2D NMR spectra. The anti-growth effect against three human melanoma cell lines, M14, A375, and A2058, of the different extracts and compounds of O. cynarocephalum was also investigated. Among them, the chloroform extract exhibited the strongest biological activity, while the most active compounds were the lignan arctigenin (1), and the sesquiterpenes, compounds 3, 5, and 6 belonging to the elemane type, and 7 belonging to the eudesmane type. Our data also demonstrate that acetone and chloroform extracts induce, in the A375 cell line, apoptotic cell death that could be related to an overall action of the compounds present, but in particular to the lignans arctigenin (1) and the sesquiterpenes compounds 3-8 and 16. In fact, these molecules were able to induce a high DNA fragmentation, correlated to a significant increase of the caspase-3 enzyme activity. Furthermore, apoptosis appears to be mediated, at least in part, via PTEN activity and the inhibition of Hsp70 expression.

  4. Reproductive profile of physically active men after exhaustive endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Vaamonde, D; Da Silva, M E; Poblador, M S; Lancho, J L

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study on non-professional (recreational) athletes was two-fold: 1) to determine if endurance exercise (EE) routinely used by professional athletes would produce reproductive changes in the general population, and 2) to assess reversion. Short-term exhaustive endurance exercise (EEE) can produce alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis with subsequent fertility changes. Sixteen healthy adult male volunteers were divided into experimental (8) and control (8) groups for the exercise period. A cycloergometer provided EEE for a period of 2 weeks. The experimental group exercised four times a week; controls were without EEE. The hormonal and seminological profiles of all subjects were evaluated. Two weeks of EEE produced hormonal and seminological values in the experimental group that were statistically different from their own pre-treatment values (FSH: 3.33 +/- 1.7; LH: 3.73 +/- 1.36; sperm concentration/ml: 42.50 +/- 29.46; type a velocity: 25.23 +/- 10.9; type d velocity: 46.18 +/- 15.81; % of normal forms: 10.42 +/- 1.97) as well as from the pre- and post-treatment control group values. The measured parameters almost returned to pre-treatment levels in the experimental group 2 - 3 days after EEE ended. From this study we concluded that when subjected to EEE, individuals drawn from a recreational exercising life style experienced changes similar to those observed in studies done with athletes, and short-term EEE induced a reversible alteration to the HPG axis.

  5. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pre-treatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pre-treatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pre-treatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from a M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia, and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Nanotoxicology screening strategies

  6. Running activity profile of adolescent tennis players during match play.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Matthias W; Baumgart, Christian; Bornefeld, Jutta; Sperlich, Billy; Freiwald, Jürgen; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2014-08-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to assess the running activities of adolescent tennis players during match play with respect to velocity, acceleration, and deceleration; (2) to characterize changes in these activities during the course of a match; and (3) to identify potential differences between winners and losers. Twenty well-trained adolescent male athletes (13 ± 1 y) played one simulated match each (giving a total of 10 matches), during which distances covered at different velocity categories (0 to < 1, 1 to < 2, 2 to < 3, 3 to < 4, and ≥ 4 m·s(-1)) and number of running activities involving high velocity (≥ 3 m·s(-1)), acceleration (≥ 2 m·s(-2)), and deceleration (≤ -2 m·s(-2)) were monitored using a global positioning system (10 Hz). Heart rate was also assessed. The total match time, total distance covered, peak velocity, and mean heart rate were 81.2 ± 14.6 min, 3362 ± 869 m, 4.4 ± 0.8 m·s(-1), and 159 ± 12 beats·min(-1), respectively. Running activities involving high acceleration (0.6 ± 0.2 n·min(-1)) or deceleration (0.6 ± 0.2 n·min(-1)) were three times as frequent as those involving high velocity (0.2 ± 0.1 n·min(-1)). No change in the pattern of running activities (P ≥ .13, d ≤ 0.39) and no differences between winners and losers (P ≥ .22, d ≤ 0.53) were evident during match play. We conclude that training of well-trained adolescent male tennis players need not focus on further development of their running abilities, since this physical component of multifactorial tennis performance does not change during the course of a match and does not differ between the winners and losers.

  7. Dysregulation of Macrophage Activation Profiles by Engineered Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kodali, Vamsi; Littke, Matthew H.; Tilton, Susan C.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Shi, Liang; Frevert, Charles W.; Wang, Wei; Pounds, Joel G.; Thrall, Brian D.

    2013-08-27

    Although the potential human health impacts from exposure to engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are uncertain, past epidemiological studies have established correlations between exposure to ambient air pollution particulates and the incidence of pneumonia and lung infections. Using amorphous silica and superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) as model high production volume ENPs, we examined how macrophage activation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or the lung pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae is altered by ENP pretreatment. Neither silica nor SPIO treatment elicited direct cytotoxic or pro-inflammatory effects in bone marrow-derived macrophages. However, pretreatment of macrophages with SPIO caused extensive reprogramming of nearly 500 genes regulated in response to LPS challenge, hallmarked by exaggerated activation of oxidative stress response pathways and suppressed activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory pathways. Silica pretreatment altered regulation of only 67 genes, but there was strong correlation with gene sets affected by SPIO. Macrophages exposed to SPIO displayed a phenotype suggesting an impaired ability to transition from an M1 to M2-like activation state, characterized by suppressed IL-10 induction, enhanced TNFα production, and diminished phagocytic activity toward S. pneumoniae. Studies in macrophages deficient in scavenger receptor A (SR-A) showed SR-A participates in cell uptake of both the ENPs and S. pneumonia and co-regulates the anti-inflammatory IL-10 pathway. Thus, mechanisms for dysregulation of innate immunity exist by virtue that common receptor recognition pathways are used by some ENPs and pathogenic bacteria, although the extent of transcriptional reprogramming of macrophage function depends on the physicochemical properties of the ENP after internalization. Our results also illustrate that biological effects of ENPs may be indirectly manifested only after challenging normal cell function. Finally, nanotoxicology screening

  8. Source apportionment of PAHs and n-alkanes in respirable particles in Tehran, Iran by wind sector and vertical profile.

    PubMed

    Moeinaddini, Mazaher; Esmaili Sari, Abbas; Riyahi bakhtiari, Alireza; Chan, Andrew Yiu-Chung; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Hawker, Darryl; Connell, Des

    2014-06-01

    The vertical concentration profiles and source contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes in respirable particle samples (PM4) collected at 10, 100, 200 and 300-m altitude from the Milad Tower of Tehran, Iran during fall and winter were investigated. The average concentrations of total PAHs and total n-alkanes were 16.7 and 591 ng/m(3), respectively. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was applied to the chemical composition and wind data to apportion the contributing sources. The five PAH source factors identified were: 'diesel' (56.3% of total PAHs on average), 'gasoline' (15.5%), 'wood combustion, and incineration' (13%), 'industry' (9.2%), and 'road soil particle' (6.0%). The four n-alkane source factors identified were: 'petrogenic' (65% of total n-alkanes on average), 'mixture of petrogenic and biomass burning' (15%), 'mixture of biogenic and fossil fuel' (11.5%), and 'biogenic' (8.5%). Source contributions by wind sector were also estimated based on the wind sector factor loadings from PMF analysis. Directional dependence of sources was investigated using the conditional probability function (CPF) and directional relative strength (DRS) methods. The calm wind period was found to contribute to 4.4% of total PAHs and 5.0% of total n-alkanes on average. Highest average concentrations of PAHs and n-alkanes were found in the 10 and 100 m samples, reflecting the importance of contributions from local sources. Higher average concentrations in the 300 m samples compared to those in the 200 m samples may indicate contributions from long-range transport. The vertical profiles of source factors indicate the gasoline and road soil particle-associated PAHs, and the mixture from biogenic and fossil fuel source-associated n-alkanes were mostly from local emissions. The smaller average contribution of diesel-associated PAHs in the lower altitude samples also indicates that the restriction of diesel-fueled vehicle use in the central area

  9. Proteomic and activity profiles of ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in germinating barley embryo.

    PubMed

    Bønsager, Birgit C; Shahpiri, Azar; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2010-10-01

    Enzymes involved in redox control are important during seed germination and seedling growth. Ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in barley embryo extracts were monitored both by 2D-gel electrophoresis and activity measurements from 4 to 144 h post imbibition (PI). Strikingly different activity profiles were observed. No ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was present in mature seeds but activity was detected after 24 h PI and increased 14-fold up to 144 h PI. In contrast, dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) activity was present at 4h PI and first decreased by 9-fold until 72 h PI followed by a 5-fold increase at 144 h PI. Glutathione reductase and monodehydroascorbate reductase activities were also detected at 4 h PI, and showed modest increases of 1.8- and 2.7-fold, respectively, by 144 h PI. The combination of functional analysis with the proteomics approach enabled correlation of the activity profiles and protein abundance. While gel spots containing APX showed intensity changes consistent with the activity profile from 0 to 72 h PI, DHAR spot intensities indicated that post-translational regulation may be responsible for the observed changes in activity. Transcript profiling, 2D-western blotting and mass spectrometric characterization of multiple APX spots demonstrated the presence of APX1 and minor amounts of APX2.

  10. Redox activity of urban quasi-ultrafine particles from primary and secondary sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Vishal; Ning, Zhi; Cho, Arthur K.; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2009-12-01

    To characterize the redox activity profiles of atmospheric aerosols from primary (traffic) and secondary photochemical sources, ambient quasi-ultrafine particles were collected near downtown Los Angeles in two different time periods - morning (6:00-9:00 PDT) and afternoon (11:00-14:00 PDT) in the summer of 2008. Detailed chemical analysis of the collected samples, including water-soluble elements, inorganic ions, organic species and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) was conducted and redox activity of the samples was measured by two different assays: the dithiothreitol (DTT) and the macrophage reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays. Tracers of secondary photochemical reactions, such as sulfate and organic acids were higher (2.1 ± 0.6 times for sulfate, and up to 3 times for the organic acids) in the afternoon period. WSOC was also elevated by 2.5 ± 0.9 times in the afternoon period due to photo-oxidation of primary particles during atmospheric aging. Redox activity measured by the DTT assay was considerably higher for the samples collected during the afternoon; on the other hand, diurnal trends in the ROS-based activity were not consistent between the morning and afternoon periods. A linear regression between redox activity and various PM chemical constituents showed that the DTT assay was highly correlated with WSOC ( R2 = 0.80), while ROS activity was associated mostly with water soluble transition metals (Vanadium, Nickel and Cadmium; R2 > 0.70). The DTT and ROS assays, which are based on the generation of different oxidizing species by chemical PM constituents, provide important information for elucidating the health risks related to PM exposure from different sources. Thus, both primary and secondary particles possess high redox activity; however, photochemical transformations of primary emissions with atmospheric aging enhance the toxicological potency of primary particles in terms of generating oxidative stress and leading to subsequent damage in cells.

  11. Chilean prosopis mesocarp flour: phenolic profiling and antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Quispe, Cristina; Soriano, Maria Del Pilar C; Theoduloz, Cristina; Jiménez-Aspée, Felipe; Pérez, Maria Jorgelina; Cuello, Ana Soledad; Isla, Maria Inés

    2015-04-17

    In South America, the mesocarp flour of Prosopis species plays a prominent role as a food resource in arid areas. The aim of this work was the characterization of the phenolic antioxidants occurring in the pod mesocarp flour of Chilean Prosopis. Samples were collected in the Copiapo, Huasco and Elqui valleys from the north of Chile. The samples of P. chilensis flour exhibited a total phenolic content ranging between 0.82-2.57 g gallic acid equivalents/100 g fresh flour weight. The highest antioxidant activity, measured by the DPPH assay, was observed for samples from the Huasco valley. HPLC-MS/MS analysis allowed the tentative identification of eight anthocyanins and 13 phenolic compounds including flavonol glycosides, C-glycosyl flavones and ellagic acid derivatives. The antioxidant activity and the phenolic composition in the flour suggest that this ancient South American resource may have potential as a functional food.

  12. Antiglycation Activity of Iridoids and Their Food Sources.

    PubMed

    West, Brett J; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Deng, Shixin; Nakajima, Sanae; Jensen, C Jarakae

    2014-01-01

    Iridoids are dietary phytochemicals that may have the ability to inhibit the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Three studies were conducted to investigate this anti-AGE potential. First, the inhibition of fluorescence intensity by food-derived iridoids, after 4 days of incubation with bovine serum albumin, glucose, and fructose, was used to evaluate in vitro antiglycation activity. Next, an 8-week open-label pilot study used the AGE Reader to measure changes in the skin autofluorescence of 34 overweight adults who consumed daily a beverage containing food sources of iridoids. Finally, a cross-sectional population study with 3913 people analyzed the relationship between daily iridoid intake and AGE accumulation, as measured by skin autofluorescence with the TruAge scanner. In the in vitro test, deacetylasperulosidic acid and loganic acid both inhibited glycation in a concentration-dependent manner, with respective IC50 values of 3.55 and 2.69 mM. In the pilot study, average skin autofluorescence measurements decreased by 0.12 units (P < 0.05). The cross-sectional population survey revealed that, for every mg of iridoids consumed, there is a corresponding decline in AGE associated age of 0.017 years (P < 0.0001). These results suggest that consumption of dietary sources of iridoids may be a useful antiaging strategy.

  13. Source localization of brain activity using helium-free interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dammers, Jürgen; Chocholacs, Harald; Eich, Eberhard; Boers, Frank; Faley, Michael; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Jon Shah, N.

    2014-05-01

    To detect extremely small magnetic fields generated by the human brain, currently all commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are equipped with low-temperature (low-Tc) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors that use liquid helium for cooling. The limited and increasingly expensive supply of helium, which has seen dramatic price increases recently, has become a real problem for such systems and the situation shows no signs of abating. MEG research in the long run is now endangered. In this study, we report a MEG source localization utilizing a single, highly sensitive SQUID cooled with liquid nitrogen only. Our findings confirm that localization of neuromagnetic activity is indeed possible using high-Tc SQUIDs. We believe that our findings secure the future of this exquisitely sensitive technique and have major implications for brain research and the developments of cost-effective multi-channel, high-Tc SQUID-based MEG systems.

  14. Source localization of brain activity using helium-free interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dammers, Jürgen Chocholacs, Harald; Eich, Eberhard; Boers, Frank; Faley, Michael; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Jon Shah, N.

    2014-05-26

    To detect extremely small magnetic fields generated by the human brain, currently all commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are equipped with low-temperature (low-T{sub c}) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors that use liquid helium for cooling. The limited and increasingly expensive supply of helium, which has seen dramatic price increases recently, has become a real problem for such systems and the situation shows no signs of abating. MEG research in the long run is now endangered. In this study, we report a MEG source localization utilizing a single, highly sensitive SQUID cooled with liquid nitrogen only. Our findings confirm that localization of neuromagnetic activity is indeed possible using high-T{sub c} SQUIDs. We believe that our findings secure the future of this exquisitely sensitive technique and have major implications for brain research and the developments of cost-effective multi-channel, high-T{sub c} SQUID-based MEG systems.

  15. Identification of sources and estimation of emission profiles from highly time-resolved pollutant measurements in Tampa, FL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancras, Joseph Patrick; Ondov, John M.; Poor, Noreen; Landis, Matthew S.; Stevens, Robert K.

    Aerosol slurry samples were collected at 30-min intervals for sequential 1-month periods at each of two sites (Sydney and "Dairy") in the Tampa Bay area during the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment using the University of Maryland Semicontinuous Elements in Aerosol Sampler-II (SEAS-II). More than 500 samples, believed to be affected by plumes from local utility and industrial sources, were selected for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometric analyses for elemental markers (Al, Fe, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se, As, Ni, Zn and Cd) based on excursions in SO 2 and NO x measurements. Correlation of short-term excursions in metals and SO 2, and surface wind directions observed between May 23 and 26th, 2002, revealed the influence of an animal feed supplements production facility (AFS), 17 km upwind at a station angle of 81°, for which emissions had not previously been detected by standard monitoring methods. Emission "profiles" for this source were developed, separately, from the time series data and by using principle components analysis (PCA) and positive matrix factorization (PMF). In addition, a local dust component was evident in Al and Fe concentration profiles during periods of elevated wind speeds and was resolved by PCA/PMF. Similarly, large but brief 1.5-h excursions in Zn (maximum, 403 ng m -3), Cd, and Pb on May 17th were correlated with winds from the direction of an incinerator (station angle, 250°) 17 km from Sydney. Lastly, large excursions in As concentrations (maximum, 86 ng m -3) observed (May 4th and 5th at Sydney and November 2nd and 3rd at the Dairy) were used to locate previously unrecognized sources, tentatively associated with combustion/production of pressure-treated lumber. Profiles developed directly from the time series data were in the range of those derived from PCA-PMF (AFS); and those for the incinerator, with previously published values.

  16. Neutron activation analysis detection limits using {sup 252}Cf sources

    SciTech Connect

    DiPrete, D.P.; Sigg, R.A.

    2000-07-01

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) developed a neutron activation analysis (NAA) facility several decades ago using low-flux {sup 252}Cf neutron sources. Through this time, the facility has addressed areas of applied interest in managing the Savannah River Site (SRS). Some applications are unique because of the site's operating history and its chemical-processing facilities. Because sensitivity needs for many applications are not severe, they can be accomplished using an {approximately}6-mg {sup 252}Cf NAA facility. The SRTC {sup 252}Cf facility continues to support applied research programs at SRTC as well as other SRS programs for environmental and waste management customers. Samples analyzed by NAA include organic compounds, metal alloys, sediments, site process solutions, and many other materials. Numerous radiochemical analyses also rely on the facility for production of short-lived tracers, yielding by activation of carriers and small-scale isotope production for separation methods testing. These applications are more fully reviewed in Ref. 1. Although the flux [{approximately}2 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s] is low relative to reactor facilities, more than 40 elements can be detected at low and sub-part-per-million levels. Detection limits provided by the facility are adequate for many analytical projects. Other multielement analysis methods, particularly inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, can now provide sensitivities on dissolved samples that are often better than those available by NAA using low-flux isotopic sources. Because NAA allows analysis of bulk samples, (a) it is a more cost-effective choice when its sensitivity is adequate than methods that require digestion and (b) it eliminates uncertainties that can be introduced by digestion processes.

  17. Phytochemical Profile and Biological Activity of Nelumbo nucifera.

    PubMed

    Paudel, Keshav Raj; Panth, Nisha

    2015-01-01

    Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. (Nymphaeaceae) is a potential aquatic crop grown and consumed throughout Asia. All parts of N. nucifera have been used for various medicinal purposes in various systems of medicine including folk medicines, Ayurveda, Chinese traditional medicine, and oriental medicine. Many chemical constituents have been isolated till the date. However, the bioactive constituents of lotus are mainly alkaloids and flavonoids. Traditionally, the whole plant of lotus was used as astringent, emollient, and diuretic. It was used in the treatment of diarrhea, tissue inflammation, and homeostasis. The rhizome extract was used as antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory properties due to the presence of asteroidal triterpenoid. Leaves were used as an effective drug for hematemesis, epistaxis, hemoptysis, hematuria, and metrorrhagia. Flowers were used to treat diarrhea, cholera, fever, and hyperdipsia. In traditional medicine practice, seeds are used in the treatment of tissue inflammation, cancer and skin diseases, leprosy, and poison antidote. Embryo of lotus seeds is used in traditional Chinese medicine as Lian Zi Xin, which primarily helps to overcome nervous disorders, insomnia, and cardiovascular diseases (hypertension and arrhythmia). Nutritional value of lotus is as important as pharmaceutical value. These days' different parts of lotus have been consumed as functional foods. Thus, lotus can be regarded as a potential nutraceutical source.

  18. Phytochemical Profile and Biological Activity of Nelumbo nucifera

    PubMed Central

    Panth, Nisha

    2015-01-01

    Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. (Nymphaeaceae) is a potential aquatic crop grown and consumed throughout Asia. All parts of N. nucifera have been used for various medicinal purposes in various systems of medicine including folk medicines, Ayurveda, Chinese traditional medicine, and oriental medicine. Many chemical constituents have been isolated till the date. However, the bioactive constituents of lotus are mainly alkaloids and flavonoids. Traditionally, the whole plant of lotus was used as astringent, emollient, and diuretic. It was used in the treatment of diarrhea, tissue inflammation, and homeostasis. The rhizome extract was used as antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory properties due to the presence of asteroidal triterpenoid. Leaves were used as an effective drug for hematemesis, epistaxis, hemoptysis, hematuria, and metrorrhagia. Flowers were used to treat diarrhea, cholera, fever, and hyperdipsia. In traditional medicine practice, seeds are used in the treatment of tissue inflammation, cancer and skin diseases, leprosy, and poison antidote. Embryo of lotus seeds is used in traditional Chinese medicine as Lian Zi Xin, which primarily helps to overcome nervous disorders, insomnia, and cardiovascular diseases (hypertension and arrhythmia). Nutritional value of lotus is as important as pharmaceutical value. These days' different parts of lotus have been consumed as functional foods. Thus, lotus can be regarded as a potential nutraceutical source. PMID:27057194

  19. Motivation and Self-Perception Profiles and Links with Physical Activity in Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddle, Stuart J. H.; Wang, C. K. John

    2003-01-01

    Research shows a decline in participation in physical activity across the teenage years. It is important, therefore, to examine factors that might influence adolescent girl's likelihood of being physically active. This study used contemporary theoretical perspectives from psychology to assess a comprehensive profile of motivational and…

  20. Phenolic and carotenoid profiles and antiproliferative activity of foxtail millet.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li Zhen; Liu, Rui Hai

    2015-05-01

    Commonly consumed foxtail millet varieties Jingu28 and Jingu34 were compared in terms of phytochemical composition, antioxidant property, and antiproliferative activity. The cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) was evaluated based on HepG2 cell cultivation. Antiproliferative properties against HepG2 and MDA cell were assayed by methylene blue assay. Total phenolic content (TPC) was 78.79 and 114.22 mg gallic acid equiv/100 g DW in Jingu28 and Jingu34. Both varieties contained ferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid, syringic acid. Xanthophylls and zeaxanthin were also detected. Peroxyl radical scavenging capacity of the foxtail millet were 228.13 (Jingu28) and 355.03 (Jingu34) μmol of vitamin C equiv/100 g, respectively. CAA values of the foxtail millet varieties ranged from 1.52 to 8.97 μmol quercetin equiv/100 g DW. The proliferation of MDA and HepG2 cancer cells were significantly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner after exposure to Jingu28 and Jingu34 extractions.

  1. Evaluating the Safety Profile of Non-Active Implantable Medical Devices Compared with Medicines.

    PubMed

    Pane, Josep; Coloma, Preciosa M; Verhamme, Katia M C; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; Rebollo, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Recent safety issues involving non-active implantable medical devices (NAIMDs) have highlighted the need for better pre-market and post-market evaluation. Some stakeholders have argued that certain features of medicine safety evaluation should also be applied to medical devices. Our objectives were to compare the current processes and methodologies for the assessment of NAIMD safety profiles with those for medicines, identify potential gaps, and make recommendations for the adoption of new methodologies for the ongoing benefit-risk monitoring of these devices throughout their entire life cycle. A literature review served to examine the current tools for the safety evaluation of NAIMDs and those for medicines. We searched MEDLINE using these two categories. We supplemented this search with Google searches using the same key terms used in the MEDLINE search. Using a comparative approach, we summarized the new product design, development cycle (preclinical and clinical phases), and post-market phases for NAIMDs and drugs. We also evaluated and compared the respective processes to integrate and assess safety data during the life cycle of the products, including signal detection, signal management, and subsequent potential regulatory actions. The search identified a gap in NAIMD safety signal generation: no global program exists that collects and analyzes adverse events and product quality issues. Data sources in real-world settings, such as electronic health records, need to be effectively identified and explored as additional sources of safety information, particularly in some areas such as the EU and USA where there are plans to implement the unique device identifier (UDI). The UDI and other initiatives will enable more robust follow-up and assessment of long-term patient outcomes. The safety evaluation system for NAIMDs differs in many ways from those for drugs, but both systems face analogous challenges with respect to monitoring real-world usage. Certain features

  2. Identifying the sources and timing of ancient and medieval atmospheric lead pollution in England using a peat profile from Lindow bog, Manchester.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Gaël; Weiss, Dominik; Grattan, John; Givelet, Nicolas; Krachler, Michael; Cheburkin, Andriy; Rausch, Nicole; Kober, Bernd; Shotyk, William

    2004-05-01

    A peat core from Lindow bog near Manchester, England, was precisely cut into 2 cm slices to provide a high-resolution reconstruction of atmospheric Pb deposition. Radiocarbon and (210)Pb age dates show that the peat core represents the period ca. 2000 BC to AD 1800. Eleven radiocarbon age dates of bulk peat samples reveal a linear age-depth relationship with an average temporal resolution of 18.5 years per cm, or 37 years per sample. Using the Pb/Ti ratio to calculate the rates of anthropogenic, atmospheric Pb deposition, the profile reveals Pb contamination first appearing in peat samples dating from ca. 900 BC which clearly pre-date Roman mining activities. Using TIMS, MC-ICP-MS, and SF-ICP-MS to measure the isotopic composition of Pb, the (208)Pb/(206)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb data indicate that English ores were the predominant sources during the pre-Roman, Roman, and Medieval Periods. The study shows that detailed studies of peat profiles from ombrotrophic bogs, using appropriate preparatory and analytical methods, can provide new insight into the timing, intensity, and predominant sources of atmospheric Pb contamination, even in samples dating from ancient times.

  3. Beef consumer segment profiles based on information source usage in Poland.

    PubMed

    Żakowska-Biemans, Sylwia; Pieniak, Zuzanna; Gutkowska, Krystyna; Wierzbicki, Jerzy; Cieszyńska, Katarzyna; Sajdakowska, Marta; Kosicka-Gębska, Małgorzata

    2017-02-01

    The main aim of this study was to identify market segments based on consumers' usage of information sources about beef and to investigate whether the use of information sources was associated with the type of information consumers were searching for, factors guiding their decision processes to buy beef and motives related to beef consumption. Data were collected in 2014 through a self-administered survey of 501 regular beef consumers. Three distinct clusters were identified: Enthusiast (38.5%), Conservative (43.1%) and Ultra Conservative (18.4%). This study revealed that culinary and personal sources of information on beef were the most frequently used. Taste, perceived healthiness and suitability to prepare many dishes were reported as primary motives to eat beef. These results show that communication channels such as culinary programs and opportunities provided by the development of labelling systems to guarantee beef quality should be considered when developing policies and strategies to increase beef consumption in Poland.

  4. Comparative activity profiles of Thielavia terrestris and Trichoderma reesei cellulases

    SciTech Connect

    Tuse, D.; Mason, B.J.; Skinner, W.A.

    1980-10-01

    The successful utilization of cellulosic materials depends on the development of economically feasible processes for the literation of low molecular weight soluble products from the polymers. These soluble products, such as hexoses and pentoses, can then be utilized as substrates for the microbial or chemical product of fuels, food, and chemical feedstocks. In the enzymatic saccharification of cellulose, one of the major roadblocks to the development of commercially attractive processes has been the instability of the cellulase complex. It is desirable, for example, to operate the conversion systems at elevated temperatures, but environments with high thermal energy can significantly shorten enzyme half life. The authors have isolated a strain of the fungus Thielavia terrestris that possesses a complete cellulase system, and its enzymes were found to have remarkable thermal stability. The author presents a comparison of the activities of the T. terrestris enzymes with those of Trichoderma reesei.

  5. Tanshinones: Sources, Pharmacokinetics and Anti-Cancer Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Jiang, Peixin; Ye, Min; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Jiang, Cheng; Lü, Junxuan

    2012-01-01

    Tanshinones are a class of abietane diterpene compound isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza (Danshen or Tanshen in Chinese), a well-known herb in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Since they were first identified in the 1930s, more than 40 lipophilic tanshinones and structurally related compounds have been isolated from Danshen. In recent decades, numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the isolation, identification, synthesis and pharmacology of tanshinones. In addition to the well-studied cardiovascular activities, tanshinones have been investigated more recently for their anti-cancer activities in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we update the herbal and alternative sources of tanshinones, and the pharmacokinetics of selected tanshinones. We discuss anti-cancer properties and identify critical issues for future research. Whereas previous studies have suggested anti-cancer potential of tanshinones affecting multiple cellular processes and molecular targets in cell culture models, data from in vivo potency assessment experiments in preclinical models vary greatly due to lack of uniformity of solvent vehicles and routes of administration. Chemical modifications and novel formulations had been made to address the poor oral bioavailability of tanshinones. So far, human clinical trials have been far from ideal in their design and execution for the purpose of supporting an anti-cancer indication of tanshinones. PMID:23202971

  6. Fruit cuticular waxes as a source of biologically active triterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Szakiel, Anna; Pączkowski, Cezary; Pensec, Flora; Bertsch, Christophe

    2012-06-01

    The health benefits associated with a diet rich in fruit and vegetables include reduction of the risk of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer, that are becoming prevalent in the aging human population. Triterpenoids, polycyclic compounds derived from the linear hydrocarbon squalene, are widely distributed in edible and medicinal plants and are an integral part of the human diet. As an important group of phytochemicals that exert numerous biological effects and display various pharmacological activities, triterpenoids are being evaluated for use in new functional foods, drugs, cosmetics and healthcare products. Screening plant material in the search for triterpenoid-rich plant tissues has identified fruit peel and especially fruit cuticular waxes as promising and highly available sources. The chemical composition, abundance and biological activities of triterpenoids occurring in cuticular waxes of some economically important fruits, like apple, grape berry, olive, tomato and others, are described in this review. The need for environmentally valuable and potentially profitable technologies for the recovery, recycling and upgrading of residues from fruit processing is also discussed.

  7. A novel method for the activity measurement of large-area beta reference sources.

    PubMed

    Stanga, D; De Felice, P; Keightley, J; Capogni, M; Ioan, M R

    2016-03-01

    A novel method has been developed for the activity measurement of large-area beta reference sources. It makes use of two emission rate measurements and is based on the weak dependence between the source activity and the activity distribution for a given value of transmission coefficient. The method was checked experimentally by measuring the activity of two ((60)Co and (137)Cs) large-area reference sources constructed from anodized aluminum foils. Measurement results were compared with the activity values measured by gamma spectrometry. For each source, they agree within one standard uncertainty and also agree within the same limits with the certified values of the source activity.

  8. Genetic diversity and antibiogram profile of diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes isolated from human, animal, foods and associated environmental sources

    PubMed Central

    Dhaka, Pankaj; Vijay, Deepthi; Vergis, Jess; Negi, Mamta; Kumar, Manesh; Mohan, Vysakh; Doijad, Swapnil; Poharkar, Krupali V.; Malik, Satyaveer Singh; Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo Baliram; Rawool, Deepak B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infectious diarrhoea particularly due to pathogenic bacteria is a major health problem in developing countries, including India. Despite significant reports of diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) pathotypes around the globe, studies which address genetic relatedness, antibiogram profile and their correlation with respect to their isolation from different sources are sparse. The present study determines isolation and identification of DEC pathotypes from different sources, their genetic characterisation, antibiogram profile and their correlation if any. Materials and methods A total of 336 samples comprising diarrhoeic stool samples from infants (n=103), young animal (n=106), foods (n=68) and associated environmental sources (n=59) were collected from Bareilly region of India. All the samples were screened by using standard microbiological methods for the detection of E. coli. The identified E. coli were then confirmed as DEC pathotypes using polymerase chain reaction–based assays. Those DEC pathotypes identified as Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) were further confirmed using HEp-2 adherence assay. All the isolated DEC pathotypes were studied for their genetic diversity using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by using disc diffusion method as per Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Results and discussion Of the four DEC pathotypes investigated, EAEC was found to be the predominant pathogen with an isolation rate of 16.5% from infants, 17.9% from young animals, 16.2% from foods and 3.4% from the associated environmental sources. These EAEC isolates, on further characterisation, revealed predominance of ‘atypical’ EAEC, with an isolation rate of 10.7% from infants, 15.1% from young animals, 16.2% from foods, and 3.4% from the associated environmental sources. On PFGE analysis, discrimination was evident within DEC pathotypes as 52 unique pulsotypes were observed for 59

  9. Proteome-wide quantitative multiplexed profiling of protein expression: carbon-source dependency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; O’Connell, Jeremy D.; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    The global proteomic alterations in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to differences in carbon sources can be comprehensively examined using mass spectrometry–based multiplexing strategies. In this study, we investigate changes in the S. cerevisiae proteome resulting from cultures grown in minimal media using galactose, glucose, or raffinose as the carbon source. We used a tandem mass tag 9-plex strategy to determine alterations in relative protein abundance due to a particular carbon source, in triplicate, thereby permitting subsequent statistical analyses. We quantified more than 4700 proteins across all nine samples; 1003 proteins demonstrated statistically significant differences in abundance in at least one condition. The majority of altered proteins were classified as functioning in metabolic processes and as having cellular origins of plasma membrane and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins remaining relatively unchanged in abundance included those having nucleic acid–related processes, such as transcription and RNA processing. In addition, the comprehensiveness of the data set enabled the analysis of subsets of functionally related proteins, such as phosphatases, kinases, and transcription factors. As a resource, these data can be mined further in efforts to understand better the roles of carbon source fermentation in yeast metabolic pathways and the alterations observed therein, potentially for industrial applications, such as biofuel feedstock production. PMID:26399295

  10. Carbon source utilization profiles suggest additional metabolic interactions in a synergistic linuron-degrading bacterial consortium.

    PubMed

    Horemans, Benjamin; Smolders, Erik; Springael, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    A bacterial triple-species consortium that synergistically metabolizes the phenylurea herbicide linuron was studied to determine whether synergy is extended toward the metabolism of other C-sources. The metabolic performance and range of the individual consortium members were compared with those of paired and three-species combinations in Biolog GN2 MicroPlate assays. The strain combinations showed an increase in the rate and extent of utilization of 80% of the C-sources that were utilized by either one or more of the individual consortium members and the additional utilization of eight C-sources for which oxidation was not observed for the individual strains. When one of the three strains was replaced by bacterial strains 'foreign' to the consortium, either belonging to the same genus or to other genera, mainly antagonistic effects occurred. The data suggest that the consortium members cooperate in the metabolism of C-sources in addition to linuron. This feature can contribute in consolidating consortium composition when linuron is absent or present at low concentrations.

  11. Proteome-wide quantitative multiplexed profiling of protein expression: carbon-source dependency in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Joao A; O'Connell, Jeremy D; Gaun, Aleksandr; Gygi, Steven P

    2015-11-05

    The global proteomic alterations in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to differences in carbon sources can be comprehensively examined using mass spectrometry-based multiplexing strategies. In this study, we investigate changes in the S. cerevisiae proteome resulting from cultures grown in minimal media using galactose, glucose, or raffinose as the carbon source. We used a tandem mass tag 9-plex strategy to determine alterations in relative protein abundance due to a particular carbon source, in triplicate, thereby permitting subsequent statistical analyses. We quantified more than 4700 proteins across all nine samples; 1003 proteins demonstrated statistically significant differences in abundance in at least one condition. The majority of altered proteins were classified as functioning in metabolic processes and as having cellular origins of plasma membrane and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins remaining relatively unchanged in abundance included those having nucleic acid-related processes, such as transcription and RNA processing. In addition, the comprehensiveness of the data set enabled the analysis of subsets of functionally related proteins, such as phosphatases, kinases, and transcription factors. As a resource, these data can be mined further in efforts to understand better the roles of carbon source fermentation in yeast metabolic pathways and the alterations observed therein, potentially for industrial applications, such as biofuel feedstock production.

  12. Development of molecular marker source profiles for emissions from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicle fleets.

    PubMed

    Lough, Glynis C; Christensen, Charles G; Schauer, James J; Tortorelli, James; Mani, Erin; Lawson, Douglas R; Clark, Nigel N; Gabele, Peter A

    2007-10-01

    As part of the Gasoline/Diesel PM Split Study, relatively large fleets of gasoline vehicles and diesel vehicles were tested on a chassis dynamometer to develop chemical source profiles for source attribution of atmospheric particulate matter in California's South Coast Air Basin. Gasoline vehicles were tested in cold-start and warm-start conditions, and diesel vehicles were tested through several driving cycles. Tailpipe emissions of particulate matter were analyzed for organic tracer compounds, including hopanes, steranes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Large intervehicle variation was seen in emission rate and composition, and results were averaged to examine the impacts of vehicle ages, weight classes, and driving cycles on the variation. Average profiles, weighted by mass emission rate, had much lower uncertainty than that associated with intervehicle variation. Mass emission rates and elemental carbon/organic carbon (EC/OC) ratios for gasoline vehicle age classes were influenced most by use of cold-start or warm-start driving cycle (factor of 2-7). Individual smoker vehicles had a large range of mass and EC/OC (factors of 40 and 625, respectively). Gasoline vehicle age averages, data on vehicle ages and miles traveled in the area, and several assumptions about smoker contributions were used to create emissions profiles representative of on-road vehicle fleets in the Los Angeles area in 2001. In the representative gasoline fleet profiles, variation was further reduced, with cold-start or warm-start and the representation of smoker vehicles making a difference of approximately a factor of two in mass emission rate and EC/OC. Diesel vehicle profiles were created on the basis of vehicle age, weight class, and driving cycle. Mass emission rate and EC/OC for diesel averages were influenced by vehicle age (factor of 2-5), weight class (factor of 2-7), and driving cycle (factor of 10-20). Absolute and relative emissions of molecular marker compounds showed

  13. SLD-MOSCNT: A new MOSCNT with step-linear doping profile in the source and drain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahne, Behrooz Abdi; Naderi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new structure, step-linear doping MOSCNT (SLD-MOSCNT), is proposed to improve the performance of basic MOSCNTs. The basic structure suffers from band to band tunneling (BTBT). We show that using SLD profile for source and drain regions increases the horizontal distance between valence and conduction bands at gate to source/drain junction which reduces BTBT probability. SLD performance is compared with other similar structures which have recently been proposed to reduce BTBT such as MOSCNT with lightly-doped drain and source (LDDS), and with double-light doping in source and drain regions (DLD). The obtained results using a nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) method show that the SLD-MOSCNT has the lowest leakage current, power consumption and delay time, and the highest current ratio and voltage gain. The ambipolar conduction in the proposed structure is very low and can be neglected. In addition, these structures can improve short-channel effects. Also, the investigation of cutoff frequency of the different structures shows that the SLD has the highest cutoff frequency. Device performance has been investigated for gate length from 8 to 20 nm which demonstrates all discussions regarding the superiority of the proposed structure are also valid for different channel lengths. This improvement is more significant especially for channel length less than 12 nm. Therefore, the SLD can be considered as a candidate to be used in the applications with high speed and low power consumption.

  14. Antibiotic Susceptibility Profile of Bacteria Isolated from Natural Sources of Water from Rural Areas of East Sikkim

    PubMed Central

    Poonia, Shubra; Singh, T. Shantikumar; Tsering, Dechen C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Contamination of water, food, and environment with antibiotic-resistant bacteria poses a serious public health issue. Objective: The objective was to study the bacterial pollution of the natural sources of water in east Sikkim and to determine the antimicrobial profile of the bacterial isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 225 samples, 75 each during winter, summer, and monsoon season were collected from the same source in every season for bacteriological analysis by membrane filtration method. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed using standard disc diffusion method. Results: A total of 19 bacterial species of the genera Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus, Salmonella, Shigella, Enterobacter, Citrobacter, Morganella, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Flavobacterium, and Serratia were isolated and their antimicrobial sensitivity tested. Generally, most bacterial isolates except Salmonella and Shigella species were found resistant to commonly used antibiotics such as ampicillin (57.5%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxaole (39.1%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (37.4%), cefixime (34.5%), tetracycline (29.1%), ceftazidime (26.3%), ofloxacin (25.9%), amikacin (8.7%), and gentamicin (2.7%) but sensitive to imipenem and piperacillin/tazobactam. Conclusion: Natural sources of water in east Sikkim are grossly contaminated with bacteria including enteropathogens. The consumption of untreated water from these sources might pose health risk to consumers. PMID:25136156

  15. Sodiation-based in-source collision for profiling of pyranocoumarins in Radix Peucedani (Qianhu): utility of sodium adducts' stability with in-source collision.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Li, Yingfei; Kang, Chen; Zhao, Haiyu; Xiang, Li; Li, Chuan; Wang, Qiao

    2017-01-19

    Full scan mode of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry equipped with an electrospray ionization source offers a chance on global detection of complicated components; however, the scan mode carries significant challenges in rapidly capturing information of analysts. Sodiation-based in-source collision was proposed here, as a technique for rapid detecting untargeted analytes in full scan analysis, which was based on the stability of sodium adducts and the nonselectivity of in-source collision. Then the technique was applied to profile of angular-type pyranocoumarins (APs) in Radix Peucedani, with full scan analysis performed at two specific in-source collision energy: a high energy 50 V that is tolerated by the sodium adducts of APs, and a low energy 10 V, at which abundant adducts were offered. The spectra list of two average mass spectra was exported, and stable ions were selected based on the intensity ratio of standards at the two collision energy. Then 27 plausible [M + Na](+) m/z values of APs were acquired after filtering the fragment ion and isotope ions and validating with [M + NH4 ](+) . Eighty-two APs finally were tentatively identified based on their accurate spectral data of MS(n) , fragmentation rules, and elution order regardless of their absolute configuration, which included 25 reported APs from Peucedanum praeruptorum Dunn. The technique provided a novel application of sodium adduct in qualitative analysis. And it was valuable for rapidly capturing information of analytes in full scan analysis, not only for APs but also for other compounds that could form sodium adducts.

  16. Ocimum basilicum L.: phenolic profile and antioxidant-related activity.

    PubMed

    Dorman, H J Damien; Hiltunen, Raimo

    2010-01-01

    Ocimum basilicum L. leaf material was extracted by maceration with (80:20:1 v/v/v) methanol: water: acetic acid to produce a crude extract (CE), which was further fractionated by liquid-liquid extraction to isolate light petroleum (PE), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol (n-BuOH) and H2O-soluble sub-fractions. The total phenol and flavonoid contents of the resulting samples were estimated using colorimetric-based methods, and their iron(III) reductive and free radical scavenging activities were determined in a battery of in vitro assays. The CE and sub-fractions contained phenolic compounds and flavonoids. The samples, except for PE, gave a positive result for the presence of flavones and flavonols; however, flavanones only appeared to be present in the CE. In iron(III) reduction, CE and n-BuOH were the most potent followed by EtOAc and H2O (statistically indistinguishable, p > 0.05). However, in the ferric reducing antioxidant power assay, H2O was the most potent followed by CE and EtOAc (statistically indistinguishable, p > 0.05) and n-BuOH and PE. In 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl scavenging, all the samples, except PE, were effective against this reactive nitrogen species, with CE, EtOAc and n-BuOH being the most potent (statistically indistinguishable, p > 0.05). In alkylperoxyl scavenging, all the samples, except for PE, were effective against this reactive oxygen species (ROS). In superoxide anion scavenging, all the samples were capable of scavenging this ROS with CE being the most effective, followed by n-BuOH and H2O (statistically indistinguishable, p > 0.05) and EtOAc and PE. Similarly, in hydroxyl scavenging, all the samples were capable of scavenging this ROS with CE and n-BuOH being the most effective (statistically indistinguishable, p > 0.05) followed by EtOAc and H2O (statistically indistinguishable, p > 0.05) and PE.

  17. The euryhaline yeast Debaryomyces hansenii has two catalase genes encoding enzymes with differential activity profile.

    PubMed

    Segal-Kischinevzky, Claudia; Rodarte-Murguía, Beatriz; Valdés-López, Victor; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González, Alicia; Alba-Lois, Luisa

    2011-03-01

    Debaryomyces hansenii is a spoilage yeast able to grow in a variety of ecological niches, from seawater to dairy products. Results presented in this article show that (i) D. hansenii has an inherent resistance to H2O2 which could be attributed to the fact that this yeast has a basal catalase activity which is several-fold higher than that observed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the same culture conditions, (ii) D. hansenii has two genes (DhCTA1 and DhCTT1) encoding two catalase isozymes with a differential enzymatic activity profile which is not strictly correlated with a differential expression profile of the encoding genes.

  18. Sensivitity improvement in low-profile distributed detector systems for tracking sources in transit.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R. B.; Klann, R.; Campos, C.; Medley, T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-01-01

    The RadTrac real-time detection and tracking software runs on a laptop computer networked to gamma-radiation detectors. A probabilistic estimate for source position is generated by combining measured count rate data with a first-principles stochastic model for the space and time dependence of count rates and knowledge of detector intrinsic efficiency. Recent development work has focused on improving RadTrac sensitivity in low-count rate situations. A method has been developed for processing count rates by energy according to that part of the energy spectrum with the greatest signal-to-noise ratio. In addition a method has been developed that places constraints on the solution that are physically appropriate when count rates approach background. In both instances experiments with a weak source confirmed the uncertainty in estimated position is reduced.

  19. Zooming into the Cosmic Horseshoe: new insights on the lens profile and the source shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellagamba, Fabio; Tessore, Nicolas; Metcalf, R. Benton

    2017-02-01

    The gravitational lens SDSS J1148+1930, also known as the Cosmic Horseshoe, is one of the biggest and most detailed Einstein rings ever observed. We use the forward reconstruction method implemented in the lens-fitting code LENSED to investigate in great detail the properties of the lens and background source. We model the lens with different mass distributions, focusing in particular on the determination of the slope of the dark-matter component. The inherent degeneracy between the lens slope and the source size can be broken when we can isolate separate components of each lensed image, as in this case. For an elliptical power-law model, κ(r) ˜ r-t, the results favour a flatter-than-isothermal slope with a maximum-likelihood value of t = 0.08. Instead, when we consider the contribution of the baryonic matter separately, the maximum-likelihood value of the slope of the dark-matter component is t = 0.31 or t = 0.44, depending on the assumed initial mass function. We discuss the origin of this result by analysing in detail how the images and the sources change when the slope t changes. We also demonstrate that these slope values at the Einstein radius are not inconsistent with the recent forecast from the theory of structure formation in the ΛCDM model.

  20. Active commuting to school: an overlooked source of childrens' physical activity?

    PubMed

    Tudor-Locke, C; Ainsworth, B E; Popkin, B M

    2001-01-01

    The assessment and promotion of childrens' healthful physical activity is important: (i) to combat the international obesity epidemic that extends to childhood; and (ii) to establish an early habit of lifestyle physical activity that can be sustained into adolescence and adulthood. The primary focus of both assessment and promotion efforts has been on in-school physical education classes and, to a lesser extent, out-of-school structured exercise, sport and play. A potential source of continuous moderate activity, active commuting to school by means of walking or by bicycle, has been largely ignored in surveys of physical activity. Suggestive evidence of steep declines in the amount of childrens' destination walking can be gleaned from national transportation surveys. At the same time, there has been a dramatic increase in the reported use of motorised vehicles, including the use for chauffeuring children. There is very little evidence to support or refute active commuting to school as an important source of childrens' physical activity; however, this is largely because it has been overlooked in the stampede to assess time in more vigorous activities. The promotion of active commuting to school must be considered in the context of parents' real and perceived concerns for their children's personal and pedestrian safety. We certainly do not have a full understanding at this time of all the factors related to decisions about transportation mode, whether by child, parent, community, or school. Such information is necessary if successful and sustainable interventions can be implemented, important transport policy decisions can be made, and community and school designs can be modified. Practice rarely waits for research, however, and there are numerous examples of innovative programming, policies and environmental designs occurring internationally that can serve as natural experiments for enterprising researchers willing to push the envelope of our understanding of active

  1. Advanced Light Source activity report 1996/97

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Ten years ago, the Advanced Light Source (ALS) existed as a set of drawings, calculations, and ideas. Four years ago, it stored an electron beam for the first time. Today, the ALS has moved from those ideas and beginnings to a robust, third-generation synchrotron user facility, with eighteen beam lines in use, many more in planning or construction phases, and hundreds of users from around the world. Progress from concepts to realities is continuous as the scientific program, already strong in many diverse areas, moves in new directions to meet the needs of researchers into the next century. ALS staff members who develop and maintain the infrastructure for this research are similarly unwilling to rest on their laurels. As a result, the quality of the photon beams the authors deliver, as well as the support they provide to users, continues to improve. The ALS Activity Report is designed to share the results of these efforts in an accessible form for a broad audience. The Scientific Program section, while not comprehensive, shares the breadth, variety, and interest of recent research at the ALS. (The Compendium of User Abstracts and Technical Reports provides a more comprehensive and more technical view.) The Facility Report highlights progress in operations, ongoing accelerator research and development, and beamline instrumentation efforts. Although these Activity Report sections are separate, in practice the achievements of staff and users at the ALS are inseparable. User-staff collaboration is essential as they strive to meet the needs of the user community and to continue the ALS's success as a premier research facility.

  2. Integrative Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics Profiling Reveals Dynamic Signaling Networks and Bioenergetics Pathways Underlying T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Haiyan; Yang, Kai; Li, Yuxin; Shaw, Timothy I; Wang, Yanyan; Blanco, Daniel Bastardo; Wang, Xusheng; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Wang, Hong; Rankin, Sherri; Guy, Cliff; Peng, Junmin; Chi, Hongbo

    2017-03-21

    The molecular circuits by which antigens activate quiescent T cells remain poorly understood. We combined temporal profiling of the whole proteome and phosphoproteome via multiplexed isobaric labeling proteomics technology, computational pipelines for integrating multi-omics datasets, and functional perturbation to systemically reconstruct regulatory networks underlying T cell activation. T cell receptors activated the T cell proteome and phosphoproteome with discrete kinetics, marked by early dynamics of phosphorylation and delayed ribosome biogenesis and mitochondrial activation. Systems biology analyses identified multiple functional modules, active kinases, transcription factors and connectivity between them, and mitochondrial pathways including mitoribosomes and complex IV. Genetic perturbation revealed physiological roles for mitochondrial enzyme COX10-mediated oxidative phosphorylation in T cell quiescence exit. Our multi-layer proteomics profiling, integrative network analysis, and functional studies define landscapes of the T cell proteome and phosphoproteome and reveal signaling and bioenergetics pathways that mediate lymphocyte exit from quiescence.

  3. Crustal composition in southern Norway from active and passive source seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratford, W. R.; Frassetto, A. M.; Thybo, H.

    2010-12-01

    Crustal composition and structure beneath the Fennoscandian shield are highly variable due to the method of crustal accretion and the long history of extensional and compressional tectonics. In southern Norway, the Moho and crust are inferred to be the youngest of the shield, however, it is likely that a large discrepancy between crustal age and Moho age exists beneath the high southern Scandes where the Caledonian orogeny was in effect and beneath the Oslo Graben where 60 million years of rifting and magmatism has altered the crust. Crustal structure in southern Norway was targeted with a multi-disciplinary seismic study (Magnus-Rex - Mantle investigations of Norwegian uplift Structure). Three ~400 km long active source seismic profiles across the southern Norway and a region wide array of broadband seismometers were deployed. P and S-wave arrivals were recorded in the Magnus-Rex project, from which Poisson ratios for the crust in southern Norway are calculated from both active source profiling and receiver functions. Unusually strong S-wave arrivals allow rare insight into crustal Poisson’s ratio structure, within crustal layers, that is not normally available from active source data and are usually determined by earthquake tomography studies where only bulk crustal values are available. An average Poisson’s ratio of 0.25 is calculated for the crust in southern Norway, suggesting it is predominantly of felsic-intermediate composition and lacks any significant mafic lower crust. This differs significantly from the adjacent crust in the Svecofennian domain of the Fennoscandian shield where Moho depths reach ~50 km and an up to 20 km thick mafic lower crust is present. The vast difference in Moho depths in the Fennoscandian shield are, therefore, mostly due to the variation in thickness of the high Vp lower crust. Estimates of crustal composition and the effect of Magma intrusion within the Oslo Graben, and possible delamination of the lowermost crust beneath

  4. Comparison of parameters of bone profile and homocysteine in physically active and non-active postmenopausal females

    PubMed Central

    Tariq, Sundus; Lone, Khalid Parvez; Tariq, Saba

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Optimal physical activity is important in attaining a peak bone mass. Physically active women have better bone mineral density and reduce fracture risk as compared to females living a sedentary life. The objective of this study was to compare parameters of bone profile and serum homocysteine levels in physically active and non-active postmenopausal females. Methods: In this cross sectional study postmenopausal females between 50-70 years of age were recruited and divided into two groups: Physically inactive (n=133) performing light physical activity and Physically active (n=34) performing moderate physical activity. Physical activity (in metabolic equivalents), bone mineral density and serum homocysteine levels were assessed. Spearman’s rho correlation was applied to observe correlations. Two independent sample t test and Mann Whitney U test were applied to compare groups. P-value ≤ 0.05 was taken statistically significant. Results: Parameters of bone profile were significantly higher and serum homocysteine levels were significantly lower in postmenopausal females performing moderate physical activity as compared to females performing light physical activity. Homocysteine was not significantly related to T-score and Z-score in both groups. Conclusion: Improving physical activity could be beneficial for improving the quality of bone, decreasing fracture risk and decreasing serum homocysteine levels. PMID:27882033

  5. Antibiotic resistance profiling and phenotyping of Aeromonas species isolated from aquatic sources.

    PubMed

    Odeyemi, Olumide A; Ahmad, Asmat

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate antibiotics resistance pattern and phenotyping of Aeromonas species isolated from different aquatic sources in Melaka, Malaysia. A total of 53 Aeromonas species were isolated from the following sources: sediment (n = 13), bivalve (n = 10), sea cucumber (n = 16) and sea water (n = 14) and resistance to 12 antibiotics - Tetracycline (30 μg), Kanamycin (30 μg), Oxytetracycline (30 μg), Ampicillin (10 μg), Streptomycin (10 μg), Gentamicin (10 μg), Sulphamethoxazole (25 μg), Nalixidic acid (30 μg), Trimethoprim (1.25 μg), Novobiocin (5 μg), Penicilin (10 μg) and Chloramphenicol (10 μg) was tested. The results obtained from this study reveal multi drug resistance pattern among the isolates. All the isolates were completely resistant to Ampicillin, Novobiocin, Sulphamethoxazole and Trimethoprim, respectively but susceptible to Tetracycline (100%), Kanamycin (5.7%), Gentamicin (5.7%) and Oxytetracycline (24.5%). Antibiotics phenotyping of the bacteria revealed 21 different phenotypes among the isolates.

  6. Ultrasonic condition monitoring of composite structures using a low-profile acoustic source and an embedded optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, S. Gareth; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Gachagan, Anthony; James, I. R.; Philip, Wayne R.; Worden, Keith; Culshaw, Brian; McNab, Alistair; Tomlinson, Geoffrey R.; Hayward, Gordon

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a concise introduction to the developments and recent findings of a BRITE-EURAM program of work (BRE2.CT94-0990 , structurally integrated system for the comprehensive evaluation of composites). The aim of the program has been to develop an acoustic/ultrasonic based structural monitoring system for composite structures using material compatible sensors. Since plate-like structures have been investigated, it has been a requirement to utilize the propagation of ultrasonic Lamb waves through the sample materials. Preliminary investigations utilized conventional piezo-electric sources coupled to the sample via perspex wedges. The Lamb waves generated by these sources were monitored using either a fully embedded or surface mounted optical fiber sensors. The system was tested with a variety of different carbon and glass fiber reinforced panels, and the interaction of the lamb waves with different defects in these materials was monitored. Conventional signal processing allowed the location of defects such as impact damage sites, delaminations and holes. Subsequent investigations have endeavored to refine the system. This paper reports the development of advanced wavelet based signal processing techniques to enhance defect visibility, the optical connectorization of composite panels, and the development of flexible low profile acoustic sources for efficient Lamb wave generation.

  7. Metabolite profiling of Dioscorea (yam) species reveals underutilised biodiversity and renewable sources for high-value compounds.

    PubMed

    Price, Elliott J; Wilkin, Paul; Sarasan, Viswambharan; Fraser, Paul D

    2016-07-07

    Yams (Dioscorea spp.) are a multispecies crop with production in over 50 countries generating ~50 MT of edible tubers annually. The long-term storage potential of these tubers is vital for food security in developing countries. Furthermore, many species are important sources of pharmaceutical precursors. Despite these attributes as staple food crops and sources of high-value chemicals, Dioscorea spp. remain largely neglected in comparison to other staple tuber crops of tropical agricultural systems such as cassava (Manihot esculenta) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). To date, studies have focussed on the tubers or rhizomes of Dioscorea, neglecting the foliage as waste. In the present study metabolite profiling procedures, using GC-MS approaches, have been established to assess biochemical diversity across species. The robustness of the procedures was shown using material from the phylogenetic clades. The resultant data allowed separation of the genotypes into clades, species and morphological traits with a putative geographical origin. Additionally, we show the potential of foliage material as a renewable source of high-value compounds.

  8. Metabolite profiling of Dioscorea (yam) species reveals underutilised biodiversity and renewable sources for high-value compounds

    PubMed Central

    Price, Elliott J.; Wilkin, Paul; Sarasan, Viswambharan; Fraser, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Yams (Dioscorea spp.) are a multispecies crop with production in over 50 countries generating ~50 MT of edible tubers annually. The long-term storage potential of these tubers is vital for food security in developing countries. Furthermore, many species are important sources of pharmaceutical precursors. Despite these attributes as staple food crops and sources of high-value chemicals, Dioscorea spp. remain largely neglected in comparison to other staple tuber crops of tropical agricultural systems such as cassava (Manihot esculenta) and sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). To date, studies have focussed on the tubers or rhizomes of Dioscorea, neglecting the foliage as waste. In the present study metabolite profiling procedures, using GC-MS approaches, have been established to assess biochemical diversity across species. The robustness of the procedures was shown using material from the phylogenetic clades. The resultant data allowed separation of the genotypes into clades, species and morphological traits with a putative geographical origin. Additionally, we show the potential of foliage material as a renewable source of high-value compounds. PMID:27385275

  9. Continuous Water Vapor Profiles from Operational Ground-Based Active and Passive Remote Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. D.; Feltz, W. F.; Ferrare, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed site central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma, offers unique operational water vapor profiling capabilities, including active and passive remote sensors as well as traditional in situ radiosonde measurements. Remote sensing technologies include an automated Raman lidar and an automated Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI), which are able to retrieve water vapor profiles operationally through the lower troposphere throughout the diurnal cycle. Comparisons of these two water vapor remote sensing methods to each other and to radiosondes over an 8-month period are presented and discussed, highlighting the accuracy and limitations of each method. Additionally, the AERI is able to retrieve profiles of temperature while the Raman lidar is able to retrieve aerosol extinction profiles operationally. These data, coupled with hourly wind profiles from a 915-MHz wind profiler, provide complete specification of the state of the atmosphere in noncloudy skies. Several case studies illustrate the utility of these high temporal resolution measurements in the characterization of mesoscale features within a 3-day time period in which passage of a dryline, warm air advection, and cold front occurred.

  10. NESmapper: accurate prediction of leucine-rich nuclear export signals using activity-based profiles.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shunichi; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Terauchi, Ryohei; Tabata, Satoshi

    2014-09-01

    The nuclear export of proteins is regulated largely through the exportin/CRM1 pathway, which involves the specific recognition of leucine-rich nuclear export signals (NESs) in the cargo proteins, and modulates nuclear-cytoplasmic protein shuttling by antagonizing the nuclear import activity mediated by importins and the nuclear import signal (NLS). Although the prediction of NESs can help to define proteins that undergo regulated nuclear export, current methods of predicting NESs, including computational tools and consensus-sequence-based searches, have limited accuracy, especially in terms of their specificity. We found that each residue within an NES largely contributes independently and additively to the entire nuclear export activity. We created activity-based profiles of all classes of NESs with a comprehensive mutational analysis in mammalian cells. The profiles highlight a number of specific activity-affecting residues not only at the conserved hydrophobic positions but also in the linker and flanking regions. We then developed a computational tool, NESmapper, to predict NESs by using profiles that had been further optimized by training and combining the amino acid properties of the NES-flanking regions. This tool successfully reduced the considerable number of false positives, and the overall prediction accuracy was higher than that of other methods, including NESsential and Wregex. This profile-based prediction strategy is a reliable way to identify functional protein motifs. NESmapper is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/nesmapper.

  11. Automated Structure-Activity Relationship Mining: Connecting Chemical Structure to Biological Profiles.

    PubMed

    Wawer, Mathias J; Jaramillo, David E; Dančík, Vlado; Fass, Daniel M; Haggarty, Stephen J; Shamji, Alykhan F; Wagner, Bridget K; Schreiber, Stuart L; Clemons, Paul A

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of small molecules is important for developing probes and novel therapeutic agents in chemical biology and drug discovery. Increasingly, multiplexed small-molecule profiling assays allow simultaneous measurement of many biological response parameters for the same compound (e.g., expression levels for many genes or binding constants against many proteins). Although such methods promise to capture SARs with high granularity, few computational methods are available to support SAR analyses of high-dimensional compound activity profiles. Many of these methods are not generally applicable or reduce the activity space to scalar summary statistics before establishing SARs. In this article, we present a versatile computational method that automatically extracts interpretable SAR rules from high-dimensional profiling data. The rules connect chemical structural features of compounds to patterns in their biological activity profiles. We applied our method to data from novel cell-based gene-expression and imaging assays collected on more than 30,000 small molecules. Based on the rules identified for this data set, we prioritized groups of compounds for further study, including a novel set of putative histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  12. Theoretical Emission-Line Profiles of Active Galactic Nuclei and the Unified Model. I. The Face-on Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintilio, R.; Viegas, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Theoretical emission-line profiles are obtained for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taking into account the presence of an obscuring torus around the central energy source. For the sake of simplicity, the torus is represented by a cylindrical shell characterized by the inner and outer radius and the opening angle. In this paper we discuss the results with angle of sight equal to 0, i.e., for a face-on torus. Different line profiles are obtained following the torus parameters. The line profiles may show more than one peak and bumps, depending on the torus dimensions. The main parameter determining the number of peaks or bumps is the opening angle. Thus, the observed line shape may be a good indicator of the torus characteristics. As an example, the fit to the observed [O III] λ5007 emission line of NGC 4151 is presented. The model reproduces the FWHM and the asymmetrical bumps observed. Partially supported by the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP) under Grant 92/4335-9.

  13. Evaluating the transcriptomic and metabolic profile of mice exposed to source drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xuxiang; Wu, Bing; Cheng, Shupei

    2012-01-03

    Transcriptomic and metabonomic methods were used to investigate mice's responses to drinking source water (DSW) exposure. After mice were fed with DSW for 90 days, hepatic transcriptome was characterized by microarray and serum metabonome were determined by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A total of 243 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified, among which 141 genes were up-regulated and 102 genes were down-regulated. Metabonomics revealed significant changes in concentrations of creatine, pyruvate, glutamine, lysine, choline, acetate, lipids, taurine, and trimethylamine oxide. Four biological pathways were identified by Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis where both gene expression and metabolite concentrations were altered in response to DSW exposure. These results highlight the significance of combined use of transcriptomic and metabonomic approaches in evaluating potential health risk induced by DSW contaminated with various hazardous materials.

  14. A wire scanner design for electron beam profile measurements in the Linac Coherent Light Source undulator.

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J. L.; Yang, B. X.; Buffington, T. W.

    2005-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), currently under design, requires beam diagnostic instruments between the magnets in the beam undulator section. Ten wire scanners are planned as one of the primary instruments to characterize electron beam properties. The development of these wire scanners presents several design challenges due to the need for high accuracy and resolution of the wire motion (3-{micro}m tolerance, typical) and the high intensity of the beam (1 nC, 3400-A peak, over an area of 30-{micro}m rms radius at 120 Hz). In this paper, we present the technical specification and design criteria for the scanners. We will also present the mechanical design of the UHV-compatible drive and its engineering analysis. Lastly, we present the wire card design and discuss associated thermal and mechanical issues originating from the highly intense x-ray and electron beams.

  15. Specification of High Activity Gamma-Ray Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, DC.

    The report is concerned with making recommendations for the specifications of gamma ray sources, which relate to the quantity of radioactive material and the radiation emitted. Primary consideration is given to sources in teletherapy and to a lesser extent those used in industrial radiography and in irradiation units used in industry and research.…

  16. Association of physical activity and physical fitness with blood pressure profile in Gujarati Indian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Wasim A; Patel, Minal C; Singh, S K

    2011-01-01

    The current study was conducted to determine how physical activity level and physical fitness affects the blood pressure profile of Gujarati Indian adolescents so as to help in developing preventive strategies for the local population as ethnic differences exist in the aetiopathogenesis of hypertension. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 485 Gujarati Indian adolescent boys and girls of age group 16-19 years. Physical activity level was assessed using Johnson Space Center/NASA Physical Activity Rating Scale and VO2 max was used to assess the physical fitness. Body composition was assessed in terms of Body Mass Index, Fat Mass Index and Waist Circumference. Blood Pressure was measured by oscillometry. One-way ANOVA was used to study if any significant differences (P<0.05) existed in the blood pressure profile between the high, moderate and low physical activity groups. Pearson's correlation coefficient was determined to assess the relationship between VO2 max and blood pressure profile. In girls, physical activity level was not found to have a significant effect on the blood pressure profile. In boys, systolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure were found to be significantly higher in Moderate Physical Activity Group as compared to Low Physical Activity Group. PVO2 max was found to have a significant negative correlationship with SBP, DBP and MAP in girls and a significant negative correlationship with SBP, PP and MAP in boys. It could thus be concluded that a better physical fitness rather than a higher physical activity level could keep the blood pressure in check in the Gujarati Indian adolescents.

  17. Active radiometric calorimeter for absolute calibration of radioactive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stump, K.E.; DeWerd, L.A.; Rudman, D.A.; Schima, S.A.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes the design and initial noise floor measurements of a radiometric calorimeter designed to measure therapeutic medical radioactive sources. The instrument demonstrates a noise floor of approximately 2 nW. This low noise floor is achieved by using high temperature superconducting (HTS) transition edge sensor (TES) thermometers in a temperature-control feedback loop. This feedback loop will be used to provide absolute source calibrations based upon the electrical substitution method. Other unique features of the calorimeter are (a) its ability to change sources for calibration without disrupting the vacuum of the instrument, and (b) the ability to measure the emitted power of a source in addition to the total contained source power.

  18. Activity-based profiling of the proteasome pathway during hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nasheri, Neda; Ning, Zhibin; Figeys, Daniel; Yao, Shao; Goto, Natalie K; Pezacki, John Paul

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection often leads to chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The stability of the HCV proteins is controlled by ubiquitin-dependent and ubiquitin-independent proteasome pathways. Many viruses modulate proteasome function for their propagation. To examine the interrelationship between HCV and the proteasome pathways we employed a quantitative activity-based protein profiling method. Using this approach we were able to quantify the changes in the activity of several proteasome subunits and found that proteasome activity is drastically reduced by HCV replication. The results imply a link between the direct downregulation of the activity of this pathway and chronic HCV infection.

  19. Assessing microbial communities for a metabolic profile similar to activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Paixão, S M; Sàágua, M C; Tenreiro, R; Anselmo, A M

    2007-05-01

    To search for reliable testing inocula alternatives to activated sludge cultures, several model microbial consortia were compared with activated sludge populations for their functional diversity. The evaluation of the metabolic potential of these mixed inocula was performed using the Biolog EcoPlates and GN and GP MicroPlates (Biolog, Inc., Hayward, California). The community-level physiological profiles (CLPPs) obtained for model communities and activated sludge samples were analyzed by principal component analysis and hierarchic clustering methods, to evaluate the ability of Biolog plates to distinguish among the different microbial communities. The effect of different inocula preparation methodologies on the community structure was also studied. The CLPPs obtained with EcoPlates and GN MicroPlates showed that EcoPlates are suitable to screen communities with a metabolic profile similar to activated sludge. New, well-defined, standardized, and safe inocula presenting the same metabolic community profile as activated sludge were selected and can be tested as surrogate cultures in activated-sludge-based bioassays.

  20. Adolescents' physical activity in physical education, school recess, and extra-curricular sport by motivational profiles.

    PubMed

    Mayorga-Vega, Daniel; Viciana, Jesús

    2014-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the differences in adolescents´ objective physical activity levels and perceived effort in physical education, school recess, and extra-curricular organized sport by motivational profiles in physical education. A sample of 102 students 11-16 yr. old completed a self-report questionnaire assessing self-determined motivation toward physical education. Subsequently, students' objective physical activity levels (steps/min., METs, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity) and perceived effort were evaluated for each situation. Cluster analysis identified a two-cluster structure: "Moderate motivation toward physical education profile" and "High motivation toward physical education profile." Adolescents in the second cluster had higher physical activity and perceived effort values than adolescents in the first cluster, except for METs and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in extra-curricular sport. These results support the importance of physical education teachers who should promote self-determined motivation toward physical education so that students can reach the recommended physical activity levels.

  1. Generalized wave envelope analysis of sound propagation in ducts with stepped noise source profiles and variable axial impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    A finite difference formulation is presented for sound propagation in a rectangular two-dimensional duct without steady flow. Before the difference equations are formulated, the governing Helmholtz equation is first transformed to a form whose solution tends not to oscillate along the length of the duct. This transformation reduces the required number of grid points by an order of magnitude. Example solutions indicate that stepped noise source profiles have much higher attenuation than plane waves in a uniform impedance liner. Also, multiple stepped impedance liners are shown to have higher attenuation than uniform ducts if the impedances are chosen properly. For optimum noise reduction with axial variations in impedance, the numerical analysis indicates that for a plane wave input the resistance should be near zero at the entrance of a suppressor duct, while the reactance should be near the optimum value associated with the least-attenuated mode in a uniform duct.

  2. High-coverage gene expression profiling analysis of the cellulase-producing fungus Acremonium cellulolyticus cultured using different carbon sources.

    PubMed

    Hideno, Akihiro; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Yano, Shinichi; Tsukahara, Kenichiro; Murakami, Katsuji; Yunokawa, Harunobu; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2013-06-01

    The gene expression of a cellulase-producing fungus, Acremonium cellulolyticus, was investigated after culturing with three different carbon sources: glycerol, lactose, and Solka-Floc powdered cellulose (SF). High-coverage gene expression profiling (HiCEP) analysis, a method requiring no prior sequence knowledge, was used to screen genes upregulated at the early stage of cellulase production. SF was used as a strong inducer of cellulase production, lactose was used as an inducer of the expression of cellulase genes at the early stage of the culture, and glycerol was used as a negative control. Approximately 15,000 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were detected in each sample prepared from the culture grown for 16 h. Based on the expression profiles of the cultured cells, 36 fragments upregulated in both the SF and lactose cultures were selected and sequenced. The deduced gene products of 31 TDFs were likely related to biomass degradation, sugar metabolism, transcriptional regulation, protein modification and metabolism, cell wall recycling, fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis, and other functions. Quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis verified that almost all of the transcripts obtained by HiCEP analysis were upregulated in the SF and lactose cultures grown for 18 h. Some of the TDFs in the SF culture were further upregulated over the course of 72 h. The gene products from these TDFs would provide insight into improving the cellulase productivity of A. cellulolyticus.

  3. Characterisation of the local topsoil contribution to airborne particulate matter in the area of Rome (Italy). Source profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrodangelo, A.; Salzano, R.; Rantica, E.; Perrino, C.

    2013-04-01

    Elemental profiles of the local resuspended natural topsoil of Rome area have been studied. Relevant compositional differences were observed either among main geological domains and rock types of this area (volcanics, flysch, marlstone, travertine) or between the two considered dimensional fractions (50 μm and PM10 resuspended from the former). A significant enrichment in trace metals (especially Pb, Ni and Cr) has been observed in the PM10 resuspended fraction of either volcanics or sedimentary outcropping rocks; volcanics show larger trace metals enrichment than sedimentary. Profiles of this study have been compared with signatures of natural crustal dust of African origin (collected either in situ or at European receptor sites, including Rome and other sites in the Latium region) and with signatures of road dust, properly selected from literature. This comparison was performed for source apportionment goals, with the aim of improving discrimination among signatures of local and non-local natural crustal materials. Elemental ratios of major and trace elements of geochemical relevance were used for the comparative study. Mg/Ca and Ti/Ca ratios appear successful in separating, by dispersion diagram, the resuspended fraction of local Rome geological topsoil from road dust and from long-range transported dust from Africa.

  4. Effects of plasma spatial profile on conversion efficiency of laser produced plasma sources for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanein, A.; Sizyuk, V.; Sizyuk, T.; Harilal, S.

    2009-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography devices that use laser produced plasma (LPP), discharge produced plasma (DPP), and hybrid devices need to be optimized to achieve sufficient brightness with minimum debris generation to support the throughput requirements of High-Volume Manufacturing (HVM) lithography exposure tools with long lifetime. Source performance, debris mitigation, and reflector system are all critical to efficient EUV collection and component lifetime. Enhanced integrated models are continued to be developed using HEIGHTS computer package to simulate EUV emission at high power and debris generation and transport in multiple and colliding LPP. A new center for materials under extreme environments (CMUXE) is established to benchmark HEIGHTS models for various EUV related issues. The models being developed and enhanced include, for example, new ideas and parameters of multiple laser beams in different geometrical configurations and with different pre-pulses to maximize EUV production. Recent experimental and theoretical work show large influence of the hydrodynamic processes on EUV generation. The effect of plasma hydrodynamics evolution on the EUV radiation generation was analyzed for planar and spherical geometry of a tin target in LPP devices. The higher efficiency of planar target in comparison to the spherical geometry was explained with better hydrodynamic containment of the heated plasma. This is not the case if the plasma is slightly overheated. Recent experimental results of the conversion efficiency (CE) of LPP are in good agreement with HEIGHTS simulation.

  5. Application of inverse methods to contaminant source identification from aquitard diffusion profiles at Dover AFB, Delaware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Ball, William P.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents a refinement and expansion of our previously described efforts to estimate contaminant plume history from observed contaminant concentrations within a low-permeability aquitard at the site of a field-scale groundwater remediation experiment at Dover Air Force Base. At this site, a two-layer aquitard has been contaminated with tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene through diffusive mass transfer from an overlying contaminated aquifer. Measurements of contaminant concentrations in the aquitard are used, together with independently obtained information about the sorption and diffusion properties of the aquitard medium, to estimate the timewise variation of the boundary concentration at the interface between the aquitard and aquifer, thus providing evidence related to the overlying plume history. In our refined analysis, we assume the contaminant source history to be a function of time with unknown form, and we supplement our interpretations with a second coring result at a different location. The results demonstrate how "forensic" interpretations of this kind can provide useful and important information regarding the contaminant release history at sites of groundwater contamination and cleanup; however, the results also show that the forensic problem is a highly nonunique problem associated with potentially large uncertainty. Interpretation of the estimated results therefore requires careful consideration in the context of other available information.

  6. Seasonal distribution, source investigation and vertical profile of phenolic endocrine disrupting compounds in Dianchi Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Huang, Bin; Jin, Wei; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Shimin; Li, Farong; Hu, Ping; Pan, Xuejun

    2012-04-01

    Phenolic endocrine disrupting compounds, including nonylphenol-di-ethoxylate (NP2EO), nonylphenol-mono-ethoxylate (NP1EO), 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), bisphenol A (BPA), 4-cumylphenol (4-CP) and 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP), were investigated in water, surface sediment and sediment cores in Dianchi Lake to track their seasonal distributions, pollution sources and historical trends. The concentrations of NP2EO, NP1EO, 4-NP, BPA, 4-CP and 4-t-OP were up to 295.14, 448.48, 45.28, 530.33, 8.96 and 21.37 ng L(-1) in water, and up to 297.11, 809.63, 4.58, 166.87, 3.62 and 40.69 ng g(-1) dry weight in surface sediment, respectively. Except BPA in water, concentrations of all the other phenolic compounds in both of the matrices were higher in January than in July, 2011. The concentrations decreased significantly with an increase in distance from the sampling locations which were adjacent to the urban areas (Kunming City, Chenggong City and Jinning City). The pollution of phenolic EDCs came mainly from industry, agriculture and daily life. The relationships between the concentrations of target compounds and the six water quality parameters were evaluated. There were significant positive correlations between concentrations of phenolic compounds in water and in surface sediment. For sediment cores, three clearly separated maxima occurred in segments 0-5 cm (the late 2000s), 5-10 cm (the early and mid of 2000s) and 20-25 cm (the mid of 1980s), respectively. NP2EO, NP1EO and BPA were the three dominant compounds in the lake.

  7. An Asia-specific source of dechlorane plus: concentration, isomer profiles, and other related compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Gao; Yang, Meng; Qi, Hong; Sverko, Ed; Ma, Wan-Li; Li, Yi-Fan; Alaee, Mehran; Reiner, Eric J; Shen, Li

    2010-09-01

    The distribution of dechloranes, a group of chlorinated flame retardants, were investigated in air, soil, and sediment around a newly discovered Dechlorane Plus (DP) production facility in China (Anpon). To date, the only known DP manufacturing plant is located in Niagara Falls, NY (OxyChem). Dechloranes including DP, Dechlorane (Mirex), and the recently discovered Dechlorane 602 (Dec 602) were detected in air, soil, and sediment, while Dechlorane 603 and Dechlorane 604 were below detection limit in all matrices. DP air concentrations near the facility ranged from 7737 to 26 734 pg m(-3), the greatest reported thus far. Soil concentrations in the same area for DP, Dechlorane, and Dec 602 were 1490+/-3580 ng g(-1), 81.6+/-96.5 ng g(-1), and 7.24+/-13.2 ng g(-1) dry weight, respectively. Interestingly, lower concentrations of DP (4.93+/-4.34 ng g(-1)), Dechlorane (30.2+/-19.9 ng g(-1)), and Dec 602 (2.14+/-2.23 ng g(-1)) were found in sediment from a nearby canal. Spatial trends of Dechlorane and Dec 602 in soil were similar to DP, implying that the DP manufacturing plant may also be a source of these other flame retardants. DP soil concentrations surrounding the facility decreased by an order of magnitude within 7.5 km. The syn-DP fractional abundance (fsyn) value (0.40) for the commercial DP product manufactured at Anpon was slightly higher than that (0.20-0.36) produced by OxyChem. The fsyn value in most air samples was largely similar to the Chinese commercial DP mixture, while most soil and sediment abundances were lower, suggesting a stereoselective depletion of syn-DP.

  8. Structural and biochemical studies of the distinct activity profiles of Rai1 enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Vivien Ya-Fan; Jiao, Xinfu; Kiledjian, Megerditch; Tong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies showed that Rai1 and its homologs are a crucial component of the mRNA 5′-end capping quality control mechanism. They can possess RNA 5′-end pyrophosphohydrolase (PPH), decapping, and 5′-3′ exonuclease (toward 5′ monophosphate RNA) activities, which help to degrade mRNAs with incomplete 5′-end capping. A single active site in the enzyme supports these apparently distinct activities. However, each Rai1 protein studied so far has a unique set of activities, and the molecular basis for these differences are not known. Here, we have characterized the highly diverse activity profiles of Rai1 homologs from a collection of fungal organisms and identified a new activity for these enzymes, 5′-end triphosphonucleotide hydrolase (TPH) instead of PPH activity. Crystal structures of two of these enzymes bound to RNA oligonucleotides reveal differences in the RNA binding modes. Structure-based mutations of these enzymes, changing residues that contact the RNA but are poorly conserved, have substantial effects on their activity, providing a framework to begin to understand the molecular basis for the different activity profiles. PMID:26101253

  9. Solubilization of gliadins for use as a source of nitrogen in the selection of bacteria with gliadinase activity.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sieiro, Patricia; Redruello, Begoña; Ladero, Victor; Cañedo, Elena; Martin, M Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-02-01

    For patients with celiac disease, gliadin detoxification via the use of gliadinases may provide an alternative to a gluten-free diet. A culture medium, in which gliadins were the sole source of nitrogen, was developed for screening for microorganisms with gliadinase activity. The problem of gliadin insolubility was solved by mild acid treatment, which renders an acid-hydrolysed gliadin/peptide mixture (AHG). This medium provided a sensitive and reliable means of detecting proteases, compared to the classical spectrophotometric method involving azocasein. When a sample of fermented wheat (a source of bacteria) was plated on an AHG-based culture medium, strains with gliadinase activity were isolated. These strains' gliadinase profiles were determined using an AHG-based substrate in zymographic analyses.

  10. Volcanic eruption source parameters from active and passive microwave sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Cimini, Domenico; Mereu, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known, in the volcanology community, that precise information of the source parameters characterising an eruption are of predominant interest for the initialization of the Volcanic Transport and Dispersion Models (VTDM). Source parameters of main interest would be the top altitude of the volcanic plume, the flux of the mass ejected at the emission source, which is strictly related to the cloud top altitude, the distribution of volcanic mass concentration along the vertical column as well as the duration of the eruption and the erupted volume. Usually, the combination of a-posteriori field and numerical studies allow constraining the eruption source parameters for a given volcanic event thus making possible the forecast of ash dispersion and deposition from future volcanic eruptions. So far, remote sensors working at visible and infrared channels (cameras and radiometers) have been mainly used to detect, track and provide estimates of the concentration content and the prevailing size of the particles propagating within the ash clouds up to several thousand of kilometres far from the source as well as track back, a-posteriori, the accuracy of the VATDM outputs thus testing the initial choice made for the source parameters. Acoustic wave (infrasound) and microwave fixed scan radar (voldorad) were also used to infer source parameters. In this work we want to put our attention on the role of sensors operating at microwave wavelengths as complementary tools for the real time estimations of source parameters. Microwaves can benefit of the operability during night and day and a relatively negligible sensitivity to the presence of clouds (non precipitating weather clouds) at the cost of a limited coverage and larger spatial resolution when compared with infrared sensors. Thanks to the aforementioned advantages, the products from microwaves sensors are expected to be sensible mostly to the whole path traversed along the tephra cloud making microwaves particularly

  11. One reporter for in-cell activity profiling of majority of protein kinase oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Gudernova, Iva; Foldynova-Trantirkova, Silvie; Ghannamova, Barbora El; Fafilek, Bohumil; Varecha, Miroslav; Balek, Lukas; Hruba, Eva; Jonatova, Lucie; Jelinkova, Iva; Kunova Bosakova, Michaela; Trantirek, Lukas; Mayer, Jiri; Krejci, Pavel

    2017-02-15

    In-cell profiling enables the evaluation of receptor tyrosine activity in a complex environment of regulatory networks that affect signal initiation, propagation and feedback. We used FGF-receptor signaling to identify EGR1 as a locus that strongly responds to the activation of a majority of the recognized protein kinase oncogenes, including 30 receptor tyrosine kinases and 154 of their disease-associated mutants. The EGR1 promoter was engineered to enhance trans-activation capacity and optimized for simple screening assays with luciferase or fluorescent reporters. The efficacy of the developed, fully synthetic reporters was demonstrated by the identification of novel targets for two clinically used tyrosine kinase inhibitors, nilotinib and osimertinib. A universal reporter system for in-cell protein kinase profiling will facilitate repurposing of existing anti-cancer drugs and identification of novel inhibitors in high-throughput screening studies.

  12. One reporter for in-cell activity profiling of majority of protein kinase oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Gudernova, Iva; Foldynova-Trantirkova, Silvie; Ghannamova, Barbora El; Fafilek, Bohumil; Varecha, Miroslav; Balek, Lukas; Hruba, Eva; Jonatova, Lucie; Jelinkova, Iva; Bosakova, Michaela Kunova; Trantirek, Lukas; Mayer, Jiri; Krejci, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    In-cell profiling enables the evaluation of receptor tyrosine activity in a complex environment of regulatory networks that affect signal initiation, propagation and feedback. We used FGF-receptor signaling to identify EGR1 as a locus that strongly responds to the activation of a majority of the recognized protein kinase oncogenes, including 30 receptor tyrosine kinases and 154 of their disease-associated mutants. The EGR1 promoter was engineered to enhance trans-activation capacity and optimized for simple screening assays with luciferase or fluorescent reporters. The efficacy of the developed, fully synthetic reporters was demonstrated by the identification of novel targets for two clinically used tyrosine kinase inhibitors, nilotinib and osimertinib. A universal reporter system for in-cell protein kinase profiling will facilitate repurposing of existing anti-cancer drugs and identification of novel inhibitors in high-throughput screening studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21536.001 PMID:28199182

  13. Inducing in situ, nonlinear soil response applying an active source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, P.A.; Bodin, P.; Gomberg, J.; Pearce, F.; Lawrence, Z.; Menq, F.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    [1] It is well known that soil sites have a profound effect on ground motion during large earthquakes. The complex structure of soil deposits and the highly nonlinear constitutive behavior of soils largely control nonlinear site response at soil sites. Measurements of nonlinear soil response under natural conditions are critical to advancing our understanding of soil behavior during earthquakes. Many factors limit the use of earthquake observations to estimate nonlinear site response such that quantitative characterization of nonlinear behavior relies almost exclusively on laboratory experiments and modeling of wave propagation. Here we introduce a new method for in situ characterization of the nonlinear behavior of a natural soil formation using measurements obtained immediately adjacent to a large vibrator source. To our knowledge, we are the first group to propose and test such an approach. Employing a large, surface vibrator as a source, we measure the nonlinear behavior of the soil by incrementally increasing the source amplitude over a range of frequencies and monitoring changes in the output spectra. We apply a homodyne algorithm for measuring spectral amplitudes, which provides robust signal-to-noise ratios at the frequencies of interest. Spectral ratios are computed between the receivers and the source as well as receiver pairs located in an array adjacent to the source, providing the means to separate source and near-source nonlinearity from pervasive nonlinearity in the soil column. We find clear evidence of nonlinearity in significant decreases in the frequency of peak spectral ratios, corresponding to material softening with amplitude, observed across the array as the source amplitude is increased. The observed peak shifts are consistent with laboratory measurements of soil nonlinearity. Our results provide constraints for future numerical modeling studies of strong ground motion during earthquakes.

  14. Activity Profile and Between-Match Variation in Elite Male Field Hockey.

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Caroline D; Edwards, Phillip L

    2017-03-01

    Sunderland, CD and Edwards, PL. Activity profile and between-match variation in elite male field hockey. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 758-764, 2017-This study aimed to (a) provide a position-specific activity profile for elite male hockey players, (b) determine if the activity profile was altered by the introduction of the "self-pass" rule, and (c) provide information relating to match-to-match variability in elite male field hockey. The activity of 28 elite male field hockey players was analyzed over 2 seasons totaling 395 player-match analyses using Global Positioning Satellite technology. Total distance, high-speed running (>15.5 km·h), sprinting (>20 km·h), and mean speed were recorded. Players were categorized into 4 positions: fullback (FB), halfback (HB), midfield (M), and forward (F). Data were analyzed using a 2-way analysis of variance (season, position) and between-match coefficients of variation (CV). The time played differs with position (FB: 65.5 ± 5.3, HB: 49.5 ± 11.5, M: 45.9 ± 7.1, F: 39.5 ± 5.4 minutes; p < 0.0005) and thus affected the activity profile. Total distance covered was greater for fullbacks (FB: 8,001 ± 447, HB: 6,435 ± 1,399, M: 6,415 ± 908, F: 5,844 ± 762 m, p < 0.001), and mean speed and percentage time spent high-speed running and sprinting were greater for forwards than all other positions (HSR: FB: 6.8 ± 1.0, HB: 8.8 ± 1.3, M: 10.7 ± 1.2, F: 13.5 ± 1.8%, p < 0.001). The activity profile did not differ with the introduction of the self-pass. Match-to-match variability (CV) ranged from 5.0% to 22.0% for total and sprint distance, respectively. This is the first study to present an activity profile of elite men's field hockey and its associated variability and demonstrates that each position is unique, and therefore, training and recovery should be position specific.

  15. Double-Peaked Profiles: Ubiquitous Signatures of Disks in the Broad Emission Lines of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Schimoia, J. S.; Peterson, B. M.; Elvis, M.; Denney, K. D.; Eracleous, M.; Nemmen, R. S.

    2017-02-01

    Broad (∼10,000 km s‑1), double-peaked emission-line profiles of Balmer lines emitted by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are thought to originate in the outer parts of an accretion disk surrounding a nuclear supermassive black hole (SMBH), at ∼1000 gravitational radii, and are most frequently observed in the nuclear spectra of low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) and radio galaxies. In the present paper we argue that broad double-peaked profiles are present also in the spectra of other type 1 AGN, such as Seyfert 1 galaxies, suggesting that the inner part of the broad-line region (BLR) is also the outer part of the accretion disk. We use the Palomar spectral survey of nearby galaxies to show that the only difference between Seyfert 1 BLR line profiles and “bona fide” double-peakers is that, in most cases, besides a disk component, we need an additional Gaussian component attributed to nondisk clouds. The recognition that the inner and most variable part of the BLR has a disk geometry suggests that the factor f in the expression to obtain the SMBH mass in type 1 AGN, {M}{BH}=f({R}{BLR}{{Δ }}{V}2/G), is f=1/{\\sin }2i for the disk-dominated sources. Our median i = 27° implies f = 4.5, very close to the most recent value of f = 4.3 ± 1.05, obtained from independent studies. We derive a relation between f and the FWHM of the broad profile that may help to reduce the uncertainties in the SMBH mass determinations of AGN.

  16. Multi-level continuous active source seismic monitoring (ML-CASSM): Application to shallow hydrofracture monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Daley, T. M.; Butler-Veytia, B.; Peterson, J.; Gasperikova, E.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2010-12-01

    Induced subsurface processes occur over a wide variety of time scales ranging from seconds (e.g. fracture initiation) to days (e.g. unsteady multiphase flow) and weeks (e.g. induced mineral precipitation). Active source seismic monitoring has the potential to dynamically characterize such alterations and allow estimation of spatially localized rates. However, even optimal timelapse seismic surveys have limited temporal resolution due to both the time required to acquire a survey and the cost of continuous field deployment of instruments and personnel. Traditional timelapse surveys are also limited by experimental repeatability due to a variety of factors including geometry replication and near-surface conditions. Recent research has demonstrated the value of semi-permanently deployed seismic systems with fixed sources and receivers for use in monitoring a variety of processes including near-surface stress changes (Silver et.al. 2007), subsurface movement of supercritical CO2 (Daley et.al. 2007), and preseismic velocity changes in fault regions (Niu et. al. 2008). This strategy, referred to as continuous active source seismic monitoring (CASSM), allows both precise quantification of traveltime changes on the order of 1.1 x 10-7 s and temporal sampling on the order of minutes. However, as previously deployed, CASSM often sacrifices spatial resolution for temporal resolution with previous experiments including only a single source level. We present results from the first deployment of CASSM with a large number of source levels under automated control. Our system is capable of autonomously acquiring full tomographic datasets (10 sources, 72 receivers) in 3 minutes without human intervention, thus allowing active source seismic imaging (rather than monitoring) of processes with short durations. Because no sources or receivers are moved in the acquisition process, signal repeatability is excellent and subtle waveform changes can be interpreted with increased confidence

  17. The PM10 fraction of road dust in the UK and India: Characterization, source profiles and oxidative potential.

    PubMed

    Pant, Pallavi; Baker, Stephen J; Shukla, Anuradha; Maikawa, Caitlin; Godri Pollitt, Krystal J; Harrison, Roy M

    2015-10-15

    Most studies of road dust composition have sampled a very wide range of particle sizes, but from the perspective of respiratory exposure to resuspended dusts, it is the PM10 fraction which is of most importance. The PM10 fraction of road dust samples was collected at two sites in Birmingham, UK (major highway and road tunnel) and one site in New Delhi, India. Dust loadings were found to be much higher for New Delhi compared to Birmingham, while concentrations of several species were much higher in the case of Birmingham. Detailed chemical source profiles were prepared for both cities and previously generated empirical factors for source attribution to brake wear, tyre wear, and crustal dust were successfully applied to the UK sites. However, 100% of the mass for the Indian site could not be accounted for using these factors. This study highlights the need for generation of local empirical estimation factors for non-exhaust vehicle emissions. A limited number of bulk road dust and brake pad samples were also characterized. Oxidative potential (OP) was also determined for a limited number of PM10 and bulk road dust samples, and Cu was found to be a factor significantly associated with OP in PM10 and bulk road dust.

  18. Calorimetric method for determination of {sup 51}Cr neutrino source activity

    SciTech Connect

    Veretenkin, E. P. Gavrin, V. N.; Danshin, S. N.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kozlova, Yu. P.; Mirmov, I. N.

    2015-12-15

    Experimental study of nonstandard neutrino properties using high-intensity artificial neutrino sources requires the activity of the sources to be determined with high accuracy. In the BEST project, a calorimetric system for measurement of the activity of high-intensity (a few MCi) neutrino sources based on {sup 51}Cr with an accuracy of 0.5–1% is created. In the paper, the main factors affecting the accuracy of determining the neutrino source activity are discussed. The calorimetric system design and the calibration results using a thermal simulator of the source are presented.

  19. Inflammatory chemokines and their receptors in human visceral leishmaniasis: Gene expression profile in peripheral blood, splenic cellular sources and their impact on trafficking of inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Sundar, Shyam

    2017-02-18

    Chemokines play an important role in determining cellular composition at inflammatory sites, and as such, influence disease outcome. In this study, we investigated the expression profile and splenic cellular source of various inflammatory chemokines and their receptors in human visceral leishmaniasis (VL). The expression of chemokines or their receptors was measured at the gene and protein level by employing real time qPCR and a cytometric bead array assay, respectively. In addition, the cellular source of chemokines and their receptors in the spleen was identified employing gene expression analyses in sequentially selected cell subsets. We identified elevated expression of CXCL10, CXCL9, CXCL8, and decreased CCL2 from VL patients. Further, we found reduced expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR1, CXCR2, CXCR3 and CCR2, but increased expression of CCR7 on VL PBMC, compared to endemic healthy controls. Additionally, splenic monocytes were found to be the major source of CXCL10, CXCL9 and CCR2, whereas T cells were the main source of CXCR3 and CCR7. We also report a strong association between plasma IFN-γ and CXCL-10, CXCL-9 levels. Enhanced parasite burden positively correlates with increased expression of CXCL10, CXCL9, IFN-γ and IL-10. Overall our result indicates that VL patients have an elevated inflammatory chemokine milieu which correlated with disease severity. However, expression of their chemokine receptors was significantly impaired, which may have contributed to reduced frequencies of blood monocytes and neutrophils in peripheral blood. In contrast, enhanced expression of CCR7 was associated with increased numbers of activated T cells in circulation. These findings highlight the importance of chemokines for recruitment of various cell populations in VL, and the knowledge gained may help in global understandings of the complex interaction between chemokines and pathological processes, and therefore will contribute towards the design of novel

  20. Synergistic activity profile of griffithsin in combination with tenofovir, maraviroc and enfuvirtide against HIV-1 clade C

    SciTech Connect

    Ferir, Geoffrey; Palmer, Kenneth E.; Schols, Dominique

    2011-09-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT) is possibly the most potent anti-HIV peptide found in natural sources. Due to its potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activity and unique safety profile it has great potential as topical microbicide component. Here, we evaluated various combinations of GRFT against HIV-1 clade B and clade C isolates in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in CD4{sup +} MT-4 cells. In all combinations tested, GRFT showed synergistic activity profile with tenofovir, maraviroc and enfuvirtide based on the median effect principle with combination indices (CI) varying between 0.34 and 0.79 at the calculated EC{sub 95} level. Furthermore, the different glycosylation patterns on the viral envelope of clade B and clade C gp120 had no observable effect on the synergistic interactions. Overall, we can conclude that the evaluated two-drug combination increases their antiviral potency and supports further clinical investigations in pre-exposure prophylaxis for GRFT combinations in the context of HIV-1 clade C infection.

  1. Gene expression profile of activated microglia under conditions associated with dopamine neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2006-03-01

    Microglia are the resident antigen-presenting cells within the central nervous system (CNS), and they serve immune-like functions in protecting the brain against injury and invading pathogens. By contrast, activated microglia can secrete numerous reactants that damage neurons. The pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases has been associated with microglial activation, but the signaling pathways that program a neuronally protective or destructive phenotype in microglia are not known. To increase the understanding of microglial activation, microarray analysis was used to profile the transcriptome of BV-2 microglial cells after activation. Microglia were activated by lipopolysaccharide, the HIV neurotoxic protein TAT, and dopamine quinone, each of which has been linked to dopamine neuronal damage. We identified 210 of 9882 genes whose expression was differentially regulated by all activators (116 increased and 94 decreased in expression). Gene ontology analysis assigned up-regulated genes to a number of specific biological processes and molecular functions, including immune response, inflammation, and cytokine/chemokine activity. Genes down-regulated in expression contribute to conditions that are permissive of microglial migration, lowered adhesion to matrix, lessened phagocytosis, and reduction in receptors that oppose chemotaxis and inflammation. These results elaborate a broad profile of microglial genes whose expression is altered by conditions associated with both neurodegenerative diseases and microglial activation.

  2. Information-Driven Active Audio-Visual Source Localization.

    PubMed

    Schult, Niclas; Reineking, Thomas; Kluss, Thorsten; Zetzsche, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We present a system for sensorimotor audio-visual source localization on a mobile robot. We utilize a particle filter for the combination of audio-visual information and for the temporal integration of consecutive measurements. Although the system only measures the current direction of the source, the position of the source can be estimated because the robot is able to move and can therefore obtain measurements from different directions. These actions by the robot successively reduce uncertainty about the source's position. An information gain mechanism is used for selecting the most informative actions in order to minimize the number of actions required to achieve accurate and precise position estimates in azimuth and distance. We show that this mechanism is an efficient solution to the action selection problem for source localization, and that it is able to produce precise position estimates despite simplified unisensory preprocessing. Because of the robot's mobility, this approach is suitable for use in complex and cluttered environments. We present qualitative and quantitative results of the system's performance and discuss possible areas of application.

  3. Detrital zircon LASS-ICP-MS petrochronologic depth profiling for determining source-to-sink relationships in the Central Alps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anfinson, O. A.; Stockli, D. F.; Stockli, L.; Malusa', M. G.

    2015-12-01

    Laser Ablation-Split Stream Depth Profiling (LASS-DP) ICP-MS petrochronology of detrital zircon (DZ) from Oligocene-Miocene strata in the Molasse and Northern Apennines showcases, in the light of the well-constrained depositional history of these successions, the advantages of this novel approach compared to traditional single and split-stream detrital zircon techniques in elucidating sediment provenance and source-to-sink relationships. While DZ U-Pb data from Oligocene-Miocene strata deposited in both the Molasse and Northern Apennines document shifts in the relative abundance of Cadomian, Caledonian, Variscan and Alpine aged detrital zircon, the source regions remain ambiguous due to non-diagnostic crystallization ages, leading to minimal zircon age variability. In contrast, DZ LASS-DP-ICP-MS petrochronology allows for the simultaneous recovery of multiple U-Pb ages and corresponding geochemical data, and thus dramatically increases our ability to resolve the petrogenetic history of individual DZ grains. The technique shows the immense power of determining the growth history of single DZ grains (rim to core relationships) and identifying/resolving the presence and age of thin magmatic/metamorphic overgrowths. Rupelian turbidites in the Apenninic foredeep exhibit a DZ population with consistent <5 mm Cretaceous metamorphic overgrowths that would likely not be resolved as a coherent population in polished sections. LASS-DP ICP-MS analysis of Caledonian and Variscan detrital zircon populations from the Molasse Basin show a distinct shift in rim-core age pairs in individual zircons that point to the erosion of different source during progressive Alpine unroofing. The geochemical data confirm a crustally derived magmatic source for the majority of the detrital zircon grains within the basin. While this technique, in comparison to traditional polished mounts, might underrepresent older core ages, this slight bias is clearly offset by the better definition and

  4. [Profiles of the utilization of 20 amino acids as the only source of nitrogen and carbon in bacteria of the genera Klebsiella, Enterobacter, Serratia, Escherichia].

    PubMed

    Sivolodskiĭ, E P

    2005-01-01

    The profiles of the utilization of 20 protein amino acids in 118 Klebsiella pneumoniae sub- sp. pneumoniae, K. oxytoca, K. planticola, K. mobilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marscescens, S. liquefaciens, Escherichia coli strains isolated from clinical material were studied. The utilization of amino acids was determined on minimal saline agar containing amino acid as the only source of nitrogen and carbon; the results were evaluated after 72-hour incubation at 37 degrees C. 17 profiles of amino-acid utilization were thus determined, most of them genus-specific in enterobacteria: Klebsiella (profiles No. 1--6, 9, 10), Enterobacter (No. 11--13), Serratia (No. 14--16), Escherichia (No. 17). The full coincidence of amino-acid utilization profiles in bacteria of K. mobilis (No. 1, 6) and K. pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae with out of such profiles in bacteria of the genera Enterobacter, Serratia, Escherichia was established, which confirmed that K. mobilis (formerly Enterobacter aerogenes) belonged to the genus Klebsiella.

  5. Socially adjusted synchrony in the activity profiles of common marmosets in light-dark conditions.

    PubMed

    Melo, Paula; Gonçalves, Bruno; Menezes, Alexandre; Azevedo, Carolina

    2013-07-01

    Synchronized state of activity and rest might be attained by mechanisms of entrainment and masking. Most zeitgebers not only act to entrain but also to mask circadian rhythms. Although the light-dark (LD) cycle is the main zeitgeber of circadian rhythms in marmosets, social cues can act as weaker zeitgebers. Evidence on the effects of social entrainment in marmosets has been collected in isolated animals or in pairs where activity is not individually recorded. To characterize the synchronization between the daily activity profiles of individuals in groups under LD conditions, the motor activity of animals from five groups was continuously monitored using actiwatches for 15 days during the 5th, 8th, and 11th months of life of juveniles. Families consisting of twins (4 ♂♀/1 ♂♂) and their parents were maintained under controlled lighting (LD 12:12 h), temperature, and humidity conditions. Synchronization was evaluated through the synchrony between the circadian activity profiles obtained from the Pearson correlation index between possible pairs of activity profiles in the light and dark phases. We also calculated the phase-angle differences between the activity onset of one animal in relation to the activity onset of each animal in the group (ψ(on)). A similar procedure was performed for activity offset (ψ(off)). By visual analysis, the correlation between the activity profiles of individuals within each family was stronger than that of individuals from different families. A mixed-model analysis showed that within the group, the correlation was stronger between twins than between twins and their parents in all families, except for the family in which both juveniles were males. Because a twin is an important social partner for juveniles, a sibling is likely to have a stronger influence on its twin's activity rhythm than other family members. Considering only the light phase, the second strongest correlation was observed between the activity profiles of the

  6. Variation in phenolic profile, β-carotene and flavonoid contents, biological activities of two Tagetes species from Pakistani flora.

    PubMed

    Ayub, Muhammad Adnan; Hussain, Abdullah Ijaz; Hanif, Muhammad Asif; Chatha, Shahzad Ali Shahid; Kamal, Ghulam Mustafa; Shahid, Muhammad; Janneh, Omar

    2017-03-16

    The objective of present study was to evaluate the variation in phenolic profile, β-carotene, flavonoid contents, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties of Tagetes eracta and Tagetes patula (T. erecta and T. patula) through different in vitro assays.,Antioxidant activity was determined through 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging and inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation assays and antibacterial and antifungal activities studied using the disc diffusion and resazurin microtiter-plate assays against bacterial and fungal strains. Moreover, Total phenolics (TP), total carotenoids (TC) and total flavonoids (TF) were also determined. Highest (TP 35.8 mg GAE/g) and TF (16.9 mg CE/g) contents were found in methanolic extract of T. patula. T. erecta extract showed higher TC contents (6.45 mg/g) than T. patula extract (6.32 mg/g). T. erecta exhibited the highest DPPH radical-scavenging activity (IC50 ) (5.73 μg/mL) and inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation (80.1%). RP-HPLC revealed the presence of caffeic acid, sinapic acid and ferulic acid in Tagetes extracts, m-coumaric acid in T. erecta whereas chlorogenic acid in T. patula extract only. Both extracts possessed promising antimicrobial activity compared to the ciprofloxacin and flumequine (+ve controls) against Bacillus subtilis and Alternaria alternate. Both extract were rich source of polyphenols exhibiting excellent biological activities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Ubiquitin-Based Probes Prepared by Total Synthesis To Profile the Activity of Deubiquitinating Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Annemieke; Merkx, Remco; Berlin, Ilana; Rodenko, Boris; Wijdeven, Ruud H M; El Atmioui, Dris; Yalçin, Zeliha; Robson, Craig N; Neefjes, Jacques J; Ovaa, Huib

    2012-01-01

    Epitope-tagged active-site-directed probes are widely used to visualize the activity of deubiquitinases (DUBs) in cell extracts, to investigate the specificity and potency of small-molecule DUB inhibitors, and to isolate and identify DUBs by mass spectrometry. With DUBs arising as novel potential drug targets, probes are required that can be produced in sufficient amounts and to meet the specific needs of a given experiment. The established method for the generation of DUB probes makes use of labor-intensive intein-based methods that have inherent limitations concerning the incorporation of unnatural amino acids and the amount of material that can be obtained. Here, we describe the total chemical synthesis of active-site-directed probes and their application to activity-based profiling and identification of functional DUBs. This synthetic methodology allowed the easy incorporation of desired tags for specific applications, for example, fluorescent reporters, handles for immunoprecipitation or affinity pull-down, and cleavable linkers. Additionally, the synthetic method can be scaled up to provide significant amounts of probe. Fluorescent ubiquitin probes allowed faster, in-gel detection of active DUBs, as compared to (immuno)blotting procedures. A biotinylated probe holding a photocleavable linker enabled the affinity pull-down and subsequent mild, photorelease of DUBs. Also, DUB activity levels were monitored in response to overexpression or knockdown, and to inhibition by small molecules. Furthermore, fluorescent probes revealed differential DUB activity profiles in a panel of lung and prostate cancer cells. PMID:23011887

  8. Issues in Humanoid Audition and Sound Source Localization by Active Audition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadai, Kazuhiro; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Kitano, Hiroaki

    In this paper, we present an active audition system which is implemented on the humanoid robot "SIG the humanoid". The audition system for highly intelligent humanoids localizes sound sources and recognizes auditory events in the auditory scene. Active audition reported in this paper enables SIG to track sources by integrating audition, vision, and motor movements. Given the multiple sound sources in the auditory scene, SIG actively moves its head to improve localization by aligning microphones orthogonal to the sound source and by capturing the possible sound sources by vision. However, such an active head movement inevitably creates motor noises.The system adaptively cancels motor noises using motor control signals and the cover acoustics. The experimental result demonstrates that active audition by integration of audition, vision, and motor control attains sound source tracking in variety of conditions.onditions.

  9. Preliminary Results from the iMUSH Active Source Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, Alan; Kiser, Eric; Palomeras, Imma; Zelt, Colin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steve; Harder, Steven; Creagar, Kenneth; Vidale, John; Abers, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    iMUSH (imaging Magma Under Saint Helens) is a US NSF sponsored multi-disciplinary investigation of Mount Saint Helens (MSH), currently the most active volcano in the Cascades arc in the northwestern United States. The project consists of active and passive seismic experiments, extensive magnetotelluric sounding, and geological/geochemical studies involving scientists at 7 institutions in the U.S. and Europe. The long-term goal of the seismic project is to combine analysis of the active source data with that of data from the 70 element broadband seismograph operating from summer 2014 until 2016. Combining seismic and MT analyses with other data, we hope to image the MSH volcanic plumbing system from the surface to the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Here we describe preliminary results of the iMUSH active source seismic experiment, conducted in July and August 2014. The active source experiment consisted of twenty-three 454 or 908 kg weight shots recorded by ~3500 seismographs deployed at ~6,000 locations. Of these instruments, ~900 Nodal Seismic instruments were deployed continuously for two weeks in an areal array within 10 km of the MSH summit. 2,500 PASSCAL Texan instruments were deployed twice for five days in 3 areal arrays and 2 dense orthogonal linear arrays that extended from MSH to distances > 80 km. Overall the data quality from the shots is excellent. The seismograph arrays also recorded dozens of micro-earthquakes beneath the MSH summit and along the MSH seismic zone, and numerous other local and regional earthquakes. In addition, at least one low frequency event beneath MSH was recorded during the experiment. At this point we have begun various types of analysis of the data set: We have determined an average 1D Vp structure from stacking short-term/long-term average ratios, we have determined the 2-D Vp structure from ray-trace inversions along the two orthogonal profiles (in the NW-SE and NE-SW directions), and we have made low-fold CMP stacks of the

  10. New activity in the Dorado gamma-ray burst source

    SciTech Connect

    Golenetskii, S.V.; Mazets, E.P.; Aptekar, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    On 1981 December 1 and 1982 January 2 the Cone detectors aboard the Venera 13 and Venera 14 probes recorded ..gamma..-ray transients generated by the same source in Dorado as the notable sequence of events observed 1979 March 5, 6 and April 4, 24.

  11. Oxide thickness-dependent effects of source doping profile on the performance of single- and double-gate tunnel field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Nguyen Dang; Shih, Chun-Hsing

    2017-02-01

    Operated by the band-to-band tunneling at the source-channel junction, the source engineering has been considered as an efficient approach to enhance the performance of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). In this paper, we report a new feature that the effects of source doping profile on the performance of single- and double-gate germanium TFETs depend on equivalent oxide thickness (EOT). Based on the numerical simulations, it is shown that the effect of source concentration on the on-current is stronger with decreasing the EOT, particularly in the double-gate configuration due to the higher gate control capability. Importantly, when the EOT is decreased below a certain value, abrupt source-channel junctions are not only unnecessary, but gradual source doping profiles even improve the performance of TFETs because of the increase in vertical tunneling generation. With the continuous trend of scaling EOT, the oxide thickness-dependent effects of source doping profile should be properly considered in designing TFET devices.

  12. Vertical profile, contamination assessment, and source apportionment of heavy metals in sediment cores of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Feng; Ju, Yun-Ru; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2016-12-01

    Six sediment cores collected at the Kaohsiung Harbor of Taiwan were analyzed to evaluate their vertical profiles, enrichments, accumulations, and source apportionments of heavy metals. This was performed to investigate any potential ecological risks posed by heavy metals. Results indicated that the mean heavy metal content (mg kg(-1)) in the six sediment cores was as follows: Hg (0.4-6.4), Cd (<0.05-2.4), Cr (18-820), Cu (16-760), Pb (31-140), and Zn (76-1900). The patterns of heavy metal content in the sediment cores differed substantially among the four river mouths. However, the vertical profiles of metals were relatively stable, indicating that wastewater has the constant characteristics and has been discharged into the rivers for a long period of time. Results of pollution assessment of enrichment factor, geo-accumulation index, and pollution load index revealed that river mouths experience severe enrichment, strong accumulation, and high contamination from the primary heavy metals. It was not consistent in the assessment results of mean effect range median quotient, potential ecological risk index, and total toxic unit method. Potential ecological risks caused by Hg in the sediments at Canon River and Love River mouths on aquatic organisms were extremely high. The estimates derived from the receptor modeling of multiple linear regression of the absolute principal component scores indicated that the contributions of the composite heavy metals derived from the Canon River and the Love River on the potential toxicity and risks to the water environment of Kaohsiung Harbor were highest, followed by those derived from Salt River and Jen-Gen River.

  13. The systematic profiling of false identity documents: method validation and performance evaluation using seizures known to originate from common and different sources.

    PubMed

    Baechler, Simon; Terrasse, Vincent; Pujol, Jean-Philippe; Fritz, Thibaud; Ribaux, Olivier; Margot, Pierre

    2013-10-10

    False identity documents constitute a potential powerful source of forensic intelligence because they are essential elements of transnational crime and provide cover for organized crime. In previous work, a systematic profiling method using false documents' visual features has been built within a forensic intelligence model. In the current study, the comparison process and metrics lying at the heart of this profiling method are described and evaluated. This evaluation takes advantage of 347 false identity documents of four different types seized in two countries whose sources were known to be common or different (following police investigations and dismantling of counterfeit factories). Intra-source and inter-sources variations were evaluated through the computation of more than 7500 similarity scores. The profiling method could thus be validated and its performance assessed using two complementary approaches to measuring type I and type II error rates: a binary classification and the computation of likelihood ratios. Very low error rates were measured across the four document types, demonstrating the validity and robustness of the method to link documents to a common source or to differentiate them. These results pave the way for an operational implementation of a systematic profiling process integrated in a developed forensic intelligence model.

  14. Caffeine as an indicator of estrogenic activity in source water.

    PubMed

    Montagner, C C; Umbuzeiro, G A; Pasquini, C; Jardim, W F

    2014-08-01

    Caffeine has already been used as an indicator of anthropogenic impacts, especially the ones related to the disposal of sewage in water bodies. In this work, the presence of caffeine has been correlated with the estrogenic activity of water samples measured using the BLYES assay. After testing 96 surface water samples, it was concluded that caffeine can be used to prioritize samples to be tested for estrogenic activity in water quality programs evaluating emerging contaminants with endocrine disruptor activity.

  15. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) activities related to sources of ground-water contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Black-Coleman, W.

    1987-02-01

    The report contains a listing of EPA programs and activities, as of October 1986, that address 33 sources of potential ground-water contamination. The information on each activity is presented in a matrix format that is organized by type of contamination source. The following information is presented for each program and activity listed: title, lead office, contact person, type of activity (study, regulation, guidance, strategy, etc.) status, and a summary of the activity. The 33 sources of ground-water contamination are discussed in the 1984 EPA Office of Technology report: Protecting the Nations Ground Water from Contamination.

  16. Modulated spectral activity (MSA) - Implications for planetary radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, James R.; Alexander, Joseph K.; Staelin, David H.

    The properties of the Jovian and Saturnian MSA, modulation patterns within the normally diffuse nonthermal radio emission that are characterized by distinctive banded structures of enhanced intensity fluctuations in frequency over time scales of minutes to tens of minutes, are discussed. Although Jovian and Saturnian MSA are both normally observed in the 0.2-1.3-MHz frequency range, similar pattern have been noted in Jovian decametric emission above 30 MHz. The MSA properties are used to constrain the possible source mechanism.

  17. Modulated spectral activity (MSA) - Implications for planetary radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thieman, James R.; Alexander, Joseph K.; Staelin, David H.

    1988-01-01

    The properties of the Jovian and Saturnian MSA, modulation patterns within the normally diffuse nonthermal radio emission that are characterized by distinctive banded structures of enhanced intensity fluctuations in frequency over time scales of minutes to tens of minutes, are discussed. Although Jovian and Saturnian MSA are both normally observed in the 0.2-1.3-MHz frequency range, similar pattern have been noted in Jovian decametric emission above 30 MHz. The MSA properties are used to constrain the possible source mechanism.

  18. Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid profile of starry flounder Platichthys stellatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhidong; Wang, Jiying; Qiao, Hongjin; Li, Peiyu; Zhang, Limin; Xia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid (AA) profile of starry flounder, Platichthys stellatus, were investigated and limiting amino acids were estimated compared with the essential AA profile between larvae and live food to clarify starry flounder larval nutritional requirements. Larvae were collected at the egg stage and 0, 2, 4, 7, 12, 17, 24 days after hatching (DAH) for analysis. Larvae grew from 1.91 mm at hatching to 12.13 mm at 24 DAH. Trypsin and chymotrypsin activities changed slightly by 4 DAH and then increased significantly 4 DAH. Pepsin activity increased sharply beginning 17 DAH. Lipase activity increased significantly 4 DAH and increased progressively with larval growth. Amylase activity was also detected in newly hatched larvae and increased 7 DAH followed by a gradual decrease. High free amino acid (FAA) content was detected in starry flounder eggs (110.72 mg/g dry weight). Total FAA content dropped to 43.29 mg/g in 4-DAH larvae and then decreased gradually to 13.74 mg/g in 24-DAH larvae. Most FAAs (except lysine and methionine) decreased >50% in 4-DAH larvae compared with those in eggs and then decreased to the lowest values in 24-DAH larvae. Changes in the protein amino acid (PAA) profile were much milder than those observed for FAAs. Most PAAs increased gradually during larval development, except lysine and phenylalanine. The percentages of free threonine, valine, isoleucine, and leucine decreased until the end of the trial, whereas the protein forms of these four AAs followed the opposite trend. A comparison of the essential AA composition of live food (rotifers, Artemia nauplii, and Artemia metanauplii) and larvae suggested that methionine was potentially the first limiting AA. These results may help develop starry flounder larviculture methods by solving the AA imbalance in live food. Moreover, the increased digestive enzyme activities indicate the possibility of introducing artificial compound feed.

  19. Simulations as Active Assessment?: Typologizing by Purpose and Source

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kollars, Nina A.; Rosen, Amanda M.

    2013-01-01

    Assessment through simulation is something that political science pedagogy has yet to explore in a robust manner. This article advances analysis of social science simulation and assessment by laying out a typology of active-learning activities that isolates and examines their potential for assessment. In short, we argue that there are essentially…

  20. Artifacts as Sources for Problem-Posing Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonotto, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    The problem-posing process represents one of the forms of authentic mathematical inquiry which, if suitably implemented in classroom activities, could move well beyond the limitations of word problems, at least as they are typically utilized. The two exploratory studies presented sought to investigate the impact of "problem-posing" activities when…

  1. PM10 and PM2.5 chemical source profiles with optical attenuation and health risk indicators of paved and unpaved road dust in Bhopal, India.

    PubMed

    Samiksha, Shilpi; Sunder Raman, Ramya; Nirmalkar, Jayant; Kumar, Samresh; Sirvaiya, Rohit

    2017-03-01

    Size classified (PM10 and PM2.5) paved and unpaved road dust chemical source profiles, optical attenuation and potential health risk from exposure to these sources are reported in this study. A total of 45 samples from 9 paved road and 6 unpaved road sites located in and around Bhopal were re-suspended in the laboratory, collected onto filter substrates and subjected to a variety of chemical analyses. In general, road dust was enriched (compared to upper continental crustal abundance) in anthropogenic pollutants including Sb, Cu, Zn, Co, and Pb. Organic and elemental carbon (OC/EC) in PM10 and PM2.5 size fractions were 50-75% higher in paved road dust compared to their counterparts in unpaved road dust. Further, the results suggest that when it is not possible to include carbon fractions in source profiles, the inclusion of optical attenuation is likely to enhance the source resolution of receptor models. Additionally, profiles obtained in this study were not very similar to the US EPA SPECIATE composite profiles for PM10 and PM2.5, for both sources. Specifically, the mass fractions of Si, Fe, OC, and EC were most different between SPECIATE composite profiles and Bhopal composite profiles. An estimate of health indicators for Bhopal road dust revealed that although Cr was only marginally enriched, its inhalation may pose a health risk. The estimates of potential lifetime incremental cancer risk induced by the inhalation of Cr in paved and unpaved road dust (PM10 and PM2.5) for both adults and children were higher than the baseline values of acceptable risk. These results suggest that road dust Cr induced carcinogenic risk should be further investigated.

  2. Expression profiles for macrophage alternative activation genes in AD and in mouse models of AD

    PubMed Central

    Colton, Carol A; Mott, Ryan T; Sharpe, Hayley; Xu, Qing; Van Nostrand, William E; Vitek, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Background Microglia are associated with neuritic plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD) and serve as a primary component of the innate immune response in the brain. Neuritic plaques are fibrous deposits composed of the amyloid beta-peptide fragments (Abeta) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Numerous studies have shown that the immune cells in the vicinity of amyloid deposits in AD express mRNA and proteins for pro-inflammatory cytokines, leading to the hypothesis that microglia demonstrate classical (Th-1) immune activation in AD. Nonetheless, the complex role of microglial activation has yet to be fully explored since recent studies show that peripheral macrophages enter an "alternative" activation state. Methods To study alternative activation of microglia, we used quantitative RT-PCR to identify genes associated with alternative activation in microglia, including arginase I (AGI), mannose receptor (MRC1), found in inflammatory zone 1 (FIZZ1), and chitinase 3-like 3 (YM1). Results Our findings confirmed that treatment of microglia with anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 induces a gene profile typical of alternative activation similar to that previously observed in peripheral macrophages. We then used this gene expression profile to examine two mouse models of AD, the APPsw (Tg-2576) and Tg-SwDI, models for amyloid deposition and for cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) respectively. AGI, MRC1 and YM1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in the Tg-2576 mouse brains compared to age-matched controls while TNFα and NOS2 mRNA levels, genes commonly associated with classical activation, increased or did not change, respectively. Only TNFα mRNA increased in the Tg-SwDI mouse brain. Alternative activation genes were also identified in brain samples from individuals with AD and were compared to age-matched control individuals. In AD brain, mRNAs for TNFα, AGI, MRC1 and the chitinase-3 like 1 and 2 genes (CHI3L1; CHI3L2) were significantly increased

  3. 802.16e System Profile for NASA Extra-Vehicular Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foore, Lawrence R.; Chelmins, David T.; Nguyen, Hung D.; Downey, Joseph A.; Finn, Gregory G.; Cagley, Richard E.; Bakula, Casey J.

    2009-01-01

    This report identifies an 802.16e system profile that is applicable to a lunar surface wireless network, and specifically for meeting extra-vehicular activity (EVA) data flow requirements. EVA suit communication needs are addressed. Design-driving operational scenarios are considered. These scenarios are then used to identify a configuration of the 802.16e system (system profile) that meets EVA requirements, but also aim to make the radio realizable within EVA constraints. Limitations of this system configuration are highlighted. An overview and development status is presented by Toyon Research Corporation concerning the development of an 802.16e compatible modem under NASA s Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program. This modem is based on the recommended system profile developed as part of this report. Last, a path forward is outlined that presents an evolvable solution for the EVA radio system and lunar surface radio networks. This solution is based on a custom link layer, and 802.16e compliant physical layer compliant to the identified system profile, and a later progression to a fully interoperable 802.16e system.

  4. Differences in activity profile of bacterial cultures studied by dynamic speckle patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Miquet, E. E.; Otero, I.; Rodríguez, D.; Darias, J. G.; Combarro, A. M.; Contreras, O. R.

    2013-02-01

    We outline the main differences in the activity profile of bacterial cultures studied by dynamic laser speckle (or biospeckle) patterns. The activity is detected in two sorts of culture mediums. The optical setup and the experimental procedure are presented. The experimentally obtained images are processed by the temporal difference method and a qualitative assessment is made with the time history of speckle patterns of the sample. The main differences are studied after changing the culture medium composition. We conclude that the EC medium is suitable to detect the E. coli bacterial presence in early hours and that Mueller Hinton agar delays some additional hours to make possible the assessment of bacteria in time.

  5. Comparative analysis of polyphenolic profiles and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of tunisian pome fruit pulp and peel aqueous acetone extracts.

    PubMed

    Fattouch, S; Caboni, P; Coroneo, V; Tuberoso, C; Angioni, A; Dessi, S; Marzouki, N; Cabras, P

    2008-02-13

    Pome trees, apple, pear, and quince, are classified into the subfamily Pomoideae, belonging to the Rosaceae family. Their autumnal fruits are consumed worldwide in different forms, that is, fresh or transformed into jams, jelly, juices, etc. Their well-established beneficial properties to human health were found mainly related to their phenolic content. Pulp and peel aqueous acetone extracts obtained from Tunisian fruits at commercial maturity were comparatively evaluated for their phenolic profiles and antioxidant and antimicrobial potentials. The phenolic compounds present in the extracts were identified and quantified using RP-HPLC-DAD and ESI-MS techniques. Significant differences in the chromatographic profiles among these fruits, as well as between pulp and peel extracts of each fruit, were observed. Quince, followed by 'Red Delicious', peel extracts showed the highest phenolic content (160.33 and 110.90 mg/100 g of fresh weight). The stronger inhibitory effect on DPPH radicals corresponded to those obtained from peel materials. A comparative analysis of the antimicrobial potential against a range of microorganism strains was also carried out. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Bacillus cereus were the most sensitive to the active extracts. Among the examined phenolic extracts, 'Red Delicious' and quince peels showed the highest effects for inhibiting bacteria growth. Minimum inhibitory and bactericide concentrations ranged from 10(2) to 10(4) microg of polyphenol/mL. Red skin apple and quince peels could be of great interest as important antioxidant and antimicrobial polyphenol sources.

  6. Active Learning Strategies for Phenotypic Profiling of High-Content Screens.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin; Horvath, Peter

    2014-06-01

    High-content screening is a powerful method to discover new drugs and carry out basic biological research. Increasingly, high-content screens have come to rely on supervised machine learning (SML) to perform automatic phenotypic classification as an essential step of the analysis. However, this comes at a cost, namely, the labeled examples required to train the predictive model. Classification performance increases with the number of labeled examples, and because labeling examples demands time from an expert, the training process represents a significant time investment. Active learning strategies attempt to overcome this bottleneck by presenting the most relevant examples to the annotator, thereby achieving high accuracy while minimizing the cost of obtaining labeled data. In this article, we investigate the impact of active learning on single-cell-based phenotype recognition, using data from three large-scale RNA interference high-content screens representing diverse phenotypic profiling problems. We consider several combinations of active learning strategies and popular SML methods. Our results show that active learning significantly reduces the time cost and can be used to reveal the same phenotypic targets identified using SML. We also identify combinations of active learning strategies and SML methods which perform better than others on the phenotypic profiling problems we studied.

  7. Activity Profile and Energy Expenditure Among Active Older Adults, British Columbia, 2011–2012

    PubMed Central

    Ashe, Maureen C.; Chase, Jocelyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Time spent by young adults in moderate to vigorous activity predicts daily caloric expenditure. In contrast, caloric expenditure among older adults is best predicted by time spent in light activity. We examined highly active older adults to examine the biggest contributors to energy expenditure in this population. Methods Fifty-four community-dwelling men and women aged 65 years or older (mean, 71.4 y) were enrolled in this cross-sectional observational study. All were members of the Whistler Senior Ski Team, and all met current American guidelines for physical activity. Activity levels (sedentary, light, and moderate to vigorous) were recorded by accelerometers worn continuously for 7 days. Caloric expenditure was measured using accelerometry, galvanic skin response, skin temperature, and heat flux. Significant variables were entered into a stepwise multivariate linear model consisting of activity level, age, and sex. Results The average (standard deviation [SD]) daily nonlying sedentary time was 564 (92) minutes (9.4 [1.5] h) per day. The main predictors of higher caloric expenditure were time spent in moderate to vigorous activity (standardized β = 0.42 [SE, 0.08]; P < .001) and male sex (standardized β = 1.34 [SE, 0.16]; P < .001). A model consisting of only moderate to vigorous physical activity and sex explained 68% of the variation in caloric expenditure. An increase in moderate to vigorous physical activity by 1 minute per day was associated with an additional 16 kcal expended in physical activity. Conclusion The relationship between activity intensity and caloric expenditure in athletic seniors is similar to that observed in young adults. Active older adults still spend a substantial proportion of the day engaged in sedentary behaviors. PMID:26182147

  8. Muscle Transcriptional Profile Based on Muscle Fiber, Mitochondrial Respiratory Activity, and Metabolic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuan; Du, Yang; Trakooljul, Nares; Brand, Bodo; Muráni, Eduard; Krischek, Carsten; Wicke, Michael; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a highly metabolically active tissue that both stores and consumes energy. Important biological pathways that affect energy metabolism and metabolic fiber type in muscle cells may be identified through transcriptomic profiling of the muscle, especially ante mortem. Here, gene expression was investigated in malignant hyperthermia syndrome (MHS)-negative Duroc and Pietrian (PiNN) pigs significantly differing for the muscle fiber types slow-twitch-oxidative fiber (STO) and fast-twitch-oxidative fiber (FTO) as well as mitochondrial activity (succinate-dependent state 3 respiration rate). Longissimus muscle samples were obtained 24 h before slaughter and profiled using cDNA microarrays. Differential gene expression between Duroc and PiNN muscle samples were associated with protein ubiquitination, stem cell pluripotency, amyloid processing, and 3-phosphoinositide biosynthesis and degradation pathways. In addition, weighted gene co-expression network analysis within both breeds identified several co-expression modules that were associated with the proportion of different fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and ATP metabolism. In particular, Duroc results revealed strong correlations between mitochondrion-associated co-expression modules and STO (r = 0.78), fast-twitch glycolytic fiber (r = -0.98), complex I (r=0.72) and COX activity (r = 0.86). Other pathways in the protein-kinase-activity enriched module were positively correlated with STO (r=0.93), while negatively correlated with FTO (r = -0.72). In contrast to PiNN, co-expression modules enriched in macromolecule catabolic process, actin cytoskeleton, and transcription activator activity were associated with fiber types, mitochondrial respiratory activity, and metabolic enzyme activities. Our results highlight the importance of mitochondria for the oxidative capacity of porcine muscle and for breed-dependent molecular pathways in muscle cell fibers. PMID:26681915

  9. Improved seismic profiling by minimally invasive multimodal surface wave method with standard penetration test source (MMSW-SPT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shibin; Ashlock, Jeramy C.

    2017-03-01

    Surface waves propagating in layered media inherently possess multimodal dispersion characteristics. However, traditional surface wave testing methods employing measurements at the free surface usually capture only a single apparent dispersion curve, especially when using short geophone arrays common to near surface and geotechnical-scale investigations. Such single-mode or fragmented multimode apparent dispersion curves contain only a fraction of the possible dispersion information, thus limiting the accuracy of inverted profiles. To enable more robust measurement of higher Rayleigh-wave modes, a recently developed hybrid minimally invasive multimodal surface wave method is combined herein with the widely used geotechnical standard penetration test (SPT), which is employed as a practical and ubiquitous downhole source. Upon superimposing surface wave dispersion data for a range of SPT impact depths within the soil, higher modes can be measured more consistently and reliably relative to traditional non-invasive testing methods. As a result, misidentification of multiple dispersion modes can be practically eliminated, significantly improving the accuracy and certainty of inversion results.

  10. Linking Aerosol Source Activities to Present and Future Climate Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D.; Bond, T. C.; Streets, D.; Menon, S.; Unger, N.

    2007-05-01

    Aerosol source sectors (transport, power, industry, residential, biomass burning) generate distinct mixtures of aerosol species. These mixtures in turn have different effects on climate. As sectoral emissions change in coming decades, whether by regulation or not, it is helpful to link pollution from source types to climate consequences. We do so, using our global (GISS GCM) aerosol model for present and future IPCC SRES scenarios. According to our model, residential and transport sectors have net positive 1995 aerosol forcings (0.04 and 0.03 W m-2) due to their large black carbon contents. However, the sulfate-dominated power and industry sectors have net negative 1995 forcings (-0.10 and -0.09 W m-2). Due to the near-balance of absorbing and scattering components, biomass burning forcing is small. For the 2050 SRES A1B scenario, the net (negative) aerosol forcing is double 1995 due primarily to increased sulfur emissions in the industry and power sectors. For 2050 B1 the net (negative) forcing decreases relative to 1995, as sulfur emissions are reduced. Both future scenarios project decreasing residential emissions. Yet transport emissions are expected to remain significant and thus become the dominant source of warming aerosols in the future. Aerosol pollution is projected to shift southward relative to the present, as the current industrialized regions generally reduce emissions and tropical and southern hemispheric regions continue to develop. Similar to these SRES scenarios, IIASA scenarios project a decline in residential emissions; however IIASA is more optimistic about transport sector emissions reductions. We will conduct present-day climate experiments, including aerosol direct and indirect effects, to study impacts of power and transport sectors on climate features such as air temperature and hydrologic cycle.

  11. Comparison of phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and cellular antioxidant activities of different varieties of blueberry (Vaccinium spp.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Huailing; Guo, Xinbo; Hu, Xiaodan; Li, Tong; Fu, Xiong; Liu, Rui Hai

    2017-02-15

    Numerous reports have demonstrated that the consumption of fruits and vegetables is beneficial for the human health. Blueberries, in particular, are rich in phytochemicals including free and bound forming. Phytochemical profiles of 14 varieties of blueberry were compared in this study. 12 compounds were analyzed and had significant changes in blueberry fruits. Total antioxidant activities in different blueberry varieties varied about 2.6times by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay, and 2times by peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (PSC) assay. The cellular antioxidant activities (CAA) in different varieties varied about 3.9times without phosphate buffer saline (PBS) wash, and 4.7times with PBS wash by CAA assay. Blueberry extracts had potent antiproliferative activities against HepG2 human liver cancer cells, indicating the potential protective benefits associated with their use as functional foods. The anti-proliferative activity was observed to be dose-dependent in blueberry extracts.

  12. Chemical proteomic probes for profiling cytochrome P450 activities and drug interactions in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Aaron T.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2007-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (P450) superfamily metabolizes many endogenous signaling molecules and drugs. P450 enzymes are regulated by post-translational mechanisms in vivo, which hinders their functional characterization by conventional genomic or proteomic methods. Here, we describe a chemical proteomic strategy to profile P450 activities directly in living systems. Derivatization of a mechanism-based inhibitor with a “clickable” handle provided an activity-based probe that labels multiple P450s both in proteomic extracts and in vivo. This probe was used to record alterations in liver P450 activities triggered by chemical agents, including inducers of P450 expression and direct P450 inhibitors. The chemical proteomic strategy described herein thus offers a versatile method to monitor P450 activities and small molecule interactions in any biological system and, through doing so, should facilitate the functional characterization of this large and diverse enzyme class. PMID:17884636

  13. Characterization and source profiling of volatile organic compounds in indoor air of private residences in Selangor State, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Nobumitsu; Yamamoto, Shuta; Matsui, Yasuto; Khan, Md Firoz; Latif, Mohd Talib; Ali Mohd, Mustafa; Yoneda, Minoru

    2017-05-15

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in indoor air were investigated at 39 private residences in Selangor State, Malaysia to characterize the indoor air quality and to identify pollution sources. Twenty-two VOCs including isomers (14 aldehydes, 5 aromatic hydrocarbons, acetone, trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene) were collected by 2 passive samplers for 24h and quantitated using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Source profiling based on benzene/toluene ratio as well as statistical analysis (cluster analysis, bivariate correlation analysis and principal component analysis) was performed to identify pollution sources of the detected VOCs. The VOCs concentrations were compared with regulatory limits of air quality guidelines in WHO/EU, the US, Canada and Japan to clarify the potential health risks to the residents. The 39 residences were classified into 2 groups and 2 ungrouped residences based on the dendrogram in the cluster analysis. Group 1 (n=30) had mainly toluene (6.87±2.19μg/m(3)), formaldehyde (16.0±10.1μg/m(3)), acetaldehyde (5.35±4.57μg/m(3)) and acetone (11.1±5.95μg/m(3)) at background levels. Group 2 (n=7) had significantly high values of formaldehyde (99.3±10.7μg/m(3)) and acetone (35.8±12.6μg/m(3)), and a tendency to have higher values of acetaldehyde (23.7±13.5μg/m(3)), butyraldehyde (3.35±0.41μg/m(3)) and isovaleraldehyde (2.30±0.39μg/m(3)). The 2 ungrouped residences showed particularly high concentrations of BTX (benzene, toluene and xylene: 235μg/m(3) in total) or acetone (133μg/m(3)). The geometric mean value of formaldehyde (19.2μg/m(3)) exceeded an 8-hour regulatory limit in Canada (9μg/m(3)), while those in other compounds did not exceed any regulatory limits, although a few residences exceeded at least one regulatory limit of benzene or acetaldehyde. Thus, the VOCs in the private residences were effectively characterized from the limited number of monitoring, and the

  14. DIFFERENTIAL GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN RAT TRACHAEL EPITHELIAL (RTE) CELLS IN RESPONSE TO COMBUSTION-SOURCE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) AND VANADIUM (V) A PRIMARY METAL CONSTITUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential gene expression profiles in rat tracheal epithelial (RTE) cells in response to combustion-source particulate matter (PM) and vanadium (V) a primary metal constituent
    Srikanth S. Nadadur, Janice A. Dye and Daniel L. Costa, US EPA, ORD, NHEERL (ETD, Pulmonary Toxico...

  15. Antimicrobial activity and genetic profile of Enteroccoci isolated from hoopoes uropygial gland.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Valdivia, Eva; Martín-Vivaldi, Manuel; Martín-Platero, Antonio M; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Méndez, María; Peralta-Sánchez, Juan M; Soler, Juan J

    2012-01-01

    Symbiotic microorganisms may be directly transferred from parents to offspring or acquired from a particular environment that animals may be able to select. If benefits for hosts vary among microbial strains, natural selection may favour hosts holding the most beneficial one. Enterococci symbionts living in the hoopoe (Upupa epops) uropygial gland are able to synthesise bacteriocins (antimicrobial peptides that inhibit the growth of competitor bacteria). We explored variability in genetic profile (through RAPD-PCR analyses) and antimicrobial properties (by performing antagonistic tests against ten bacterial indicator strains) of the different isolates obtained from the uropygial glands of hoopoe females and nestlings. We found that the genetic profile of bacterial isolates was related to antimicrobial activity, as well as to individual host identity and the nest from which samples were obtained. This association suggest that variation in the inhibitory capacity of Enterococci symbionts should be under selection.

  16. Antimicrobial Activity and Genetic Profile of Enteroccoci Isolated from Hoopoes Uropygial Gland

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Valdivia, Eva; Martín-Vivaldi, Manuel; Martín-Platero, Antonio M.; Martínez-Bueno, Manuel; Méndez, María; Peralta-Sánchez, Juan M.; Soler, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    Symbiotic microorganisms may be directly transferred from parents to offspring or acquired from a particular environment that animals may be able to select. If benefits for hosts vary among microbial strains, natural selection may favour hosts holding the most beneficial one. Enterococci symbionts living in the hoopoe (Upupa epops) uropygial gland are able to synthesise bacteriocins (antimicrobial peptides that inhibit the growth of competitor bacteria). We explored variability in genetic profile (through RAPD-PCR analyses) and antimicrobial properties (by performing antagonistic tests against ten bacterial indicator strains) of the different isolates obtained from the uropygial glands of hoopoe females and nestlings. We found that the genetic profile of bacterial isolates was related to antimicrobial activity, as well as to individual host identity and the nest from which samples were obtained. This association suggest that variation in the inhibitory capacity of Enterococci symbionts should be under selection. PMID:22911858

  17. [Main types of activity of specialists of medical and preventive profile in military hospitals].

    PubMed

    Akimkin, V G; Azarov, I I; Volynkov, I O; Bobylev, V A

    2015-09-01

    Infection prevention in medical organizations is an essential task to ensure quality of medical care and create a safe environment for patients and medical staff. The main task of a specialist of medical and preventive profile in the hospital is to maintain sanitary and epidemiological safety and control fulfillment of a complex of preventive measures. To achieve these goals specialists monitor epidemiological and microbiological fulfilment of the implementation and effectiveness of preventive measures, which allow to except infection entry to the hospital and possible carrying out beyond the hospital, occurrence and spread of disease. An obligatory activity of the specialist of medical and preventive profile in the hospital is a scientific and methodical work. The authors propose adoption of preventive structural subdivisions to the state largest diversified military hospitals.

  18. Papaya seed represents a rich source of biologically active isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Yoshimoto, Motoko; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Shimoishi, Yasuaki; Asai, Yumi; Park, Eun Young; Sato, Kenji; Nakamura, Yasushi

    2007-05-30

    In the present study, papaya (Carica papaya) seed and edible pulp were carefully separated and then the contents of benzyl isothiocyanate and the corresponding glucosinolate (benzyl glucosinolate, glucotropaeolin) quantified in each part. The papaya seed with myrosinase inactivation contained >1 mmol of benzyl glucosinolate in 100 g of fresh seed. This content is equivalent to that of Karami daikon (the hottest Japanese white radish) or that of cress. The papaya seed extract also showed a very high activity of myrosinase and, without myrosinase inactivation, produced 460 micromol of benzyl isothiocyanate in 100 g of seed. In contrast, papaya pulp contained an undetectable amount of benzyl glucosinolate and showed no significant myrosinase activity. The n-hexane extract of the papaya seed homogenate was highly effective in inhibiting superoxide generation and apoptosis induction in HL-60 cells, the activities of which are comparable to those of authentic benzyl isothiocyanate.

  19. Geology of the Tremor Source: What are the Active Processes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagereng, A.; Hartnady, M. I. H.; Diener, J. F. A.

    2015-12-01

    Tectonic tremor is a low frequency seismic signal lacking impulsive body wave arrivals, but including low and very-low frequency earthquakes. The seismic signal is interpreted to be associated with shear failure at the tremor source, and has been detected on well-instrumented subduction and transform plate boundary interfaces. Tectonic tremor has now been detected at a wide range of depths, but appears to predominantly occur in regions of transitional frictional behavior. To create the low and very-low frequency earthquakes within the tremor signal, frictional failure with a low stress drop is required at the tremor source. A common inference is therefore that tremor involves shear failure at low effective normal stress. Incrementally formed slickenfibre veins are commonly observed in exhumed fault zones. Based on the angle between shear surfaces and tensile veins, slickenfibres can in some locations be shown to have formed incrementally at low effective stress, comparable to tectonic tremor. The veins show slip increments of 10 - 100 micrometers, and along-strike lengths of tens to hundreds of meters, in agreement with values predicted from low frequency earthquake signals. Although slickenfibre veins are a candidate for the geological fingerprint of tectonic tremor, the tremor source occurs over a depth and temperature range that involves several grain scale deformation mechanisms, and both pro- and retrograde metamorphic conditions. The mechanism may therefore be more fundamental, and relate to shear failure in a mixed rheology rock assemblage where ambient stress levels are low. This includes shear failure on weak, frictional discontinuities within bulk viscous rheologies, as can be expected within the frictional transition zones where tremor is observed, independently of metamorphic grade. Slickenfibre veins represent one type of preserved shear discontinuity, on which it is easy to determine past slip increments. We show a number of other examples of

  20. Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon profiles and sources in pine needles and particulate matter in Dayton, Ohio, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomashuk, Timothy A.; Truong, Triet M.; Mantha, Madhavi; McGowin, Audrey E.

    2012-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in pine needles (passive sampling) and on high-volume particulate matter (PM) filters (active sampling) over a period of eight to ten months at two separate sites in the Dayton, Ohio, USA metropolitan area: Moraine and Yellow Springs. Total PAH concentrations for PM ranged from 77.4 μg g-1 to 837 μg g-1 (dry wt.) at both sites with high molecular weight PAHs being the predominant form that tended to be higher in concentration during the colder months. Total PAH concentrations for pine needles varied by tree species and location. With an average concentration of 4187 ng g-1, Austrian pine (Pinus nigra) needles in Moraine ranged from 2543 ng g-1to 6111 ng g-1 (dry wt.) with the lowest and highest concentrations occurring in October and August, respectively. The amount of phenanthrene was extremely high for August, 4200 ± 112, which could have resulted from the close proximity of the tree to the parking lot at a firehouse. White pine (Pinus strobus) needles in Yellow Springs had an average concentration of 384 ng g-1and ranged from 127 ng g-1 to 589 ng g-1 (dry wt.) with September and November, respectively, having the lowest and highest PAH concentrations. The 2- and 3-ring PAHs were the predominant form in P. nigra, while the 4-ring PAHs predominated in P. strobus. Total PAH concentrations in P. nigra were an order of magnitude greater than for P. strobus. A bivariate plot of BaA/(BaA + Chry) versus Flt(Flt + Pyr) allowed the PM and pine needle data to be included in the same source analysis and indicated sources of PM at both sites were biomass and/or coal combustion. This plot also suggested PAHs in Yellow Springs P. strobus originated from petroleum combustion sources, whereas PAHs in Moraine P. nigra originated from petroleum combustion with some sources more aged or remote.

  1. Quercetin changes purinergic enzyme activities and oxidative profile in platelets of rats with hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Santi, Adriana; Schmatz, Roberta; Zanini, Daniela; Cardoso, Andréia M; Abadalla, Fátima H; Thomé, Gustavo R; Murussi, Camila; Polachini, Carla R N; Delenogare, Diéssica P; Loro, Vania L; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria R C

    2016-12-01

    Diseases related to thyroid hormones have been extensively studied because affect a large number of individuals, and these hormones participate in the regulation of the whole organism homeostasis. However, little is known about the involvement of purinergic signaling related to oxidative stress in hypothyroidism and possible therapeutic adjuncts for treatment of this disorder. Thus, the present study investigates the effects of quercetin on NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities, platelet aggregation and oxidative profile in platelets of rats with methimazole (MMI)-induced hypothyroidism. Methimazole at a concentration of 20mg/100mL was administered for 90days. From the second month the animals received quercetin 10 or 25mg/kg for 60days. Results showed that: Ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity decreased in methimazole/water group and the treatment with quercetin 25mg/kg decreased NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities. Moreover, platelet aggregation increased in methimazole/water group. Lipid peroxidation increased while superoxide dismutase and catalase activities decreased, but, interestingly, the treatment with quercetin reversed these changes. These results demonstrated that quercetin modulates adenine nucleotide hydrolysis decreasing the ADP formation and adenosine deamination. At the same time quercetin improves the oxidative profile, as well as reduces platelet aggregation, which together with the modulation in the nucleotides levels can contribute to the prevention of platelet disorders.

  2. Laser ion source activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    DOE PAGES

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro

    2015-07-31

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we have been developing laser ion sources for diverse accelerators. Tabletop Nd:YAG lasers with up to several Joules of energy are mainly used to create ablation plasmas for stable operations. The obtained charge states depend on laser power density and target species. Two types of ion extraction schemes, Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) and conventional static extraction, are used depending on application. We optimized and select a suitable laser irradiation condition and a beam extraction scheme to meet the requirement of the following accelerator system. We have demonstrated to accelerate more than 5 x 1010more » of C6+ ions using the DPIS. We successfully commissioned low charge ion beam provider to the user facilities in BNL. As a result, to achieve higher current, higher charge state and lower emittance, further studies will continue.« less

  3. Laser ion source activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro

    2015-07-31

    In Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we have been developing laser ion sources for diverse accelerators. Tabletop Nd:YAG lasers with up to several Joules of energy are mainly used to create ablation plasmas for stable operations. The obtained charge states depend on laser power density and target species. Two types of ion extraction schemes, Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) and conventional static extraction, are used depending on application. We optimized and select a suitable laser irradiation condition and a beam extraction scheme to meet the requirement of the following accelerator system. We have demonstrated to accelerate more than 5 x 1010 of C6+ ions using the DPIS. We successfully commissioned low charge ion beam provider to the user facilities in BNL. As a result, to achieve higher current, higher charge state and lower emittance, further studies will continue.

  4. Background and Source Term Identification in Active Neutron Interrogation Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    low MeV neutron energy range, the increased numbers of neutrons from scattering ...reactions for low neutron energy . For U-235, low energy neutrons (thermal neutrons ) are more likely to cause fission than inelastic scattering or...manner. Active neutron interrogation is a sought after method for this since the resulting high energy gamma rays produced by inelastic scattering

  5. Temporal behaviour profiles of Mus musculus in nature are affected by population activity.

    PubMed

    Robbers, Yuri; Koster, Eva A S; Krijbolder, Doortje I; Ruijs, Amanda; van Berloo, Sander; Meijer, Johanna H

    2015-02-01

    Animals have circadian clocks that govern their activity pattern, resulting in 24h rhythms in physiology and behaviour. Under laboratory conditions, light is the major external signal that affects temporal patterns in behaviour, and Mus musculus is strictly nocturnal in its behaviour. In the present study we questioned whether under natural conditions, environmental factors other than light affect the temporal profile of mice. In order to test this, we investigated the activity patterns of free-ranging M. musculus in a natural habitat, using sensors and a camera integrated into a recording unit that the mice could freely enter and leave. Our data show that mice have seasonal fluctuations in activity duration (6.7±0.82 h in summer, 11.3±1.80 h in winter). Furthermore, although primarily nocturnal, wild mice also exhibit daytime activity from spring until late autumn. A multivariate analysis revealed that the major factor correlating with increased daytime activity was population activity, defined as the number of visits to the recording site. Day length had a small but significant effect. Further analysis revealed that the relative population activity (compared to the past couple of days) is a better predictor of daytime activity than absolute population activity. Light intensity and temperature did not have a significant effect on daytime activity. The amount of variance explained by external factors is 51.9%, leaving surprisingly little unexplained variance that might be attributed to the internal clock. Our data further indicate that mice determine population activity by comparing a given night with the preceding 2-7 nights, a time frame suggesting a role for olfactory cues. We conclude that relative population activity is a major factor controlling the temporal activity patterns of M. musculus in an unrestricted natural population.

  6. Alkaloid metabolite profiles by GC/MS and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities with binding-mode predictions of five Amaryllidaceae plants.

    PubMed

    Cortes, Natalie; Alvarez, Rafael; Osorio, Edison H; Alzate, Fernando; Berkov, Strahil; Osorio, Edison

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzymatic inhibition is an important target for the management of Alzheimer disease (AD) and AChE inhibitors are the mainstay drugs for its treatment. In order to discover new sources of potent AChE inhibitors, a combined strategy is presented based on AChE-inhibitory activity and chemical profiles by GC/MS, together with in silico studies. The combined strategy was applied on alkaloid extracts of five Amaryllidaceae species that grow in Colombia. Fifty-seven alkaloids were detected using GC/MS, and 21 of them were identified by comparing their mass-spectral fragmentation patterns with standard reference spectra in commercial and private library databases. The alkaloid extracts of Zephyranthes carinata exhibited a high level of inhibitory activity (IC50 = 5.97 ± 0.24 μg/mL). Molecular modeling, which was performed using the structures of some of the alkaloids present in this extract and the three-dimensional crystal structures of AChE derived from Torpedo californica, disclosed their binding configuration in the active site of this AChE. The results suggested that the alkaloids 3-epimacronine and lycoramine might be of interest for AChE inhibition. Although the galanthamine group is known for its potential utility in treating AD, the tazettine-type alkaloids should be evaluated to find more selective compounds of potential benefit for AD.

  7. Metabolic profile and biological activities of Lavandula pedunculata subsp. lusitanica (Chaytor) Franco: studies on the essential oil and polar extracts.

    PubMed

    Costa, Patrícia; Gonçalves, Sandra; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Almeida, Carlos; Nogueira, José M F; Romano, Anabela

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the metabolic profile and biological activities of the essential oil and polar extracts of Lavandula pedunculata subsp. lusitanica (Chaytor) Franco collected in south Portugal. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that oxygen-containing monoterpenes was the principal group of compounds identified in the essential oil. Camphor (40.6%) and fenchone (38.0%) were found as the major constituents. High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) analysis allowed the identification of hydroxycinnamic acids (3-O-caffeoylquinic, 4-O-caffeoylquinic, 5-O-caffeoylquinic and rosmarinic acids) and flavones (luteolin and apigenin) in the polar extracts, with rosmarinic acid being the main compound in most of them. The bioactive compounds from L. pedunculata polar extracts were the most efficient free-radical scavengers, Fe(2+) chelators and inhibitors of malondialdehyde production, while the essential oil was the most active against acetylcholinesterase. Our results reveal that the subspecies of L. pedunculata studied is a potential source of active metabolites with a positive effect on human health.

  8. Comparison of the free and bound phenolic profiles and cellular antioxidant activities of litchi pulp extracts from different solvents

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    alkaline hydrolysis method. Conclusions The free and bound phenolic contents and profiles and antioxidant activities of the extracts were found to be dependent on the extraction solvent used. Litchi exhibited good cellular antioxidant activity and could be a potentially useful natural source of antioxidants. PMID:24405977

  9. Quantifying the sources of error in measurements of urine activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mozley, P.D.; Kim, H.J.; McElgin, W.

    1994-05-01

    Accurate scintigraphic measurements of radioactivity in the bladder and voided urine specimens can be limited by scatter, attenuation, and variations in the volume of urine that a given dose is distributed in. The purpose of this study was to quantify some of the errors that these problems can introduce. Transmission scans and 41 conjugate images of the bladder were sequentially acquired on a dual headed camera over 24 hours in 6 subjects after the intravenous administration of 100-150 MBq (2.7-3.6 mCi) of a novel I-123 labeled benzamide. Renal excretion fractions were calculated by measuring the counts in conjugate images of 41 sequentially voided urine samples. A correction for scatter was estimated by comparing the count rates in images that were acquired with the photopeak centered an 159 keV and images that were made simultaneously with the photopeak centered on 126 keV. The decay and attenuation corrected, geometric mean activities were compared to images of the net dose injected. Checks of the results were performed by measuring the total volume of each voided urine specimen and determining the activity in a 20 ml aliquot of it with a dose calibrator. Modeling verified the experimental results which showed that 34% of the counts were attenuated when the bladder had been expanded to a volume of 300 ml. Corrections for attenuation that were based solely on the transmission scans were limited by the volume of non-radioactive urine in the bladder before the activity was administered. The attenuation of activity in images of the voided wine samples was dependent on the geometry of the specimen container. The images of urine in standard, 300 ml laboratory specimen cups had 39{plus_minus}5% fewer counts than images of the same samples laid out in 3 liter bedpans. Scatter through the carbon fiber table substantially increased the number of counts in the images by an average of 14%.

  10. Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lassowskat, Ines; Böttcher, Christoph; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) target a variety of protein substrates to regulate cellular signaling processes in eukaryotes. In plants, the number of identified MAPK substrates that control plant defense responses is still limited. Here, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with an inducible system to simulate in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3, and MPK6. Metabolome analysis revealed that this artificial MPK3/6 activation (without any exposure to pathogens or other stresses) is sufficient to drive the production of major defense-related metabolites, including various camalexin, indole glucosinolate and agmatine derivatives. An accompanying (phospho)proteome analysis led to detection of hundreds of potential phosphoproteins downstream of MPK3/6 activation. Besides known MAPK substrates, many candidates on this list possess typical MAPK-targeted phosphosites and in many cases, the corresponding phosphopeptides were detected by mass spectrometry. Notably, several of these putative phosphoproteins have been reported to be associated with the biosynthesis of antimicrobial defense substances (e.g., WRKY transcription factors and proteins encoded by the genes from the "PEN" pathway required for penetration resistance to filamentous pathogens). Thus, this work provides an inventory of candidate phosphoproteins, including putative direct MAPK substrates, for future analysis of MAPK-mediated defense control. (Proteomics data are available with the identifier PXD001252 via ProteomeXchange, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org).

  11. Screening and HPLC-Based Activity Profiling for New Antiprotozoal Leads from European Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Stefanie; Thomi, Semira; Kaiser, Marcel; Hamburger, Matthias; Adams, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Based on a survey of remedies used in Renaissance Europe to treat malaria, we prepared and screened a library of 254 extracts from 61 plants for antiplasmodial activity in vitro. HPLC-based activity profiling was performed for targeted identification of active constituents in extracts. One of the most remarkable results was the identification of onopordopicrin, a germacranolide sesquiterpene lactone isolated from Arctium nemorosum as a potent inhibitor of P. falciparum with an IC50 of 6.9 μM. It was tested similarly against Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, the parasite which causes African sleeping sickness. With an IC50 of 0.37 μM, onopordopicrin was one of the most potent natural products reported so far. Cytotoxicity was determined against rat myoblast L6 cells (IC50: 3.06). PMID:22396915

  12. Development and validation of the Human Activity Profile into Chinese language: lessons in determining equivalence.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Ann; Wellard, Sally; Kenrick, Marita

    2006-03-01

    The Human Activity Profile (HAP), and associated Dyspnea Scale, is a self-report instrument for assessing levels of human activity. Although it has been used in studies examining the levels of activity in people, it is limited to people who are only able to understand English. However, many countries are multicultural with significant numbers of people whose native language is not English. This study sought to demonstrate the equivalence between the Chinese and English versions of the HAP and Dyspnea scales. Thirty-five bilingual university students completed both the Chinese and English versions of each questionnaire. There was 89% and 85% agreement between items across the HAP and Dyspnea Scale questionnaires, respectively. Although the psychometric evaluations suggested there was equivalence between the Chinese and English versions of both the HAP and Dyspnea Scale, lessons have been learnt regarding the different written forms of Chinese.

  13. Antioxidant activity, anti-proliferative activity, and amino acid profiles of ethanolic extracts of edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Panthong, S; Boonsathorn, N; Chuchawankul, S

    2016-10-17

    Biological activities of various mushrooms have recently been discovered, particularly, immunomodulatory and antitumor activities. Herein, three edible mushrooms, Auricularia auricula-judae (AA), Pleurotus abalonus (PA) and Pleurotus sajor-caju (PS) extracted using Soxhlet ethanol extraction were evaluated for their antioxidative, anti-proliferative effects on leukemia cells. Using the Folin-Ciocalteau method and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay, phenolics and antioxidant activity were found in all sample mushrooms. Additionally, anti-proliferative activity of mushroom extracts against U937 leukemia cells was determined using a viability assay based on mitochondrial activity. PA (0.5 mg/mL) and AA (0.25-0.5 mg/mL) significantly reduced cell viability. Interestingly, PS caused a hormetic-like biphasic dose-response. Low doses (0-0.25 mg/L) of PS promoted cell proliferation up to 140% relative to control, whereas higher doses (0.50 mg/mL) inhibited cell proliferation. Against U937 cells, AA IC50 was 0.28 ± 0.04 mg/mL, which was lower than PS or PA IC50 (0.45 ± 0.01 and 0.49 ± 0.001 mg/mL, respectively). Furthermore, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage conferred cytotoxicity. PS and PA were not toxic to U937 cells at any tested concentration; AA (0.50 mg/mL) showed high LDH levels and caused 50% cytotoxicity. Additionally, UPLC-HRMS data indicated several phytochemicals known to support functional activities as either antioxidant or anti-proliferative. Glutamic acid was uniquely found in ethanolic extracts of AA, and was considered an anti-cancer amino acid with potent anti-proliferative effects on U937 cells. Collectively, all mushroom extracts exhibited antioxidant effects, but their anti-proliferative effects were dose-dependent. Nevertheless, the AA extract, with highest potency, is a promising candidate for future applications.

  14. High-intensity activity profiles of elite soccer players at different performance levels.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul S; Di Mascio, Michele; Peart, Dan; Olsen, Peter; Sheldon, Bill

    2010-09-01

    The aims of the study were to (a) determine the high-intensity activity patterns of soccer players at different performance levels and playing positions, (b) investigate temporary and end game fatigue in elite domestic and international soccer matches, and (c) quantify acceleration and maximal running speed profiles of elite soccer players. Elite domestic (n = 100) and international (n = 10) soccer players were analyzed using a multicamera computerized tracking system. No differences were found for high-intensity running distance (2,520 +/- 678 vs. 2,745 +/- 332 m), mean recovery time (67 +/- 15 vs. 71 +/- 26 seconds), or maximal running speed (7.76 +/- 0.31 vs. 7.66 +/- 0.34 mxs-1). The distance covered in high-intensity running irrespective of playing level was 18% lower (p < 0.05) in the last than in the first 15-minute period of the game (391 +/- 117 vs. 478 +/- 141 m). The decline in high-intensity running immediately after the most intense 5-minute period was similar between international (222 +/- 33 vs. 109 +/- 37 m or 51% decline) and elite domestic (243 +/- 81 vs. 114 +/- 51 m or 53% decline) players. Wide midfielders, central midfielders, fullbacks, and attackers covered a greater (p < 0.01) distance in high-intensity running than central defenders (3,243 +/- 625, 2,949 +/- 435, 2,806 +/- 408, 2,618 +/- 745 vs. 2,034 +/- 284 m). Results demonstrate that high-intensity running is reduced during various periods of elite soccer matches, and high-intensity activity profiles and fatigue patterns are similar between international and elite domestic players but vary markedly between playing positions. These data provide valuable information to the fitness coach regarding the high-intensity active profile of elite soccer players that could be used to develop soccer-specific training drills.

  15. Vertical profiles of trapped greenhouse gases in Alaskan permafrost active layers before the spring thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Eunji; Yang, Ji-woong; Kim, Yongwon; Ahn, Jinho

    2015-04-01

    Seasonally frozen ground over permafrost is important in controlling annual greenhouse gas exchange between permafrost and atmosphere. Soil microbes decompose soil carbon and generate carbon dioxide and methane when they become activated. However, the actual greenhouse gas emission follows various efflux pathways. For example, seasonal freezing of the top soil layers can either restrain or press the gas emission from deeper layers. It has been reported that abrupt release of methane during spring is attributable to the emission of trapped gases that had failed to be released instantly after formation (1, 2). In order to examine the seasonally trapped greenhouse gases, we drilled five Alaskan permafrost cores before spring thaw; one from coastal tundra, two from typical boreal forests, one from area where fire occurred, and one from peat accumulated sites. Vertical profiles of carbon dioxide and methane concentrations were obtained with 5-10 cm depth intervals. We found methane peaks from two cores, indicating inhibition of methane efflux. We also analyzed organic carbon, nitrogen and water contents and compared them with the greenhouse gas profiles. We are continuing analysis for the soil temperature profiles of the sampling boreholes because the detailed temperature information might be related to microbial activity, and can be used as indirect indicators of soil water freezing and latent heat influences at some active layer depth (zero curtain effects). All the high-resolution analyses for subsurface environments may help to improve understanding greenhouse gas emission from permafrost regions. 1. Mastepanov M, et al. (2008) Large tundra methane burst during onset of freezing. Nature 456(7222):628-630. 2. Song C, et al. (2012) Large methane emission upon spring thaw from natural wetlands in the northern permafrost region. Environmental Research Letters 7(3):034009.

  16. Paraoxonase Activity and Lipid Profile in Paediatric Nephrotic Syndrome: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anuradha B.; Patil, Vidya S.; Ingleshwar, Deepti G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dyslipidaemia of Nephrotic Syndrome (NS) is known to be linked to oxidative reactions and atherosclerosis. Paraoxonase (PON1) has been implicated in the prevention of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) lipid peroxidation and also degrades biologically active oxidised lipids in lipoprotein. Aim The present study was taken up to assess PON1 levels in paediatric nephrotic syndrome and also to see if any correlation exists between lipid parameters and PON1. Materials and Methods This study consists of Group 1 with 40 cases of NS in the age group of 2-14 years and Group 2 with 40 age and sex matched healthy controls. Lipid profile and paraoxonase activity was measured in serum samples of both the groups. Results Statistical analysis by student’s t-test showed that the mean levels of Total Cholesterol, Trigylycerides, LDL, and VLDL were significantly increased in Group 1 when compared to Group 2 (p <0.001). The mean levels of HDL were similar in both groups. The levels of PON1 were significantly lowered in Group 1 when compared to Group 2. Correlation studies showed no significant correlation between lipid profile and PON1. Conclusion Cases have atherosclerotic dyslipidaemia and significantly decreased PON1 activity. Decreased PON1 may lead to increased oxidation of LDL accelerating the process of atherosclerosis. PMID:27134858

  17. Enzymatic activity and proteomic profile of class III peroxidases during sugarcane stem development.

    PubMed

    Cesarino, Igor; Araújo, Pedro; Sampaio Mayer, Juliana Lischka; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2012-06-01

    Class III peroxidases are present as large multigene families in all land plants. This large number of genes together with the diversity of processes catalyzed by peroxidases suggests possible functional specialization of each isoform. However, assigning a precise role for each individual peroxidase gene has continued to be a major bottleneck. Here we investigated the enzyme activity and translational profile of class III peroxidases during stem development of sugarcane as a first step in the estimation of physiological functions of individual isoenzymes. Internodes at three different developmental stages (young, developing and mature) were divided into pith (inner tissue) and rind (outer tissue) fractions. The rind of mature internodes presented the highest enzymatic activity and thus could be considered the ideal tissue for the discovery of peroxidase gene function. In addition, activity staining of 2DE gels revealed different isoperoxidase profiles and protein expression regulation among different tissue fractions. In-gel tryptic digestion of excised spots followed by peptide sequencing by LC-MS/MS positively matched uncharacterized peroxidases in the sugarcane database SUCEST. Multiple spots matching the same peroxidase gene were found, which reflects the generation of more than one isoform from a particular gene by post-translational modifications. The identified sugarcane peroxidases appear to be monocot-specific sequences with no clear ortholog in dicot model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

  18. In vivo high-throughput profiling of CRISPR-Cpf1 activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui K; Song, Myungjae; Lee, Jinu; Menon, A Vipin; Jung, Soobin; Kang, Young-Mook; Choi, Jae W; Woo, Euijeon; Koh, Hyun C; Nam, Jin-Wu; Kim, Hyongbum

    2017-02-01

    CRISPR from Prevotella and Francisella 1 (Cpf1) is an effector endonuclease of the class 2 CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated proteins) gene editing system. We developed a method for evaluating Cpf1 activity, based on target sequence composition in mammalian cells, in a high-throughput manner. A library of >11,000 target sequence and guide RNA pairs was delivered into human cells using lentiviral vectors. Subsequent delivery of Cpf1 into this cell library induced insertions and deletions (indels) at the integrated synthetic target sequences, which allowed en masse evaluation of Cpf1 activity by using deep sequencing. With this approach, we determined protospacer-adjacent motif sequences of two Cpf1 nucleases, one from Acidaminococcus sp. BV3L6 (hereafter referred to as AsCpf1) and the other from Lachnospiraceae bacterium ND2006 (hereafter referred to as LbCpf1). We also defined target-sequence-dependent activity profiles of AsCpf1, which enabled the development of a web tool that predicts the indel frequencies for given target sequences (http://big.hanyang.ac.kr/cindel). Both the Cpf1 characterization profile and the in vivo high-throughput evaluation method will greatly facilitate Cpf1-based genome editing.

  19. Dynamic Metabolic Profiles and Tissue-Specific Source Effects on the Metabolome of Developing Seeds of Brassica napus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianqiao; Zheng, Suning; Xu, Xinying; Guo, Haolun; Ye, Wenxue

    2015-01-01

    Canola (Brassica napus) is one of several important oil-producing crops, and the physiological processes, enzymes, and genes involved in oil synthesis in canola seeds have been well characterized. However, relatively little is known about the dynamic metabolic changes that occur during oil accumulation in seeds, as well as the mechanistic origins of metabolic changes. To explore the metabolic changes that occur during oil accumulation, we isolated metabolites from both seed and silique wall and identified and characterized them by using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results showed that a total of 443 metabolites were identified from four developmental stages. Dozens of these metabolites were differentially expressed during seed ripening, including 20 known to be involved in seed development. To investigate the contribution of tissue-specific carbon sources to the biosynthesis of these metabolites, we examined the metabolic changes of silique walls and seeds under three treatments: leaf-detachment (Ld), phloem-peeling (Pe), and selective silique darkening (Sd). Our study demonstrated that the oil content was independent of leaf photosynthesis and phloem transport during oil accumulation, but required the metabolic influx from the silique wall. Notably, Sd treatment resulted in seed senescence, which eventually led to a severe reduction of the oil content. Sd treatment also caused a significant accumulation of fatty acids (FA), organic acids and amino acids. Furthermore, an unexpected accumulation of sugar derivatives and organic acid was observed in the Pe- and Sd-treated seeds. Consistent with this, the expression of a subset of genes involved in FA metabolism, sugar and oil storage was significantly altered in Pe and Sd treated seeds. Taken together, our studies suggest the metabolite profiles of canola seeds dynamically varied during the course of oil accumulation, which may provide a new insight into the mechanisms of the oil

  20. Dynamic Metabolic Profiles and Tissue-Specific Source Effects on the Metabolome of Developing Seeds of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Tan, Helin; Xie, Qingjun; Xiang, Xiaoe; Li, Jianqiao; Zheng, Suning; Xu, Xinying; Guo, Haolun; Ye, Wenxue

    2015-01-01

    Canola (Brassica napus) is one of several important oil-producing crops, and the physiological processes, enzymes, and genes involved in oil synthesis in canola seeds have been well characterized. However, relatively little is known about the dynamic metabolic changes that occur during oil accumulation in seeds, as well as the mechanistic origins of metabolic changes. To explore the metabolic changes that occur during oil accumulation, we isolated metabolites from both seed and silique wall and identified and characterized them by using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The results showed that a total of 443 metabolites were identified from four developmental stages. Dozens of these metabolites were differentially expressed during seed ripening, including 20 known to be involved in seed development. To investigate the contribution of tissue-specific carbon sources to the biosynthesis of these metabolites, we examined the metabolic changes of silique walls and seeds under three treatments: leaf-detachment (Ld), phloem-peeling (Pe), and selective silique darkening (Sd). Our study demonstrated that the oil content was independent of leaf photosynthesis and phloem transport during oil accumulation, but required the metabolic influx from the silique wall. Notably, Sd treatment resulted in seed senescence, which eventually led to a severe reduction of the oil content. Sd treatment also caused a significant accumulation of fatty acids (FA), organic acids and amino acids. Furthermore, an unexpected accumulation of sugar derivatives and organic acid was observed in the Pe- and Sd-treated seeds. Consistent with this, the expression of a subset of genes involved in FA metabolism, sugar and oil storage was significantly altered in Pe and Sd treated seeds. Taken together, our studies suggest the metabolite profiles of canola seeds dynamically varied during the course of oil accumulation, which may provide a new insight into the mechanisms of the oil

  1. Occurrence, profile and spatial distribution of organochlorines pesticides in soil of Nepal: Implication for source apportionment and health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ishwar Chandra; Devi, Ningombam Linthoingambi; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Shakya, Pawan Raj

    2016-12-15

    Nepal is a landlocked country located between world's two most populous countries-India and China where high level of organochlorines pesticides has been reported from multi-environmental matrices. In this study, we investigated the occurrence, distributions and profile of selected OCP chemicals in surface soil samples (N=72) from four major cities of Nepal. Overall, the sum of total OCPs in soil ranged from 20 to 250ng/g with Biratnagar being the most polluted site in Nepal. DDTs and endosulfans were the most abundant OCP chemicals in soil samples. The concentration of DDTs ranged from 8 to 230ng/g, 8-56ng/g, 8-63ng/g, and 8-27ng/g in surface soil, while endosulfans were in the range of 2.9-3.3ng/g, 2.8-8.7ng/g, 2.8-3.4ng/g, 2.8-3.2ng/g in Biratnagar, Kathmandu, Pokhara and Birgunj, respectively. The isomeric ratio of DDT and their metabolites suggested the ongoing usages of technical DDT as well as dicofol in this region. Lower ratio of α/β-endosulfan indicated past application of endosulfans in Nepal. HCHs were less detected OCPs in soil sample accounting only 4-9% of ∑OCPs. The isomeric ratio of α-/γ-HCH indicated that the HCHs may be originated from mixed source of technical HCH as well as lindane use. Scattered plot of TOC and BC showed they were weakly and positively related with concentration of OCPs in soil. Health risk assessment modeling study of OCPs in soil suggested moderate cancer risk with ingestion being the most potential pathway of OCPs exposure.

  2. Aerosols and lightning activity: The effect of vertical profile and aerosol type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proestakis, E.; Kazadzis, S.; Lagouvardos, K.; Kotroni, V.; Amiridis, V.; Marinou, E.; Price, C.; Kazantzidis, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) instrument on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite has been utilized for the first time in a study regarding lightning activity modulation due to aerosols. Lightning activity observations, obtained by the ZEUS long range Lightning Detection Network, European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) data and Cloud Fraction (CF) retrieved by MODIS on board Aqua satellite have been combined with CALIPSO CALIOP data over the Mediterranean basin and for the period March to November, from 2007 to 2014. The results indicate that lightning activity is enhanced during days characterized by higher Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) values, compared to days with no lightning. This study contributes to existing studies on the link between lightning activity and aerosols, which have been based just on columnar AOD satellite retrievals, by performing a deeper analysis into the effect of aerosol profiles and aerosol types. Correlation coefficients of R = 0.73 between the CALIPSO AOD and the number of lightning strikes detected by ZEUS and of R = 0.93 between ECMWF CAPE and lightning activity are obtained. The analysis of extinction coefficient values at 532 nm indicates that at an altitudinal range exists, between 1.1 km and 2.9 km, where the values for extinction coefficient of lightning-active and non-lightning-active cases are statistically significantly different. Finally, based on the CALIPSO aerosol subtype classification, we have investigated the aerosol conditions of lightning-active and non-lightning-active cases. According to the results polluted dust aerosols are more frequently observed during non-lightning-active days, while dust and smoke aerosols are more abundant in the atmosphere during the lightning-active days.

  3. Energy cost and energy sources during a simulated firefighting activity.

    PubMed

    Perroni, Fabrizio; Tessitore, Antonio; Cortis, Cristina; Lupo, Corrado; D'artibale, Emanuele; Cignitti, Lamberto; Capranica, Laura

    2010-12-01

    This study aimed to 1) analyze the energy requirement (VO2eq) and the contribution of the aerobic (VO2ex), anaerobic alactic (VO2al), and anaerobic lactic (VO2la-) energy sources of a simulated intervention; 2) ascertain differences in mean VO2 and heart rate (HR) during firefighting tasks; and 3) verify the relationship between time of job completion and the fitness level of firefighters. Twenty Italian firefighters (age = 32 ± 6 yr, VO2peak = 43.1 ± 4.9 mL·kg·min) performed 4 consecutive tasks (i.e., child rescue; 250-m run; find an exit; 250-m run) that required a VO2eq of 406.26 ± 73.91 mL·kg (VO2ex = 86 ± 5%; VO2al = 9 ± 3%; VO2la- = 5 ± 3%). After 30 minutes, the recovery HR (108 ± 15 beats·min) and VO2 (8.86±2.67mL·kg·min) were higher (p < 0.0001) than basal values (HR = 66 ± 8 beats·min; VO2 = 4.57 ± 1.07 mL·kg·min), indicating that passive recovery is insufficient in reducing the cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain of the previous workload. Differences (p < 0.001) between tasks emerged for mean VO2 and HR, with a lack of significant correlation between the time of job completion and the firefighters' aerobic fitness. These findings indicate that unpredictable working conditions highly challenge expert firefighters who need adequate fitness levels to meet the requirements of their work. Practically, to enhance the fitness level of firefighters, specific interval training programs should include a wide variety of tasks requiring different intensities and decision-making strategies.

  4. 2001 NSLS ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE).

    SciTech Connect

    CORWIN, M.A.

    2002-05-01

    The year 2001 has been another highly productive year at the NSLS, with over 2500 users, including 720 first time users, conducting nearly 1200 experiments in fields ranging from the life, materials, chemical, and environmental sciences to applied science and technology. An impressive array of highlights from this scientific activity is included in this Activity Report. They include the first demonstration of a direct structural probe of the superconducting ground state in the cuprates by utilizing anomalous soft x-ray resonance effects to selectively enhance the scattering from doped holes. Another highly significant result was the determination of the structure of the potassium channel membrane protein. This is especially significant as it provides insight into how the channel functions and how it selects a particular kind of ion. In the nanoscience area, small angle x-ray scattering measurements played an essential role in determining that preferential sequestering of tailored metal nanocrystals into a self-assembled lamellar diblock copolymer can produce high quality metallodielectric photonic bandgap structures, demonstrating the potential of these nanocomposites for photonic crystal engineering. The infrared microscopy program continued to yield noteworthy results, including an important study that characterized the types and abundances of organic materials in contaminated and uncontaminated sediments from the New York/New Jersey Harbor. These results will be useful in devising improved methods for the destruction or removal of these environmental contaminants.

  5. Hydrochemical profiles in urban groundwater systems: New insights into contaminant sources and pathways in the subsurface from legacy and emerging contaminants.

    PubMed

    White, D; Lapworth, D J; Stuart, M E; Williams, P J

    2016-08-15

    It has long been known that groundwaters beneath urban areas carry a fingerprint from urban activities but finding a consistent tracer for anthropogenic influence has proved elusive. The varied sources of urban contaminants means that a single consistent and inexpensive means of tracing the fate of urban contaminants is not generally possible and multiple tracers are often required to understand the contaminant sources and pathways in these complex systems. This study has utilized a combination of micro-organic (MO) contaminants and inorganic hydrochemistry to trace recharge pathways and quantify the variability of groundwater quality in multi-level piezometers in the city of Doncaster, UK. A total of 23 MOs were detected during this study, with more compounds consistently detected during higher groundwater table conditions highlighting the importance of sampling under different hydrological conditions. Four of the compounds detected are EU Water Framework Directive priority substances: atrazine, simazine, naphthalene and DEHP, with a maximum concentration of 0.18, 0.03, 0.2, 16μg/l respectively. Our study shows that the burden of the banned pesticide atrazine persists in the Sherwood Sandstone and is detected at two of the three study sites. Emerging contaminants are seen throughout the borehole profiles and provide insights into transient pathways for contaminant migration in the sub-surface. Long term changes in inorganic hydrochemistry show possible changes in contaminant input or the dissolution of minerals. Nitrate was detected above 50mg/l but on the whole nitrate concentrations have declined in the intervening years either due to a reduction of nitrate application at the surface or a migration of peak nitrate concentrations laterally or to greater depth. This study shows that multiple tracers together with multi-level piezometers can give a better resolution of contaminant pathways and variable flow regimes within the relatively uncomplicated aquifer of

  6. Protein turnover, amino acid profile and amino acid flux in juvenile shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei: effects of dietary protein source.

    PubMed

    Mente, Eleni; Coutteau, Peter; Houlihan, Dominic; Davidson, Ian; Sorgeloos, Patrick

    2002-10-01

    The effect of dietary protein on protein synthesis and growth of juvenile shrimps Litopenaeus vannamei was investigated using three different diets with equivalent protein content. Protein synthesis was investigated by a flooding dose of tritiated phenylalanine. Survival, specific growth and protein synthesis rates were higher, and protein degradation was lower, in shrimps fed a fish/squid/shrimp meal diet, or a 50% laboratory diet/50% soybean meal variant diet, than in those fed a casein-based diet. The efficiency of retention of synthesized protein as growth was 94% for shrimps fed the fish meal diet, suggesting a very low protein turnover rate; by contrast, the retention of synthesized protein was only 80% for shrimps fed the casein diet. The amino acid profile of the casein diet was poorly correlated with that of the shrimps. 4 h after a single meal the protein synthesis rates increased following an increase in RNA activity. A model was developed for amino acid flux, suggesting that high growth rates involve a reduction in the turnover of proteins, while amino acid loss appears to be high.

  7. Polychlorinated biphenyl source attribution in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA, using multivariate similarity among congener profiles in sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Cacela, Dave; Beltman, Douglas J; Lipton, Joshua

    2002-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener concentrations measured in 1,189 sediment samples from Green Bay (MI/WI, USA), Lake Michigan (MI/WI, USA), and the Fox River (WI, USA) were analyzed statistically to evaluate whether PCB congener profiles in outer Green Bay are more similar to those observed in inner Green Bay or Lake Michigan. Similarities among PCB profiles were assessed with complementary multivariate analysis techniques: Principal component analysis (PCA), cluster analysis, and classification trees. The PCA indicated that profiles in outer Green Bay are distinct from those of inner Green Bay or Lake Michigan but are more similar to those of inner Green Bay. The outer bay profiles are dissimilar to profiles that would result from a simple process of mixing contaminated sediments from the inner bay with Lake Michigan sediments and, therefore, support the conclusion that contaminants in outer Green Bay come from discharges of the Fox River. Several classification trees based on small sets of congener proportions defined simple rules that consistently distinguished the regional profiles. Application of these rules to classify the outer bay samples suggests that the profiles of less than 7% of outer bay samples are similar to Lake Michigan profiles. These results are interpreted with respect to physical transport and chemical weathering processes that may account for the observed differences.

  8. Modification of Pulsed Electric Field Conditions Results in Distinct Activation Profiles of Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Frelinger, Andrew L.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Garner, Allen L.; Torres, Andrew S.; Caiafa, Antonio; Morton, Christine A.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neculaes, V. Bogdan; Michelson, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) used in therapeutic wound healing applications is poorly characterized and standardized. Using pulsed electric fields (PEF) to activate platelets may reduce variability and eliminate complications associated with the use of bovine thrombin. We previously reported that exposing PRP to sub-microsecond duration, high electric field (SMHEF) pulses generates a greater number of platelet-derived microparticles, increased expression of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, and differential release of growth factors compared to thrombin. Moreover, the platelet releasate produced by SMHEF pulses induced greater cell proliferation than plasma. Aims To determine whether sub-microsecond duration, low electric field (SMLEF) bipolar pulses results in differential activation of PRP compared to SMHEF, with respect to profiles of activation markers, growth factor release, and cell proliferation capacity. Methods PRP activation by SMLEF bipolar pulses was compared to SMHEF pulses and bovine thrombin. PRP was prepared using the Harvest SmartPreP2 System from acid citrate dextrose anticoagulated healthy donor blood. PEF activation by either SMHEF or SMLEF pulses was performed using a standard electroporation cuvette preloaded with CaCl2 and a prototype instrument designed to take into account the electrical properties of PRP. Flow cytometry was used to assess platelet surface P-selectin expression, and annexin V binding. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial growth factor (EGF) and platelet factor 4 (PF4), and were measured by ELISA. The ability of supernatants to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture was also evaluated. Controls included vehicle-treated, unactivated PRP and PRP with 10 mM CaCl2 activated with 1 U/mL bovine thrombin. Results PRP activated with SMLEF bipolar pulses or thrombin had similar light scatter profiles, consistent with the

  9. Volatile profiling of aromatic traditional medicinal plant, Polygonum minus in different tissues and its biological activities.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rafidah; Baharum, Syarul Nataqain; Bunawan, Hamidun; Lee, Minki; Mohd Noor, Normah; Rohani, Emelda Roseleena; Ilias, Norashikin; Zin, Noraziah Mohamad

    2014-11-20

    The aim of this research was to identify the volatile metabolites produced in different organs (leaves, stem and roots) of Polygonum minus, an important essential oil producing crop in Malaysia. Two methods of extraction have been applied: Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) and hydrodistillation coupled with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). Approximately, 77 metabolites have been identified and aliphatic compounds contribute significantly towards the aroma and flavour of this plant. Two main aliphatic compounds: decanal and dodecanal were found to be the major contributor. Terpenoid metabolites were identified abundantly in leaves but not in the stem and root of this plant. Further studies on antioxidant, total phenolic content, anticholinesterase and antimicrobial activities were determined in the essential oil and five different extracts. The plant showed the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity in polar (ethanol) extract for all the tissues tested. For anti-acetylcholinesterase activity, leaf in aqueous extract and methanol extract showed the best acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities. However, in microbial activity, the non-polar extracts (n-hexane) showed high antimicrobial activity against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) compared to polar extracts. This study could provide the first step in the phytochemical profiles of volatile compounds and explore the additional value of pharmacology properties of this essential oil producing crop Polygonum minus.

  10. ‘Dopamine-first’ mechanism enables the rational engineering of the norcoclaurine synthase aldehyde activity profile

    PubMed Central

    Lichman, Benjamin R; Gershater, Markus C; Lamming, Eleanor D; Pesnot, Thomas; Sula, Altin; Keep, Nicholas H; Hailes, Helen C; Ward, John M

    2015-01-01

    Norcoclaurine synthase (NCS) (EC 4.2.1.78) catalyzes the Pictet–Spengler condensation of dopamine and an aldehyde, forming a substituted (S)-tetrahydroisoquinoline, a pharmaceutically important moiety. This unique activity has led to NCS being used for both in vitro biocatalysis and in vivo recombinant metabolism. Future engineering of NCS activity to enable the synthesis of diverse tetrahydroisoquinolines is dependent on an understanding of the NCS mechanism and kinetics. We assess two proposed mechanisms for NCS activity: (a) one based on the holo X-ray crystal structure and (b) the ‘dopamine-first’ mechanism based on computational docking. Thalictrum flavum NCS variant activities support the dopamine-first mechanism. Suppression of the non-enzymatic background reaction reveals novel kinetic parameters for NCS, showing it to act with low catalytic efficiency. This kinetic behaviour can account for the ineffectiveness of recombinant NCS in in vivo systems, and also suggests NCS may have an in planta role as a metabolic gatekeeper. The amino acid substitution L76A, situated in the proposed aldehyde binding site, results in the alteration of the enzyme's aldehyde activity profile. This both verifies the dopamine-first mechanism and demonstrates the potential for the rational engineering of NCS activity. PMID:25620686

  11. Angular dependence of source-target-detector in active mode standoff infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Castro-Suarez, John R.; Aparicio-Bolaños, Joaquín. A.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-06-01

    Active mode standoff measurement using infrared spectroscopy were carried out in which the angle between target and the source was varied from 0-70° with respect to the surface normal of substrates containing traces of highly energetic materials (explosives). The experiments were made using three infrared sources: a modulated source (Mod-FTIR), an unmodulated source (UnMod-FTIR) and a scanning quantum cascade laser (QCL), part of a dispersive mid infrared (MIR) spectrometer. The targets consisted of PENT 200 μg/cm2 deposited on aluminum plates placed at 1 m from the sources. The evaluation of the three modalities was aimed at verifying the influence of the highly collimated laser beam in the detection in comparison with the other sources. The Mod-FTIR performed better than QCL source in terms of the MIR signal intensity decrease with increasing angle.

  12. Ten marker compounds-based comparative study of green tea and guava leaf by HPTLC densitometry methods: antioxidant activity profiling.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Sangwan, Payare L; Abdullah, Sheikh Tasduq; Gupta, Bhisan D; Dhar, Jagdish K; Manickavasagar, Rajendran; Koul, Surrinder

    2011-04-01

    High-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) method for the separation and quantitative determination of ten markers (catechins, flavonoids, and phenolics) in different extracts of green tea and guava leaf has been developed and the antioxidant activity profiles of the two plant extracts have been determined. Ten marker compounds have been resolved using silica gel 60 F(254) plates, toluene/acetone/formic acid (5:4:1  v/v/v) for markers 1-6, and toluene/ethyl acetate/formic acid/methanol (3:3:0.8:0.2  v/v/v/v) for markers 7-10 as the mobile phases. The high-performance thin layer chromatography densitometry was performed at wavelengths of 282 and 285  nm for the markers 1-6 and 7-10, respectively. Potent antioxidant activity and the presence of phenolics and flavan-3-ols has been observed for the guava leaf extracts suggestive of its use as an alternate economical source of antioxidants over green tea--the well-established food additive/nutraceutical agent.

  13. An exposure:activity profiling method for interpreting high-throughput screening data for estrogenic activity--proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Becker, Richard A; Friedman, Katie Paul; Simon, Ted W; Marty, M Sue; Patlewicz, Grace; Rowlands, J Craig

    2015-04-01

    Rapid high throughput in vitro screening (HTS) assays are now available for characterizing dose-responses in assays that have been selected for their sensitivity in detecting estrogen-related endpoints. For example, EPA's ToxCast™ program recently released endocrine assay results for more than 1800 substances and the interagency Tox21 consortium is in the process of releasing data for approximately 10,000 chemicals. But such activity measurements alone fall short for the purposes of priority setting or screening because the relevant exposure context is not considered. Here, we extend the method of exposure:activity profiling by calculating the exposure:activity ratios (EARs) using human exposure estimates and AC50 values for a range of chemicals tested in a suite of seven estrogenic assays in ToxCast™ and Tox21. To provide additional context, relative estrogenic exposure:activity quotients (REEAQ) were derived by comparing chemical-specific EARs to the EAR of the ubiquitous dietary phytoestrogen, genistein (GEN). Although the activity of a substance in HTS-endocrine assays is not a measure of health hazard or risk, understanding how such a dose compares to human exposures provides a valuable additional metric that can be used in decision-making; substances with small EARs and REEAQs would indicate low priority for further endocrine screening or testing.

  14. Electromyographic Patterns during Golf Swing: Activation Sequence Profiling and Prediction of Shot Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Verikas, Antanas; Vaiciukynas, Evaldas; Gelzinis, Adas; Parker, James; Olsson, M. Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzes muscle activity, recorded in an eight-channel electromyographic (EMG) signal stream, during the golf swing using a 7-iron club and exploits information extracted from EMG dynamics to predict the success of the resulting shot. Muscles of the arm and shoulder on both the left and right sides, namely flexor carpi radialis, extensor digitorum communis, rhomboideus and trapezius, are considered for 15 golf players (∼5 shots each). The method using Gaussian filtering is outlined for EMG onset time estimation in each channel and activation sequence profiling. Shots of each player revealed a persistent pattern of muscle activation. Profiles were plotted and insights with respect to player effectiveness were provided. Inspection of EMG dynamics revealed a pair of highest peaks in each channel as the hallmark of golf swing, and a custom application of peak detection for automatic extraction of swing segment was introduced. Various EMG features, encompassing 22 feature sets, were constructed. Feature sets were used individually and also in decision-level fusion for the prediction of shot effectiveness. The prediction of the target attribute, such as club head speed or ball carry distance, was investigated using random forest as the learner in detection and regression tasks. Detection evaluates the personal effectiveness of a shot with respect to the player-specific average, whereas regression estimates the value of target attribute, using EMG features as predictors. Fusion after decision optimization provided the best results: the equal error rate in detection was 24.3% for the speed and 31.7% for the distance; the mean absolute percentage error in regression was 3.2% for the speed and 6.4% for the distance. Proposed EMG feature sets were found to be useful, especially when used in combination. Rankings of feature sets indicated statistics for muscle activity in both the left and right body sides, correlation-based analysis of EMG dynamics and features

  15. Phenolic profiles and antioxidant and anticarcinogenic activities of Greek herbal infusions; balancing delight and chemoprevention?

    PubMed

    Kaliora, Andriana C; Kogiannou, Dimitra A A; Kefalas, Panagiotis; Papassideri, Issidora S; Kalogeropoulos, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and phenolic profiles of six herbal infusions - namely rosemary, Cretan dittany, St. John's Wort, sage, marjoram and thyme were assayed. Additionally, the infusion anticarcinogenic effect as to their ability to (a) scavenge free radicals, (b) inhibit cell growth, (c) decrease IL-8 levels and (d) regulate p65 subunit in epithelial colon cancer (HT29) and prostate (PC3) cancer cells was investigated. LC-DAD-MS and GC-MS analyses showed major qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic profiles of the infusions. All herbal infusions exhibited antiradical activity which correlated strongly with their total phenolic content. Infusions exhibited the potential to inhibit cell growth and to reduce IL-8 levels in HT29 colon and PC3 prostate cancer cells. The regulation reported in p65 subunit in HT29 treated with St John's Wort and in PC3 treated with thyme might point to the NF-κB as the molecular target underlying the effect of these infusions.

  16. Inner workings of thrombolites: spatial gradients of metabolic activity as revealed by metatranscriptome profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobberley, J. M.; Khodadad, C. L. M.; Visscher, P. T.; Reid, R. P.; Hagan, P.; Foster, J. S.

    2015-07-01

    Microbialites are sedimentary deposits formed by the metabolic interactions of microbes and their environment. These lithifying microbial communities represent one of the oldest ecosystems on Earth, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying the function of these communities are poorly understood. In this study, we used comparative metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses to characterize the spatial organization of the thrombolites of Highborne Cay, The Bahamas, an actively forming microbialite system. At midday, there were differences in gene expression throughout the spatial profile of the thrombolitic mat with a high abundance of transcripts encoding genes required for photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and exopolymeric substance production in the upper three mm of the mat. Transcripts associated with denitrification and sulfate reduction were in low abundance throughout the depth profile, suggesting these metabolisms were less active during midday. Comparative metagenomics of the Bahamian thrombolites with other known microbialite ecosystems from across the globe revealed that, despite many shared core pathways, the thrombolites represented genetically distinct communities. This study represents the first time the metatranscriptome of living microbialite has been characterized and offers a new molecular perspective on those microbial metabolisms, and their underlying genetic pathways, that influence the mechanisms of carbonate precipitation in lithifying microbial mat ecosystems.

  17. Activity Pattern Profiles: Relationship With Affect, Daily Functioning, Impairment, and Variables Related to Life Goals.

    PubMed

    Esteve, Rosa; López-Martínez, Alicia E; Peters, Madelon L; Serrano-Ibáñez, Elena R; Ruíz-Párraga, Gema T; González-Gómez, Henar; Ramírez-Maestre, Carmen

    2017-01-04

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to identify subgroups of patients on the basis of their activity patterns and to investigate their relationship with life goals, optimism, affect, and functioning. The sample was comprised of 276 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed on the activity pattern variables and the resulting clusters were compared using 1-way analysis of variance. The 4-cluster was the optimal solution. The 4 clusters comprised: 1) avoiders: patients with high levels of avoidance and low levels of persistence, who use pacing to reduce pain, 2) doers: patients with high levels of persistence and low levels of pacing and avoidance, 3) extreme cyclers: patients with high levels of avoidance and persistence and low levels of pacing, and 4) medium cyclers: patients with moderately high levels of avoidance and persistence and high levels of pacing. Comparison of the clusters showed that doers had the most adaptive profile, whereas avoiders, followed by extreme cyclers, had unhealthy profiles. Doers showed a high level of optimism and a good balance between goal value, expectancy, and conflict.

  18. Inner workings of thrombolites: spatial gradients of metabolic activity as revealed by metatranscriptome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Mobberley, J. M.; Khodadad, C. L. M.; Visscher, P. T.; Reid, R. P.; Hagan, P.; Foster, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Microbialites are sedimentary deposits formed by the metabolic interactions of microbes and their environment. These lithifying microbial communities represent one of the oldest ecosystems on Earth, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying the function of these communities are poorly understood. In this study, we used comparative metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses to characterize the spatial organization of the thrombolites of Highborne Cay, The Bahamas, an actively forming microbialite system. At midday, there were differences in gene expression throughout the spatial profile of the thrombolitic mat with a high abundance of transcripts encoding genes required for photosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and exopolymeric substance production in the upper three mm of the mat. Transcripts associated with denitrification and sulfate reduction were in low abundance throughout the depth profile, suggesting these metabolisms were less active during midday. Comparative metagenomics of the Bahamian thrombolites with other known microbialite ecosystems from across the globe revealed that, despite many shared core pathways, the thrombolites represented genetically distinct communities. This study represents the first time the metatranscriptome of living microbialite has been characterized and offers a new molecular perspective on those microbial metabolisms, and their underlying genetic pathways, that influence the mechanisms of carbonate precipitation in lithifying microbial mat ecosystems. PMID:26213359

  19. Activation processes on GaAs photocathode by different currents of oxygen source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zhuang; Shi, Feng; Cheng, Hongchang; Wang, Shufei; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Yuan; Chen, Chang

    2015-04-01

    In order to know the influence of activation processes on GaAs photocathodes, three GaAs samples were activated by a fixed current of cesium source and different currents of oxygen source. The current of caesium source is same during activation to ensure initial adsorption of caesium quantum is similar, which is the base to show the difference during alternation activation of caesium and oxygen. Analysed with the activation data, it is indicated that Cs-to-O current ratio of 1.07 is the optimum ratio to obtain higher sensitivity and better stability. According to double dipole model, stable and uniform double dipole layers of GaAs-O-Cs:Cs-O-Cs are formed and negative electron affinity is achieved on GaAs surface by activation with cesium and oxygen. The analytical result is just coincident with the model. Thus there is an efficient technological method to improve sensitivity and stability of GaAs photocathode.

  20. A study of outflow activity around EGO sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, C.; Paron, S.; Ortega, M.; Astort, A.; Rubio, M.

    2013-06-01

    Extended green objects (EGOs) were identified in Spitzer-IRAC images as they present a particular extended "green" emission at 4.5 μm, hence their name. An EGO is probably a massive young stellar object driving outflows, with the extended emission at 4.5 μm likely due to H2 lines and CO band-heads excited by the shock of the outflow propagating in the interstellar medium. Therefore, the dedicated observation and study of EGOs and their close environments can provide additional insight into our understanding of massive-star formation processes. In this context, based on previous studies we have selected a set of particularly interesting EGOs with the aim of analysing and characterising their outflow activity and its impact on the interstellar medium around them. This is a work in progress in which new observations at molecular and near-infrared wavelengths have recently been carried out towards some of the selected EGOs and more observations will be done in the following semesters. Here we report the results obtained so far from the data analysis of the images towards EGO, G45.47+0.05 and EGO, G35.04-0.47. For these two targets the molecular line observations were acquired using the Atacama Submillimiter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) and the near-infrared images for EGO, G45.47+0.05 were taken with Gemini-NIRI. The near future plans of this project include new images from WHT-LIRIS for EGO, G035.20-0.74 and EGO, G035.03+0.35.

  1. Antistaphylococcal activity and metabolite profiling of manuka honey (Leptospermum scoparium L.) after in vitro simulated digestion.

    PubMed

    Mannina, Luisa; Sobolev, Anatoly P; Coppo, Erika; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Marchese, Anna; Daglia, Maria

    2016-03-01

    The antistaphylococcal activity against methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus and the metabolite profiling of manuka honey (MH) were investigated before and after in vitro simulated gastric (GD) and gastroduodenal (GDD) digestions. Undigested manuka honey showed antibacterial activity against all the tested strains, the GD sample showed no activity against S. aureus, and the GDD honey showed an antistaphylococcal activity, which was slightly reduced in comparison with the undigested sample. To explain these results, methylglyoxal (MGO), to which most of the antibacterial activity of MH is ascribed, was subjected to in vitro simulated GD and GDD. After digestion, MGO showed antibacterial activity at concentrations definitively higher than those registered in digested MH samples. These results showed that the antistaphylococcal activity registered after digestion cannot be ascribed to MGO. Thus metabolite analysis, carried out using an explorative untargeted NMR-based approach and a targeted RP-HPLC-PAD-ESI-MSn analysis focused on bio-active substances, was used to highlight the chemical modifications occurring from digestion. The results showed that (1) the level of MGO decreases and (2) the content of aromatic compounds, such as leptosin and methyl syringate, markers of manuka honey, was stable under gastric and gastroduodenal conditions, whereas (3) the levels of acetic and lactic acids increase in particular after gastroduodenal digestion, being 1.5 and 2.8 times higher in GDD-MH than in UND-MH, respectively. Overall, the results obtained from chemical analysis provide at least a partial explanation of the registered antibacterial activity observed after gastroduodenal digestion.

  2. Alkaloid profiles and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of Fumaria species from Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Vrancheva, Radka Z; Ivanov, Ivan G; Aneva, Ina Y; Dincheva, Ivayla N; Badjakov, Ilian K; Pavlov, Atanas I

    2016-01-01

    GC-MS analysis of alkaloid profiles of five Fumaria species, naturally grown in Bulgaria (F. officinalis, F. thuretii, F. kralikii, F. rostellata and F. schrammii) and analysis of acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of alkaloid extracts were performed. Fourteen isoquinoline alkaloids were identified, with the principle ones being protopine, cryptopine, sinactine, parfumine, fumariline, fumarophycine, and fumaritine. Protopine contents, defined by HPLC analysis varied between 210.6 ± 8.8 μg/g DW (F. schrammii) and 334.5 ± 7.1 μg/g DW. (F. rostellata). While all of the investigated alkaloid extracts significantly inhibited acetylcholinesterase activity, the F. kralikii demonstrated the highest level of inhibition (IC(50) 0.13 ± 0.01 mg extract/mL).

  3. Time place learning and activity profile under constant light and constant dark in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Moura, Clarissa de Almeida; Lima, Jéssica Polyana da Silva; Silveira, Vanessa Augusta Magalhães; Miguel, Mário André Leocadio; Luchiari, Ana Carolina

    2017-05-01

    The ability to learn about the signs of variability in space and time is known as time place learning (TPL). To adjust their circadian rhythms, animals use stimuli that change regularly, such as the light-dark cycle, temperature, food availability or even social stimuli. Because light-dark cycle is the most important environmental temporal cue, we asked how a diurnal animal would perform TPL if this cue was removed. Zebrafish has been extensively studied in the chronobiology area due to it diurnal chronotype, thus, we studied the effects of constant light and constant dark on the time-place learning and activity profile in zebrafish. Our data show that while under constant light and dark condition zebrafish was not able of TPL, after 30days under the constant conditions, constant light led to higher activity level and less significant (robust) 24h rhythm.

  4. Modulation of Activity Profiles for Largazole-Based HDAC Inhibitors through Alteration of Prodrug Properties

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Largazole is a potent and class I-selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor purified from marine cyanobacteria and was demonstrated to possess antitumor activity. Largazole employs a unique prodrug strategy, via a thioester moiety, to liberate the bioactive species largazole thiol. Here we report alternate prodrug strategies to modulate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles of new largazole-based compounds. The in vitro effects of largazole analogues on cancer cell proliferation and enzymatic activities of purified HDACs were comparable to the natural product. However, in vitro and in vivo histone hyperacetylation in HCT116 cells and implanted tumors, respectively, showed differences, particularly in the onset of action and oral bioavailability. These results indicate that, by employing a different approach to disguise the “warhead” moiety, the functional consequence of these prodrugs can be significantly modulated. Our data corroborate the role of the pharmacokinetic properties of this class of compounds to elicit the desired and timely functional response. PMID:25147612

  5. Application of PAH concentration profiles in lake sediments as indicators for smelting activity.

    PubMed

    Warner, Wiebke; Ruppert, Hans; Licha, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    The ability of lake sediment cores to store long-term anthropogenic pollution establishes them as natural archives. In this study, we focus on the influence of copper shale mining and smelting in the Mansfeld area of Germany, using the depth profiles of two sediment cores from Lake Süßer See. The sediment cores provide a detailed chronological deposition history of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals in the studied area. Theisen sludge, a fine-grained residue from copper shale smelting, reaches the lake via deflation by wind or through riverine input; it is assumed to be the main source of pollution. To achieve the comparability of absolute contaminant concentrations, we calculated the influx of contaminants based on the sedimentation rate. Compared to the natural background concentrations, PAHs are significantly more enriched than heavy metals. They are therefore more sensitive and selective for source apportionment. We suggest two diagnostic ratios of PAHs to distinguish between Theisen sludge and its leachate: the ratio fluoranthene to pyrene ~2 and the ratio of PAH with logKOW<5.7 to PAH with a logKOW>5.7 converging to an even lower value than 2.3 (the characteristic of Theisen sludge) to identify the particulate input in lake environments.

  6. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling Identifies Type 1 Interferon Response Pathways in Active Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Zhang, Mingzi M.; Wong, Hazel E. E.; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout; Marzuki, Sangkot; Seielstad, Mark; van de Vosse, Esther; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), remains the leading cause of mortality from a single infectious agent. Each year around 9 million individuals newly develop active TB disease, and over 2 billion individuals are latently infected with M.tb worldwide, thus being at risk of developing TB reactivation disease later in life. The underlying mechanisms and pathways of protection against TB in humans, as well as the dynamics of the host response to M.tb infection, are incompletely understood. We carried out whole-genome expression profiling on a cohort of TB patients longitudinally sampled along 3 time-points: during active infection, during treatment, and after completion of curative treatment. We identified molecular signatures involving the upregulation of type-1 interferon (α/β) mediated signaling and chronic inflammation during active TB disease in an Indonesian population, in line with results from two recent studies in ethnically and epidemiologically different populations in Europe and South Africa. Expression profiles were captured in neutrophil-depleted blood samples, indicating a major contribution of lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Expression of type-1 interferon (α/β) genes mediated was also upregulated in the lungs of M.tb infected mice and in infected human macrophages. In patients, the regulated gene expression-signature normalized during treatment, including the type-1 interferon mediated signaling and a concurrent opposite regulation of interferon-gamma. Further analysis revealed IL15RA, UBE2L6 and GBP4 as molecules involved in the type-I interferon response in all three experimental models. Our data is highly suggestive that the innate immune type-I interferon signaling cascade could be used as a quantitative tool for monitoring active TB disease, and provide evidence that components of the patient’s blood gene expression signature bear similarities to the pulmonary and macrophage response to mycobacterial infection

  7. Structure-activity relationships and receptor profiles of some ocular hypotensive prostanoids.

    PubMed

    Resul, B; Stjernschantz, J; Selén, G; Bito, L

    1997-02-01

    A novel series of prostaglandin F (PGF) analogues have been prepared and evaluated in vivo and in vitro. Their intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering effects and potential side-effects, as prodrug eye drops, have been tested in cats, monkeys and rabbits. Furthermore, the PGF-analogues were tested as free acids for FP-receptor agonistic activity on cat iris sphincter. The results were compared to that of PGF2 alpha (C#1). Based on the structure-activity relationship investigations, inversion of the configuration, at carbon-9 (C#3) or carbon-11 (C#4), changes the potency and the receptor profile of PGF2 alpha. Replacement part of the omega-chain of PGF2 alpha with a benzene ring changes the potency and receptor profile of PGF2 alpha. The optimal position of the benzene ring is on carbon-17, 17-phenyl-18,19,20-trinor PGF2 alpha-isopropyl ester (C#8), and exhibited a much higher therapeutic index in the eye than PGF2 alpha or its ester. The biological activity of different substituents on the C#8 benzene ring have also been studied. Interestingly, introduction of a methyl group at positions 2 or 3 of the benzene ring (C#16 or C#17) affords compounds which are biologically more active than the methyl group at the 4-position (C#18). Furthermore, one of the analogues 13,14-dihydro-17-phenyl-18,19,20-trinor PGF2 alpha-isopropyl ester (latanoprost), has been found in clinical studies to be a highly potent and efficacious IOP-reducing agent for the treatment of glaucoma.

  8. Prediction of Response to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy in Rectal Cancer by Multiplex Kinase Activity Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Folkvord, Sigurd; Flatmark, Kjersti; Dueland, Svein

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Tumor response of rectal cancer to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) varies considerably. In experimental tumor models and clinical radiotherapy, activity of particular subsets of kinase signaling pathways seems to predict radiation response. This study aimed to determine whether tumor kinase activity profiles might predict tumor response to preoperative CRT in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: Sixty-seven LARC patients were treated with a CRT regimen consisting of radiotherapy, fluorouracil, and, where possible, oxaliplatin. Pretreatment tumor biopsy specimens were analyzed using microarrays with kinase substrates, and the resulting substrate phosphorylation patterns were correlated with tumor response to preoperative treatment as assessed by histomorphologic tumor regression grade (TRG). A predictive model for TRG scores from phosphosubstrate signatures was obtained by partial-least-squares discriminant analysis. Prediction performance was evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation and use of an independent test set. Results: In the patient population, 73% and 15% were scored as good responders (TRG 1-2) or intermediate responders (TRG 3), whereas 12% were assessed as poor responders (TRG 4-5). In a subset of 7 poor responders and 12 good responders, treatment outcome was correctly predicted for 95%. Application of the prediction model on the remaining patient samples resulted in correct prediction for 85%. Phosphosubstrate signatures generated by poor-responding tumors indicated high kinase activity, which was inhibited by the kinase inhibitor sunitinib, and several discriminating phosphosubstrates represented proteins derived from signaling pathways implicated in radioresistance. Conclusions: Multiplex kinase activity profiling may identify functional biomarkers predictive of tumor response to preoperative CRT in LARC.

  9. Interpretation of pH-activity profiles for acid-base catalysis from molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Thakshila; Swails, Jason M; Harris, Michael E; Roitberg, Adrian E; York, Darrin M

    2015-02-17

    The measurement of reaction rate as a function of pH provides essential information about mechanism. These rates are sensitive to the pK(a) values of amino acids directly involved in catalysis that are often shifted by the enzyme active site environment. Experimentally observed pH-rate profiles are usually interpreted using simple kinetic models that allow estimation of "apparent pK(a)" values of presumed general acid and base catalysts. One of the underlying assumptions in these models is that the protonation states are uncorrelated. In this work, we introduce the use of constant pH molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent (CpHMD) with replica exchange in the pH-dimension (pH-REMD) as a tool to aid in the interpretation of pH-activity data of enzymes and to test the validity of different kinetic models. We apply the methods to RNase A, a prototype acid-base catalyst, to predict the macroscopic and microscopic pK(a) values, as well as the shape of the pH-rate profile. Results for apo and cCMP-bound RNase A agree well with available experimental data and suggest that deprotonation of the general acid and protonation of the general base are not strongly coupled in transphosphorylation and hydrolysis steps. Stronger coupling, however, is predicted for the Lys41 and His119 protonation states in apo RNase A, leading to the requirement for a microscopic kinetic model. This type of analysis may be important for other catalytic systems where the active forms of the implicated general acid and base are oppositely charged and more highly correlated. These results suggest a new way for CpHMD/pH-REMD simulations to bridge the gap with experiments to provide a molecular-level interpretation of pH-activity data in studies of enzyme mechanisms.

  10. Active source cancellation of the blade tone fundamental and harmonics in centrifugal fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmann, G. H.; Fox, D. J.; Neise, W.

    1988-10-01

    An active source method is shown to effectively cancel the blade tone fundamental and harmonics in centrifugal fans for a variety of fan loading conditions and duct terminations. The special case is considered where the frequency of the blade tone harmonics lies just above the cut-on frequency of the first higher order mode of the fan ducting. The results suggest that the present active control mechanism involves a local alteration of the aerodynamic source pressures.

  11. Tuning the Biological Activity Profile of Antibacterial Polymers via Subunit Substitution Pattern

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Binary nylon-3 copolymers containing cationic and hydrophobic subunits can mimic the biological properties of host-defense peptides, but relationships between composition and activity are not yet well understood for these materials. Hydrophobic subunits in previously studied examples have been limited mostly to cycloalkane-derived structures, with cyclohexyl proving to be particularly promising. The present study evaluates alternative hydrophobic subunits that are isomeric or nearly isomeric with the cyclohexyl example; each has four sp3 carbons in the side chains. The results show that varying the substitution pattern of the hydrophobic subunit leads to relatively small changes in antibacterial activity but causes significant changes in hemolytic activity. We hypothesize that these differences in biological activity profile arise, at least in part, from variations among the conformational propensities of the hydrophobic subunits. The α,α,β,β-tetramethyl unit is optimal among the subunits we have examined, providing copolymers with potent antibacterial activity and excellent prokaryote vs eukaryote selectivity. Bacteria do not readily develop resistance to the new antibacterial nylon-3 copolymers. These findings suggest that variation in subunit conformational properties could be generally valuable in the development of synthetic polymers for biological applications. PMID:24601599

  12. Exploration of the antiplatelet activity profile of betulinic acid on human platelets.

    PubMed

    Tzakos, Andreas G; Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Tsoumani, Maria; Kyriakou, Eleni; Hwa, John; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Tselepis, Alexandros D

    2012-07-18

    Betulinic acid, a natural pentacyclic triterpene acid, presents a diverse mode of biological actions including antiretroviral, antibacterial, antimalarial, and anti-inflammatory activities. The potency of betulinic acid as an inhibitor of human platelet activation was evaluated, and its antiplatelet profile against in vitro platelet aggregation, induced by several platelet agonists (adenosine diphosphate, thrombin receptor activator peptide-14, and arachidonic acid), was explored. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to examine the effect of betulinic acid on P-selectin membrane expression and PAC-1 binding to activated platelets. Betulinic acid potently inhibits platelet aggregation and also reduced PAC-1 binding and the membrane expression of P-selectin. Principal component analysis was used to screen, on the chemical property space, for potential common pharmacophores of betulinic acid with approved antithrombotic drugs. A common pharmacophore was defined between the NMR-derived structure of betulinic acid and prostacyclin agonists (PGI2), and the importance of its carboxylate group in its antiplatelet activity was determined. The present results indicate that betulinic acid has potential use as an antithrombotic compound and suggest that the mechanism underlying the antiplatelet effects of betulinic acid is similar to that of the PGI2 receptor agonists, a hypothesis that deserves further investigation.

  13. Tuning the biological activity profile of antibacterial polymers via subunit substitution pattern.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runhui; Chen, Xinyu; Chakraborty, Saswata; Lemke, Justin J; Hayouka, Zvi; Chow, Clara; Welch, Rodney A; Weisblum, Bernard; Masters, Kristyn S; Gellman, Samuel H

    2014-03-19

    Binary nylon-3 copolymers containing cationic and hydrophobic subunits can mimic the biological properties of host-defense peptides, but relationships between composition and activity are not yet well understood for these materials. Hydrophobic subunits in previously studied examples have been limited mostly to cycloalkane-derived structures, with cyclohexyl proving to be particularly promising. The present study evaluates alternative hydrophobic subunits that are isomeric or nearly isomeric with the cyclohexyl example; each has four sp(3) carbons in the side chains. The results show that varying the substitution pattern of the hydrophobic subunit leads to relatively small changes in antibacterial activity but causes significant changes in hemolytic activity. We hypothesize that these differences in biological activity profile arise, at least in part, from variations among the conformational propensities of the hydrophobic subunits. The α,α,β,β-tetramethyl unit is optimal among the subunits we have examined, providing copolymers with potent antibacterial activity and excellent prokaryote vs eukaryote selectivity. Bacteria do not readily develop resistance to the new antibacterial nylon-3 copolymers. These findings suggest that variation in subunit conformational properties could be generally valuable in the development of synthetic polymers for biological applications.

  14. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile

    PubMed Central

    Storch, Eric A.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Bodzin, Danielle; Mutch, P. Jane; Lehmkuhl, Heather; Aman, Michael; Goodman, Wayne K.

    2010-01-01

    Although effective in treating a range of childhood psychiatric conditions, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been implicated in the induction of an “activation syndrome” (characterized by symptoms of irritability, restlessness, emotional labiality, etc.) that may represent an intermediary state change that fosters suicidality. SSRI-induced activation syndrome is well-accepted by many clinicians and thought to be relatively common, particularly in children and teens. However, gaps exist in empirical data on phenomenology and tools for early detection. With this in mind, we report on a recently funded National Institutes of Health grant to develop a measure of behavioral activation to be completed in a clinical setting. We discuss the development of this measure—the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile (TE-ASAP)—as well as psychometric results from a sample of youth with internalizing disorders who were at varying stages of SSRI treatment. Overall, psychometric data were quite promising, with the TE-ASAP demonstrating excellent reliability (i.e., internal consistency, inter-rater, short-term test–retest stability) and strong validity properties. Through further evaluation of the TE-ASAP in the context of a controlled multimodal trial in youth with obsessive–compulsive disorder, we hope to augment understanding of activation syndrome and, in turn, mitigate risks through early detection of this potentially lifethreatening adverse effect. PMID:20473344

  15. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jeannette M; Storch, Eric A; Murphy, Tanya K; Bodzin, Danielle; Mutch, P Jane; Lehmkuhl, Heather; Aman, Michael; Goodman, Wayne K

    2010-02-04

    Although effective in treating a range of childhood psychiatric conditions, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) have been implicated in the induction of an "activation syndrome" (characterized by symptoms of irritability, restlessness, emotional labiality, etc.) that may represent an intermediary state change that fosters suicidality. SSRI-induced activation syndrome is well-accepted by many clinicians and thought to be relatively common, particularly in children and teens. However, gaps exist in empirical data on phenomenology and tools for early detection. With this in mind, we report on a recently funded National Institutes of Health grant to develop a measure of behavioral activation to be completed in a clinical setting. We discuss the development of this measure-the Treatment-Emergent Activation and Suicidality Assessment Profile (TE-ASAP)-as well as psychometric results from a sample of youth with internalizing disorders who were at varying stages of SSRI treatment. Overall, psychometric data were quite promising, with the TE-ASAP demonstrating excellent reliability (i.e., internal consistency, inter-rater, short-term test-retest stability) and strong validity properties. Through further evaluation of the TE-ASAP in the context of a controlled multimodal trial in youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder, we hope to augment understanding of activation syndrome and, in turn, mitigate risks through early detection of this potentially lifethreatening adverse effect.

  16. Active faults in the deformation zone off Noto Peninsula, Japan, revealed by high- resolution seismic profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Okamura, Y.; Murakami, F.; Kimura, H.; Ikehara, K.

    2008-12-01

    Recently, a lot of earthquakes occur in Japan. The deformation zone which many faults and folds have concentrated exists on the Japan Sea side of Japan. The 2007 Noto Hanto Earthquake (MJMA 6.9) and 2007 Chuetsu-oki Earthquake (MJMA 6.8) were caused by activity of parts of faults in this deformation zone. The Noto Hanto Earthquake occurred on 25 March, 2007 under the northwestern coast of Noto Peninsula, Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. This earthquake is located in Quaternary deformation zone that is continued from northern margin of Noto Peninsula to southeast direction (Okamura, 2007a). National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) carried out high-resolution seismic survey using Boomer and 12 channels short streamer cable in the northern part off Noto Peninsula, in order to clarify distribution and activities of active faults in the deformation zone. A twelve channels short streamer cable with 2.5 meter channel spacing developed by AIST and private corporation is designed to get high resolution seismic profiles in shallow sea area. The multi-channel system is possible to equip on a small fishing boat, because the data acquisition system is based on PC and the length of the cable is short and easy to handle. Moreover, because the channel spacing is short, this cable is very effective for a high- resolution seismic profiling survey in the shallow sea, and seismic data obtained by multi-channel cable can be improved by velocity analysis and CDP stack. In the northern part off Noto Peninsula, seismic profiles depicting geologic structure up to 100 meters deep under sea floor were obtained. The most remarkable reflection surface recognized in the seismic profiles is erosion surface at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). In the western part, sediments about 30 meters (40 msec) thick cover the erosional surface that is distributed under the shelf shallower than 100m in depth and the sediments thin toward offshore and east. Flexures like deformation in

  17. Depth profiles of bacterioplankton assemblages and their activities in the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celussi, Mauro; Cataletto, Bruno; Fonda Umani, Serena; Del Negro, Paola

    2009-12-01

    The identification of bacterial community structure has led, since the beginning of the 1990s, to the idea that bacterioplankton populations are stratified in the water column and that diverse lineages with mostly unknown phenotypes dominate marine microbial communities. The diversity of depth-related assemblages is also reflected in their patterns of activities, as bacteria affiliated to different groups can express different activities in a given ecosystem. We analysed bacterial assemblages (DGGE fingerprinting) and their activities (prokaryotic carbon production, protease, phosphatase, chitinase, beta-glucosidase and lipase activities) in two areas in the Ross Sea, differing mainly in their productivity regime: two stations are located in the Terra Nova Bay polynya area (highly productive during summer) and two close to Cape Adare (low phytoplankton biomass and activity). At every station a pronounced stratification of bacterial assemblages was identified, highlighting epipelagic communities differing substantially from the mesopelagic and the bathypelagic communities. Multivariate analysis suggested that pressure and indirectly light-affected variables (i.e. oxygen and fluorescence) had a great effect on the bacterial communities outcompeting the possible influences of temperature and dissolved organic carbon concentration. Generally activities decreased with depth even though a signal of the Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) at one of the northern stations corresponded to an increase in some of the degradative activities, generating some 'hot spots' in the profile. We also found that similar assemblages express similar metabolic requirements reflected in analogous patterns of activity (similar degradative potential and leucine uptake rate). Furthermore, the presence of eukaryotic chloroplasts' 16S rDNA in deep samples highlighted how in some cases the dense surface-water formation (in this case High Salinity Shelf Water—HSSW) and downwelling can affect, at least

  18. The fast neutron fluence and the activation detector activity calculations using the effective source method and the adjoint function

    SciTech Connect

    Hep, J.; Konecna, A.; Krysl, V.; Smutny, V.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes the application of effective source in forward calculations and the adjoint method to the solution of fast neutron fluence and activation detector activities in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and RPV cavity of a VVER-440 reactor. Its objective is the demonstration of both methods on a practical task. The effective source method applies the Boltzmann transport operator to time integrated source data in order to obtain neutron fluence and detector activities. By weighting the source data by time dependent decay of the detector activity, the result of the calculation is the detector activity. Alternatively, if the weighting is uniform with respect to time, the result is the fluence. The approach works because of the inherent linearity of radiation transport in non-multiplying time-invariant media. Integrated in this way, the source data are referred to as the effective source. The effective source in the forward calculations method thereby enables the analyst to replace numerous intensive transport calculations with a single transport calculation in which the time dependence and magnitude of the source are correctly represented. In this work, the effective source method has been expanded slightly in the following way: neutron source data were performed with few group method calculation using the active core calculation code MOBY-DICK. The follow-up neutron transport calculation was performed using the neutron transport code TORT to perform multigroup calculations. For comparison, an alternative method of calculation has been used based upon adjoint functions of the Boltzmann transport equation. Calculation of the three-dimensional (3-D) adjoint function for each required computational outcome has been obtained using the deterministic code TORT and the cross section library BGL440. Adjoint functions appropriate to the required fast neutron flux density and neutron reaction rates have been calculated for several significant points within the RPV

  19. Effect of Lipid Sources with Different Fatty Acid Profiles on Intake, Nutrient Digestion and Ruminal Fermentation of Feedlot Nellore Steers

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentini, Giovani; Carvalho, Isabela P. C.; Messana, Juliana D.; Canesin, Roberta C.; Castagnino, Pablo S.; Lage, Josiane F.; Arcuri, Pedro B.; Berchielli, Telma T.

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of lipid sources with different fatty acid profiles on nutrient digestion and ruminal fermentation. Ten rumen and duodenal fistulated Nellore steers (268 body weight±27 kg) were distributed in a duplicated 5×5 Latin square. Dietary treatments were as follows: without fat (WF), palm oil (PO), linseed oil (LO), protected fat (PF; Lactoplus), and whole soybeans (WS). The roughage feed was corn silage (600 g/kg on a dry matter [DM] basis) plus concentrate (400 g/kg on a DM basis). The higher intake of DM and organic matter (OM) (p<0.001) was found in animals on the diet with PF and WF (around 4.38 and 4.20 kg/d, respectively). Treatments with PO and LO decreased by around 10% the total digestibility of DM and OM (p<0.05). The addition of LO decreased by around 22.3% the neutral detergent fiber digestibility (p = 0.047) compared with other diets. The higher microbial protein synthesis was found in animals on the diet with LO and WS (33 g N/kg OM apparently digested in the rumen; p = 0.040). The highest C18:0 and linolenic acid intakes occurred in animals fed LO (p<0.001), and the highest intake of oleic (p = 0.002) and C16 acids (p = 0.022) occurred with the diets with LO and PF. Diet with PF decreased biohydrogenation extent (p = 0.05) of C18:1 n9,c, C18:2 n6,c, and total unsaturated fatty acids (UFA; around 20%, 7%, and 13%, respectively). The diet with PF and WF increased the concentration of NH3-N (p<0.001); however, the diet did not change volatile fatty acids (p>0.05), such as the molar percentage of acetate, propionate, butyrate and the acetate:propionate ratio. Treatments PO, LO and with WS decreased by around 50% the concentration of protozoa (p<0.001). Diets with some type of protection (PF and WS) decreased the effects of lipid on ruminal fermentation and presented similar outflow of benefit UFA as LO. PMID:26580282

  20. Effect of Lipid Sources with Different Fatty Acid Profiles on Intake, Nutrient Digestion and Ruminal Fermentation of Feedlot Nellore Steers.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, Giovani; Carvalho, Isabela P C; Messana, Juliana D; Canesin, Roberta C; Castagnino, Pablo S; Lage, Josiane F; Arcuri, Pedro B; Berchielli, Telma T

    2015-11-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of lipid sources with different fatty acid profiles on nutrient digestion and ruminal fermentation. Ten rumen and duodenal fistulated Nellore steers (268 body weight±27 kg) were distributed in a duplicated 5×5 Latin square. Dietary treatments were as follows: without fat (WF), palm oil (PO), linseed oil (LO), protected fat (PF; Lactoplus), and whole soybeans (WS). The roughage feed was corn silage (600 g/kg on a dry matter [DM] basis) plus concentrate (400 g/kg on a DM basis). The higher intake of DM and organic matter (OM) (p<0.001) was found in animals on the diet with PF and WF (around 4.38 and 4.20 kg/d, respectively). Treatments with PO and LO decreased by around 10% the total digestibility of DM and OM (p<0.05). The addition of LO decreased by around 22.3% the neutral detergent fiber digestibility (p = 0.047) compared with other diets. The higher microbial protein synthesis was found in animals on the diet with LO and WS (33 g N/kg OM apparently digested in the rumen; p = 0.040). The highest C18:0 and linolenic acid intakes occurred in animals fed LO (p<0.001), and the highest intake of oleic (p = 0.002) and C16 acids (p = 0.022) occurred with the diets with LO and PF. Diet with PF decreased biohydrogenation extent (p = 0.05) of C18:1 n9,c, C18:2 n6,c, and total unsaturated fatty acids (UFA; around 20%, 7%, and 13%, respectively). The diet with PF and WF increased the concentration of NH3-N (p<0.001); however, the diet did not change volatile fatty acids (p>0.05), such as the molar percentage of acetate, propionate, butyrate and the acetate:propionate ratio. Treatments PO, LO and with WS decreased by around 50% the concentration of protozoa (p<0.001). Diets with some type of protection (PF and WS) decreased the effects of lipid on ruminal fermentation and presented similar outflow of benefit UFA as LO.

  1. Modeling of neutrals in the Linac4 H(-) ion source plasma: hydrogen atom production density profile and Hα intensity by collisional radiative model.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Shibata, T; Ohta, M; Yasumoto, M; Nishida, K; Hatayama, A; Mattei, S; Lettry, J; Sawada, K; Fantz, U

    2014-02-01

    To control the H(0) atom production profile in the H(-) ion sources is one of the important issues for the efficient and uniform surface H(-) production. The purpose of this study is to construct a collisional radiative (CR) model to calculate the effective production rate of H(0) atoms from H2 molecules in the model geometry of the radio-frequency (RF) H(-) ion source for Linac4 accelerator. In order to validate the CR model by comparison with the experimental results from the optical emission spectroscopy, it is also necessary for the model to calculate Balmer photon emission rate in the source. As a basic test of the model, the time evolutions of H(0) production and the Balmer Hα photon emission rate are calculated for given electron energy distribution functions in the Linac4 RF H(-) ion source. Reasonable test results are obtained and basis for the detailed comparisons with experimental results have been established.

  2. HerMES: disentangling active galactic nuclei and star formation in the radio source population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlings, J. I.; Page, M. J.; Symeonidis, M.; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Guo, K.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ibar, E.; Oliver, S. J.; Roseboom, I. G.; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N.; Vaccari, M.; Wardlow, J. L.

    2015-10-01

    We separate the extragalactic radio source population above ˜50 μJy into active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star-forming sources. The primary method of our approach is to fit the infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), constructed using Spitzer/IRAC (Infrared Array Camera) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) and Herschel/SPIRE photometry, of 380 radio sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South. From the fitted SEDs, we determine the relative AGN and star-forming contributions to their infrared emission. With the inclusion of other AGN diagnostics such as X-ray luminosity, Spitzer/IRAC colours, radio spectral index and the ratio of star-forming total infrared flux to k-corrected 1.4 GHz flux density, qIR, we determine whether the radio emission in these sources is powered by star formation or by an AGN. The majority of these radio sources (60 per cent) show the signature of an AGN at some wavelength. Of the sources with AGN signatures, 58 per cent are hybrid systems for which the radio emission is being powered by star formation. This implies that radio sources which have likely been selected on their star formation have a high AGN fraction. Below a 1.4 GHz flux density of 1 mJy, along with finding a strong contribution to the source counts from pure star-forming sources, we find that hybrid sources constitute 20-65 per cent of the sources. This result suggests that hybrid sources have a significant contribution, along with sources that do not host a detectable AGN, to the observed flattening of the source counts at ˜1 mJy for the extragalactic radio source population.

  3. Active extragalactic sources - Nearly simultaneous observations from 20 centimeters to 1400 A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landau, R.; Golisch, B.; Jones, T. J.; Jones, T. W.; Pedelty, J.; Rudnick, L.; Sitko, M. L.; Kenney, J.; Roellig, T.; Salonen, E.

    1986-01-01

    IRAS, IUE, and ground-based optical, NIR, mm and submm, and radio observations obtained mainly on Apr. 9-23, 1983, are reported for 19 active extragalactic sources and eight control sources. The overall spectra of the compact active sources are shown to be well represented by continuous-curvature functions such as parabolas. The spectra are found to be consistent with models involving continuous particle injection (with synchrotron losses) or first-order Fermi acceleration (with escape and synchrotron losses), but not with models using relativistic Maxwellian electron distributions.

  4. An Active Global Attack Model for Sensor Source Location Privacy: Analysis and Countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Zhu, Sencun; Cao, Guohong; Laporta, Thomas

    Source locations of events are sensitive contextual information that needs to be protected in sensor networks. Previous work focuses on either an active local attacker that traces back to a real source in a hop-by-hop fashion, or a passive global attacker that eavesdrops/analyzes all network traffic to discover real sources. An active global attack model, which is more realistic and powerful than current ones, has not been studied yet. In this paper, we not only formalize this strong attack model, but also propose countermeasures against it.

  5. Active sand dunes are largest dust source in the Sahara Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-09-01

    Dried up lakebeds and playas in the Sahara Desert of North Africa are large sources of dust in the atmosphere. The Bodélé Depression at the southern edge of the Sahara Desert, for example, is the single largest source of dust in the world; on average, 100 dust storms a year originate from the Bodélé Depression. A new study by Crouvi et al., however, finds that active sand dunes could be even bigger sources of desert dust in the atmosphere. Atmospheric dust plays active roles in climate and biological processes in the ocean: It regulates heating at the surface of the Earth; modifies cloud properties that affect rainfall; and acts as the only source of iron, a critical nutrient for microorganisms in the ocean. Little is known about types of dust sources in the Sahara Desert, which alone accounts for more than 50% of the dust in the atmosphere.

  6. Dynamics of soil organic carbon and microbial activity in treated wastewater irrigated agricultural soils along soil profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jüschke, Elisabeth; Marschner, Bernd; Chen, Yona; Tarchitzky, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    Treated wastewater (TWW) is an important source for irrigation water in arid and semiarid regions and already serves as an important water source in Jordan, the Palestinian Territories and Israel. Reclaimed water still contains organic matter (OM) and various compounds that may effect microbial activity and soil quality (Feigin et al. 1991). Natural soil organic carbon (SOC) may be altered by interactions between these compounds and the soil microorganisms. This study evaluates the effects of TWW irrigation on the quality, dynamics and microbial transformations of natural SOC. Priming effects (PE) and SOC mineralization were determined to estimate the influence of TWW irrigation on SOC along soil profiles of agricultural soils in Israel and the Westbank. The used soil material derived from three different sampling sites allocated in Israel and The Palestinian Authority. Soil samples were taken always from TWW irrigated sites and control fields from 6 different depths (0-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-50, 50-70, 70-100 cm). Soil carbon content and microbiological parameters (microbial biomass, microbial activities and enzyme activities) were investigated. In several sites, subsoils (50-160 cm) from TWW irrigated plots were depleted in soil organic matter with the largest differences occurring in sites with the longest TWW irrigation history. Laboratory incubation experiments with additions of 14C-labelled compounds to the soils showed that microbial activity in freshwater irrigated soils was much more stimulated by sugars or amino acids than in TWW irrigated soils. The lack of such "priming effects" (Hamer & Marschner 2005) in the TWW irrigated soils indicates that here the microorganisms are already operating at their optimal metabolic activity due to the continuous substrate inputs with soluble organic compounds from the TWW. The fact that PE are triggered continuously due to TWW irrigation may result in a decrease of SOC over long term irrigation. Already now this could be

  7. Sector-based VOCs emission factors and source profiles for the surface coating industry in the Pearl River Delta region of China.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhuangmin; Sha, Qing'e; Zheng, Junyu; Yuan, Zibing; Gao, Zongjiang; Ou, Jiamin; Zheng, Zhuoyun; Li, Cheng; Huang, Zhijiong

    2017-04-01

    Accurate depiction of VOCs emission characteristics is essential for the formulation of VOCs control strategies. As one of the continuous efforts in improving VOCs emission characterization in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, this study targeted on surface coating industry, the most important VOCs emission sources in the PRD. Sectors in analysis included shipbuilding coating, wood furniture coating, metal surface coating, plastic surface coating, automobile coating and fabric surface coating. Sector-based field measurement was conducted to characterize VOCs emission factors and source profiles in the PRD. It was found that the raw material-based VOCs emission factors for these six sectors ranged from 0.34 to 0.58kg VOCs per kg of raw materials (kg·kg(-1)) while the emission factors based on the production yield varied from 0.59kg to 13.72t VOCs for each production manufactured. VOCs emission factors of surface coating industry were therefore preferably calculated based on raw materials with low uncertainties. Source profiles differed greatly among different sectors. Aromatic was the largest group for shipbuilding coating, wood furniture coating, metal surface coating and automobile coating while the oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs) were the most abundant in the plastic and fabric surface coating sectors. The major species of aromatic VOCs in each of these six sectors were similar, mainly toluene and m/p-xylene, while the OVOCs varied among the different sectors. VOCs profiles in the three processes of auto industry, i.e., auto coating, auto drying and auto repairing, also showed large variations. The major species in these sectors in the PRD were similar with other places but the proportions of individual compounds were different. Some special components were also detected in the PRD region. This study highlighted the importance of updating local source profiles in a comprehensive and timely manner.

  8. Antioxidant activity, phenolic-flavonoid content and high-performance liquid chromatography profiling of three different variants of Syzygium cumini seeds: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Syama Hari; Prakasan, Nisha; Purushothaman, Jayamurthy

    2017-01-01

    Background: The medicinally important phytochemicals present in Syzygium cumini seeds probably accounts for its wide use in traditional systems of medicines in India, like Ayurveda, Unani, and Siddha. Aim: The aim of the study was to determine the antioxidant potential of three different geographical variants of S. cumini seeds and to compare the phenolic profiling to know the effect of geographical variation in phenolic composition. Materials and Methods: Total phenolic and flavonoid content of S. cumini seeds were analyzed. Antioxidant activities in terms of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), nitric oxide and superoxide radical scavenging assays were performed. The most active fractions were subjected to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) profiling to identify the phenolic composition. Results: Among all the fractions, 70% methanol fraction of S. cumini seed showed significant antioxidant potential. There existed a linear correlation between phenolic content and antioxidant activity. HPLC profiling of 70% methanol (ME) fractions of all the variants revealed the presence of phenolic compounds with high concentrations of ellagic acid and gallic acid. The differences in phenolic concentration due to geographical changes might be the reason for higher antioxidant potential showed by 70% ME of Trivandrum variant. Conclusion: 70% methanolic fraction of S. cumini can act as a novel source of natural antioxidant. PMID:28163968

  9. Full Spectrum of LPS Activation in Alveolar Macrophages of Healthy Volunteers by Whole Transcriptomic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yutong; Zhao, Jing; Donahoe, Michael P.; Barge, Suchitra; Horne, William T.; Kolls, Jay K.; McVerry, Bryan J.; Birukova, Anastasiya; Tighe, Robert M.; Foster, W. Michael; Hollingsworth, John; Ray, Anuradha; Mallampalli, Rama; Ray, Prabir; Lee, Janet S.

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding macrophage activation, little is known regarding how human alveolar macrophages in health calibrate its transcriptional response to canonical TLR4 activation. In this study, we examined the full spectrum of LPS activation and determined whether the transcriptomic profile of human alveolar macrophages is distinguished by a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF)-dominant type I interferon signature. Bronchoalveolar lavage macrophages were obtained from healthy volunteers, stimulated in the presence or absence of ultrapure LPS in vitro, and whole transcriptomic profiling was performed by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). LPS induced a robust type I interferon transcriptional response and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis predicted interferon regulatory factor (IRF)7 as the top upstream regulator of 89 known gene targets. Ubiquitin-specific peptidase (USP)-18, a negative regulator of interferon α/β responses, was among the top up-regulated genes in addition to IL10 and USP41, a novel gene with no known biological function but with high sequence homology to USP18. We determined whether IRF-7 and USP-18 can influence downstream macrophage effector cytokine production such as IL-10. We show that IRF-7 siRNA knockdown enhanced LPS-induced IL-10 production in human monocyte-derived macrophages, and USP-18 overexpression attenuated LPS-induced production of IL-10 in RAW264.7 cells. Quantitative PCR confirmed upregulation of USP18, USP41, IL10, and IRF7. An independent cohort confirmed LPS induction of USP41 and IL10 genes. These results suggest that IRF-7 and predicted downstream target USP18, both elements of a type I interferon gene signature identified by RNA-Seq, may serve to fine-tune early cytokine response by calibrating IL-10 production in human alveolar macrophages. PMID:27434537

  10. Retrieval of Precipitation Profiles from Multiresolution, Multifrequency, Active and Passive Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grecu, Mircea; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Olson, William S.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique for estimating vertical profiles of precipitation from multifrequency, multiresolution active and passive microwave observations is investigated using both simulated and airborne data. The technique is applicable to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite multi-frequency active and passive observations. These observations are characterized by various spatial and sampling resolutions. This makes the retrieval problem mathematically more difficult and ill-determined because the quality of information decreases with decreasing resolution. A model that, given reflectivity profiles and a small set of parameters (including the cloud water content, the intercept drop size distribution, and a variable describing the frozen hydrometeor properties), simulates high-resolution brightness temperatures is used. The high-resolution simulated brightness temperatures are convolved at the real sensor resolution. An optimal estimation procedure is used to minimize the differences between simulated and observed brightness temperatures. The retrieval technique is investigated using cloud model synthetic and airborne data from the Fourth Convection And Moisture Experiment. Simulated high-resolution brightness temperatures and reflectivities and airborne observation strong are convolved at the resolution of the TRMM instruments and retrievals are performed and analyzed relative to the reference data used in observations synthesis. An illustration of the possible use of the technique in satellite rainfall estimation is presented through an application to TRMM data. The study suggests improvements in combined active and passive retrievals even when the instruments resolutions are significantly different. Future work needs to better quantify the retrievals performance, especially in connection with satellite applications, and the uncertainty of the models used in retrieval.

  11. Combined tomographic forward and inverse modeling of active seismic refraction profiling data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, I.; Kopp, H.

    2008-12-01

    We present a new code for combined forward and inverse tomographic modeling based on first-arrival travel times of active seismic refraction profiling data (PROFIT - Profile Forward and Inverse Tomographic modeling). The main features of the algorithm involve the original version of bending ray tracing, parameterization based on nodes, variable grid size definition determined by the ray density, and regularization of the inversion. The key purpose of applying the PROFIT code is rather not in solely producing the tomographic image of a continuous velocity field, but in creating a geologically reasonable synthetic model. This model then includes first-order velocity changes representing petrophysical boundaries and is thus better suited for a geological-tectonic interpretation than its smoothed tomographic counterpart. After performing forward and inverse modeling, the synthetic model will reproduce a congeneric model to the tomographic inversion result of the observed data. We demonstrate the working ability of the code using two marine datasets acquired in the Musicians Seamount Province (Pacific Ocean). The results of the tomographic inversion clearly resolve the dominating extrusive volcanism. In addition, the combined forward and inverse approach tests a large variety of synthetic models to fit the observed data tomography. Along both profiles, the preferred structural model includes a strong positive velocity anomaly extending into the seamount edifice. We suggest that this anomaly pattern represents secondary intrusive processes, which are only revealed by the combined tomographic forward and inverse modeling and could not be resolved by exclusively applying a tomographic inversion. In addition, we present examples of imaging salt domes in the Precaspian oil province as well as a higher-resolution field study that was conducted as a preinvestigative study for tunnel construction to demonstrate the capability of the code in different regimes and on different

  12. Assessing Acoustic Sound Levels Associated with Active Source Seismic Surveys in Shallow Marine Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Tolstoy, M.; Thode, A.; Diebold, J. B.; Webb, S. C.

    2004-12-01

    The potential effect of active source seismic research on marine mammal populations is a topic of increasing concern, and controversy surrounding such operations has begun to impact the planning and permitting of academic surveys [e.g., Malakoff, 2002 Science]. Although no causal relationship between marine mammal strandings and seismic exploration has been proven, any circumstantial evidence must be thoroughly investigated. A 2002 stranding of two beaked whales in the Gulf of California within 50 km of a R/V Ewing seismic survey has been a subject of concern for both marine seismologists and environmentalists. In order to better understand possible received levels for whales in the vicinity of these operations, modeling is combined with ground-truth calibration measurements. A wide-angle parabolic equation model, which is capable of including shear within the sediment and basement layers, is used to generate predictive models of low-frequency transmission loss within the Gulf of California. This work incorporates range-dependent bathymetry, sediment thickness, sound velocity structure and sub-bottom properties. Oceanic sounds speed profiles are derived from the U.S. Navy's seasonal GDEM model and sediment thicknesses are taken from NOAA's worldwide database. The spectral content of the Ewing's 20-airgun seismic array is constrained by field calibration in the spring of 2003 [Tolstoy et al., 2004 GRL], indicating peak energies at frequencies below a few hundred Hz, with energy spectral density showing an approximate power-law decrease at higher frequencies (being ~40 dB below peak at 1 kHz). Transmission loss is estimated along a series of radials extending from multiple positions along the ship's track, with the directivity of the array accounted for by phase-shifting point sources that are scaled by the cube root of the individual airgun volumes. This allows the time-space history of low-frequency received levels to be reconstructed within the Gulf of California

  13. Selective androgen receptor modulator activity of a steroidal antiandrogen TSAA-291 and its cofactor recruitment profile.

    PubMed

    Hikichi, Yukiko; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Hara, Takahito

    2015-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) specifically bind to the androgen receptor and exert agonistic or antagonistic effects on target organs. In this study, we investigated the SARM activity of TSAA-291, previously known as a steroidal antiandrogen, in mice because TSAA-291 was found to possess partial androgen receptor agonist activity in reporter assays. In addition, to clarify the mechanism underlying its tissue selectivity, we performed comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis of androgen receptor using TSAA-291 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an endogenous androgen. The androgen receptor agonistic activity of TSAA-291 was more obvious in reporter assays using skeletal muscle cells than in those using prostate cells. In castrated mice, TSAA-291 increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate and seminal vesicle. Comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis via mammalian two-hybrid methods revealed that among a total of 112 cofactors, 12 cofactors including the protein inhibitor of activated STAT 1 (PIAS1) were differently recruited to androgen receptor in the presence of TSAA-291 and DHT. Prostate displayed higher PIAS1 expression than skeletal muscle. Forced expression of the PIAS1 augmented the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor, and silencing of PIAS1 by siRNAs suppressed the secretion of prostate-specific antigen, an androgen responsive marker. Our results demonstrate that TSAA-291 has SARM activity and suggest that TSAA-291 may induce different conformational changes of the androgen receptor and recruitment profiles of cofactors such as PIAS1, compared with DHT, to exert tissue-specific activity.

  14. EEG and MEG: sensitivity to epileptic spike activity as function of source orientation and depth.

    PubMed

    Hunold, A; Funke, M E; Eichardt, R; Stenroos, M; Haueisen, J

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of neuronal activity from epileptic patients reveal situations in which either EEG or MEG or both modalities show visible interictal spikes. While different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the spikes in EEG and MEG have been reported, a quantitative relation of spike source orientation and depth as well as the background brain activity to the SNR has not been established. We investigated this quantitative relationship for both dipole and patch sources in an anatomically realistic cortex model. Altogether, 5600 dipole and 3300 patch sources were distributed on the segmented cortical surfaces of two volunteers. The sources were classified according to their quantified depths and orientations, ranging from 20 mm to 60 mm below the skin surface and radial and tangential, respectively. The source time-courses mimicked an interictal spike, and the simulated background activity emulated resting activity. Simulations were conducted with individual three-compartment boundary element models. The SNR was evaluated for 128 EEG, 102 MEG magnetometer, and 204 MEG gradiometer channels. For superficial dipole and superficial patch sources, EEG showed higher SNRs for dominantly radial orientations, and MEG showed higher values for dominantly tangential orientations. Gradiometers provided higher SNR than magnetometers for superficial sources, particularly for those with dominantly tangential orientations. The orientation dependent difference in SNR in EEG and MEG gradually changed as the sources were located deeper, where the interictal spikes generated higher SNRs in EEG compared to those in MEG for all source orientations. With deep sources, the SNRs in gradiometers and magnetometers were of the same order. To better detect spikes, both EEG and MEG should be used.

  15. Sirt1 Activation Markedly Alters Transcription Profiles and Improves Outcome in Experimental Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Opal, Steven; Ellis, James L; Suri, Vipin; Freudenberg, Johannes M; Vlasuk, George P; Li, Yong; Chahin, Abdullah B; Palardy, John E; Parejo, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Michelle; Chahin, Abdulrahman; Kessimian, Noubar

    2015-11-16

    The sirtuin family consists of seven NAD+-dependent enzymes affecting a broad array of regulatory protein networks by primarily catalyzing the deacetylation of key lysine residues in regulatory proteins. The enzymatic activity of SIRT1 can be enhanced by small molecule activators known as SIRT1 activator compounds (STACs). We tested the therapeutic potential of the STAC SRT3025 in two preclinical models of severe infection, the murine cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model to induce peritonitis and intra-tracheal installation of Streptococcus pneumoniae to induce severe bacterial pneumonia. SRT3025 provided significant survival benefits over vehicle control in both the peritonitis and pneumococcal pneumonia models when administered with appropriate antimicrobial agents. The survival benefit of SRT3025 in the CLP model was absent in SIRT1 knock-out showing the SIRT1-dependency of SRT3025's effects. SRT3025 administration promoted bacterial clearance and significantly reduced inflammatory cytokines from the lungs of animals challenged with S. pneumoniae. SRT3025 treatment was also accompanied by striking changes in the transcription profiles in multiple inflammatory and metabolic pathways in liver, spleen, small bowel and lung tissue. Remarkably, these organ-specific changes in the transcriptome analyses were similar following CLP or pneumococcal challenge despite different sets of pathogens at disparate sites of infection. Pharmacologic activation of SIRT1 modulates the innate host response and could represent a novel treatment strategy for severe infection.

  16. PHARMACOLOGICAL SIRT1 ACTIVATION IMPROVES MORTALITY AND MARKEDLY ALTERS TRANSCRIPTIONAL PROFILES THAT ACCOMPANY EXPERIMENTAL SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Opal, Steven M; Ellis, James L; Suri, Vipin; Freudenberg, Johannes M; Vlasuk, George P; Li, Yong; Chahin, Abdullah B; Palardy, John E; Parejo, Nicholas; Yamamoto, Michelle; Chahin, Abdulrahman; Kessimian, Noubar

    2016-04-01

    The sirtuin family consists of seven NAD+-dependent enzymes affecting a broad array of regulatory protein networks by primarily catalyzing the deacetylation of key lysine residues in regulatory proteins. The enzymatic activity of SIRT1 can be enhanced by small molecule activators known as SIRT1 activator compounds (STACs). We tested the therapeutic potential of the STAC SRT3025 in two preclinical models of severe infection, the murine cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model to induce peritonitis and intratracheal installation of Streptococcus pneumoniae to induce severe bacterial pneumonia. SRT3025 provided significant survival benefits over vehicle control in both the peritonitis and pneumococcal pneumonia models when administered with appropriate antimicrobial agents. The survival benefit of SRT3025 in the CLP model was absent in SIRT1 knockout showing the SIRT1 dependency of SRT3025's effects. SRT3025 administration promoted bacterial clearance and significantly reduced inflammatory cytokines from the lungs of animals challenged with S. pneumoniae. SRT3025 treatment was also accompanied by striking changes in the transcription profiles in multiple inflammatory and metabolic pathways in liver, spleen, small bowel, and lung tissue. Remarkably, these organ-specific changes in the transcriptome analyses were similar following CLP or pneumococcal challenge despite different sets of pathogens at disparate sites of infection. Pharmacologic activation of SIRT1 modulates the innate host response and could represent a novel treatment strategy for severe infection.

  17. Variability in HOMA-IR, Lipoprotein Profile and Selected Hormones in Young Active Men

    PubMed Central

    Lutoslawska, Grazyna; Czajkowska, Anna; Tkaczyk, Joanna; Mazurek, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to insulin actions is contributing to many metabolic disturbances. Such factors as age, sex, nutrition, body fat, and physical activity determine body insulin resistance. Present study attempted to asses insulin resistance and its metabolic effects with respect to energy intake in young, lean, and active men. A total of 87 men aged 18–23 participated in the study. Plasma levels of glucose, insulin, lipoproteins, cortisol, and TSH were determined. Insulin resistance was expressed as Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) and calculated using homeostatic model. The median value of HOMA-IR (1.344) was used to divide subjects into two groups. Men did not differ in anthropometric parameters, daily physical activity, and plasma TSH and cortisol levels. However, in men with higher HOMA-IR significantly lower daily energy intake was observed concomitantly with higher TG, TC, and HDL-C concentrations in plasma versus their counterparts with lower HOMA-IR. Exclusively in subjects with higher HOMA-IR significant and positive correlation was noted between HOMA-IR and TC and LDL-C. We concluded that despite a normal body weight and physical activity, a subset of young men displayed unfavorable changes in insulin sensitivity and lipid profile, probably due to insufficient energy intake. PMID:24348155

  18. Polyphenolic Profile and Antioxidant Activities of Oolong Tea Infusion under Various Steeping Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xinguo; Duan, Jun; Jiang, Yueming; Duan, Xuewu; Chen, Feng

    2007-01-01

    The phenolic profile and antioxidant activities of oolong tea extract were investigated after tea was steeped in 90 or 100 °C water for 3 or 10 min. The extraction yield increased with increasing temperature and extended steeping time. However, higher temperature and longer time (100 °C water for 10 min) led to loss of phenolics. The aqueous extract of oolong tea (AEOT) at 100 °C for 3 min exhibited the strongest antioxidant activity. The major polyphenolic components of the AEOT were identified as (−)-epigallocatechin (EGC), (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and (−)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG). The two major catechins (EGC and EGCG) in the tea infusion contributed significantly to the investigated antioxidant activities [i.e., the 2,2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH) radical scavenging and superoxide radical scavenging activities] with high correlation values in r = 0.9486 and 0.9327 for the EGC and r = 0.9592 and 0.8718 for the EGCG, respectively.

  19. Antimicrobial activity and composition profile of grape (Vitis vinifera) pomace extracts obtained by supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Daniela A; Salvador, Ana Augusta; Smânia, Artur; Smânia, Elza F A; Maraschin, Marcelo; Ferreira, Sandra R S

    2013-04-10

    The possibility of increasing the aggregated value of the huge amount of residues generated by wineries around the world foment studies using the grape pomace - the residue from the wine production, composed by seed, skin and stems - to obtain functional ingredients. Nowadays, consumers in general prefer natural and safe products mainly for food and cosmetic fields, where the supercritical fluid extraction is of great importance due to the purity of the extracts provided. Therefore, the objective of this work is to evaluate the global extraction yield, the antimicrobial activity and the composition profile of Merlot and Syrah grape pomace extracts obtained by supercritical CO2 (SC-CO2) and CO2 added with co-solvent at pressures up to 300 bar and temperatures of 50 and 60 °C. The results were compared with the ones obtained by Soxhlet and by ultrasound-assisted leaching extraction methods. The main components from the extracts, identified by HPLC, were gallic acid, p-OH-benzoic acid, vanillic acid and epicatechin. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the extracts were evaluated using four strains of bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and three fungi strains (Candida albicans, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei). Despite lower extraction yield results, the supercritical fluid extracts presented the highest antimicrobial effectiveness compared to the other grape pomace extracts due to the presence of antimicrobial active compounds. Syrah extracts were less efficient against the microorganisms tested and Merlot extracts were more active against Gram-positive bacteria.

  20. Changes of phenolic profiles and antioxidant activity in canaryseed (Phalaris canariensis L.) during germination.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhijie; Yu, Lilei; Wang, Xinkun; Gu, Zhenxin; Beta, Trust

    2016-03-01

    Canaryseed is an important cereal crop in western Canada. The changes of the total phenolic content (TPC), antioxidant activities, phenolic acid profiles (free and bound) of canaryseed during germination were investigated in the present study. The growth properties also were investigated. Fresh weight, shoot length and root length increased, whereas dry mass of canaryseed decreased during germination. A 22.3% loss of dry matter was observed at 120h of germination. The total phenolic content and antioxidant activities of free and bound extracts showed a general trend of germinated seeds>raw seeds>soaked seeds. Free, bound and total phenolic content significantly increased 1042%, 120% and 741% at the end of germination as compared to raw seeds (p<0.05). DPPH, ABTS and ORAC assays were employed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of canaryseed. There were high correlations between total phenolic content and antioxidant activities. TPC and ORAC values showed the highest correlation (r=0.9984). Six phenolic acids in free phenolic extracts and seven phenolic acids in bound phenolic extracts were detected, respectively. Bound ferulic acid, the dominant phenolic acid in canaryseed, significantly increased during germination (p<0.05). Study showed that germination provided a new approach to further develop canaryseed as a functional food for human consumption.

  1. A shift in emission time profiles of fossil fuel combustion due to energy transitions impacts source receptor matrices for air quality.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Carlijn; Kuenen, Jeroen; Kranenburg, Richard; Scholz, Yvonne; Schaap, Martijn

    2015-03-01

    Effective air pollution and short-lived climate forcer mitigation strategies can only be designed when the effect of emission reductions on pollutant concentrations and health and ecosystem impacts are quantified. Within integrated assessment modeling source-receptor relationships (SRRs) based on chemistry transport modeling are used to this end. Currently, these SRRs are made using invariant emission time profiles. The LOTOS-EUROS model equipped with a source attribution module was used to test this assumption for renewable energy scenarios. Renewable energy availability and thereby fossil fuel back up are strongly dependent on meteorological conditions. We have used the spatially and temporally explicit energy model REMix to derive time profiles for backup power generation. These time profiles were used in LOTOS-EUROS to investigate the effect of emission timing on air pollutant concentrations and SRRs. It is found that the effectiveness of emission reduction in the power sector is significantly lower when accounting for the shift in the way emissions are divided over the year and the correlation of emissions with synoptic situations. The source receptor relationships also changed significantly. This effect was found for both primary and secondary pollutants. Our results indicate that emission timing deserves explicit attention when assessing the impacts of system changes on air quality and climate forcing from short lived substances.

  2. Expression profile of heat shock response factors during hookworm larval activation and parasitic development.

    PubMed

    Gelmedin, Verena; Delaney, Angela; Jennelle, Lucas; Hawdon, John M

    2015-07-01

    When organisms are exposed to an increase in temperature, they undergo a heat shock response (HSR) regulated by the transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1). The heat shock response includes the rapid changes in gene expression initiated by binding of HSF-1 to response elements in the promoters of heat shock genes. Heat shock proteins function as molecular chaperones to protect proteins during periods of elevated temperature and other stress. During infection, hookworm infective third stage larvae (L3) undergo a temperature shift from ambient to host temperature. This increased temperature is required for the resumption of feeding and activation of L3, but whether this increase initiates a heat shock response is unknown. To investigate the role of the heat shock in hookworm L3 activation and parasitic development, we identified and characterized the expression profile of several components of the heat shock response in the hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. We cloned DNAs encoding an hsp70 family member (Aca-hsp-1) and an hsp90 family member (Aca-daf-21). Exposure to a heat shock of 42°C for one hour caused significant up-regulation of both genes, which slowly returned to near baseline levels following one hour attenuation at 22°C. Neither gene was up-regulated in response to host temperature (37°C). Conversely, levels of hsf-1 remained unchanged during heat shock, but increased in response to incubation at 37°C. During activation, both hsp-1 and daf-21 are down regulated early, although daf-21 levels increase significantly in non-activated control larvae after 12h, and slightly in activated larvae by 24h incubation. The heat shock response modulators celastrol and KNK437 were tested for their effects on gene expression during heat shock and activation. Pre-incubation with celastrol, an HSP90 inhibitor that promotes heat shock gene expression, slightly up-regulated expression of both hsp-1 and daf-21 during heat shock. KNK437, an inhibitor of heat shock

  3. Linking Expression of Fructan Active Enzymes, Cell Wall Invertases and Sucrose Transporters with Fructan Profiles in Growing Taproot of Chicory (Cichorium intybus): Impact of Hormonal and Environmental Cues

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hongbin; Bausewein, Anja; Steininger, Heike; Su, Tao; Zhao, Hongbo; Harms, Karsten; Greiner, Steffen; Rausch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In chicory taproot, the inulin-type fructans serve as carbohydrate reserve. Inulin metabolism is mediated by fructan active enzymes (FAZYs): sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST; fructan synthesis), fructan:fructan-1-fructosyltransferase (1-FFT; fructan synthesis and degradation), and fructan 1-exohydrolases (1-FEH1/2a/2b; fructan degradation). In developing taproot, fructan synthesis is affected by source-to-sink sucrose transport and sink unloading. In the present study, expression of FAZYs, sucrose transporter and CWI isoforms, vacuolar invertase and sucrose synthase was determined in leaf blade, petiole and taproot of young chicory plants (taproot diameter: 2 cm) and compared with taproot fructan profiles for the following scenarios: (i) N-starvation, (ii) abscisic acid (ABA) treatment, (iii) ethylene treatment (via 1-aminoyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid [ACC]), and (iv) cold treatment. Both N-starvation and ABA treatment induced an increase in taproot oligofructans. However, while under N-starvation this increase reflected de novo synthesis, under ABA treatment gene expression profiles indicated a role for both de novo synthesis and degradation of long-chain fructans. Conversely, under ACC and cold treatment oligofructans slightly decreased, correlating with reduced expression of 1-SST and 1-FFT and increased expression of FEHs and VI. Distinct SUT and CWI expression profiles were observed, indicating a functional alignment of SUT and CWI expression with taproot fructan metabolism under different source-sink scenarios. PMID:27994611

  4. On the source of the flaring activity in AB Doradus: the UV spectral signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez de Castro, Ana I.

    2002-05-01

    AB Dor is a young, 30-Myr-old, low-mass star with a short rotation period and strong flaring activity. In this work, a detailed analysis of the flaring activity is carried out based on ultraviolet spectral tracers of hot (T ~105 ) plasma, namely HST /GHRS profiles of the Civ[uv1] and Siiv[uv1] lines. The quiescent component has been subtracted out and the spectral signature of the flares is analysed in detail. A total of nine events are detected in 10.63h. The e-folding time for flares has been derived when possible, yielding values between 300 and 1200s. It is shown that the Civ[uv1] and Siiv[uv1] profiles associated with the flaring activity can be classified into three main groups: narrow redshifted profiles, `broad' profiles and double-peaked profiles. Therefore, the spectroscopic signature of flares in hot (T ~105 K) plasma is not always the same. As a consequence, it is highly likely that different mechanisms are involved in the flaring activity of AB Dor. The most frequently observed profiles are the narrow redshifted profiles; six out of the nine events display this type of profile. An analysis of the velocity field at the stellar surface shows up that they are most likely associated with matter infall. Henceforth, it is feasible that this type of flares are associated with downward flowing material in post-flare magnetic loops , as frequently observed in the Sun. The broad profiles have a FWHM~=300kms-1 and are very asymmetric with an extended blue wing reaching 400kms-1 . These profiles have been observed during the strongest flare in the monitoring when the line flux rose up to three times the quiescent value. The large width and asymmetry of the profiles are best explained if this type of flares are associated with gas flows in curved magnetic structures. Three possible mechanisms are analysed: (1) the development of thermal instabilities in large magnetic loops, (2) gas infall and (3) the interaction between the fast and slow components of the stellar

  5. Ileal and colonic fatty acid profiles in patients with active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bühner, S; Nagel, E; Körber, J; Vogelsang, H; Linn, T; Pichlmayr, R

    1994-01-01

    In patients with active Crohn's disease and in a control group the fatty acid profiles in the whole lipid fraction of ileal and colonic mucosal biopsy specimens were determined by capillary gas chromatography. The biopsy specimens in Crohn's disease patients were taken from the inflamed terminal ileum as well as from the inflamed and macroscopically normal colon. Compared with controls the fatty acid distribution in the inflamed ileal mucosa was significantly characterised by (a) a decrease of 18:2 n6 and 18:3 n3 accompanied by a substantial increase of the highly polyunsaturated fatty acids 20:4 n6, 22:4 n6, and 22:6 n3 and (b) a higher unsaturation index of total fatty acids compared with controls. These changes were similar in the inflamed colon. Additionally, both the inflamed and the macroscopically normal colonic mucosa showed an increase of saturated (18:0) and a decrease of monounsaturated fatty acids (18:1 n9). Fatty acid profiles of ileum and colon showed side variations in controls, but not in the Crohn's disease group. These data suggest that in Crohn's disease changes in the distribution of polyunsaturated fatty acids seem to be the general feature of inflamed mucosa in small and large intestine. Results further suggest that colonic fatty acid metabolism in Crohn's disease is altered by degrees, showing changes in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids as an additional, primary event. PMID:7959199

  6. Protein profiling and histone deacetylation activities in somaclonal variants of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.).

    PubMed

    Yaacob, Jamilah Syafawati; Loh, Hwei-San; Mat Taha, Rosna

    2013-01-01

    Mantled fruits as a result of somaclonal variation are often observed from the oil palm plantlets regenerated via tissue culture. The mantling of fruits with finger-like and thick outer coating phenotypes significantly reduces the seed size and oil content, posing a threat to oil palm planters, and may jeopardize the economic growth of countries that depend particularly on oil palm plantation. The molecular aspects of the occurrence of somaclonal variations are yet to be known, possibly due to gene repression such as DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone deacetylation. Histone deacetylases (HDACs), involved in eukaryotic gene regulation by catalyzing the acetyl groups are removal from lysine residues on histone, hence transcriptionally repress gene expression. This paper described the total protein polymorphism profiles of somaclonal variants of oil palm and the effects of histone deacetylation on this phenomenon. Parallel to the different phenotypes, the protein polymorphism profiles of the mantled samples (leaves, fruits, and florets) and the phenotypically normal samples were proven to be different. Higher HDAC activity was found in mantled leaf samples than in the phenotypically normal leaf samples, leading to a preliminary conclusion that histone deacetylation suppressed gene expression and contributed to the development of somaclonal variants.

  7. Protein Profiling and Histone Deacetylation Activities in Somaclonal Variants of Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.)

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Jamilah Syafawati; Loh, Hwei-San; Mat Taha, Rosna

    2013-01-01

    Mantled fruits as a result of somaclonal variation are often observed from the oil palm plantlets regenerated via tissue culture. The mantling of fruits with finger-like and thick outer coating phenotypes significantly reduces the seed size and oil content, posing a threat to oil palm planters, and may jeopardize the economic growth of countries that depend particularly on oil palm plantation. The molecular aspects of the occurrence of somaclonal variations are yet to be known, possibly due to gene repression such as DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone deacetylation. Histone deacetylases (HDACs), involved in eukaryotic gene regulation by catalyzing the acetyl groups are removal from lysine residues on histone, hence transcriptionally repress gene expression. This paper described the total protein polymorphism profiles of somaclonal variants of oil palm and the effects of histone deacetylation on this phenomenon. Parallel to the different phenotypes, the protein polymorphism profiles of the mantled samples (leaves, fruits, and florets) and the phenotypically normal samples were proven to be different. Higher HDAC activity was found in mantled leaf samples than in the phenotypically normal leaf samples, leading to a preliminary conclusion that histone deacetylation suppressed gene expression and contributed to the development of somaclonal variants. PMID:23844406

  8. Metabolic Profiles and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Cordyceps bassiana Fruiting Bodies According to Developmental Stage

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Sun-Hee; Lee, Seok-Young; Sung, Gi-Ho; Kim, Seong Hwan; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic profiles of Cordyceps bassiana according to fruiting body developmental stage were investigated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We were able to detect 62 metabolites, including 48 metabolites from 70% methanol extracts and 14 metabolites from 100% n-hexane extracts. These metabolites were classified as alcohols, amino acids, organic acids, phosphoric acids, purine nucleosides and bases, sugars, saturated fatty acids, unsaturated fatty acids, or fatty amides. Significant changes in metabolite levels were found according to developmental stage. Relative levels of amino acids, purine nucleosides, and sugars were higher in development stage 3 than in the other stages. Among the amino acids, valine, isoleucine, lysine, histidine, glutamine, and aspartic acid, which are associated with ABC transporters and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis, also showed higher levels in stage 3 samples. The free radical scavenging activities, which were significantly higher in stage 3 than in the other stages, showed a positive correlation with purine nucleoside metabolites such as adenosine, guanosine, and inosine. These results not only show metabolic profiles, but also suggest the metabolic pathways associated with fruiting body development stages in cultivated C. bassiana. PMID:24058459

  9. Crustal Structure in the Imperial Valley Region of California From Active-Source Seismic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuis, G. S.; Mooney, W. D.

    2008-12-01

    shallow as 12 km beneath the Imperial Valley. Modeling of gravity data requires that this layer deepen and/or pinch out beneath the bordering mesas and mountain ranges. This pinch-out is imaged in the 1992 data beneath the Chocolate Mountains. Based on its high velocity and the presence of intrusive basaltic rocks in the sedimentary section in the Imperial Valley, the subbasement is thought to be a mafic intrusive complex similar to oceanic middle crust. (4) Crustal thickness and upper-mantle velocity are 21-22 km and 7.6-7.7 km/s, respectively, beneath the Imperial Valley but increase to 27 km and 8.0 km/s, respectively, beneath the Chocolate Mountains. Our results from the Salton Trough may be contrasted with active-source seismic results from the northern Gulf of California (Guaymas basin; Lizarralde et al., 2007). These results show the crust to thin to 10-14 km within the Gulf. Below 3-4 km of sediment, the crust has a velocity of 6.8 km/s, interpreted to be new igneous (gabbroic) crust. Thus, the rifting process appears to have produced negligible metasedimentary basement and a crustal thickness as little as half that beneath the Salton Trough.

  10. Site-specific profiles of estrogenic activity in agricultural areas of California's inland waters.

    PubMed

    Lavado, Ramon; Loyo-Rosales, Jorge E; Floyd, Emily; Kolodziej, Edward P; Snyder, Shane A; Sedlak, David L; Schlenk, Daniel

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate the occurrence and sources of compounds capable of feminizing fish in agriculturally impacted waterways of the Central Valley of California, water samples were extracted and subjected to chemical analyses as well as in vitro and in vivo measurements of vitellogenin in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Among the 16 sites sampled, 6 locations frequently exhibited elevated concentrations of estrogenic substances with 17beta-estradiol equivalents up to 242 ng/L in vitro and 12 microg/kg in vivo. The patterns of activity varied among sites, with two sites showing elevated activity only in vitro, two showing elevated activity only in vivo, and two showing elevated activity in both assays. Sequential elution of solid-phase extraction (SPE) disks followed by bioassay-guided fractionation was used to characterize water samples from the two locations where activity was observed in both bioassays. The highest estrogenic activity was observed in the most nonpolar fractions (80-100% methanol eluent) from the Napa River, while most of the activity in the Sacramento River Delta eluted in the 60% methanol eluent. Quantitative analyses of SPE extracts and additional HPLC fractionation of the SPE extracts by GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS indicated concentrations of steroid hormones, alkylphenol polyethoxylates, and herbicides that were at least 1-3 orders of magnitude below bioassay 17beta-estradiol equivalent calculations. Given the different patterns of activity and chemical properties of the estrogenic compounds, it appears that estrogenic activity in these agriculturally impacted surface waters is attributable to multiple compounds. Further investigation is needed to identify the compounds causing the estrogenic activity and to determine the potential impacts of these compounds on feral fish.

  11. Mixed carbon sources for nitrate reduction in activated sludge-identification of bacteria and process activity studies.

    PubMed

    Hagman, M; Nielsen, J L; Nielsen, P H; Jansen, J la C

    2008-03-01

    Mixtures of methanol and acetate as carbon source were investigated in order to determine their capacity to enhance denitrification and for analysis of the microbial composition and carbon degradation activity in activated sludge from wastewater treatment plants. Laboratory batch reactors at 20 degrees C were used for nitrate uptake rate (NUR) measurements in order to investigate the anoxic activity, while single and mixed carbon substrates were added to activated sludge. Microautoradiography (MAR) in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) were applied for microbial analysis during exposure to different carbon sources. The NUR increased with additions of a mixture of acetate and methanol compared with additions of a single carbon source. MAR-FISH measurements demonstrated that the probe-defined group of Azoarcus was the main group of bacteria utilising acetate and the only active group utilising methanol under anoxic conditions. The present study indicated an improved denitrification potential by additions of a mixed carbon source compared with commonly used single-carbon additions. It is also established that Azoarcus bacteria are involved in the degradation of both acetate and methanol in the anoxic activated sludge.

  12. Discovery of TSAO derivatives with an unusual HIV-1 activity/resistance profile.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Sonia; García-Aparicio, Carlos; Van Laethem, Kristel; Gago, Federico; Lobatón, Esther; De Clercq, Erik; Balzarini, Jan; Camarasa, María-José; Velázquez, Sonsoles

    2006-08-01

    The very first TSAO derivative that lacks the 4''-amino group at the 3'-spiro moiety (compound 3) has been prepared and the effect of this modification on the activity/resistance profile has been evaluated. This molecule proved HIV-1 specific (NNRTI-characteristic). A mixture of wild-type and V106V/A or L234L/I mutations were found in the RT of some, but not all compound 3-resistant virus strains. Compound 3 does not select for the TSAO-specific E138K mutation in the RT. However, the compound markedly lost its antiviral potential against a variety of virus strains that contain NNRTI-characteristic mutations in RT including E138K. The deaminated TSAO compound must fit differently in the HIV-1 RT enzyme than its prototype TSAO-m(3)T.

  13. Advancing understanding of microbial bioenergy conversion processes by activity-based protein profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Fredrickson, James K.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Nandhikonda, Premchendar; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2015-09-25

    Here, the development of renewable biofuels is a global priority, but success will require novel technologies that greatly improve our understanding of microbial systems biology. An approach with great promise in enabling functional characterization of microbes is activity-based protein profiling (ABPP), which employs chemical probes to directly measure enzyme function in discrete enzyme classes in vivo and/or in vitro, thereby facilitating the rapid discovery of new biocatalysts and enabling much improved biofuel production platforms. We review general design strategies in ABPP, and highlight recent advances that are or could be pivotal to biofuels processes including applications of ABPP to cellulosic bioethanol, biodiesel, and phototrophic production of hydrocarbons. We also examine the key challenges and opportunities of ABPP in renewable biofuels research. The integration of ABPP with molecular and systems biology approaches will shed new insight on the catalytic and regulatory mechanisms of functional enzymes and their synergistic effects in the field of biofuels production.

  14. High performance liquid chromatography profiling of health-promoting phytochemicals and evaluation of antioxidant, anti-lipoxygenase, iron chelating and anti-glucosidase activities of wetland macrophytes

    PubMed Central

    Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Wong, Fai-Chu; Sit, Nam-Weng; Chai, Tsun-Thai

    2014-01-01

    Background: The phytochemistry and bioactivity of wetland macrophytes are underexplored. Plants are known as the natural sources of phytochemical beneficial to health. Objective: The objective of this study is to analyze the phytochemical profiles and bioactivities of 10 extracts prepared from different plant parts of wetland macrophytes Hanguana malayana, Ludwigia adscendens and Monochoria hastata. Materials and Methods: High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to analyze the phytochemical profile of the extracts. Antioxidant assay such as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, nitric oxide (NO) radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power were performed. Bioactivity assays carried out were anti-lipoxygenase, anti-glucosidase, and iron chelating. Results: Leaf extract of L. adscendens had the highest 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (half of maximal effective concentration [EC50] =0.97 mg/mL) and NO (EC50 = 0.31 mg/mL) scavenging activities. The extract also exhibited the highest iron chelating (EC50 = 3.24 mg/mL) and anti-glucosidase (EC50 = 27.5 μg/mL) activities. The anti-glucosidase activity of L. adscendens leaf extract was comparable or superior to those of acarbose, myricetin and quercetin. Correlation between iron chelating and radical scavenging activities among the extracts implies the presence of dual-function phytoconstituents with concurrent iron chelating and radical scavenging activities. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of p-coumaric acid (p-CA), gallic acid (GA) and myricetin in all or most extracts. M. hastata fruit and leaf extracts had the highest p-hydroxybenzoic acid content. Antioxidant and anti-glucosidase activities of the extracts were correlated with p-CA, GA, and myricetin contents. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that wetland macrophytes H. malayana, L. adscendens and M. hastata are potential sources of health-promoting phytochemicals with potent therapeutically-relevant bioactivities. PMID:25298659

  15. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity and HPLC Fingerprinting Profiles of Three Pyrola Species from Different Regions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongmei; He, Fengyuan; Lv, Zhenjiang; Li, Dengwu

    2014-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the variation of phytochemical composition, antioxidant activity and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) fingerprinting profiles of three Pyrola species. Thirteen samples (eight P. decorata, three P. calliantha and two P. renifolia) were collected from different regions in China. The tannin, hyperoside and quercetin contents of all samples were determined by reverse-phase HPLC and varied within the range 9.77–34.75, 0.34–2.16 and 0.062–0.147 mg/g dry weigh, respectively. Total flavonoid content was evaluated and varied within the range 16.22–37.82 mg/g dry weight. Antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH assay, with IC50 ranging from 7.96 to 50.33 µg/ml, ABTS•+ and FRAP assay, within the range 612.66–1021.05 and 219.64–398.12 µmol equiv. Trolox/g, respectively. These results revealed that there were significant variations in phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activity among all samples. Due to the higher phytochemical content and significant antioxidant activity, P. calliantha was selected as the most valuable species, and the P. calliantha sample from Left banner of Alxa even possessed the strongest antioxidant activity among all the thirteen samples. Futhermore, Emei Mountain was proved to be the most suitable region for producing P. decorata. Moreover, in order to further evaluate the diversities and quality of Pyrola, HPLC fingerprint analysis coupled with hierarchical cluster and discrimination analyses were introduced to establish a simple, rapid and effective method for accurate identification, classification and quality assessment of Pyrola. Thirteen samples were divided into three groups consistent with their morphological classification. Two types of discriminant functions were generated and the ratio of discrimination was 100%. This method can identify different species of Pyrola and the same species from different regions of origin. Also, it can be used to compare and

  16. Exterior optical cloaking and illusions by using active sources: A boundary element perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H. H.; Xiao, J. J.; Lai, Y.; Chan, C. T.

    2010-05-01

    Recently, it was demonstrated that active sources can be used to cloak any objects that lie outside the cloaking devices [F. Guevara Vasquez, G. W. Milton, and D. Onofrei, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 073901 (2009)]. Here, we propose that active sources can create illusion effects so that an object outside the cloaking device can be made to look like another object. Invisibility is a special case in which the concealed object is transformed to a volume of air. From a boundary element perspective, we show that active sources can create a nearly “silent” domain which can conceal any objects inside and at the same time make the whole system look like an illusion of our choice outside a virtual boundary. The boundary element method gives the fields and field gradients, which can be related to monopoles and dipoles, on continuous curves which define the boundary of the active devices. Both the cloaking and illusion effects are confirmed by numerical simulations.

  17. Auditory Selective Attention Reveals Preparatory Activity in Different Cortical Regions for Selection Based on Source Location and Source Pitch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Adrian K. C.; Rajaram, Siddharth; Xia, Jing; Bharadwaj, Hari; Larson, Eric; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2012-01-01

    In order to extract information in a rich environment, we focus on different features that allow us to direct attention to whatever source is of interest. The cortical network deployed during spatial attention, especially in vision, is well characterized. For example, visuospatial attention engages a frontoparietal network including the frontal eye fields (FEFs), which modulate activity in visual sensory areas to enhance the representation of an attended visual object. However, relatively little is known about the neural circuitry controlling attention directed to non-spatial features, or to auditory objects or features (either spatial or non-spatial). Here, using combined magnetoencephalography (MEG) and anatomical information obtained from MRI, we contrasted cortical activity when observers attended to different auditory features given the same acoustic mixture of two simultaneous spoken digits. Leveraging the fine temporal resolution of MEG, we establish that activity in left FEF is enhanced both prior to and throughout the auditory stimulus when listeners direct auditory attention to target location compared to when they focus on target pitch. In contrast, activity in the left posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS), a region previously associated with auditory pitch categorization, is greater when listeners direct attention to target pitch rather than target location. This differential enhancement is only significant after observers are instructed which cue to attend, but before the acoustic stimuli begin. We therefore argue that left FEF participates more strongly in directing auditory spatial attention, while the left STS aids auditory object selection based on the non-spatial acoustic feature of pitch. PMID:23335874

  18. NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

    2008-05-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam SAXS

  19. Disposal Process for High Activity Sources by a University through the U.S. Dept. of Energy's Off-Site Source Recovery Project - 12076

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, James P.; Brandl, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Sealed radioactive sources are used in a wide variety of applications by a large number of license holders in the Unites States. Applications range from low-activity calibration sources to high-activity irradiators for engineering, research, or medical purposes. This paper describes and evaluates the safety and security measures in place for disused sealed sources, in particular of high activity sealed sources at the end of their operational life-time. The technical, radiation protection, and financial challenges for licensees and the Competent Authorities are reviewed from the point of view of the license holder. As an example, the waste management processes and the chain of custody for disused research irradiator sources are followed from extraction from the irradiator facility to the source disposal or recycling contractor. Possible safety and security concern in the waste disposal process are investigated in order to identify improvement potential for radiation protection or source security. Two shipments of disused sealed sources from Colorado State University (CSU) have been conducted through the CSU Radiation Control Office (RCO) in the last two years, with a third shipment expected to be completed by the end of November 2011. Two of the sources shipped are considered 'high' activity and exceed the U.S. NRC limits requiring increased controls for security purposes. Three sources were shipped in 2009 and ten more are expected in 2011. A total activity of 117.3 GBq was shipped in 2009. Nine sources were recently shipped in October 2011 through a third party waste broker where the total activity was 96.34 GBq. The last source is scheduled for shipment no later than 30 November 2011 and contains an activity of 399.96 GBq. Radiation waste disposal of high activity sources in large shields with unknown manufacturers, serial numbers, or model numbers is an arduous process requiring multiple contacts with various state and federal agencies. DOE's OSRP has made it

  20. Flavonoid profile, antioxidant and cytotoxic activity of different extracts from Algerian Rhamnus alaternus L. bark

    PubMed Central

    Boussahel, Soulef; Speciale, Antonio; Dahamna, Saliha; Amar, Yacine; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Cacciola, Francesco; Cimino, Francesco; Donato, Paola; Ferlazzo, Guido; Harzallah, Daoud; Cristani, Mariateresa

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rhamnus alaternus (Rhamnaceae) L. has been traditionally used for treatment of many diseases. Objective: In this study, we determined the antioxidant/free radical scavenger properties, the flavonoid profile and the cytotoxicity of aqueous and methanolic extracts obtained by maceration from Algerian R. alaternus bark, like also of aqueous extract prepared by decoction according to the traditional method. This to estimate the usefulness of the drug traditional preparation and compare it with those made in the laboratory. Materials and Methods: The antioxidant activity of the extracts was evaluated using five different redox-based assays, all involving one redox reaction with the oxidant. High-performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis was used to identify and quantify the flavonoids content. Cytotoxicity on human monocytic leukemia cells (U937) was also carried out. Results: All the extracts tested showed a good antioxidant/free radical scavenger activity and a similar flavonoid fingerprint. However, the methanolic one presented the best antioxidant activity that can be due to the highest flavonoid amount and significantly reduced the proliferation of leukemia cells. The results confirm that the extract prepared by decoction contains efficient antioxidant compounds and this justifies in part the therapeutic and preventive usefulness. Moreover, the methanolic extract exerted excellent cytotoxicity on U937 that could be attributed to kaempferol and rhamnocitrin glycosides. PMID:26109754

  1. Phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activity of different varieties of Adinandra Tea (Adinandra Jack).

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongsheng; Chen, Gu; Fu, Xiong; Liu, Rui-Hai

    2015-01-14

    Consumption of plant foods has been negatively associated with the risk of developing chronic diseases, which is partly attributed to their rich and diverse phytochemicals. To promote the rational and effective application of Adinandra tea (Adinandra Jack), a traditional Chinese tea (Shiyacha) widely consumed as a health beverage, the complete phytochemical profile and antioxidant activity of four varieties of Adinandra tea were analyzed. They were rich in phenolics and flavonoids, ranging from 71.29 to 140.54 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g and from 19.13 to 88.72 mg of catechin equivalent/g, respectively. Their antioxidant capacities were high, as revealed by oxygen radical absorbance capacity, peroxyl radical scavenging capacity, and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assays. An obvious antiproliferation effect was observed in HepG2 and MCF-7 cells, with EC50 ranging from 1.05 to 6.44 mg/mL and from 2.26 to 8.02 mg/mL, respectively. Among the four varieties compared, Nitida and Millettii had a higher CAA value and antiproliferation activity, while Latifolia contained considerable bound phenolics.

  2. Placental profiling of UGT1A enzyme expression and activity and interactions with preeclampsia at term.

    PubMed

    Collier, Abby C; Thévenon, Audrey D; Goh, William; Hiraoka, Mark; Kendal-Wright, Claire E

    2015-12-01

    Placental UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes have critical roles in hormone, nutrient, chemical balance and fetal exposure during pregnancy. Placental UGT1A isoforms were profiled and differences between preeclamptic (PE) and non-PE placental UGT expression determined. In third trimester villous placenta, UGT1A1, 1A4, 1A6 and 1A9 were expressed and active in all specimens (n = 10), but UGT1A3, 1A5, 1A7, 1A8 and 1A10 were absent. The UGT1A activities were comparable to human liver microsomes per milligram, but placental microsome yields were only 2 % of liver (1 mg/g of tissue vs. 45 mg/g of tissue). For successful PCR, placental collection and processing within 60 min from delivery, including DNAse and ≥300 ng of RNA in reverse transcription were essential and snap freezing in liquid nitrogen immediately was the best preservation method. Although UGT1A6 mRNA was lower in PE (P < 0.001), there were no other significant effects on UGT mRNA, protein or activities. A more comprehensive tissue sample set is required for confirmation of PE interactions with UGT. Placental UGT1A enzyme expression patterns are similar to the liver and a detoxicative role for placental UGT1A is inferred.

  3. Profiling Physical Activity, Diet, Screen and Sleep Habits in Portuguese Children

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sara; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Gomes, Thayse Natacha; Borges, Alessandra; Santos, Daniel; Souza, Michele; dos Santos, Fernanda K.; Chaves, Raquel N.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Barreira, Tiago V.; Maia, José A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity in children is partly due to unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, e.g., sedentary activity and poor dietary choices. This trend has been seen globally. To determine the extent of these behaviours in a Portuguese population of children, 686 children 9.5 to 10.5 years of age were studied. Our aims were to: (1) describe profiles of children’s lifestyle behaviours; (2) identify behaviour pattern classes; and (3) estimate combined effects of individual/socio-demographic characteristics in predicting class membership. Physical activity and sleep time were estimated by 24-h accelerometry. Nutritional habits, screen time and socio-demographics were obtained. Latent Class Analysis was used to determine unhealthy lifestyle behaviours. Logistic regression analysis predicted class membership. About 78% of children had three or more unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, while 0.2% presented no risk. Two classes were identified: Class 1-Sedentary, poorer diet quality; and Class 2-Insufficiently active, better diet quality, 35% and 65% of the population, respectively. More mature children (Odds Ratio (OR) = 6.75; 95%CI = 4.74–10.41), and boys (OR = 3.06; 95% CI = 1.98–4.72) were more likely to be overweight/obese. However, those belonging to Class 2 were less likely to be overweight/obese (OR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.43–0.84). Maternal education level and household income did not significantly predict weight status (p ≥ 0.05). PMID:26043034

  4. Profiling physical activity, diet, screen and sleep habits in Portuguese children.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Sara; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Gomes, Thayse Natacha; Borges, Alessandra; Santos, Daniel; Souza, Michele; dos Santos, Fernanda K; Chaves, Raquel N; Champagne, Catherine M; Barreira, Tiago V; Maia, José A R

    2015-06-02

    Obesity in children is partly due to unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, e.g., sedentary activity and poor dietary choices. This trend has been seen globally. To determine the extent of these behaviours in a Portuguese population of children, 686 children 9.5 to 10.5 years of age were studied. Our aims were to: (1) describe profiles of children's lifestyle behaviours; (2) identify behaviour pattern classes; and (3) estimate combined effects of individual/ socio-demographic characteristics in predicting class membership. Physical activity and sleep time were estimated by 24-h accelerometry. Nutritional habits, screen time and socio-demographics were obtained. Latent Class Analysis was used to determine unhealthy lifestyle behaviours. Logistic regression analysis predicted class membership. About 78% of children had three or more unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, while 0.2% presented no risk. Two classes were identified: Class 1-Sedentary, poorer diet quality; and Class 2-Insufficiently active, better diet quality, 35% and 65% of the population, respectively. More mature children (Odds Ratio (OR) = 6.75; 95%CI = 4.74-10.41), and boys (OR = 3.06; 95% CI = 1.98-4.72) were more likely to be overweight/obese. However, those belonging to Class 2 were less likely to be overweight/obese (OR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.43-0.84). Maternal education level and household income did not significantly predict weight status (p ≥ 0.05).

  5. Oxidative Profile and δ-Aminolevulinate Dehydratase Activity in Healthy Pregnant Women with Iron Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    De Lucca, Leidiane; Rodrigues, Fabiane; Jantsch, Letícia B.; Neme, Walter S.; Gallarreta, Francisco M. P.; Gonçalves, Thissiane L.

    2016-01-01

    An oxidative burst occurs during pregnancy due to the large consumption of oxygen in the tissues and an increase in metabolic demands in response to maternal physiological changes and fetal growth. This study aimed to determine the oxidative profile and activity of δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) in pregnant women who received iron supplementation. Oxidative stress parameters were evaluated in 25 pregnant women with iron supplementation, 25 pregnant women without supplementation and 25 non-pregnant women. The following oxidative stress parameters were evaluated: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), protein thiol groups (P-SH), non-protein thiol levels (NP-SH), vitamin C levels, catalase and δ-ALA-D activity. Markers of oxidative stress and cell damage, such as TBARS in plasma were significantly higher in pregnant women without supplementation. Levels of P-SH, NP-SH and δ-ALA-D activity were significantly lower in pregnant women without supplementation compared to non-pregnant and pregnant women with supplementation, while vitamin C levels were significantly lower in pregnant women without supplementation when compared to non-pregnant women. The increase in the generation of oxidative species and decrease of antioxidants suggest the loss of physiological oxidative balance during normal pregnancy, which was not observed in pregnant women with iron supplementation, suggesting a protective effect of iron against oxidative damage. PMID:27153075

  6. Placental profiling of UGT1A enzyme expression and activity and interactions with preeclampsia at term

    PubMed Central

    Thévenon, Audrey D.; Goh, William; Hiraoka, Mark; Kendal-Wright, Claire E.

    2014-01-01

    Placental UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes have critical roles in hormone, nutrient, chemical balance and fetal exposure during pregnancy. Placental UGT1A isoforms were profiled and differences between preeclamptic (PE) and non-PE placental UGT expression determined. In third trimester villous placenta, UGT1A1, 1A4, 1A6 and 1A9 were expressed and active in all specimens (n = 10), but UGT1A3, 1A5, 1A7, 1A8 and 1A10 were absent. The UGT1A activities were comparable to human liver microsomes per milligram, but placental microsome yields were only 2 % of liver (1 mg/g of tissue vs. 45 mg/g of tissue). For successful PCR, placental collection and processing within 60 min from delivery, including DNAse and ≥300 ng of RNA in reverse transcription were essential and snap freezing in liquid nitrogen immediately was the best preservation method. Although UGT1A6 mRNA was lower in PE (P < 0.001), there were no other significant effects on UGT mRNA, protein or activities. A more comprehensive tissue sample set is required for confirmation of PE interactions with UGT. Placental UGT1A enzyme expression patterns are similar to the liver and a detoxicative role for placental UGT1A is inferred. PMID:25465229

  7. Enhanced complement activation is part of the unfavourable cardiovascular risk profile in South Asians

    PubMed Central

    Siezenga, M A; Chandie Shaw, P K; van der Geest, R N; Mollnes, T E; Daha, M R; Rabelink, T J; Berger, S P

    2009-01-01

    South Asian immigrants in western societies exhibit a high burden of diabetes and subsequent vascular complications. Diabetic vascular complications are associated with vascular inflammation. We hypothesize that enhanced complement activation is involved. Therefore, levels of complement C3 and SC5b-9 – the soluble end product of complement activation – in a group of 200 South Asians were compared with an age- and sex-matched control group of native Caucasians. In addition, the association between complement levels and albuminuria, an indicator of renal damage and a cardiovascular risk marker, was assessed in the diabetic South Asian group. Compared with native Caucasians, South Asians had significantly higher levels of both serum C3 and plasma SC5b-9, even when only non-diabetic South Asians were considered. Diabetic South Asians had significantly higher C3 levels compared with non-diabetic South Asians. In diabetic South Asians, higher levels of SC5b-9 were associated with an increased prevalence of albuminuria (odds ratio 5·4, 95% confidence interval 1·8–15·8). These results suggest that enhanced complement activation is part of the unfavourable cardiovascular risk profile in South Asians. PMID:19659775

  8. Antioxidant activity and phenolic profiles of the wild currant Ribes magellanicum from Chilean and Argentinean Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Aspee, Felipe; Thomas-Valdés, Samanta; Schulz, Ayla; Ladio, Ana; Theoduloz, Cristina; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2016-07-01

    The Patagonian currant Ribes magellanicum is highly valued due to its pleasant flavor and sweet taste. The aim of this study was to characterize its constituents and to assess their antioxidant and cytoprotective properties. For the fruit phenolic-enriched extract (PEE), total phenolics (TP), total flavonoids (TF), and antioxidant activity (DPPH, Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and Trolox equivalent antioxidant activity (TEAC)) were determined. Argentinean samples presented better activity in the DPPH and FRAP assays. Best cytoprotection against oxidative stress induced by H2O2 in AGS cells was found in one Argentinean sample at 500 μg mL(-1) (65.7%). HPLC MS/MS analysis allowed the tentative identification of 59 constituents, including eight anthocyanins, 11 conjugates of caffeic-, ferulic-, and coumaric acid, and 38 flavonoids, most of them quercetin and kaempferol derivatives. Argentinean samples showed a more complex pattern of anthocyanins, hydroxycinnamic acids (HCA), and flavonoids. Cyanidin rhamnoside hexoside and cyanidin hexoside were the main anthocyanins, accounting for 35 and 55% for the Argentinean and 60 and 27% for the ripe Chilean fruits. HCA content was about three times higher in Argentinean samples. The phenolic profiles of Chilean and Argentinean Ribes magellanicum show remarkable differences in chemical composition with higher HCA and flavonoid content in Argentinean samples.

  9. Seismic Reflection Image of Lithospheric Structure Beneath Shidara, Using Explosive Sources from the 2001 Deep Seismic Profiling in Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, H.; Ito, T.; Miller, K.; Iwasaki, T.; Hirata, N.; Ohishi, M.; Kaip, G.; Kato, N.; Kikuchi, S.; Kwiatkowski, A.; Kurashimo, E.; Kawamura, T.

    2001-12-01

    Central Honshu lies above an active subduction zone where the Philippine Sea plate is being subducted beneath the Eurasian plate. A better understanding of the lithospheric structure of this region is important for assessing the risk of large mega-thrust earthquakes and also for understanding processes of continental growth. In order to define the deep geometry of major structures within the crust as well as the down-going slab, a deep seismic reflection profile was collected in the central part of Honshu, Japan. This experiment was performed as a piggy-back on a larger scale seismic experiment conducted by the Japan Marine Science and Technology Center and Joint Japanese University teams in late August, 2001. In the Shidara area, a 27-km seismic line was deployed perpendicular to the trench axis and major geologic boundaries. In the central part of the seismic line, 10-Hz vertical geophones, connected by a digital telemetry cables, were deployed over 15 km at a 50 m spacing. In addition, 100 TEXAN (Reftek 125) recorders with 4.5 Hz geophones were deployed at ca. 120 m-intervals for 12 km. A total of six shots with a maximum offset of 210 km, were clearly recorded by this dense receiver array. Near-vertical incidence data were obtained with recordings of a 500 kg shot at the northern end of this receiver array and a 100 kg shot at the southern end. The shots were recorded for 60 to 64 s at a 4 ms sampling rate. Records from these shots exhibit strong, layered reflections from 6 to 9.5 s, which we interpret as being derived from the lower crust. North-dipping reflections at 10.5 to 11.5 s can be interpreted as reflections from the down-going slab. Some north-dipping events from the middle and upper crust probably correspond to the deeper extension of the Median Tectonic Line and Butsuzo Tectonic Line, both of which extend for more than 1000 km along western Honshu and Kyushu Islands.

  10. Source segregation and food waste prevention activities in high-density households in a deprived urban area.

    PubMed

    Rispo, A; Williams, I D; Shaw, P J

    2015-10-01

    A waste audit and a household questionnaire survey were conducted in high-density housing estates in one of the most economically and socially deprived areas of England (Haringey, London). Such areas are under-represented in published research. The study examined source segregation, potential participation in a food waste segregation scheme, and food waste prevention activities in five estates (1034 households). The results showed that: contamination of recyclables containers was low; ca. 28% of the mixed residual waste's weight was recyclable; food waste comprised a small proportion of the waste from these residents, probably because of their relatively disadvantaged economic circumstances; and the recycling profile reflected an intermittent pattern of behaviour. Although the majority of respondents reported that they would participate in a food waste separation scheme, the response rate was low and many responses of "don't know" were recorded. Municipalities committed to foster improved diversion from landfill need to recognise that there is no "quick and easy fix", regardless of local or national aspirations. Lasting and sustained behaviour change requires time and the quality of service provision and associated infrastructure play a fundamental role in facilitating residents to participate effectively in waste management activities that maximise capture of source-segregated materials. Populations in deprived areas that reside in high-rise, high-density dwellings are "hard-to-reach" in terms of participation in recycling schemes and exceptional efforts and additional resources are usually required to improve performance.

  11. New Active Remote-sensing Capabilities: Laser Ablation Spectrometer and Lidar Atmospheric Species Profile Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, R. J.; Bergstralh, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: With the anticipated development of high-capacity fission power and electric propulsion for deep-space missions, it will become possible to propose experiments that demand higher power than current technologies (e.g. radioisotope power sources) provide. Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO), the first mission in the Project Prometheus program, will explore the icy moons of Jupiter with a suite of high-capability experiments that take advantage of the high power levels (and indirectly, the high data rates) that fission power affords. This abstract describes two high-capability active-remote-sensing experiments that will be logical candidates for subsequent Prometheus-class missions.

  12. Behaviorally activated mRNA expression profiles produce signatures of learning and enhanced inhibition in aged rats with preserved memory.

    PubMed

    Haberman, Rebecca P; Colantuoni, Carlo; Koh, Ming Teng; Gallagher, Michela

    2013-01-01

    Aging is often associated with cognitive decline, but many elderly individuals maintain a high level of function throughout life. Here we studied outbred rats, which also exhibit individual differences across a spectrum of outcomes that includes both preserved and impaired spatial memory. Previous work in this model identified the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus as a region critically affected by age and integral to differing cognitive outcomes. Earlier microarray profiling revealed distinct gene expression profiles in the CA3 region, under basal conditions, for aged rats with intact memory and those with impairment. Because prominent age-related deficits within the CA3 occur during neural encoding of new information, here we used microarray analysis to gain a broad perspective of the aged CA3 transcriptome under activated conditions. Behaviorally-induced CA3 expression profiles differentiated aged rats with intact memory from those with impaired memory. In the activated profile, we observed substantial numbers of genes (greater than 1000) exhibiting increased expression in aged unimpaired rats relative to aged impaired, including many involved in synaptic plasticity and memory mechanisms. This unimpaired aged profile also overlapped significantly with a learning induced gene profile previously acquired in young adults. Alongside the increased transcripts common to both young learning and aged rats with preserved memory, many transcripts behaviorally-activated in the current study had previously been identified as repressed in the aged unimpaired phenotype in basal expression. A further distinct feature of the activated profile of aged rats with intact memory is the increased expression of an ensemble of genes involved in inhibitory synapse function, which could control the phenotype of neural hyperexcitability found in the CA3 region of aged impaired rats. These data support the conclusion that aged subjects with preserved memory recruit adaptive mechanisms to

  13. Emission and profile characteristic of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in PM2.5 and PM10 from stationary sources based on dilution sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Shaofei; Ji, Yaqin; Li, Zhiyong; Lu, Bing; Bai, Zhipeng

    2013-10-01

    The mass concentrations and profile characteristic for 18 kinds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in PM2.5 and PM10 from stack gases for six types of stationary sources in Shandong Province, China were studied by a dilution sampling system and GC-MS analysis method from February to March in 2010. The mass concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 from the six types of stationary sources varied in 8.2-79.4 mg m-3 and 23.3-156.7 mg m-3, respectively. The total mass concentrations of analyzed PAHs in PM2.5 and PM10 were in the ranges of 0.40-94.35 μg m-3 and 9.16-122.91 μg m-3. The most toxic ashes were from sinter and coke oven for both PM2.5 and PM10 with high carcinogenic PAHs concentrations. BbF, Phe, NaP, BghiP, Pyr, BaP and BeP were abundant which was different from formers and one of the key reasons may be the differences of sampling methods. Diversities in PAHs compositions existed between fly ashes within PM2.5 and PM10 fractions for coke oven according to coefficient of divergence (CD) values. PAHs profiles for PM10 emitted from coke oven were different from those of other stationary sources (with CD values higher than 0.35) and for PM2.5, it was the same for sinter (with most CD values close to 0.30). There existed similar PAHs markers for fine particles emitted from stationary sources excepted for the sinter. For PM10, PAHs markers were primary 3-ring PAHs except for the coke oven with BbF, IND and BghiP as its signatures. Diagnostic ratios of BaA/(BaA + Chr), Flu/(Flu + Pyr), BaP/(BaP + BeP), BeP/BghiP and IND/(IND + BghiP) could be not well distinguished for the six types of stationary sources with the maximum/minimum ratios lower than 2 for both PM2.5 and PM10 of fly ashes which should be not used for source identification studies. The mass concentrations and source profiles of PAHs should be updated timely for size-differentiated fly ashes from various stationary sources by dilution sampling method.

  14. Liquid chromatography coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and post-column addition of metal salt solutions as a powerful tool for the metabolic profiling of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Cirigliano, Adriana M; Rodriguez, M Alejandra; Gagliano, M Laura; Bertinetti, Brenda V; Godeas, Alicia M; Cabrera, Gabriela M

    2016-03-25

    Fusarium oxysporum L11 is a non-pathogenic soil-borne fungal strain that yielded an extract that showed antifungal activity against phytopathogens. In this study, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (API-QTOF-MS) was applied for the comprehensive profiling of the metabolites from the extract. The employed sources were electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Post-column addition of metal solutions of Ca, Cu and Zn(II) was also tested using ESI. A total of 137 compounds were identified or tentatively identified by matching their accurate mass signals, suggested molecular formulae and MS/MS analysis with previously reported data. Some compounds were isolated and identified by NMR. The extract was rich in cyclic peptides like cyclosporins, diketopiperazines and sansalvamides, most of which were new, and are reported here for the first time. The use of post-column addition of metals resulted in a useful strategy for the discrimination of compound classes since specific adducts were observed for the different compound families. This technique also allowed the screening for compounds with metal binding properties. Thus, the applied methodology is a useful choice for the metabolic profiling of extracts and also for the selection of metabolites with potential biological activities related to interactions with metal ions.

  15. Enhanced Amphiphilic Profile of a Short β-Stranded Peptide Improves Its Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Giorgia; Scorciapino, Mariano A.; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Bürck, Jochen; Montaldo, Nicola Pietro; Pintus, Manuela; Sanna, Roberta; Casu, Mariano; Giuliani, Andrea; Pirri, Giovanna; Luca, Vincenzo; Ulrich, Anne S.; Rinaldi, Andrea C.

    2015-01-01

    SB056 is a novel semi-synthetic antimicrobial peptide with a dimeric dendrimer scaffold. Active against both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria, its mechanism has been attributed to a disruption of bacterial membranes. The branched peptide was shown to assume a β-stranded conformation in a lipidic environment. Here, we report on a rational modification of the original, empirically derived linear peptide sequence [WKKIRVRLSA-NH2, SB056-lin]. We interchanged the first two residues [KWKIRVRLSA-NH2, β-SB056-lin] to enhance the amphipathic profile, in the hope that a more regular β-strand would lead to a better antimicrobial performance. MIC values confirmed that an enhanced amphiphilic profile indeed significantly increases activity against both Gram-positive and -negative strains. The membrane binding affinity of both peptides, measured by tryptophan fluorescence, increased with an increasing ratio of negatively charged/zwitterionic lipids. Remarkably, β-SB056-lin showed considerable binding even to purely zwitterionic membranes, unlike the original sequence, indicating that besides electrostatic attraction also the amphipathicity of the peptide structure plays a fundamental role in binding, by stabilizing the bound state. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism and solid-state 19F-NMR were used to characterize and compare the conformation and mobility of the membrane bound peptides. Both SB056-lin and β-SB056-lin adopt a β-stranded conformation upon binding POPC vesicles, but the former maintains an intrinsic structural disorder that also affects its aggregation tendency. Upon introducing some anionic POPG into the POPC matrix, the sequence-optimized β-SB056-lin forms well-ordered β-strands once electro-neutrality is approached, and it aggregates into more extended β-sheets as the concentration of anionic lipids in the bilayer is raised. The enhanced antimicrobial activity of the analogue correlates with the formation of these extended β-sheets, which

  16. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan W; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J; Ryan, Joseph V; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Kelvin H L; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    The use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass (SON68) and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems because of their fundamental and practical significance. Our results show that high sputter rates and accurate interfacial information can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering, whereas this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the analysis efficiency of insulating materials and, thus, can expand its applications to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin film characterization, and many other systems of interest.

  17. Effects of germination on the nutritional properties, phenolic profiles, and antioxidant activities of buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ge; Xu, Zhicun; Gao, Yuanyuan; Huang, Xianxiao; Zou, Yanping; Yang, Tiankui

    2015-05-01

    Germination is considered to be an effective process for improving the nutritional quality and functionality of cereals. In this study, changes of nutritional ingredients, antinutritional components, chemical composition, and antioxidant activities of buckwheat seeds over 72 h of germination were investigated, and the reasons for these changes are discussed. With the prolonged germination time, the contents of crude protein, reducing sugar, total phenolics, total flavonoids, and condensed tannins increased significantly, while the levels of crude fat, phytic acid, and the activity of trypsin inhibitor decreased. Phenolic compounds, such as rutin, vitexin, isovitexin, orientin, isoorientin, chlorogenic acid, trans-3-hydroxycinnamic acid, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid increased significantly during the germination process, which may be due to the activation of phenylalanine ammonialyase. The improvement of flavonoids led to significant enhancement of the antioxidant activities of germinated buckwheat. Germinated buckwheat had better nutritional value and antioxidant activities than ungerminated buckwheat, and it represented an excellent natural source of flavonoids and phenolic compounds, especially rutin and C-glycosylflavones. Therefore, germinated buckwheat could be used as a promising functional food for health promotion.

  18. The VSOP 5 GHz Active Galactic Nucleus Survey. V. Imaging Results for the Remaining 140 Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, R.; Fomalont, E. B.; Wiik, K.; Horiuchi, S.; Hirabayashi, H.; Edwards, P. G.; Murata, Y.; Asaki, Y.; Moellenbrock, G. A.; Scott, W. K.; Taylor, A. R.; Gurvits, L. I.; Paragi, Z.; Frey, S.; Shen, Z.-Q.; Lovell, J. E. J.; Tingay, S. J.; Rioja, M. J.; Fodor, S.; Lister, M. L.; Mosoni, L.; Coldwell, G.; Piner, B. G.; Yang, J.

    2008-04-01

    In 1997 February, the Japanese radio astronomy satellite HALCA was launched to provide the space-bourne element for the VLBI Space Observatory Program (VSOP) mission. Approximately 25% of the mission time was dedicated to the VSOP survey of bright compact active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 5 GHz. This paper, the fifth in the series, presents images and models for the remaining 140 sources not included in the third paper in the series, which contained 102 sources. For most sources, the plots of the (u,v) coverage, the visibility amplitude versus (u,v) distance, and the high-resolution image are presented. Model fit parameters to the major radio components are determined, and the brightness temperature of the core component for each source is calculated. The brightness temperature distributions for all of the sources in the VSOP AGN survey are discussed.

  19. Difficulties in Estimating the Physical Parameters of Compact Radio Sources in Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyukh, V. S.

    2016-12-01

    The various factors influencing estimates of the physical parameters of compact radio sources in active galactic nuclei (AGN) using a methods based on uniform models of synchrotron radiation sources are analyzed. It is found that the form of the relativistic electron energy density distribution as a function of magnetic energy density (Ee-EH) in the radio sources is determined by the shape of the electron energy spectrum. It is shown that the very large observed deviations of the estimated energies of the field and relativistic particles from equipartition are mainly caused by nonuniformity of the radio sources. In order to obtain correct estimates of the physical parameters of nonuniform radio sources, it is necessary to know their angular sizes at low frequencies (in the opaque region) and their Doppler factors.

  20. Characterization of the protease activity of detergents: laboratory practicals for studying the protease profile and activity of various commercial detergents.

    PubMed

    Valls, Cristina; Pujadas, Gerard; Garcia-Vallve, Santi; Mulero, Miquel

    2011-07-01

    Detergent enzymes account for about 30% of the total worldwide production of enzymes and are one of the largest and most successful applications of modern industrial biotechnology. Proteases can improve the wash performance of household, industrial, and institutional laundry detergents used to remove protein-based stains such as blood, grass, body fluids, and food soils. This article describes two easy and cheap laboratory exercises to study the presence, profile, and basic enzymology of detergent proteases. These laboratory practicals are based on the determination of the detergent protease activity of various commercial detergents using the N-succinyl-L-alanyl-L-alanyl-L-prolyl-L-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide method and the bovine serum albumin degradation capacity. Students are also required to elucidate the enzymatic subtype of detergent proteases by studying the inhibitory potential of several types of protease inhibitors revealed by the same experimental methodology. Additionally, the results of the exercises can be used to provide additional insights on elementary enzymology by studying the influence of several important parameters on protease activity such as temperature (in this article) and the influence of pH and effects of surfactants and oxidizers (proposed). Students also develop laboratory skills, problem-solving capacities, and the ability to write a laboratory report. The exercises are mainly designed for an advanced undergraduate project in the biochemistry and biotechnology sciences. Globally, these laboratory practicals show students the biotechnological applications of proteases in the detergent industry and also reinforce important enzymology concepts.

  1. In vitro biological activities and fatty acid profiles of Pistacia terebinthus fruits and Pistacia khinjuk seeds.

    PubMed

    Hacıbekiroğlu, Işil; Yılmaz, Pelin Köseoğlu; Haşimi, Nesrin; Kılınç, Ersin; Tolan, Veysel; Kolak, Ufuk

    2015-01-01

    This study reports in vitro anticholinesterase, antioxidant and antimicrobial effects of the n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethanol and ethanol-water extracts prepared from Pistacia terebinthus L. fruits and Pistacia khinjuk Stocks seeds as well as their total phenolic and flavonoid contents, and fatty acid compositions. Ethanol and ethanol-water extracts of both species exhibited higher anticholinesterase activity than galanthamine. Among ABTS, DPPH and CUPRAC assays, the highest antioxidant capacity of the extracts was found in the last one. P. terebinthus ethanol extract being rich in flavonoid content showed the best cupric reducing effect. All extracts possessed no antimicrobial activity. The main fatty acid in P. terebinthus fruits (52.52%) and P. khinjuk seeds (59.44%) was found to be oleic acid. Our results indicate that P. terebinthus fruits and P. khinjuk seeds could be a good source of anticholinesterase compounds, and could be phytochemically investigated.

  2. Phenolic Profile and Antioxidant Activity of Melon (Cucumis Melo L.) Seeds from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Zeb, Alam

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic composition of different extracts of honeydew melon seeds and their antioxidant activity was determined for the first time. Phenolic compounds were identified using a reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) method. Results showed the identification of five phenolic compounds in water extract namely gallic acid and its derivative, hydroxybenzoic acid and catechin derivatives and caffeic acid. There were nine phenolic compounds identified in methanol–water extract, which are caffeic acid, two vanillic acid derivatives, ellagitanins, quercetin-3-rutinoside, derivatives of syringic acid and ellagic acid. The amounts of gallic acid, caffeic acid and catechin were higher among all phenolic compounds. Total phenolic compounds and radical scavenging activity were higher in water and methanol–water extract than their corresponding methanol extracts. In conclusion, melon seeds are a good source of natural antioxidants with significant biological functions and may serve as food ingredients and as fortifying material for maintaining shelf life. PMID:28231162

  3. Evidence for Infrared-faint Radio Sources as z > 1 Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Minh T.; Norris, Ray P.; Siana, Brian; Middelberg, Enno

    2010-02-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 μm) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z >~ 1) active galactic nuclei.

  4. Nanograting-based compact VUV spectrometer and beam profiler for in-situ characterization of high-order harmonic generation light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kornilov, Oleg; Wilcox, Russell; Gessner, Oliver

    2010-07-09

    A compact, versatile device for VUV beam characterization is presented. It combines the functionalities of a VUV spectrometer and a VUV beam profiler in one unit and is entirely supported by a standard DN200 CF flange. The spectrometer employs a silicon nitride transmission nanograting in combination with a micro-channel plate based imaging detector. This enables the simultaneous recording of wavelengths ranging from 10 nm to 80 nm with a resolution of 0.25 nm to 0.13 nm. Spatial beam profiles with diameters up to 10 mm are imaged with 0.1 mm resolution. The setup is equipped with an in-vacuum translation stage that allows for in situ switching between the spectrometer and beam profiler modes and for moving the setup out of the beam. The simple, robust design of the device is well suited for non-intrusive routine characterization of emerging laboratory- and accelerator-based VUV light sources. Operation of the device is demonstrated by characterizing the output of a femtosecond high-order harmonic generation light source.

  5. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Ammonia Monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kristen; Sadler, Natalie C; Wright, Aaron T; Yeager, Chris; Hyman, Michael R

    2016-04-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic nitrifying bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2 (-)) through the sequential activities of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (HAO). Many alkynes are mechanism-based inactivators of AMO, and here we describe an activity-based protein profiling method for this enzyme using 1,7-octadiyne (17OD) as a probe. Inactivation of NH4 (+)-dependent O2 uptake by N. europaea by 17OD was time- and concentration-dependent. The effects of 17OD were specific for ammonia-oxidizing activity, andde novoprotein synthesis was required to reestablish this activity after cells were exposed to 17OD. Cells were reacted with Alexa Fluor 647 azide using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) (click) reaction, solubilized, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and infrared (IR) scanning. A fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was observed for cells previously exposed to 17OD but not for cells treated with either allylthiourea or acetylene prior to exposure to 17OD or for cells not previously exposed to 17OD. The fluorescent polypeptide was membrane associated and aggregated when heated with β-mercaptoethanol and SDS. The fluorescent polypeptide was also detected in cells pretreated with other diynes, but not in cells pretreated with structural homologs containing a single ethynyl functional group. The membrane fraction from 17OD-treated cells was conjugated with biotin-azide and solubilized in SDS. Streptavidin affinity-purified polypeptides were on-bead trypsin-digested, and amino acid sequences of the peptide fragments were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Peptide fragments from AmoA were the predominant peptides detected in 17OD-treated samples. In-gel digestion and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-tandem time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) analyses also confirmed that the fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was AmoA.

  6. Pedometer-determined physical activity profile of healthcare professionals in a Nigerian tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Owoeye, Oluwatoyosi; Tomori, Adetipe; Akinbo, Sunday

    2016-01-01

    Background: Healthcare professionals (HCPs) are perceived as statutory advocates for healthy living and promotion of healthy behaviors such as regular participation in physical activity (PA). This study assessed and compared pedometer-determined PA of different urban HCPs in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 180 HCPs from a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. PA was measured by daily walking steps using a pedometer. Results: The mean step count obtained was 7,396.94 ± 2,714.63 steps/day. Only 20% of the HCPs met a minimum PA of 10,000 steps/day. About one-third (34.4%) of the HCPs were low active and less than a quarter (23.9%) were somewhat active. Further, less than half (43.9%) of the HCPs were found to have PA levels ≥7,500 steps/day. Overall, nurses had the highest step counts (7,980 steps/day) followed by physiotherapists (7,332 steps/day), while pharmacists had the lowest step counts (6,201 steps/day). There was however no significant difference in the mean step counts of the various cadres of the HCPs (P > 0.05). Step counts of HCPs were found to significantly negatively correlate with their age (r = −0.53; P < 0.001), body mass index (r = −0.39; P < 0.001), and body fat percentage (r = −0.42; P < 0.001). Conclusion: PA profile of the HCPs was mostly characterized by a low active PA level and less than a quarter met the recommended minimum of 10,000 steps/day. PMID:27226683

  7. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Ammonia Monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kristen; Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.; Yeager, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic nitrifying bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2−) through the sequential activities of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (HAO). Many alkynes are mechanism-based inactivators of AMO, and here we describe an activity-based protein profiling method for this enzyme using 1,7-octadiyne (17OD) as a probe. Inactivation of NH4+-dependent O2 uptake by N. europaea by 17OD was time- and concentration-dependent. The effects of 17OD were specific for ammonia-oxidizing activity, and de novo protein synthesis was required to reestablish this activity after cells were exposed to 17OD. Cells were reacted with Alexa Fluor 647 azide using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) (click) reaction, solubilized, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and infrared (IR) scanning. A fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was observed for cells previously exposed to 17OD but not for cells treated with either allylthiourea or acetylene prior to exposure to 17OD or for cells not previously exposed to 17OD. The fluorescent polypeptide was membrane associated and aggregated when heated with β-mercaptoethanol and SDS. The fluorescent polypeptide was also detected in cells pretreated with other diynes, but not in cells pretreated with structural homologs containing a single ethynyl functional group. The membrane fraction from 17OD-treated cells was conjugated with biotin-azide and solubilized in SDS. Streptavidin affinity-purified polypeptides were on-bead trypsin-digested, and amino acid sequences of the peptide fragments were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Peptide fragments from AmoA were the predominant peptides detected in 17OD-treated samples. In-gel digestion and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–tandem time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) analyses also confirmed that the fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was AmoA. PMID:26826234

  8. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-15

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He{sup 4} nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T{sup 3}.

  9. Multitaxon activity profiling reveals differential microbial response to reduced seawater pH and oil pollution.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Francisco J R C; Cleary, Daniel F R; Costa, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Marina; Polónia, Ana R M; Silva, Artur M S; Simões, Mário M Q; Oliveira, Vanessa; Gomes, Newton C M

    2016-09-01

    There is growing concern that predicted changes to global ocean chemistry will interact with anthropogenic pollution to significantly alter marine microbial composition and function. However, knowledge of the compounding effects of climate change stressors and anthropogenic pollution is limited. Here, we used 16S and 18S rRNA (cDNA)-based activity profiling to investigate the differential responses of selected microbial taxa to ocean acidification and oil hydrocarbon contamination under controlled laboratory conditions. Our results revealed that a lower relative abundance of sulphate-reducing bacteria (Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus clade) due to an adverse effect of seawater acidification and oil hydrocarbon contamination (reduced pH-oil treatment) may be coupled to changes in sediment archaeal communities. In particular, we observed a pronounced compositional shift and marked reduction in the prevalence of otherwise abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to the archaeal Marine Benthic Group B and Marine Hydrothermal Vent Group (MHVG) in the reduced pH-oil treatment. Conversely, the abundance of several putative hydrocarbonoclastic fungal OTUs was higher in the reduced pH-oil treatment. Sediment hydrocarbon profiling, furthermore, revealed higher concentrations of several alkanes in the reduced pH-oil treatment, corroborating the functional implications of the structural changes to microbial community composition. Collectively, our results advance the understanding of the response of a complex microbial community to the interaction between reduced pH and anthropogenic pollution. In future acidified marine environments, oil hydrocarbon contamination may alter the typical mixotrophic and k-/r-strategist composition of surface sediment microbiomes towards a more heterotrophic state with lower doubling rates, thereby impairing the ability of the ecosystem to recover from acute oil contamination events.

  10. Liquid chromatography-bioassay-mass spectrometry for profiling of physiologically active food.

    PubMed

    Morlock, Gertrud E; Klingelhöfer, Ines

    2014-08-19

    Complex samples like food contain thousands of single compounds. In the past, only known target compounds were looked for; however, most bioactive compounds in food are unknown. On the contrary, nontarget analyses face the challenge of determining the thousand peaks' identities, but it remains largely unclear which peaks are bioactive. Here, we show a novel effect-directed food profiling, as food and food supplements can be unknowingly physiologically active. By the combination of planar chromatography, using water-wettable reversed phase high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC RP18 W) plates, with detection by specific microorganisms, endocrine compounds in food were quantitatively detected as sharp-bounded zones and further characterized by mass spectrometry. This analytical workflow allowed frequent food intakes to be identified as risky with regard to estrogen-effective compounds, in discussion for their potential involvement in foodborne pathogenesis and for use in personalized health care. Using this accelerated workflow with its comprehensive detection potential, unknown endocrine compounds can be discovered. Exemplarily, the discovery of up to six endocrine disrupting compounds was shown in seven propolis samples and in four spices. For example, microorganisms quantitatively detected an estrogen-effective compound in the range of 0.07-0.24% in seven propolis samples, which was assigned to be caffeic acid phenethyl ester by mass spectrometry. This streamlined nontarget analysis detected modes of action, followed by targeted characterization of newly discovered effective compounds. Also, drug discovery or analysis of traditional medicines may profit from this effect-directed profiling of complex samples.

  11. Activity profiles of 309 ToxCast™ chemicals evaluated across 292 biochemical targets.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Thomas B; Houck, Keith A; Sipes, Nisha S; Singh, Amar V; Judson, Richard S; Martin, Matthew T; Weissman, Arthur; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C; Mortensen, Holly M; Reif, David M; Rabinowitz, James R; Setzer, R Woodrow; Richard, Ann M; Dix, David J; Kavlock, Robert J

    2011-03-28

    Understanding the potential health risks posed by environmental chemicals is a significant challenge elevated by the large number of diverse chemicals with generally uncharacterized exposures, mechanisms, and toxicities. The present study is a performance evaluation and critical analysis of assay results for an array of 292 high-throughput cell-free assays aimed at preliminary toxicity evaluation of 320 environmental chemicals in EPA's ToxCast™ project (Phase I). The chemicals (309 unique, 11 replicates) were mainly precursors or the active agent of commercial pesticides, for which a wealth of in vivo toxicity data is available. Biochemical HTS (high-throughput screening) profiled cell and tissue extracts using semi-automated biochemical and pharmacological methodologies to evaluate a subset of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), CYP450 enzymes (CYPs), kinases, phosphatases, proteases, HDACs, nuclear receptors, ion channels, and transporters. The primary screen tested all chemicals at a relatively high concentration 25 μM concentration (or 10 μM for CYP assays), and a secondary screen re-tested 9132 chemical-assay pairs in 8-point concentration series from 0.023 to 50 μM (or 0.009-20 μM for CYPs). Mapping relationships across 93,440 chemical-assay pairs based on half-maximal activity concentration (AC50) revealed both known and novel targets in signaling and metabolic pathways. The primary dataset, summary data and details on quality control checks are available for download at http://www.epa.gov/ncct/toxcast/.

  12. Enhancing the T-shaped learning profile when teaching hydrology using data, modeling, and visualization activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Christopher A.; Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Schiesser, Roy; Merwade, Venkatesh

    2016-03-01

    Previous research has suggested that the use of more authentic learning activities can produce more robust and durable knowledge gains. This is consistent with calls within civil engineering education, specifically hydrology, that suggest that curricula should more often include professional perspective and data analysis skills to better develop the "T-shaped" knowledge profile of a professional hydrologist (i.e., professional breadth combined with technical depth). It was expected that the inclusion of a data-driven simulation lab exercise that was contextualized within a real-world situation and more consistent with the job duties of a professional in the field, would provide enhanced learning and appreciation of job duties beyond more conventional paper-and-pencil exercises in a lower-division undergraduate course. Results indicate that while students learned in both conditions, learning was enhanced for the data-driven simulation group in nearly every content area. This pattern of results suggests that the use of data-driven modeling and visualization activities can have a significant positive impact on instruction. This increase in learning likely facilitates the development of student perspective and conceptual mastery, enabling students to make better choices about their studies, while also better preparing them for work as a professional in the field.

  13. Enhancing the T-shaped learning profile when teaching hydrology using data, modeling, and visualization activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, C. A.; Ruddell, B. L.; Schiesser, R.; Merwade, V.

    2015-07-01

    Previous research has suggested that the use of more authentic learning activities can produce more robust and durable knowledge gains. This is consistent with calls within civil engineering education, specifically hydrology, that suggest that curricula should more often include professional perspective and data analysis skills to better develop the "T-shaped" knowledge profile of a professional hydrologist (i.e., professional breadth combined with technical depth). It was expected that the inclusion of a data driven simulation lab exercise that was contextualized within a real-world situation and more consistent with the job duties of a professional in the field, would provide enhanced learning and appreciation of job duties beyond more conventional paper-and-pencil exercises in a lower division undergraduate course. Results indicate that while students learned in both conditions, learning was enhanced for the data-driven simulation group in nearly every content area. This pattern of results suggests that the use of data-driven modeling and visualization activities can have a significant positive impact on instruction. This increase in learning likely facilitates the development of student perspective and conceptual mastery, enabling students to make better choices about their studies, while also better preparing them for work as a professional in the field.

  14. Power output in vertical jumps: does optimum loading depend on activity profiles?

    PubMed

    Pazin, Nemanja; Berjan, Bobana; Nedeljkovic, Aleksandar; Markovic, Goran; Jaric, Slobodan

    2013-03-01

    The previously proposed maximum dynamic output hypothesis (MDO: i.e. the optimum load for maximizing the power output during jumping is one's own body) was tested on individuals of various activity profiles. Forty males (10 strength-trained athletes, 10 speed-trained athletes, 10 physically active non-athletes, and 10 sedentary individuals) performed different vertical jumps on a force plate while a pulley system was used to either reduce or increase the subject's body weight by 10-30 %. As expected, an increase in external loading resulted in a significant increase (p < 0.001) in force output and a concomitant decrease of peak jumping velocity in all groups of participants. The main finding, however, was that all groups revealed the maximum peak and mean power output at approximately the subjects' own body weight although their weight represented prominently different percentage of their maximum dynamic strength. While a significant (p < 0.05), albeit moderate, 'group × load' interaction in one jump was observed for the peak power output, the individual optimum load for maximizing the power output number did not differ among the groups. Although apparently further research on various types of movements is needed, the present results provide, so far, the strongest support of the MDO hypothesis.

  15. Effect of heat treatment on the antioxidant activity, color, and free phenolic acid profile of malt.

    PubMed

    Inns, Elizabeth L; Buggey, Lesley A; Booer, Christopher; Nursten, Harry E; Ames, Jennifer M

    2007-08-08

    Green malt was kilned at 95 degrees C following two regimens: a standard regimen (SKR) and a rapid regimen (RKR). Both resulting malts were treated further in a tray dryer heated to 120 degrees C, as was green malt previously dried to 65 degrees C (TDR). Each regimen was monitored by determining the color, antioxidant activity (by both ABTS(.+) and FRAP methods), and polyphenolic profile. SKR and RKR malts exhibited decreased L* and increased b* values above approximately 80 degrees C. TDR malts changed significantly less, and color did not develop until 110 degrees C, implying that different chemical reactions lead to color in those malts. Antioxidant activity increased progressively with each regimen, although with TDR malts this became significant only at 110-120 degrees C. The RKR malt ABTS(.+) values were higher than those of the SKR malt. The main phenolics, that is, ferulic, p-coumaric, and vanillic acids, were monitored throughout heating. Ferulic acid levels increased upon heating to 80 degrees C for SKR and to 70 degrees C for RKR, with subsequent decreases. However, the levels for TDR malts did not increase significantly. The increase in free phenolics early in kilning could be due to enzymatic release of bound phenolics and/or easier extractability due to changes in the matrix. The differences between the kilning regimens used suggest that further modification of the regimens could lead to greater release of bound phenolics with consequent beneficial effects on flavor stability in beer and, more generally, on human health.

  16. Comprehensive developmental profiles of gene activity in regions and subregions of the Arabidopsis seed

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Mark F.; Kirkbride, Ryan C.; Stone, Sandra L.; Pelletier, Julie M.; Bui, Anhthu Q.; Yeung, Edward C.; Hashimoto, Meryl; Fei, Jiong; Harada, Corey M.; Munoz, Matthew D.; Le, Brandon H.; Drews, Gary N.; Brady, Siobhan M.; Goldberg, Robert B.; Harada, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Seeds are complex structures that consist of the embryo, endosperm, and seed-coat regions that are of different ontogenetic origins, and each region can be further divided into morphologically distinct subregions. Despite the importance of seeds for food, fiber, and fuel globally, little is known of the cellular processes that characterize each subregion or how these processes are integrated to permit the coordinated development of the seed. We profiled gene activity genome-wide in every organ, tissue, and cell type of Arabidopsis seeds from fertilization through maturity. The resulting mRNA datasets offer the most comprehensive description of gene activity in seeds with high spatial and temporal resolution, providing unique insights into the function of understudied seed regions. Global comparisons of mRNA populations reveal unexpected overlaps in the functional identities of seed subregions. Analyses of coexpressed gene sets suggest that processes that regulate seed size and filling are coordinated across several subregions. Predictions of gene regulatory networks based on the association of transcription factors with enriched DNA sequence motifs upstream of coexpressed genes identify regulators of seed development. These studies emphasize the utility of these datasets as an essential resource for the study of seed biology. PMID:23319655

  17. Activity-Based Protein Profiling Reveals Broad Reactivity of the Nerve Agent Sarin.

    PubMed

    Tuin, Adriaan W; Mol, Marijke A E; van den Berg, Roland M; Fidder, A; van der Marel, Gijs A; Overkleeft, Herman S; Noort, Daan

    2009-04-01

    Elucidation of noncholinesterase protein targets of organophosphates, and nerve agents in particular, may reveal additional mechanisms for their high toxicity as well as clues for novel therapeutic approaches toward intoxications with these agents. Within this framework, we here describe the synthesis of the activity-based probe 3, which contains a phosphonofluoridate moiety, a P-Me moiety, and a biotinylated O-alkyl group, and its use in activity-based protein profiling with two relevant biological samples, that is, rhesus monkey liver and cultured human A549 lung cells. In this way, we have unearthed eight serine hydrolases (fatty acid synthase, acylpeptide hydrolase, dipeptidyl peptidase 9, prolyl oligopeptidase, carboxylesterase, long-chain acyl coenzyme A thioesterase, PAF acetylhydrolase 1b, and esterase D/S-formyl glutathione hydrolase) as targets that are modified by the nerve agent sarin. It is also shown that the newly developed probe 3 might find its way into the development of alternative, less laborious purification protocols for human butyrylcholinesterase, a potent bioscavenger currently under clinical investigation as a prophylactic/therapeutic for nerve agent intoxications.

  18. Isotope microscopy visualization of the adsorption profile of 2-methylisoborneol and geosmin in powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Sakamoto, Asuka; Nakao, Soichi; Taniguchi, Takuma; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka; Sakamoto, Naoya; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-09-16

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon may enhance its equilibrium adsorption capacity for small molecules and micropollutants, such as 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin, as well as for macromolecules and natural organic matter. Shell adsorption, in which adsorbates do not completely penetrate the adsorbent but instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the adsorbent, may explain this enhancement in equilibrium adsorption capacity. Here, we used isotope microscopy and deuterium-doped MIB and geosmin to directly visualize the solid-phase adsorbate concentration profiles of MIB and geosmin in carbon particles. The deuterium/hydrogen ratio, which we used as an index of the solid-phase concentration of MIB and geosmin, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of carbon particles. Solid-phase concentrations of MIB and geosmin obtained from the deuterium/hydrogen ratio roughly agreed with those predicted by shell adsorption model analyses of isotherm data. The direct visualization of the localization of micropollutant adsorbates in activated carbon particles provided direct evidence of shell adsorption.

  19. Distribution of active organic matter in the soil profiles of natural and agricultural ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodzhaeva, A. K.; Semenov, V. M.

    2015-12-01

    The amount of active (potentially mineralizable) organic carbon (C0) in the 1-m-deep layer of typical chernozem, dark-gray forest soil, and gray forest soil was estimated for virgin plots and arable land. It was shown that C0 is mainly found in the topsoil (0-20 cm), where its pool reaches 32-60% of the total amount of C0 in the layer of 0-100 cm. The C0 content and its portion in the total organic carbon decrease down the soil profiles. The disturbance of the structure of the pool of active organic carbon—the loss of the moderately mineralizable (0.1 > k 2 > 0.1 day-1) fraction—takes place in the upper horizon of plowed soils. The total pool of C0 in the upper meter of typical chernozem under cropland and under meadow-steppe cenosis comprises 2.8 and 5.2 t/ha, respectively; for the dark gray forest soil under cropland and forest, it reaches 5.5 and 9.8 t/ha, respectively; and for the gray forest soil under cropland and forest, 2.4 and 3.4 t/ha, respectively. The pools of C0 in the typical chernozem. dark gray forest, and gray forest soils are comparable with the values of the annual C-CO2 emission from the soils of these zones.

  20. Insights on the Phytochemical Profile (Cyclopeptides) and Biological Activities of Calotropis procera Latex Organic Fractions

    PubMed Central

    Jucá, Thiago Lustosa; Ramos, Márcio Viana; Moreno, Frederico Bruno Mendes Batista; Viana de Matos, Mayara Patrícia; Marinho-Filho, José Delano Barreto; Moreira, Renato Azevedo; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Calotropis procera is a medicinal plant whose pharmacological properties are associated with its latex. Here, the Calotropis procera latex fractions were investigated in an attempt to trace its phytochemical profile and measure its anti-inflammatory and toxicity activity. The crude latex was partitioned, yielding five fractions (49.4% hexane, 5.2% dichloromethane, 2.0% ethyl acetate, 2.1% n-butanol, and 41.1% aqueous). Phytochemical screening and spectroscopy analysis revealed that dichloromethane is the most chemically diverse fraction. Triterpenes were detected in both the hexane and dichloromethane fractions, while flavonoids were detected in the dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions. These fractions were cytotoxic to cancer cell lines (LD50 0.05 to 3.9 μg/mL) and lethal to brine shrimp (LD50 10.9 to 65.7 μg/mL). Reduced neutrophil migration in rats was observed in carrageenan-induced peritonitis for the dichloromethane (67%), ethyl acetate (56%), and aqueous (72%) fractions. A positive reaction with tolidine and ninhydrin suggested that cyclopeptides are in the ethyl acetate fraction. It is therefore concluded that Calotropis procera latex dichloromethane and ethyl acetate fractions exhibit both in vitro and in vivo activities as well as anti-inflammatory properties. Cyclopeptide detection is especially interesting because previous attempts to investigate these low-molecular cyclic amino acid sequences in C. procera have failed. PMID:24348174

  1. Shotgun Metagenomic Profiles Have a High Capacity To Discriminate Samples of Activated Sludge According to Wastewater Type

    PubMed Central

    Ibarbalz, Federico M.; Orellana, Esteban; Figuerola, Eva L. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was conducted to investigate whether functions encoded in the metagenome could improve our ability to understand the link between microbial community structures and functions in activated sludge. By analyzing data sets from six industrial and six municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), covering different configurations, operational conditions, and geographic regions, we found that wastewater influent composition was an overriding factor shaping the metagenomic composition of the activated sludge samples. Community GC content profiles were conserved within treatment plants on a time scale of years and between treatment plants with similar influent wastewater types. Interestingly, GC contents of the represented phyla covaried with the average GC contents of the corresponding WWTP metagenome. This suggests that the factors influencing nucleotide composition act similarly across taxa and thus the variation in nucleotide contents is driven by environmental differences between WWTPs. While taxonomic richness and functional richness were correlated, shotgun metagenomics complemented taxon-based analyses in the task of classifying microbial communities involved in wastewater treatment systems. The observed taxonomic dissimilarity between full-scale WWTPs receiving influent types with varied compositions, as well as the inferred taxonomic and functional assignment of recovered genomes from each metagenome, were consistent with underlying differences in the abundance of distinctive sets of functional categories. These conclusions were robust with respect to plant configuration, operational and environmental conditions, and even differences in laboratory protocols. IMPORTANCE This work contributes to the elucidation of drivers of microbial community assembly in wastewater treatment systems. Our results are significant because they provide clear evidence that bacterial communities in WWTPs assemble mainly according to influent wastewater

  2. Structure of the deep oceanic lithosphere in the Northwestern Pacific ocean basin derived from active-source seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, A.; Kodaira, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Fujie, G.; Arai, R.; Miura, S.

    2015-12-01

    Many seismological studies have detected the sharp seismic discontinuities in the upper mantle, some of which are interpreted the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). However there are few data at the old Pacific plate, in particular at ocean basin, which is critical information for understanding nature of the oceanic LAB. In 2014 we conducted an active-source refraction/reflection survey along a 1130-km-long line in southeast of the Shatsky Rise. Five ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) were deployed and recovered by R/V Kairei of JAMSTEC. We used an airgun array with a total volume of 7,800 cubic inches with firing at intervals of 200 m. Multi-channel seismic reflection (MCS) data were also collected with a 444-channel, 6,000-m-long streamer cable. In OBS records the apparent velocity of the refraction waves from the uppermost mantle was high (< 8.6 km/sec), and considered to be caused by preferred orientation of olivine (e.g., Kodaira et al., 2014). Another remarkable feature is wide-angle reflection waves from the deep lithosphere at large (150-500 km) offsets. We applied the traveltime mapping method (Fujie et al., 2006), forward analysis (Zelt and Smith, 1992) and the amplitude modeling (Larsen and Grieger, 1998) to the OBS data. The results show that deep mantle reflectors exist at the depths from 35 to 60 km, and one possible explanation is that these reflectors correspond to patched low velocity zones around the base of the lithosphere. On MCS sections the clear and sharp Moho was imaged only at the southwestern end of the profile, but Moho was ambiguous or even not imaged in the most part of the profile. Since our seismic line covers the oceanic lithosphere with different ages that correspond to different stages of the Shatsky activity, the Moho appearance may reflect the variation of the Shatsky activity.

  3. Compact sources of suprathermal microwave emission detected in quiescent active regions during lunar occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, E.; Kaufmann, P.; Strauss, F. M.

    1992-04-01

    Solar quiescent active regions are known to exhibit radio emission from discrete structures. The knowledge of their dimensions and brightness temperatures is essential for understanding the physics of quiescent, confined plasma regions. Solar eclipses of 10 August, 1980 and 26 January, 1990, observed with high sensitivity and high time resolution at 22 GHz, allowed an unprecedented opportunity to identify Fresnel diffraction effects during lunar occultations of active regions. The results indicate the presence of quiescent discrete sources smaller than one arcsec in one dimension. Assuming symmetrical sources, their brightness temperatures were larger than 2 x 10 exp 7 K and 8 x 10 exp 7 K, for the 1980 and 1990 observations, respectively.

  4. Active Control of a Moving Noise SOURCE—EFFECT of Off-Axis Source Position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GUO, J.; PAN, J.; HODGSON, M.

    2002-03-01

    An optimally arranged multiple-channel active-control system is known to be able to create a large quiet zone in free space for a stationary primary noise source. When the primary noise source moves, the active control of the noise becomes much more difficult, as the primary noise field changes with time in space. In this case, the controller of the control system must respond fast enough to compensate for the change; much research has been focused on this issue. In this paper, it is shown that a moving source also causes difficulties from an acoustical perspective. A moving source not only changes continuously the strengths and phases of the sound field in the space, but also changes the wavefront of the primary sound field continuously. It is known that the efficiency of active noise control is determined mainly by the wavefront matching between the primary and control fields. To keep the control system effective in the case of a moving source, the wavefront of the control field needs to change, in order to continuously match the primary-wavefront change. This paper shows that there are limitations to the control-wavefront change. An optimally pre-arranged, multiple-channel control system is not able to construct a matching wavefront when the primary source moves outside a certain range. In other words, the control system is still able to create a large quiet zone only when the primary source moves within a range around the central axis of the control system. Both the location and the size of the quiet zone change with the location of the primary source.

  5. PCDD/PCDF and dl-PCB in the ambient air of a tropical Andean city: passive and active sampling measurements near industrial and vehicular pollution sources.

    PubMed

    Cortés, J; González, C M; Morales, L; Abalos, M; Abad, E; Aristizábal, B H

    2014-09-01

    Concentration gradients were observed in gas and particulate phases of PCDD/F originating from industrial and vehicular sources in the densely populated tropical Andean city of Manizales, using passive and active air samplers. Preliminary results suggest greater concentrations of dl-PCB in the mostly gaseous fraction (using quarterly passive samplers) and greater concentrations of PCDD/F in the mostly particle fraction (using daily active samplers). Dioxin-like PCB predominance was associated with the semi-volatility property, which depends on ambient temperature. Slight variations of ambient temperature in Manizales during the sampling period (15°C-27°C) may have triggered higher concentrations in all passive samples. This was the first passive air sampling monitoring of PCDD/F conducted in an urban area of Colombia. Passive sampling revealed that PCDD/F in combination with dioxin-like PCB ranged from 16 WHO-TEQ2005/m(3) near industrial sources to 7 WHO-TEQ2005/m(3) in an intermediate zone-a reduction of 56% over 2.8 km. Active sampling of particulate phase PCDD/F and dl-PCB were analyzed in PM10 samples. PCDD/F combined with dl-PCB ranged from 46 WHO-TEQ2005/m(3) near vehicular sources to 8 WHO-TEQ2005/m(3) in the same intermediate zone, a reduction of 83% over 2.6 km. Toxic equivalent quantities in both PCDD/F and dl-PCB decreased toward an intermediate zone of the city. Variations in congener profiles were consistent with variations expected from nearby sources, such as a secondary metallurgy plant, areas of concentrated vehicular emissions and a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI). These variations in congener profile measurements of dioxins and dl-PCBs in passive and active samples can be partly explained by congener variations expected from the various sources.

  6. PM2.5 chemical source profiles for vehicle exhaust, vegetative burning, geological material, and coal burning in Northwestern Colorado during 1995.

    PubMed

    Watson, J G; Chow, J C; Houck, J E

    2001-06-01

    PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 2.5 microm) chemical source profiles applicable to speciated emissions inventories and receptor model source apportionment are reported for geological material, motor vehicle exhaust, residential coal (RCC) and wood combustion (RWC), forest fires, geothermal hot springs; and coal-fired power generation units from northwestern Colorado during 1995. Fuels and combustion conditions are similar to those of other communities of the inland western US. Coal-fired power station profiles differed substantially between different units using similar coals, with the major difference being lack of selenium in emissions from the only unit that was equipped with a dry limestone sulfur dioxide (SO2) scrubber. SO2 abundances relative to fine particle mass emissions in power plant emissions were seven to nine times higher than hydrogen sulfide (H2S) abundances from geothermal springs, and one to two orders of magnitude higher than SO2 abundances in RCC emissions, implying that the SO2 abundance is an important marker for primary particle contributions of non-aged coal-fired power station contributions. The sum of organic and elemental carbon ranged from 1% to 10% of fine particle mass in coal-fired power plant emissions, from 5% to 10% in geological material, >50% in forest fire emissions, >60% in RWC emissions, and >95% in RCC and vehicle exhaust emissions. Water-soluble potassium (K+) was most abundant in vegetative burning profiles. K+/K ratios ranged from 0.1 in geological material profiles to 0.9 in vegetative burning emissions, confirming previous observations that soluble potassium is a good marker for vegetative burning.

  7. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety profile