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Sample records for active space second-order

  1. Second-Order Perturbation Theory for Generalized Active Space Self-Consistent-Field Wave Functions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongxia; Li Manni, Giovanni; Olsen, Jeppe; Gagliardi, Laura

    2016-07-12

    A multireference second-order perturbation theory approach based on the generalized active space self-consistent-field (GASSCF) wave function is presented. Compared with the complete active space (CAS) and restricted active space (RAS) wave functions, GAS wave functions are more flexible and can employ larger active spaces and/or different truncations of the configuration interaction expansion. With GASSCF, one can explore chemical systems that are not affordable with either CASSCF or RASSCF. Perturbation theory to second order on top of GAS wave functions (GASPT2) has been implemented to recover the remaining electron correlation. The method has been benchmarked by computing the chromium dimer ground-state potential energy curve. These calculations show that GASPT2 gives results similar to CASPT2 even with a configuration interaction expansion much smaller than the corresponding CAS expansion.

  2. Nuclear Energy Gradients for Internally Contracted Complete Active Space Second-Order Perturbation Theory: Multistate Extensions.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Shiozaki, Toru

    2016-08-09

    We report the development of the theory and computer program for analytical nuclear energy gradients for (extended) multistate complete active space perturbation theory (CASPT2) with full internal contraction. The vertical shifts are also considered in this work. This is an extension of the fully internally contracted CASPT2 nuclear gradient program recently developed for a state-specific variant by us [MacLeod and Shiozaki, J. Chem. Phys. 2015, 142, 051103]; in this extension, the so-called λ equation is solved to account for the variation of the multistate CASPT2 energies with respect to the change in the amplitudes obtained in the preceding state-specific CASPT2 calculations, and the Z vector equations are modified accordingly. The program is parallelized using the MPI3 remote memory access protocol that allows us to perform efficient one-sided communication. The optimized geometries of the ground and excited states of a copper corrole and benzophenone are presented as numerical examples. The code is publicly available under the GNU General Public License.

  3. Second-order perturbative corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction with the hole and particle approach

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, David

    2014-04-14

    Second-order corrections to the restricted active space configuration interaction (RASCI) with the hole and particle truncation of the excitation operator are developed. Theoretically, the computational cost of the implemented perturbative approach, abbreviated as RASCI(2), grows like its single reference counterpart in MP2. Two different forms of RASCI(2) have been explored, that is the generalized Davidson-Kapuy and the Epstein-Nesbet partitions of the Hamiltonian. The preliminary results indicate that the use of energy level shift of a few tenths of a Hartree might systematically improve the accuracy of the RASCI(2) energies. The method has been tested in the computation of the ground state energy profiles along the dissociation of the hydrogen fluoride and N{sub 2} molecules, the computation of correlation energy in the G2/97 molecular test set, and in the computation of excitation energies to low-lying states in small organic molecules.

  4. Local complete active space second-order perturbation theory using pair natural orbitals (PNO-CASPT2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Filipe; Kats, Daniel; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2016-09-01

    We present a CASPT2 method which exploits local approximations to achieve linear scaling of the computational effort with the molecular size, provided the active space is small and local. The inactive orbitals are localized, and the virtual space for each electron pair is spanned by a domain of pair-natural orbitals (PNOs). The configuration space is internally contracted, and the PNOs are defined for uniquely defined orthogonal pairs. Distant pair energies are obtained by multipole approximations, so that the number of configurations that are explicitly treated in the CASPT2 scales linearly with molecular size (assuming a constant active space). The PNOs are generated using approximate amplitudes obtained in a pair-specific semi-canonical basis of projected atomic orbitals (PAOs). The evaluation and transformation of the two-electron integrals use the same parallel local density fitting techniques as recently described for linear-scaling PNO-LMP2 (local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory). The implementation of the amplitude equations, which are solved iteratively, employs the local integrated tensor framework. The efficiency and accuracy of the method are tested for excitation energies and correlation energies. It is demonstrated that the errors introduced by the local approximations are very small. They can be well controlled by few parameters for the distant pair approximation, initial PAO domains, and the PNO domains.

  5. Local complete active space second-order perturbation theory using pair natural orbitals (PNO-CASPT2).

    PubMed

    Menezes, Filipe; Kats, Daniel; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2016-09-28

    We present a CASPT2 method which exploits local approximations to achieve linear scaling of the computational effort with the molecular size, provided the active space is small and local. The inactive orbitals are localized, and the virtual space for each electron pair is spanned by a domain of pair-natural orbitals (PNOs). The configuration space is internally contracted, and the PNOs are defined for uniquely defined orthogonal pairs. Distant pair energies are obtained by multipole approximations, so that the number of configurations that are explicitly treated in the CASPT2 scales linearly with molecular size (assuming a constant active space). The PNOs are generated using approximate amplitudes obtained in a pair-specific semi-canonical basis of projected atomic orbitals (PAOs). The evaluation and transformation of the two-electron integrals use the same parallel local density fitting techniques as recently described for linear-scaling PNO-LMP2 (local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory). The implementation of the amplitude equations, which are solved iteratively, employs the local integrated tensor framework. The efficiency and accuracy of the method are tested for excitation energies and correlation energies. It is demonstrated that the errors introduced by the local approximations are very small. They can be well controlled by few parameters for the distant pair approximation, initial PAO domains, and the PNO domains.

  6. Fully relativistic complete active space self-consistent field for large molecules: Quasi-second-order minimax optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Jefferson E.; Shiozaki, Toru

    2015-01-28

    We develop an efficient algorithm for four-component complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods on the basis of the Dirac equation that takes into account spin–orbit and other relativistic effects self-consistently. Orbitals are optimized using a trust-region quasi-Newton method with Hessian updates so that energies are minimized with respect to rotations among electronic orbitals and maximized with respect to rotations between electronic and positronic orbitals. Utilizing density fitting and parallel computation, we demonstrate that Dirac–Coulomb CASSCF calculations can be routinely performed on systems with 100 atoms and a few heavy-elements. The convergence behavior and wall times for octachloridodirhenate(III) and a tungsten methylidene complex are presented. In addition, the excitation energies of octachloridodirhenate(III) are reported using a state-averaged variant.

  7. Fully relativistic complete active space self-consistent field for large molecules: Quasi-second-order minimax optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Jefferson E.; Shiozaki, Toru

    2015-01-01

    We develop an efficient algorithm for four-component complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods on the basis of the Dirac equation that takes into account spin-orbit and other relativistic effects self-consistently. Orbitals are optimized using a trust-region quasi-Newton method with Hessian updates so that energies are minimized with respect to rotations among electronic orbitals and maximized with respect to rotations between electronic and positronic orbitals. Utilizing density fitting and parallel computation, we demonstrate that Dirac-Coulomb CASSCF calculations can be routinely performed on systems with 100 atoms and a few heavy-elements. The convergence behavior and wall times for octachloridodirhenate(III) and a tungsten methylidene complex are presented. In addition, the excitation energies of octachloridodirhenate(III) are reported using a state-averaged variant.

  8. Fully relativistic complete active space self-consistent field for large molecules: quasi-second-order minimax optimization.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jefferson E; Shiozaki, Toru

    2015-01-28

    We develop an efficient algorithm for four-component complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) methods on the basis of the Dirac equation that takes into account spin-orbit and other relativistic effects self-consistently. Orbitals are optimized using a trust-region quasi-Newton method with Hessian updates so that energies are minimized with respect to rotations among electronic orbitals and maximized with respect to rotations between electronic and positronic orbitals. Utilizing density fitting and parallel computation, we demonstrate that Dirac-Coulomb CASSCF calculations can be routinely performed on systems with 100 atoms and a few heavy-elements. The convergence behavior and wall times for octachloridodirhenate(III) and a tungsten methylidene complex are presented. In addition, the excitation energies of octachloridodirhenate(III) are reported using a state-averaged variant.

  9. Complete active space second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) study of N(2D) + H2O reaction paths on D1 and D0 potential energy surfaces: Direct and roaming pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isegawa, Miho; Liu, Fengyi; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2014-10-01

    We report reaction paths starting from N(2D) + H2O for doublet spin states, D0 and D1. The potential energy surfaces are explored in an automated fashion using the global reaction route mapping strategy. The critical points and reaction paths have been fully optimized at the complete active space second order perturbation theory level taking all valence electrons in the active space. In addition to direct dissociation pathways that would be dominant, three roaming processes, two roaming dissociation, and one roaming isomerization: (1) H2ON → H-O(H)N → H-HON → NO(2Π) + H2, (2) cis-HNOH → HNO-H → H-HNO → NO + H2, (3) H2NO → H-HNO → HNO-H → trans-HNOH, are confirmed on the D0 surface.

  10. Multistability of second-order competitive neural networks with nondecreasing saturated activation functions.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiaobing; Cao, Jinde

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, second-order interactions are introduced into competitive neural networks (NNs) and the multistability is discussed for second-order competitive NNs (SOCNNs) with nondecreasing saturated activation functions. Firstly, based on decomposition of state space, Cauchy convergence principle, and inequality technique, some sufficient conditions ensuring the local exponential stability of 2N equilibrium points are derived. Secondly, some conditions are obtained for ascertaining equilibrium points to be locally exponentially stable and to be located in any designated region. Thirdly, the theory is extended to more general saturated activation functions with 2r corner points and a sufficient criterion is given under which the SOCNNs can have (r+1)N locally exponentially stable equilibrium points. Even if there is no second-order interactions, the obtained results are less restrictive than those in some recent works. Finally, three examples with their simulations are presented to verify the theoretical analysis.

  11. Complete active space second order perturbation theory (CASPT2) study of N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2}O reaction paths on D{sub 1} and D{sub 0} potential energy surfaces: Direct and roaming pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Isegawa, Miho; Liu, Fengyi; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2014-10-21

    We report reaction paths starting from N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2}O for doublet spin states, D{sub 0} and D{sub 1}. The potential energy surfaces are explored in an automated fashion using the global reaction route mapping strategy. The critical points and reaction paths have been fully optimized at the complete active space second order perturbation theory level taking all valence electrons in the active space. In addition to direct dissociation pathways that would be dominant, three roaming processes, two roaming dissociation, and one roaming isomerization: (1) H{sub 2}ON → H–O(H)N → H–HON → NO({sup 2}Π) + H{sub 2}, (2) cis-HNOH → HNO–H → H–HNO → NO + H{sub 2}, (3) H{sub 2}NO → H–HNO → HNO–H → trans-HNOH, are confirmed on the D{sub 0} surface.

  12. Two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory with Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field reference function and spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential.

    PubMed

    Kim, Inkoo; Lee, Yoon Sup

    2014-10-28

    We report the formulation and implementation of KRCASPT2, a two-component multi-configurational second-order perturbation theory based on Kramers restricted complete active space self-consistent field (KRCASSCF) reference function, in the framework of the spin-orbit relativistic effective core potential. The zeroth-order Hamiltonian is defined as the sum of nondiagonal one-electron operators with generalized two-component Fock matrix elements as scalar factors. The Kramers symmetry within the zeroth-order Hamiltonian is maintained via the use of a state-averaged density, allowing a consistent treatment of degenerate states. The explicit expressions are derived for the matrix elements of the zeroth-order Hamiltonian as well as for the perturbation vector. The use of a fully variational reference function and nondiagonal operators in relativistic multi-configurational perturbation theory is reported for the first time. A series of initial calculations are performed on the ionization potential and excitation energies of the atoms of the 6p-block; the results display a significant improvement over those from KRCASSCF, showing a closer agreement with experimental results. Accurate atomic properties of the superheavy elements of the 7p-block are also presented, and the electronic structures of the low-lying excited states are compared with those of their lighter homologues.

  13. Complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2//CASSCF) study of the dissociative electron attachment in canonical DNA nucleobases caused by low-energy electrons (0-3 eV)

    SciTech Connect

    Francés-Monerris, Antonio; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Merchán, Manuela; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel

    2015-12-07

    Low-energy (0-3 eV) ballistic electrons originated during the irradiation of biological material can interact with DNA/RNA nucleobases yielding transient-anion species which undergo decompositions. Since the discovery that these reactions can eventually lead to strand breaking of the DNA chains, great efforts have been dedicated to their study. The main fragmentation at the 0-3 eV energy range is the ejection of a hydrogen atom from the specific nitrogen positions. In the present study, the methodological approach introduced in a previous work on uracil [I. González-Ramírez et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2769-2776 (2012)] is employed to study the DNA canonical nucleobases fragmentations of N–H bonds induced by low-energy electrons. The approach is based on minimum energy path and linear interpolation of internal coordinates computations along the N–H dissociation channels carried out at the complete-active-space self-consistent field//complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory level. On the basis of the calculated theoretical quantities, new assignations for the adenine and cytosine anion yield curves are provided. In addition, the π{sub 1}{sup −} and π{sub 2}{sup −} states of the pyrimidine nucleobases are expected to produce the temporary anions at electron energies close to 1 and 2 eV, respectively. Finally, the present theoretical results do not allow to discard neither the dipole-bound nor the valence-bound mechanisms in the range of energies explored, suggesting that both possibilities may coexist in the experiments carried out with the isolated nucleobases.

  14. Complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2//CASSCF) study of the dissociative electron attachment in canonical DNA nucleobases caused by low-energy electrons (0-3 eV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francés-Monerris, Antonio; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Merchán, Manuela; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Low-energy (0-3 eV) ballistic electrons originated during the irradiation of biological material can interact with DNA/RNA nucleobases yielding transient-anion species which undergo decompositions. Since the discovery that these reactions can eventually lead to strand breaking of the DNA chains, great efforts have been dedicated to their study. The main fragmentation at the 0-3 eV energy range is the ejection of a hydrogen atom from the specific nitrogen positions. In the present study, the methodological approach introduced in a previous work on uracil [I. González-Ramírez et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2769-2776 (2012)] is employed to study the DNA canonical nucleobases fragmentations of N-H bonds induced by low-energy electrons. The approach is based on minimum energy path and linear interpolation of internal coordinates computations along the N-H dissociation channels carried out at the complete-active-space self-consistent field//complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory level. On the basis of the calculated theoretical quantities, new assignations for the adenine and cytosine anion yield curves are provided. In addition, the π1- and π2- states of the pyrimidine nucleobases are expected to produce the temporary anions at electron energies close to 1 and 2 eV, respectively. Finally, the present theoretical results do not allow to discard neither the dipole-bound nor the valence-bound mechanisms in the range of energies explored, suggesting that both possibilities may coexist in the experiments carried out with the isolated nucleobases.

  15. Complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2//CASSCF) study of the dissociative electron attachment in canonical DNA nucleobases caused by low-energy electrons (0-3 eV).

    PubMed

    Francés-Monerris, Antonio; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Merchán, Manuela; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel

    2015-12-07

    Low-energy (0-3 eV) ballistic electrons originated during the irradiation of biological material can interact with DNA/RNA nucleobases yielding transient-anion species which undergo decompositions. Since the discovery that these reactions can eventually lead to strand breaking of the DNA chains, great efforts have been dedicated to their study. The main fragmentation at the 0-3 eV energy range is the ejection of a hydrogen atom from the specific nitrogen positions. In the present study, the methodological approach introduced in a previous work on uracil [I. González-Ramírez et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 8, 2769-2776 (2012)] is employed to study the DNA canonical nucleobases fragmentations of N-H bonds induced by low-energy electrons. The approach is based on minimum energy path and linear interpolation of internal coordinates computations along the N-H dissociation channels carried out at the complete-active-space self-consistent field//complete-active-space second-order perturbation theory level. On the basis of the calculated theoretical quantities, new assignations for the adenine and cytosine anion yield curves are provided. In addition, the π1 (-) and π2 (-) states of the pyrimidine nucleobases are expected to produce the temporary anions at electron energies close to 1 and 2 eV, respectively. Finally, the present theoretical results do not allow to discard neither the dipole-bound nor the valence-bound mechanisms in the range of energies explored, suggesting that both possibilities may coexist in the experiments carried out with the isolated nucleobases.

  16. An ab initio study on the four electronically lowest-lying states of CH 2 using the state-averaged complete active space second-order configuration interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yukio; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1997-12-01

    Four electronically lowest-lying ( X˜ 3B 1, ã 1A 1, b˜ 1B 1, and c˜ 1A 1) states of CH 2 have been investigated systematically using ab initio electronic structure theory. Complete active space (CAS) self-consistent-field (SCF) second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) and state-averaged (SA) CASSCF-SOCI levels of theory have been employed. The CASSCF reference wave function was constructed by minimizing the total energy of a specified state, while the SACASSCF reference wave function was obtained by minimizing the equally weighted total energy of the four ( X˜ 3B 1, ã 1A 1, b˜ 1B 1, and c˜ 1A 1) states. The third excited state ( c˜ 1A 1 or 2 1A 1) is of particular theoretical interest because it is represented by the second root of CASSCF and SOCI Hamiltonian matrices. Theoretical treatments of states not the lowest of their symmetry require special attention due to their tendency of variational collapse to the lower-lying state(s). For these four lowest-lying states total energies and physical properties including dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and associated infrared (IR) intensities were determined and compared with the results from the configuration interaction with single and double excitations (CISD) method and available experimental values. The CASSCF-SOCI method should provide the most reliable energetics and physical properties in the present study owing to its fully variational nature in the molecular orbital (MO) and CI spaces for a given state. It is demonstrated that the SACASSCF-SOCI wave functions produce results which are quite consistent with those from the CASSCF-SOCI method. Thus significantly increased application of the SACASSCF-SOCI method to the excited states of a wide variety of molecular systems is expected.

  17. Estimates of solutions of certain classes of second-order differential equations in a Hilbert space

    SciTech Connect

    Artamonov, N V

    2003-08-31

    Linear second-order differential equations of the form u''(t)+(B+iD)u'(t)+(T+iS)u(t)=0 in a Hilbert space are studied. Under certain conditions on the (generally speaking, unbounded) operators T, S, B and D the correct solubility of the equation in the 'energy' space is proved and best possible (in the general case) estimates of the solutions on the half-axis are obtained.

  18. Non-divergence parabolic equations of second order with critical drift in Lebesgue spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gong

    2017-02-01

    We consider uniformly parabolic equations and inequalities of second order in the non-divergence form with drift \\[-u_{t}+Lu=-u_{t}+\\sum_{ij}a_{ij}D_{ij}u+\\sum b_{i}D_{i}u=0\\,(\\geq0,\\,\\leq0)\\] in some domain $\\Omega\\subset \\mathbb{R}^{n+1}$. We prove a variant of Aleksandrov-Bakelman-Pucci-Krylov-Tso estimate with $L^{p}$ norm of the inhomogeneous term for some number $pspaces defined below which are critical under the parabolic scaling but not necessarily to be bounded. This is a continuation of the work in \\cite{GC}.

  19. Noniterative local second order Mo/ller{endash}Plesset theory: Convergence with local correlation space

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, P.E.; Head-Gordon, M.

    1998-11-01

    We extend our noniterative local correlation method [P. E. Maslen and M. Head-Gordon, Chem. Phys. Lett., {bold 283}, 102 (1998)] by defining a hierarchy of local spaces, ranging from small to large. The accuracy of the local method is then examined as a function of the size of the local space. A medium size local space recovers 98{percent} of the MP2 correlation energy, and reproduces fine details of the potential energy surface such as rotational barriers with an RMS error of 0.2 kcal/mol and a maximum error of 0.4 kcal/mol. A large local space recovers 99.5{percent} of the correlation energy and yields rotational barriers with a RMS error of 0.05 kcal/mol and a maximum error of 0.1 kcal/mol, at significantly increased computational cost. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Second order superintegrable systems in conformally flat spaces. IV. The classical 3D Staeckel transform and 3D classification theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kalnins, E.G.; Kress, J.M.; Miller, W. Jr.

    2006-04-15

    This article is one of a series that lays the groundwork for a structure and classification theory of second order superintegrable systems, both classical and quantum, in conformally flat spaces. In the first part of the article we study the Staeckel transform (or coupling constant metamorphosis) as an invertible mapping between classical superintegrable systems on different three-dimensional spaces. We show first that all superintegrable systems with nondegenerate potentials are multiseparable and then that each such system on any conformally flat space is Staeckel equivalent to a system on a constant curvature space. In the second part of the article we classify all the superintegrable systems that admit separation in generic coordinates. We find that there are eight families of these systems.

  1. Monolithic integration of active and second-order nonlinear functionality in Bragg reflection waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijlani, Bhavin J.

    2011-07-01

    This thesis explored the theory, design, fabrication and characterization of AlGaAs Bragg reflection waveguides (BRW) towards the goal of a platform for monolithic integration of active and optically nonlinear devices. Through integration of a diode laser and nonlinear phase-matched cavity, the possibility of on-chip nonlinear frequency generation was explored. Such integrated devices would be highly useful as a robust, alignment free, small footprint and electrically injected alternative to bulk optic systems. A theoretical framework for modal analysis of arbitrary 1-D photonic crystal defect waveguides is developed. This method relies on the transverse resonance condition. It is then demonstrated in the context of several types of Bragg reflection waveguides. The framework is then extended to phase-match second-order nonlinearities and incorporating quantum-wells for diode lasers. Experiments within a slab and ridge waveguide demonstrated phase-matched Type-I second harmonic generation at fundamental wavelength of 1587 and 1600 nm, respectively; a first for this type of waveguide. For the slab waveguide, conversion efficiency was 0.1 %/W. In the more strongly confined ridge waveguides, efficiency increased to 8.6 %/W owing to the increased intensity. The normalized conversion efficiency was estimated to be at 600 %/Wcm2. Diode lasers emitting at 980 nm in the BRW mode were also fabricated. Verification of the Bragg mode was performed through imaging the near- field of the mode. Propagation loss of this type of mode was measured directly for the first time at ≈ 14 cm-1. The lasers were found to be very insensitive with characteristic temperature at 215 K. Two designs incorporating both laser and phase-matched nonlinearity within the same cavity were fabricated, for degenerate and non-degenerate down-conversion. Though the lasers were sub-optimal, a parametric fluorescence signal was readily detected. Fluorescence power as high as 4 nW for the degenerate design

  2. Communication: Electronic UV-Vis transient spectra of the ∙OH reaction products of uracil, thymine, cytosine, and 5,6-dihydrouracil by using the complete active space self-consistent field second-order perturbation (CASPT2//CASSCF) theory.

    PubMed

    Francés-Monerris, Antonio; Merchán, Manuela; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel

    2013-08-21

    Addition of ∙OH radicals to pyrimidine nucleobases is a common reaction in DNA/RNA damage by reactive oxygen species. Among several experimental techniques, transient absorption spectroscopy has been during the last decades used to characterize such compounds. Discrepancies have however appeared in the assignment of the adduct or adducts responsible for the reported transient absorption UV-Vis spectra. In order to get an accurate assignment of the transient spectra and a unified description of the absorption properties of the ∙OH reaction products of pyrimidines, a systematic complete active space self-consistent field second-order perturbation (CASPT2//CASSCF) theory study has been carried out on the uracil, thymine, and cytosine ∙OH addition adducts, as well as on the 5,6-dihydrouracil hydrogen abstraction products. With the obtained findings, the C5OH contributions to the lowest-energy band can be finally discarded. Instead, a bright (2)(π2) state of the C6OH adducts is determined to be the main responsible in all compounds for the absorption band in the Vis range.

  3. An Activation Energy Experiment for a Second-Order Reaction in a Single Laboratory Period.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barile, Raymond C.; Michiels, Leo P.

    1983-01-01

    Describes modification of a chemical reaction to a single 4 1/2-hour laboratory period. Reaction kinetics between 2, 4-initrochlorobenzene and piperidine to form 2, 4-dinitrophenyl-piperidine and piperidinium hydrochloride are followed conductometrically at three temperatures to obtain data to calculate activation parameters. (Author/JN)

  4. Improved Accuracy of the Asymmetric Second-Order Vegetation Isoline Equation over the RED–NIR Reflectance Space

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Munenori; Obata, Kenta; Taniguchi, Kenta; Yoshioka, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between two reflectances of different bands is often encountered in cross calibration and parameter retrievals from remotely-sensed data. The asymmetric-order vegetation isoline is one such relationship, derived previously, where truncation error was reduced from the first-order approximated isoline by including a second-order term. This study introduces a technique for optimizing the magnitude of the second-order term and further improving the isoline equation’s accuracy while maintaining the simplicity of the derived formulation. A single constant factor was introduced into the formulation to adjust the second-order term. This factor was optimized by simulating canopy radiative transfer. Numerical experiments revealed that the errors in the optimized asymmetric isoline were reduced in magnitude to nearly 1/25 of the errors obtained from the first-order vegetation isoline equation, and to nearly one-fifth of the error obtained from the non-optimized asymmetric isoline equation. The errors in the optimized asymmetric isoline were compared with the magnitudes of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimates reported for four specific sensors aboard four Earth observation satellites. These results indicated that the error in the asymmetric isoline could be reduced to the level of the SNR by adjusting a single factor. PMID:28245566

  5. Improved Accuracy of the Asymmetric Second-Order Vegetation Isoline Equation over the RED-NIR Reflectance Space.

    PubMed

    Miura, Munenori; Obata, Kenta; Taniguchi, Kenta; Yoshioka, Hiroki

    2017-02-24

    The relationship between two reflectances of different bands is often encountered in cross calibration and parameter retrievals from remotely-sensed data. The asymmetric-order vegetation isoline is one such relationship, derived previously, where truncation error was reduced from the first-order approximated isoline by including a second-order term. This study introduces a technique for optimizing the magnitude of the second-order term and further improving the isoline equation's accuracy while maintaining the simplicity of the derived formulation. A single constant factor was introduced into the formulation to adjust the second-order term. This factor was optimized by simulating canopy radiative transfer. Numerical experiments revealed that the errors in the optimized asymmetric isoline were reduced in magnitude to nearly 1/25 of the errors obtained from the first-order vegetation isoline equation, and to nearly one-fifth of the error obtained from the non-optimized asymmetric isoline equation. The errors in the optimized asymmetric isoline were compared with the magnitudes of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimates reported for four specific sensors aboard four Earth observation satellites. These results indicated that the error in the asymmetric isoline could be reduced to the level of the SNR by adjusting a single factor.

  6. Study of multi-layer active magnetic regenerators using magnetocaloric materials with first and second order phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, T.; Engelbrecht, K.; Nielsen, K. K.; Neves Bez, H.; Bahl, C. R. H.

    2016-09-01

    Magnetocaloric materials (MCM) with a first order phase transition (FOPT) usually exhibit a large, although sharp, isothermal entropy change near their Curie temperature, compared to materials with a second order phase transition (SOPT). Experimental results of applying FOPT materials in recent magnetocaloric refrigerators (MCR) demonstrated the great potential for these materials, but a thorough study on the impact of the moderate adiabatic temperature change and strong temperature dependence of the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) is lacking. Besides, comparing active magnetic regenerators (AMR) using FOPT and SOPT materials is also of fundamental interest. We present modeling results of multi-layer AMRs using FOPT and SOPT materials based on a 1D numerical model. First the impact of isothermal entropy change, adiabatic temperature change and shape factor describing the temperature dependence of the MCE are quantified and analyzed by using artificially built magnetocaloric properties. Then, based on measured magnetocaloric properties of La(Fe,Mn,Si)13H y and Gd, an investigation on how to layer typical FOPT and SOPT materials with different temperature spans is carried out. Moreover, the sensitivity of variation in Curie temperature distribution for both groups of AMRs is investigated. Finally, a concept of mixing FOPT and SOPT materials is studied for improving the stability of layered AMRs with existing materials.

  7. Second order gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cuzinatto, R.R. . E-mail: rodrigo@ift.unesp.br; Melo, C.A.M. de . E-mail: cassius.anderson@gmail.com; Pompeia, P.J. . E-mail: pompeia@ift.unesp.br

    2007-05-15

    A gauge theory of second order in the derivatives of the auxiliary field is constructed following Utiyama's program. A novel field strength G = {partial_derivative}F + fAF arises besides the one of the first order treatment, F = {partial_derivative}A - {partial_derivative}A + fAA. The associated conserved current is obtained. It has a new feature: topological terms are determined from local invariance requirements. Podolsky Generalized Eletrodynamics is derived as a particular case in which the Lagrangian of the gauge field is L {sub P} {proportional_to} G {sup 2}. In this application the photon mass is estimated. The SU (N) infrared regime is analysed by means of Alekseev-Arbuzov-Baikov's Lagrangian.

  8. Polarimetric signatures of a layer of random nonspherical discrete scatterers overlying a homogeneous half-space based on first- and second-order vector radiative transfer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Leung; Ding, Kung-Hau

    1991-01-01

    Complete polarimetric signatures of a layer of random, nonspherical discrete scatterers overlying a homogeneous half space are studied with the first- and second-order solutions of the vector radiative transfer theory. Some of the salient features of the numerical results are as follows: (1) the inclusion of the nondiagonal extinction matrix in the vector radiative transfer theory accounts for an appreciable phase difference between vv and hh polarizations, particularly for aligned scatterers; (2) the ensemble-averaged scattered Stokes vector is generally partially polarized, with the degree of polarization less than unity; (3) there generally exists a pedestal in the copolarization return when plotted as a function of ellipticity and orientation angles, which may be due to heterogeneity of scattering objects and/or multiple scattering effects; and (4) multiple scattering effects generally enhance the pedestal in copolarization return, decrease the degree of polarization, affect phase difference, and also enhance the depolarization return.

  9. An Analysis of Second-Order Autoshaping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward-Robinson, Jasper

    2004-01-01

    Three mechanisms can explain second-order conditioning: (1) The second-order conditioned stimulus (CS2) could activate a representation of the first-order conditioned stimulus (CS1), thereby provoking the conditioned response (CR); The CS2 could enter into an excitatory association with either (2) the representation governing the CR, or (3) with a…

  10. Long-period oscillations of active region patterns: least-squares mapping on second-order curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumbadze, G.; Shergelashvili, B. M.; Kukhianidze, V.; Ramishvili, G.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Khodachenko, M.; Gurgenashvili, E.; Poedts, S.; De Causmaecker, P.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Active regions (ARs) are the main sources of variety in solar dynamic events. Automated detection and identification tools need to be developed for solar features for a deeper understanding of the solar cycle. Of particular interest here are the dynamical properties of the ARs, regardless of their internal structure and sunspot distribution. Aims: We studied the oscillatory dynamics of two ARs: NOAA 11327 and NOAA 11726 using two different methods of pattern recognition. Methods: We developed a novel method of automated AR border detection and compared it to an existing method for the proof-of-concept. The first method uses least-squares fitting on the smallest ellipse enclosing the AR, while the second method applies regression on the convex hull. Results: After processing the data, we found that the axes and the inclination angle of the ellipse and the convex hull oscillate in time. These oscillations are interpreted as the second harmonic of the standing long-period kink oscillations (with the node at the apex) of the magnetic flux tube connecting the two main sunspots of the ARs. We also found that the inclination angles oscillate with characteristic periods of 4.9 h in AR 11726 and 4.6 h in AR 11327. In addition, we discovered that the lengths of the pattern axes in the ARs oscillate with similar characteristic periods and these oscillations might be ascribed to standing global flute modes. Conclusions: In both ARs we have estimated the distribution of the phase speed magnitude along the magnetic tubes (along the two main spots) by interpreting the obtained oscillation of the inclination angle as the standing second harmonic kink mode. After comparing the obtained results for fast and slow kink modes, we conclude that both of these modes are good candidates to explain the observed oscillations of the AR inclination angles, as in the high plasma β regime the phase speeds of these modes are comparable and on the order of the Alfvén speed. Based on the

  11. A New Discretization Method of Order Four for the Numerical Solution of One-Space Dimensional Second-Order Quasi-Linear Hyperbolic Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohanty, R. K.; Arora, Urvashi

    2002-01-01

    Three level-implicit finite difference methods of order four are discussed for the numerical solution of the mildly quasi-linear second-order hyperbolic equation A(x, t, u)u[subscript xx] + 2B(x, t, u)u[subscript xt] + C(x, t, u)u[subscript tt] = f(x, t, u, u[subscript x], u[subscript t]), 0 less than x less than 1, t greater than 0 subject to…

  12. The role of atomic excited states of Au on N2O capture and activation: a multireference second-order perturbation theory study.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Neria, Oscar; Bertin, Virineya; Poulain, Enrique

    2010-12-28

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is an intermediate compound formed during catalysis occurring in automobile exhaust pipes. Atomic Au in its ground state is unable to react with N(2)O, however, several Au excited states are bound to N(2)O, but not all of these states are able to activate N(2)O bonds. In this work, N(2)O capture and activation by a single Au atom are studied considering Au in the ground and excited states with multiplicities = 2, 4 and 6. The Au + N(2)O reactions are studied at multireference second-order perturbation level of theory using C(s) symmetry. The AuN(2)O ((4)A', (4)A'', (6)A' and (6)A'') adducts are spontaneously created from Au excited states. From these complexes, only the (4)A', (6)A' and (6)A'' states exhibit N(2)O activation reaction paths yielding N(2,) NO and O atoms as end products when N(2)O approaches Au excited states side-on. Cations both ground and excited states, capture N(2)O although only the Au(+) ((5)A') + N(2)O ((1)Σ(+)) → NAuNO(+) ((5)A') reaction (for the end-on and side-on approaches) shows N(2)O activation with N-N bond breaking. In the case of Au anions, the ground state and most of the excited states capture N(2)O and activation takes place according to Au(-) ((3)A', (5)A', (5)A'') + N(2)O ((1)Σ(+)) → AuO(-) ((3)A', (5)A', (5)A'') + N(2)(g) for the N(2)O end-on approach by the oxygen atom. The reaction paths show a metal-gas dative covalent bonding character. Mulliken charge population analysis obtained for the active states shows that the binding is done through charge donation and retro-donation between the metal and the N(2)O molecule.

  13. The role of atomic excited states of Au on N2O capture and activation: A multireference second-order perturbation theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvera-Neria, Oscar; Bertin, Virineya; Poulain, Enrique

    2010-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an intermediate compound formed during catalysis occurring in automobile exhaust pipes. Atomic Au in its ground state is unable to react with N2O, however, several Au excited states are bound to N2O, but not all of these states are able to activate N2O bonds. In this work, N2O capture and activation by a single Au atom are studied considering Au in the ground and excited states with multiplicities = 2, 4 and 6. The Au + N2O reactions are studied at multireference second-order perturbation level of theory using Cs symmetry. The AuN2O (4A', 4A'', 6A' and 6A'') adducts are spontaneously created from Au excited states. From these complexes, only the 4A', 6A' and 6A'' states exhibit N2O activation reaction paths yielding N2, NO and O atoms as end products when N2O approaches Au excited states side-on. Cations both ground and excited states, capture N2O although only the Au+ (5A') + N2O (1Σ+) → NAuNO+ (5A') reaction (for the end-on and side-on approaches) shows N2O activation with N-N bond breaking. In the case of Au anions, the ground state and most of the excited states capture N2O and activation takes place according to Au- (3A', 5A', 5A'') + N2O (1Σ+) → AuO- (3A', 5A', 5A'') + N2(g) for the N2O end-on approach by the oxygen atom. The reaction paths show a metal-gas dative covalent bonding character. Mulliken charge population analysis obtained for the active states shows that the binding is done through charge donation and retro-donation between the metal and the N2O molecule.

  14. Pole Assignment for Second-Order Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHU, E. K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper contains some results for pole assignment problems for the second-order system M ẍ(t)+D ẋ(t)+K x (t)=B u (t) . Specifically, Algorithm 0 constructs feedback matrices F1 and F2 such that the closed-loop quadratic pencil Pc( λ)= λ2M+ λ ( D+ BF2)+( K+ BF1) has a desired set of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors are well-conditioned. The method is a modification of the SVD-based method proposed by Juang and Maghami [1, 2] which is a second-order adaptation of the well-known robust eigenvalue assignment method by Kautsky et al. [3] for first-order systems. Robustness is achieved by minimising some not-so-well-known condition numbers of the eigenvalues of the closed-loop second-order pencil. We next consider the partial pole assignment problem. In 1997, Datta, Elhay and Ram proposed three biorthogonality relations for eigenvectors of symmetric definite quadratic pencils [4]. One of these relations was used to derive an explicit solution to the partial pole assignment problem by state feedback for the related single-input symmetric definite second-order control system. The solution shed new light on the stabilisation and control of large flexible space structures, for which only one small subset of the spectrum needs to be reassigned while retaining the complementary part of the spectrum. In this paper, the method has been generalised for multi-input and non-symmetric quadratic pencils. Finally, we discuss briefly the output feedback pole assignment problem.

  15. Nonlocal diffusion second order partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, I.; Loi, N. V.; Malaguti, L.; Taddei, V.

    2017-02-01

    The paper deals with a second order integro-partial differential equation in Rn with a nonlocal, degenerate diffusion term. Nonlocal conditions, such as the Cauchy multipoint and the weighted mean value problem, are investigated. The existence of periodic solutions is also studied. The dynamic is transformed into an abstract setting and the results come from an approximation solvability method. It combines a Schauder degree argument with an Hartman-type inequality and it involves a Scorza-Dragoni type result. The compact embedding of a suitable Sobolev space in the corresponding Lebesgue space is the unique amount of compactness which is needed in this discussion. The solutions are located in bounded sets and they are limits of functions with values in finitely dimensional spaces.

  16. Smart structure control in matrix second order form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwekar, Anjali M.; Yedavalli, Rama K.

    1995-05-01

    Matrix second order systems arise in a variety of structural dynamics and control problems. The analysis and design of such systems is traditionally done in frequency domain or in time domain (state space framework). The formulation of the control design problem in matrix second order form (i.e., configuration space framework) has many advantages over first order state space form. In this paper, a novel approach for designing a stabilizing controller in a second-order model of piezoelectrically controlled flexible beam is proposed.

  17. Smart structure control in matrix second-order form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwekar, Anjali M.; Yedavalli, Rama K.

    1996-08-01

    Matrix second-order systems arise in a variety of structural dynamics and control problems. The analysis and design of such systems is traditionally done in the frequency domain or in the time domain (state space framework). The formulation of the control design problem in matrix second-order form (i.e. configuration space framework) has many advantages over first-order state-space form. In this paper, a novel approach for designing a stabilizing controller in a second-order model of a piezoelectrically controlled flexible beam is proposed.

  18. Second-order superintegrable quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.; Kalnins, E. G.; Kress, J. M.

    2007-03-15

    A classical (or quantum) superintegrable system on an n-dimensional Riemannian manifold is an integrable Hamiltonian system with potential that admits 2n - 1 functionally independent constants of the motion that are polynomial in the momenta, the maximum number possible. If these constants of the motion are all quadratic, then the system is second-order superintegrable, the most tractable case and the one we study here. Such systems have remarkable properties: multi-integrability and separability, a quadratic algebra of symmetries whose representation theory yields spectral information about the Schroedinger operator, and deep connections with expansion formulas relating classes of special functions. For n = 2 and for conformally flat spaces when n = 3, we have worked out the structure of the classical systems and shown that the quadratic algebra always closes at order 6. Here, we describe the quantum analogs of these results. We show that, for nondegenerate potentials, each classical system has a unique quantum extension.

  19. The second-order gravitational red shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, J.

    1973-01-01

    The direct measurement of the nonlinear term of the gravitational field equations by using very stable clocks is discussed along with measuring the perhelion advance of a planet or satellite. These are considered measurements of the second-order gravitational red shift. The exact expression for the frequency shift of light in a gravitational field is derived. Other topics discussed include: The Doppler-cancelling technique; the second-order red shift in a spherically symmetric gravitational field; finite signal transit time; and the reality and interpretation of coordinates in the second-order red shift experiment.

  20. Multireference second order perturbation theory with a simplified treatment of dynamical correlation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Enhua; Zhao, Dongbo; Li, Shuhua

    2015-10-13

    A multireference second order perturbation theory based on a complete active space configuration interaction (CASCI) function or density matrix renormalized group (DMRG) function has been proposed. This method may be considered as an approximation to the CAS/A approach with the same reference, in which the dynamical correlation is simplified with blocked correlated second order perturbation theory based on the generalized valence bond (GVB) reference (GVB-BCPT2). This method, denoted as CASCI-BCPT2/GVB or DMRG-BCPT2/GVB, is size consistent and has a similar computational cost as the conventional second order perturbation theory (MP2). We have applied it to investigate a number of problems of chemical interest. These problems include bond-breaking potential energy surfaces in four molecules, the spectroscopic constants of six diatomic molecules, the reaction barrier for the automerization of cyclobutadiene, and the energy difference between the monocyclic and bicyclic forms of 2,6-pyridyne. Our test applications demonstrate that CASCI-BCPT2/GVB can provide comparable results with CASPT2 (second order perturbation theory based on the complete active space self-consistent-field wave function) for systems under study. Furthermore, the DMRG-BCPT2/GVB method is applicable to treat strongly correlated systems with large active spaces, which are beyond the capability of CASPT2.

  1. Solution of second order supersymmetrical intertwining relations in Minkowski plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioffe, M. V.; Kolevatova, E. V.; Nishnianidze, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    Supersymmetrical (SUSY) intertwining relations are generalized to the case of quantum Hamiltonians in Minkowski space. For intertwining operators (supercharges) of second order in derivatives, the intertwined Hamiltonians correspond to completely integrable systems with the symmetry operators of fourth order in momenta. In terms of components, the intertwining relations correspond to the system of nonlinear differential equations which are solvable with the simplest—constant—ansatzes for the "metric" matrix in second order part of the supercharges. The corresponding potentials are built explicitly both for diagonalizable and nondiagonalizable form of "metric" matrices, and their properties are discussed.

  2. Urban Principals' Second Order Change Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Rosemarye T.; La Cava, Gonzalo S.

    2011-01-01

    Urban school leaders have challenges in continually improving student achievement and making change as quickly as needed. To address this problem 37 non-Title I principals completed an on-line survey, Principal's Actions Survey (PAS), based on the seven responsibilities for second order change identified by Marzano, Waters, and McNulty (2005).…

  3. Second-Order Conditioning in "Drosophila"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in "Drosophila melanogaster" has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning…

  4. Second order density perturbations for dust cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggla, Claes; Wainwright, John

    2014-08-01

    We present simple expressions for the relativistic first and second order fractional density perturbations for Friedmann-Lemaître cosmologies with dust, in four different gauges: the Poisson, uniform curvature, total matter and synchronous-comoving gauges. We include a cosmological constant and arbitrary spatial curvature in the background. A distinctive feature of our approach is our description of the spatial dependence of the perturbations using a canonical set of quadratic differential expressions involving an arbitrary spatial function that arises as a conserved quantity. This enables us to unify, simplify and extend previous seemingly disparate results. We use the primordial matter and metric perturbations that emerge at the end of the inflationary epoch to determine the additional arbitrary spatial function that arises when integrating the second order perturbation equations. This introduces a non-Gaussianity parameter into the expressions for the second order density perturbation. In the special case of zero spatial curvature we show that the time evolution simplifies significantly, and requires the use of only two nonelementary functions, the so-called growth suppression factor at the linear level, and one new function at the second order level. We expect that the results will be useful in applications, for example, studying the effects of primordial non-Gaussianity on the large scale structure of the Universe.

  5. Beyond special relativity at second order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, J. M.; Cortés, J. L.; Relancio, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    The study of generic, nonlinear, deformations of special relativity parametrized by a high-energy scale M , which was carried out at first order in 1 /M in J. M. Carmona, J. L. Cortés, and F. Mercati, Phys. Rev. D 86, 084032 (2012), is extended to second order. This can be done systematically through a ("generalized") change of variables from momentum variables that transform linearly. We discuss the different perspectives on the meaning of the change of variables, obtain the coefficients of modified composition laws and Lorentz transformations at second order, and work out how κ -Poincaré, the most commonly used example in the literature, is reproduced as a particular case of the generic framework exposed here.

  6. Calculating Second-Order Effects in MOSFET's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benumof, Reuben; Zoutendyk, John A.; Coss, James R.

    1990-01-01

    Collection of mathematical models includes second-order effects in n-channel, enhancement-mode, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's). When dimensions of circuit elements relatively large, effects neglected safely. However, as very-large-scale integration of microelectronic circuits leads to MOSFET's shorter or narrower than 2 micrometer, effects become significant in design and operation. Such computer programs as widely-used "Simulation Program With Integrated Circuit Emphasis, Version 2" (SPICE 2) include many of these effects. In second-order models of n-channel, enhancement-mode MOSFET, first-order gate-depletion region diminished by triangular-cross-section deletions on end and augmented by circular-wedge-cross-section bulges on sides.

  7. Second order Horner's syndrome in a cat.

    PubMed

    De Risio, Luisa; Fraser McConnell, James

    2009-08-01

    This case report describes the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 3.5-year-old, male neutered, domestic shorthair cat with second order Horner's syndrome as the only clinical abnormality. The neuroanatomical pathway of the sympathetic innervation to the eye, differential diagnoses for Horner's syndrome in cats, and the interpretation of pharmacological testing are reviewed. The unusual MRI findings and the value of fat-suppressed MRI sequences are discussed.

  8. Visualizing second order tensor fields with hyperstreamlines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delmarcelle, Thierry; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1993-01-01

    Hyperstreamlines are a generalization to second order tensor fields of the conventional streamlines used in vector field visualization. As opposed to point icons commonly used in visualizing tensor fields, hyperstreamlines form a continuous representation of the complete tensor information along a three-dimensional path. This technique is useful in visulaizing both symmetric and unsymmetric three-dimensional tensor data. Several examples of tensor field visualization in solid materials and fluid flows are provided.

  9. Second Order Bragg Scattering in a SAR,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    accept the notion that the short- wave components of the ship wake are slightly distorted versions of the Kelvin wake, then there is the possibility of...scattering, at a given place, from a spectrum of waves . The Dabob Bay data indicates that there is little energy in the wake having wave numbers capable...observations do show considerable enhancement of waves of twice the Bragg wavelength at the angle where a SAR wake is observed.. Second order Bragg

  10. Spacetime encodings. III. Second order Killing tensors

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Jeandrew

    2010-01-15

    This paper explores the Petrov type D, stationary axisymmetric vacuum (SAV) spacetimes that were found by Carter to have separable Hamilton-Jacobi equations, and thus admit a second-order Killing tensor. The derivation of the spacetimes presented in this paper borrows from ideas about dynamical systems, and illustrates concepts that can be generalized to higher-order Killing tensors. The relationship between the components of the Killing equations and metric functions are given explicitly. The origin of the four separable coordinate systems found by Carter is explained and classified in terms of the analytic structure associated with the Killing equations. A geometric picture of what the orbital invariants may represent is built. Requiring that a SAV spacetime admits a second-order Killing tensor is very restrictive, selecting very few candidates from the group of all possible SAV spacetimes. This restriction arises due to the fact that the consistency conditions associated with the Killing equations require that the field variables obey a second-order differential equation, as opposed to a fourth-order differential equation that imposes the weaker condition that the spacetime be SAV. This paper introduces ideas that could lead to the explicit computation of more general orbital invariants in the form of higher-order Killing tensors.

  11. Robust stability of second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, C. H.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a robust control design using strictly positive realness for second-order dynamic systems. The robust strictly positive real controller allows the system to be stabilized with only acceleration measurements. An important property of this design is that stabilization of the system is independent of the system parameters. The control design connects a virtual system to the given plant. The combined system is positive real regardless of system parameter uncertainty. Then any strictly positive real controllers can be used to achieve robust stability. A spring-mass system example and its computer simulations are presented to demonstrate this controller design.

  12. Anomalous transport in second order hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megías, Eugenio; Valle, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    We study the non-dissipative transport effects appearing at second order in the hydrodynamic expansion for a non-interacting gas of chiral fermions by using the partition function formalism. We discuss some features of the corresponding constitutive relations, derive the explicit expressions for the conductivities and compare with existing results in the literature. Talk given by E. Megías at the 4th International Conference on New Frontiers in Physics (ICNFP 2015), 23-30 August 2015, Kolymbari, Crete, Greece.

  13. Symmetries of second-order PDEs and conformal Killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamparlis, Michael; Paliathanasis, Andronikos

    2015-06-01

    We study the Lie point symmetries of a general class of partial differential equations (PDE) of second order. An equation from this class naturally defines a second-order symmetric tensor (metric). In the case the PDE is linear on the first derivatives we show that the Lie point symmetries are given by the conformal algebra of the metric modulo a constraint involving the linear part of the PDE. Important elements in this class are the Klein-Gordon equation and the Laplace equation. We apply the general results and determine the Lie point symmetries of these equations in various general classes of Riemannian spaces. Finally we study the type II hidden symmetries of the wave equation in a Riemannian space with a Lorenzian metric.

  14. First- and second-order Poisson spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, William R.; Shirley, Eric L.; Migdall, Alan L.; Polyakov, Sergey V.; Hendrix, Kurt

    2009-08-01

    Although Thomas Young is generally given credit for being the first to provide evidence against Newton's corpuscular theory of light, it was Augustin Fresnel who first stated the modern theory of diffraction. We review the history surrounding Fresnel's 1818 paper and the role of the Poisson spot in the associated controversy. We next discuss the boundary-diffraction-wave approach to calculating diffraction effects and show how it can reduce the complexity of calculating diffraction patterns. We briefly discuss a generalization of this approach that reduces the dimensionality of integrals needed to calculate the complete diffraction pattern of any order diffraction effect. We repeat earlier demonstrations of the conventional Poisson spot and discuss an experimental setup for demonstrating an analogous phenomenon that we call a "second-order Poisson spot." Several features of the diffraction pattern can be explained simply by considering the path lengths of singly and doubly bent paths and distinguishing between first- and second-order diffraction effects related to such paths, respectively.

  15. Robust stability of second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, C.-H.

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown recently how virtual passive controllers can be designed for second-order dynamic systems to achieve robust stability. The virtual controllers were visualized as systems made up of spring, mass and damping elements. In this paper, a new approach emphasizing on the notion of positive realness to the same second-order dynamic systems is used. Necessary and sufficient conditions for positive realness are presented for scalar spring-mass-dashpot systems. For multi-input multi-output systems, we show how a mass-spring-dashpot system can be made positive real by properly choosing its output variables. In particular, sufficient conditions are shown for the system without output velocity. Furthermore, if velocity cannot be measured then the system parameters must be precise to keep the system positive real. In practice, system parameters are not always constant and cannot be measured precisely. Therefore, in order to be useful positive real systems must be robust to some degrees. This can be achieved with the design presented in this paper.

  16. Second-order temporal modulation transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, C; Soares, C; Vonner, T

    2001-08-01

    Detection thresholds were measured for a sinusoidal modulation applied to the modulation depth of a sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) white noise carrier as a function of the frequency of the modulation applied to the modulation depth (referred to as f'm). The SAM noise acted therefore as a "carrier" stimulus of frequency fm, and sinusoidal modulation of the SAM-noise modulation depth generated two additional components in the modulation spectrum: fm-f'm and fm+f'm. The tracking variable was the modulation depth of the sinusoidal variation applied to the "carrier" modulation depth. The resulting "second-order" temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) measured on four listeners for "carrier" modulation frequencies fm of 16, 64, and 256 Hz display a low-pass segment followed by a plateau. This indicates that sensitivity to fluctuations in the strength of amplitude modulation is best for fluctuation rates f'm below about 2-4 Hz when using broadband noise carriers. Measurements of masked modulation detection thresholds for the lower and upper modulation sideband suggest that this capacity is possibly related to the detection of a beat in the sound's temporal envelope. The results appear qualitatively consistent with the predictions of an envelope detector model consisting of a low-pass filtering stage followed by a decision stage. Unlike listeners' performance, a modulation filterbank model using Q values > or = 2 should predict that second-order modulation detection thresholds should decrease at high values of f'm due to the spectral resolution of the modulation sidebands (in the modulation domain). This suggests that, if such modulation filters do exist, their selectivity is poor. In the latter case, the Q value of modulation filters would have to be less than 2. This estimate of modulation filter selectivity is consistent with the results of a previous study using a modulation-masking paradigm [S. D. Ewert and T. Dau, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181

  17. Cascaded Second-Order Nonlinearities in Waveguides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundheimer, Michael Lee

    The cascaded second-order nonlinearity arising from the second-harmonic generation process in noncentrosymmetric media is a novel approach to achieving the nonlinear phase shifts required for all-optical signal processing. The research presented in this dissertation demonstrated and measured the cascaded second-order nonlinearity for the first time in viable integrated optical waveguide formats. Cascaded self-phase modulation was measured in potassium titanyl phosphate (KTiOPO_4 or KTP) segmented quasi-phasematched waveguides at wavelengths near 855 nm and in the optical fiber telecommunications window near 1.585 μm using picosecond and femtosecond pulses, respectively. Spectral modulation and broadening were observed on the output fundamental spectrum and compared to predictions from pulsed second -harmonic generation theory under conditions of group-velocity mismatch (temporal walk-off) and group-velocity dispersion. Peak cascaded phase shifts of the fundamental of approximately pi at 855 nm were inferred with 690 W of peak guided power. Peak cascaded phase shifts of approximately pi/2 were inferred at 1.585 μm with 760 W of peak power in the guide. Direct interferometric measurements of the magnitude and sign of the cascaded nonlinear phase shift of the fundamental were performed in temperature-tuned lithium niobate (LiNbO _3) channel waveguides at 1.32 mum. The cascaded phase shift was shown to change sign upon passing through the phasematching condition, as required by theory. Peak cascaded phase shifts of +0.53 pi and -0.13 pi were measured for 86 W peak power in these waveguides. A non-uniform temperature profile along the waveguide led to a non-uniform wavevector-mismatch along the guide, resulting in an enhanced positive phase shift and an increased temperature bandwidth for the phase shift. The phase shifts achieved in this research are large enough to be suitable for some all-optical signal processing functions.

  18. Relativistic second-order dissipative hydrodynamics at finite chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Amaresh; Friman, Bengt; Redlich, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Starting from the Boltzmann equation in the relaxation time approximation and employing a Chapman-Enskog like expansion for the distribution function close to equilibrium, we derive second-order evolution equations for the shear stress tensor and the dissipative charge current for a system of massless quarks and gluons. The transport coefficients are obtained exactly using quantum statistics for the phase space distribution functions at non-zero chemical potential. We show that, within the relaxation time approximation, the second-order evolution equations for the shear stress tensor and the dissipative charge current can be decoupled. We find that, for large values of the ratio of chemical potential to temperature, the charge conductivity is small compared to the coefficient of shear viscosity. Moreover, we show that in the relaxation-time approximation, the limiting behaviour of the ratio of heat conductivity to shear viscosity is qualitatively similar to that obtained for a strongly coupled conformal plasma.

  19. Bounded solutions of a second order evolution equation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiva, Hugo

    2001-02-01

    In this paper we study the following abstract second order differential equation with dissipation in a Hilbert space H: u″+cu'+dA u+kG(u)=P(t), u∈H, t∈R, where c, d and k are positive constants, G:H→H is a Lipschitzian function and P:R→H is a continuous and bounded function. A:D(A)⊂H→H is an unbounded linear operator which is self-adjoint, positive definite and has compact resolvent. Under these conditions we prove that for some values of d, c and k this system has a bounded solution which is exponentially asymptotically stable. Moreover; if P(t) is almost periodic, then this bounded solution is also almost periodic. These results are applied to a very well known second order system partial differential equations; such as the sine-Gordon equation, The suspension bridge equation proposed by Lazer and McKenna, etc.

  20. Bioethics as public discourse and second-order discipline.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, Loretta M

    2009-06-01

    Bioethics is best viewed as both a second-order discipline and also part of public discourse. Since their goals differ, some bioethical activities are more usefully viewed as advancing public discourse than academic disciplines. For example, the "Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights" sponsored by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization seeks to promote ethical guidance on bioethical issues. From the vantage of philosophical ethics, it fails to rank or specify its stated principles, justify controversial principles, clarify key terms, or say what is meant by calling potentially conflicting norms "foundational." From the vantage of improving the public discourse about bioethical problems and seeking ethical solutions in the public arena, however, this document may have an important role. The goals and relations between bioethics as a second-order discipline and public discourse are explored.

  1. Optimality Conditions in Differentiable Vector Optimization via Second-Order Tangent Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, Bienvenido Novo, Vicente

    2004-03-15

    We provide second-order necessary and sufficient conditions for a point to be an efficient element of a set with respect to a cone in a normed space, so that there is only a small gap between necessary and sufficient conditions. To this aim, we use the common second-order tangent set and the asymptotic second-order cone utilized by Penot. As an application we establish second-order necessary conditions for a point to be a solution of a vector optimization problem with an arbitrary feasible set and a twice Frechet differentiable objective function between two normed spaces. We also establish second-order sufficient conditions when the initial space is finite-dimensional so that there is no gap with necessary conditions. Lagrange multiplier rules are also given.

  2. Adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode control for microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incremona, Gian Paolo; Cucuzzella, Michele; Ferrara, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the design of adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode (ASSOSM) control laws for grid-connected microgrids. Due to the presence of the inverter, of unpredicted load changes, of switching among different renewable energy sources, and of electrical parameters variations, the microgrid model is usually affected by uncertain terms which are bounded, but with unknown upper bounds. To theoretically frame the control problem, the class of second-order systems in Brunovsky canonical form, characterised by the presence of matched uncertain terms with unknown bounds, is first considered. Four adaptive strategies are designed, analysed and compared to select the most effective ones to be applied to the microgrid case study. In the first two strategies, the control amplitude is continuously adjusted, so as to arrive at dominating the effect of the uncertainty on the controlled system. When a suitable control amplitude is attained, the origin of the state space of the auxiliary system becomes attractive. In the other two strategies, a suitable blend between two components, one mainly working during the reaching phase, the other being the predominant one in a vicinity of the sliding manifold, is generated, so as to reduce the control amplitude in steady state. The microgrid system in a grid-connected operation mode, controlled via the selected ASSOSM control strategies, exhibits appreciable stability properties, as proved theoretically and shown in simulation.

  3. Serpentine: Finite Difference Methods for Wave Propagation in Second Order Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2012-03-26

    Wave propagation phenomena are important in many DOE applications such as nuclear explosion monitoring, geophysical exploration, estimating ground motion hazards and damage due to earthquakes, non-destructive testing, underground facilities detection, and acoustic noise propagation. There are also future applications that would benefit from simulating wave propagation, such as geothermal energy applications and monitoring sites for carbon storage via seismic reflection techniques. In acoustics and seismology, it is of great interest to increase the frequency bandwidth in simulations. In seismic exploration, greater frequency resolution enables shorter wave lengths to be included in the simulations, allowing for better resolution in the seismic imaging. In nuclear explosion monitoring, higher frequency seismic waves are essential for accurate discrimination between explosions and earthquakes. When simulating earthquake induced motion of large structures, such as nuclear power plants or dams, increased frequency resolution is essential for realistic damage predictions. Another example is simulations of micro-seismic activity near geothermal energy plants. Here, hydro-fracturing induces many small earthquakes and the time scale of each event is proportional to the square root of the moment magnitude. As a result, the motion is dominated by higher frequencies for smaller seismic events. The above wave propagation problems are all governed by systems of hyperbolic partial differential equations in second order differential form, i.e., they contain second order partial derivatives of the dependent variables. Our general research theme in this project has been to develop numerical methods that directly discretize the wave equations in second order differential form. The obvious advantage of working with hyperbolic systems in second order differential form, as opposed to rewriting them as first order hyperbolic systems, is that the number of differential equations in the

  4. Magnetic Compensation for Second-Order Doppler Shift in LITS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, Eric; Tjoelker, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The uncertainty in the frequency of a linear-ion-trap frequency standard (LITS) can be reduced substantially by use of a very small magnetic inhomogeneity tailored to compensate for the residual second-order Doppler shift. An effect associated with the relativistic time dilatation, one cause of the second-order Doppler shift, is ion motion that is attributable to the trapping radio-frequency (RF)electromagnetic field used to trap ions. The second-order Doppler shift is reduced by using a multi-pole trap; however it is still the largest source of systematic frequency shift in the latest generation of LITSs, which are among the most stable clocks in the world. The present compensation scheme reduces the frequency instability of the affected LITS to about a tenth of its previous value. The basic principles of prior generation LITSs were discussed in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles. Below are recapitulated only those items of basic information necessary to place the present development in context. A LITS includes a microwave local oscillator, the frequency of which is stabilized by comparison with the frequency of the ground state hyperfine transition of 199Hg+ ions. The comparison involves a combination of optical and microwave excitation and interrogation of the ions in a linear ion trap in the presence of a nominally uniform magnetic field. In the current version of the LITS, there are two connected traps (see figure): (1) a quadrupole trap wherein the optical excitation and measurement take place and (2) a 12-pole trap (denoted the resonance trap), wherein the microwave interrogation takes place. The ions are initially loaded into the quadrupole trap and are thereafter shuttled between the two traps. Shuttling ions into the resonance trap allows sensitive microwave interrogation to take place well away from loading interference. The axial magnetic field for the resonance trap is generated by an electric current in a finely wound wire coil surrounded by

  5. Galaxy bias and gauges at second order in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Bruni, Marco; Koyama, Kazuya; Maartens, Roy; Matarrese, Sabino; Sasaki, Misao; Wands, David

    2015-09-01

    We discuss the question of gauge choice when analysing relativistic density perturbations at second order. We compare Newtonian and general relativistic approaches. Some misconceptions in the recent literature are addressed. We show that the comoving-synchronous gauge is the unique gauge in general relativity that corresponds to the Lagrangian frame and is entirely appropriate to describe the matter overdensity at second order. The comoving-synchronous gauge is the simplest gauge in which to describe Lagrangian bias at second order.

  6. Visualization of second order tensor fields and matrix data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delmarcelle, Thierry; Hesselink, Lambertus

    1992-01-01

    We present a study of the visualization of 3-D second order tensor fields and matrix data. The general problem of visualizing unsymmetric real or complex Hermitian second order tensor fields can be reduced to the simultaneous visualization of a real and symmetric second order tensor field and a real vector field. As opposed to the discrete iconic techniques commonly used in multivariate data visualization, the emphasis is on exploiting the mathematical properties of tensor fields in order to facilitate their visualization and to produce a continuous representation of the data. We focus on interactively sensing and exploring real and symmetric second order tensor data by generalizing the vector notion of streamline to the tensor concept of hyperstreamline. We stress the importance of a structural analysis of the data field analogous to the techniques of vector field topology extraction in order to obtain a unique and objective representation of second order tensor fields.

  7. French space activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanc, R.

    1982-01-01

    The four main points of research and development of space programs by France are explained. The National Center of Space Studies is discussed, listing the missions of the Center and describing the activities of the staff.

  8. A study of second-order supersonic flow theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1952-01-01

    Second-order solutions of supersonic-flow problems are sought by iteration, using the linearized solution as the first step. For plane and axially symmetric flows, particular solutions of the iteration equation are discovered which reduce the second-order problem to an equivalent linearized problem. Comparison of second-order solutions with exact and numerical results shows great improvement over linearized theory. For full three-dimensional flow, only a partial particular solution is found. The inclined cone is solved, and the possibility of treating more general problems is considered.

  9. Method to render second order beam optics programs symplectic

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, D.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1984-10-01

    We present evidence that second order matrix-based beam optics programs violate the symplectic condition. A simple method to avoid this difficulty, based on a generating function approach to evaluating transfer maps, is described. A simple example illustrating the non-symplectricity of second order matrix methods, and the effectiveness of our solution to the problem, is provided. We conclude that it is in fact possible to bring second order matrix optics methods to a canonical form. The procedure for doing so has been implemented in the program DIMAT, and could be implemented in programs such as TRANSPORT and TURTLE, making them useful in multiturn applications. 15 refs.

  10. On the state estimation of structures with second order observers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, W. Keith; Park, K. C.

    1989-01-01

    The use of Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) control synthesis techniques implies the availability of full state feedback. For vibration control of structures, usually only a limited number of states are measured from which an observer model reconstructs the full state. It is shown that using second order observers is a viable technique for reconstructing the unmeasured states of structures under mildly restrictive conditions. Moreover, the computational advantages of the second order observer as compared to a first order observer indicate that significantly larger observer models may be utilized. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the performance of second order observers. The implications of second order observers in the development of Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology is discussed.

  11. Variational principles for multisymplectic second-order classical field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto-Martínez, Pedro Daniel; Román-Roy, Narciso

    2015-06-01

    We state a unified geometrical version of the variational principles for second-order classical field theories. The standard Lagrangian and Hamiltonian variational principles and the corresponding field equations are recovered from this unified framework.

  12. Second-order quasinormal mode of the Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Hiroyuki; Ioka, Kunihito

    2007-10-01

    We formulate and calculate the second-order quasinormal modes (QNMs) of a Schwarzschild black hole (BH). Gravitational waves (GW) from a distorted BH, the so-called ringdowns, are well understood as QNMs in general relativity. Since QNMs from binary BH mergers will be detected with a high signal-to-noise ratio by GW detectors, it is also possible to detect the second perturbative order of QNMs, generated by nonlinear gravitational interaction near the BH. In the BH perturbation approach, we derive the master Zerilli equation for the metric perturbation to second order and explicitly regularize it at the horizon and spatial infinity. We numerically solve the second-order Zerilli equation by implementing the modified Leaver continued fraction method. The second-order QNM frequencies are found to be twice the first-order ones, and the GW amplitude is up to ˜10% that of the first order for the binary BH mergers. Since the second-order QNMs always exist, we can use their detections (i) to test the nonlinearity of general relativity, in particular, the no-hair theorem, (ii) to remove fake events in the data analysis of QNM GWs, and (iii) to measure the distance to the BH.

  13. Space construction activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Center for Space Construction at the University of Colorado at Boulder was established in 1988 as a University Space Engineering Research Center. The mission of the Center is to conduct interdisciplinary engineering research which is critical to the construction of future space structures and systems and to educate students who will have the vision and technical skills to successfully lead future space construction activities. The research activities are currently organized around two central projects: Orbital Construction and Lunar Construction. Summaries of the research projects are included.

  14. Deflection of light to second order in conformal Weyl gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sultana, Joseph

    2013-04-01

    We reexamine the deflection of light in conformal Weyl gravity obtained in Sultana and Kazanas (2010), by extending the calculation based on the procedure by Rindler and Ishak, for the bending angle by a centrally concentrated spherically symmetric matter distribution, to second order in M/R, where M is the mass of the source and R is the impact parameter. It has recently been reported in Bhattacharya et al. (JCAP 09 (2010) 004; JCAP 02 (2011) 028), that when this calculation is done to second order, the term γr in the Mannheim-Kazanas metric, yields again the paradoxical contribution γR (where the bending angle is proportional to the impact parameter) obtained by standard formalisms appropriate to asymptotically flat spacetimes. We show that no such contribution is obtained for a second order calculation and the effects of the term γr in the metric are again insignificant as reported in our earlier work.

  15. Some restrictions on the existence of second order limit language

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Azrin; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Yusof, Yuhani; Fong, Wan Heng

    2015-10-01

    The cut and paste phenomenon on DNA molecules with the presence of restriction enzyme and appropriate ligase has led to the formalism of mathematical modelling of splicing system. A type of splicing system named Yusof-Goode splicing system is used to present the transparent behaviour of the DNA splicing process. The limit language that is defined as the leftover molecules after the system reaches its equilibrium point has been extended to a second order limit language. The non-existence of the second order limit language biologically has lead to this study by using mathematical approach. In this paper, the factors that restrict the formation of the second order limit language are discussed and are presented as lemmas and theorem using Y-G approach. In addition, the discussion focuses on Yusof- Goode splicing system with at most two initial strings and two rules with one cutting site and palindromic crossing site and recognition sites.

  16. Weak value amplification via second-order correlated technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Cui; Jing-Zheng, Huang; Xiang, Liu; Gui-Hua, Zeng

    2016-02-01

    We propose a new framework combining weak measurement and second-order correlated technique. The theoretical analysis shows that weak value amplification (WVA) experiment can also be implemented by a second-order correlated system. We then build two-dimensional second-order correlated function patterns for achieving higher amplification factor and discuss the signal-to-noise ratio influence. Several advantages can be obtained by our proposal. For instance, detectors with high resolution are not necessary. Moreover, detectors with low saturation intensity are available in WVA setup. Finally, type-one technical noise can be effectively suppressed. Project supported by the Union Research Centre of Advanced Spaceflight Technology (Grant No. USCAST2013-05), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61170228, 61332019, and 61471239), and the High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA122901).

  17. Second-order wave effects on TLP tendon tension responses

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, H.; Mercier, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a general procedure for analyzing the second-order wave effects on the tendon tension responses of a TLP. The approach solves both first- and second-order equation of motions for a TLP system in frequency domain. Viscous effects are included in the form of statistically linearized damping coefficients. An efficient algorithm has been devised for reducing the burden of second-order wave diffraction analysis, which selects the interacting frequency pairs according to springing frequency of interest to minimize the cost of computing quadratic transfer functions (QTFs) and allow accurate interpolation of QTFs. Moment statistics of the tension process are computed through an eigenvalue analysis. The developed method is applied to analyze the tendon tension responses of a TLP design in water depth of 3,000 ft.

  18. Static second-order polarizabilities of aminobenzophenones and nitrobenzophenones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Craig E.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.

    1991-01-01

    Static-field theoretical studies on molecular second-order polarizabilities (beta) of benzophenone derivatives were performed. Calculations were based on the use of shaped electric fields and semiempirical Hamiltonians. Either an electron-donating (amine) or an electron-withdrawing (nitro) substituent was incorporated into a phenyl ring of benzophenone; the phenyl rings of benzophenone were oriented either coplanar or perpendicular to the carbonyl. The change in charge transfer with respect to the electrophilic character of the carbonyl group was monitored to determine its effect on the molecular second-order polarizability. Calculations were performed for all constitutional isomers of the two benzophenone derivatives.

  19. Second-order subsonic airfoil theory including edge effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1956-01-01

    Several recent advances in plane subsonic flow theory are combined into a unified second-order theory for airfoil sections of arbitrary shape. The solution is reached in three steps: the incompressible result is found by integration, it is converted into the corresponding subsonic compressible result by means of the second-order compressibility rule, and it is rendered uniformly valid near stagnation points by further rules. Solutions for a number of airfoils are given and are compared with the results of other theories and of experiment. A straight-forward computing scheme is outlined for calculating the surface velocities and pressures on any airfoil at any angle of attack

  20. Second order limit language in variants of splicing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Azrin; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Heng, Fong Wan; Yusof, Yuhani

    2014-07-01

    The cutting and pasting processes that occur in DNA molecules have led to the formulation of splicing system. Since then, there are few models used to model the splicing system. The splicing language, which is the product of splicing system, can be categorized into two, namely the adult and limit language. In this research, limit language is extended to the second order limit language. Few problems are approached which lead to the formation of second order limit language which is then analyzed using various types of splicing system.

  1. Human cooperation: second-order free-riding problem solved?

    PubMed

    Fowler, James H

    2005-09-22

    Panchanathan and Boyd describe a model of indirect reciprocity in which mutual aid among cooperators can promote large-scale human cooperation without succumbing to a second-order free-riding problem (whereby individuals receive but do not give aid). However, the model does not include second-order free riders as one of the possible behavioural types. Here I present a simplified version of their model to demonstrate how cooperation unravels if second-round defectors enter the population, and this shows that the free-riding problem remains unsolved.

  2. New implementation of the configuration-based multi-reference second order perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yibo; Wang, Yubin; Han, Huixian; Song, Qi; Suo, Bingbing; Wen, Zhenyi

    2012-10-01

    We present an improved version of the configuration-based multi-reference second-order perturbation approach (CB-MRPT2) according to the formulation of Lindgren on perturbation theory of a degenerate model space. This version involves a reclassification of the perturbation functions and new algorithms to calculate matrix elements in the perturber energy expressions utilizing the graphical unitary group approach and the hole-particle symmetry. The diagonalize-then-perturb (DP), including Rayleigh-Schrödinger and Brillouin-Wigner, and diagonalize-then-perturb-then-diagonalize (DPD) modes have been implemented. The new CB-MRPT2 method is applied to several typical and interesting systems: (1) the vertical excitation energies for several states of CO and N2, (2) energy comparison and timing of the ground state of C4H6, (3) the quasi-degeneracy of states in LiF, (4) the intruder state problems of AgH, and (5) the relative energies of di-copper-oxygen-ammonia complex isomers. The results indicate that the computational accuracy and efficiency of the presented methods are competitive and intruder-free. It should be emphasized that the DPD method rectifies naturally the shortcomings of LiF potential energy curves constructed by the original second order complete active space perturbation theory (CASPT2), without having to recourse to the so-called state mixture. Unlike CASPT2, the new methods give the same energy ordering for the two di-copper-oxygen-ammonia isomers as the previous multi-reference configuration interaction with single and double excitations methods. The new CB-MRPT2 method is shown to be a useful tool to study small to medium-sized systems.

  3. The Development of Perceptual Sensitivity to Second-Order Facial Relations in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Gallay, Mathieu; Durand, Karine; Robichon, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated children's perceptual ability to process second-order facial relations. In total, 78 children in three age groups (7, 9, and 11 years) and 28 adults were asked to say whether the eyes were the same distance apart in two side-by-side faces. The two faces were similar on all points except the space between the eyes, which was…

  4. Observed galaxy number counts on the lightcone up to second order: I. Main result

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Maartens, Roy; Clarkson, Chris E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com

    2014-09-01

    We present the galaxy number overdensity up to second order in redshift space on cosmological scales for a concordance model. The result contains all general relativistic effects up to second order that arise from observing on the past light cone, including all redshift effects, lensing distortions from convergence and shear, and contributions from velocities, Sachs-Wolfe, integrated SW and time-delay terms. This result will be important for accurate calculation of the bias on estimates of non-Gaussianity and on precision parameter estimates, introduced by nonlinear projection effects.

  5. Forward and Backward Second-Order Pavlovian Conditioning in Honeybees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussaini, Syed Abid; Komischke, Bernhard; Menzel, Randolf; Lachnit, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Second-order conditioning (SOC) is the association of a neutral stimulus with another stimulus that had previously been combined with an unconditioned stimulus (US). We used classical conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) in honeybees ("Apis mellifera") with odors (CS) and sugar (US). Previous SOC experiments in bees were…

  6. Digital second-order phase-locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. K.; Carl, C. C.; Tagnelia, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    Actual tests with second-order digital phase-locked loop at simulated relative Doppler shift of 1x0.0001 produced phase lock with timing error of 6.5 deg and no appreciable Doppler bias. Loop thus appears to achieve subcarrier synchronization and to remove bias due to Doppler shift in range of interest.

  7. Modeling Ability Differentiation in the Second-Order Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenaar, Dylan; Dolan, Conor V.; van der Maas, Han L. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we present factor models to test for ability differentiation. Ability differentiation predicts that the size of IQ subtest correlations decreases as a function of the general intelligence factor. In the Schmid-Leiman decomposition of the second-order factor model, we model differentiation by introducing heteroscedastic residuals,…

  8. Solving Second-Order Differential Equations with Variable Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmer, A., III; Costa, G. B.

    2008-01-01

    A method is developed in which an analytical solution is obtained for certain classes of second-order differential equations with variable coefficients. By the use of transformations and by repeated iterated integration, a desired solution is obtained. This alternative method represents a different way to acquire a solution from classic power…

  9. A New Factorisation of a General Second Order Differential Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Janet

    2006-01-01

    A factorisation of a general second order ordinary differential equation is introduced from which the full solution to the equation can be obtained by performing two integrations. The method is compared with traditional methods for solving these type of equations. It is shown how the Green's function can be derived directly from the factorisation…

  10. Second-order variational equations for N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, Hanno; Tamayo, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    First-order variational equations are widely used in N-body simulations to study how nearby trajectories diverge from one another. These allow for efficient and reliable determinations of chaos indicators such as the Maximal Lyapunov characteristic Exponent (MLE) and the Mean Exponential Growth factor of Nearby Orbits (MEGNO). In this paper we lay out the theoretical framework to extend the idea of variational equations to higher order. We explicitly derive the differential equations that govern the evolution of second-order variations in the N-body problem. Going to second order opens the door to new applications, including optimization algorithms that require the first and second derivatives of the solution, like the classical Newton's method. Typically, these methods have faster convergence rates than derivative-free methods. Derivatives are also required for Riemann manifold Langevin and Hamiltonian Monte Carlo methods which provide significantly shorter correlation times than standard methods. Such improved optimization methods can be applied to anything from radial-velocity/transit-timing-variation fitting to spacecraft trajectory optimization to asteroid deflection. We provide an implementation of first- and second-order variational equations for the publicly available REBOUND integrator package. Our implementation allows the simultaneous integration of any number of first- and second-order variational equations with the high-accuracy IAS15 integrator. We also provide routines to generate consistent and accurate initial conditions without the need for finite differencing.

  11. Second-Order Conditioning during a Compound Extinction Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pineno, Oskar; Zilski, Jessica M.; Schachtman, Todd R.

    2007-01-01

    Two conditioned taste aversion experiments with rats were conducted to establish if a target taste that had received a prior pairing with illness could be subject to second-order conditioning during extinction treatment in compound with a flavor that also received prior conditioning. In these experiments, the occurrence of second-order…

  12. Second-order nonlinear optical metamaterials: ABC-type nanolaminates

    SciTech Connect

    Alloatti, L. Kieninger, C.; Lauermann, M.; Köhnle, K.; Froelich, A.; Wegener, M.; Frenzel, T.; Freude, W.; Leuthold, J.; Koos, C.

    2015-09-21

    We demonstrate a concept for second-order nonlinear metamaterials that can be obtained from non-metallic centrosymmetric constituents with inherently low optical absorption. The concept is based on iterative atomic-layer deposition of three different materials, A = Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B = TiO{sub 2}, and C = HfO{sub 2}. The centrosymmetry of the resulting ABC stack is broken since the ABC and the inverted CBA sequences are not equivalent—a necessary condition for non-zero second-order nonlinearity. In our experiments, we find that the bulk second-order nonlinear susceptibility depends on the density of interfaces, leading to a nonlinear susceptibility of 0.26 pm/V at a wavelength of 800 nm. ABC-type nanolaminates can be deposited on virtually any substrate and offer a promising route towards engineering of second-order optical nonlinearities at both infrared and visible wavelengths.

  13. A uniformly second order fast sweeping method for eikonal equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Songting

    2013-05-01

    A uniformly second order method with a local solver based on the piecewise linear discontinuous Galerkin formulation is introduced to solve the eikonal equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The method utilizes an interesting phenomenon, referred as the superconvergence phenomenon, that the numerical solution of monotone upwind schemes for the eikonal equation is first order accurate on both its value and gradient when the solution is smooth. This phenomenon greatly simplifies the local solver based on the discontinuous Galerkin formulation by reducing its local degrees of freedom from two (1-D) (or three (2-D), or four (3-D)) to one with the information of the gradient frozen. When considering the eikonal equation with point-source conditions, we further utilize a factorization approach to resolve the source singularities of the eikonal by decomposing it into two parts, either multiplicatively or additively. One part is known and captures the source singularities; the other part serves as a correction term that is differentiable at the sources and satisfies the factored eikonal equations. We extend the second order method to solve the factored eikonal equations to compute the correction term with second order accuracy, then recover the eikonal with second order accuracy. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the performance of the method.

  14. Second-order accurate nonoscillatory schemes for scalar conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huynh, Hung T.

    1989-01-01

    Explicit finite difference schemes for the computation of weak solutions of nonlinear scalar conservation laws is presented and analyzed. These schemes are uniformly second-order accurate and nonoscillatory in the sense that the number of extrema of the discrete solution is not increasing in time.

  15. Remarks on the second-order Seiberg-Witten maps

    SciTech Connect

    Trampetic, Josip; Wohlgenannt, Michael

    2007-12-15

    In this brief report, we discuss the Seiberg-Witten maps up to the second order in the noncommutative parameter {theta}. They add to the recently published solutions in [A. Alboteanu, T. Ohl, and R. Rueckl, Phys. Rev. D 76, 105018 (2007).]. Expressions for the vector, fermion, and Higgs fields are given explicitly.

  16. Generalized Second-Order Partial Derivatives of 1/r

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hnizdo, V.

    2011-01-01

    The generalized second-order partial derivatives of 1/r, where r is the radial distance in three dimensions (3D), are obtained using a result of the potential theory of classical analysis. Some non-spherical-regularization alternatives to the standard spherical-regularization expression for the derivatives are derived. The utility of a…

  17. Second-Order Conditioning of Human Causal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jara, Elvia; Vila, Javier; Maldonado, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    This article provides the first demonstration of a reliable second-order conditioning (SOC) effect in human causal learning tasks. It demonstrates the human ability to infer relationships between a cause and an effect that were never paired together during training. Experiments 1a and 1b showed a clear and reliable SOC effect, while Experiments 2a…

  18. Neumann problems for second order ordinary differential equations across resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Li; Huaizhong, Wang

    1995-05-01

    This paper deals with the existence-uniqueness problem to Neumann problems for second order ordinary differential equations probably across resonance. By the optimal control theory method, some global optimality results about the unique solvability for such boundary value problems are established.

  19. Feasibility of a second-order gravitational red-shift experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, J.; Vessot, R. F. C.

    1976-01-01

    The number of gravitation experiments undertaken since the advent of Einstein's theory of gravitation is quite small, with, so far, only the famous perihelion-advance experiment and a recent lunar-laser-ranging experiment being capable of measuring a nonlinear, second-order effect. It now appears that another distinct test of the second-order term may be feasible through the use of very stable atomic clocks. This experiment, which would measure the second-order gravitational red-shift, is a bona fide test of the field equations of gravity, not just a test of the underlying principle of equivalence. The nature of such an experiment, the basic equations, model-orbit calculations, and some tracking-accuracy requirements are presented. It is concluded that current space-probe tracking capabilities cannot determine all the necessary orbital parameters with sufficient accuracy for this experiment at the present time.

  20. First- and second-order charged particle optics

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.L.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1984-07-01

    Since the invention of the alternating gradient principle there has been a rapid evolution of the mathematics and physics techniques applicable to charged particle optics. In this publication we derive a differential equation and a matrix algebra formalism valid to second-order to present the basic principles governing the design of charged particle beam transport systems. A notation first introduced by John Streib is used to convey the essential principles dictating the design of such beam transport systems. For example the momentum dispersion, the momentum resolution, and all second-order aberrations are expressed as simple integrals of the first-order trajectories (matrix elements) and of the magnetic field parameters (multipole components) characterizing the system. 16 references, 30 figures.

  1. Experimental Measurement of the Second-Order Coherence of Supercontinuum.

    PubMed

    Närhi, Mikko; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T; Genty, Goëry

    2016-06-17

    We measure experimentally the second-order coherence properties of supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Our approach is based on measuring separately the quasicoherent and quasistationary contributions to the cross-spectral density and mutual coherence functions using a combination of interferometric and nonlinear gating techniques. This allows us to introduce two-dimensional coherence spectrograms which provide a direct characterization and convenient visualization of the spectrotemporal coherence properties. The measured second-order coherence functions are in very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Our results pave the way towards the full experimental characterization of supercontinuum coherence properties. More generally, they provide a generic approach for the complete experimental measurement of the coherence of broadband sources.

  2. Second-order envelope equation of graphene electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ji

    2014-10-01

    A treatment of graphene's electronic states based on the tight-binding method is presented. Like Dirac equation, this treatment uses envelope functions to eliminate crystal potential. Besides, a density-functional-theory Kohn-Sham (KS) orbital of an isolated carbon atom is employed. By locally expanding envelope functions into second-order polynomials and by involving up to third-nearest atoms in calculating orbital integrals, the second-order envelope equation is obtained. This equation does not contain any experimental data except graphene's crystal structure, and its coefficients are determined through several kinds of integrals of the carbon KS orbital. As an improvement, it leads to more accurate energy dispersion than Dirac equation including the triangular warping effect and asymmetry for electrons and holes, and gives the Fermi velocity which is in good agreement with the experimental value.

  3. Quasiparticle second-order viscous hydrodynamics from kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinti, Leonardo; Jaiswal, Amaresh; Ryblewski, Radoslaw

    2017-03-01

    We present the derivation of second-order relativistic viscous hydrodynamics from an effective Boltzmann equation for a system consisting of quasiparticles of a single species. We consider temperature-dependent masses of the quasiparticles and devise a thermodynamically consistent framework to formulate second-order evolution equations for shear and bulk viscous pressure corrections. The main advantage of this formulation is that one can consistently implement a realistic equation of state of the medium within the framework of kinetic theory. Specializing to the case of a one-dimensional purely longitudinal boost-invariant expansion, we study the effect of this new formulation on the viscous hydrodynamic evolution of strongly interacting matter formed in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  4. Experimental Measurement of the Second-Order Coherence of Supercontinuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Närhi, Mikko; Turunen, Jari; Friberg, Ari T.; Genty, Goëry

    2016-06-01

    We measure experimentally the second-order coherence properties of supercontinuum generated in a photonic crystal fiber. Our approach is based on measuring separately the quasicoherent and quasistationary contributions to the cross-spectral density and mutual coherence functions using a combination of interferometric and nonlinear gating techniques. This allows us to introduce two-dimensional coherence spectrograms which provide a direct characterization and convenient visualization of the spectrotemporal coherence properties. The measured second-order coherence functions are in very good agreement with numerical simulations based on the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Our results pave the way towards the full experimental characterization of supercontinuum coherence properties. More generally, they provide a generic approach for the complete experimental measurement of the coherence of broadband sources.

  5. Thermoconvective Instability of a Second-Order Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dávalos, Luis Antonio O.; Manero, Octavio

    1986-02-01

    The non-linear three-dimensional thermoconvective instability of a second-order fluid layer between two parallel semi-infinite walls is analyzed under the fixed-heat flux boundary condition. In the analysis, the Boussinesq approximation is used to account for density changes in the system. It is shown that the non-linear time-dependent equation that governs the convective motion is of the same form as those obtained by Chapman and Proctor in the two-dimensional case and by Proctor (for infinitely thickwalls) in the three-dimensional case for Newtonian fluids. This result shows that the theorems of Tanner and Giesekus for planar, creeping flow of incompressible second-order fluids can be extended to three-dimensional, non-linear, time-dependent thermoconvective phenomena.

  6. Second-order centrality correlation in scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Meilei; Guo, Xinling; Chen, Jiaquan; Lu, Zhe-Ming; Nie, Tingyuan

    2015-02-01

    Scale-free networks in which the degree displays a power-law distribution can be classified into assortative, disassortative, and neutral networks according to their degree-degree correlation. The second-order centrality proposed in a distributed computation manner is quick-calculated and accurate to identify critical nodes. We explore the second-order centrality correlation (SOC) for each type of the scale-free networks. The SOC-SOC correlation in assortative network and neutral network behaves similarly to the degree-degree correlation, while it behaves an apparent difference in disassortative networks. Experiments show that the invulnerability of most of scale-free networks behaves similarly under the node removal ordering by SOC centrality and degree centrality, respectively. The netscience network and the Yeast network behave a little differently because they are native disconnecting networks.

  7. First and second order convex approximation strategies in structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleury, C.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, various methods based on convex approximation schemes are discussed that have demonstrated strong potential for efficient solution of structural optimization problems. First, the convex linearization method (Conlin) is briefly described, as well as one of its recent generalizations, the method of moving asymptotes (MMA). Both Conlin and MMA can be interpreted as first-order convex approximation methods that attempt to estimate the curvature of the problem functions on the basis of semiempirical rules. Attention is next directed toward methods that use diagonal second derivatives in order to provide a sound basis for building up high-quality explicit approximations of the behavior constraints. In particular, it is shown how second-order information can be effectively used without demanding a prohibitive computational cost. Various first-order and second-order approaches are compared by applying them to simple problems that have a closed form solution.

  8. High T{sub c} superconducting second-order gradiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kittel, A.; Kouznetsov, K.A.; McDermott, R.; Oh, B.; Clarke, J. |

    1998-10-01

    A planar, second-order gradiometer was fabricated from single-layer YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}x} films. The gradiometer consists of a symmetric flux transformer with an overall length of 80 mm inductively coupled to a directly coupled magnetometer, and has a baseline of 31 mm. The mutual inductance between the flux transformer and the magnetometer is adjusted mechanically to reduce the response to a uniform magnetic field applied perpendicularly to the plane of the gradiometer to typically 50 ppm. From an independent measurement, the residual first-order gradient response was determined to be at most 1.4{percent} relative to the second-order gradient response. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Second order upwind Lagrangian particle method for Euler equations

    SciTech Connect

    Samulyak, Roman; Chen, Hsin -Chiang; Yu, Kwangmin

    2016-06-01

    A new second order upwind Lagrangian particle method for solving Euler equations for compressible inviscid fluid or gas flows is proposed. Similar to smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), the method represents fluid cells with Lagrangian particles and is suitable for the simulation of complex free surface / multiphase flows. The main contributions of our method, which is different from SPH in all other aspects, are (a) significant improvement of approximation of differential operators based on a polynomial fit via weighted least squares approximation and the convergence of prescribed order, (b) an upwind second-order particle-based algorithm with limiter, providing accuracy and long term stability, and (c) accurate resolution of states at free interfaces. In conclusion, numerical verification tests demonstrating the convergence order for fixed domain and free surface problems are presented.

  10. Second order upwind Lagrangian particle method for Euler equations

    DOE PAGES

    Samulyak, Roman; Chen, Hsin -Chiang; Yu, Kwangmin

    2016-06-01

    A new second order upwind Lagrangian particle method for solving Euler equations for compressible inviscid fluid or gas flows is proposed. Similar to smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), the method represents fluid cells with Lagrangian particles and is suitable for the simulation of complex free surface / multiphase flows. The main contributions of our method, which is different from SPH in all other aspects, are (a) significant improvement of approximation of differential operators based on a polynomial fit via weighted least squares approximation and the convergence of prescribed order, (b) an upwind second-order particle-based algorithm with limiter, providing accuracy and longmore » term stability, and (c) accurate resolution of states at free interfaces. In conclusion, numerical verification tests demonstrating the convergence order for fixed domain and free surface problems are presented.« less

  11. Superquantile/CVaR Risk Measures: Second-Order Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-31

    Springer, 2001. [11] H. Mausser and D. Rosen. Efficient risk /return frontiers for credit risk . Algo. Research Quarterly, 2(4):35–47, 1998. [12] N...Superquantile/CVaR Risk Measures: Second-Order Theory1 R. Tyrrell Rockafellar Johannes O. Royset Department of Mathematics Operations Research...Department University of Washington Naval Postgraduate School rtr@uw.edu joroyset@nps.edu Abstract. Superquantiles, which refer to conditional value-at- risk

  12. Second order parametric processes in nonlinear silica microspheres.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Han, Ming; Wang, Anbo; Liu, Zhiwen; Heflin, James R

    2008-04-25

    We analyze second order parametric processes in a silica microsphere coated with radially aligned nonlinear optical molecules. In a high-Q nonlinear microsphere, we discover that it is possible to achieve ultralow threshold parametric oscillation that obeys the rule of angular momentum conservation. Based on symmetry considerations, one can also implement parametric processes that naturally generate quantum entangled photon pairs. Practical issues regarding implementation of the nonlinear microsphere are also discussed.

  13. Extensions and applications of a second-order landsurface parameterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreou, S. A.; Eagleson, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    Extensions and applications of a second order land surface parameterization, proposed by Andreou and Eagleson are developed. Procedures for evaluating the near surface storage depth used in one cell land surface parameterizations are suggested and tested by using the model. Sensitivity analysis to the key soil parameters is performed. A case study involving comparison with an "exact" numerical model and another simplified parameterization, under very dry climatic conditions and for two different soil types, is also incorporated.

  14. Second order filter response with series coupled silica microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, A.; Iitchenko, V. S.; Handley, T.; Maleki, L.

    2002-01-01

    We have demonstrated an approach for fabricating a photonic filter with second order response function. The filter consists of two germania-doped silica microtoroidal or microspherical resonators cascaded in series. We use UV irradiation to tune the mode of one microcavity to bring it close to the mode of the second microcavity. This approach produces a filter function with much sharper rolloff than can be obtained with the individual microresonators.

  15. Stabilisation of second-order nonlinear equations with variable delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezansky, Leonid; Braverman, Elena; Idels, Lev

    2015-08-01

    For a wide class of second-order nonlinear non-autonomous models, we illustrate that combining proportional state control with the feedback that is proportional to the derivative of the chaotic signal allows to stabilise unstable motions of the system. The delays are variable, which leads to more flexible controls permitting delay perturbations; only delay bounds are significant for stabilisation by a delayed control. The results are applied to the sunflower equation which has an infinite number of equilibrium points.

  16. Second-order reconstruction of the inflationary potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liddle, Andrew R.; Turner, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    To first order in the deviation from scale invariance the inflationary potential and its first two derivatives can be expressed in terms of the spectral indices of the scalar and tensor perturbations, n and n(sub T), and their contributions to the variance of the quadrupole CBR temperature anisotropy, S and T. In addition, there is a 'consistency relation' between these quantities: n(sub T) = (-1/ 7)(T/S). We derive the second-order expressions for the inflationary potential and its first two derivatives and the first-order expression for its third derivative, in terms, of n, n(sub T), S, T, and dn/d ln gamma. We also obtain the second-order consistency relation, n(sub T) = (-1/7)(T/S)(1 + 0.11(T/S) + 0.15(n-1)). As an example we consider the exponential potential, the only known case where exact analytic solutions for the perturbation spectra exist. We reconstruct the potential via Taylor expansion (with coefficients calculated at both first and second order), and introduce the Pade approximate as a greatly improved alternative.

  17. Second-order statistics of a twisted gaussian Schell-model beam in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Cai, Yangjian

    2010-11-22

    We present a detailed investigation of the second-order statistics of a twisted gaussian Schell-model (TGSM) beam propagating in turbulent atmosphere. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral, analytical expressions for the second-order moments of the Wigner distribution function of a TGSM beam in turbulent atmosphere are derived. Evolution properties of the second-order statistics, such as the propagation factor, the effective radius of curvature (ERC) and the Rayleigh range, of a TGSM beam in turbulent atmosphere are explored in detail. Our results show that a TGSM beam is less affected by the turbulence than a GSM beam without twist phase. In turbulent atmosphere the Rayleigh range doesn't equal to the distance where the ERC takes a minimum value, which is much different from the result in free space. The second-order statistics are closely determined by the parameters of the turbulent atmosphere and the initial beam parameters. Our results will be useful in long-distance free-space optical communications.

  18. A simple second-order digital phase-locked loop.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegnelia, C. R.

    1972-01-01

    A simple second-order digital phase-locked loop has been designed for the Viking Orbiter 1975 command system. Excluding analog-to-digital conversion, implementation of the loop requires only an adder/subtractor, two registers, and a correctable counter with control logic. The loop considers only the polarity of phase error and corrects system clocks according to a filtered sequence of this polarity. The loop is insensitive to input gain variation, and therefore offers the advantage of stable performance over long life. Predictable performance is guaranteed by extreme reliability of acquisition, yet in the steady state the loop produces only a slight degradation with respect to analog loop performance.

  19. A second-order impact model for forest fire regimes.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Stefano; Rinaldi, Sergio

    2006-09-01

    We present a very simple "impact" model for the description of forest fires and show that it can mimic the known characteristics of wild fire regimes in savannas, boreal forests, and Mediterranean forests. Moreover, the distribution of burned biomasses in model generated fires resemble those of burned areas in numerous large forests around the world. The model has also the merits of being the first second-order model for forest fires and the first example of the use of impact models in the study of ecosystems.

  20. Langevin dynamics of financial systems: A second-order analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canessa, E.

    2001-07-01

    We address the issue of stock market fluctuations within Langevin Dynamics (LD) and the thermodynamics definitions of multifractality in order to study its second-order characterization given by the analogous specific heat Cq, where q is an analogous temperature relating the moments of the generating partition function for the financial data signals. Due to non-linear and additive noise terms within the LD, we found that Cq can display a shoulder to the right of its main peak as also found in the S&P500 historical data which may resemble a classical phase transition at a critical point.

  1. Time regularity of the solutions to second order hyperbolic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Tamotu; Taglialatela, Giovanni

    2011-04-01

    We consider the Cauchy problem for a second order weakly hyperbolic equation, with coefficients depending only on the time variable. We prove that if the coefficients of the equation belong to the Gevrey class γ^{s0} and the Cauchy data belong to γ^{s1}, then the Cauchy problem has a solution in γ^{s0}([0,T^{*}];γ^{s1}({R})) for some T *>0, provided 1≤ s 1≤2-1/ s 0. If the equation is strictly hyperbolic, we may replace the previous condition by 1≤ s 1≤ s 0.

  2. Slowly rotating scalar field wormholes: The second order approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kashargin, P. E.; Sushkov, S. V.

    2008-09-15

    We discuss rotating wormholes in general relativity with a scalar field with negative kinetic energy. To solve the problem, we use the assumption about slow rotation. The role of a small dimensionless parameter plays the ratio of the linear velocity of rotation of the wormhole's throat and the velocity of light. We construct the rotating wormhole solution in the second-order approximation with respect to the small parameter. The analysis shows that the asymptotical mass of the rotating wormhole is greater than that of the nonrotating one, and the null energy condition violation in the rotating wormhole spacetime is weaker than that in the nonrotating one.

  3. Octonic second-order equations of relativistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Mironov, Victor L.; Mironov, Sergey V.

    2009-01-15

    We demonstrate a generalization of relativistic quantum mechanics using eight-component value ''octons'' that generate an associative noncommutative spatial algebra. It is shown that the octonic second-order equation for the eight-component octonic wave function, obtained from the Einstein relation for energy and momentum, describes particles with spin 1/2. It is established that the octonic wave function of a particle in the state with defined spin projection has a specific spatial structure that takes the form of an octonic oscillator with two spatial polarizations: longitudinal linear and transverse circular.

  4. A second order derivative scheme based on Bregman algorithm class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagna, Rosanna; Crisci, Serena; Cuomo, Salvatore; Galletti, Ardelio; Marcellino, Livia

    2016-10-01

    The algorithms based on the Bregman iterative regularization are known for efficiently solving convex constraint optimization problems. In this paper, we introduce a second order derivative scheme for the class of Bregman algorithms. Its properties of convergence and stability are investigated by means of numerical evidences. Moreover, we apply the proposed scheme to an isotropic Total Variation (TV) problem arising out of the Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) denoising. Experimental results confirm that our algorithm has good performance in terms of denoising quality, effectiveness and robustness.

  5. Supersonic second order analysis and optimization program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clever, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate nonlinear inviscid theoretical techniques for predicting aerodynamic characteristics and surface pressures for relatively slender vehicles at supersonic and moderate hypersonic speeds were developed. Emphasis was placed on approaches that would be responsive to conceptual configuration design level of effort. Second order small disturbance theory was utilized to meet this objective. Numerical codes were developed for analysis and design of relatively general three dimensional geometries. Results from the computations indicate good agreement with experimental results for a variety of wing, body, and wing-body shapes. Case computational time of one minute on a CDC 176 are typical for practical aircraft arrangement.

  6. Second-order neutral impulsive stochastic evolution equations with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yong; Sun, Dandan

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, we study the second-order neutral stochastic evolution equations with impulsive effect and delay (SNSEEIDs). We establish the existence and uniqueness of mild solutions to SNSEEIDs under non-Lipschitz condition with Lipschitz condition being considered as a special case by the successive approximation. Furthermore, we give the continuous dependence of solutions on the initial data by means of corollary of the Bihari inequality. An application to the stochastic nonlinear wave equation with impulsive effect and delay is given to illustrate the theory.

  7. A novel unsplit perfectly matched layer for the second-order acoustic wave equation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Youneng; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan

    2014-08-01

    When solving acoustic field equations by using numerical approximation technique, absorbing boundary conditions (ABCs) are widely used to truncate the simulation to a finite space. The perfectly matched layer (PML) technique has exhibited excellent absorbing efficiency as an ABC for the acoustic wave equation formulated as a first-order system. However, as the PML was originally designed for the first-order equation system, it cannot be applied to the second-order equation system directly. In this article, we aim to extend the unsplit PML to the second-order equation system. We developed an efficient unsplit implementation of PML for the second-order acoustic wave equation based on an auxiliary-differential-equation (ADE) scheme. The proposed method can benefit to the use of PML in simulations based on second-order equations. Compared with the existing PMLs, it has simpler implementation and requires less extra storage. Numerical results from finite-difference time-domain models are provided to illustrate the validity of the approach.

  8. Double ionization of single oriented water molecules by electron impact: Second-order Born description

    SciTech Connect

    Dal Cappello, C.; Champion, C.; Kada, I.; Mansouri, A.

    2011-06-15

    The double ionization of isolated water molecules fixed in space is investigated within a theoretical approach based on the second-order Born approximation. Electron angular distributions have been studied for specific kinematical conditions. The three usual mechanisms, the shake-off and the two two-step mechanisms, have been identified. A significant contribution of the two-step mechanism is clearly visible for some particular kinematics.

  9. A preliminary compressible second-order closure model for high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Sarkar, Sutanu

    1989-01-01

    A preliminary version of a compressible second-order closure model that was developed in connection with the National Aero-Space Plane Project is presented. The model requires the solution of transport equations for the Favre-averaged Reynolds stress tensor and dissipation rate. Gradient transport hypotheses are used for the Reynolds heat flux, mass flux, and turbulent diffusion terms. Some brief remarks are made about the direction of future research to generalize the model.

  10. Second-order modeling of arsenite transport in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Magdi Selim, H.

    2011-11-01

    Rate limited processes including kinetic adsorption-desorption can greatly impact the fate and behavior of toxic arsenic compounds in heterogeneous soils. In this study, miscible displacement column experiments were carried out to investigate the extent of reactivity during transport of arsenite in soils. Arsenite breakthrough curves (BTCs) of Olivier and Windsor soils exhibited strong retardation with diffusive effluent fronts followed by slow release or tailing during leaching. Such behavior is indicative of the dominance of kinetic retention reactions for arsenite transport in the soil columns. Sharp decrease or increase in arsenite concentration in response to flow interruptions (stop-flow) further verified that non-equilibrium conditions are dominant. After some 40-60 pore volumes of continued leaching, 30-70% of the applied arsenite was retained by the soil in the columns. Furthermore, continued arsenite slow release for months was evident by the high levels of residual arsenite concentrations observed during leaching. In contrast, arsenite transport in a reference sand material exhibited no retention where complete mass recovery in the effluent solution was attained. A second-order model (SOM) which accounts for equilibrium, reversible, and irreversible retention mechanisms was utilized to describe arsenite transport results from the soil columns. Based on inverse and predictive modeling results, the SOM model successfully depicted arsenite BTCs from several soil columns. Based on inverse and predictive modeling results, a second-order model which accounts for kinetic reversible and irreversible reactions is recommended for describing arsenite transport in soils.

  11. Second-order perturbations of cosmological fluids: Relativistic effects of pressure, multicomponent, curvature, and rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim

    2007-11-15

    velocity perturbations including the rotation coincide with the ones in Newton's gravity. All equations in this work include the cosmological constant in the background world model. We emphasize that our relativistic/Newtonian correspondences in several situations and pure general relativistic corrections in the context of Newtonian equations are mainly about the dynamic equations of density and velocity perturbations without using the gravitational potential (metric perturbations). Consequently, our relativistic/Newtonian correspondences do not imply the absence of many space-time (i.e., pure general relativistic) effects like frame dragging, and redshift and deflection of photons even in such cases. We also present the case of multiple minimally coupled scalar fields, and properly derive the large-scale conservation properties of curvature perturbation variable in various temporal gauge conditions to the second order.

  12. Experimental study of non-linear second-order analytical data with focus on the second-order advantage.

    PubMed

    Culzoni, María J; Damiani, Patricia C; García-Reiriz, Alejandro; Goicoechea, Héctor C; Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2007-07-01

    Three different experimental systems have been studied regarding the determination of analytes in complex samples, using non-linear second-order instrumental data, which are intrinsically able to provide the second-order advantage. This permits the quantitation of calibrated analytes in the presence of unexpected sample components, although a suitable algorithm is required. The recently described combination of artificial neural networks with post-training residual bilinearization has been applied to the three data sets, with successful results concerning prediction accuracy and precision, as well as profile recovery for the potential interferents in test samples. The studies involve: (1) the determination of two pharmaceuticals in the presence of an unexpected excipient by absorbance-pH matrix measurements, (2) the quantitation of iron(II) by its catalytic effect on the kinetics of the bromate oxidation of a colorant in the presence of a second interfering organic dye, and (3) the analysis of the antibiotic amoxicillin by fluorescence excitation-emission matrices in the presence of a fluorescent anti-inflammatory. The prediction results were compared and shown to be significantly better than those yielded by the unfolded partial least-squares/residual bilinearization model, due to the non-linear nature of the studied data.

  13. Gravitational Microlensing by Ellis Wormhole: Second Order Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukmanova, Regina; Kulbakova, Aliya; Izmailov, Ramil; Potapov, Alexander A.

    2016-11-01

    Gravitational lensing is the effect of light bending in a gravitational field. It can be used as a possible observational method to detect or exclude the existence of wormholes. In this work, we extend the work by Abe on gravitational microlensing by Ellis wormhole by including the second order deflection term. Using the lens equation and definition of Einstein radius, we find the angular locations of the physical image inside and outside Einstein ring. The work contains a comparative analysis of light curves between the Schwarzschild black hole and the Ellis wormhole that can be used to distinguish such objects though such distinctions are too minute to be observable even in the near future. We also tabulate the optical depth and event rate for lensing by bulge and Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) stars.

  14. Measurement of the second-order coherence of pseudothermal light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuusela, Tom A.

    2017-04-01

    We describe photon statistics experiments using pseudothermal light that can be performed in an undergraduate physics laboratory. We examine the light properties in terms of a second-order coherence function, as determined either by measuring the light intensity as a function of time or via coincidence analysis of a pair of photon detectors. We determine the coherence time and intensity distribution of the pseudothermal light source that exhibits either Gaussian or non-Gaussian statistics as a function of their optical parameters, and then compare the results with theoretical predictions. The simple photodiode method can be used for the qualitative analysis of the coherence time, but more accurate measurements are achieved using the coincidence method.

  15. Digital second-order phase-locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holes, J. K.; Carl, C.; Tegnelia, C. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A digital second-order phase-locked loop is disclosed in which a counter driven by a stable clock pulse source is used to generate a reference waveform of the same frequency as an incoming waveform, and to sample the incoming waveform at zero-crossover points. The samples are converted to digital form and accumulated over M cycles, reversing the sign of every second sample. After every M cycles, the accumulated value of samples is hard limited to a value SGN = + or - 1 and multiplied by a value delta sub 1 equal to a number of n sub 1 of fractions of a cycle. An error signal is used to advance or retard the counter according to the sign of the sum by an amount equal to the sum.

  16. Digital adaptive controllers using second order models with transport lag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S.; Kaufman, H.

    1975-01-01

    Design of a discrete optimal regulator requires the a priori knowledge of a mathematical model for the system of interest. Because a second-order model with transport lag is very amenable to control computations and because this type of model has been used previously to represent certain high order single input-single output processes, an adaptive controller was designed based upon adjustment of controls computed for such a model. An extended Kalman filter was utilized for tracking the model parameters which were subsequently used to update a set of optimal control gains. Favorable results were obtained in applying this procedure to the control of several examples including a ninth order nonlinear process.

  17. K-inflationary power spectra at second order

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jérôme; Vennin, Vincent; Ringeval, Christophe E-mail: christophe.ringeval@uclouvain.be

    2013-06-01

    Within the class of inflationary models, k-inflation represents the most general single field framework that can be associated with an effective quadratic action for the curvature perturbations and a varying speed of sound. The incoming flow of high-precision cosmological data, such as those from the Planck satellite and small scale Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments, calls for greater accuracy in the inflationary predictions. In this work, we calculate for the first time the next-to-next-to-leading order scalar and tensor primordial power spectra in k-inflation needed in order to obtain robust constraints on the inflationary theory. The method used is the uniform approximation together with a second order expansion in the Hubble and sound flow functions. Our result is checked in various limits in which it reduces to already known situations.

  18. Second-Order Fermi Acceleration and Emission in Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Katsuaki; Takahara, Fumio; Toma, Kenji; Kusunose, Masaaki; Kakuwa, Jun

    The second-order Fermi acceleration (Fermi-II) driven by turbulence may be responsible for the electron acceleration in blazar jets. We test this model with time-dependent simulations, adopt it for 1ES 1101-232, and Mrk 421. The Fermi-II model with radial evolution of the electron injection rate and/or diffusion coefficient can reproduce the spectra from the radio to the gamma-ray regime. For Mrk 421, an external radio photon field with a luminosity of 4.9 begin{math} {times} 10 (38) erg s (-1) is required to agree with the observed GeV flux. The temporal variability of the diffusion coefficient or injection rate causes flare emission. The observed synchronicity of X-ray and TeV flares implies a decrease of the magnetic field in the flaring source region.

  19. Analysis of implicit second-order upwind-biased stencils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Thomas W.; Warren, Gary P.

    1993-01-01

    Truncation error and stability properties of several implicit upwind schemes for the two-dimensional Euler equations are examined. The schemes use linear data reconstruction methods to achieve second-order flux integrations where the implicit Jacobian operators are first order. The stability properties of the schemes are examined by a Von Neumann analysis of the linearized, constant-coefficient Euler equations. The choice of the data reconstruction method used to evaluate the flux integral has a dramatic effect on the convergence properties of the implicit solution method. In particular, the typical one-dimensional data reconstruction methods used with structured grids exhibit poor convergence properties compared to the unstructured grid method considered. Of the schemes examined, the one with the superior convergence properties is well-suited for both unstructured and structured grids, which has important implications for the design of implicit methods.

  20. Second-Order Accurate Projective Integrators for Multiscale Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S L; Gear, C W

    2005-05-27

    We introduce new projective versions of second-order accurate Runge-Kutta and Adams-Bashforth methods, and demonstrate their use as outer integrators in solving stiff differential systems. An important outcome is that the new outer integrators, when combined with an inner telescopic projective integrator, can result in fully explicit methods with adaptive outer step size selection and solution accuracy comparable to those obtained by implicit integrators. If the stiff differential equations are not directly available, our formulations and stability analysis are general enough to allow the combined outer-inner projective integrators to be applied to black-box legacy codes or perform a coarse-grained time integration of microscopic systems to evolve macroscopic behavior, for example.

  1. New implicitly solvable potential produced by second order shape invariance

    SciTech Connect

    Cannata, F.; Ioffe, M.V.; Kolevatova, E.V.; Nishnianidze, D.N.

    2015-05-15

    The procedure proposed recently by Bougie et al. (2010) to study the general form of shape invariant potentials in one-dimensional Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SUSY QM) is generalized to the case of Higher Order SUSY QM with supercharges of second order in momentum. A new shape invariant potential is constructed by this method. It is singular at the origin, it grows at infinity, and its spectrum depends on the choice of connection conditions in the singular point. The corresponding Schrödinger equation is solved explicitly: the wave functions are constructed analytically, and the energy spectrum is defined implicitly via the transcendental equation which involves Confluent Hypergeometric functions. - Highlights: • New potential with 2nd order irreducible shape invariance was constructed. • The connection conditions at the singularity of potential were obtained. • The explicit expressions for all wave functions were derived. • The implicit equation for the energy spectrum was obtained.

  2. Absorbing boundary conditions for second-order hyperbolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Hong; Wong, Yau Shu

    1989-01-01

    A uniform approach to construct absorbing artificial boundary conditions for second-order linear hyperbolic equations is proposed. The nonlocal boundary condition is given by a pseudodifferential operator that annihilates travelling waves. It is obtained through the dispersion relation of the differential equation by requiring that the initial-boundary value problem admits the wave solutions travelling in one direction only. Local approximation of this global boundary condition yields an nth-order differential operator. It is shown that the best approximations must be in the canonical forms which can be factorized into first-order operators. These boundary conditions are perfectly absorbing for wave packets propagating at certain group velocities. A hierarchy of absorbing boundary conditions is derived for transonic small perturbation equations of unsteady flows. These examples illustrate that the absorbing boundary conditions are easy to derive, and the effectiveness is demonstrated by the numerical experiments.

  3. Analytical energy gradients for second-order multireference perturbation theory using density fitting.

    PubMed

    Győrffy, Werner; Shiozaki, Toru; Knizia, Gerald; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2013-03-14

    We present algorithms for computing analytical energy gradients for multi-configuration self-consistent field methods and partially internally contracted complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) using density fitting (DF). Our implementation is applicable to both single-state and multi-state CASPT2 analytical gradients. The accuracy of the new methods is demonstrated for structures and excitation energies of valence and Rydberg states of pyrrole, as well as for structures and adiabatic singlet-triplet energy splittings for the hydro-, the O,O(')-formato-, and the N,N(')-diiminato-copper-dioxygen complexes. It is shown that the effects of density fitting on optimized structures and relative energies are negligible. For cases in which the total cost is dominated by the integral evaluations and transformations, the DF-CASPT2 gradient calculations are found to be faster than the corresponding conventional calculations by typically a factor of three to five using triple-ζ basis sets, and by about a factor of ten using quadruple-ζ basis sets.

  4. WEAK GALERKIN METHODS FOR SECOND ORDER ELLIPTIC INTERFACE PROBLEMS

    PubMed Central

    MU, LIN; WANG, JUNPING; WEI, GUOWEI; YE, XIU; ZHAO, SHAN

    2013-01-01

    Weak Galerkin methods refer to general finite element methods for partial differential equations (PDEs) in which differential operators are approximated by their weak forms as distributions. Such weak forms give rise to desirable flexibilities in enforcing boundary and interface conditions. A weak Galerkin finite element method (WG-FEM) is developed in this paper for solving elliptic PDEs with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Theoretically, it is proved that high order numerical schemes can be designed by using the WG-FEM with polynomials of high order on each element. Extensive numerical experiments have been carried to validate the WG-FEM for solving second order elliptic interface problems. High order of convergence is numerically confirmed in both L2 and L∞ norms for the piecewise linear WG-FEM. Special attention is paid to solve many interface problems, in which the solution possesses a certain singularity due to the nonsmoothness of the interface. A challenge in research is to design nearly second order numerical methods that work well for problems with low regularity in the solution. The best known numerical scheme in the literature is of order O(h) to O(h1.5) for the solution itself in L∞ norm. It is demonstrated that the WG-FEM of the lowest order, i.e., the piecewise constant WG-FEM, is capable of delivering numerical approximations that are of order O(h1.75) to O(h2) in the L∞ norm for C1 or Lipschitz continuous interfaces associated with a C1 or H2 continuous solution. PMID:24072935

  5. Second-order schedules and the problem of conditioned reinforcement

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, D. Alan

    1971-01-01

    Thirteen pigeons were exposed to a variety of second-order schedules in which responding under a component schedule was reinforced according to a schedule of reinforcement. Under different conditions, completion of each component resulted in either (1) the brief presentation of a stimulus also present during reinforcement (pairing operation), (2) the brief presentation of a stimulus not present during reinforcement (nonpairing operation), or (3) no brief stimulus presentation (tandem). Brief-stimulus presentations engendered a pattern of responding within components similar to that engendered by food. Patterning was observed when fixed-interval and fixed-ratio components were maintained under fixed- and variable-ratio and fixed- and variable-interval schedules. There were no apparent differences in performance under pairing and nonpairing conditions in any study. The properties of the stimuli presented in brief-stimulus operations produced different effects on response patterning. In one study, similar effects on performance were found whether brief-stimulus presentations were response-produced or delivered independently of responding. Response patterning did not occur when the component schedule under which a nonpaired stimulus was produced occurred independently of the food schedule. The results suggest a reevaluation of the role of conditioned reinforcement in second-order schedule performance. The similarity of behavior under pairing and nonpairing operations is consistent with two hypotheses: (1) the major effect is due to the discriminative properties of the brief stimulus; (2) the scheduling operation under which the paired or nonpaired stimulus is presented can establish it as a reinforcer. PMID:16811549

  6. WEAK GALERKIN METHODS FOR SECOND ORDER ELLIPTIC INTERFACE PROBLEMS.

    PubMed

    Mu, Lin; Wang, Junping; Wei, Guowei; Ye, Xiu; Zhao, Shan

    2013-10-01

    Weak Galerkin methods refer to general finite element methods for partial differential equations (PDEs) in which differential operators are approximated by their weak forms as distributions. Such weak forms give rise to desirable flexibilities in enforcing boundary and interface conditions. A weak Galerkin finite element method (WG-FEM) is developed in this paper for solving elliptic PDEs with discontinuous coefficients and interfaces. Theoretically, it is proved that high order numerical schemes can be designed by using the WG-FEM with polynomials of high order on each element. Extensive numerical experiments have been carried to validate the WG-FEM for solving second order elliptic interface problems. High order of convergence is numerically confirmed in both L2 and L∞ norms for the piecewise linear WG-FEM. Special attention is paid to solve many interface problems, in which the solution possesses a certain singularity due to the nonsmoothness of the interface. A challenge in research is to design nearly second order numerical methods that work well for problems with low regularity in the solution. The best known numerical scheme in the literature is of order [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] for the solution itself in L∞ norm. It is demonstrated that the WG-FEM of the lowest order, i.e., the piecewise constant WG-FEM, is capable of delivering numerical approximations that are of order [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text] in the L∞ norm for C(1) or Lipschitz continuous interfaces associated with a C(1) or H(2) continuous solution.

  7. Second order closure modeling of turbulent buoyant wall plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Gang; Lai, Ming-Chia; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1992-01-01

    Non-intrusive measurements of scalar and momentum transport in turbulent wall plumes, using a combined technique of laser Doppler anemometry and laser-induced fluorescence, has shown some interesting features not present in the free jet or plumes. First, buoyancy-generation of turbulence is shown to be important throughout the flow field. Combined with low-Reynolds-number turbulence and near-wall effect, this may raise the anisotropic turbulence structure beyond the prediction of eddy-viscosity models. Second, the transverse scalar fluxes do not correspond only to the mean scalar gradients, as would be expected from gradient-diffusion modeling. Third, higher-order velocity-scalar correlations which describe turbulent transport phenomena could not be predicted using simple turbulence models. A second-order closure simulation of turbulent adiabatic wall plumes, taking into account the recent progress in scalar transport, near-wall effect and buoyancy, is reported in the current study to compare with the non-intrusive measurements. In spite of the small velocity scale of the wall plumes, the results showed that low-Reynolds-number correction is not critically important to predict the adiabatic cases tested and cannot be applied beyond the maximum velocity location. The mean and turbulent velocity profiles are very closely predicted by the second-order closure models. but the scalar field is less satisfactory, with the scalar fluctuation level underpredicted. Strong intermittency of the low-Reynolds-number flow field is suspected of these discrepancies. The trends in second- and third-order velocity-scalar correlations, which describe turbulent transport phenomena, are also predicted in general, with the cross-streamwise correlations better than the streamwise one. Buoyancy terms modeling the pressure-correlation are shown to improve the prediction slightly. The effects of equilibrium time-scale ratio and boundary condition are also discussed.

  8. On the maximum principle for complete second-order elliptic operators in general domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitolo, Antonio

    This paper is concerned with the maximum principle for second-order linear elliptic equations in a wide generality. By means of a geometric condition previously stressed by Berestycki-Nirenberg-Varadhan, Cabré was very able to improve the classical ABP estimate obtaining the maximum principle also in unbounded domains, such as infinite strips and open connected cones with closure different from the whole space. Now we introduce a new geometric condition that extends the result to a more general class of domains including the complements of hypersurfaces, as for instance the cut plane. The methods developed here allow us to deal with complete second-order equations, where the admissible first-order term, forced to be zero in a preceding result with Cafagna, depends on the geometry of the domain.

  9. Relativistic second-order dissipative fluid dynamics at finite chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Amaresh; Friman, Bengt; Redlich, Krzysztof

    2016-07-01

    We employ a Chapman-Enskog like expansion for the distribution function close to equilibrium to solve the Boltzmann equation in the relaxation time approximation and subsequently derive second-order evolution equations for dissipative charge currentand shear stress tensor for a system of massless quarks and gluons. We use quantum statistics for the phase space distribution functions to calculate the transport coefficients. We show that, the second-order evolution equations for the dissipative charge current and the shear stress tensor can be decoupled. We find that, for large chemical potential, the charge conductivity is small compared to the shear viscosity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the limiting behaviour of the ratio of heat conductivity to shear viscosity is identicalto that obtained for a strongly coupled conformal plasma.

  10. Second-order perturbation theory: The problem of infinite mode coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jeremy; Wardell, Barry; Pound, Adam

    2016-11-01

    Second-order self-force computations, which will be essential in modeling extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, involve two major new difficulties that were not present at first order. One is the problem of large scales, discussed in Pound [Phys. Rev. D 92, 104047 (2015)]. Here we discuss the second difficulty, which occurs instead on small scales: if we expand the field equations in spherical harmonics, then because the first-order field contains a singularity, we require an arbitrarily large number of first-order modes to accurately compute even a single second-order mode. This is a generic feature of nonlinear field equations containing singularities, allowing us to study it in the simple context of a scalar toy model in flat space. Using that model, we illustrate the problem and demonstrate a robust strategy for overcoming it.

  11. Existence and Stability Results for Second-Order Stochastic Equations Driven by Fractional Brownian Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revathi, P.; Sakthivel, R.; Song, D.-Y.; Ren, Yong; Zhang, Pei

    2013-09-01

    Fractional Brownian motion has been widely used to model a number of phenomena in diverse fields of science and engineering. In this article, we investigate the existence, uniqueness and stability of mild solutions for a class of second-order nonautonomous neutral stochastic evolution equations with infinite delay driven by fractional Brownian motion (fBm) with Hurst parameter H ∈ (1/2, 1) in Hilbert spaces. More precisely, using semigroup theory and successive approximation approach, we establish a set of sufficient conditions for obtaining the required result under the assumption that coefficients satisfy non-Lipschitz condition with Lipschitz condition being considered as a special case. Further, the result is deduced to study the second-order autonomous neutral stochastic equations with fBm. The results generalize and improve some known results. Finally, as an application, stochastic wave equation with infinite delay driven by fractional Brownian motion is provided to illustrate the obtained theory.

  12. Second order anisotropy contribution in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    PubMed Central

    Timopheev, A. A.; Sousa, R.; Chshiev, M.; Nguyen, H. T.; Dieny, B.

    2016-01-01

    Hard-axis magnetoresistance loops were measured on perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction pillars of diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. By fitting these loops to an analytical model, the effective anisotropy fields in both free and reference layers were derived and their variations in temperature range between 340 K and 5 K were determined. It is found that a second-order anisotropy term of the form −K2cos4θ must be added to the conventional uniaxial –K1cos2θ term to explain the experimental data. This higher order contribution exists both in the free and reference layers. At T = 300 K, the estimated −K2/K1 ratios are 0.1 and 0.24 for the free and reference layers, respectively. The ratio is more than doubled at low temperatures changing the ground state of the reference layer from “easy-axis” to “easy-cone” regime. The easy-cone regime has clear signatures in the shape of the hard-axis magnetoresistance loops. The existence of this higher order anisotropy was also confirmed by ferromagnetic resonance experiments on FeCoB/MgO sheet films. It is of interfacial nature and is believed to be due to spatial fluctuations at the nanoscale of the first order anisotropy parameter at the FeCoB/MgO interface. PMID:27246631

  13. Polarization opposition effect and second-order ray tracing.

    PubMed

    Videen, Gorden

    2002-08-20

    I develop a second-order ray-tracing model of the light scattered by a cloud of randomly oriented facets having sizes much larger than the incident wavelength. My results suggest that both symmetric and asymmetric branches of the polarization opposition effect can be produced by the same mechanism responsible for the photometric opposition effect, i.e., constructive interference of light rays traversing reciprocal paths that is associated with coherent backscattering enhancement. The model provides a greatly simplified representation of the physical phenomena to isolate the two mechanisms that may be responsible for the effect. The shapes and positions of the two branches of the polarization opposition effect calculated with the model are consistent with observation, so the model may provide a rapid technique to characterize the optical and physical properties of a scattering system. I note, however, that the model is a gross simplification containing only two physical mechanisms, Fresnel reflections and coherent interference, and it is possible that it represents a nonphysical description of particles smaller than the wavelength or that other mechanisms contributing to the polarization opposition effect are not included.

  14. Second order sliding mode control for a quadrotor UAV.

    PubMed

    Zheng, En-Hui; Xiong, Jing-Jing; Luo, Ji-Liang

    2014-07-01

    A method based on second order sliding mode control (2-SMC) is proposed to design controllers for a small quadrotor UAV. For the switching sliding manifold design, the selection of the coefficients of the switching sliding manifold is in general a sophisticated issue because the coefficients are nonlinear. In this work, in order to perform the position and attitude tracking control of the quadrotor perfectly, the dynamical model of the quadrotor is divided into two subsystems, i.e., a fully actuated subsystem and an underactuated subsystem. For the former, a sliding manifold is defined by combining the position and velocity tracking errors of one state variable, i.e., the sliding manifold has two coefficients. For the latter, a sliding manifold is constructed via a linear combination of position and velocity tracking errors of two state variables, i.e., the sliding manifold has four coefficients. In order to further obtain the nonlinear coefficients of the sliding manifold, Hurwitz stability analysis is used to the solving process. In addition, the flight controllers are derived by using Lyapunov theory, which guarantees that all system state trajectories reach and stay on the sliding surfaces. Extensive simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method.

  15. Second order anisotropy contribution in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Timopheev, A A; Sousa, R; Chshiev, M; Nguyen, H T; Dieny, B

    2016-06-01

    Hard-axis magnetoresistance loops were measured on perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction pillars of diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. By fitting these loops to an analytical model, the effective anisotropy fields in both free and reference layers were derived and their variations in temperature range between 340 K and 5 K were determined. It is found that a second-order anisotropy term of the form -K2cos(4)θ must be added to the conventional uniaxial -K1cos(2)θ term to explain the experimental data. This higher order contribution exists both in the free and reference layers. At T = 300 K, the estimated -K2/K1 ratios are 0.1 and 0.24 for the free and reference layers, respectively. The ratio is more than doubled at low temperatures changing the ground state of the reference layer from "easy-axis" to "easy-cone" regime. The easy-cone regime has clear signatures in the shape of the hard-axis magnetoresistance loops. The existence of this higher order anisotropy was also confirmed by ferromagnetic resonance experiments on FeCoB/MgO sheet films. It is of interfacial nature and is believed to be due to spatial fluctuations at the nanoscale of the first order anisotropy parameter at the FeCoB/MgO interface.

  16. Second order optimization for the inference of gene regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Das, Mouli; Murthy, Chivukula A; De, Rajat K

    2014-02-01

    With the increasing availability of experimental data on gene interactions, modeling of gene regulatory pathways has gained special attention. Gradient descent algorithms have been widely used for regression and classification applications. Unfortunately, results obtained after training a model by gradient descent are often highly variable. In this paper, we present a new second order learning rule based on the Newton's method for inferring optimal gene regulatory pathways. Unlike the gradient descent method, the proposed optimization rule is independent of the learning parameter. The flow vectors are estimated based on biomass conservation. A set of constraints is formulated incorporating weighting coefficients. The method calculates the maximal expression of the target gene starting from a given initial gene through these weighting coefficients. Our algorithm has been benchmarked and validated on certain types of functions and on some gene regulatory networks, gathered from literature. The proposed method has been found to perform better than the gradient descent learning. Extensive performance comparison with the extreme pathway analysis method has underlined the effectiveness of our proposed methodology.

  17. Correction of the Chromaticity up to Second Order for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    H. K. Sayed, S.A. Bogacz, P. Chevtsov

    2010-03-01

    The proposed electron collider lattice exhibits low β- functions at the Interaction Point (IP) (βx*100mm - βy* 20 mm) and rather large equilibrium momentum spread of the collider ring (δp/p = 0.00158). Both features make the chromatic corrections of paramount importance. Here the chromatic effects of the final focus quadruples are cor- rected both locally and globally. Local correction features symmetric sextupole families around the IP, the betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate the second order chromatic aberration. Global interleaved families of sextupoles are placed in the figure-8 arc sections, and non-interleaved families at straight sec- tion making use of the freely propagated dispersion wave from the arcs. This strategy minimizes the required sex- tupole strength and eventually leads to larger dynamic aper- ture of the collider. The resulting spherical aberrations induced by the sextupoles are mitigated by design; the straight and arc sections optics features an inverse identity transformation between sextupoles in each pair.

  18. Modal cost analysis for linear matrix-second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelton, R. E.; Hughes, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Reduced models and reduced controllers for systems governed by matrix-second-order differential equations are obtained by retaining those modes which make the largest contributions to quadratic control objectives. Such contributions, expressed in terms of modal data, used as mode truncation criteria, allow the statement of the specific control objectives to influence the early model reduction from very high order models which are available, for example, from finite element methods. The relative importance of damping, frequency, and eigenvector in the mode truncation decisions are made explicit for each of these control objectives: attitude control, vibration suppression and figure control. The paper also shows that using modal cost analysis (MCA) on the closed loop modes of the optimally controlled system allows the construction of reduced control policies which feedback only those closed loop modal coordinates which are most critical to the quadratic control performance criterion. In this way, the modes which should be controlled (and hence the modes which must be observable by choice of measurements), are deduced from truncations of the optimal controller.

  19. A planar second-order DC SQUID gradiometer.

    PubMed

    Carelli, P; Chiaventi, L; Leoni, R; Pullano, M; Schirripa Spagnolo, G

    1991-01-01

    In this work we describe a DC SQUID gradiometer, sensitive to the second spatial derivative of the magnetic field. The sensitive area of the gradiometer is the inductive body of the DC SQUID itself. The isoflux line distribution generated by a dipolar source, obtained by performing magnetic measurements with an array of such detectors, is relatively complicated, but its localisation capability is similar to that one usually achieves with axial detector arrays. Planar gradiometers also show a better resolution for near sources and a stronger rejection of far disturbances. The final device is expected to have an inductance of a few hundreds of pH in order to obtain performances typical of a low noise DC SQUID. The pick-up coils will be the combination of four square holes of 500 microns side with a 1.05 cm baseline. Due to the magnetic field concentration (in the final device it can be a factor 10) the gradiometer will have a sensitivity of 10(-11) T m-2 Hz-1/2 and a field sensitivity of about 2 fT Hz-1/2. Some preliminary results, obtained on detectors with an intermediate area between the prototype and final device, are reported here. The process used to fabricate this second-order gradiometer is based on Nb-NbO chi-PbAuIn Josephson tunnel junctions. Some possible improvements will also be described.

  20. Second order anisotropy contribution in perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timopheev, A. A.; Sousa, R.; Chshiev, M.; Nguyen, H. T.; Dieny, B.

    2016-06-01

    Hard-axis magnetoresistance loops were measured on perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction pillars of diameter ranging from 50 to 150 nm. By fitting these loops to an analytical model, the effective anisotropy fields in both free and reference layers were derived and their variations in temperature range between 340 K and 5 K were determined. It is found that a second-order anisotropy term of the form ‑K2cos4θ must be added to the conventional uniaxial –K1cos2θ term to explain the experimental data. This higher order contribution exists both in the free and reference layers. At T = 300 K, the estimated ‑K2/K1 ratios are 0.1 and 0.24 for the free and reference layers, respectively. The ratio is more than doubled at low temperatures changing the ground state of the reference layer from “easy-axis” to “easy-cone” regime. The easy-cone regime has clear signatures in the shape of the hard-axis magnetoresistance loops. The existence of this higher order anisotropy was also confirmed by ferromagnetic resonance experiments on FeCoB/MgO sheet films. It is of interfacial nature and is believed to be due to spatial fluctuations at the nanoscale of the first order anisotropy parameter at the FeCoB/MgO interface.

  1. Modeling Second-Order Chemical Reactions using Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, N. E.; Barton, C. C.; Seybold, P. G.; Rizki, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    Cellular automata (CA) are discrete, agent-based, dynamic, iterated, mathematical computational models used to describe complex physical, biological, and chemical systems. Unlike the more computationally demanding molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo approaches, which use "force fields" to model molecular interactions, CA models employ a set of local rules. The traditional approach for modeling chemical reactions is to solve a set of simultaneous differential rate equations to give deterministic outcomes. CA models yield statistical outcomes for a finite number of ingredients. The deterministic solutions appear as limiting cases for conditions such as a large number of ingredients or a finite number of ingredients and many trials. Here we present a 2-dimensional, probabilistic CA model of a second-order gas phase reaction A + B → C, using a MATLAB basis. Beginning with a random distribution of ingredients A and B, formation of C emerges as the system evolves. The reaction rate can be varied based on the probability of favorable collisions of the reagents A and B. The model permits visualization of the conversion of reagents to products, and allows one to plot concentration vs. time for A, B and C. We test hypothetical reaction conditions such as: limiting reagents, the effects of reaction probabilities, and reagent concentrations on the reaction kinetics. The deterministic solutions of the reactions emerge as statistical averages in the limit of the large number of cells in the array. Modeling results for dynamic processes in the atmosphere will be presented.

  2. Second order gyrokinetic theory for particle-in-cell codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronko, Natalia; Bottino, Alberto; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The main idea of the gyrokinetic dynamical reduction consists in a systematical removal of the fast scale motion (the gyromotion) from the dynamics of the plasma, resulting in a considerable simplification and a significant gain of computational time. The gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations are nowadays implemented in for modeling (both laboratory and astrophysical) strongly magnetized plasmas. Different versions of the reduced set of equations exist, depending on the construction of the gyrokinetic reduction procedure and the approximations performed in the derivation. The purpose of this article is to explicitly show the connection between the general second order gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov system issued from the modern gyrokinetic theory and the model currently implemented in the global electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code ORB5. Necessary information about the modern gyrokinetic formalism is given together with the consistent derivation of the gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations from first principles. The variational formulation of the dynamics is used to obtain the corresponding energy conservation law, which in turn is used for the verification of energy conservation diagnostics currently implemented in ORB5. This work fits within the context of the code verification project VeriGyro currently run at IPP Max-Planck Institut in collaboration with others European institutions.

  3. A unified model for transfer alignment at random misalignment angles based on second-order EKF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiao; Mei, Chunbo; Qin, Yongyuan; Yan, Gongmin; Liu, Zhenbo

    2017-04-01

    In the transfer alignment process of inertial navigation systems (INSs), the conventional linear error model based on the small misalignment angle assumption cannot be applied to large misalignment situations. Furthermore, the nonlinear model based on the large misalignment angle suffers from redundant computation with nonlinear filters. This paper presents a unified model for transfer alignment suitable for arbitrary misalignment angles. The alignment problem is transformed into an estimation of the relative attitude between the master INS (MINS) and the slave INS (SINS), by decomposing the attitude matrix of the latter. Based on the Rodriguez parameters, a unified alignment model in the inertial frame with the linear state-space equation and a second order nonlinear measurement equation are established, without making any assumptions about the misalignment angles. Furthermore, we employ the Taylor series expansions on the second-order nonlinear measurement equation to implement the second-order extended Kalman filter (EKF2). Monte-Carlo simulations demonstrate that the initial alignment can be fulfilled within 10 s, with higher accuracy and much smaller computational cost compared with the traditional unscented Kalman filter (UKF) at large misalignment angles.

  4. Second-order spatial correlation in the far-field: Comparing entangled and classical light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Erfeng; Liu, Weitao; Lin, Huizu; Chen, Pingxing

    2016-02-01

    We consider second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light in the far-field. The quantum theory of second-order spatial correlation is analyzed, and the role of photon statistics and detection mode in the second-order spatial correlation are discussed. Meanwhile, the difference of second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light sources is deduced.

  5. Second order multidimensional sign-preserving remapping for ALE methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Ryan N; Szmelter, J.

    2010-12-15

    A second-order conservative sign-preserving remapping scheme for Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods is developed utilising concepts of the Multidimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA). The algorithm is inherently multidimensional, and so does not introduce splitting errors. The remapping is implemented in a two-dimensional, finite element ALE solver employing staggered quadrilateral meshes. The MPDATA remapping uses a finite volume discretization developed for volume coordinates. It is applied for the remapping of density and internal energy arranged as cell centered, and velocity as nodal, dependent variables. In the paper, the advection of scalar fields is examined first for test cases with prescribed mesh movement. A direct comparison of MPDATA with the performance of the van Leer MUSCL scheme indicates advantages of a multidimensional approach. Furthermore, distinctly different performance between basic MPDATA and the infinite gauge option is illustrated using benchmarks involving transport of a sign changing velocity field. Further development extends the application of MPDATA remapping to the full ALE solver with a staggered mesh arrangement for density, internal energy and momentum using volume coordinates. At present, two options of the algorithm - basic and infinite gauge - are implemented. To ensure a meaningful assessment, an identical Lagrangian solver and computational mesh update routines are used with either MPDATA or van Leer MUSCL remapping. The evaluation places particular focus on the abilities of both schemes to accurately model multidimensional problems. Theoretical considerations are supported with numerical examples. In addition to the prescribed mesh movement cases for advection of scalars, the demonstrations include two-dimensional Eulerian and ALE flow simulations on quadrilateral meshes with both fixed and variable timestep control. The key comparisons include the standard test cases of Sod and Noh

  6. Second-order moments of an electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model beam in a uniaxial crystal.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Liu, Lin; Zhao, Chengliang; Yuan, Yangsheng; Cai, Yangjian

    2014-02-01

    We derive the analytical expressions for the second-order moments of an electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model (EGSM) beam propagating in a uniaxial crystal. With the help of the derived formulas, we study the evolution properties of the propagation factor, the effective radius of curvature and the Rayleigh range of an EGSM beam in a uniaxial crystal. It is found that the evolution properties of an EGSM beam in a uniaxial crystal are much different from its evolution properties in free space and are closely determined by the initial beam parameters and the parameters of the uniaxial crystal. The uniaxial crystal provides one way for modulating the properties of an EGSM beam.

  7. The second-order theory of electromagnetic hot ion beam instabilities. [in interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, S. P.; Tokar, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the application of a second-order theory for electromagnetic instabilities in a collisionless plasma to two modes which resonate with hot ion beams. The application of the theory is strictly limited to the linear growth phase. However, the application of the theory may be extended to obtain a description of the beam at postsaturation if the wave-beam resonance is sufficiently broad in velocity space. Under the considered limitations, it is shown that, as in the cold beam case, the fluctuating fields do not gain appreciable momentum and that the primary exchange of momentum is between the beam and main component.

  8. First and second-order features for detection of masses in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Cha, Kenny; Helvie, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    We are developing novel methods for prescreening of mass candidates in computer-aided detection (CAD) system for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). With IRB approval and written informed consent, 186 views from 94 breasts were imaged using a GE GEN2 prototype DBT system. The data set was randomly separated into training and test sets by cases. Gradient field convergence features based on first-order features were used to select the initial set of mass candidates. Eigenvalues based on second-order features from the Hessian matrix were extracted for the mass candidate locations in the DBT volume. The features from the first- and second-order analysis form the feature vector that was input to a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier to generate a candidate-likelihood score. The likelihood scores were ranked and the top N candidates were passed onto the subsequent detection steps. The improvement between using only first-order features and the combination of first and second-order features was analyzed using a rank-sensitivity plot. 3D objects were obtained with two-stage 3D clustering followed by active contour segmentation. Morphological, gradient field, and texture features were extracted and feature selection was performed using stepwise feature selection. A combination of LDA and rule-based classifiers was used for FP reduction. The LDA classifier output a masslikelihood score for each object that was used as a decision variable for FROC analysis. At breast-based sensitivities of 70% and 80%, prescreening using first-order and second-order features resulted in 0.7 and 1.0 FPs/DBT.

  9. Second-order lower radial tangent derivatives and applications to set-valued optimization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bihang; Peng, Zhenhua; Xu, Yihong

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concepts of second-order radial composed tangent derivative, second-order radial tangent derivative, second-order lower radial composed tangent derivative, and second-order lower radial tangent derivative for set-valued maps by means of a radial tangent cone, second-order radial tangent set, lower radial tangent cone, and second-order lower radial tangent set, respectively. Some properties of second-order tangent derivatives are discussed, using which second-order necessary optimality conditions are established for a point pair to be a Henig efficient element of a set-valued optimization problem, and in the expressions the second-order tangent derivatives of the objective function and the constraint function are separated.

  10. Canadian space robotic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallaberger, Christian; Space Plan Task Force, Canadian Space Agency

    The Canadian Space Agency has chosen space robotics as one of its key niche areas, and is currently preparing to deliver the first flight elements for the main robotic system of the international space station. The Mobile Servicing System (MSS) is the Canadian contribution to the international space station. It consists of three main elements. The Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) is a 7-metre, 7-dof, robotic arm. The Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), a smaller 2-metre, 7-dof, robotic arm can be used independently, or attached to the end of the SSRMS. The Mobile Base System (MBS) will be used as a support platform and will also provide power and data links for both the SSRMS and the SPDM. A Space Vision System (SVS) has been tested on Shuttle flights, and is being further developed to enhance the autonomous capabilities of the MSS. The CSA also has a Strategic Technologies in Automation and Robotics Program which is developing new technologies to fulfill future robotic space mission needs. This program is currently developing in industry technological capabilities in the areas of automation of operations, autonomous robotics, vision systems, trajectory planning and object avoidance, tactile and proximity sensors, and ground control of space robots. Within the CSA, a robotic testbed and several research programs are also advancing technologies such as haptic devices, control via head-mounted displays, predictive and preview displays, and the dynamic characterization of robotic arms. Canada is also now developing its next Long Term Space Plan. In this context, a planetary exploration program is being considered, which would utilize Canadian space robotic technologies in this new arena.

  11. Effects of Deception on Children's Understanding of Second-Order False Belief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    This research examined two questions: effects of deception on children's understanding of second-order false belief, and possible effects of number of siblings on second-order performance. Kindergarten children responded to 3 second-order problems that varied in the presence and the nature of deception. Performance was better on the problems…

  12. The Second-Order Factor Structure of the 16 PF: A Four Factor Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marth, Joseph R.; Newman, Isadore

    A review of the research into the second-order factor structure of the 16 Personality Factor Questionnaire (16 PF) indicates disagreement about the number and meaning of the second-order factors. However, repeated analyses of the second-order factor structure have consistently found fewer than the eight factors suggested by Catell (1973) and the…

  13. Second-order perturbation corrections to singles and doubles coupled-cluster methods: General theory and application to the valence optimized doubles model

    SciTech Connect

    Gwaltney, Steven R.; Sherrill, C. David; Head-Gordon, Martin; Krylov, Anna I.

    2000-09-01

    We present a general perturbative method for correcting a singles and doubles coupled-cluster energy. The coupled-cluster wave function is used to define a similarity-transformed Hamiltonian, which is partitioned into a zeroth-order part that the reference problem solves exactly plus a first-order perturbation. Standard perturbation theory through second-order provides the leading correction. Applied to the valence optimized doubles (VOD) approximation to the full-valence complete active space self-consistent field method, the second-order correction, which we call (2), captures dynamical correlation effects through external single, double, and semi-internal triple and quadruple substitutions. A factorization approximation reduces the cost of the quadruple substitutions to only sixth order in the size of the molecule. A series of numerical tests are presented showing that VOD(2) is stable and well-behaved provided that the VOD reference is also stable. The second-order correction is also general to standard unwindowed coupled-cluster energies such as the coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) method itself, and the equations presented here fully define the corresponding CCSD(2) energy. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Synthesis, crystal structure and second-order nonlinear optical property of a novel pentanary selenide (K3I)[InB12(InSe4)3].

    PubMed

    Guo, Sheng-Ping; Chi, Yang; Liu, Bin-Wen; Guo, Guo-Cong

    2016-06-21

    A novel pentanary selenide (K3I)[InB12(InSe4)3] was obtained via a high-temperature solid-state method. It crystallizes in the hexagonal space group P6322 which features an InSe4 tetrahedron consolidated B12 icosahedron and 1-D chain constructed by InSe6 octahedron and B12Se12 cluster alternatively connected along the c-axis. Second-order nonlinear optical property measurement shows that it is second harmonic generation-active. Theory calculation indicates that it is an indirect semiconductor with the energy gap of 1.15 eV.

  15. Second-order hydrodynamics and universality in non-conformal holographic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinert, Philipp; Probst, Jonas

    2016-12-01

    We study second-order hydrodynamic transport in strongly coupled non-conformal field theories with holographic gravity duals in asymptotically anti-de Sitter space. We first derive new Kubo formulae for five second-order transport coefficients in non-conformal fluids in (3 + 1) dimensions. We then apply them to holographic RG flows induced by scalar operators of dimension Δ = 3. For general background solutions of the dual bulk geometry, we find explicit expressions for the five transport coefficients at infinite coupling and show that a specific combination, tilde{H}=2η {τ}_{π }-2(κ -{κ}^{ast})-{λ}_2 , always vanishes. We prove analytically that the Haack-Yarom identity H = 2 ητ π - 4λ1 - λ2 = 0, which is known to be true for conformal holographic fluids at infinite coupling, also holds when taking into account leading non-conformal corrections. The numerical results we obtain for two specific families of RG flows suggest that H vanishes regardless of conformal symmetry. Our work provides further evidence that the Haack-Yarom identity H = 0 may be universally satisfied by strongly coupled fluids.

  16. A parallel second-order adaptive mesh algorithm for incompressible flow in porous media.

    PubMed

    Pau, George S H; Almgren, Ann S; Bell, John B; Lijewski, Michael J

    2009-11-28

    In this paper, we present a second-order accurate adaptive algorithm for solving multi-phase, incompressible flow in porous media. We assume a multi-phase form of Darcy's law with relative permeabilities given as a function of the phase saturation. The remaining equations express conservation of mass for the fluid constituents. In this setting, the total velocity, defined to be the sum of the phase velocities, is divergence free. The basic integration method is based on a total-velocity splitting approach in which we solve a second-order elliptic pressure equation to obtain a total velocity. This total velocity is then used to recast component conservation equations as nonlinear hyperbolic equations. Our approach to adaptive refinement uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement of the grids in both space and time. The integration algorithm on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which coarse grids are advanced in time, fine grids are advanced multiple steps to reach the same time as the coarse grids and the data at different levels are then synchronized. The single-grid algorithm is described briefly, but the emphasis here is on the time-stepping procedure for the adaptive hierarchy. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithm's accuracy and convergence properties and to illustrate the behaviour of the method.

  17. A Parallel Second-Order Adaptive Mesh Algorithm for Incompressible Flow in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Pau, George Shu Heng; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we present a second-order accurate adaptive algorithm for solving multiphase, incompressible flows in porous media. We assume a multiphase form of Darcy's law with relative permeabilities given as a function of the phase saturation. The remaining equations express conservation of mass for the fluid constituents. In this setting the total velocity, defined to be the sum of the phase velocities, is divergence-free. The basic integration method is based on a total-velocity splitting approach in which we solve a second-order elliptic pressure equation to obtain a total velocity. This total velocity is then used to recast component conservation equations as nonlinear hyperbolic equations. Our approach to adaptive refinement uses a nested hierarchy of logically rectangular grids with simultaneous refinement of the grids in both space and time. The integration algorithm on the grid hierarchy is a recursive procedure in which coarse grids are advanced in time, fine grids areadvanced multiple steps to reach the same time as the coarse grids and the data atdifferent levels are then synchronized. The single grid algorithm is described briefly,but the emphasis here is on the time-stepping procedure for the adaptive hierarchy. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithm's accuracy and convergence properties and to illustrate the behavior of the method.

  18. SECOND-ORDER SOLUTIONS OF COSMOLOGICAL PERTURBATION IN THE MATTER-DOMINATED ERA

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Noh, Hyerim; Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    2012-06-10

    We present the growing mode solutions of cosmological perturbations to the second order in the matter-dominated era. We also present several gauge-invariant combinations of perturbation variables to the second order in the most general fluid context. Based on these solutions, we study the Newtonian correspondence of relativistic perturbations to the second order. In addition to the previously known exact relativistic/Newtonian correspondence of density and velocity perturbations to the second order in the comoving gauge, here we show that in the sub-horizon limit we have the correspondences for density, velocity, and potential perturbations in the zero-shear gauge and in the uniform-expansion gauge to the second order. Density perturbation in the uniform-curvature gauge also shows the correspondence to the second order in the sub-horizon scale. We also identify the relativistic gravitational potential that shows exact correspondence to the Newtonian one to the second order.

  19. On the properness condition for modal analysis of non-symmetric second-order systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouisse, Morvan; Foltête, Emmanuel

    2011-02-01

    Non-symmetric second-order systems can be found in several engineering contexts, including vibroacoustics, rotordynamics, or active control. In this paper, the notion of properness for complex modes is extended to the case of non-self-adjoint problems. The properness condition is related to the ability of a set of complex modes to represent in an exact way the behavior of a physical second-order system, meaning that the modes are the solutions of a quadratic eigenvalue problem whose matrices are those of a physical system. This property can be used to identify the damping matrices which may be difficult to obtain with mathematical modeling techniques. The first part of the paper demonstrates the properness condition for non symmetric systems in general. In the second part, the authors propose a methodology to enforce that condition in order to perform an optimal reconstruction of the "closest" physical system starting from a given basis complex modes. The last part is dedicated to numerical and experimental illustrations of the proposed methodology. A simulated academic test case is first used to investigate the numerical aspects of the method. A physical application is then considered in the context of rotordynamics. Finally, an experimental test case is presented using a structure with an active control feedback. An extension of the LSCF identification technique is also introduced to identify both left and right complex mode shapes from measured frequency response functions.

  20. Crystal structures and second-order NLO properties of borogermanates

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian-Han; Kong, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2012-11-15

    Borogermanates are a class of very important compounds in materials chemistry. In this paper, the syntheses, structures, and properties of metal borogermanates are reviewed. Organically templated borogermanates with zeolite-like open-frameworks show potential applications as microporous materials. Many compounds in alkali or alkaline-earth borogermanate systems are structurally acentric or polar, some of which exhibit excellent Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) coefficients, wide transparency regions, and high optical-damage thresholds as well as excellent thermal stability. Most of the lanthanide borogermanates are structurally centrosymmetric and not SHG active; however, they are able to emit strong luminescence in visible or near-IR region. In the B-rich compounds, BO{sub 3} and BO{sub 4} groups can be polymerized into a variety of discrete polynuclear anionic cluster units or extended architectures via B-O-B bridges; whereas in the Ge-rich compounds, GeO{sub 4} and GeO{sub 6} polyhedra can also be polymerized. The combinations of borate and germinate afforded rich structural and topological types. - Graphical abstract: Borogermanates are a class of very important compounds in materials chemistry. Both BO{sub x} (x=3, 4) and GeO{sub y} (y=4, 6) polyhedra can be polymerized into a variety of discrete polynuclear anionic cluster units or extended architectures. The combinations of borate and germanate groups in the same oxide framework not only give rise to a rich structural chemistry, but also afford many polar compounds with good SHG properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Borogermanates are a class of new materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They feature to be the combination of B and Ge atoms into the same oxide framework. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They can form a large number of novel 2D and 3D framework structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some of them are acentric or polar with moderate strong SHG responses.

  1. First and second order operator splitting methods for the phase field crystal equation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Geun; Shin, Jaemin; Lee, June-Yub

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we present operator splitting methods for solving the phase field crystal equation which is a model for the microstructural evolution of two-phase systems on atomic length and diffusive time scales. A core idea of the methods is to decompose the original equation into linear and nonlinear subequations, in which the linear subequation has a closed-form solution in the Fourier space. We apply a nonlinear Newton-type iterative method to solve the nonlinear subequation at the implicit time level and thus a considerably large time step can be used. By combining these subequations, we achieve the first- and second-order accuracy in time. We present numerical experiments to show the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed methods.

  2. Relaxation approximations to second-order traffic flow models by high-resolution schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolos, I.K.; Delis, A.I.; Papageorgiou, M.

    2015-03-10

    A relaxation-type approximation of second-order non-equilibrium traffic models, written in conservation or balance law form, is considered. Using the relaxation approximation, the nonlinear equations are transformed to a semi-linear diagonilizable problem with linear characteristic variables and stiff source terms with the attractive feature that neither Riemann solvers nor characteristic decompositions are in need. In particular, it is only necessary to provide the flux and source term functions and an estimate of the characteristic speeds. To discretize the resulting relaxation system, high-resolution reconstructions in space are considered. Emphasis is given on a fifth-order WENO scheme and its performance. The computations reported demonstrate the simplicity and versatility of relaxation schemes as numerical solvers.

  3. A second-order Markov process for modeling diffusive motion through spatial discretization.

    PubMed

    Sant, Marco; Papadopoulos, George K; Theodorou, Doros N

    2008-01-14

    A new "mesoscopic" stochastic model has been developed to describe the diffusive behavior of a system of particles at equilibrium. The model is based on discretizing space into slabs by drawing equispaced parallel planes along a coordinate direction. A central role is played by the probability that a particle exits a slab via the face opposite to the one through which it entered (transmission probability), as opposed to exiting via the same face through which it entered (reflection probability). A simple second-order Markov process invoking this probability is developed, leading to an expression for the self-diffusivity, applicable for large slab widths, consistent with a continuous formulation of diffusional motion. This model is validated via molecular dynamics simulations in a bulk system of soft spheres across a wide range of densities.

  4. Local explicitly correlated second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory with pair natural orbitals.

    PubMed

    Tew, David P; Helmich, Benjamin; Hättig, Christof

    2011-08-21

    We explore using a pair natural orbital analysis of approximate first-order pair functions as means to truncate the space of both virtual and complementary auxiliary orbitals in the context of explicitly correlated F12 methods using localised occupied orbitals. We demonstrate that this offers an attractive procedure and that only 10-40 virtual orbitals per significant pair are required to obtain second-order valence correlation energies to within 1-2% of the basis set limit. Moreover, for this level of virtual truncation, only 10-40 complementary auxiliary orbitals per pair are required for an accurate resolution of the identity in the computation of the three- and four-electron integrals that arise in explicitly correlated methods.

  5. Mesh independent convergence of the modified inexact Newton method for a second order nonlinear problem

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T; Pasciak, J E; Vassilevski, P S

    2004-09-20

    In this paper, we consider an inexact Newton method applied to a second order nonlinear problem with higher order nonlinearities. We provide conditions under which the method has a mesh-independent rate of convergence. To do this, we are required to first, set up the problem on a scale of Hilbert spaces and second, to devise a special iterative technique which converges in a higher than first order Sobolev norm. We show that the linear (Jacobian) system solved in Newton's method can be replaced with one iterative step provided that the initial nonlinear iterate is accurate enough. The closeness criteria can be taken independent of the mesh size. Finally, the results of numerical experiments are given to support the theory.

  6. Generalized solutions of initial-boundary value problems for second-order hyperbolic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeyeva, L. A.; Zakir'yanova, G. K.

    2011-07-01

    The method of boundary integral equations is developed as applied to initial-boundary value problems for strictly hyperbolic systems of second-order equations characteristic of anisotropic media dynamics. Based on the theory of distributions (generalized functions), solutions are constructed in the space of generalized functions followed by passing to integral representations and classical solutions. Solutions are considered in the class of singular functions with discontinuous derivatives, which are typical of physical problems describing shock waves. The uniqueness of the solutions to the initial-boundary value problems is proved under certain smoothness conditions imposed on the boundary functions. The Green's matrix of the system and new fundamental matrices based on it are used to derive integral analogues of the Gauss, Kirchhoff, and Green formulas for solutions and solving singular boundary integral equations.

  7. First and second order operator splitting methods for the phase field crystal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Geun; Shin, Jaemin; Lee, June-Yub

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we present operator splitting methods for solving the phase field crystal equation which is a model for the microstructural evolution of two-phase systems on atomic length and diffusive time scales. A core idea of the methods is to decompose the original equation into linear and nonlinear subequations, in which the linear subequation has a closed-form solution in the Fourier space. We apply a nonlinear Newton-type iterative method to solve the nonlinear subequation at the implicit time level and thus a considerably large time step can be used. By combining these subequations, we achieve the first- and second-order accuracy in time. We present numerical experiments to show the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed methods.

  8. Second order rate constants for intramolecular conversions: Application to gas-phase NMR relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. H.; Lazaar, K. I.

    1983-09-01

    The usually quoted expression for the second order rate constant, for a unimolecular reaction at the low pressure limit, is valid only for strictly irreversible processes. Its application to isomerization reactions (which are to some extent reversible) is demonstrably in error; corrected expressions have been published. Attention is directed to intramolecular conversions over low barriers, for which the inappropriateness of the unidirectional expression becomes obvious. For such isomerizations we propose a model which incorporates only operationally observable states, so that an essential conceptual ambiguity is avoided. Use of this model is illustrated for the syn⇄anti conversions of methyl nitrite, derived from a gas phase NMR coalescence curve (Mc:Tc). The present data suggest that during isomerization the alkyl nitrites may not be completely ergodic on a time scale of 10-9 s. A regional phase-space model is proposed which has the appropriate formalism to account for this behavior.

  9. Discrete Kalman filtering equations of second-order form for control-structure interaction simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alvin, K. F.; Belvin, W. Keith

    1991-01-01

    A second-order form of discrete Kalman filtering equations is proposed as a candidate state estimator for efficient simulations of control-structure interactions in coupled physical coordinate configurations as opposed to decoupled modal coordinates. The resulting matrix equation of the present state estimator consists of the same symmetric, sparse N x N coupled matrices of the governing structural dynamics equations as opposed to unsymmetric 2N x 2N state space-based estimators. Thus, in addition to substantial computational efficiency improvement, the present estimator can be applied to control-structure design optimization for which the physical coordinates associated with the mass, damping and stiffness matrices of the structure are needed instead of modal coordinates.

  10. First-Order System Least-Squares for Second-Order Elliptic Problems with Discontinuous Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manteuffel, Thomas A.; McCormick, Stephen F.; Starke, Gerhard

    1996-01-01

    The first-order system least-squares methodology represents an alternative to standard mixed finite element methods. Among its advantages is the fact that the finite element spaces approximating the pressure and flux variables are not restricted by the inf-sup condition and that the least-squares functional itself serves as an appropriate error measure. This paper studies the first-order system least-squares approach for scalar second-order elliptic boundary value problems with discontinuous coefficients. Ellipticity of an appropriately scaled least-squares bilinear form of the size of the jumps in the coefficients leading to adequate finite element approximation results. The occurrence of singularities at interface corners and cross-points is discussed. and a weighted least-squares functional is introduced to handle such cases. Numerical experiments are presented for two test problems to illustrate the performance of this approach.

  11. Second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of nonelectrically poled DR1-PMMA guest-host polymers.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Atsushi; Sato, Yasuaki; Ito, Kazuma; Murakami, Kenta; Tamaki, Yasuaki; Mase, Nobuyuki; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Tasaka, Shigeru

    2013-11-27

    Guest-host nonlinear optical polymers have attracted considerable interest due to their applications in fast electro-optical modulators and wavelength converters. In general, the electrical poling procedures, for which high DC external fields are applied, are necessary for aligning guest chromophores in polar order and activating the second-order nonlinearity. We present the nonelectrical poling behaviors for guest-host polymers: DR1 (4-[ethyl (2-hydroxyethyl) amino]-4'-nitroazobenzene) is the guest, and PMMA (poly (methyl methacrylate)) is the host. Second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility was induced in the conventional guest-host polymers after annealing at temperatures above the glass transition points of the host polymer even without applying the external fields. This phenomenon did not occur in the side-chain polymers, where the guests were directly bonded to the host chains. The guest polar alignments were most likely generated from the guest hydroxyl groups chemisorbing on the substrates. The polar alignments of the guest formed not only near the surface of the substrate, but also inside the host polymers. The optimized conditions for the SHG conversion were examined in the context of the polymer film thickness and guest concentration. The nonelectrical poling techniques described in this study are useful for enhancing the surface nonlinearity in the several materials, and they will be useful for further developments in nanophotonics and plasmonics.

  12. New organic second-order nonlinear optical crystals of benzylidene-aniline derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunekawa, Tetsuya; Gotoh, Tetsuya; Mataki, Hiroshi; Kondo, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Seiji; Iwamoto, Masao

    1990-12-01

    The benzylidene-aniline derivative with an electron-donating group at 4-position and an electron-accepting group at 4'-position has been suggested by MO calculation, to have a small molecular dipole moment but a large second-order hyperpolarizability in comparison with those of p-nitroaniline analogous molecules, hence, to be a promising molecule on searching for a new organic crystal with large second-order optical nonlinearity. Chemical modification of the molecule suggested led to a discovery of a series of crystals having high activities in second harmonic generation ( SHG ) ; one of which, 4'-nitrobenzylidene-3-acetamino-4-methoxyaniline ( MNBA ) crystal in monodinic Cc with four molecules per unit cell showed larger powder SHG than 2-methyl-4-mtroaniline ( MNA ) crystal in a preliminary powder SHG experiment. A strongly polarized non-centrosymmetric molecular packing has been achieved in this crystal by the presence of intermolecular hydrogen bond between neighboring acetainino groups. Calculation by an oriented gas model with the use of the detailed structural data from X-ray analysis for the MNBA crystal predicted that the crystal may have up to ca. 2.9 times larger macroscopic optical nonlinearity than MNA crystal. This has been experimentally proven by measuring the d for SHG by Maker fringe method. The largest d coefficient was found to be dii , and the value obtained was 454 pm/V which is 1.8 times larger than d11 of MNA crystal and 13 times larger than of lithium mobate ( ) crystal.

  13. Real-time fringe pattern demodulation with a second-order digital phase-locked loop.

    PubMed

    Gdeisat, M A; Burton, D R; Lalor, M J

    2000-10-10

    The use of a second-order digital phase-locked loop (DPLL) to demodulate fringe patterns is presented. The second-order DPLL has better tracking ability and more noise immunity than the first-order loop. Consequently, the second-order DPLL is capable of demodulating a wider range of fringe patterns than the first-order DPLL. A basic analysis of the first- and the second-order loops is given, and a performance comparison between the first- and the second-order DPLL's in analyzing fringe patterns is presented. The implementation of the second-order loop in real time on a commercial parallel image processing system is described. Fringe patterns are grabbed and processed, and the resultant phase maps are displayed concurrently.

  14. Structural changes of small amplitude kinetic Alfvén solitary waves due to second-order corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Cheong R.

    2015-10-01

    The structural changes of kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (KASWs) due to higher-order terms are investigated. While the first-order differential equation for KASWs provides the dispersion relation for kinetic Alfvén waves, the second-order differential equation describes the structural changes of the solitary waves due to higher-order nonlinearity. The reductive perturbation method is used to obtain the second-order and third-order partial differential equations; then, Kodama and Taniuti's technique [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 45, 298 (1978)] is applied in order to remove the secularities in the third-order differential equations and derive a linear second-order inhomogeneous differential equation. The solution to this new second-order equation indicates that, as the amplitude increases, the hump-type Korteweg-de Vries solution is concentrated more around the center position of the soliton and that dip-type structures form near the two edges of the soliton. This result has a close relationship with the interpretation of the complex KASW structures observed in space with satellites.

  15. Structural changes of small amplitude kinetic Alfvén solitary waves due to second-order corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Cheong R.

    2015-10-15

    The structural changes of kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (KASWs) due to higher-order terms are investigated. While the first-order differential equation for KASWs provides the dispersion relation for kinetic Alfvén waves, the second-order differential equation describes the structural changes of the solitary waves due to higher-order nonlinearity. The reductive perturbation method is used to obtain the second-order and third-order partial differential equations; then, Kodama and Taniuti's technique [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 45, 298 (1978)] is applied in order to remove the secularities in the third-order differential equations and derive a linear second-order inhomogeneous differential equation. The solution to this new second-order equation indicates that, as the amplitude increases, the hump-type Korteweg-de Vries solution is concentrated more around the center position of the soliton and that dip-type structures form near the two edges of the soliton. This result has a close relationship with the interpretation of the complex KASW structures observed in space with satellites.

  16. Second order scheme for Maxwell's equations with discontinuous dielectric permittivity on structured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismagilov, Timur Z.

    2013-10-01

    A second order finite volume scheme for numerical solution of Maxwell's equations with discontinuous dielectric permittivity on structured meshes is suggested. The scheme is based on approaches of Godunov, Lax-Wendroff and Van Leer. The distinctive feature of the suggested scheme is calculation and limitation of derivatives that ensures second order of approximation even in the cells adjacent to dielectric permittivity discontinuity. Numerical tests for problems with linear and curvilinear dielectric permittivity discontinuities confirm second order of approximation.

  17. Detection, discrimination and integration of second-order orientation information in strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Behzad; Allen, Harriet A; Hess, Robert F

    2005-08-01

    To better understand the nature of the cortical deficit in amblyopia we undertook a systematic investigation of second-order processing in 8 amblyopic and 8 normal observers. We investigated local detection, discrimination and global integration. Our local stimulus consisted of a Gaussian patch of fractal noise multiplied by a 1-d sinusoidal modulator. Our global stimulus consisted of an array of such elements. We revealed second-order detection deficits for stimuli with equi-visible carriers. Orientation discrimination for an isolated second-order patch was comparable in normal and amblyopic eyes. We showed that pure integration of second-order patterns can be normal in amblyopia.

  18. Linear matrix inequalities for analysis and control of linear vector second-order systems

    SciTech Connect

    Adegas, Fabiano D.; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2014-10-06

    Many dynamical systems are modeled as vector second-order differential equations. This paper presents analysis and synthesis conditions in terms of LMI with explicit dependence in the coefficient matrices of vector second-order systems. These conditions benefit from the separation between the Lyapunov matrix and the system matrices by introducing matrix multipliers, which potentially reduce conservativeness in hard control problems. Multipliers facilitate the usage of parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions as certificates of stability of uncertain and time-varying vector second-order systems. The conditions introduced in this work have the potential to increase the practice of analyzing and controlling systems directly in vector second-order form.

  19. Space weather activities in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    The Sun has long been understood as a source of energy for mankind. Only in the more modern times has it also been seen as a source of disturbances in the space environment of the Earth, but also of the other planets and the heliosphere. Space weather research had an early start in Europe with investigations of Birkeland, Fitzgerald and Lodge, ultimately leading to an understanding of geomagnetic storms and their relation to the Sun. Today, European space weather activities range from the study of the Sun, through the inner heliosphere, to the magnetosphere, ionosphere, atmosphere, down to ground level effects. We will give an overview of European space weather activities and focus on the chain of events from Sun to Earth.

  20. Extended observer based on adaptive second order sliding mode control for a fixed wing UAV.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Herman; Salas-Peña, Oscar S; León-Morales, Jesús de

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the design of attitude and airspeed controllers for a fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicle. An adaptive second order sliding mode control is proposed for improving performance under different operating conditions and is robust in presence of external disturbances. Moreover, this control does not require the knowledge of disturbance bounds and avoids overestimation of the control gains. Furthermore, in order to implement this controller, an extended observer is designed to estimate unmeasurable states as well as external disturbances. Additionally, sufficient conditions are given to guarantee the closed-loop stability of the observer based control. Finally, using a full 6 degree of freedom model, simulation results are obtained where the performance of the proposed method is compared against active disturbance rejection based on sliding mode control.

  1. Optimal tracking and second order sliding power control of the DFIG wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeddaim, S.; Betka, A.; Charrouf, O.

    2017-02-01

    In the present paper, an optimal operation of a grid-connected variable speed wind turbine equipped with a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) is presented. The proposed cascaded nonlinear controller is designed to perform two main objectives. In the outer loop, a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm based on fuzzy logic theory is designed to permanently extract the optimal aerodynamic energy, whereas in the inner loop, a second order sliding mode control (2-SM) is applied to achieve smooth regulation of both stator active and reactive powers quantities. The obtained simulation results show a permanent track of the MPP point regardless of the turbine power-speed slope moreover the proposed sliding mode control strategy presents attractive features such as chattering-free, compared to the conventional first order sliding technique (1-SM).

  2. Treatment of Second-Order Structures of Proteins Using Oxygen Radio Frequency Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Nakahigashi, Akari; Liu, Hao; Goto, Masaaki

    2010-08-01

    Decomposition characteristics of second-order structures of proteins are determined using an oxygen radio frequency (RF) plasma sterilizer in order to prevent infectious proteins from contaminating medical equipment in hospitals. The removal of casein protein as a test protein with a concentration of 50 mg/cm2 on the plane substrate requires approximately 8 h when singlet atomic oxygen is irradiated. The peak intensity of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra of the β-sheet structures decreases at approximately the same rate as those of the α-helix and first-order structures of proteins. Active oxygen has a sufficient oxidation energy to dissociate hydrogen bonds within the β-sheet structure.

  3. Second-Order-accurate Schemes for Magnetohydrodynamics with Divergence-free Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balsara, Dinshaw S.

    2004-03-01

    MHD on structured meshes and MHD on unstructured meshes because such analogies can guide the design of MHD schemes and AMR-MHD techniques on unstructured meshes. The present paper also lays out the roadmap for designing MHD schemes for structured and unstructured meshes that have better than second-order accuracy in space and time. All the schemes designed here are shown to be second-order-accurate. We also show that the accuracy does not depend on the quality of the Riemann solver. We have compared the numerical dissipation of the unsplit MHD schemes presented here with the dimensionally split MHD schemes that have been used in the past and found the former to be superior. The dissipation does depend on the Riemann solver, but the dependence becomes weaker as the quality of the interpolation is improved. Several stringent test problems are presented to show that the methods work, including problems involving high-velocity flows in low-plasma-β magnetospheric environments. Similar advances can be made in other fields, such as electromagnetics, radiation MHD, and incompressible flow, that rely on a Stokes-law type of update strategy.

  4. A Comparison Study of Second-Order Screening Designs and Their Extension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    40 vii Page III. Effect of Heredity and Sparsity on Second-Order Screening Design Performance...second- order screening designs with respect to the assumptions of both sparsity (factor or effect) and heredity (strong or weak). To date, evaluation of...screening design per- formance has assumed both factor sparsity and strong effect heredity . The article is currently under review for publication in

  5. Post processing with first- and second-order hidden Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghva, Kazem; Poudel, Srijana; Malreddy, Spandana

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present the implementation and evaluation of first order and second order Hidden Markov Models to identify and correct OCR errors in the post processing of books. Our experiments show that the first order model approximately corrects 10% of the errors with 100% precision, while the second order model corrects a higher percentage of errors with much lower precision.

  6. Operator Factorization and the Solution of Second-Order Linear Ordinary Differential Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robin, W.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of second-order linear ordinary differential equations is reviewed from the standpoint of the operator factorization approach to the solution of ordinary differential equations (ODE). Using the operator factorization approach, the general second-order linear ODE is solved, exactly, in quadratures and the resulting…

  7. Assessing Stability and Change in a Second-Order Confirmatory Factor Model of Meaning in Life.

    PubMed

    Krause, Neal; Hayward, R David

    2014-04-01

    Research indicates that meaning in life is an important correlate of health and well-being. However, relatively little is known about the way a sense of meaning may change over time. The purpose of this study is to explore two ways of assessing change in meaning within a second-order confirmatory factor analysis framework. First, tests are conducted to see if the first and second-order factor loadings and measurement error terms are invariant over time. Second, a largely overlooked technique is used to assess change and stability in meaning at the second-order level. Findings from a nationwide survey reveal that the first and second-order factor loadings are invariant of time. Moreover, the second-order measurement error terms, but not the first-order measurement error terms, are invariant, as well. The results further reveal that standard ways of assessing stability mask significant change in meaning that is due largely to regression to the mean.

  8. Second order gravitational effects on CMB temperature anisotropy in {lambda} dominated flat universes

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Kenji; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2008-05-15

    We study second order gravitational effects of local inhomogeneities on the cosmic microwave background radiation in flat universes with matter and a cosmological constant {lambda}. We find that the general relativistic correction to the Newtonian approximation is negligible at second order provided that the size of the inhomogeneous region is sufficiently smaller than the horizon scale. For a spherically symmetric top-hat type quasilinear perturbation, the first order temperature fluctuation corresponding to the linear integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect is enhanced (suppressed) by the second order one for a compensated void (lump). As a function of redshift of the local inhomogeneity, the second order temperature fluctuations due to evolution of the gravitational potential have a peak before the matter-{lambda} equality epoch for a fixed comoving size and a density contrast. The second order gravitational effects from local quasilinear inhomogeneities at a redshift z{approx}1 may significantly affect the cosmic microwave background.

  9. Second-order diffraction forces on an array of vertical cylinders in bichromatic bidirectional waves

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, J.H.; Williams, A.N.

    1995-02-01

    A complete second-order solution is presented for the hydrodynamic forces due to the action of bichromatic, bidirectional waves on an array of bottom-mounted, surface-piercing cylinders of arbitrary cross section in water of uniform finite depth. Based on the constant structural cross section, the first-order problem is solved utilizing a two-dimensional Green function approach, while an assisting radiation potential approach is used to obtain the hydrodynamic loads due to the second-order potential. Results are presented which illustrate the influence of wave directionality on the second-order sum and difference frequency hydrodynamic forces on a two-cylinder array. It is found that wave directionality may have a significant influence on the second-order hydrodynamic forces on these arrays and that the assumption of unidirectional waves does not always lead to conservative estimates of the second-order loading.

  10. US Space Situational Awareness activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Stephen, , Col; Hand, Kelly; Smith, Bradley, , Col

    A new ESA Programme on Space Situational Awareness (SSA) has been approved during the ESA Council at Ministerial level in November 2008. A preparatory phase is in progress, covering the timeframe 2009 -2012. It concentrates on the architectural design of the SSA System, its governance and data policy, as well as on the provision of precursor services based on the federation of existing National and European assets. A continuation of the SSA programme will be proposed at the next Ministerial Council for the years 2012 and onwards. The SSA Preparatory Programme covers three distinct segments, namely: -Space Surveillance and Tracking of artificial objects orbiting the Earth -Space Weather -Near Earth Objects Each of the above segments has a strong relation with Science and is supported by specific RD Programmes at National, EC and ESA levels. In this paper, the scientific aspects of the three SSA Segments are outlined and the following main topics developed: • Space Surveillance: statistical models of the evolution of the space debris population in Earth-bound orbits, study of active mitigation measures, impact analysis, tracking and char-acterisation principles based on radar and optical techniques. • Space Weather: awareness of the natural space environment, detection and forecasting of space weather effects and interferences, analysis of appropriate ground and space-based sensors for the monitoring of the Sun, the solar wind, the radiation belts, the magnetosphere and the ionosphere. • Near Earth Objects (NEOs): methods for determination of physical characteristics of newly discovered objects, study of appropriate sensors based on radar and optical techniques, iden-tification and ranking of collision risks of NEOs with the Earth, study of possible mitigation measures (e.g. Don Quichotes project). The research topics undertaken during the preparatory programme, as well as those foreseen during the next phase, possibly with a strong international cooperation

  11. The effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayati, I.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the second-order hydrodynamic effects on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine. Second-order hydrodynamics induce loads and motions at the sum- and difference-frequencies of the incident waves. These effects have often been ignored in offshore wind analysis, under the assumption that they are significantly smaller than first-order effects. The sum- and difference-frequency loads can, however, excite eigenfrequencies of a floating system, leading to large oscillations that strain the mooring system or vibrations that cause fatigue damage to the structure. Observations of supposed second-order responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) offshore basin suggest that these effects might be more important than originally expected. These observations inspired interest in investigating how second-order excitation affects floating offshore wind turbines and whether second-order hydrodynamics should be included in offshore wind simulation tools like FAST. In this work, the effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a floating semisubmersible offshore wind turbine are investigated. Because FAST is currently unable to account for second-order effects, a method to assess these effects was applied in which linearized properties of the floating wind system derived from FAST (including the 6x6 mass and stiffness matrices) are used by WAMIT to solve the first- and second-order hydrodynamics problems in the frequency domain. The method was applied to the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation OC4-DeepCwind semisubmersible platform, supporting the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW baseline wind turbine. In this paper, the loads and response of the system caused by the second-order hydrodynamics are analysed and compared to the first-order hydrodynamic loads and induced motions in the frequency domain. Further, the second-order loads

  12. Effects of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on a Semisubmersible Floating Offshore Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bayati, I.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the second-order hydrodynamic effects on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine. Second-order hydrodynamics induce loads and motions at the sum- and difference-frequencies of the incident waves. These effects have often been ignored in offshore wind analysis, under the assumption that they are significantly smaller than first-order effects. The sum- and difference-frequency loads can, however, excite eigenfrequencies of the system, leading to large oscillations that strain the mooring system or vibrations that cause fatigue damage to the structure. Observations of supposed second-order responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium at the MARIN offshore basin suggest that these effects might be more important than originally expected. These observations inspired interest in investigating how second-order excitation affects floating offshore wind turbines and whether second-order hydrodynamics should be included in offshore wind simulation tools like FAST in the future. In this work, the effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a floating semisubmersible offshore wind turbine are investigated. Because FAST is currently unable to account for second-order effects, a method to assess these effects was applied in which linearized properties of the floating wind system derived from FAST (including the 6x6 mass and stiffness matrices) are used by WAMIT to solve the first- and second-order hydrodynamics problems in the frequency domain. The method has been applied to the OC4-DeepCwind semisubmersible platform, supporting the NREL 5-MW baseline wind turbine. The loads and response of the system due to the second-order hydrodynamics are analysed and compared to first-order hydrodynamic loads and induced motions in the frequency domain. Further, the second-order loads and induced response data are compared to the loads and motions induced by aerodynamic loading as solved by FAST.

  13. Inferring Genetic Interactions via a Data-Driven Second Order Model

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ci-Ren; Hung, Ying-Chao; Chen, Chung-Ming; Shieh, Grace S.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic/transcriptional regulatory interactions are shown to predict partial components of signaling pathways, which have been recognized as vital to complex human diseases. Both activator (A) and repressor (R) are known to coregulate their common target gene (T). Xu et al. (2002) proposed to model this coregulation by a fixed second order response surface (called the RS algorithm), in which T is a function of A, R, and AR. Unfortunately, the RS algorithm did not result in a sufficient number of genetic interactions (GIs) when it was applied to a group of 51 yeast genes in a pilot study. Thus, we propose a data-driven second order model (DDSOM), an approximation to the non-linear transcriptional interactions, to infer genetic and transcriptional regulatory interactions. For each triplet of genes of interest (A, R, and T), we regress the expression of T at time t + 1 on the expression of A, R, and AR at time t. Next, these well-fitted regression models (viewed as points in R3) are collected, and the center of these points is used to identify triples of genes having the A-R-T relationship or GIs. The DDSOM and RS algorithms are first compared on inferring transcriptional compensation interactions of a group of yeast genes in DNA synthesis and DNA repair using microarray gene expression data; the DDSOM algorithm results in higher modified true positive rate (about 75%) than that of the RS algorithm, checked against quantitative RT-polymerase chain reaction results. These validated GIs are reported, among which some coincide with certain interactions in DNA repair and genome instability pathways in yeast. This suggests that the DDSOM algorithm has potential to predict pathway components. Further, both algorithms are applied to predict transcriptional regulatory interactions of 63 yeast genes. Checked against the known transcriptional regulatory interactions queried from TRANSFAC, the proposed also performs better than the RS algorithm. PMID:22563331

  14. Extravehicular activity space suit interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoog, A. Ingemar; McBarron, James W.; Severin, Guy I.

    1995-10-01

    The European Agency (ESA) and the Russian Space Agency (RKA) are jointly developing a new space suit system for improved extravehicular activity (EVA) capabilities in support of the MIR Space Station Programme, the EVA Suit 2000. Recent national policy agreements between the U.S. and Russia on planned cooperations in manned space also include joint extravehicular activity (EVA). With an increased number of space suit systems and a higher operational frequency towards the end of this century an improved interoperability for both routine and emergency operations is of eminent importance. It is thus timely to report the current status of ongoing work on international EVA interoperability being conducted by the Committee on EVA Protocols and Operations of the International Academy of Astronautics initialed in 1991. This paper summarises the current EVA interoperability issues to be harmonised and presents quantified vehicle interface requirements for the current U.S. Shuttle EMU and Russian MIR Orlan DMA and the new European/Russian EVA Suit 2000 extravehicular systems. Major critical/incompatible interfaces for suits/mothercraft of different combinations arc discussed, and recommendations for standardisations given.

  15. The second-order differential phase contrast and its retrieval for imaging with x-ray Talbot interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yi; Tang Xiangyang

    2012-12-15

    simulations show that, in addition to small-angle scattering, the contrast generated by the second-order derivative is magnified substantially by the ratio of detector cell dimension over grating period, which plays a significant role in dark-field imaging implemented with the Talbot interferometry. Conclusions: The analytic formulae derived in this work to characterize the second-order differential phase contrast in the dark-field imaging implemented with the Talbot interferometry are of significance, which may initiate more activities in the research and development of x-ray differential phase contrast imaging for extensive preclinical and eventually clinical applications.

  16. In unison: First- and second-order information combine for integration of shape information.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ken W S; Dickinson, J Edwin; Badcock, David R

    2016-09-01

    The modulation of orientation around radial frequency (RF) patterns and RF textures is globally processed in both cases. This psychophysical study investigates whether the combination-a textured RF path obtained by applying an RF texture to an RF contour-is processed like a texture or a contour when making judgements about shape. Unlike RF textures, the impression of a closed flow was not required for global integration of textured RF paths, suggesting that these paths were processed as second-order, or contrast-defined contours. Luminance-defined (LD) RF paths were shown to globally integrate but with thresholds approximately half of those for the proposed second-order textured paths. The next experiment investigated whether this benefit was due to LD stimuli possessing double the amount of information (first- and second-order information). A mixed three-part contour composed of two different second-order texture components and an LD component was then employed to determine how the different cues combined. The mixed path thresholds matched predictions derived from a linear combination of first- and second-order cues. The conclusion is that the shape of isolated contours is processed using both first- and second-order information equally and that the contribution of texture is to carry additional second-order signal.

  17. Second-order focusing parallel electron energy magnetic sector analyzer designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khursheed, Anjam

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents parallel magnetic sector analyzer designs that are predicted to have second-order or better focusing properties. Simulation results indicate that by reducing the gap between excitation plates in a compact parallel energy magnetic sector box design, second-order focusing regions in the detected energy spectrum can be obtained. A method for combining a first-order focusing magnetic box sector unit with a larger magnet sector unit is also presented in which, the field strength varies relatively slowly. Simulations predict that using a combination of such magnetic sector units, focusing properties better than second order can be achieved for most of the detected energy range.

  18. Second order optical nonlinearity of graphene due to electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole effects.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J L; Vermeulen, N; Sipe, J E

    2017-03-06

    We present a practical scheme to separate the contributions of the electric quadrupole-like and the magnetic dipole-like effects to the forbidden second order optical nonlinear response of graphene, and give analytic expressions for the second order optical conductivities, calculated from the independent particle approximation, with relaxation described in a phenomenological way. We predict strong second order nonlinear effects, including second harmonic generation, photon drag, and difference frequency generation. We discuss in detail the controllability of these effects by tuning the chemical potential, taking advantage of the dominant role played by interband optical transitions in the response.

  19. Second order finite volume scheme for Maxwell's equations with discontinuous electromagnetic properties on unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismagilov, Timur Z.

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a second order finite volume scheme for numerical solution of Maxwell's equations with discontinuous dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability on unstructured meshes. The scheme is based on Godunov scheme and employs approaches of Van Leer and Lax-Wendroff to increase the order of approximation. To keep the second order of approximation near dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability discontinuities a novel technique for gradient calculation and limitation is applied near discontinuities. Results of test computations for problems with linear and curvilinear discontinuities confirm second order of approximation. The scheme was applied to modelling propagation of electromagnetic waves inside photonic crystal waveguides with a bend.

  20. First and Second Order Necessary Conditions for Stochastic Optimal Control Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnans, J. Frederic; Silva, Francisco J.

    2012-06-15

    In this work we consider a stochastic optimal control problem with either convex control constraints or finitely many equality and inequality constraints over the final state. Using the variational approach, we are able to obtain first and second order expansions for the state and cost function, around a local minimum. This fact allows us to prove general first order necessary condition and, under a geometrical assumption over the constraint set, second order necessary conditions are also established. We end by giving second order optimality conditions for problems with constraints on expectations of the final state.

  1. Second-order solution for determining density and velocity fields of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramann, Mirt

    1993-01-01

    In this Letter, I use second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory to calculate an analytical expression relating density to velocity in a gravitating system. This solution can be used to compare peculiar velocity field measurements with observations of large-scale structure. The predictions of both linear theory and second-order theory are compared with the results of N-body simulations. While linear theory systematically overestimates the velocity flows in high-density regions, the second-order corrections calculated herein remove this systematic error.

  2. Second order optical nonlinearity of graphene due to electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole effects

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, J. L.; Vermeulen, N.; Sipe, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    We present a practical scheme to separate the contributions of the electric quadrupole-like and the magnetic dipole-like effects to the forbidden second order optical nonlinear response of graphene, and give analytic expressions for the second order optical conductivities, calculated from the independent particle approximation, with relaxation described in a phenomenological way. We predict strong second order nonlinear effects, including second harmonic generation, photon drag, and difference frequency generation. We discuss in detail the controllability of these effects by tuning the chemical potential, taking advantage of the dominant role played by interband optical transitions in the response. PMID:28262762

  3. A survey on orthogonal matrix polynomials satisfying second order differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duran, Antonio J.; Grunbaum, F. Alberto

    2005-06-01

    The subject of orthogonal polynomials cuts across a large piece of mathematics and its applications. Two notable examples are mathematical physics in the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as the theory of spherical functions for symmetric spaces. It is also clear that many areas of mathematics grew out of the consideration of problems like the moment problem that are intimately associated to the study of (scalar valued) orthogonal polynomials.Matrix orthogonality on the real line has been sporadically studied during the last half century since Krein devoted some papers to the subject in 1949, see (AMS Translations, Series 2, vol. 97, Providence, Rhode Island, 1971, pp. 75-143, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 69(2) (1949) 125). In the last decade this study has been made more systematic with the consequence that many basic results of scalar orthogonality have been extended to the matrix case. The most recent of these results is the discovery of important examples of orthogonal matrix polynomials: many families of orthogonal matrix polynomials have been found that (as the classical families of Hermite, Laguerre and Jacobi in the scalar case) satisfy second order differential equations with coefficients independent of n. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the techniques that have led to these examples, a small sample of the examples themselves and a small step in the challenging direction of finding applications of these new examples.

  4. Analyzing a stochastic time series obeying a second-order differential equation.

    PubMed

    Lehle, B; Peinke, J

    2015-06-01

    The stochastic properties of a Langevin-type Markov process can be extracted from a given time series by a Markov analysis. Also processes that obey a stochastically forced second-order differential equation can be analyzed this way by employing a particular embedding approach: To obtain a Markovian process in 2N dimensions from a non-Markovian signal in N dimensions, the system is described in a phase space that is extended by the temporal derivative of the signal. For a discrete time series, however, this derivative can only be calculated by a differencing scheme, which introduces an error. If the effects of this error are not accounted for, this leads to systematic errors in the estimation of the drift and diffusion functions of the process. In this paper we will analyze these errors and we will propose an approach that correctly accounts for them. This approach allows an accurate parameter estimation and, additionally, is able to cope with weak measurement noise, which may be superimposed to a given time series.

  5. On synchronization in power-grids modelled as networks of second-order Kuramoto oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzybowski, J. M. V.; Macau, E. E. N.; Yoneyama, T.

    2016-11-01

    This work concerns analytical results on the role of coupling strength in the phenomenon of onset of complete frequency locking in power-grids modelled as a network of second-order Kuramoto oscillators. Those results allow estimation of the coupling strength for the onset of complete frequency locking and to assess the features of network and oscillators that favor synchronization. The analytical results are evaluated using an order parameter defined as the normalized sum of absolute values of phase deviations of the oscillators over time. The investigation of the frequency synchronization within the subsets of the parameter space involved in the synchronization problem is also carried out. It is shown that the analytical results are in good agreement with those observed in the numerical simulations. In order to illustrate the methodology, a case study is presented, involving the Brazilian high-voltage transmission system under a load peak condition to study the effect of load on the syncronizability of the grid. The results show that both the load and the centralized generation might have concurred to the 2014 blackout.

  6. Time reversibility and nonequilibrium thermodynamics of second-order stochastic processes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hao

    2014-02-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of a general second-order stochastic system is investigated. We prove that at steady state, under inversion of velocities, the condition of time reversibility over the phase space is equivalent to the antisymmetry of spatial flux and the symmetry of velocity flux. Then we show that the condition of time reversibility alone cannot always guarantee the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. Comparing the two conditions together, we find that the frictional force naturally emerges as the unique odd term of the total force at thermodynamic equilibrium, and is followed by the Einstein relation. The two conditions respectively correspond to two previously reported different entropy production rates. In the case where the external force is only position dependent, the two entropy production rates become one. We prove that such an entropy production rate can be decomposed into two non-negative terms, expressed respectively by the conditional mean and variance of the thermodynamic force associated with the irreversible velocity flux at any given spatial coordinate. In the small inertia limit, the former term becomes the entropy production rate of the corresponding overdamped dynamics, while the anomalous entropy production rate originates from the latter term. Furthermore, regarding the connection between the first law and second law, we find that in the steady state of such a limit, the anomalous entropy production rate is also the leading order of the Boltzmann-factor weighted difference between the spatial heat dissipation densities of the underdamped and overdamped dynamics, while their unweighted difference always tends to vanish.

  7. Second-order accurate interface- and discontinuity-aware diffusion solvers in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, William W. Scannapieco, Anthony J.

    2015-01-15

    A numerical scheme is developed for two- and three-dimensional time-dependent diffusion equations in numerical simulations involving mixed cells. The focus of the development is on the formulations for both transient and steady states, the property for large time steps, second-order accuracy in both space and time, the correct treatment of the discontinuity in material properties, and the handling of mixed cells. For a mixed cell, interfaces between materials are reconstructed within the cell so that each of resulting sub-cells contains only one material and the material properties of each sub-cell are known. Diffusion equations are solved on the resulting polyhedral mesh even if the original mesh is structured. The discontinuity of material properties between different materials is correctly treated based on governing physics principles. The treatment is exact for arbitrarily strong discontinuity. The formulae for effective diffusion coefficients across interfaces between materials are derived for general polyhedral meshes. The scheme is general in two and three dimensions. Since the scheme to be developed in this paper is intended for multi-physics code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), we present the scheme on mesh generated from AMR. The correctness and features of the scheme are demonstrated for transient problems and steady states in one-, two-, and three-dimensional simulations for heat conduction and radiation heat transfer. The test problems involve dramatically different materials.

  8. Second-order perturbation theory using correlated orbitals. I. Full-valence reference functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisel, O.; Ellinger, Y.

    1994-11-01

    Recent developments of performant perturbation treatments on multiconfiguration wave functions have renewed interest in the coupling of variational and perturbative methods. In this communication it is shown that the choice of both the orbitals and the perturbation Hamiltonian to be used is as crucial as the choice of the reference space for obtaining accurate results. Møller-Plesset and Epstein-Nesbet perturbation series are applied to full-valence configuration interaction (FVCI) wave functions built on MCSCF (multi-configurational self-consistent field), FOCI (first-order configuration interaction) and SOCI (second-order configuration interaction) natural orbitals. Applications are presented for the following well-known systems: CH 2 (X 3B 1-a 1A 1), CH 2+ (X 2A 1, 1 2B 1, 1 2A 2, 1 2B 2), SiH 2 (X 1A 1, a 3B 1, A 1B 1) and NH 2 (X 2A 1, A 2B 1). The results are compared to the corresponding full configuration interaction (FCI) when available.

  9. Second-order perturbation theory using correlated orbitals. 1: Full-valence reference functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisel, O.; Ellinger, Y.

    1994-11-01

    Recent developments of performant perturbation treatments on multiconfiguration wave functions have renewed interest in the coupling of variational and perturbative methods. In this communication it is shown that the choice of both the orbitals and the perturbation Hamiltonian to be used is as crucial as the choice of the reference space for obtaining accurate results. Moller-Plesset and Epstein-Nesbet perturbation series are applied to full-valence configuration interaction (FVCI) wave functions built on MCSCF (multi-configurational self-consistent field), FOCI (first-order configuration interaction) and SOCI (second-order configuration interaction) natural orbitals. Applications are presented for the following well-known systems: CH2(X(sup 3)B(sub 1) -a(sup 1)A(sub 1), CH2(+)(X(sup 2)A(sub 1), 1(sup 2)B(sub 1), 1(sup 2)A(sub 2), 1(sup 2)B(sub 2)), SiH2(X(sub 1)A(sub 1), a(sup 3)B(sub 1), A(sup 1)B(sub 1) and NH2(X(sup 2)A(sub 1), A(sup 2)B(sub 1)). The results are compared to the corresponding full configuration interaction (FCI) when available.

  10. A second-order accurate immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2014-07-01

    A new immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) is presented for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The immersed boundary method (IBM) recently developed by Breugem (2012) [19] is adopted in the present method, development including the retraction technique, the multi-direct forcing method and the direct account of the inertia of the fluid contained within the particles. The present IB-LBM is, however, formulated with further improvement with the implementation of the high-order Runge-Kutta schemes in the coupled fluid-particle interaction. The major challenge to implement high-order Runge-Kutta schemes in the LBM is that the flow information such as density and velocity cannot be directly obtained at a fractional time step from the LBM since the LBM only provides the flow information at an integer time step. This challenge can be, however, overcome as given in the present IB-LBM by extrapolating the flow field around particles from the known flow field at the previous integer time step. The newly calculated fluid-particle interactions from the previous fractional time steps of the current integer time step are also accounted for in the extrapolation. The IB-LBM with high-order Runge-Kutta schemes developed in this study is validated by several benchmark applications. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the IB-LBM has the capacity to resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order accuracy. The optimal retraction distances for spheres and tubes that help the method achieve the second-order accuracy are found to be around 0.30 and -0.47 times of the lattice spacing, respectively. Simulations of the Stokes flow through a simple cubic lattice of rotational spheres indicate that the lift force produced by the Magnus effect can be very significant in view of the magnitude of the drag force when the practical rotating speed of the spheres is encountered. This finding

  11. A second-order accurate immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for particle-laden flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Qiang; Fan, Liang-Shih

    2014-07-01

    A new immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) is presented for fully resolved simulations of incompressible viscous flows laden with rigid particles. The immersed boundary method (IBM) recently developed by Breugem (2012) [19] is adopted in the present method, development including the retraction technique, the multi-direct forcing method and the direct account of the inertia of the fluid contained within the particles. The present IB-LBM is, however, formulated with further improvement with the implementation of the high-order Runge–Kutta schemes in the coupled fluid–particle interaction. The major challenge to implement high-order Runge–Kutta schemes in the LBM is that the flow information such as density and velocity cannot be directly obtained at a fractional time step from the LBM since the LBM only provides the flow information at an integer time step. This challenge can be, however, overcome as given in the present IB-LBM by extrapolating the flow field around particles from the known flow field at the previous integer time step. The newly calculated fluid–particle interactions from the previous fractional time steps of the current integer time step are also accounted for in the extrapolation. The IB-LBM with high-order Runge–Kutta schemes developed in this study is validated by several benchmark applications. It is demonstrated, for the first time, that the IB-LBM has the capacity to resolve the translational and rotational motion of particles with the second-order accuracy. The optimal retraction distances for spheres and tubes that help the method achieve the second-order accuracy are found to be around 0.30 and −0.47 times of the lattice spacing, respectively. Simulations of the Stokes flow through a simple cubic lattice of rotational spheres indicate that the lift force produced by the Magnus effect can be very significant in view of the magnitude of the drag force when the practical rotating speed of the spheres is encountered

  12. Graphics Processing Unit-Accelerated Code for Computing Second-Order Wiener Kernels and Spike-Triggered Covariance

    PubMed Central

    Mano, Omer

    2017-01-01

    Sensory neuroscience seeks to understand and predict how sensory neurons respond to stimuli. Nonlinear components of neural responses are frequently characterized by the second-order Wiener kernel and the closely-related spike-triggered covariance (STC). Recent advances in data acquisition have made it increasingly common and computationally intensive to compute second-order Wiener kernels/STC matrices. In order to speed up this sort of analysis, we developed a graphics processing unit (GPU)-accelerated module that computes the second-order Wiener kernel of a system’s response to a stimulus. The generated kernel can be easily transformed for use in standard STC analyses. Our code speeds up such analyses by factors of over 100 relative to current methods that utilize central processing units (CPUs). It works on any modern GPU and may be integrated into many data analysis workflows. This module accelerates data analysis so that more time can be spent exploring parameter space and interpreting data. PMID:28068420

  13. Unconditionally stable, second-order accurate schemes for solid state phase transformations driven by mechano-chemical spinodal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sagiyama, Koki; Rudraraju, Shiva; Garikipati, Krishna

    2016-09-13

    Here, we consider solid state phase transformations that are caused by free energy densities with domains of non-convexity in strain-composition space; we refer to the non-convex domains as mechano-chemical spinodals. The non-convexity with respect to composition and strain causes segregation into phases with different crystal structures. We work on an existing model that couples the classical Cahn-Hilliard model with Toupin’s theory of gradient elasticity at finite strains. Both systems are represented by fourth-order, nonlinear, partial differential equations. The goal of this work is to develop unconditionally stable, second-order accurate time-integration schemes, motivated by the need to carry out large scale computations of dynamically evolving microstructures in three dimensions. We also introduce reduced formulations naturally derived from these proposed schemes for faster computations that are still second-order accurate. Although our method is developed and analyzed here for a specific class of mechano-chemical problems, one can readily apply the same method to develop unconditionally stable, second-order accurate schemes for any problems for which free energy density functions are multivariate polynomials of solution components and component gradients. Apart from an analysis and construction of methods, we present a suite of numerical results that demonstrate the schemes in action.

  14. Unconditionally stable, second-order accurate schemes for solid state phase transformations driven by mechano-chemical spinodal decomposition

    DOE PAGES

    Sagiyama, Koki; Rudraraju, Shiva; Garikipati, Krishna

    2016-09-13

    Here, we consider solid state phase transformations that are caused by free energy densities with domains of non-convexity in strain-composition space; we refer to the non-convex domains as mechano-chemical spinodals. The non-convexity with respect to composition and strain causes segregation into phases with different crystal structures. We work on an existing model that couples the classical Cahn-Hilliard model with Toupin’s theory of gradient elasticity at finite strains. Both systems are represented by fourth-order, nonlinear, partial differential equations. The goal of this work is to develop unconditionally stable, second-order accurate time-integration schemes, motivated by the need to carry out large scalemore » computations of dynamically evolving microstructures in three dimensions. We also introduce reduced formulations naturally derived from these proposed schemes for faster computations that are still second-order accurate. Although our method is developed and analyzed here for a specific class of mechano-chemical problems, one can readily apply the same method to develop unconditionally stable, second-order accurate schemes for any problems for which free energy density functions are multivariate polynomials of solution components and component gradients. Apart from an analysis and construction of methods, we present a suite of numerical results that demonstrate the schemes in action.« less

  15. Polarimetric signatures of a canopy of dielectric cylinders based on first and second order vector radiative transfer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Leung; Chan, Chi Hou; Kong, Jin AU; Joseph, James

    1992-01-01

    Complete polarimetric signatures of a canopy of dielectric cylinders overlying a homogeneous half space are studied with the first and second order solutions of the vector radiative transfer theory. The vector radiative transfer equations contain a general nondiagonal extinction matrix and a phase matrix. The energy conservation issue is addressed by calculating the elements of the extinction matrix and the elements of the phase matrix in a manner that is consistent with energy conservation. Two methods are used. In the first method, the surface fields and the internal fields of the dielectric cylinder are calculated by using the fields of an infinite cylinder. The phase matrix is calculated and the extinction matrix is calculated by summing the absorption and scattering to ensure energy conservation. In the second method, the method of moments is used to calculate the elements of the extinction and phase matrices. The Mueller matrix based on the first order and second order multiple scattering solutions of the vector radiative transfer equation are calculated. Results from the two methods are compared. The vector radiative transfer equations, combined with the solution based on method of moments, obey both energy conservation and reciprocity. The polarimetric signatures, copolarized and depolarized return, degree of polarization, and phase differences are studied as a function of the orientation, sizes, and dielectric properties of the cylinders. It is shown that second order scattering is generally important for vegetation canopy at C band and can be important at L band for some cases.

  16. Evaluation of decay curves of a chemical species undergoing simultaneous first- and second-order decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, K. H.

    1970-01-01

    IBM 1620 computer prepares tables to enable fast calculation of the first- and second-order rate constants from two half-lives and the corresponding initial concentrations, obtained from either one or two decay curves.

  17. Comparison of Second-Order Loads on a Tension-Leg Platform for Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gueydon, S.; Wuillaume, P.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2015-03-01

    The first objective of this work is to compare the two floating offshore wind turbine simulation packages {DIFFRAC+aNySIM} and {WAMIT+FAST}. The focus is on second-order wave loads, and so first- and second-order wave loads are applied to a structure sequentially for a detailed comparison and a more precise analysis of the effects of the second-order loads. aNySIM does not have the capability to model flexible bodies, and so the simulations performed in this tool are done assuming a rigid body. FAST also assumes that the platform is rigid, but can account for the flexibility of the tower. The second objective is to study the effects of the second-order loads on the response of a TLP floating wind turbine. The flexibility of the tower must be considered for this investigation, and therefore only FAST is used.

  18. On Picard boundary value problem for second order asymptotically homogeneous equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.

    Using the Leray-Schauder continuation principle we give some existence results for the Picard boundary value problem of second order asymptotically homogeneous equations. Some previous results by Tippett, Gaines-Mawhin, Lazer-Leach will be extended.

  19. Second-order temporal interference of two independent light beams at an asymmetrical beam splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianbin; Wang, Jingjing; Xu, Zhuo

    2017-01-01

    The second-order temporal interference of classical and nonclassical light at an asymmetrical beam splitter is discussed based on two-photon interference in Feynman's path integral theory. The visibility of the second-order interference pattern is determined by the properties of the superposed light beams, the ratio between the intensities of these two light beams, and the reflectivity of the asymmetrical beam splitter. Some requirements about the asymmetrical beam splitter have to be satisfied in order to ensure that the visibility of the second-order interference pattern of nonclassical light beams exceeds classical limit. The visibility of the second-order interference pattern of photons emitted by two independent single-photon sources is independent of the ratio between the intensities. These conclusions are important for the researches and applications in quantum optics and quantum information when asymmetrical beam splitter is employed.

  20. Second-order curved boundary treatments of the lattice Boltzmann method for convection-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Juntao; Hu, Zexi; Yong, Wen-An

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a kind of second-order curved boundary treatments for the lattice Boltzmann method solving two-dimensional convection-diffusion equations with general nonlinear Robin boundary conditions. The key idea is to derive approximate boundary values or normal derivatives on computational boundaries, with second-order accuracy, by using the prescribed boundary condition. Once the approximate information is known, the second-order bounce-back schemes can be perfectly adopted. Our boundary treatments are validated with a number of numerical examples. The results show the utility of our boundary treatments and very well support our theoretical predications on the second-order accuracy thereof. The idea is quite universal. It can be directly generalized to 3-dimensional problems, multiple-relaxation-time models, and the Navier-Stokes equations.

  1. An Example of Following Second-Order Kinetics by Simple Laboratory Means

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreiber, Gisela

    1976-01-01

    Describes a procedure for studying the kinetics of the second-order hydrolysis of ethylene bromohydrine in alkaline medium by incorporating a substance that changes color as one of the reacting components is depleted. (MLH)

  2. Third-order integrable difference equations generated by a pair of second-order equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukidaira, Junta; Takahashi, Daisuke

    2006-02-01

    We show that the third-order difference equations proposed by Hirota, Kimura and Yahagi are generated by a pair of second-order difference equations. In some cases, the pair of the second-order equations are equivalent to the Quispel-Robert-Thomson (QRT) system, but in the other cases, they are irrelevant to the QRT system. We also discuss an ultradiscretization of the equations.

  3. Comments on the present state of second-order closure models for incompressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1992-01-01

    Second-order closure models account for history and nonlocal effects of the mean velocity gradients on the Reynolds stress tensor. Turbulent flows involving body forces or curvature, Reynolds stress relaxational effects, and counter-gradient transport are usually better described. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: (1) the Reynolds stress transport equation; (2) issues in second-order closure modeling; and (3) near wall models.

  4. An alternative assessment of second-order closure models in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of three recently proposed second-order closure models is tested in benchmark turbulent shear flows. Both homogeneous shear flow and the log-layer of an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer are considered for this purpose. An objective analysis of the results leads to an assessment of these models that stands in contrast to that recently published by other authors. A variety of pitfalls in the formulation and testing of second-order closure models are uncovered by this analysis.

  5. Motion aftereffect of combined first-order and second-order motion.

    PubMed

    van der Smagt, M J; Verstraten, F A; Vaessen, E B; van Londen, T; van de Grind, W A

    1999-01-01

    When, after prolonged viewing of a moving stimulus, a stationary (test) pattern is presented to an observer, this results in an illusory movement in the direction opposite to the adapting motion. Typically, this motion aftereffect (MAE) does not occur after adaptation to a second-order motion stimulus (i.e. an equiluminous stimulus where the movement is defined by a contrast or texture border, not by a luminance border). However, a MAE of second-order motion is perceived when, instead of a static test pattern, a dynamic test pattern is used. Here, we investigate whether a second-order motion stimulus does affect the MAE on a static test pattern (sMAE), when second-order motion is presented in combination with first-order motion during adaptation. The results show that this is indeed the case. Although the second-order motion stimulus is too weak to produce a convincing sMAE on its own, its influence on the sMAE is of equal strength to that of the first-order motion component, when they are adapted to simultaneously. The results suggest that the perceptual appearance of the sMAE originates from the site where first-order and second-order motion are integrated.

  6. Active probing of space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chang; Silevitch, Michael B.; Villalon, Elena

    1989-09-01

    During the course of the research period our efforts were focused on the following areas: (1) An examination of stochastic acceleration mechanisms in the ionosphere; (2) A study of nonequilibrium dynamics of the coupled magnetosphere - ionosphere system; and (3) Laboratory studies of active space experiments. Reprints include: Dynamics of charged particles in the near wake of a very negatively charged body -- Laboratory experiment and numerical simulation; Laboratory study of the electron temperature in the near wake of a conducting body; New model for auroral breakup during substorms; Substorm breakup on closed field lines; New model for substorm on sets -- The pre-breakup and triggering regimes; Model of the westward traveling surge and the generation of Pi 2 pulsations; Ionospheric electron acceleration by electromagnetic waves near regions of plasma resonances; Relativistic particle acceleration by obliquely propagating electromagnetic fields; Some consequences of intense electromagnetic wave injection into space plasmas.

  7. A study and extension of second-order blind source separation to operational modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoni, J.; Chauhan, S.

    2013-02-01

    Second-order blind source separation (SOBSS) has gained recent interest in operational modal analysis (OMA), since it is able to separate a set of system responses into modal coordinates from which the system poles can be extracted by single-degree-of-freedom techniques. In addition, SOBSS returns a mixing matrix whose columns are the estimates of the system mode shapes. The objective of this paper is threefold. First, a theoretical analysis of current SOBSS methods is conducted within the OMA framework and its precise conditions of applicability are established. Second, a new separation method is proposed that fixes current limitations of SOBSS: It returns estimate of complex mode shapes, it can deal with more active modes than the number of available sensors, and it shows superior performance in the case of heavily damped and/or strongly coupled modes. Third, a theoretical connection is drawn between SOBSS and stochastic subspace identification (SSI), which stands as one of the points of reference in OMA. All approaches are finally compared by means of numerical simulations.

  8. Area summation of first- and second-order modulations of luminance.

    PubMed

    Summers, Robert J; Baker, Daniel H; Meese, Tim S

    2015-01-14

    To extend our understanding of the early visual hierarchy, we investigated the long-range integration of first- and second-order signals in spatial vision. In our first experiment we performed a conventional area summation experiment where we varied the diameter of (a) luminance-modulated (LM) noise and (b) contrast-modulated (CM) noise. Results from the LM condition replicated previous findings with sine-wave gratings in the absence of noise, consistent with long-range integration of signal contrast over space. For CM, the summation function was much shallower than for LM suggesting, at first glance, that the signal integration process was spatially less extensive than for LM. However, an alternative possibility was that the high spatial frequency noise carrier for the CM signal was attenuated by peripheral retina (or cortex), thereby impeding our ability to observe area summation of CM in the conventional way. To test this, we developed the "Swiss cheese" stimulus of Meese and Summers (2007) in which signal area can be varied without changing the stimulus diameter, providing some protection against inhomogeneity of the retinal field. Using this technique and a two-component subthreshold summation paradigm we found that (a) CM is spatially integrated over at least five stimulus cycles (possibly more), (b) spatial integration follows square-law signal transduction for both LM and CM and (c) the summing device integrates over spatially-interdigitated LM and CM signals when they are co-oriented, but not when cross-oriented. The spatial pooling mechanism that we have identified would be a good candidate component for a module involved in representing visual textures, including their spatial extent.

  9. ElaStic: A tool for calculating second-order elastic constants from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golesorkhtabar, Rostam; Pavone, Pasquale; Spitaler, Jürgen; Puschnig, Peter; Draxl, Claudia

    2013-08-01

    Elastic properties play a key role in materials science and technology. The elastic tensors at any order are defined by the Taylor expansion of the elastic energy or stress in terms of the applied strain. In this paper, we present ElaStic, a tool that is able to calculate the full second-order elastic stiffness tensor for any crystal structure from ab initio total-energy and/or stress calculations. This tool also provides the elastic compliances tensor and applies the Voigt and Reuss averaging procedure in order to obtain an evaluation of the bulk, shear, and Young moduli as well as the Poisson ratio of poly-crystalline samples. In a first step, the space-group is determined. Then, a set of deformation matrices is selected, and the corresponding structure files are produced. In a next step, total-energy or stress calculations for each deformed structure are performed by a chosen density-functional theory code. The computed energies/stresses are fitted as polynomial functions of the applied strain in order to get derivatives at zero strain. The knowledge of these derivatives allows for the determination of all independent components of the elastic tensor. In this context, the accuracy of the elastic constants critically depends on the polynomial fit. Therefore, we carefully study how the order of the polynomial fit and the deformation range influence the numerical derivatives, and we propose a new approach to obtain the most reliable results. We have applied ElaStic to representative materials for each crystal system, using total energies and stresses calculated with the full-potential all-electron codes exciting and WIEN2k as well as the pseudo-potential code Quantum ESPRESSO.

  10. Democratic decisions establish stable authorities that overcome the paradox of second-order punishment.

    PubMed

    Hilbe, Christian; Traulsen, Arne; Röhl, Torsten; Milinski, Manfred

    2014-01-14

    Individuals usually punish free riders but refuse to sanction those who cooperate but do not punish. This missing second-order peer punishment is a fundamental problem for the stabilization of cooperation. To solve this problem, most societies today have implemented central authorities that punish free riders and tax evaders alike, such that second-order punishment is fully established. The emergence of such stable authorities from individual decisions, however, creates a new paradox: it seems absurd to expect individuals who do not engage in second-order punishment to strive for an authority that does. Herein, we provide a mathematical model and experimental results from a public goods game where subjects can choose between a community with and without second-order punishment in two different ways. When subjects can migrate continuously to either community, we identify a bias toward institutions that do not punish tax evaders. When subjects have to vote once for all rounds of the game and have to accept the decision of the majority, they prefer a society with second-order punishment. These findings uncover the existence of a democracy premium. The majority-voting rule allows subjects to commit themselves and to implement institutions that eventually lead to a higher welfare for all.

  11. A critical perspective on second-order empathy in understanding psychopathology: phenomenology and ethics.

    PubMed

    Rashed, Mohammed Abouelleil

    2015-04-01

    The centenary of Karl Jaspers' General Psychopathology was recognised in 2013 with the publication of a volume of essays dedicated to his work (edited by Stanghellini and Fuchs). Leading phenomenological-psychopathologists and philosophers of psychiatry examined Jaspers notion of empathic understanding and his declaration that certain schizophrenic phenomena are 'un-understandable'. The consensus reached by the authors was that Jaspers operated with a narrow conception of phenomenology and empathy and that schizophrenic phenomena can be understood through what they variously called second-order and radical empathy. This article offers a critical examination of the second-order empathic stance along phenomenological and ethical lines. It asks: (1) Is second-order empathy (phenomenologically) possible? (2) Is the second-order empathic stance an ethically acceptable attitude towards persons diagnosed with schizophrenia? I argue that second-order empathy is an incoherent method that cannot be realised. Further, the attitude promoted by this method is ethically problematic insofar as the emphasis placed on radical otherness disinvests persons diagnosed with schizophrenia from a fair chance to participate in the public construction of their identity and, hence, to redress traditional symbolic injustices.

  12. Spatial variances of wind fields and their relation to second-order structure functions and spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelzang, Jur; King, Gregory P.; Stoffelen, Ad

    2015-02-01

    Kinetic energy variance as a function of spatial scale for wind fields is commonly estimated either using second-order structure functions (in the spatial domain) or by spectral analysis (in the frequency domain). Both techniques give an order-of-magnitude estimate. More accurate estimates are given by a statistic called spatial variance. Spatial variances have a clear interpretation and are tolerant for missing data. They can be related to second-order structure functions, both for discrete and continuous data. Spatial variances can also be Fourier transformed to yield a relation with spectra. The flexibility of spatial variances is used to study various sampling strategies, and to compare them with second-order structure functions and spectral variances. It is shown that the spectral sampling strategy is not seriously biased to calm conditions for scatterometer ocean surface vector winds. When the second-order structure function behaves like rp, its ratio with the spatial variance equals >(p+1>)>(p+2>). Ocean surface winds in the tropics have p between 2/3 and 1, so one-sixth to one-fifth of the second-order structure function value is a good proxy for the cumulative variance.

  13. Trends in space activities in 2014: The significance of the space activities of governments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paikowsky, Deganit; Baram, Gil; Ben-Israel, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses the principal events of 2014 in the field of space activities, and extrapolates from them the primary trends that can be identified in governmental space activities. In 2014, global space activities centered on two vectors. The first was geopolitical, and the second relates to the matrix between increasing commercial space activities and traditional governmental space activities. In light of these two vectors, the article outlines and analyzes trends of space exploration, human spaceflights, industry and technology, cooperation versus self-reliance, and space security and sustainability. It also reviews the space activities of the leading space-faring nations.

  14. Second-Order Belief Attribution in Williams Syndrome: Intact or Impaired?

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kate; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2005-01-01

    Second-order mental state attribution in a group of children with Williams syndrome was investigated. The children were compared to age, IQ, and language-matched groups of children with Prader-Willi syndrome or nonspecific mental retardation. Participants were given two trials of a second-order reasoning task. No significant differences between the Williams syndrome and Prader-WiIli or mentally retarded groups on any of the test questions were found. Results contrast with the view that individuals with Williams syndrome have an intact theory of mind and suggest that in their attributions of second-order mental states, children with Williams syndrome perform no better than do other groups of children with mental retardation. PMID:10587733

  15. Time-dependent Second Order Scattering Theory for Weather Radar with a Finite Beam Width

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, Satoru; Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood; Ito, Shigeo; Oguchi, Tomohiro

    2006-01-01

    Multiple scattering effects from spherical water particles of uniform diameter are studied for a W-band pulsed radar. The Gaussian transverse beam-profile and the rectangular pulse-duration are used for calculation. An second-order analytical solution is derived for a single layer structure, based on a time-dependent radiative transfer theory as described in the authors' companion paper. When the range resolution is fixed, increase in footprint radius leads to increase in the second order reflectivity that is defined as the ratio of the second order return to the first order one. This feature becomes more serious as the range increases. Since the spaceborne millimeter-wavelength radar has a large footprint radius that is competitive to the mean free path, the multiple scattering effect must be taken into account for analysis.

  16. Second order gauge invariant measure of a tidally deformed black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, Nahid

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a Lagrangian perturbation theory for the second order treatment of small disturbances of the event horizon in Schwarzchild black holes is introduced. The issue of gauge invariance in the context of general relativistic theory is also discussed. The developments of this paper is a logical continuation of the calculations presented in [1], in which the first order coordinate dependance of the intrinsic and exterinsic geometry of the horizon is examined and the first order gauge invariance of the intrinsic geometry of the horizon is shown. In context of second order perturbation theory, It is shown that the rate of the expansion of the congruence of the horizon generators is invariant under a second order reparametrization; so it can be considered as a measure of tidal perturbation. A generally non-vanishing expression for this observable, which accomodates tidal perturbations and implies nonlinear response of the horizon, is also presented.

  17. The stability of numerical methods for second order ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gear, C. W.

    1978-01-01

    An important characterization of a numerical method for first order ODE's is the region of absolute stability. If all eigenvalues of the linear problem dy/dt = Ay are inside this region, the numerical method is stable. If the second order system d/dt(dy/dt) = 2Ady/dt - By is solved as a first order system, the same result applies to the eigenvalues of the generalized eigenvalue problem (lambda-squared)I 2(lambda)A + B. No such region exists for general methods for second order equations, but in some cases a region of absolute stability can be defined for methods for the single second order equation d/dt(dy/dt) = 2ady/dt - by. The absence of a region of absolute stability can occur when different members of a system of first order equations are solved by different methods.

  18. New second order Mumford-Shah model based on Γ-convergence approximation for image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jinming; Lu, Wenqi; Pan, Zhenkuan; Bai, Li

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a second order variational model named the Mumford-Shah total generalized variation (MSTGV) is proposed for simultaneously image denoising and segmentation, which combines the original Γ-convergence approximated Mumford-Shah model with the second order total generalized variation (TGV). For image denoising, the proposed MSTGV can eliminate both the staircase artefact associated with the first order total variation and the edge blurring effect associated with the quadratic H1 regularization or the second order bounded Hessian regularization. For image segmentation, the MSTGV can obtain clear and continuous boundaries of objects in the image. To improve computational efficiency, the implementation of the MSTGV does not directly solve its high order nonlinear partial differential equations and instead exploits the efficient split Bregman algorithm. The algorithm benefits from the fast Fourier transform, analytical generalized soft thresholding equation, and Gauss-Seidel iteration. Extensive experiments are conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed model.

  19. Second-order radio frequency kinetic theory revisited: Resolving inconsistency with conventional fluid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiale; Gao, Zhe

    2013-08-15

    The second-order velocity distribution function was calculated from the second-order rf kinetic theory [Jaeger et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 641 (2000)]. However, the nonresonant ponderomotive force in the radial direction derived from the theory is inconsistent with that from the fluid theory. The inconsistency arises from that the multiple-timescale-separation assumption fails when the second-order Vlasov equation is directly integrated along unperturbed particle orbits. A slowly ramped wave field including an adiabatic turn-on process is applied in the modified kinetic theory in this paper. Since this modification leads only to additional reactive/nonresonant response relevant with the secular resonant response from the previous kinetic theory, the correct nonresonant ponderomotive force can be obtained while all the resonant moments remain unchanged.

  20. Encoding and estimation of first- and second-order binocular disparity in natural images

    PubMed Central

    Hibbard, Paul B.; Goutcher, Ross; Hunter, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The first stage of processing of binocular information in the visual cortex is performed by mechanisms that are bandpass-tuned for spatial frequency and orientation. Psychophysical and physiological evidence have also demonstrated the existence of second-order mechanisms in binocular processing, which can encode disparities that are not directly accessible to first-order mechanisms. We compared the responses of first- and second-order binocular filters to natural images. We found that the responses of the second-order mechanisms are to some extent correlated with the responses of the first-order mechanisms, and that they can contribute to increasing both the accuracy, and depth range, of binocular stereopsis. PMID:26731646

  1. Consistency of Equations in the Second-Order Gauge-Invariant Cosmological Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.

    2009-06-01

    Along the general framework of the gauge-invariant perturbation theory developed in the papers [K.~Nakamura, Prog.~Theor.~Phys. 110 (2003), 723; Prog.~Theor.~Phys. 113 (2005), 481], we rederive the second-order Einstein equation on four-dimensional homogeneous isotropic background universe in a gauge-invariant manner without ignoring any mode of perturbations. We consider the perturbations both in the universe dominated by the single perfect fluid and in that dominated by the single scalar field. We also confirmed the consistency of all the equations of the second-order Einstein equation and the equations of motion for matter fields, which are derived in the paper [K.~Nakamura, arXiv:0804.3840]. This confirmation implies that all the derived equations of the second order are self-consistent and these equations are correct in this sense.

  2. First- or second-order transition in the melting of repeat sequence DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y Z; Prohofsky, E W

    1994-01-01

    Both theoretical analysis and observation of the continuity of the melted fraction of base pairs indicate that the melting transition in DNA is second order. Analysis of the salt dependence of the transition by polyelectrolyte limiting laws, however, has first-order dynamics imbedded in the analysis. This paper proposes that the observation taken to be a latent heat of melting in the limiting law analysis could instead be a specific heat anomaly associated with a second-order transition. The limiting laws can be reconstructed based on a second-order transition with a specific heat anomaly. The T2M dependence of this excess heat is also consistent with its being a specific heat anomaly of a system displaying classical critical behavior. Classical critical behavior indicates that theoretical mean field approaches such as MSPA should be particularly appropriate to helix melting studies. PMID:8130338

  3. BOTDA sensors enhanced using high-efficiency second-order distributed Brillouin amplification.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xin-Hong; Chang, Han-Qing; Ao, Lei; Ji, Xiao-Ling; Xu, Cong; Zhang, Wei-Li

    2016-06-27

    A novel approach for long-distance sensing through Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) assisted by second-order distributed Brillouin amplification (DBA) was proposed and experimentally demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first BOTDA study that used second-order DBA. Compared with BOTDA assisted by first-order DBA, the proposed approach enhanced the signal-to-noise ratio of the Brillouin trace by ~3 dB for a range featuring minimum sensing intensity. Long-distance sensing with ~5 m spatial resolution and ± 1.6°C measurement uncertainty over ~99 km fiber was successfully realized by employing high-efficiency pumping using ~6 dBm second-order and ~1.5 dBm first-order pumps.

  4. Stabilization and PID tuning algorithms for second-order unstable processes with time-delays.

    PubMed

    Seer, Qiu Han; Nandong, Jobrun

    2017-03-01

    Open-loop unstable systems with time-delays are often encountered in process industry, which are often more difficult to control than stable processes. In this paper, the stabilization by PID controller of second-order unstable processes, which can be represented as second-order deadtime with an unstable pole (SODUP) and second-order deadtime with two unstable poles (SODTUP), is performed via the necessary and sufficient criteria of Routh-Hurwitz stability analysis. The stability analysis provides improved understanding on the existence of a stabilizing range of each PID parameter. Three simple PID tuning algorithms are proposed to provide desired closed-loop performance-robustness within the stable regions of controller parameters obtained via the stability analysis. The proposed PID controllers show improved performance over those derived via some existing methods.

  5. Part A: Nonprincipal-plane scattering from flat plates: Second-order and corner diffractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Polka, Lesley A.

    1989-01-01

    Two models of a flat plate for nonprincipal-plane scattering are explored. The first is a revised version of the Physical Optics/Physical Theory of Diffraction (PO/PTD) model with second-order PTD equivalent currents included to account for second-order interactions among the plate edges. The second model uses a heurisitcally derived corner diffraction coefficient to account for the corner scattering mechanism. The patterns obtained using the newer models were compared to the data of previously reported models, the Moment Method (MM), and experimental results. Near normal incidence, all the models agreed; however, near grazing incidence a need for higher-order and corner diffraction mechanisms was noted. In many instances the second-order and corner-scattered fields which were formulated improved the results.

  6. Theoretical study of second-order hyperpolarizability for nitrogen radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazkar, Maryam; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    We report calculations of the static and dynamic hyperpolarizabilities of the nitrogen radical cation in doublet state. The electronic contributions were computed analytically using density functional theory and multi-configurational self-consistent field method with extended basis sets for non-resonant excitation. The open-shell electronic system of nitrogen radical cation provides negative second-order optical nonlinearity, suggesting that the hyperpolarizability coefficient, {{γ }(2)}, in the non-resonant regime is mainly composed of combinations of virtual one-photon transitions rather than two-photon transitions. The second-order optical properties of nitrogen radical cation have been calculated as a function of bond length starting with the neutral molecular geometry (S0 minimum) and stretching the N-N triple bond, reaching the ionic D0 relaxed geometry all the way toward dissociation limit, to investigate the effect of internuclear bond distance on second-order hyperpolarizability.

  7. Second-order systematic errors in Mueller matrix dual rotating compensator ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Broch, Laurent; En Naciri, Aotmane; Johann, Luc

    2010-06-10

    We investigate the systematic errors at the second order for a Mueller matrix ellipsometer in the dual rotating compensator configuration. Starting from a general formalism, we derive explicit second-order errors in the Mueller matrix coefficients of a given sample. We present the errors caused by the azimuthal inaccuracy of the optical components and their influences on the measurements. We demonstrate that the methods based on four-zone or two-zone averaging measurement are effective to vanish the errors due to the compensators. For the other elements, it is shown that the systematic errors at the second order can be canceled only for some coefficients of the Mueller matrix. The calibration step for the analyzer and the polarizer is developed. This important step is necessary to avoid the azimuthal inaccuracy in such elements. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements are presented and discussed.

  8. Perceived timing of first- and second-order changes in vision and hearing.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Roberto; Alais, David; Burr, David

    2005-10-01

    Simultaneous changes in visual stimulus attributes (such as motion or color) are often perceived to occur at different times, a fact usually attributed to differences in neural processing times of those attributes. However, other studies suggest that perceptual misalignments are not due to stimulus attributes, but to the type of change, first- or second-order. To test whether this idea generalizes across modalities, we studied perceptual synchrony of acoustic and of audiovisual cross-modal stimuli, which varied in a first- or second-order fashion. First-order changes were abrupt changes in tone intensity or frequency (auditory), or spatial position (visual), while second-order changes were an inversion of the direction of change, such as a turning point when a rising tone starts falling or a translating visual blob reverses. For both pure acoustic and cross-modal stimuli, first-order changes were systematically perceived before second-order changes. However, when both changes were first-order, or both were second-order, little or no difference in perceptual delay was found between them, regardless of attribute or modality. This shows that the type of attribute change, as well as latency differences, is a strong determinant of subjective temporal alignments. We also performed an analysis of reaction times (RTs) to the first- and second-order attribute changes used in these temporal alignment experiments. RT differences between these stimuli did not correspond with our temporal alignment data, suggesting that subjective alignments cannot be accounted for by a simple latency-based explanation.

  9. Contributions to the second order dielectric response of an electron liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Martina E.; Miesenboeck, Helga M.; Macke, Wilhelm

    1988-06-01

    The dielectric response function χ of a uniform electron gas is investigated up to the second order of the Coulomb interaction with different methods. When examining all polarisation diagrams with two interaction lines, it is confirmed that previous work in the Green's function formalism does not contain all second order processes and the importance of the corrections is pointed out. It is further shown, how the evaluation of χ with Green's function can be greatly simplified when taking into account the symmetry of the expressions.

  10. Second-order infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles

    SciTech Connect

    Sabitov, I Kh

    2014-12-31

    We study infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles. We begin by considering the minimal possible smoothness class C{sup 1} both for surfaces and for deformation fields. Conditions are formulated for a given harmonic of a first-order infinitesimal bending to be extendable into a second order infinitesimal bending. We finish by stating a criterion for nonrigidity of second order for closed surfaces of revolution in the analytic class. We also give the first concrete example of such a nonrigid surface. Bibliography: 15 entries.

  11. First- and second-order backscattering from clouds illuminated by finite beams.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R C; Browell, E V

    1972-06-01

    Calculations have been carried out for first- and second-order backscattering from water clouds illuminated by a continuous 0.9-micro beam with a finite divergence angle. In the single-scattering calculations several cloud types were used, while only an approximation to fair weather cumulus clouds was used for double scattering. It was found that the intensity and hence the reflectivity varied with the transceiver-cloud distance for both orders of scattering. Second-order backscattering also varied with field of view. From these results a criterion is suggested for determining when the plane parallel atmosphere theories can be used with finite beams.

  12. Development of Silica Fibers and Microstructures with Large and Thermodynamically Stable Second Order Nonlinearity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-22

    C. Hofmann, Z. Liu, A. Wang, J. R. Heflin , and Y. Xu, “Demonstration of a cylindrically symmetric second-order nonlinear fiber with self-assembled...organic surface layers,” Opt. Express, 19 (11), 10326-10335 (2011). Y. Xu, M. Han, A. Wang, Z. Liu, and J. R. Heflin , “Second order parametric...processes in nonlinear silica microspheres,” Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, Art#163905, (2008). Y. Xu, A. Wang, J. R. Heflin , and Z. Liu, “Proposal and

  13. Anti-Stokes luminescence in the light of second order perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Rupak Pal, Bipul Bansal, Bhavtosh

    2014-11-10

    Anti-Stokes photoluminescence is measured in high-quality GaAs quantum wells. The primary pathway for interband optical absorption and hence emission under subbandgap photoexcitation is the optical phonon-mediated second-order electric dipole transition. This conclusion is drawn from the remarkable agreement between predictions of second-order perturbation calculation and the measured intensity of anti-Stokes photoluminescence, both as function of the detuning wavelength and temperature. The results are of direct relevance to laser cooling of solids where phonon-assisted upconversion is a necessary condition.

  14. Discrete integration of continuous Kalman filtering equations for time invariant second-order structural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Belvin, W. Keith

    1990-01-01

    A general form for the first-order representation of the continuous second-order linear structural-dynamics equations is introduced to derive a corresponding form of first-order continuous Kalman filtering equations. Time integration of the resulting equations is carried out via a set of linear multistep integration formulas. It is shown that a judicious combined selection of computational paths and the undetermined matrices introduced in the general form of the first-order linear structural systems leads to a class of second-order discrete Kalman filtering equations involving only symmetric sparse N x N solution matrices.

  15. Schwarzian derivative treatment of the quantum second-order supersymmetry anomaly, and coupling-constant metamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2017-02-01

    A canonical quantization scheme applied to a classical supersymmetric system with quadratic in momentum supercharges gives rise to a quantum anomaly problem described by a specific term to be quadratic in Planck constant. We reveal a close relationship between the anomaly and the Schwarzian derivative, and specify a quantization prescription which generates the anomaly-free supersymmetric quantum system with second order supercharges. We also discuss the phenomenon of a coupling-constant metamorphosis that associates quantum systems with the first-order supersymmetry to the systems with the second-order supercharges.

  16. Linearly first- and second-order, unconditionally energy stable schemes for the phase field crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaofeng; Han, Daozhi

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we develop a series of linear, unconditionally energy stable numerical schemes for solving the classical phase field crystal model. The temporal discretizations are based on the first order Euler method, the second order backward differentiation formulas (BDF2) and the second order Crank-Nicolson method, respectively. The schemes lead to linear elliptic equations to be solved at each time step, and the induced linear systems are symmetric positive definite. We prove that all three schemes are unconditionally energy stable rigorously. Various classical numerical experiments in 2D and 3D are performed to validate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed schemes.

  17. Radiation effects on stagnation point flow with melting heat transfer and second order slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabood, F.; Shafiq, A.; Hayat, T.; Abelman, S.

    This article examines the effects of melting heat transfer and thermal radiation in stagnation point flow towards a stretching/shrinking surface. Mathematical formulation is made in the presence of mass transfer and second order slip condition. Numerical solutions to the resulting nonlinear problems are obtained by Runge-Kutta fourth fifth order method. Physical quantities like velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, Nusselt and Sherwood number are analyzed via sundry parameters for stretching/shrinking, first order slip, second order slip, radiation, melting, Prandtl and Schmidt. A comparative study with the previously published results in limiting sense is made.

  18. Second-order discrete Kalman filtering equations for control-structure interaction simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Belvin, W. Keith; Alvin, Kenneth F.

    1991-01-01

    A general form for the first-order representation of the continuous, second-order linear structural dynamics equations is introduced in order to derive a corresponding form of first-order Kalman filtering equations (KFE). Time integration of the resulting first-order KFE is carried out via a set of linear multistep integration formulas. It is shown that a judicious combined selection of computational paths and the undetermined matrices introduced in the general form of the first-order linear structural systems leads to a class of second-order discrete KFE involving only symmetric, N x N solution matrix.

  19. Discontinuous deformation analysis with second-order finite element meshed block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayeli, Roozbeh; Mortazavi, Ali

    2006-12-01

    The discontinuous deformation analysis (DDA) with second-order displacement functions was derived based on six-node triangular mesh in order to satisfy the requirement for the accurate calculations in practical applications. The matrices of equilibrium equations for the second-order DDA were given in detail for program coding. By close comparison with widely used finite element method and closed form solutions, the advantages of the modified DDA were illustrated. The program coding was carried out in C++ environment and the new code applied to three examples with known analytical solutions. A very good agreement was achieved between the analytical and numerical results produced by the modified DDA code. Copyright

  20. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities in the Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association received an award of Cooperative Agreement #NCC5-356 on September 29, 1998. The mission of this activity, know as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, USRA recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members.

  1. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities in the Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David; Marshall, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Universities Space Research Association received an award of Cooperative Agreement NCC5-356 on September 29, 1998. The mission of this activity, known as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, USRA recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members.

  2. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities In the Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, David

    2002-01-01

    The mission of this activity, known as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members. This paper is the final report from this now completed Cooperative Agreement.

  3. Second-Order Systematicity of Associative Learning: A Paradox for Classical Compositionality and a Coalgebraic Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Steven; Wilson, William H.

    2016-01-01

    Systematicity is a property of cognitive architecture whereby having certain cognitive capacities implies having certain other “structurally related” cognitive capacities. The predominant classical explanation for systematicity appeals to a notion of common syntactic/symbolic structure among the systematically related capacities. Although learning is a (second-order) cognitive capacity of central interest to cognitive science, a systematic ability to learn certain cognitive capacities, i.e., second-order systematicity, has been given almost no attention in the literature. In this paper, we introduce learned associations as an instance of second-order systematicity that poses a paradox for classical theory, because this form of systematicity involves the kinds of associative constructions that were explicitly rejected by the classical explanation. Our category theoretic explanation of systematicity resolves this problem, because both first and second-order forms of systematicity are derived from the same categorical construction: universal morphisms, which generalize the notion of compositionality of constituent representations to (categorical) compositionality of constituent processes. We derive a model of systematic associative learning based on (co)recursion, which is an instance of a universal construction. These results provide further support for a category theory foundation for cognitive architecture. PMID:27505411

  4. Do Children with Autism Perceive Second-Order Relational Features? The Case of the Thatcher Illusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouse, Helen; Donnelly, Nick; Hadwin, Julie A.; Brown, Tony

    2004-01-01

    Background: This study presents two experiments that investigated whether children with autism were susceptible to the Thatcher illusion. Perception of the Thatcher illusion requires being able to compute second-order configural relations for facial stimuli. Method: In both experiments children with autism were matched for non-verbal and verbal…

  5. Modelling of the magnetic field effects in hydrodynamic codes using a second order tensorial diffusion scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breil, J.; Maire, P.-H.; Nicolaï, P.; Schurtz, G.

    2008-05-01

    In laser produced plasmas large self-generated magnetic fields have been measured. The classical formulas by Braginskii predict that magnetic fields induce a reduction of the magnitude of the heat flux and its rotation through the Righi-Leduc effect. In this paper a second order tensorial diffusion method used to correctly solve the Righi-Leduc effect in multidimensional code is presented.

  6. Conservation of Autonomy: Toward a Second-Order Perspective on Psychosomatic Symptoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fourie, David P.

    1993-01-01

    Considers families of people suffering from psychosomatic disorders from perspective of second-order cybernetics in which emphasis is on autonomy of various levels of system. Describes psychosomatic symptoms and illustrates symptoms as expression of ideas aimed at conservation of autonomy, both at individual and family level. Highlights…

  7. Control by Contextual Stimuli in Novel Second-Order Conditional Discriminations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Gonzalez, Luis Antonio; Martinez, Hector

    2007-01-01

    Eighteen undergraduates participated in studies designed to examine the factors that produce transfer of contextual functions to novel stimuli in second-order conditional discriminations. In Study 1, participants selected comparison B1 given sample A1 and comparison B2 given sample A2 in a matching-to-sample procedure. Contextual stimuli X1 or X2…

  8. Computer Simulation for Calculating the Second-Order Correlation Function of Classical and Quantum Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facao, M.; Lopes, A.; Silva, A. L.; Silva, P.

    2011-01-01

    We propose an undergraduate numerical project for simulating the results of the second-order correlation function as obtained by an intensity interference experiment for two kinds of light, namely bunched light with Gaussian or Lorentzian power density spectrum and antibunched light obtained from single-photon sources. While the algorithm for…

  9. Time domain reflectometry waveform analysis with second order bounded mean oscillation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tangent-line methods and adaptive waveform interpretation with Gaussian filtering (AWIGF) have been proposed for determining reflection positions of time domain reflectometry (TDR) waveforms. However, the accuracy of those methods is limited for short probe TDR sensors. Second order bounded mean osc...

  10. Cue-invariant shape recognition in rats as tested with second-order contours.

    PubMed

    De Keyser, Roxane; Bossens, Christophe; Kubilius, Jonas; Op de Beeck, Hans P

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates are the main animal model to investigate high-level properties of human cortical vision. For one property, transformation-invariant object recognition, recent studies have revealed interesting and unknown capabilities in rats. Here we report on the ability of rats to rely upon second-order cues that are important to structure the incoming visual images into figure and background. Rats performed a visual shape discrimination task in which the shapes were not only defined by first-order luminance information but also by a variety of second-order cues such as a change in texture properties. Once the rats were acquainted with a first set of second-order stimuli, they showed a surprising degree of generalization towards new second-order stimuli. The limits of these capabilities were tested in various ways, and the ability to extract the shapes broke down only in extreme cases where no local cues were available to solve the task. These results demonstrate how rats are able to make choices based on fairly complex strategies when necessary.

  11. Keep Your Distance! Using Second-Order Ordinary Differential Equations to Model Traffic Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Mark

    2004-01-01

    A simple mathematical model for how vehicles follow each other along a stretch of road is presented. The resulting linear second-order differential equation with constant coefficients is solved and interpreted. The model can be used as an application of solution techniques taught at first-year undergraduate level and as a motivator to encourage…

  12. Sample Sizes for Two-Group Second-Order Latent Growth Curve Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wanstrom, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Second-order latent growth curve models (S. C. Duncan & Duncan, 1996; McArdle, 1988) can be used to study group differences in change in latent constructs. We give exact formulas for the covariance matrix of the parameter estimates and an algebraic expression for the estimation of slope differences. Formulas for calculations of the required sample…

  13. On types of the resolvent of a complete second order differential operator

    SciTech Connect

    Ospanov, Kordan Nauryzkhanovich

    2015-09-18

    In this work we consider the complete second order differential operator, the intermediate coefficient of which is growing rapidly. We find the conditions when its resolvent is compact or belongs to Schatten class, in particular, it is a nuclear operator. The most accurate results are obtained when the coefficient oscillates weakly. In this case we shown that the operator is separable.

  14. Navier-Stokes computation of compressible turbulent flows with a second order closure, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haminh, Hieu; Kollmann, Wolfgang; Vandromme, Dany

    1990-01-01

    A second order closure turbulence model for compressible flows is developed and implemented in a 2D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver. From the beginning where a kappa-epsilon turbulence model was implemented in the bidiagonal implicit method of MACCORMACK (referred to as the MAC3 code) to the final stage of implementing a full second order closure in the efficient line Gauss-Seidel algorithm, numerous work was done, individually and collectively. Besides the collaboration itself, the final product of this work is a second order closure derived from the Launder, Reece, and Rodi model to account for near wall effects, which has been called FRAME model, which stands for FRench-AMerican-Effort. During the reporting period, two different problems were worked out. The first was to provide Ames researchers with a reliable compressible boundary layer code including a wide collection of turbulence models for quick testing of new terms, both in two equations and in second order closure (LRR and FRAME). The second topic was to complete the implementation of the FRAME model in the MAC5 code. The work related to these two different contributions is reported. dilatation in presence of stron shocks. This work, which has been conducted during a work at the Center for Turbulence Research with Zeman aimed also to cros-check earlier assumptions by Rubesin and Vandromme.

  15. Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, Vyacheslav M.; Popovych, Roman O.; Shapoval, Nataliya M.

    2013-01-01

    Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients are exhaustively described over both the complex and real fields. The exact lower and upper bounds for the dimensions of the maximal Lie invariance algebras possessed by such systems are obtained using an effective algebraic approach. PMID:23564972

  16. Solving Second-Order Ordinary Differential Equations without Using Complex Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kougias, Ioannis E.

    2009-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is a subject with a wide range of applications and the need of introducing it to students often arises in the last year of high school, as well as in the early stages of tertiary education. The usual methods of solving second-order ODEs with constant coefficients, among others, rely upon the use of complex…

  17. Employment of Second Order Ruled Surfaces in Design of Sheet Beam Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnykh, Anatoly; /SLAC

    2007-03-05

    A novel 3D method of sheet beam gun design has recently been developed. Second order ruled surfaces (SORS) can be used to define the geometry of the gun electrodes. The gun design process is made simpler if SORS are derived from analytical formulas. A proposed method is discussed and illustrated.

  18. Concurrent Second-Order Schedules: Some Effects of Variations in Response Number and Duration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sealey, Diane M.; Sumpter, Catherine E.; Temple, W.; Foster, T. Mary

    2005-01-01

    To examine the effects on concurrent performance of independent manipulations of response-unit duration and number, 6 hens were exposed to concurrent second- order schedules of reinforcement. Each first-order operant unit required completion of a fixed-ratio schedule within the time specified by a fixed- interval schedule, with one further…

  19. Independence of First- and Second-Order Memories in Newborn Rabbits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coureaud, Gerard; Languille, Solene; Joly, Virginie; Schaal, Benoist; Hars, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The mammary pheromone promotes the acquisition of novel odorants (CS1) in newborn rabbits. Here, experiments pinpoint that CS1 becomes able to support neonatal learning of other odorants (CS2). We therefore evaluated whether these first- and second-order memories remained dependent after reactivation. Amnesia induced after CS2 recall selectively…

  20. Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Vyacheslav M; Popovych, Roman O; Shapoval, Nataliya M

    2013-01-01

    Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients are exhaustively described over both the complex and real fields. The exact lower and upper bounds for the dimensions of the maximal Lie invariance algebras possessed by such systems are obtained using an effective algebraic approach.

  1. Second-order magnetic critical points at finite magnetic fields: Revisiting Arrott plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bustingorry, S.; Pomiro, F.; Aurelio, G.; Curiale, J.

    2016-06-01

    The so-called Arrott plot, which consists in plotting H /M against M2, with H the applied magnetic field and M the magnetization, is used to extract valuable information in second-order magnetic phase transitions. Besides, it is widely accepted that a negative slope in the Arrott plot is indicative of a first-order magnetic transition. This is known as the Banerjee criterion. In consequence, the zero-field transition temperature T* is reported as the characteristic first-order transition temperature. By carefully analyzing the mean-field Landau model used for studying first-order magnetic transitions, we show in this work that T* corresponds in fact to a triple point where three first-order lines meet. More importantly, this analysis reveals the existence of two symmetrical second-order critical points at finite magnetic field (Tc,±Hc) . We then show that a modified Arrott plot can be used to obtain information about these second-order critical points. To support this idea we analyze experimental data on La2 /3Ca1 /3MnO3 and discuss an estimate for the location of the triple point and the second-order critical points.

  2. SMITE - A Second Order Eulerian Code for Hydrodynamic and Elastic-Plastic Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    et al Mathematical Applications Group, Incorporated Prepared for: Ballistic Research Laboratories August 1975 DISTRIBI,TED BY: mi] National...SMITE - A SECOND ORDER EULERIAN CODE FOR HYDRODYNAMIC AND ELASTIC-PLASTIC PROBLEMS Prepared by Mathematical Applications Group, Inc. 3...AODRcis jMathematical Applications Group, Inc. 13 Westchester Plaza IFlmsford, New York 10523 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT, PROJECT, TASK AREA t WORK

  3. Second-order hot image from a scatterer in high-power laser systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Liangping; Zhao Jianlin; Jing Feng

    2005-05-01

    A theory is developed for predicting a second-order hot-image formation in high-power laser systems. Light diffracted from a small optical scatterer interferes with an intense original wave in the nonlinear medium to produce a hologram like a Fresnel-zone plate. The theoretical model shows that the hologram produces a negative first-order diffractive wave focused to the traditional hot image and negative second-order diffraction that causes another intense image, namely, a second-order hot image. It is found by analysis that the location of the second-order hot image arises in a downstream plane with a half-distance from the medium to the scatterer. Results of the numerical calculations show that the peak intensity of the nonlinear image may reach a level high enough to damage optical components with the increase of the breakup integral (B integral), indicating that the image may also potentially damage expensive optical components in high-power laser systems.

  4. Second-Order Schedules of Token Reinforcement with Pigeons: Implications for Unit Price

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Christopher E.; Hackenberg, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    Four pigeons were exposed to second-order schedules of token reinforcement, with stimulus lights serving as token reinforcers. Tokens were earned according to a fixed-ratio (token-production) schedule, with the opportunity to exchange tokens for food (exchange period) occurring after a fixed number had been produced (exchange-production ratio).…

  5. Second-order intensity-moment characteristics for broadband partially coherent flat-topped beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haidan; Zhao, Daomu

    2010-01-18

    Based on the intensity moments and Wigner distribution function, the second-order moments for broadband partially coherent flat-topped (BPCFT) beams in atmospheric turbulence are studied. The beam width of BPCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence is larger than that in free space. The beam width of BPCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence is larger than that of broadband fully coherent flat-topped (BFCFT) beams in atmospheric turbulence. The broader the bandwidth is, the larger the beam width of BPCFT beams becomes. Similar conclusion can be obtained by analyzing the divergence angle and beam propagation factor of BPCFT beams. The beam width of BPCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence is less affected by the broad spectral bandwidth than that in free space. The beam width of BFCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence is less affected by the broad spectral bandwidth than that of BPCFT beams in atmospheric turbulence.

  6. Lie and Noether point symmetries of a class of quasilinear systems of second-order differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliathanasis, Andronikos; Tsamparlis, Michael

    2016-09-01

    We study the Lie and Noether point symmetries of a class of systems of second-order differential equations with n independent and m dependent variables (n × m systems). We solve the symmetry conditions in a geometric way and determine the general form of the symmetry vector and of the Noetherian conservation laws. We prove that the point symmetries are generated by the collineations of two (pseudo)metrics, which are defined in the spaces of independent and dependent variables. We demonstrate the general results in two special cases (a) a system of m coupled Laplace equations and (b) the Klein-Gordon equation of a particle in the context of Generalized Uncertainty Principle. In the second case we determine the complete invariant group of point transformations, and we apply the Lie invariants in order to find invariant solutions of the wave function for a spin-0 particle in the two dimensional hyperbolic space.

  7. Efficiency of perfectly matched layers for seismic wave modeling in second-order viscoelastic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Ping; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Yixian; Chu, Risheng

    2016-12-01

    In order to improve the perfectly matched layer (PML) efficiency in viscoelastic media, we first propose a split multi-axial PML (M-PML) and an unsplit convolutional PML (C-PML) in the second-order viscoelastic wave equations with the displacement as the only unknown. The advantage of these formulations is that it is easy and efficient to revise the existing codes of the second-order spectral element method (SEM) or finite-element method (FEM) with absorbing boundaries in a uniform equation, as well as more economical than the auxiliary differential equations PML. Three models which are easily suffered from late time instabilities are considered to validate our approaches. Through comparison the M-PML with C-PML efficiency of absorption and stability for long time simulation, it can be concluded that: (1) for an isotropic viscoelastic medium with high Poisson's ratio, the C-PML will be a sufficient choice for long time simulation because of its weak reflections and superior stability; (2) unlike the M-PML with high-order damping profile, the M-PML with second-order damping profile loses its stability in long time simulation for an isotropic viscoelastic medium; (3) in an anisotropic viscoelastic medium, the C-PML suffers from instabilities, while the M-PML with second-order damping profile can be a better choice for its superior stability and more acceptable weak reflections than the M-PML with high-order damping profile. The comparative analysis of the developed methods offers meaningful significance for long time seismic wave modeling in second-order viscoelastic wave equations.

  8. Second-Order Factor Analysis as a Validity Assessment Tool: A Case Study Example Involving Perceptions of Stereotypic Love.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrello, Gloria M.; Thompson, Bruce

    The calculation of second-order results in the validity assessment of measures and some useful interpretation aids are presented. First-order and second-order results give different and informative pictures of data dynamics. Several aspects of good practice in interpretation of second-order results are presented using data from 487 subjects…

  9. First-and Second-Order Displacement Transfer Functions for Structural Shape Calculations Using Analytically Predicted Surface Strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2012-01-01

    New first- and second-order displacement transfer functions have been developed for deformed shape calculations of nonuniform cross-sectional beam structures such as aircraft wings. The displacement transfer functions are expressed explicitly in terms of beam geometrical parameters and surface strains (uniaxial bending strains) obtained at equally spaced strain stations along the surface of the beam structure. By inputting the measured or analytically calculated surface strains into the displacement transfer functions, one could calculate local slopes, deflections, and cross-sectional twist angles of the nonuniform beam structure for mapping the overall structural deformed shapes for visual display. The accuracy of deformed shape calculations by the first- and second-order displacement transfer functions are determined by comparing these values to the analytically predicted values obtained from finite element analyses. This comparison shows that the new displacement transfer functions could quite accurately calculate the deformed shapes of tapered cantilever tubular beams with different tapered angles. The accuracy of the present displacement transfer functions also are compared to those of the previously developed displacement transfer functions.

  10. Sustainable institutionalized punishment requires elimination of second-order free-riders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perc, Matjaž

    2012-03-01

    Although empirical and theoretical studies affirm that punishment can elevate collaborative efforts, its emergence and stability remain elusive. By peer-punishment the sanctioning is something an individual elects to do depending on the strategies in its neighborhood. The consequences of unsustainable efforts are therefore local. By pool-punishment, on the other hand, where resources for sanctioning are committed in advance and at large, the notion of sustainability has greater significance. In a population with free-riders, punishers must be strong in numbers to keep the ``punishment pool'' from emptying. Failure to do so renders the concept of institutionalized sanctioning futile. We show that pool-punishment in structured populations is sustainable, but only if second-order free-riders are sanctioned as well, and to a such degree that they cannot prevail. A discontinuous phase transition leads to an outbreak of sustainability when punishers subvert second-order free-riders in the competition against defectors.

  11. Background first- and second-order modeling for point target detection.

    PubMed

    Genin, Laure; Champagnat, Frédéric; Le Besnerais, Guy

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with point target detection in nonstationary backgrounds such as cloud scenes in aerial or satellite imaging. We propose an original spatial detection method based on first- and second-order modeling (i.e., mean and covariance) of local background statistics. We first show that state-of-the-art nonlocal denoising methods can be adapted with minimal effort to yield edge-preserving background mean estimates. These mean estimates lead to very efficient background suppression (BS) detection. However, we propose that BS be followed by a matched filter based on an estimate of the local spatial covariance matrix. The identification of these matrices derives from a robust classification of pixels in classes with homogeneous second-order statistics based on a Gaussian mixture model. The efficiency of the proposed approaches is demonstrated by evaluation on two cloudy sky background databases.

  12. The second-order luminosity-redshift relation in a generic inhomogeneous cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Marozzi, Giovanni; Veneziano, Gabriele; Nugier, Fabien E-mail: giovanni.marozzi@unige.ch E-mail: gabriele.veneziano@cern.ch

    2012-11-01

    After recalling a general non-perturbative expression for the luminosity-redshift relation holding in a recently proposed 'geodesic light-cone' gauge, we show how it can be transformed to phenomenologically more convenient gauges in which cosmological perturbation theory is better understood. We present, in particular, the complete result on the luminosity-redshift relation in the Poisson gauge up to second order for a fairly generic perturbed cosmology, assuming that appreciable vector and tensor perturbations are only generated at second order. This relation provides a basic ingredient for the computation of the effects of stochastic inhomogeneities on precision dark-energy cosmology whose results we have anticipated in a recent letter. More generally, it can be used in connection with any physical information carried by light-like signals traveling along our past light-cone.

  13. Long-distance fiber sensor system based on the second-order Raman pump and amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, B.; Hu, J.; Chen, Z.; Yu, C.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel technique to realize a long-distance fiber sensor system based on the second-order Raman pump and amplification. With the second-order Raman pump and amplification, a gain spectrum around 1582-nm is achieved. It serves as not only the optical source for the remote fiber sensor but also the filter to intensity modulated the wavelength shift of the fiber sensor. A long-distance fiber strain sensor system is demonstrated by adopting a fiber Fabry-Pérot sensor. Experimental results show that the wavelength shift of the sensor in response to the strain is simultaneously intensity modulated by the steep slope with a high sensitivity, while it is temperature insensitive. With the side gain spectrum served as a quasi-linear filter, the sensor can also be quasi-linearly intensity-modulated.

  14. Second order classical perturbation theory for the sticking probability of heavy atoms scattered on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Tapas; Pollak, Eli

    2015-08-14

    A second order classical perturbation theory is developed to calculate the sticking probability of a particle scattered from an uncorrugated thermal surface. An analytic expression for the temperature dependent energy loss of the particle to the surface is derived by employing a one-dimensional generalized Langevin equation. The surface temperature reduces the energy loss, since the thermal surface transfers energy to the particle. Using a Gaussian energy loss kernel and the multiple collision theory of Fan and Manson [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 064703 (2009)], enables the determination of the fraction of particles trapped on the surface after subsequent momentum reversals of the colliding particle. This then leads to an estimate of the trapping probability. The theory is tested for the model scattering of Ar on a LiF(100) surface. Comparison with numerical simulations shows excellent agreement of the analytical theory with simulations, provided that the energy loss is determined by the second order perturbation theory.

  15. Error analysis of exponential integrators for oscillatory second-order differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Volker; Hochbruck, Marlis

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, we analyse a family of exponential integrators for second-order differential equations in which high-frequency oscillations in the solution are generated by a linear part. Conditions are given which guarantee that the integrators allow second-order error bounds independent of the product of the step size with the frequencies. Our convergence analysis generalizes known results on the mollified impulse method by García-Archilla, Sanz-Serna and Skeel (1998, SIAM J. Sci. Comput. 30 930-63) and on Gautschi-type exponential integrators (Hairer E, Lubich Ch and Wanner G 2002 Geometric Numerical Integration (Berlin: Springer), Hochbruck M and Lubich Ch 1999 Numer. Math. 83 403-26).

  16. Adaptive uniform finite-/fixed-time convergent second-order sliding-mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basin, Michael; Bharath Panathula, Chandrasekhara; Shtessel, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an adaptive gain algorithm for second-order sliding-mode control (2-SMC), specifically a super-twisting (STW)-like controller, with uniform finite/fixed convergence time, that is robust to perturbations with unknown bounds. It is shown that a second-order sliding mode is established as exact finite-time convergence to the origin if the adaptive gain does not have the ability to get reduced and converge to a small vicinity of the origin if the adaptation algorithm does not overestimate the control gain. The estimate of fixed convergence time of the studied adaptive STW-like controller is derived based on the Lyapunov analysis. The efficacy of the proposed adaptive algorithm is illustrated in a tutorial example, where the adaptive STW-like controller with uniform finite/fixed convergence time is compared to the adaptive STW controller with non-uniform finite convergence time.

  17. Second-order nonlinear susceptibility in quantum dot structure under applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M.; Noori, Farah T. Mohammed; Al-Khursan, Amin H.

    2015-06-01

    A model for quantum dot (QD) subbands, when the dots are in the form of quantum disks, under applied electric field was stated. Then, subbands of dots with different disk radii and heights were calculated under applied field. The competition between the shift due to confinement by field and the size was shown for subbands. Second-order nonlinear susceptibility in quantum dots (QDs) was derived using density matrix theory which is, then, simulated using the calculated subbands. Both interband (IB) and intersubband (ISB) transitions were discussed. High second-order susceptibility in QDs was predicted. The results show a reduction in the susceptibility with the applied field while the peak wavelength was mainly relates to energy difference between subbands. A good match between theory and laboratory experiments was observed. Laboratory experiments at terahertz region might be possible using valence intersubband which is important in many device applications.

  18. Linear ion trap for second-order Doppler shift reduction in frequency standard applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Janik, Gary R.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lute

    1990-01-01

    The authors have designed and are presently testing a novel linear ion trap that permits storage of a large number of ions with reduced susceptibility to the second-order Doppler effect caused by the RF confining fields. This new trap should store about 20 times the number of ions as a conventional RF trap with no corresponding increase in second-order Doppler shift from the confining field. In addition, the sensitivity of this shift to trapping parameters, i.e., RF voltage, RF frequency, and trap size, is greatly reduced. The authors have succeeded in trapping mercury ions and xenon ions in the presence of helium buffer gas. Trap times as long as 2000 s have been measured.

  19. Harnessing second-order optical nonlinearities at interfaces in multilayer silicon-oxy-nitride waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Dylan F.; Alamin Dow, Ali B.; Stepanov, Dmitri; Abolghasem, Payam; Kherani, Nazir P.; Helmy, Amr S.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate multi-layer silicon-oxy-nitride (SiON) waveguides as a platform for broadband tunable phase-matching of second-order nonlinear interactions arising at material interfaces. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) is measured with a 2 ps pulsed pump of 1515-1535 nm wavelength, where 6 nW power is generated by an average pump power of 30 mW in a 0.92 mm long device. The wavelength acceptance bandwidth of the SHG is as broad as 20 nm due to the low material dispersion of SiON waveguides. The waveguide structure provides a viable method for utilizing second order nonlinearity for light generation and manipulation in silicon photonic circuits.

  20. Direct method for second-order sensitivity analysis of modal assurance criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Sheng; Mao, Kuanmin; Li, Li; Xiao, Weiwei; Li, Bin

    2016-08-01

    A Lagrange direct method is proposed to calculate the second-order sensitivity of modal assurance criterion (MAC) values of undamped systems. The eigenvalue problem and normalizations of eigenvectors, which augmented by using some Lagrange multipliers, are used as the constraints of the Lagrange functional. Once the Lagrange multipliers are determined, the sensitivities of MAC values can be evaluated directly. The Lagrange direct method is accurate, efficient and easy to implement. A simply supported beam is utilized to check the accuracy of the proposed method. A frame is adopted to validate the predicting capacity of the first- and second-order sensitivities of MAC values. It is shown that the computational costs of the proposed method can be remarkably reduced in comparison with those of the indirect method without loss of accuracy.

  1. Quasidegenerate second-order perturbation corrections to single excitation configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head-Gordon, Martin

    1999-02-01

    A family of quasidegenerate second-order perturbation theories that correct excitation energies from single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) are introduced which generalize the earlier non-degenerate second-order method, CIS(D). The new methods are termed CIS(D), where n ranges from 0 to x, according to the number of terms retained in a doubles denominator expansion. Truncation at either n = 0 or n = 1 yields methods which involve the diagonalization of a dressed singles-only response matrix, where the dressing is state-independent. Hence CIS(D0) and CIS(D1) can be implemented efficiently using semidirect methods, which are discussed. Test calculations on formaldehyde, ethylene, chlorine nitrate, styrene, benzaldehyde, and chalcone are presented to assess the performance of these methods. CIS(D0) and CIS(D1) both show significant improvements relative to CIS(D) in cases of near-degeneracy.

  2. Second-order Percus Yevick theory for mixtures of Lennard-Jones fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Douglas Henderson Stefan

    The second-order integral equation formalism of Attard, applied recently, with good results, to one-component hard spheres and Lennard-Jones fluids, is applied to some binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones fluids. Comparison with molecular dynamic simulations of the pair correlation functions shows that this method is also quite accurate for mixtures. This is true not only when the Lorentz Berthelot mixing rules are obeyed but also when there are substantial deviations from these rules.

  3. Navier-Stokes computation of compressible turbulent flows with a second order closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dingus, C.; Kollmann, W.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was the development of a complete second order closure for wall bounded flows, including all components of the dissipation rate tensor and a numerical solution procedure for the resulting system of equations. The main topics discussed are the closure of the pressure correlations and the viscous destruction terms in the dissipation rate equations and the numerical solution scheme based on a block-tridiagonal solver for the nine equations required for the prediction of plane or axisymmetric flows.

  4. Static multipole polarisabilities and second-order Stark shift in francium.

    PubMed

    Khan, F; Khandelwal, G S; Wilson, J W

    1988-01-01

    The multipole polarisability of the ground state of francium is calculated by utilising both the variational technique of Davison and the quantum defect theory underlying the Bates-Damgaard method. This approach is also shown to yield reasonable results for other alkali atoms. Second-order Stark shift for the ground state of francium is presented as a function of field strength for possible future experimental comparison.

  5. Static multipole polarisabilities and second-order Stark shift in francium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The multipole polarizability of the ground state of francium is calculated by utilizing both the variational technique of Davison and the quantum defect theory underlying the Bates-Damgaard method. This approach is also shown to yield reasonable results for other alkali atoms. Second-order Stark shift for the ground state of francium is presented as a function of field strength for possible future experimental comparison.

  6. Second-Order Far Field Computational Boundary Conditions for Inviscid Duct Flow Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    COMPUTATIONAL BOUNDARY CONDITIONS INTERNAL FLOW COMPUTATIONS EULER METHODS 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number...SOLUTIONS OF THE LINEARIZED, SECOND-ORDER EULER EQUATIONS. THE EULER EQUATIONS ARE LINEARIZED ABOUT A CONSTANT PRESSURE, RECTILINEAR FLOW C)NDITION...THE BOUNDARY PROCEDURE CAN BE USED WITH ANY NUMERICAL EULER SOLUTION METHOD AND ALLOWS COMPUTATIONAL BOUNDARIES TO BE LOCATED EXTREMELY CLOSE TO THE

  7. A second-order all-digital phase-locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, J. K.; Tegnelia, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    A simple second-order digital phase-locked loop has been designed to synchronize itself to a square-wave subcarrier. Analysis and experimental performance are given for both acquisition behavior and steady-state phase error performance. In addition, the damping factor and the noise bandwidth are derived analytically. Although all the data are given for the square-wave subcarrier case, the results are applicable to arbitrary subcarriers that are odd symmetric about their transition region.

  8. Finite amplitude instability of second-order fluids in plane Poiseuille flow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintire, L. V.; Lin, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of plane Poiseuille flow of second-order fluids to finite amplitude disturbances is examined using the method of Stuart and Watson as extended by Reynolds and Potter. For slightly non-Newtonian fluids subcritical instabilities are predicted. No supercritical equilibrium states are expected if the entire spectrum of disturbance wavelengths is present. Possible implications with respect to the Toms phenomenon are discussed.

  9. On the accuracy of second-order Møller-Plesset correlation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, J. R.

    1997-05-01

    Accurate second-order Møller-Plesset correlation energies are computed and compared with several semi-empirical estimates of the total correlation energies including those provided by Clementi, Anno and Teruya, and the recent results of Davidson, Froese and co-workers, for atoms with ten, twelve and eighteen electrons. Somewhat surprisingly, the MP2 correlation energies present what is considered to be in good agreement with the newest estimates, especially when the behaviour with the nuclear charge is examined.

  10. The Formation of the Second-Order Nonlinearity in Thermally Poled Fused Silica Glass

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NONIINEARITY IN THERMALLY POLED FUSED SILICA GLASS 6. AUTHOR(S) THOMAS GUSTAVE ALLEY 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...ADDRESS(ES) The University of New Mexico 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 98-020D 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...self- organized , photoinduced, second-order nonlinearity. The most widely accepted explanation attributes the nonlinearity to an asymmetric

  11. Mitigation of Second-Order Ionospheric Error for Real-Time PPP Users in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazeem, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Currently, the international global navigation satellite system (GNSS) real-time service (IGS-RTS) products are used extensively for real-time precise point positioning and ionosphere modeling applications. The major challenge of the dual frequency real-time precise point positioning (RT-PPP) is that the solution requires relatively long time to converge to the centimeter-level accuracy. This relatively long convergence time results essentially from the un-modeled high-order ionospheric errors. To overcome this challenge, a method for the second-order ionospheric delay mitigation, which represents the bulk of the high-order ionospheric errors, is proposed for RT-PPP users in Europe. A real-time regional ionospheric model (RT-RIM) over Europe is developed using the IGS-RTS precise satellite orbit and clock products. GPS observations from a regional network consisting of 60 IGS and EUREF reference stations are processed using the Bernese 5.2 software package in order to extract the real-time vertical total electron content (RT-VTEC). The proposed RT-RIM has spatial and temporal resolution of 1º×1º and 15 minutes, respectively. In order to investigate the effect of the second-order ionospheric delay on the RT-PPP solution, new GPS data sets from another reference stations are used. The examined stations are selected to represent different latitudes. The GPS observations are corrected from the second-order ionospheric errors using the extracted RT-VTEC values. In addition, the IGS-RTS precise orbit and clock products are used to account for the satellite orbit and clock errors, respectively. It is shown that the RT-PPP convergence time and positioning accuracy are improved when the second-order ionospheric delay is accounted for.

  12. Second-order Born approximation for the ionization of molecules by electron and positron impact

    SciTech Connect

    Dal Cappello, C.; Rezkallah, Z.; Houamer, S.; Charpentier, I.; Hervieux, P. A.; Ruiz-Lopez, M. F.; Dey, R.; Roy, A. C.

    2011-09-15

    Second-order Born approximation is applied to study the ionization of molecules. The initial and final states are described by single-center wave functions. For the initial state a Gaussian wave function is used while for the ejected electron it is a distorted wave. Results of the present model are compared with recent (e,2e) experiments on the water molecule. Preliminary results are also presented for the ionization of the thymine molecule by electrons and positrons.

  13. Second-order virial expansion for an atomic gas in a harmonic waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, Tom; Leyronas, Xavier; Pricoupenko, Ludovic

    2016-06-01

    The virial expansion for cold two-component Fermi and Bose atomic gases is considered in the presence of a waveguide and in the vicinity of a Feshbach resonance. The interaction between atoms and the coupling with the Feshbach molecules is modeled using a quantitative separable two-channel model. The scattering phase shift in an atomic waveguide is defined. This permits us to extend the Beth-Uhlenbeck formula for the second-order virial coefficient to this inhomogeneous case.

  14. On the basic equations for the second-order modeling of compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, W. W.; Shih, T.-H.

    1991-01-01

    Equations for the mean and turbulent quantities for compressible turbulent flows are derived. Both the conventional Reynolds average and the mass-weighted, Favre average were employed to decompose the flow variable into a mean and a turbulent quality. These equations are to be used later in developing second order Reynolds stress models for high speed compressible flows. A few recent advances in modeling some of the terms in the equations due to compressibility effects are also summarized.

  15. A second-order characteristic line scheme for solving a juvenile-adult model of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Deng, Keng; Wang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a second-order characteristic line scheme for a nonlinear hierarchical juvenile-adult population model of amphibians. The idea of the scheme is not to follow the characteristics from the initial data, but for each time step to find the origins of the grid nodes at the previous time level. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the scheme and its capability to handle solutions with singularity.

  16. Cascading failures in interdependent lattice networks: from first order to second order phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Bashan, Amir; Buldyrev, Sergey; Stanley, Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2012-02-01

    We study a system composed of two interdependent lattice networks A and B, where nodes in network A depend on a node within a certain shuffling distance r of its corresponding counterpart in network B and vice versa. We find, using numerical simulation that percolation in the two interdependent lattice networks system shows that for small r the phase transition is second order while for larger r it is a first order.

  17. A second order kinetic approach for modeling solute retention and transport in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selim, H. M.; Amacher, M. C.

    1988-12-01

    We present a second-order kinetic approach for the description of solute retention during transport in soils. The basis for this approach is that it accounts for the sites on the soil matrix which are accessible for retention of the reactive solutes in solution. This approach was incorporated with the fully kinetic two-site model where the difference between the characteristics of the two types of sites is based on the rate of kinetic retention reactions. We also assume that the retention mechanisms are site-specific, e.g., the sorbed phase on type 1 sites may be characteristically different in their energy of reaction and/or the solute species from that on type 2 sites. The second-order two-site (SOTS) model was capable of describing the kinetic retention behavior of Cr(VI) batch data for Olivier, Windsor, and Cecil soils. Using independently measured parameters, the SOTS model was successful in predicting experimental Cr breakthrough curves (BTC's). The proposed second-order approach was also extended to the diffusion controlled mobile-immobile or two-region (SOMIM) model. The use of estimated parameters (e.g., the mobile water fraction and mass transfer coefficients) for the SOMIM model did not provide improved predictions of Cr BTC's in comparison to the SOTS model. The failure of the mobile-immobile model was attributed to the lack of nonequilibrium conditions for the two regions in these soils.

  18. A novel nonlinear adaptive filter using a pipelined second-order Volterra recurrent neural network.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haiquan; Zhang, Jiashu

    2009-12-01

    To enhance the performance and overcome the heavy computational complexity of recurrent neural networks (RNN), a novel nonlinear adaptive filter based on a pipelined second-order Volterra recurrent neural network (PSOVRNN) is proposed in this paper. A modified real-time recurrent learning (RTRL) algorithm of the proposed filter is derived in much more detail. The PSOVRNN comprises of a number of simple small-scale second-order Volterra recurrent neural network (SOVRNN) modules. In contrast to the standard RNN, these modules of a PSOVRNN can be performed simultaneously in a pipelined parallelism fashion, which can lead to a significant improvement in its total computational efficiency. Moreover, since each module of the PSOVRNN is a SOVRNN in which nonlinearity is introduced by the recursive second-order Volterra (RSOV) expansion, its performance can be further improved. Computer simulations have demonstrated that the PSOVRNN performs better than the pipelined recurrent neural network (PRNN) and RNN for nonlinear colored signals prediction and nonlinear channel equalization. However, the superiority of the PSOVRNN over the PRNN is at the cost of increasing computational complexity due to the introduced nonlinear expansion of each module.

  19. Second-order many-body perturbation expansions of vibrational Dyson self-energies.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Matthew R; Hirata, So

    2013-07-21

    Second-order many-body perturbation theories for anharmonic vibrational frequencies and zero-point energies of molecules are formulated, implemented, and tested. They solve the vibrational Dyson equation self-consistently by taking into account the frequency dependence of the Dyson self-energy in the diagonal approximation, which is expanded in a diagrammatic perturbation series up to second order. Three reference wave functions, all of which are diagrammatically size consistent, are considered: the harmonic approximation and diagrammatic vibrational self-consistent field (XVSCF) methods with and without the first-order Dyson geometry correction, i.e., XVSCF[n] and XVSCF(n), where n refers to the truncation rank of the Taylor-series potential energy surface. The corresponding second-order perturbation theories, XVH2(n), XVMP2[n], and XVMP2(n), are shown to be rigorously diagrammatically size consistent for both total energies and transition frequencies, yield accurate results (typically within a few cm(-1) at n = 4 for water and formaldehyde) for both quantities even in the presence of Fermi resonance, and have access to fundamentals, overtones, and combinations as well as their relative intensities as residues of the vibrational Green's functions. They are implemented into simple algorithms that require only force constants and frequencies of the reference methods (with no basis sets, quadrature, or matrix diagonalization at any stage of the calculation). The rules for enumerating and algebraically interpreting energy and self-energy diagrams are elucidated in detail.

  20. Practical considerations for a second-order directional hearing aid microphone system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Stephen C.

    2003-04-01

    First-order directional microphone systems for hearing aids have been available for several years. Such a system uses two microphones and has a theoretical maximum free-field directivity index (DI) of 6.0 dB. A second-order microphone system using three microphones could provide a theoretical increase in free-field DI to 9.5 dB. These theoretical maximum DI values assume that the microphones have exactly matched sensitivities at all frequencies of interest. In practice, the individual microphones in the hearing aid always have slightly different sensitivities. For the small microphone separation necessary to fit in a hearing aid, these sensitivity matching errors degrade the directivity from the theoretical values, especially at low frequencies. This paper shows that, for first-order systems the directivity degradation due to sensitivity errors is relatively small. However, for second-order systems with practical microphone sensitivity matching specifications, the directivity degradation below 1 kHz is not tolerable. A hybrid order directive system is proposed that uses first-order processing at low frequencies and second-order directive processing at higher frequencies. This hybrid system is suggested as an alternative that could provide improved directivity index in the frequency regions that are important to speech intelligibility.

  1. Speckle reduction in ultrasound medical images using adaptive filter based on second order statistics.

    PubMed

    Thakur, A; Anand, R S

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses an adaptive filtering technique for reducing speckle using second order statistics of the speckle pattern in ultrasound medical images. Several region-based adaptive filter techniques have been developed for speckle noise suppression, but there are no specific criteria for selecting the region growing size in the post processing of the filter. The size appropriate for one local region may not be appropriate for other regions. Selection of the correct region size involves a trade-off between speckle reduction and edge preservation. Generally, a large region size is used to smooth speckle and a small size to preserve the edges into an image. In this paper, a smoothing procedure combines the first order statistics of speckle for the homogeneity test and second order statistics for selection of filters and desired region growth. Grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) is calculated for every region during the region contraction and region growing for second order statistics. Further, these GLCM features determine the appropriate filter for the region smoothing. The performance of this approach is compared with the aggressive region-growing filter (ARGF) using edge preservation and speckle reduction tests. The processed image results show that the proposed method effectively reduces speckle noise and preserves edge details.

  2. Second order transport coefficient from the chiral anomaly at weak coupling: Diagrammatic resummation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Alba, Amadeo; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2015-07-01

    We compute one of the second order transport coefficients arising from the chiral anomaly in a high-temperature weakly coupled regime of quark-gluon plasma. This transport coefficient is responsible for the C P -odd current that is proportional to the time derivative of the magnetic field, and can be considered as a first correction to the chiral magnetic conductivity at finite, small frequency. We observe that this transport coefficient has a nonanalytic dependence on the coupling as ˜1 /(g4log (1 /g )) at the weak coupling regime, which necessitates a resummation of infinite ladder diagrams with leading pinch singularities to get a correct leading log result, a feature quite similar to what one finds in the computation of electric conductivity. We formulate and solve the relevant C P -odd Schwinger-Dyson equation in real-time perturbation theory that reduces to a coupled set of second order differential equations at leading log order. Our result for this second order transport coefficient indicates that chiral magnetic current has some resistance to the time change of the magnetic field; this shall be called the "chiral induction effect." We also discuss the case of color current induced by a color magnetic field.

  3. Effects of Second-Order Hydrodynamic Forces on Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, T.; Sarmento, A. J. N. A.; Jonkman, J.

    2014-04-01

    Relative to first-order, second-order wave-excitation loads are known to cause significant motions and additional loads in offshore oil and gas platforms. The design of floating offshore wind turbines was partially inherited from the offshore oil and gas industry. Floating offshore wind concepts have been studied with powerful aero-hydro-servo-elastic tools; however, most of the existing work on floating offshore wind turbines has neglected the contribution of second-order wave-excitation loads. As a result, this paper presents a computationally efficient methodology to consider these loads within FAST, a wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The method implemented was verified against the commercial OrcaFlex tool, with good agreement, and low computational time. A reference floating offshore wind turbine was studied under several wind and wave load conditions, including the effects of second-order slow-drift and sum-frequency loads. Preliminary results revealed that these loads excite the turbine's natural frequencies, namely the surge and pitch natural frequencies.

  4. Second order nonlinearity in Si by inhomogeneous strain and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilling, Jörg; Schriever, Clemens; Bianco, Federica; Cazzanelli, Massimo; Pavesi, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    The lack of a dipolar second order susceptibility (χ(2)) in silicon due to its centro-symmetric diamond lattice usually inhibits efficient second order nonlinear optical processes in the silicon bulk. Depositing stressed silicon nitride layers or growing a thermal oxide layer introduces an inhomogeneous strain into the silicon lattice and breaks the centro-symmetry of its crystal structure thereby creating a χ(2). This causes enhanced second harmonic generation and was observed in reflection and transmission measurements for wavelengths in the infrared. However strain is not the only means to break the structures symmetry. Fixed charges at the silicon nitride/silicon interface cause a high electric field close to the silicon interface which causes electric-field-induced-second-harmonic (EFISH) contributions too. The combination of both effects leads to χ(2) values which are estimated to be of the order as classic χ(2) materials like KDP or LiNiO3. This paves the way for the exploitation of other second order nonlinear processes in the area of silicon photonics and is an example how fundamental optical properties of materials can be altered by strain.

  5. Effect of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on Floating Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Roald, L.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A,; Chokani, N.

    2013-07-01

    Offshore winds are generally stronger and more consistent than winds on land, making the offshore environment attractive for wind energy development. A large part of the offshore wind resource is however located in deep water, where floating turbines are the only economical way of harvesting the energy. The design of offshore floating wind turbines relies on the use of modeling tools that can simulate the entire coupled system behavior. At present, most of these tools include only first-order hydrodynamic theory. However, observations of supposed second-order hydrodynamic responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium suggest that second-order effects might be critical. In this paper, the methodology used by the oil and gas industry has been modified to apply to the analysis of floating wind turbines, and is used to assess the effect of second-order hydrodynamics on floating offshore wind turbines. The method relies on combined use of the frequency-domain tool WAMIT and the time-domain tool FAST. The proposed assessment method has been applied to two different floating wind concepts, a spar and a tension-leg-platform (TLP), both supporting the NREL 5-MW baseline wind turbine. Results showing the hydrodynamic forces and motion response for these systems are presented and analysed, and compared to aerodynamic effects.

  6. A Second Order Continuum Theory of Fluids - Beyond the Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolucci, Samuel

    2016-11-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations have proved very valuable in modeling fluid flows over the last two centuries. However, there are some cases where it has been demonstrated that they do not provide accurate results. In such cases, very large variations in velocity and/or thermal fields occur in the flows. It is recalled that the Navier-Stokes equations result from linear approximations of constitutive quantities. Using continuum mechanics principles, we derive a second order constitutive theory that application of which should provide more accurate results is such cases. One important case is the structure of gas-dynamic shock waves. It has been demonstrated experimentally that the Navier-Stokes formulation yields incorrect shock profiles even at moderate Mach numbers. Current continuum theories, and indeed most statistical mechanics theories, that have been advanced to reconcile such discrepancies have not been fully successful. Thus, application of the second order theory based solely on a continuum formulation provides an excellent test problem. Results of the second-order equations applied to the shock structure are obtained for monatomic and diatomic gases over a large range of Mach numbers and are compared to experimental results.

  7. Second-Order Consensus in Multiagent Systems via Distributed Sliding Mode Control.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenwu; Wang, He; Cheng, Fei; Yu, Xinghuo; Wen, Guanghui

    2016-11-22

    In this paper, the new decoupled distributed sliding-mode control (DSMC) is first proposed for second-order consensus in multiagent systems, which finally solves the fundamental unknown problem for sliding-mode control (SMC) design of coupled networked systems. A distributed full-order sliding-mode surface is designed based on the homogeneity with dilation for reaching second-order consensus in multiagent systems, under which the sliding-mode states are decoupled. Then, the SMC is applied to the decoupled sliding-mode states to reach their origin in finite time, which is the sliding-mode surface. The states of agents can first reach the designed sliding-mode surface in finite time and then move to the second-order consensus state along the surface in finite time as well. The DSMC designed in this paper can eliminate the influence of singularity problems and weaken the influence of chattering, which is still very difficult in the SMC systems. In addition, DSMC proposes a general decoupling framework for designing SMC in networked multiagent systems. Simulations are presented to verify the theoretical results in this paper.

  8. Computationally efficient multidimensional analysis of complex flow cytometry data using second order polynomial histograms.

    PubMed

    Zaunders, John; Jing, Junmei; Leipold, Michael; Maecker, Holden; Kelleher, Anthony D; Koch, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Many methods have been described for automated clustering analysis of complex flow cytometry data, but so far the goal to efficiently estimate multivariate densities and their modes for a moderate number of dimensions and potentially millions of data points has not been attained. We have devised a novel approach to describing modes using second order polynomial histogram estimators (SOPHE). The method divides the data into multivariate bins and determines the shape of the data in each bin based on second order polynomials, which is an efficient computation. These calculations yield local maxima and allow joining of adjacent bins to identify clusters. The use of second order polynomials also optimally uses wide bins, such that in most cases each parameter (dimension) need only be divided into 4-8 bins, again reducing computational load. We have validated this method using defined mixtures of up to 17 fluorescent beads in 16 dimensions, correctly identifying all populations in data files of 100,000 beads in <10 s, on a standard laptop. The method also correctly clustered granulocytes, lymphocytes, including standard T, B, and NK cell subsets, and monocytes in 9-color stained peripheral blood, within seconds. SOPHE successfully clustered up to 36 subsets of memory CD4 T cells using differentiation and trafficking markers, in 14-color flow analysis, and up to 65 subpopulations of PBMC in 33-dimensional CyTOF data, showing its usefulness in discovery research. SOPHE has the potential to greatly increase efficiency of analysing complex mixtures of cells in higher dimensions.

  9. Pulsed second order field NMR for real time PGSE and single-shot surface to volume ratio measurements.

    PubMed

    Kittler, W C; Obruchkov, S; Galvosas, P; Hunter, M W

    2014-10-01

    Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance provides a powerful tool for the measurement of particle diffusion and mobility. When these particles are contained in a porous medium, the diffusive process is influenced by the pore boundaries, and their effect on diffusion measurements provides information about the pore space. The acquisition of the apparent diffusion coefficient and its dependence on time, in the short time limit, reveals the surface to volume ratio of the porous medium, and in the long time limit, its tortuosity. With conventional pulsed field gradient techniques, processes where pore boundaries are evolving on the sub-second time scale cannot be resolved. Using pulsed second order magnetic fields in conjunction with one-dimensional imaging and the pulse sequence Difftrain, this paper presents a proof of concept for the first ever real time single-shot surface to volume NMR measurement.

  10. Space activities and global popular music culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, Allison Rae; Collins, Patrick

    During the "space age" era, space activities appear increasingly as a theme in Western popular music, as they do in popular culture generally. In combination with the electronics and tele-communications revolution, "pop/rock" music has grown explosively during the space age to become an effectively global culture. From this base a number of trends are emerging in the pattern of influences that space activities have on pop music. The paper looks at the use of themes and imagery in pop music; the role of space technology in the modern "globalization" of pop music; and current and future links between space activities and pop music culture, including how public space programmes are affected by its influence on popular attitudes.

  11. Space weather activities at NOAA s Space Environment Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunches, J.

    The NOAA Space Environment Center is the focal point for real-time space weather monitoring and prediction in the United States . The Space Weather Operations (SWO) division staffs a 24-hour/day operations center, through which both in-situ and remotely sensed data and imagery flow. These diverse data streams are analyzed continuously, and that information is applied to both predictions and specifications of various aspects of the space environment. These include the behavior of the geomagnetic field, the character of the ionosphere, and the strength of the near-earth radiation environment. Models are brought to bear in each of thes e areas, as SEC has an active research-to-operations transition effort. The Rapid Prototyping Center is the venue through which pertinent models and data must pass to be brought into the operational arena. The model outputs are then made available both internally and externally. SEC is a member of the International Space Environment Service (ISES), a partnership currently consisting of eleven nations. The mission of the ISES is to encourage and facilitate near-real-time international monitoring and prediction of the space environment by: the rapid exchange of space environment information; the standardization of the methodology for space environment observations and data reduction; the uniform publication of observations and statistics; and the application of standardized space environment products and services to assist users in reducing the impact of space weather on activities of human interest. An overview of the operational attributes of the SEC, and the function of the ISES, will be presented. Additional issues related to space weather customers, new data streams to be available in the near-term, and how these new data and imagery will be integrated int o operations will be discussed.

  12. Volcanic accretion, tectonic extension and the second-order segmentation of slow and ultraslow-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannat, M.; Sauter, D.; Escartin, J.

    2011-12-01

    In this presentation we compare the segmentation and seafloor geology record of slow and ultraslow ridges with variable volcanic input. The easternmost Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), where long stretches of the axis lack volcanism is our volcanism-poor end-member, which we contrast with volcanically more active parts of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Keeping the differences of spreading rates in perspective, we use this comparison to analyze and discuss the respective roles of tectonic extension, which ultimately leads to the exhumation of deeply-derived rocks (ultramafics and gabbros), and of volcanic accretion, in shaping the geometry of the plate boundary. Second-order segments at slow and ultraslow ridges are typically 30 to 100 km-long, and separated by transform, or so-called "non-transform" discontinuities. Segment centers typically have a thicker crust, and in most cases have a thinner axial lithosphere, than segment ends. Although we do not resolve the controversy of whether these characteristics are produced by discrete melt and/or mantle diapirs in the subaxial asthenosphere (eg Lin et al. 1990), or by melt channeling toward regions of thinner axial lithosphere (eg Magde and Sparks, 1997), we show that melt supply and volcanism are needed to initiate second-order ridge segmentation. Axial valley bounding faults in our SWIR volcanism-poor end-member go un-segmented for up to 170 km along-axis.

  13. A new adjustable gains for second order sliding mode control of saturated DFIG-based wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bounadja, E.; Djahbar, A.; Taleb, R.; Boudjema, Z.

    2017-02-01

    The control of Doubly-Fed induction generator (DFIG), used in wind energy conversion, has been given a great deal of interest. Frequently, this control has been dealt with ignoring the magnetic saturation effect in the DFIG model. The aim of the present work is twofold: firstly, the magnetic saturation effect is accounted in the control design model; secondly, a new second order sliding mode control scheme using adjustable-gains (AG-SOSMC) is proposed to control the DFIG via its rotor side converter. This scheme allows the independent control of the generated active and reactive power. Conventionally, the second order sliding mode control (SOSMC) applied to the DFIG, utilize the super-twisting algorithm with fixed gains. In the proposed AG-SOSMC, a simple means by which the controller can adjust its behavior is used. For that, a linear function is used to represent the variation in gain as a function of the absolute value of the discrepancy between the reference rotor current and its measured value. The transient DFIG speed response using the aforementioned characteristic is compared with the one determined by using the conventional SOSMC controller with fixed gains. Simulation results show, accurate dynamic performances, quicker transient response and more accurate control are achieved for different operating conditions.

  14. Aeronautics and space report of the President: 1981 activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Achievements in the aeronautics and space program by function are summarized. Activities in communications, Earth's resources and environment, space science, space transportation, international activities, and aeronautics are included.

  15. Enhancing second-order conditioning with lesions of the basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Holland, Peter C

    2016-04-01

    Because the occurrence of primary reinforcers in natural environments is relatively rare, conditioned reinforcement plays an important role in many accounts of behavior, including pathological behaviors such as the abuse of alcohol or drugs. As a result of pairing with natural or drug reinforcers, initially neutral cues acquire the ability to serve as reinforcers for subsequent learning. Accepting a major role for conditioned reinforcement in everyday learning is complicated by the often-evanescent nature of this phenomenon in the laboratory, especially when primary reinforcers are entirely absent from the test situation. Here, I found that under certain conditions, the impact of conditioned reinforcement could be extended by lesions of the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Rats received first-order Pavlovian conditioning pairings of 1 visual conditioned stimulus (CS) with food prior to receiving excitotoxic or sham lesions of the BLA, and first-order pairings of another visual CS with food after that surgery. Finally, each rat received second-order pairings of a different auditory cue with each visual first-order CS. As in prior studies, relative to sham-lesioned control rats, lesioned rats were impaired in their acquisition of second-order conditioning to the auditory cue paired with the first-order CS that was trained after surgery. However, lesioned rats showed enhanced and prolonged second-order conditioning to the auditory cue paired with the first-order CS that was trained before amygdala damage was made. Implications for an enhanced role for conditioned reinforcement by drug-related cues after drug-induced alterations in neural plasticity are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Ethanol self-administration in mice under a second-order schedule.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Richard J; Pinkston, Jonathan W; Ginsburg, Brett C

    2015-09-01

    Long Fixed-Interval (FI) schedules, particularly second-order schedules, can engender substantial responding before drug or ethanol delivery that is uninfluenced by the direct effects of the drug or ethanol. Thus, these schedules can be used to study the effects of medications upon drug- or ethanol-seeking, uninfluenced by the direct effects of the self-administered drug or ethanol. Long FI second-order schedules are frequently used in primates and occasionally in rats. Under second-order schedules, completion of one response requirement, e.g., a Fixed Ratio 10 (FR10:S), produces a brief stimulus presentation, e.g., a 1-s 80-dB 4-kHZ tone, and this FR10:S serves as the response unit under another schedule, e.g., an FI 1800-s. Thus, the first FR10 completed after 1800 s would result in delivery both of the tone and of reinforcement, e.g., 10 × 0.01 mL 16% (w/v) ethanol. To examine if such schedules could be effectively used in mice, which have advantages in neurobiological and genetic studies, we trained eight C57BL/6J mice to respond under the schedule just described. This schedule maintained substantial responding. The temporal pattern of behavior was typical of an FI schedule with responding accelerating across the interval. We also examined the effects of acute and chronic administration of fluvoxamine on this responding, and these were modest. Finally, we examined responding when alcohol and/or tone deliveries were withheld, and found that extinction occurred most rapidly when both were withheld. This work demonstrates that long FI schedules of ethanol delivery may be useful in studying ethanol seeking in mice.

  17. Comparison of Second-Order Loads on a Semisubmersible Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Gueydon, S.; Duarte, T.; Jonkman, J.; Bayati, I.; Sarmento, A.

    2014-03-01

    As offshore wind projects move to deeper waters, floating platforms become the most feasible solution for supporting the turbines. The oil and gas industry has gained experience with floating platforms that can be applied to offshore wind projects. This paper focuses on the analysis of second-order wave loading on semisubmersible platforms. Semisubmersibles, which are being chosen for different floating offshore wind concepts, are particularly prone to slow-drift motions. The slack catenary moorings usually result in large natural periods for surge and sway motions (more than 100 s), which are in the range of the second-order difference-frequency excitation force. Modeling these complex structures requires coupled design codes. Codes have been developed that include turbine aerodynamics, hydrodynamic forces on the platform, restoring forces from the mooring lines, flexibility of the turbine, and the influence of the turbine control system. In this paper two different codes are employed: FAST, which was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and aNySIM, which was developed by the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands. The hydrodynamic loads are based on potential-flow theory, up to the second order. Hydrodynamic coefficients for wave excitation, radiation, and hydrostatic forces are obtained with two different panel codes, WAMIT (developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and DIFFRAC (developed by MARIN). The semisubmersible platform, developed for the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation project is used as a reference platform. Irregular waves are used to compare the behavior of this platform under slow-drift excitation loads. The results from this paper highlight the effects of these loads on semisubmersible-type platforms, which represent a promising solution for the commercial development of the offshore deepwater wind resource.

  18. First- and second-order stimulus length selectivity in New World monkey striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Bourne, J A; Lui, L; Tweedale, R; Rosa, M G P

    2004-01-01

    Motion is a powerful cue for figure-ground segregation, allowing the recognition of shapes even if the luminance and texture characteristics of the stimulus and background are matched. In order to investigate the neural processes underlying early stages of the cue-invariant processing of form, we compared the responses of neurons in the striate cortex (V1) of anaesthetized marmosets to two types of moving stimuli: bars defined by differences in luminance, and bars defined solely by the coherent motion of random patterns that matched the texture and temporal modulation of the background. A population of form-cue-invariant (FCI) neurons was identified, which demonstrated similar tuning to the length of contours defined by first- and second-order cues. FCI neurons were relatively common in the supragranular layers (where they corresponded to 28% of the recorded units), but were absent from layer 4. Most had complex receptive fields, which were significantly larger than those of other V1 neurons. The majority of FCI neurons demonstrated end-inhibition in response to long first- and second-order bars, and were strongly direction selective. Thus, even at the level of V1 there are cells whose variations in response level appear to be determined by the shape and motion of the entire second-order object, rather than by its parts (i.e. the individual textural components). These results are compatible with the existence of an output channel from V1 to the ventral stream of extrastriate areas, which already encodes the basic building blocks of the image in an invariant manner.

  19. Second-order Poisson Nernst-Planck solver for ion channel transport

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Qiong; Chen, Duan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    The Poisson Nernst-Planck (PNP) theory is a simplified continuum model for a wide variety of chemical, physical and biological applications. Its ability of providing quantitative explanation and increasingly qualitative predictions of experimental measurements has earned itself much recognition in the research community. Numerous computational algorithms have been constructed for the solution of the PNP equations. However, in the realistic ion-channel context, no second order convergent PNP algorithm has ever been reported in the literature, due to many numerical obstacles, including discontinuous coefficients, singular charges, geometric singularities, and nonlinear couplings. The present work introduces a number of numerical algorithms to overcome the abovementioned numerical challenges and constructs the first second-order convergent PNP solver in the ion-channel context. First, a Dirichlet to Neumann mapping (DNM) algorithm is designed to alleviate the charge singularity due to the protein structure. Additionally, the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method is reformulated for solving the PNP equations. The MIB method systematically enforces the interface jump conditions and achieves the second order accuracy in the presence of complex geometry and geometric singularities of molecular surfaces. Moreover, two iterative schemes are utilized to deal with the coupled nonlinear equations. Furthermore, extensive and rigorous numerical validations are carried out over a number of geometries, including a sphere, two proteins and an ion channel, to examine the numerical accuracy and convergence order of the present numerical algorithms. Finally, application is considered to a real transmembrane protein, the Gramicidin A channel protein. The performance of the proposed numerical techniques is tested against a number of factors, including mesh sizes, diffusion coefficient profiles, iterative schemes, ion concentrations, and applied voltages. Numerical predictions are

  20. Assessment of First- and Second-Order Wave-Excitation Load Models for Cylindrical Substructures

    SciTech Connect

    Pereyra, Brandon; Wendt, Fabian; Robertson, Amy; Jonkman, Jason

    2016-07-01

    The hydrodynamic loads on an offshore wind turbine's support structure present unique engineering challenges for offshore wind. Two typical approaches used for modeling these hydrodynamic loads are potential flow (PF) and strip theory (ST), the latter via Morison's equation. This study examines the first- and second-order wave-excitation surge forces on a fixed cylinder in regular waves computed by the PF and ST approaches to (1) verify their numerical implementations in HydroDyn and (2) understand when the ST approach breaks down. The numerical implementation of PF and ST in HydroDyn, a hydrodynamic time-domain solver implemented as a module in the FAST wind turbine engineering tool, was verified by showing the consistency in the first- and second-order force output between the two methods across a range of wave frequencies. ST is known to be invalid at high frequencies, and this study investigates where the ST solution diverges from the PF solution. Regular waves across a range of frequencies were run in HydroDyn for a monopile substructure. As expected, the solutions for the first-order (linear) wave-excitation loads resulting from these regular waves are similar for PF and ST when the diameter of the cylinder is small compared to the length of the waves (generally when the diameter-to-wavelength ratio is less than 0.2). The same finding applies to the solutions for second-order wave-excitation loads, but for much smaller diameter-to-wavelength ratios (based on wavelengths of first-order waves).

  1. Second-order structure function scaling derivation from the Euler and magnetohydrodynamic equations.

    PubMed

    Beronov, Kamen N

    2002-06-01

    An anomalous scaling paradigm that has recently come to be canonical has two features limiting its range of applicability: The driving and driven fields are separated dyamically and the driving field statistics is prescribed, in terms of the (inertial subrange) scaling of its second-order structure functions and of white-noise statistics in time. Then the spectrum of scaling exponents for the driven field, scalar or vector, depends parametrically on the driving. Here, the coupling of turbulent vorticity to the driving velocity field is considered. Using simple approximations and no white-noise statistics assumption, equations are derived for the evolution of two-point second-order correlations. The turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) case is treated in an analogous fashion. In the neutral case, the kinematic coupling between vorticity and velocity leads to a unique prediction for the scaling exponent of the second-order structure functions of the two turbulent fields. The velocity scaling exponent estimate is zeta(2)=3(1/2)-1 approximately equal to 0.732, i.e., close to experimental data. Unlike Kolmogorov scaling, this result is systematically derived from the Euler equations. The analogous scaling of MHD fields is now treated beyond the dynamo theory approximation. In contrast to the uniqueness found in the neutral case, predicted MHD scalings depend on one parameter, similar to the "plasma beta" parameter beta(T) relating kinetic to magnetic energy. The nature of predicted dependence of inertial-range scaling exponents on beta(T) agrees with an observed dichotomy between high-beta(T) and low-beta(T) turbulence regimes.

  2. A second-order unconstrained optimization method for canonical-ensemble density-functional methods.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Cecilie R; Olsen, Jeppe

    2013-03-07

    A second order converging method of ensemble optimization (SOEO) in the framework of Kohn-Sham Density-Functional Theory is presented, where the energy is minimized with respect to an ensemble density matrix. It is general in the sense that the number of fractionally occupied orbitals is not predefined, but rather it is optimized by the algorithm. SOEO is a second order Newton-Raphson method of optimization, where both the form of the orbitals and the occupation numbers are optimized simultaneously. To keep the occupation numbers between zero and two, a set of occupation angles is defined, from which the occupation numbers are expressed as trigonometric functions. The total number of electrons is controlled by a built-in second order restriction of the Newton-Raphson equations, which can be deactivated in the case of a grand-canonical ensemble (where the total number of electrons is allowed to change). To test the optimization method, dissociation curves for diatomic carbon are produced using different functionals for the exchange-correlation energy. These curves show that SOEO favors symmetry broken pure-state solutions when using functionals with exact exchange such as Hartree-Fock and Becke three-parameter Lee-Yang-Parr. This is explained by an unphysical contribution to the exact exchange energy from interactions between fractional occupations. For functionals without exact exchange, such as local density approximation or Becke Lee-Yang-Parr, ensemble solutions are favored at interatomic distances larger than the equilibrium distance. Calculations on the chromium dimer are also discussed. They show that SOEO is able to converge to ensemble solutions for systems that are more complicated than diatomic carbon.

  3. Space activities in 2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagkratis, Spyros

    2011-09-01

    The global financial crisis of 2008 has created an economic environment unfavourable to public and corporate economic activity alike, which could not have left space activities unaffected. However, the effects of the crisis upon the space sector have been so far less damaging than anticipated. The following paper presents recent developments in the field of space policies, institutional budgets and commercial activity worldwide, in an effort to improve the understanding of the new trends in commercial and public space activities. It particularly explores the strategies followed by space stakeholders in different countries and regions in order to pursue their planned space programmes in view of difficult financial conditions. Finally, it highlights the differences in the outlook of space activities between established and emerging space-faring nations and attempts to explore their medium-term consequences on an international level. For this purpose, it was based on research conducted in the framework of a recent ESPI report on "Space Policies, Issues and trends in 2009/2010".

  4. Second-Order Moller-Plesset Perturbation Theory for Molecular Dirac-Hartree-Fock Wave Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Moller-Plesset perturbation theory is developed to second order for a selection of Kramers restricted Dirac-Hartree-Fock closed and open-shell reference wave functions. The open-shell wave functions considered are limited to those with no more than two electrons in open shells, but include the case of a two-configuration SCF reference. Denominator shifts are included in the style of Davidson's OPT2 method. An implementation which uses unordered integrals with labels is presented, and results are given for a few test cases.

  5. Adaptive control for a class of second-order nonlinear systems with unknown input nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Guay, M

    2003-01-01

    An adaptive controller is developed for a class of second-order nonlinear dynamic systems with input nonlinearities using artificial neural networks (ANN). The unknown input nonlinearities are continuous and monotone and satisfy a sector constraint. In contrast to conventional Lyapunov-based design techniques, an alternative Lyapunov function, which depends on both system states and control input variable, is used for the development of a control law and a learning algorithm. The proposed adaptive controller guarantees the stability of the closed-loop system and convergence of the output tracking error to an adjustable neighbour of the origin.

  6. A second-order Grad-Shafranov solver with accurate derivative computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshghi, Iraj; Ricketson, Lee; Cerfon, Antoine

    2016-10-01

    We present progress on a fast Grad-Shafranov and Poisson solver that uses the finite element method with linear elements to find equilibria of the electro-magnetic potentials inside tokamaks. The code converges with second-order errors, and we introduce a module which can take derivatives of the potential at no increase in error. Thus, this code can be much faster than most higher-order finite element solvers, while still retaining a sufficiently small error margin in the physically relevant quantities.

  7. Self Assembled Spin Coated and Bulk Films of a Novel Polydiacetylene as Second Order NLO Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-31

    NLO Polymers 6. AUTHOm(m) R&T Code: 4132016 W.H. Kim, B. Bihari, R. Moody, N. B. Kodali , J.Kumar,S.K. Dr. JoAnn MilUiken Tripathy. 7. PERFORMING...Polymers by W.H. Kim, B. Bihari, R. Moody, N. B. Kodali , J.Kumar,S.K. Tripathy. Submitted to Macromolecules University of Massachusetts Lowell Department...FILMS OF A NOVEL POLYDIACETYLENE AS SECOND ORDER NLO POLYMERS W. H. Kim, B. Bihari+, R. Moody+, N. B. Kodali , J. Kumar+, and S. K. Tripathy, University

  8. Self Assembled Spin Coated and Bulk Films of a Novel Polydiacetylene as Second Order NLO Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-31

    T Code: 4132016 W.H. Kim, B. Bihari, R. Moody, N. B. Kodali , J.KumarS.K. Dr. JoAnn Milliken Tripathy. 7. PHI-OUHMING OFH-NIZATION NAMIE(S) AND...Self Assembled Spin Coated and Bulk Films of a Novel Polydiacetylene as Second Order NLO Polymers by W.H. Kim, B. Bihari, R. Moody, N. B. Kodali ...POLYMERS W. H. Kim, B. Bihari+, R. Moody+, N. B. Kodali , J. Kumar+, and S. K. Tripathy, University of Massachusetts-Lowell, Center for Advanced Materials

  9. Description of second-order effects within the framework of endochronic inelasticity for large deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadashevich, Yu. I.; Pomytkin, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    The history of origination and development of the endochronic approach is briefly described. The Novozhilov-Kadashevich version of the flow theory is used to write the constitutive relations of endochronic type and to present a method for their generalization to the domain of large deformations and rotations. Several examples of qualitative description of inelastic second-order effects are demonstrated. It is also noted that, within the framework of geometrically linear theories of phenomenological-type inelasticity, such effects cannot be explained theoretically from unified positions.

  10. Analysis and design of a second-order digital phase-locked loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasche, P. R.

    1979-01-01

    A specific second-order digital phase-locked loop (DPLL) was modeled as a first-order Markov chain with alternatives. From the matrix of transition probabilities of the Markov chain, the steady-state phase error of the DPLL was determined. In a similar manner the loop's response was calculated for a fading input. Additionally, a hardware DPLL was constructed and tested to provide a comparison to the results obtained from the Markov chain model. In all cases tested, good agreement was found between the theoretical predictions and the experimental data.

  11. Un-Reduction of Systems of Second-Order Ordinary Differential Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Toraño Andrés, Eduardo; Mestdag, Tom

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we consider an alternative approach to ''un-reduction''. This is the process where one associates to a Lagrangian system on a manifold a dynamical system on a principal bundle over that manifold, in such a way that solutions project. We show that, when written in terms of second-order ordinary differential equations (SODEs), one may associate to the first system a (what we have called) ''primary un-reduced SODE'', and we explain how all other un-reduced SODEs relate to it. We give examples that show that the considered procedure exceeds the realm of Lagrangian systems and that relate our results to those in the literature.

  12. A second-order differential equation for a point charged particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torromé, Ricardo Gallego

    A model for the dynamics of a classical point charged particle interacting with higher order jet fields is introduced. In this model, the dynamics of the charged particle is described by an implicit ordinary second-order differential equation. Such equation is free of run-away and pre-accelerated solutions of Dirac’s type. The theory is Lorentz invariant, compatible with the first law of Newton and Larmor’s power radiation formula. Few implications of the new equation in the phenomenology of non-neutral plasmas is considered.

  13. Practical Calculation of Second-order Supersonic Flow past Nonlifting Bodies of Revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dyke, Milton D

    1952-01-01

    Calculation of second-order supersonic flow past bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack is described in detail, and reduced to routine computation. Use of an approximate tangency condition is shown to increase the accuracy for bodies with corners. Tables of basic functions and standard computing forms are presented. The procedure is summarized so that one can apply it without necessarily understanding the details of the theory. A sample calculation is given, and several examples are compared with solutions calculated by the method of characteristics.

  14. Second-order Bragg gratings in single-mode chalcogenide fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Bernier, M; Asatryan, K E; Vallee, R; Galstian, T M; Vasil'ev, Sergei A; Medvedkov, O I; Plotnichenko, V G; Gnusin, P I; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2011-05-31

    Bragg gratings with a second-order resonance wavelength in the near-IR spectral region have been inscribed into single-mode chalcogenide (As{sub 2}S{sub 3}) glass fibre by a He - Ne laser beam using a configuration typical of Bragg grating fabrication in germanosilicate fibre, with the use of a phase mask that ensures effective diffraction of the writing light into the +1 and -1 orders. The spectra of the inscribed gratings show no resonances due to cladding mode excitation because the cladding material is photosensitive. (fibre optics)

  15. Ultra-fast digital holography of the femto-second order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Hongchen; Wang, Xiaolei; Mu, Guoguang

    2007-01-01

    We report on pulsed digital micro holographic systems recording ultra-fast process of the femto-second order, by spatially angular division multiplexing (SADM) and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), respectively. Both intensity and phase images of the digitally reconstructed images are obtained through Fourier transformation and digital filtering, which show clearly the plasma forming and propagating dynamic process of laser induced ionization of ambient air at the wavelength of 800 nm, with a time resolution of 50 fs and frame intervals of 300 to 550 fs.

  16. Thermal poling induced second-order nonlinearity in femtosecond- laser-modified fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    An Honglin; Fleming, Simon; McMillen, Benjamin W.; Chen, Kevin P.; Snoke, David

    2008-08-11

    Thermal poling was utilized to induce second-order nonlinearity in regions of fused silica modified by 771 nm femtosecond laser pulses. With second-harmonic microscopy, it was found that the nonlinearity in the laser-modified region was much lower than that in nonmodified regions. This is attributed to a more rigid glass network after irradiation by the femtosecond laser pulses and/or lack of mobile alkali ions. Measurement of the distribution of chemical elements in the femtosecond-laser-modified region in a soda lime glass revealed a lower level of sodium ions.

  17. Constraints on general second-order scalar-tensor models from gravitational Cherenkov radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Rampei; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro E-mail: kazuhiro@hiroshima-u.ac.jp

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate that the general second-order scalar-tensor theories, which have attracted attention as possible modified gravity models to explain the late time cosmic acceleration, could be strongly constrained from the argument of the gravitational Cherenkov radiation. To this end, we consider the purely kinetic coupled gravity and the extended galileon model on a cosmological background. In these models, the propagation speed of tensor mode could be less than the speed of light, which puts very strong constraints from the gravitational Cherenkov radiation.

  18. Treatment Characteristics of Second Order Structure of Proteins Using Low-Pressure Oxygen RF Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuya; Nakahigashi, Akari; Kawaguchi, Ryutaro; Goto, Masaaki

    2010-10-01

    Removal of proteins from the surface of medical equipments is attempted using oxygen plasma produced by RF discharge. FTIR spectra indicate that the bonding of C-H and N-H in the casein protein is reduced after irradiation of oxygen plasma. Also, the second order structure of a protein such as α-helix and β-sheet are modified by the oxygen plasma. Complete removal of casein protein with the concentration of 0.016 mg/cm2 that is equivalent to remnants on the medical equipment requires two hours avoiding the damage to medical equipments.

  19. Second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of AIIBVI and AIIIBV semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Sinha, Anita; Singh, B. P.; Chandra, S.

    2016-10-01

    The second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) susceptibilities χ123(2) of AIIBVI and AIIIBV groups of semiconductors with zincblende (ZB) structure have been studied. Two relations have been proposed for the calculation of χ123(2) (0) at zero frequency. One is based on bond charge model of Levine and the other is based on plasma oscillations theory of solids. Calculated values of χ123(2) (0) for all compounds are in fair agreement with the available experimental and reported values.

  20. A Stable Clock Error Model Using Coupled First and Second Order Gauss-Markov Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Russell; Lee, Taesul

    2008-01-01

    Long data outages may occur in applications of global navigation satellite system technology to orbit determination for missions that spend significant fractions of their orbits above the navigation satellite constellation(s). Current clock error models based on the random walk idealization may not be suitable in these circumstances, since the covariance of the clock errors may become large enough to overflow flight computer arithmetic. A model that is stable, but which approximates the existing models over short time horizons is desirable. A coupled first- and second-order Gauss-Markov process is such a model.

  1. Action approach to cosmological perturbations: the second-order metric in matter dominance

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Creminelli, Paolo; Vernizzi, Filippo; Norena, Jorge

    2008-08-15

    We study nonlinear cosmological perturbations during post-inflationary evolution, using the equivalence between a perfect barotropic fluid and a derivatively coupled scalar field with Lagrangian [-({partial_derivative}{phi}){sup 2}]{sup (1+w)/2w}. Since this Lagrangian is just a special case of k-inflation, this approach is analogous to the one employed in the study of non-Gaussianities from inflation. We use this method to derive the second-order metric during matter dominance in the comoving gauge directly as a function of the primordial inflationary perturbation {zeta}. Going to Poisson gauge, we recover the metric previously derived in the literature.

  2. Solution of second order quasi-linear boundary value problems by a wavelet method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Youhe; Wang, Jizeng

    2015-03-10

    A wavelet Galerkin method based on expansions of Coiflet-like scaling function bases is applied to solve second order quasi-linear boundary value problems which represent a class of typical nonlinear differential equations. Two types of typical engineering problems are selected as test examples: one is about nonlinear heat conduction and the other is on bending of elastic beams. Numerical results are obtained by the proposed wavelet method. Through comparing to relevant analytical solutions as well as solutions obtained by other methods, we find that the method shows better efficiency and accuracy than several others, and the rate of convergence can even reach orders of 5.8.

  3. Effect of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Roald, L.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-05-01

    The design of offshore floating wind turbines uses design codes that can simulate the entire coupled system behavior. At the present, most codes include only first-order hydrodynamics, which induce forces and motions varying with the same frequency as the incident waves. Effects due to second- and higher-order hydrodynamics are often ignored in the offshore industry, because the forces induced typically are smaller than the first-order forces. In this report, first- and second-order hydrodynamic analysis used in the offshore oil and gas industry is applied to two different wind turbine concepts--a spar and a tension leg platform.

  4. Brillouin optical time-domain analysis assisted by second-order Raman amplification.

    PubMed

    Martin-Lopez, Sonia; Alcon-Camas, Mercedes; Rodriguez, Felix; Corredera, Pedro; Ania-Castañon, Juan Diego; Thévenaz, Luc; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel

    2010-08-30

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a new method to extend the range of Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) systems. It exploits the virtual transparency created by second-order Raman pumping in optical fibers. The idea is theoretically analyzed and experimentally demonstrated in a 50 km fiber. By working close to transparency, we also show that the measurement length of the BOTDA can be increased up to 100 km with 2 meter resolution. We envisage extensions of this technique to measurement lengths well beyond this value, as long as the issue of relative intensity noise (RIN) of the primary Raman pump can be avoided.

  5. Second-order shaped pulsed for solid-state quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, Pinaki

    2008-01-01

    We present the construction and detailed analysis of highly optimized self-refocusing pulse shapes for several rotation angles. We characterize the constructed pulses by the coefficients appearing in the Magnus expansion up to second order. This allows a semianalytical analysis of the performance of the constructed shapes in sequences and composite pulses by computing the corresponding leading-order error operators. Higher orders can be analyzed with the numerical technique suggested by us previously. We illustrate the technique by analyzing several composite pulses designed to protect against pulse amplitude errors, and on decoupling sequences for potentially long chains of qubits with on-site and nearest-neighbor couplings.

  6. Cluster consensus of second-order multi-agent systems via pinning control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Qing; Francis, Austin; Chen, Shi-Hua

    2010-12-01

    This paper investigates the cluster consensus problem for second-order multi-agent systems by applying the pinning control method to a small collection of the agents. Consensus is attained independently for different agent clusters according to the community structure generated by the group partition of the underlying graph and sufficient conditions for both cluster and general consensus are obtained by using results from algebraic graph theory and the LaSalle Invariance Principle. Finally, some simple simulations are presented to illustrate the technique.

  7. Effects of assortative mixing in the second-order Kuramoto model.

    PubMed

    Peron, Thomas K Dm; Ji, Peng; Rodrigues, Francisco A; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    In this paper we analyze the second-order Kuramoto model in the presence of a positive correlation between the heterogeneity of the connections and the natural frequencies in scale-free networks. We numerically show that discontinuous transitions emerge not just in disassortative but also in strongly assortative networks, in contrast with the first-order model. We also find that the effect of assortativity on network synchronization can be compensated by adjusting the phase damping. Our results show that it is possible to control collective behavior of damped Kuramoto oscillators by tuning the network structure or by adjusting the dissipation related to the phases' movement.

  8. Supramolecular control over the structural organization of a second-order NLO-active organogelator.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Fátima; Faour, Lara; Gindre, Denis; Canevet, David; Sallé, Marc

    2016-10-19

    A study of the structural parameters which govern the supramolecular organization of an organogelator built from the Disperse Red moiety is proposed. In particular, the key balance between intermolecular H-bonding and/or π-π interactions is addressed by comparing the effect of a secondary amide vs. an ester linker within the molecular structure. Solution (1)H-NMR studies show the superiority of the former interaction in promoting the nanostructuring process, allowing it to reach a gel state in toluene. The nanostructures obtained from both the amide and the ester derivatives were also studied in the solid state. In particular, the use of second-harmonic generation microscopy demonstrates that an anisotropic organization of the material can even be observed in the case of the ester derivative, which demonstrates the efficiency of the tris(alkoxy)benzene unit in directing the self-assembly process, independently of additional H-bond interactions.

  9. Second-Order Active NLO Chromophores for DNA Based Electro-Optics Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-21

    8 was obtained by a click reaction between the diazidopyrrolidine carboxylate 26 and 27 using copper iodide and diisopropyl ethylamine in THF. The...IHex2N 22 Hex2NTMS TMS TMSA PdCl2(PPh3)2 CuI, Et3N, THF 40 °C, 48h 91% K2CO3, MeOH 4h 98% Hex2N 17 23 Chromophore 6 was obtained by a click ... reaction between 18 and 17 using sodium ascorbate and copper sulphate. The product was purified by column chromatography to afford chromophore 5 in

  10. Natural orbitals from single and double excitation configuration interaction wave functions: their use in second-order configuration interaction and wave functions incorporating limited triple and quadruple excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grev, Roger S.; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1992-05-01

    As an alternative to orbitals obtained from a molecular complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) wave function, we have investigated the use of natural orbitals (NOs) obtained from configuration interaction (CI) wave functions including all single and double excitations (CISD) for use in multireference CI (MRCI) studies. The specific MRCI methods investigated are (1) second-order CI (SOCI), which includes all single and double excitations with respect to a full CI in the valence space and (2) a wave function that includes all single and double excitations out of a valence space CISD reference function. The latter wave function can also be described as a single-double-triple-quadruple excitation CI in which only two electrons are allowed to simultaneously reside outside of the valence space, ``which we call CISD[TQ].'' Comparison is made with CASSCF-SOCI and full CI results for NH2 (2B1), CH3 (2A`2), and SiH2 (1B1) at equilibrium bond distances (Re) 1.5 and 2.0Re, and with full CI results for the dissociation energy of N2. The dissociation energies of N2 and C2 are also obtained using large atomic natural orbital basis sets and the results compared to CASSCF-SOCI and internally contracted MRCI results. In all, the MRCI results with CISD NOs are very similar to the CASSCF-MRCI results, and at geometries where the reference wave function is dominant, the relatively compact CISD[TQ] method yields results that are very close to SOCI. In addition to their ease of generation, the CISD NOs offer the added advantage of allowing for truncation of the CI configuration list on an orbital basis by simply deleting high-lying virtual orbitals. The errors introduced by this truncation are almost quantitatively obtained at the CISD level of theory.

  11. Operational Space Weather Activities in the US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas; Singer, Howard; Onsager, Terrance; Viereck, Rodney; Murtagh, William; Rutledge, Robert

    2016-07-01

    We review the current activities in the civil operational space weather forecasting enterprise of the United States. The NOAA/Space Weather Prediction Center is the nation's official source of space weather watches, warnings, and alerts, working with partners in the Air Force as well as international operational forecast services to provide predictions, data, and products on a large variety of space weather phenomena and impacts. In October 2015, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy released the National Space Weather Strategy (NSWS) and associated Space Weather Action Plan (SWAP) that define how the nation will better forecast, mitigate, and respond to an extreme space weather event. The SWAP defines actions involving multiple federal agencies and mandates coordination and collaboration with academia, the private sector, and international bodies to, among other things, develop and sustain an operational space weather observing system; develop and deploy new models of space weather impacts to critical infrastructure systems; define new mechanisms for the transition of research models to operations and to ensure that the research community is supported for, and has access to, operational model upgrade paths; and to enhance fundamental understanding of space weather through support of research models and observations. The SWAP will guide significant aspects of space weather operational and research activities for the next decade, with opportunities to revisit the strategy in the coming years through the auspices of the National Science and Technology Council.

  12. Analysis of the Spectrum of CH3OOH Using Second-Order Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzugan, Laura C.; McCoy, Anne B.; Sinha, Amitabha; Matthews, Jamie

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we calculate the spectrum of the OH stretch overtone region in CH_3OOH using vibrational second-order perturbation theory. Comparison of the calculated to the experimental spectra shows very good agreement. With this in place, the goal of this study is to use second-order perturbation theory to investigate the following questions. To begin with, we explored the origins of the transition strength and found that both mechanical and electrical anharmonicities contribute to the overall intensity. Then we studied the amount of OO stretch and OH stretch character in the wavefunctions that correspond to the states that are accessed by the experiment. This is of interest because the VMP (vibrationally mediated photodissociation) action spectrum of CH_3OOH is obtained by detection of the OH radical following vibrational excitation of the overtones/combination bands and the subsequent photodissociation along the OO bond. Interestingly, OH is detected in its vibrationless state following excitation of the OH and CH stretch overtones and combination bands involving the OH stretch. In contrast, vibrationally excited OH is only detected following excitation of OH stretch overtones in methyl peroxide. To further understand the origins of the intensity in CH_3OOH, we also explored the effects of deuteration in the OH and CH overtone regions.

  13. Enhanced modified Smith predictor for second-order non-minimum phase unstable processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uma, S.; Seshagiri Rao, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a modified Smith predictor design is proposed for enhanced control of non-minimum phase unstable second-order time-delay processes with/without zero. The proposed method involves the design of two controllers, i.e. set-point tracking controller and disturbance rejection controller. Set-point tracking controller is designed as a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) in series with a lag filter using direct synthesis method. The disturbance rejection controller is designed as a PID in series with a lead/lag filter based on direct synthesis method. Set-point weighting is considered for minimising the overshoots. The proposed method is applied by simulation on several second-order unstable processes. Robustness studies have been carried out using the small-gain theorem. The method gives good nominal and robust control performances. Significant improvement in the disturbance rejection is obtained with the proposed method when compared to the recently reported methods in the literature.

  14. Toroidal figures of equilibrium from a second-order accurate, accelerated SCF method with subgrid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huré, J.-M.; Hersant, F.

    2017-02-01

    We compute the structure of a self-gravitating torus with polytropic equation of state (EOS) rotating in an imposed centrifugal potential. The Poisson solver is based on isotropic multigrid with optimal covering factor (fluid section-to-grid area ratio). We work at second order in the grid resolution for both finite difference and quadrature schemes. For soft EOS (i.e. polytropic index n ≥ 1), the underlying second order is naturally recovered for boundary values and any other integrated quantity sensitive to the mass density (mass, angular momentum, volume, virial parameter, etc.), i.e. errors vary with the number N of nodes per direction as ˜1/N2. This is, however, not observed for purely geometrical quantities (surface area, meridional section area, volume), unless a subgrid approach is considered (i.e. boundary detection). Equilibrium sequences are also much better described, especially close to critical rotation. Yet another technical effort is required for hard EOS (n < 1), due to infinite mass density gradients at the fluid surface. We fix the problem by using kernel splitting. Finally, we propose an accelerated version of the self-consistent field (SCF) algorithm based on a node-by-node pre-conditioning of the mass density at each step. The computing time is reduced by a factor of 2 typically, regardless of the polytropic index. There is a priori no obstacle to applying these results and techniques to ellipsoidal configurations and even to 3D configurations.

  15. Effects of second order photobleaching on recovered diffusion parameters from fluorescence photobleaching recovery

    PubMed Central

    Bjarneson, D. W.; Petersen, N. O.

    1991-01-01

    In the original theoretical development of fluorescence photobleaching recovery with circular or Gaussian laser intensity profiles (Axelrod et al., 1976, Biophys. J.) the bleaching process is assumed to obey first order kinetics in the fluorescent probe. While this is reasonable in most cases where oxygen participates in the photolysis reaction, some processes may obey second order kinetics in the fluorophore concentration due to dimerization. Accordingly, we present here an analysis of the fluorescence recovery when the photobleaching process is taken to be second order in the probe. Analytical solutions for small bleaching levels indicate that the fluorescence recovery curve is very similar to that measured following a bleaching process first order in the probe. Numerical solutions for moderate bleaching levels show that the recovery is qualitatively similar, but quantitatively different. Because the shape of the recovery curve provides no evidence as to the order of photobleaching, we recommend continued use of the previous theoretical analysis. However, it must be borne in mind that the diffusion coefficient is increasingly underestimated as the extent of photobleaching is increased. The true diffusion coefficient is obtained in the limit of small levels of photobleaching. Estimates of the fractional recovery are not affected by this approach. PMID:19431806

  16. Second-Order Controllability of Multi-Agent Systems with Multiple Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Shi, Yun-Tao; Su, Hou-Sheng; Han, Xiao

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new second-order continuous-time multi-agent model and analyzes the controllability of second-order multi-agent system with multiple leaders based on the asymmetric topology. This paper considers the more general case: velocity coupling topology is different from location coupling topology. Some sufficient and necessary conditions are presented for the controllability of the system with multiple leaders. In addition, the paper studies the controllability of the system with velocity damping gain. Simulation results are given to illustrate the correctness of theoretical results. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61473129, 61304049, 61104140, 61473002, the Beijing Natural Science Foundation Program under Grant No. 4132021, the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University from Chinese Ministry of Education under Grant NCET-12-0215, “The-Great-Wall-Scholar” Candidate Training-Plan of North China University of Technology (NX130), and the Plan Training Project of Excellent Young Teacher of North China University of Technology (NX132), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, (HUST: Grant No. 2015TS025), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (WUT: Grant No. 2015VI015)

  17. A second order cone complementarity approach for the numerical solution of elastoplasticity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. L.; Li, J. Y.; Zhang, H. W.; Pan, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a new approach for solving elastoplastic problems as second order cone complementarity problems (SOCCPs). Specially, two classes of elastoplastic problems, i.e. the J 2 plasticity problems with combined linear kinematic and isotropic hardening laws and the Drucker-Prager plasticity problems with associative or non-associative flow rules, are taken as the examples to illustrate the main idea of our new approach. In the new approach, firstly, the classical elastoplastic constitutive equations are equivalently reformulated as second order cone complementarity conditions. Secondly, by employing the finite element method and treating the nodal displacements and the plasticity multiplier vectors of Gaussian integration points as the unknown variables, we obtain a standard SOCCP formulation for the elastoplasticity analysis, which enables the using of general SOCCP solvers developed in the field of mathematical programming be directly available in the field of computational plasticity. Finally, a semi-smooth Newton algorithm is suggested to solve the obtained SOCCPs. Numerical results of several classical plasticity benchmark problems confirm the effectiveness and robustness of the SOCCP approach.

  18. Cascaded second-order processes for the efficient generation of narrowband terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirmi, Giovanni; Hemmer, Michael; Ravi, Koustuban; Reichert, Fabian; Zapata, Luis E.; Calendron, Anne-Laure; Çankaya, Hüseyin; Ahr, Frederike; Mücke, Oliver D.; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Kärtner, Franz X.

    2017-02-01

    The generation of high-energy narrowband terahertz radiation has gained heightened importance in recent years due to its potentially transformative impact on spectroscopy, high-resolution radar and more recently electron acceleration. Among various applications, such terahertz radiation is particularly important for table-top free electron lasers, which are at the moment a subject of extensive research. Second-order nonlinear optical methods are among the most promising techniques to achieve the required coherent radiation with energy > 10 mJ, peak field > 100 MV m‑1, and frequency between 0.1 and 1 THz. However, they are conventionally thought to suffer from low efficiencies < ∼10‑3, due to the high ratio between optical and terahertz photon energies, in what is known as the Manley-Rowe limitation. In this paper, we review the current second-order nonlinear optical methods for the generation of narrowband terahertz radiation. We explain how to employ spectral cascading to increase the efficiency beyond the Manley-Rowe limit and describe the first experimental results in the direction of a terahertz-cascaded optical parametric amplifier, a novel technique which promises to fully exploit spectral cascading to generate narrowband terahertz radiation with few percent optical-to-terahertz conversion efficiency.

  19. Synthesis of second-order nonlinearities in dielectric-semiconductor-dielectric metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hung-Hsi; Yang, Mu-Han; Sharma, Rajat; Puckett, Matthew W.; Montoya, Sergio; Wurm, Christian D.; Vallini, Felipe; Fullerton, Eric E.; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a large effective second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility in electronic optical metamaterials based on sputtered dielectric-semiconductor-dielectric multilayers of silicon dioxide/amorphous silicon (a-Si)/aluminum oxide. The interfacial fixed charges (Qf) with opposite signs on either side of dielectric-semiconductor interfaces result in a non-zero built-in electric field within the a-Si layer, which couples to the large third-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor of a-Si and induces an effective second-order nonlinear susceptibility tensor χeff(2). The value of the largest components of the effective χeff(2) tensor, i.e., χ(2)zzz, is determined experimentally to be 2 pm/V for the as-fabricated metamaterials and increases to 8.5 pm/V after the post-thermal annealing process. The constituents and fabrication methods make these metamaterials CMOS compatible, enabling efficient nonlinear devices for chip-scale silicon photonic integrated circuits.

  20. A second order residual based predictor-corrector approach for time dependent pollutant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, S.; Hervouet, J.-M.; Ricchiuto, M.; Ata, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present a second order residual distribution scheme for scalar transport problems in shallow water flows. The scheme, suitable for the unsteady cases, is obtained adapting to the shallow water context the explicit Runge-Kutta schemes for scalar equations [1]. The resulting scheme is decoupled from the hydrodynamics yet the continuity equation has to be considered in order to respect some important numerical properties at discrete level. Beyond the classical characteristics of the residual formulation presented in [1,2], we introduce the possibility to iterate the corrector step in order to improve the accuracy of the scheme. Another novelty is that the scheme is based on a precise monotonicity condition which guarantees the respect of the maximum principle. We thus end up with a scheme which is mass conservative, second order accurate and monotone. These properties are checked in the numerical tests, where the proposed approach is also compared to some finite volume schemes on unstructured grids. The results obtained show the interest in adopting the predictor-corrector scheme for pollutant transport applications, where conservation of the mass, monotonicity and accuracy are the most relevant concerns.

  1. Second-order corrections to neutrino two-flavor oscillation parameters in the wave packet approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, A. E.; Guzzo, M. M.; Torres, F. R.

    2006-11-01

    We report about an analytic study involving the intermediate wave packet formalism for quantifying the physically relevant information which appears in the neutrino two-flavor conversion formula and helping us to obtain more precise limits and ranges for neutrino flavor oscillation. By following the sequence of analytic approximations where we assume a strictly peaked momentum distribution and consider the second-order corrections in a power series expansion of the energy, we point out a residual time-dependent phase which, coupled with the spreading/slippage effects, can subtly modify the neutrino-oscillation parameters and limits. Such second-order effects are usually ignored in the relativistic wave packet treatment, but they present an evident dependence on the propagation regime so that some small modifications to the oscillation pattern, even in the ultra-relativistic limit, can be quantified. These modifications are implemented in the confrontation with the neutrino-oscillation parameter range (mass-squared difference Δm2 and the mixing angle θ) where we assume the same wave packet parameters previously noticed in the literature in a kind of toy model for some reactor experiments. Generically speaking, our analysis parallels the recent experimental purposes which are concerned with higher precision parameter measurements. To summarize, we show that the effectiveness of a more accurate determination of Δm2 and θ depends on the wave packet width a and on the averaged propagating energy flux E¯ which still correspond to open variables for some classes of experiments.

  2. Conditional budgets of second-order statistics in nonpremixed and premixed turbulent combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macart, Jonathan F.; Grenga, Temistocle; Mueller, Michael E.

    2016-11-01

    Combustion heat release modifies or introduces a number of new terms to the balance equations for second-order turbulence statistics (turbulent kinetic energy, scalar variance, etc.) compared to incompressible flow. A major modification is a significant increase in viscosity and dissipation in the high-temperature combustion products, but new terms also appear due to density variation and gas expansion (dilatation). Previous scaling analyses have hypothesized that dilatation effects are important in turbulent premixed combustion but are unimportant in turbulent nonpremixed combustion. To explore this hypothesis, a series of DNS calculations have been performed in the low Mach number limit for spatially evolving turbulent planar jet flames of hydrogen and air in both premixed and nonpremixed configurations. Unlike other studies exploring the effects of heat release on turbulence, the turbulence is not forced, and detailed chemical kinetics are used to describe hydrogen-air combustion. Budgets for second-order statistics are computed conditioned on progress variable in the premixed flame and on mixture fraction in the nonpremixed flame in order to locate regions with respect to the flame structure where dilatation effects are strongest.

  3. Studies of Second Order Optical Nonlinearities of 4-Aminobenzophenone (ABP) Single Crystal Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Achintya; Thakur, Mrinal

    1998-03-01

    Specific organic materials exhibit very high second order optical susceptibilities. Growth of single crystal films of these materials and characterization of nonlinear optical properties are necessary for implementation of device applications. We have grown large-area films ( 1 cm^2 area, 4 μm thick) of ABP by a modification of the shear method. Single crystal nature of the films was confirmed by polarized optical microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis showed a [100] surface orientation. The absorption spectra revealed transparency from 390 nm to 1940 nm. Significant elements of the second order optical susceptibility tensor were measured by detailed SHG experiments using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 100 ps, 82 MHz). Second-harmonic power was measured using lock-in detection with carefully selected polarization conditions while the film was rotated about the propagation direction. Using LiNbØas the reference, d-coefficients of ABP were found to be d_23=7.2 pm/V and d_22=0.7 pm/V. Type-I and type-II phase-matching directions were identified on the film by analyzing the optical indicatrix surfaces at fundamental and second-harmonic frequencies.

  4. Perturbations of matter fields in the second-order gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kouji

    2009-12-01

    To show that the general framework of the second-order gauge-invariant perturbation theory developed by K. Nakamura [Prog. Theor. Phys. 110, 723 (2003)PTPKAV0033-068X10.1143/PTP.110.723; Prog. Theor. Phys. 113, 481 (2005)PTPKAV0033-068X10.1143/PTP.113.481] is applicable to a wide class of cosmological situations, some formulas for the perturbations of the matter fields are summarized within the framework of the second-order gauge-invariant cosmological perturbation theory in a four-dimensional homogeneous isotropic universe, which is developed in Prog. Theor. Phys. 117, 17 (2007)PTPKAV0033-068X10.1143/PTP.117.17. We derive the formulas for the perturbations of the energy-momentum tensors and equations of motion for a perfect fluid, an imperfect fluid, and a single scalar field, and show that all equations are derived in terms of gauge-invariant variables without any gauge fixing. Through these formulas, we may say that the decomposition formulas for the perturbations of any tensor field into gauge-invariant and gauge-variant parts, which are proposed in the above papers, are universal.

  5. The second-order Rytov approximation and residual error in dual-frequency satellite navigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, B. C.; Tinin, M. V.

    The second-order Rytov approximation has been used to determine ionospheric corrections for the phase path up to third order. We show the transition of the derived expressions to previous results obtained within the ray approximation using the second-order approximation of perturbation theory by solving the eikonal equation. The resulting equation for the phase path is used to determine the residual ionospheric first-, second- and third-order errors of a dual-frequency navigation system, with diffraction effects taken into account. Formulas are derived for the biases and variances of these errors, and these formulas are analyzed and modeled for a turbulent ionosphere. The modeling results show that the third-order error that is determined by random irregularities can be dominant in the residual errors. In particular, the role of random irregularities is enhanced for small elevation angles. Furthermore, in the case of small angles the role of diffraction effects increases. It is pointed out that a need to pass on to diffraction formulas arises when the Fresnel radius exceeds the inner scale of turbulence.

  6. Hanbury Brown-Twiss interferometry and second-order correlations of inflaton quanta

    SciTech Connect

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2011-01-15

    The quantum theory of optical coherence is applied to the scrutiny of the statistical properties of the relic inflaton quanta. After adapting the description of the quantized scalar and tensor modes of the geometry to the analysis of intensity correlations, the normalized degrees of first-order and second-order coherence are computed in the concordance paradigm and are shown to encode faithfully the statistical properties of the initial quantum state. The strongly bunched curvature phonons are not only super-Poissonian but also superchaotic. Testable inequalities are derived in the limit of large-angular scales and can be physically interpreted in the light of the tenets of Hanbury Brown-Twiss interferometry. The quantum mechanical results are compared and contrasted with different situations including the one where intensity correlations are the result of a classical stochastic process. The survival of second-order correlations (not necessarily related to the purity of the initial quantum state) is addressed by defining a generalized ensemble where super-Poissonian statistics is an intrinsic property of the density matrix and turns out to be associated with finite volume effects which are expected to vanish in the thermodynamic limit.

  7. Modeling of finite-amplitude sound beams: second order fields generated by a parametric loudspeaker.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Sha, Kan; Gan, Woon-Seng; Tian, Jing

    2005-04-01

    The nonlinear interaction of sound waves in air has been applied to sound reproduction for audio applications. A directional audible sound can be generated by amplitude-modulating the ultrasound carrier with an audio signal, then transmitting it from a parametric loudspeaker. This brings the need of a computationally efficient model to describe the propagation of finite-amplitude sound beams for the system design and optimization. A quasilinear analytical solution capable of fast numerical evaluation is presented for the second-order fields of the sum-, difference-frequency and second harmonic components. It is based on a virtual-complex-source approach, wherein the source field is treated as an aggregation of a set of complex virtual sources located in complex distance, then the corresponding fundamental sound field is reduced to the computation of sums of simple functions by exploiting the integrability of Gaussian functions. By this result, the five-dimensional integral expressions for the second-order sound fields are simplified to one-dimensional integrals. Furthermore, a substantial analytical reduction to sums of single integrals also is derived for an arbitrary source distribution when the basis functions are expressible as a sum of products of trigonometric functions. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by a comparison of numerical results with experimental data previously published for the rectangular ultrasonic transducer.

  8. Increasing returns to scale: The solution to the second-order social dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hang; Chen, Shu; Luo, Jun; Tan, Fei; Jia, Yongmin; Chen, Yefeng

    2016-01-01

    Humans benefit from extensive cooperation; however, the existence of free-riders may cause cooperation to collapse. This is called the social dilemma. It has been shown that punishing free-riders is an effective way of resolving this problem. Because punishment is costly, this gives rise to the second-order social dilemma. Without exception, existing solutions rely on some stringent assumptions. This paper proposes, under very mild conditions, a simple model of a public goods game featuring increasing returns to scale. We find that punishers stand out and even dominate the population provided that the degree of increasing returns to scale is large enough; consequently, the second-order social dilemma dissipates. Historical evidence shows that people are more willing to cooperate with others and punish defectors when they suffer from either internal or external menaces. During the prehistoric age, the abundance of contributors was decisive in joint endeavours such as fighting floods, defending territory, and hunting. These situations serve as favourable examples of public goods games in which the degrees of increasing returns to scale are undoubtedly very large. Our findings show that natural selection has endowed human kind with a tendency to pursue justice and punish defection that deviates from social norms. PMID:27535087

  9. Sachs-Wolfe at second order: the CMB bispectrum on large angular scales

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekeur, Lotfi; Creminelli, Paolo; D'Amico, Guido; Noreña, Jorge; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: creminel@ictp.it E-mail: norena@sissa.it

    2009-08-01

    We calculate the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy bispectrum on large angular scales in the absence of primordial non-Gaussianities, assuming exact matter dominance and extending at second order the classic Sachs-Wolfe result δT/T = Φ/3. The calculation is done in Poisson gauge. Besides intrinsic contributions calculated at last scattering, one must consider integrated effects. These are associated to lensing, and to the time dependence of the potentials (Rees-Sciama) and of the vector and tensor components of the metric generated at second order. The bispectrum is explicitly computed in the flat-sky approximation. It scales as l{sup −4} in the scale invariant limit and the shape dependence of its various contributions is represented in 3d plots. Although all the contributions to the bispectrum are parametrically of the same order, the full bispectrum is dominated by lensing. In the squeezed limit it corresponds to f{sub NL}{sup local} = −1/6−cos(2θ), where θ is the angle between the short and the long modes; the angle dependent contribution comes from lensing. In the equilateral limit it corresponds to f{sub NL}{sup equil} ≅ 3.13.

  10. Transport coefficients in second-order non-conformal viscous hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw

    2015-05-01

    Based on the exact solution of Boltzmann kinetic equation in the relaxation-time approximation, the precision of the two most recent formulations of relativistic second-order non-conformal viscous hydrodynamics (14-moment approximation and causal Chapman-Enskog method), standard Israel-Stewart theory, and anisotropic hydrodynamics framework, in the simple case of one-dimensional Bjorken expansion, is tested. It is demonstrated that the failure of Israel-Stewart theory in reproducing exact solutions of the Boltzmann kinetic equation occurs due to neglecting and/or choosing wrong forms of some of the second-order transport coefficients. In particular, the importance of shear-bulk couplings in the evolution equations for dissipative quantities is shown. One finds that, in the case of the bulk viscous pressure correction, such coupling terms are as important as the corresponding first-order Navier-Stokes term and must be included in order to obtain, at least qualitative, overall agreement with the kinetic theory.

  11. Indirect reciprocity can stabilize cooperation without the second-order free rider problem.

    PubMed

    Panchanathan, Karthik; Boyd, Robert

    2004-11-25

    Models of large-scale human cooperation take two forms. 'Indirect reciprocity' occurs when individuals help others in order to uphold a reputation and so be included in future cooperation. In 'collective action', individuals engage in costly behaviour that benefits the group as a whole. Although the evolution of indirect reciprocity is theoretically plausible, there is no consensus about how collective action evolves. Evidence suggests that punishing free riders can maintain cooperation, but why individuals should engage in costly punishment is unclear. Solutions to this 'second-order free rider problem' include meta-punishment, mutation, conformism, signalling and group-selection. The threat of exclusion from indirect reciprocity can sustain collective action in the laboratory. Here, we show that such exclusion is evolutionarily stable, providing an incentive to engage in costly cooperation, while avoiding the second-order free rider problem because punishers can withhold help from free riders without damaging their reputations. However, we also show that such a strategy cannot invade a population in which indirect reciprocity is not linked to collective action, thus leaving unexplained how collective action arises.

  12. Analysis of heart rate variability signal in meditation using second-order difference plot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Damodar Prasad; Tibarewala, Dewaki Nandan; Bhattacharya, Dilip Kumar

    2011-06-01

    In this article, the heart rate variability signal taken from subjects practising different types of meditations have been investigated to find the underlying similarity among them and how they differ from the non-meditative condition. Four different groups of subjects having different meditation techniques are involved. The data have been obtained from the Physionet and also collected with our own ECG machine. For data analysis, the second order difference plot is applied. Each of the plots obtained from the second order differences form a single cluster which is nearly elliptical in shape except for some outliers. In meditation, the axis of the elliptical cluster rotates anticlockwise from the cluster formed from the premeditation data, although the amount of rotation is not of the same extent in every case. This form study reveals definite and specific changes in the heart rate variability of the subjects during meditation. All the four groups of subjects followed different procedures but surprisingly the resulting physiological effect is the same to some extent. It indicates that there is some commonness among all the meditative techniques in spite of their apparent dissimilarity and it may be hoped that each of them leads to the same result as preached by the masters of meditation. The study shows that meditative state has a completely different physiology and that it can be achieved by any meditation technique we have observed. Possible use of this tool in clinical setting such as in stress management and in the treatment of hypertension is also mentioned.

  13. Biochemical systems theory: increasing predictive power by using second-order derivatives measurements.

    PubMed

    Cascante, M; Sorribas, A; Franco, R; Canela, E I

    1991-04-21

    Models based on the power-law formalism provide a useful tool for analyzing metabolic systems. Within this methodology, the S-system variant furnishes the best strategy. In this paper we explore an extension of this formalism by considering second-order derivative terms of the Taylor series which the power-law is based upon. Results show that the S-system equations which include second-order Taylor coefficients give better accuracy in predicting the response of the system to a perturbation. Hence, models based on this new approach could provide a useful tool for quantitative purposes if one is able to measure the required derivatives experimentally. In particular we show the utility of this approach when it comes to discriminating between two mechanisms that are equivalent in the S-system a representation based on first-order coefficients. However, the loss of analytical tractability is a serious disadvantage for using this approach as a general tool for studying metabolic systems.

  14. Determination of imidacloprid in water samples via photochemically induced fluorescence and second-order multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Edwar; Cid, Camila; Báez, María E

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a new method for the determination of imidacloprid in water samples; one of the most widely used neonicotinoid pesticides in the farming industry. The method is based on the measurement of excitation-emission spectra of photo-induced fluorescence (PIF-EEMs) associated with second-order multivariate calibration with a parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and unfolded partial least squares coupled to residual bilinearization (U-PLS/RBL). The second order advantage permitted the determination of imidacloprid in the presence of potential interferences, which also shows photo-induced fluorescence (other pesticides and/or unexpected compounds of the real samples). The photoreaction was performed in 100-μl disposable micropipettes. As a preliminary step, solid phase extraction on C18 (SPE-C18) was applied to concentrate the analyte and diminish the limit of detection. The LOD was approximately 1 ng mL(-1), which is suitable for detecting imidacloprid in water according to the guidelines established in North America and Europe. The PIF-EEMs coupled to PARAFAC or U-PLS/RBL was successfully applied for the determination of imidacloprid in different real water samples, with an average recovery of 101±10%.

  15. Numerical methods on European option second order asymptotic expansions for multiscale stochastic volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canhanga, Betuel; Ni, Ying; Rančić, Milica; Malyarenko, Anatoliy; Silvestrov, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    After Black-Scholes proposed a model for pricing European Options in 1973, Cox, Ross and Rubinstein in 1979, and Heston in 1993, showed that the constant volatility assumption made by Black-Scholes was one of the main reasons for the model to be unable to capture some market details. Instead of constant volatilities, they introduced stochastic volatilities to the asset dynamic modeling. In 2009, Christoffersen empirically showed "why multifactor stochastic volatility models work so well". Four years later, Chiarella and Ziveyi solved the model proposed by Christoffersen. They considered an underlying asset whose price is governed by two factor stochastic volatilities of mean reversion type. Applying Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms and the method of characteristics they presented a semi-analytical formula to compute an approximate price for American options. The huge calculation involved in the Chiarella and Ziveyi approach motivated the authors of this paper in 2014 to investigate another methodology to compute European Option prices on a Christoffersen type model. Using the first and second order asymptotic expansion method we presented a closed form solution for European option, and provided experimental and numerical studies on investigating the accuracy of the approximation formulae given by the first order asymptotic expansion. In the present paper we will perform experimental and numerical studies for the second order asymptotic expansion and compare the obtained results with results presented by Chiarella and Ziveyi.

  16. Pseudo-Second-Order Calcium-Mediated Cryptosporidium parvum Oocyst Attachment to Environmental Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xia; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Jellison, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are able to infect a wide range of mammals, including humans, via fecal-oral transmission. The remobilization of biofilm-associated C. parvum oocysts back into the water column by biofilm sloughing or bulk erosion poses a threat to public health and may be responsible for waterborne outbreaks; thus, the investigation of C. parvum attachment mechanisms to biofilms, particularly the physical and chemical factors controlling oocyst attachment to biofilms, is essential to predict the behavior of oocysts in the environment. In our study, biofilms were grown in rotating annular bioreactors using prefiltered stream water (0.2-μm retention) and rock biofilms (6-μm retention) until the mean biofilm thickness reached steady state. Oocyst deposition followed a calcium-mediated pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Kinetic parameters (i.e., initial oocyst deposition rate constant and total number of oocysts adhered to biofilms at equilibrium) from the model were then used to evaluate the impact of water conductivity on the attachment of oocysts to biofilms. Oocyst deposition was independent of solution ionic strength; instead, the presence of calcium enhanced oocyst attachment, as demonstrated by deposition tests. Calcium was identified as the predominant factor that bridges the carboxylic functional groups on biofilm and oocyst surfaces to cause attachment. The pseudo-second-order kinetic profile fit all experimental conditions, regardless of water chemistry and/or lighting conditions.

  17. Second order formalism for spin (1/2) fermions and Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado-Acosta, E. G.; Napsuciale, Mauro; Rodriguez, Simon

    2011-04-01

    We develop a second order formalism for massive spin 1/2 fermions based on the projection over Poincare invariant subspaces in the ((1/2),0)+(0,(1/2)) representation of the homogeneous Lorentz group. Using the U(1){sub em} gauge principle we obtain a second order description for the electromagnetic interactions of a spin 1/2 fermion with two free parameters, the gyromagnetic factor g and a parameter {xi} related to odd-parity Lorentz structures. We calculate Compton scattering in this formalism. In the particular case g=2, {xi}=0, and for states with well-defined parity, we recover Dirac results. In general, we find the correct classical limit and a finite value r{sub c}{sup 2} for the forward differential cross section, independent of the photon energy and of the value of the parameters g and {xi}. The differential cross section vanishes at high energies for all g, {xi} except in the forward direction. The total cross section at high energies vanishes only for g=2, {xi}=0. We argue that this formalism is more convenient than Dirac theory in the description of low energy electromagnetic properties of baryons and illustrate the point with the proton case.

  18. Second order x-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    X-ray phase imaging is sensitive to structural variation of soft tissue, and offers excellent contrast resolution for characterization of cancerous tissues. Also, the cross-section of x-ray phase shift is a thousand times greater than that of x-ray attenuation in soft tissue over the diagnostic energy range, allowing a much higher signal-to-noise ratio at a substantially lower radiation dose than attenuation-based x-ray imaging. In this paper, we present a second order approximation model with respect to phase shift based on the paraxial Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory, and also discuss in-line dark-field imaging based on the second order model. This proposed model accurately establishes a quantitative correspondence between phases and recorded intensity images, outperforming the linear phase approximation model widely used in the conventional methods of x-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging. This new model can be iteratively solved using the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART). The state of the art compressive sensing ingredients can be incorporated to achieve high quality image reconstruction. Our numerical simulation studies demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach that is more accurate and stable, and more robust against noise than the conventional approach.

  19. Physics of Space Plasma Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Karl

    2010-04-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; Part I. Setting the Scene: 2. Sites of activity; 3. Plasma models; Part II. Quiescence: 4. Introduction; 5. Magnetohydrodynamic states; 6. Particle picture of steady states; 7. A unified theory of steady states; 8. Quasi-static evolution and thin current sheets (TCS); Part III. Dynamics: 9. Nonideal effects; 10. Selected macroinstabilities; 11. Magnetic reconnection; 12. Aspects of bifurcation and nonlinear dynamics; Part IV. Applications: 13. Magnetospheric activity; 14. Models of solar activity; 15. Discussion; Appendix 1. Unified theory: details and derivations; Appendix 2. Variational principle for collisionless plasmas; Appendix 3. Symbols and fundamental constants; References; Index.

  20. Activities in Science Related to Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    Contained are a collection of science activities based upon forty-six scientific concepts related to space science. These activities are designed for junior high school science, but a much wider grade level range of use is possible. The booklet is primarily intended for teacher use. Each series of concept-oriented activities is independent of the…

  1. An adaptive, formally second order accurate version of the immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, Boyce E.; Hornung, Richard D.; McQueen, David M.; Peskin, Charles S.

    2007-04-01

    Like many problems in biofluid mechanics, cardiac mechanics can be modeled as the dynamic interaction of a viscous incompressible fluid (the blood) and a (visco-)elastic structure (the muscular walls and the valves of the heart). The immersed boundary method is a mathematical formulation and numerical approach to such problems that was originally introduced to study blood flow through heart valves, and extensions of this work have yielded a three-dimensional model of the heart and great vessels. In the present work, we introduce a new adaptive version of the immersed boundary method. This adaptive scheme employs the same hierarchical structured grid approach (but a different numerical scheme) as the two-dimensional adaptive immersed boundary method of Roma et al. [A multilevel self adaptive version of the immersed boundary method, Ph.D. Thesis, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 1996; An adaptive version of the immersed boundary method, J. Comput. Phys. 153 (2) (1999) 509-534] and is based on a formally second order accurate (i.e., second order accurate for problems with sufficiently smooth solutions) version of the immersed boundary method that we have recently described [B.E. Griffith, C.S. Peskin, On the order of accuracy of the immersed boundary method: higher order convergence rates for sufficiently smooth problems, J. Comput. Phys. 208 (1) (2005) 75-105]. Actual second order convergence rates are obtained for both the uniform and adaptive methods by considering the interaction of a viscous incompressible flow and an anisotropic incompressible viscoelastic shell. We also present initial results from the application of this methodology to the three-dimensional simulation of blood flow in the heart and great vessels. The results obtained by the adaptive method show good qualitative agreement with simulation results obtained by earlier non-adaptive versions of the method, but the flow in the vicinity of the model heart valves

  2. Variational Optimization of the Second-Order Density Matrix Corresponding to a Seniority-Zero Configuration Interaction Wave Function.

    PubMed

    Poelmans, Ward; Van Raemdonck, Mario; Verstichel, Brecht; De Baerdemacker, Stijn; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Massaccesi, Gustavo E; Alcoba, Diego R; Bultinck, Patrick; Van Neck, Dimitri

    2015-09-08

    We perform a direct variational determination of the second-order (two-particle) density matrix corresponding to a many-electron system, under a restricted set of the two-index N-representability P-, Q-, and G-conditions. In addition, we impose a set of necessary constraints that the two-particle density matrix must be derivable from a doubly occupied many-electron wave function, i.e., a singlet wave function for which the Slater determinant decomposition only contains determinants in which spatial orbitals are doubly occupied. We rederive the two-index N-representability conditions first found by Weinhold and Wilson and apply them to various benchmark systems (linear hydrogen chains, He, N2, and CN(-)). This work is motivated by the fact that a doubly occupied many-electron wave function captures in many cases the bulk of the static correlation. Compared to the general case, the structure of doubly occupied two-particle density matrices causes the associate semidefinite program to have a very favorable scaling as L(3), where L is the number of spatial orbitals. Since the doubly occupied Hilbert space depends on the choice of the orbitals, variational calculation steps of the two-particle density matrix are interspersed with orbital-optimization steps (based on Jacobi rotations in the space of the spatial orbitals). We also point to the importance of symmetry breaking of the orbitals when performing calculations in a doubly occupied framework.

  3. Active Control of Cryogenic Propellants in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, William

    2011-01-01

    A new era of space exploration is being planned. Exploration architectures under consideration require the long term storage of cryogenic propellants in space. This requires development of active control systems to mitigate the effect of heat leak. This work summarizes current state of the art, proposes operational design strategies and presents options for future architectures. Scaling and integration of active systems will be estimated. Ideal long range spacecraft systems will be proposed with Exploration architecture benefits considered.

  4. Second-order power spectra of CMB anisotropies due to primordial random perturbations in flat cosmological models

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Kenji

    2008-05-15

    Second-order power spectra of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies due to random primordial perturbations at the matter-dominant stage are studied, based on the relativistic second-order theory of perturbations in flat cosmological models and on the second-order formula of CMB anisotropies derived by Mollerach and Matarrese. So far the second-order integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect has been analyzed using the three-point correlation or bispectrum. In this paper we derive the second-order term of power spectra given using the two-point correlation of temperature fluctuations. The second-order density perturbations are small, compared with the first-order ones. The second-order power spectra of CMB anisotropies, however, are not small at all, compared with the first-order power spectra, because at the early stage the first-order integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect is very small and the second-order integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect may be dominant over the first-order ones. So their characteristic behaviors may be measured through future precise observation and bring useful information on the structure and evolution of our universe in the future.

  5. The Relationship between Second-Order False Belief and Display Rules Reasoning: The Integration of Cognitive and Affective Social Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naito, Mika; Seki, Yoshimi

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the relation between cognitive and affective social understanding, Japanese 4- to 8-year-olds received tasks of first- and second-order false beliefs and prosocial and self-presentational display rules. From 6 to 8 years, children comprehended display rules, as well as second-order false belief, using social pressures justifications…

  6. Landsat: Space Activities for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Steven K.

    1979-01-01

    An aerospace education activity is described which is suitable for grades 3-12. Students piece together several images from the Landsat satellite to make a mosaic of their state. From the mosaic clear acetate overlay maps can be made relating to such subjects as agriculture, geology, hydrology, or urban planning. (BB)

  7. Flocking of Second-Order Multiagent Systems With Connectivity Preservation Based on Algebraic Connectivity Estimation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hao; Wei, Yue; Chen, Jie; Xin, Bin

    2017-04-01

    The problem of flocking of second-order multiagent systems with connectivity preservation is investigated in this paper. First, for estimating the algebraic connectivity as well as the corresponding eigenvector, a new decentralized inverse power iteration scheme is formulated. Then, based on the estimation of the algebraic connectivity, a set of distributed gradient-based flocking control protocols is built with a new class of generalized hybrid potential fields which could guarantee collision avoidance, desired distance stabilization, and the connectivity of the underlying communication network simultaneously. What is important is that the proposed control scheme allows the existing edges to be broken without violation of connectivity constraints, and thus yields more flexibility of motions and reduces the communication cost for the multiagent system. In the end, nontrivial comparative simulations and experimental results are performed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results and highlight the advantages of the proposed estimation scheme and control algorithm.

  8. Higher-harmonic collective modes in a trapped gas from second-order hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, W. E.; Romatschke, P.

    2017-02-01

    Utilizing a second-order hydrodynamics formalism, the dispersion relations for the frequencies and damping rates of collective oscillations as well as spatial structure of these modes up to the decapole oscillation in both two- and three- dimensional gas geometries are calculated. In addition to higher-order modes, the formalism also gives rise to purely damped ‘non-hydrodynamic’ modes. We calculate the amplitude of the various modes for both symmetric and asymmetric trap quenches, finding excellent agreement with an exact quantum mechanical calculation. We find that higher-order hydrodynamic modes are more sensitive to the value of shear viscosity, which may be of interest for the precision extraction of transport coefficients in Fermi gas systems.

  9. Second Order Catalytic Quasispecies Yields Discontinuous Mean Fitness at Error Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Nathaniel; Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2010-05-01

    The quasispecies model describes processes related to the origin of life and viral evolutionary dynamics. We discuss how the error catastrophe that reflects the transition from localized to delocalized quasispecies population is affected by catalytic replication of different reaction orders. Specifically, we find that second order mechanisms lead to a discontinuity in the mean fitness of the population at the error threshold. This is in contrast to the behavior of the first order, autocatalytic replication mechanism considered in the standard quasispecies model. This suggests that quasispecies models with higher order replication mechanisms produce discontinuities in the mean fitness, and hence the viable population fraction as well, at the error threshold, while lower order replication mechanisms yield a continuous mean fitness function. We discuss potential implications for understanding replication in the RNA world and in virology.

  10. Second order classical perturbation theory for atom surface scattering: Analysis of asymmetry in the angular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yun Pollak, Eli; Miret-Artés, Salvador

    2014-01-14

    A second order classical perturbation theory is developed and applied to elastic atom corrugated surface scattering. The resulting theory accounts for experimentally observed asymmetry in the final angular distributions. These include qualitative features, such as reduction of the asymmetry in the intensity of the rainbow peaks with increased incidence energy as well as the asymmetry in the location of the rainbow peaks with respect to the specular scattering angle. The theory is especially applicable to “soft” corrugated potentials. Expressions for the angular distribution are derived for the exponential repulsive and Morse potential models. The theory is implemented numerically to a simplified model of the scattering of an Ar atom from a LiF(100) surface.

  11. Cooperative Adaptive Output Regulation for Second-Order Nonlinear Multiagent Systems With Jointly Connected Switching Networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Jie

    2017-01-11

    This paper studies the cooperative global robust output regulation problem for a class of heterogeneous second-order nonlinear uncertain multiagent systems with jointly connected switching networks. The main contributions consist of the following three aspects. First, we generalize the result of the adaptive distributed observer from undirected jointly connected switching networks to directed jointly connected switching networks. Second, by performing a new coordinate and input transformation, we convert our problem into the cooperative global robust stabilization problem of a more complex augmented system via the distributed internal model principle. Third, we solve the stabilization problem by a distributed state feedback control law. Our result is illustrated by the leader-following consensus problem for a group of Van der Pol oscillators.

  12. Bioethics as a second-order discipline: who is not a bioethicist?

    PubMed

    Kopelman, Loretta M

    2006-12-01

    A dispute exists about whether bioethics should become a new discipline with its own methods, competency standards, duties, honored texts, and core curriculum. Unique expertise is a necessary condition for disciplines. Using the current literature, different views about the sort of expertise that might be unique to bioethicists are critically examined to determine if there is an expertise that might meet this requirement. Candidates include analyses of expertise based in "philosophical ethics," "casuistry," "atheoretical or situation ethics," "conventionalist relativism," "institutional guidance," "regulatory guidance and compliance," "political advocacy," "functionalism," and "principlism." None succeed in identifying a unique area of expertise for successful bioethicists that could serve as a basis for making it a new discipline. Rather expertise in bioethics is rooted in many professions, disciplines and fields and best understood as a second-order discipline.

  13. Hyperbolic Second Order Equations with Non-Regular Time Dependent Coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garetto, Claudia; Ruzhansky, Michael

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we study weakly hyperbolic second order equations with time dependent irregular coefficients. This means assuming that the coefficients are less regular than Hölder. The characteristic roots are also allowed to have multiplicities. For such equations, we describe the notion of a `very weak solution' adapted to the type of solutions that exist for regular coefficients. The construction is based on considering Friedrichs-type mollifiers of coefficients and corresponding classical solutions, and their quantitative behaviour in the regularising parameter. We show that even for distributional coefficients, the Cauchy problem does have a very weak solution, and that this notion leads to classical or to ultradistributional solutions under conditions when such solutions also exist. In concrete applications, the dependence on the regularising parameter can be traced explicitly.

  14. Composite second-order performance improvement in optical fibre CATV transmission system using chirped fibre grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qing; Liu, Feng; Cai, Hai-Wen; Qu, Rong-Hui; Fang, Zu-Jie

    2005-05-01

    Theoretically, we analyse the dispersion compensation characteristics of the chirped fibre grating (CFG) in an optical fibre cable television (CATV) system and obtain the analytic expression of the composite second-order (CSO) distortion using the time-domain form of the field envelope wave equation. The obtained result is in good agreement with the numerical simulation result. Experimentally, we verify the result by making use of the tunable characteristics of CFG to change the dispersion compensation amount and obtain an optimal CSO performance in a 125km fibre transmission link. Both the theoretical and experimental results show that the CSO performance can be improved by properly choosing the dispersion compensation amount for a certain fibre transmission link.

  15. COMPARISON OF NUMERICAL METHODS FOR SOLVING THE SECOND-ORDER DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS OF MOLECULAR SCATTERING THEORY

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, L.D.; Alexander, M.H.; Johnson, B.R.; Lester Jr., W. A.; Light, J.C.; McLenithan, K.D.; Parker, G.A.; Redmon, M.J.; Schmalz, T.G.; Secrest, D.; Walker, R.B.

    1980-07-01

    The numerical solution of coupled, second-order differential equations is a fundamental problem in theoretical physics and chemistry. There are presently over 20 commonly used methods. Unbiased comparisons of the methods are difficult to make and few have been attempted. Here we report a comparison of 11 different methods applied to 3 different test problems. The test problems have been constructed to approximate chemical systems of current research interest and to be representative of the state of the art in inelastic molecular collisions. All calculations were done on the same computer and the attempt was made to do all calculations to the same level of accuracy. The results of the initial tests indicated that an improved method might be obtained by using different methods in different integration regions. Such a hybrid program was developed and found to be at least 1.5 to 2.0 times faster than any individual method.

  16. Approximated optimum condition of second order response surface model with correlated observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somayasa, Wayan

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper we establish an inference procedure for the eigenvalues of the model matrix of the second-order response surface model (RSM). In contrast to the classical treatment where the sample are assumed to be independently distributed, in this work we do not need such distributional simplification. The confidence region for the unknown vector of the eigenvalues is derived by means of delta method. The finite sample behavior of the convergence result is discussed by Monte Carlo Simulation. We get the approximated distribution of the pivotal quantity of the population eigenvalues as a chi-square distribution model. Next we attempt to apply the method to a real data provided by a mining industry. The data represents the percentage of cobalt (Co) observed over the exploration region.

  17. Post processing of optically recognized text via second order hidden Markov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Srijana

    In this thesis, we describe a postprocessing system on Optical Character Recognition(OCR) generated text. Second Order Hidden Markov Model (HMM) approach is used to detect and correct the OCR related errors. The reason for choosing the 2nd order HMM is to keep track of the bigrams so that the model can represent the system more accurately. Based on experiments with training data of 159,733 characters and testing of 5,688 characters, the model was able to correct 43.38 % of the errors with a precision of 75.34 %. However, the precision value indicates that the model introduced some new errors, decreasing the correction percentage to 26.4%.

  18. Second-order corrections to the wave function at the origin in muonic hydrogen and pionium

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Vladimir G.; Korzinin, Evgeny Yu.; Karshenboim, Savely G.

    2009-07-15

    Nonrelativistic second-order corrections to the wave function at the origin in muonic and exotic atoms are considered. The corrections are due to the electronic vacuum polarization. Such corrections are of interest due to various effective approaches, which take into account QED and hadronic effects. The wave function at the origin plays a key role in the calculation of the pionium lifetime, various finite nuclear size effects, and the hyperfine splitting. The results are obtained for the 1s and 2s states in pionic and muonic hydrogen and deuterium and in pionium, a bound system of {pi}{sup +} and {pi}{sup -}. Applications to the hyperfine structure and the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen are also considered.

  19. Photoassociation of a cold-atom-molecule pair. II. Second-order perturbation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lepers, M.; Vexiau, R.; Bouloufa, N.; Dulieu, O.; Kokoouline, V.

    2011-04-15

    The electrostatic interaction between an excited atom and a diatomic ground-state molecule in an arbitrary rovibrational level at large mutual separations is investigated with a general second-order perturbation theory, in the perspective of modeling the photoassociation between cold atoms and molecules. We find that the combination of quadrupole-quadrupole and van der Waals interactions competes with the rotational energy of the dimer, limiting the range of validity of the perturbative approach to distances larger than 100 Bohr radii. Numerical results are given for the long-range interaction between Cs and Cs{sub 2}, showing that the photoassociation is probably efficient for any Cs{sub 2} rotational energy.

  20. Numerical simulation of second-order hyperbolic telegraph type equations with variable coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Sapna; Kumar, Manoj; Tiwari, Surabhi

    2015-02-01

    In this article, the authors proposed a numerical scheme based on Crank-Nicolson finite difference scheme and Haar wavelets to find numerical solutions of different types of second order hyperbolic telegraph equations (i.e. telegraph equation with constant coefficients, with variable coefficients, and singular telegraph equation). This work is an extension of the scheme by Jiwari (2012) for hyperbolic equations. The use of Haar basis function is made with multiresolution analysis to get the fast and accurate results on collocation points. The convergence of the proposed scheme is proved by doing its error analysis. Four test examples are considered to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the scheme. The scheme is easy and very suitable for computer implementation and provides numerical solutions close to the exact solutions and available in the literature.

  1. The structure of the second-order non-Born-Oppenheimer density matriz D2:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludena, Eduardo; Iza, Peter; Aray, Yosslen; Cornejo, Mauricio; Zambrano, Dik

    Properties of the non-Born-Oppenheimer 2-matrix are examined. Using a coordinate system formed by internal translationally invariant plus the total center-of-mass coordinates it is shown that regardless of the point of reference selected, the operator for the reduced second order density matrix, 2-RDM, solely depends upon the translationally invariant internal coordinates. We apply this result to examine the nature of the 2-RDM extracted from the exact analytical solutions for model non-Born-Oppenheimer four-particle systems of the Coulomb-Hooke and Moshinsky types. We obtain for both these models explicit closed-form analytic expressions for the electron and nuclear 2-RDM. An explicit expression is also obtained for the electron-nuclear 2-RDM in the Moshinsky case, which shows coupling between the electron and nuclear coordinates. EVL and YA acknowledge support of SENESCYT's Prometheus Program.

  2. Conjugate symplecticity of second-order linear multi-step methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Quan-Dong; Jiao, Yan-Dong; Tang, Yi-Fa

    2007-06-01

    We review the two different approaches for symplecticity of linear multi-step methods (LMSM) by Eirola and Sanz-Serna, Ge and Feng, and by Feng and Tang, Hairer and Leone, respectively, and give a numerical example between these two approaches. We prove that in the conjugate relation with and being LMSMs, if is symplectic, then the B-series error expansions of , and of the form are equal to those of trapezoid, mid-point and Euler forward schemes up to a parameter [theta] (completely the same when [theta]=1), respectively, this also partially solves a problem due to Hairer. In particular we indicate that the second-order symmetric leap-frog scheme Z2=Z0+2[tau]J-1[backward difference]H(Z1) cannot be conjugate-symplectic via another LMSM.

  3. A single-loop optimization method for reliability analysis with second order uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shaojun; Pan, Baisong; Du, Xiaoping

    2015-08-01

    Reliability analysis may involve random variables and interval variables. In addition, some of the random variables may have interval distribution parameters owing to limited information. This kind of uncertainty is called second order uncertainty. This article develops an efficient reliability method for problems involving the three aforementioned types of uncertain input variables. The analysis produces the maximum and minimum reliability and is computationally demanding because two loops are needed: a reliability analysis loop with respect to random variables and an interval analysis loop for extreme responses with respect to interval variables. The first order reliability method and nonlinear optimization are used for the two loops, respectively. For computational efficiency, the two loops are combined into a single loop by treating the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) optimal conditions of the interval analysis as constraints. Three examples are presented to demonstrate the proposed method.

  4. Unbalanced and Minimal Point Equivalent Estimation Second-Order Split-Plot Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Peter A.; Kowalski, Scott M.; Vining, G. Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    Restricting the randomization of hard-to-change factors in industrial experiments is often performed by employing a split-plot design structure. From an economic perspective, these designs minimize the experimental cost by reducing the number of resets of the hard-to- change factors. In this paper, unbalanced designs are considered for cases where the subplots are relatively expensive and the experimental apparatus accommodates an unequal number of runs per whole-plot. We provide construction methods for unbalanced second-order split- plot designs that possess the equivalence estimation optimality property, providing best linear unbiased estimates of the parameters; independent of the variance components. Unbalanced versions of the central composite and Box-Behnken designs are developed. For cases where the subplot cost approaches the whole-plot cost, minimal point designs are proposed and illustrated with a split-plot Notz design.

  5. The cognitive demands of second order manual control: Applications of the event related brain potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickens, C.; Gill, R.; Kramer, A.; Ross, W.; Donchin, E.

    1981-01-01

    Three experiments are described in which tracking difficulty is varied in the presence of a covert tone discrimination task. Event related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited by the tones are employed as an index of the resource demands of tracking. The ERP measure reflected the control order variation, and this variable was thereby assumed to compete for perceptual/central processing resources. A fine-grained analysis of the results suggested that the primary demands of second order tracking involve the central processing operations of maintaining a more complex internal model of the dynamic system, rather than the perceptual demands of higher derivative perception. Experiment 3 varied tracking bandwidth in random input tracking, and the ERP was unaffected. Bandwidth was then inferred to compete for response-related processing resources that are independent of the ERP.

  6. A second-order Budkyo-type parameterization of landsurface hydrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreou, S. A.; Eagleson, P. S.

    1982-01-01

    A simple, second order parameterization of the water fluxes at a land surface for use as the appropriate boundary condition in general circulation models of the global atmosphere was developed. The derived parameterization incorporates the high nonlinearities in the relationship between the near surface soil moisture and the evaporation, runoff and percolation fluxes. Based on the one dimensional statistical dynamic derivation of the annual water balance, it makes the transition to short term prediction of the moisture fluxes, through a Taylor expansion around the average annual soil moisture. A comparison of the suggested parameterization is made with other existing techniques and available measurements. A thermodynamic coupling is applied in order to obtain estimations of the surface ground temperature.

  7. Homotopy Algorithm for Optimal Control Problems with a Second-order State Constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Hermant, Audrey

    2010-02-15

    This paper deals with optimal control problems with a regular second-order state constraint and a scalar control, satisfying the strengthened Legendre-Clebsch condition. We study the stability of structure of stationary points. It is shown that under a uniform strict complementarity assumption, boundary arcs are stable under sufficiently smooth perturbations of the data. On the contrary, nonreducible touch points are not stable under perturbations. We show that under some reasonable conditions, either a boundary arc or a second touch point may appear. Those results allow us to design an homotopy algorithm which automatically detects the structure of the trajectory and initializes the shooting parameters associated with boundary arcs and touch points.

  8. Second-order approximation for heat conduction: dissipation principle and free energies.

    PubMed

    Amendola, Giovambattista; Fabrizio, Mauro; Golden, Murrough; Lazzari, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    In the context of new models of heat conduction, the second-order approximation of Tzou's theory, derived by Quintanilla and Racke, has been studied recently by two of the present authors, where it was proved equivalent to a fading memory material. The importance of determining free energy functionals for such materials, and indeed for any material with memory, is emphasized. Because the kernel does not satisfy certain convexity restrictions that allow us to obtain various traditional free energies for materials with fading memory, it is necessary to restrict the study to the minimum and related free energies, which do not require these restrictions. Thus, the major part of this work is devoted to deriving an explicit expression for the minimum free energy. Simple modifications of this expression also give an intermediate free energy and the maximum free energy for the material. These derivations differ in certain important respects from earlier work on such free energies.

  9. A First and Second Order Moment Approach to Probabilistic Control Synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a robust control design methodology based on the estimation of the first two order moments of the random variables and processes that describe the controlled response. Synthesis is performed by solving an multi-objective optimization problem where stability and performance requirements in time- and frequency domains are integrated. The use of the first two order moments allows for the efficient estimation of the cost function thus for a faster synthesis algorithm. While reliability requirements are taken into account by using bounds to failure probabilities, requirements related to undesirable variability are implemented by quantifying the concentration of the random outcome about a deterministic target. The Hammersley Sequence Sampling and the First- and Second-Moment- Second-Order approximations are used to estimate the moments, whose accuracy and associated computational complexity are compared numerically. Examples using output-feedback and full-state feedback with state estimation are used to demonstrate the ideas proposed.

  10. Compression of ultra-short pulses due to cascaded second order nonlinearities in photonic bandgap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Shereena; Shahid Khan, Mohd.; Hafiz, Aurangzeb Khurram

    2016-03-01

    The cascaded second order nonlinearities in a 1-D photonic bandgap structure (1-D PBG) in the spectral domain have been explored. A weak signal pulse operating at frequency of interest is seeded with a strong pulse operating at its second harmonic (SH) frequency. The interaction of both pulses in the periodic structure takes place with a particular phase mismatch condition. The intensity of SH pulse controls the propagation of signal pulse and the signal pulse exhibits pulse compression at particular input SH intensity. Considering the parameter for GaInP/InAlP PBG structure we have demonstrated pulse compression from 290 fs to 155 fs. The dependency of pulse compression on the structural parameters, group velocity mismatch, group velocity dispersion and input intensity of pump has also been explored.

  11. Second-order approximation for heat conduction: dissipation principle and free energies

    PubMed Central

    Amendola, Giovambattista; Golden, Murrough

    2016-01-01

    In the context of new models of heat conduction, the second-order approximation of Tzou's theory, derived by Quintanilla and Racke, has been studied recently by two of the present authors, where it was proved equivalent to a fading memory material. The importance of determining free energy functionals for such materials, and indeed for any material with memory, is emphasized. Because the kernel does not satisfy certain convexity restrictions that allow us to obtain various traditional free energies for materials with fading memory, it is necessary to restrict the study to the minimum and related free energies, which do not require these restrictions. Thus, the major part of this work is devoted to deriving an explicit expression for the minimum free energy. Simple modifications of this expression also give an intermediate free energy and the maximum free energy for the material. These derivations differ in certain important respects from earlier work on such free energies. PMID:27118896

  12. Second order gradiometer and dc SQUID integrated on a planar substrate

    SciTech Connect

    van Nieuwenhuyzen, G.J.; de Waal, V.J.

    1985-02-15

    An integrated system of a thin-film niobium dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and a second order gradiometer on a planar substrate is described. The system consists of a dc SQUID with eight loops in parallel, each sensitive to the second derivative partial/sup 2/B/sub z//partialx/sup 2/ of the magnetic field. The calculated SQUID inductance is 1.3 nH. With an overall size of 16 x 16.5 mm/sup 2/ a sensitivity of 1.5 x 10/sup -9/ Tm/sup -2/ Hz/sup -1//sup ///sup 2/ is obtained. The measured transfer function for uniform fields perpendicular to the plane of the gradiometer is 2.1 x 10/sup -7/ T Phi/sup -1//sub 0/.

  13. A second-order focusing electrostatic toroidal electron spectrometer with 2pi radian collection.

    PubMed

    Khursheed, Anjam; Hoang, Hung Quang

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a toroidal electron energy spectrometer designed to capture electrons in the full 2pi azimuthal angular direction while at the same time having second-order focusing optics. Simulation results based upon direct ray tracing predict that the relative energy resolution of the spectrometer will be 0.146% and 0.0188% at input angular spreads of +/- 6 degrees and +/- 3 degrees, respectively, comparable to the theoretically best resolution of the cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA), and an order of magnitude better than existing toroidal spectrometers. Also predicted for the spectrometer is a parallel energy acquisition mode of operation, where the energy bandwidth is expected to be > +/- 10% (20% total) of the pass energy. The spectrometer is designed to allow for retardation of the pass energy without the need to incorporate auxiliary lenses.

  14. Analytical analysis of second-order Stokes wave in Brillouin ring fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Al-Asadi, H A; Abu Bakar, M H; Al-Mansoori, M H; Adikan, F R Mahamd; Mahdi, M A

    2011-12-05

    This paper details a theoretical modeling of Brillouin ring fiber laser which incorporates the interaction between multiple Brillouin Stokes signals. The ring cavity was pumped at several Brillouin pump (BP) powers and the output was measured through an optical coupler with various coupling ratios. The first-order Brillouin Stokes signal was saturated with the presence of the second-order Stokes signal in the cavity as a result of energy transfer between them. The outcome of the study found that the optimum point for the first-order Stokes wave performance is at laser power reduction of 10%. Resultantly, at the optimum output coupling ratio of 90%, the BFL was able to produce 19.2 mW output power at BP power and Brillouin threshold power of 60 and 21.3 mW respectively. The findings also exhibited the feasibility of the theoretical models application to ring-type Brillouin fiber laser of various design parameters.

  15. Approach Detect Sensor System by Second Order Derivative of Laser Irradiation Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tomohide; Yano, Yoshikazu; Tsuda, Norio; Yamada, Jun

    In recent years, as a result of a large amount of greenhouse gas emission, atmosphere temperature at ground level gradually rises. Therefore the Kyoto Protocol was adopted to solve the matter in 1997. By the energy-saving law amended in 1999, it is advisable that an escalator is controlled to pause during no user. Now a photo-electric sensor is used to control escalator, but a pole to install the sensor is needed. Then, a new type of approach detection sensor using laser diode, CCD camera and CPLD, which can be built-in escalator, has been studied. This sensor can derive the irradiated area of laser beam by simple processing in which the laser beam is irradiated in only the odd field of the interlace video signal. By second order derivative of laser irradiated area, this sensor can detect only the approaching target but can not detect the target which crosses and stands in the sensing area.

  16. Observed galaxy number counts on the lightcone up to second order: II. Derivation

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Maartens, Roy; Clarkson, Chris E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com

    2014-11-01

    We present a detailed derivation of the observed galaxy number over-density on cosmological scales up to second order in perturbation theory. We include all relativistic effects that arise from observing on the past lightcone. The derivation is in a general gauge, and applies to all dark energy models (including interacting dark energy) and to metric theories of modified gravity. The result will be important for accurate cosmological parameter estimation, including non-Gaussianity, since all projection effects need to be taken into account. It also offers the potential for new probes of General Relativity, dark energy and modified gravity. This paper accompanies Paper I which presents the key results for the concordance model in Poisson gauge.

  17. Further development and testing of a second-order bulk boundary layer model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Krasner, R.D.

    1993-05-03

    A one-layer bulk boundary layer model is developed. The model predicts the mixed layer values of the potential temperature, mixing ratio, and u- and v-momentum. The model also predicts the depth of the boundary layer and the vertically integrated turbulence kinetic energy (TKE). The TKE is determined using a second-order closure that relates the rate of dissipation to the TKE. The fractional area covered by rising motion sigma and the entrainment rate (E) are diagnostically determined. The model is used to study the clear convective boundary layer (CBL) using data from the Wangara, Australia boundary layer experiment. The Wangara data is also used as an observation base to validate model results. A further study is accomplished by simulating the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over an ocean surface. This study is designed to find the steady-state solutions of the prognostic variable.

  18. Necessary and sufficient conditions of stationary average consensus for second-order multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yongquan; Sun, Jitao

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the stationary average consensus problem for second-order discrete-time multi-agent systems (SDMAS). A stationary consensus problem is to find a control algorithm that brings the state of a group of agents to a common constant value which is called the collective decision. We introduce the concept of stationary average consensus of SDMAS and propose a consensus algorithm. Based on the polynomial stability and the graph theory, we obtain two necessary and sufficient conditions of stationary average consensus of SDMAS. The last theorem provides an algebraic criterion of stationary average consensus, and can help us to determine the parameters in the consensus algorithm. Furthermore, in this consensus algorithm, only the states of the agents are transferred among the agents. Therefore, this algorithm can not only solve the stationary average consensus problem but also reduce the amount of transferred data. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the efficiency of our results.

  19. Influence of the higher-order nonlinearities in embodying the second-order holographic associative memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanskii, Peter V.; Felde, Christina V.; Konovchuk, Alexey V.; Oleksyuk, Maxim V.

    2015-11-01

    Recording nonlinearity is conventionally considered as the source of noise in holographic imaging. Important exclusion from this general statement is nonlinear holographic associative memory, where the quadratic recording nonlinearity causes true brightness rendering and the possibility for associative coupling and reconstructing optical signals of arbitrary complexity which are stored at the same carrier without interference. In this paper we discuss the role of nonlinearities of an amplitude response of a hologram of the orders higher than the quadratic one in implementing the second-ordered holographic associative memory. We show that higher-order nonlinearities are also involved in implementing this type of memory. This conclusion may be of importance for interpretation of biological/human memory also. The highlight of our study is the conclusion that reconstruction of the complex conjugate heteroassociative response is provided directly, viz. by the set of specified by us pseudogratings, rather than by the mechanism of sequential diffractions.

  20. Super-twisting sliding mode differentiation for improving PD controllers performance of second order systems.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Ivan; Chairez, Isaac; Camacho, Oscar; Yañez, Cornelio

    2014-07-01

    Designing a proportional derivative (PD) controller has as main problem, to obtain the derivative of the output error signal when it is contaminated with high frequency noises. To overcome this disadvantage, the supertwisting algorithm (STA) is applied in closed-loop with a PD structure for multi-input multi-output (MIMO) second order nonlinear systems. The stability conditions were analyzed in terms of a strict non-smooth Lyapunov function and the solution of Riccati equations. A set of numerical test was designed to show the advantages of implementing PD controllers that used STA as a robust exact differentiator. The first numerical example showed the stabilization of an inverted pendulum. The second example was designed to solve the tracking problem of a two-link robot manipulator.

  1. An optimal PID controller via LQR for standard second order plus time delay systems.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Misra, Anuraag; Thakur, S K; Pandit, V S

    2016-01-01

    An improved tuning methodology of PID controller for standard second order plus time delay systems (SOPTD) is developed using the approach of Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and pole placement technique to obtain the desired performance measures. The pole placement method together with LQR is ingeniously used for SOPTD systems where the time delay part is handled in the controller output equation instead of characteristic equation. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology has been demonstrated via simulation of stable open loop oscillatory, over damped, critical damped and unstable open loop systems. Results show improved closed loop time response over the existing LQR based PI/PID tuning methods with less control effort. The effect of non-dominant pole on the stability and robustness of the controller has also been discussed.

  2. Second order catalytic quasispecies yields discontinuous mean fitness at error threshold.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Nathaniel; Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2010-05-07

    The quasispecies model describes processes related to the origin of life and viral evolutionary dynamics. We discuss how the error catastrophe that reflects the transition from localized to delocalized quasispecies population is affected by catalytic replication of different reaction orders. Specifically, we find that second order mechanisms lead to a discontinuity in the mean fitness of the population at the error threshold. This is in contrast to the behavior of the first order, autocatalytic replication mechanism considered in the standard quasispecies model. This suggests that quasispecies models with higher order replication mechanisms produce discontinuities in the mean fitness, and hence the viable population fraction as well, at the error threshold, while lower order replication mechanisms yield a continuous mean fitness function. We discuss potential implications for understanding replication in the RNA world and in virology.

  3. Very high polarimetric sensitivity to strain of second order mode of highly birefringent microstructured fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasilowski, Tomasz; Skorupski, Krzysztof; Makara, Mariusz; Statkiewicz-Barabach, Gabriela; Mergo, Pawel; Marc, Pawel; Jaroszewicz, Leszek

    2011-05-01

    Microstructured fibres (MSF) or photonic crystal fibres (PCF) possess a number of unique properties enabling a wide range of novel applications either in the telecommunication or in the sensing domain. In this paper we show that highly birefringent (HB) MSF with a dedicated design that allows inscribing fibre Bragg gratings in the MSF core can serve as pressure or stress transducers with extremely large sensitivity of second order mode, while exhibiting a low sensitivity to temperature drifts. Therefore, Bragg gratings inscribed in such MSF may offer a viable alternative to traditional optical fibre sensors of much lower stress sensitivity that require temperature compensation mechanisms and that are not intrinsically capable of distinguishing stress and temperature.

  4. Testing second order cyclostationarity in the squared envelope spectrum of non-white vibration signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghesani, P.; Pennacchi, P.; Ricci, R.; Chatterton, S.

    2013-10-01

    Cyclostationary models for the diagnostic signals measured on faulty rotating machineries have proved to be successful in many laboratory tests and industrial applications. The squared envelope spectrum has been pointed out as the most efficient indicator for the assessment of second order cyclostationary symptoms of damages, which are typical, for instance, of rolling element bearing faults. In an attempt to foster the spread of rotating machinery diagnostics, the current trend in the field is to reach higher levels of automation of the condition monitoring systems. For this purpose, statistical tests for the presence of cyclostationarity have been proposed during the last years. The statistical thresholds proposed in the past for the identification of cyclostationary components have been obtained under the hypothesis of having a white noise signal when the component is healthy. This need, coupled with the non-white nature of the real signals implies the necessity of pre-whitening or filtering the signal in optimal narrow-bands, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and the risk of losing diagnostic information or introducing biases on the result. In this paper, the authors introduce an original analytical derivation of the statistical tests for cyclostationarity in the squared envelope spectrum, dropping the hypothesis of white noise from the beginning. The effect of first order and second order cyclostationary components on the distribution of the squared envelope spectrum will be quantified and the effectiveness of the newly proposed threshold verified, providing a sound theoretical basis and a practical starting point for efficient automated diagnostics of machine components such as rolling element bearings. The analytical results will be verified by means of numerical simulations and by using experimental vibration data of rolling element bearings.

  5. An enhanced FIVER method for multi-material flow problems with second-order convergence rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, Alex; Zeng, Xianyi; Avery, Philip; Farhat, Charbel

    2017-01-01

    The finite volume (FV) method with exact two-material Riemann problems (FIVER) is an Eulerian computational method for the solution of multi-material flow problems. It is robust in the presence of large density jumps at the fluid-fluid interfaces, and the presence of large structural motions, deformations, and even topological changes at the fluid-structure interfaces. To achieve simplicity in implementation, it approximates each material interface by a surrogate surface which conforms to the control volume boundaries. Unfortunately, this approximation introduces a first-order error of the geometric type in the solution process. In this paper, it is first shown that this error causes the original version of FIVER to be inconsistent in the neighborhood of material interfaces and degrades its global order of spatial accuracy. Then, an enhanced version of FIVER is presented to rectify this issue, restore consistency, and achieve for smooth problems the desired global convergence rate. To this effect, the original definition of a surrogate material interface is retained because of its attractive simplicity. However, the solution at this interface of a two-material Riemann problem is enhanced with a simple reconstruction procedure based on interpolation and extrapolation. Next, the extrapolation component of this procedure is equipped with a limiter in order to achieve nonlinear stability for non-smooth problems. In the one-dimensional inviscid setting, the resulting FIVER method is also shown to be total variation bounded. Focusing on the context of a second-order FV semi-discretization, the nonlinear stability and second-order global convergence rate of this enhanced FIVER method are illustrated for several model multi-fluid and fluid-structure interaction problems. The potential of this computational method for complex multi-material flow problems is also demonstrated with the simulation of the collapse of an air bubble submerged in water and the comparison of the

  6. The nature of letter crowding as revealed by first- and second-order classification images

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Anirvan S.; Tjan, Bosco S.

    2009-01-01

    Visual crowding refers to the marked inability to identify an otherwise perfectly identifiable object when it is flanked by other objects. Crowding places a significant limit on form vision in the visual periphery; its mechanism is, however, unknown. Building on the method of signal-clamped classification images (Tjan & Nandy, 2006), we developed a series of first- and second-order classification-image techniques to investigate the nature of crowding without presupposing any model of crowding. Using an “o” versus “x” letter-identification task, we found that (1) crowding significantly reduced the contrast of first-order classification images, although it did not alter the shape of the classification images; (2) response errors during crowding were strongly correlated with the spatial structures of the flankers that resembled those of the erroneously perceived targets; (3) crowding had no systematic effect on intrinsic spatial uncertainty of an observer nor did it suppress feature detection; and (4) analysis of the second-order classification images revealed that crowding reduced the amount of valid features used by the visual system and, at the same time, increased the amount of invalid features used. Our findings strongly support the feature-mislocalization or source-confusion hypothesis as one of the proximal contributors of crowding. Our data also agree with the inappropriate feature-integration account with the requirement that feature integration be a competitive process. However, the feature-masking account and a front-end version of the spatial attention account of crowding are not supported by our data. PMID:18217820

  7. Second-order Born approximation for the scattering phase shifts: Application to the Friedel sum rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nersisyan, Hrachya B.; Fernández-Varea, José M.

    2013-09-01

    Screening effects are important to understand various aspects of ion-solid interactions and, in particular, play a crucial role in the stopping of ions in solids. In this paper the phase shifts and scattering amplitudes for the quantum-mechanical elastic scattering within up to the second-order Born (B2) approximation are revisited for an arbitrary spherically-symmetric electron-ion interaction potential. The B2 phase shifts and scattering amplitudes are then used to derive the Friedel sum rule (FSR) involving the second-order Born corrections. This results in a simple equation for the B2 perturbative screening parameter of an impurity ion immersed in a fully degenerate electron gas which, as expected, turns out to depend on the ion atomic number Z1 unlike the first-order Born (B1) screening parameter reported earlier by some authors. Furthermore, our analytical results for the Yukawa, hydrogenic, Hulthén, and Mensing potentials are compared, for both positive and negative ions and a wide range of one-electron radii, to the exact screening parameters calculated self-consistently by imposing the FSR requirement. It is shown that the B2 screening parameters agree excellently with the exact values at large and moderate densities of the degenerate electron gas, while at lower densities they progressively deviate from the exact numerical solutions but are nevertheless more accurate than the prediction of the B1 approximation. In addition, a simple Padé approximant to the Born series has been developed that improves the performance of the perturbative FSR for any negative ion as well as for Z1=+1.

  8. Second-order nonlinear optical response of zigzag BN single-walled nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, Vl. A.; Muryumin, E. E.; Gaiduk, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    A theory based on the two-band tight-binding approximation for π electrons is developed to describe the second-order nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of arrays of uniformly sized and well-aligned boron-nitride single-walled nanotubes (BN-SWNTs) with a zigzag achiral structure. It is assumed that the coherent light beam at frequency ω , incident upon the nanotube sample, is linearly polarized along the symmetry axis of the nanotubes. The long-axis NLO susceptibility χ(2)(ω) of those nanotubes is calculated within the independent nanotube approximation and in neglecting local-field effects. Using the perturbation-theory formalism in the crystal-momentum representation, we derive an explicit analytic expression for the χ(2)(ω) and apply it to study three distinct second-order NLO effects possible in the BN-SWNTs due to their noncentrosymmetric structure—namely, second-harmonic generation (SHG), linear electro-optical (LEO) effect, and nonlinear optical rectification (NOR). The theory is illustrated by numerical model calculations of the SHG, LEO, and NOR susceptibility spectra for several representative BN-SWNT ensembles consisting of large-diameter nanotubes. The calculated SHG spectra are found to be dominated by the highly peaked 2ω resonance at half the band-gap energy of the BN-SWNTs, where the absorption of light is negligible. Distinct features are also found in the LEO and NOR susceptibility spectra, e.g., a sudden switching of the susceptibility from a positive peak value to a negative peak one in the near vicinity of the fundamental absorption edge. A fairly large magnitude of those susceptibilities, reaching the order of 10-7esu under off-resonant conditions and up to 10-6esu in the resonant case, suggests that BN-SWNTs are a promising material for various electro-optical device applications.

  9. Fast full waveform inversion with source encoding and second-order optimization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Clara; Métivier, Ludovic; Operto, Stéphane; Brossier, Romain; Virieux, Jean

    2015-02-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) of 3-D data sets has recently been possible thanks to the development of high performance computing. However, FWI remains a computationally intensive task when high frequencies are injected in the inversion or more complex wave physics (viscoelastic) is accounted for. The highest computational cost results from the numerical solution of the wave equation for each seismic source. To reduce the computational burden, one well-known technique is to employ a random linear combination of the sources, rather that using each source independently. This technique, known as source encoding, has shown to successfully reduce the computational cost when applied to real data. Up to now, the inversion is normally carried out using gradient descent algorithms. With the idea of achieving a fast and robust frequency-domain FWI, we assess the performance of the random source encoding method when it is interfaced with second-order optimization methods (quasi-Newton l-BFGS, truncated Newton). Because of the additional seismic modelings required to compute the Newton descent direction, it is not clear beforehand if truncated Newton methods can indeed further reduce the computational cost compared to gradient algorithms. We design precise stopping criteria of iterations to fairly assess the computational cost and the speed-up provided by the source encoding method for each optimization method. We perform experiment on synthetic and real data sets. In both cases, we confirm that combining source encoding with second-order optimization methods reduces the computational cost compared to the case where source encoding is interfaced with gradient descent algorithms. For the synthetic data set, inspired from the geology of Gulf of Mexico, we show that the quasi-Newton l-BFGS algorithm requires the lowest computational cost. For the real data set application on the Valhall data, we show that the truncated Newton methods provide the most robust direction of descent.

  10. Movement Activities for Places and Spaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmus, Carolyn J., Ed.; Fowler, John, Ed.

    This manual is for the use of elementary school teachers. It presents a systematic approach to teaching movement and ways of teaching physical education activities in the classroom rather than in a gymnasium or out-of-doors. Activity games that will help children develop flexibility, motor skills, and a sense of space and cooperation with others…

  11. Space based astronomy: Teacher's guide with activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, Carla B. (Editor); Weiler, Edward; Morrow, Cherilyn; Bacon, Pamela M.; Thorne, Muriel; Blanchard, Paul A.; Howard, Sethane; Pengra, Patricia R.; Brown, Deborah A.; Winrich, Ralph

    1994-01-01

    This curriculum guide uses hands-on activities to help students and teachers understand the significance of space-based astronomy - astronomical observations made from outer space. The guide contains few of the traditional activities found in many astronomy guides such as constellation studies, lunar phases, and planetary orbits. Instead, it tells the story of why it is important to observe celestial objects from outer space and how to study the entire electromagnetic spectrum. The guide begins with a survey of astronomy related NASA spacecraft. This is followed by a collection of activities in four units: (1) the atmospheric filter; (2) the electromagnetic spectrum; (3) collecting electromagnetic radiation; and (4) down to Earth. A curriculum index identifies the curriculum areas each activity addresses. The guide concludes with a glossary, reference list, a NASA Resources list, and an evaluation card. It is designed for students in grades 5 through 8.

  12. The role of envelope beat cues in the detection and discrimination of second-order amplitude modulation (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllgrabe, Christian; Lorenzi, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The present study extends previous work from Lorenzi et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 2470-2478 (2001)] by investigating the respective contribution of two temporal cues (fast modulation sideband and slow envelope beat cues) to the detection and discrimination of ``second-order'' sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM). Second-order SAM detection and rate discrimination abilities were measured at low beat rates (fm'<=128 Hz) with a ``carrier'' modulation rate fixed at a high value (fm=256 Hz). The second-order SAM data were compared with first-order SAM detection and rate discrimination thresholds measured in similar conditions at rates fm between 1 and 256 Hz. The results showed that (1) through 64 Hz, first- and second-order SAM detection thresholds increased similarly when stimulus duration decreased from 2 s to 250 ms, whereas first-order SAM detection thresholds remained unaffected by changes in duration when fm>=128 Hz, and (2) through 32 Hz, first- and second-order SAM rate discrimination thresholds were similar and substantially lower than first-order SAM rate discrimination thresholds measured at fm>=128 Hz. These data demonstrate that the perception of second-order SAM is mainly based on the slow envelope beat cues. They also suggest a substantial contribution of the slow envelope beat cues appearing at the output of modulation filters tuned to or near fm to the perception of second-order SAM.

  13. Activities of NICT space weather project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Ken T.; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Mamoru

    NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology) has been in charge of space weather forecast service in Japan for more than 20 years. The main target region of the space weather is the geo-space in the vicinity of the Earth where human activities are dominant. In the geo-space, serious damages of satellites, international space stations and astronauts take place caused by energetic particles or electromagnetic disturbances: the origin of the causes is dynamically changing of solar activities. Positioning systems via GPS satellites are also im-portant recently. Since the most significant effect of positioning error comes from disturbances of the ionosphere, it is crucial to estimate time-dependent modulation of the electron density profiles in the ionosphere. NICT is one of the 13 members of the ISES (International Space Environment Service), which is an international assembly of space weather forecast centers under the UNESCO. With help of geo-space environment data exchanging among the member nations, NICT operates daily space weather forecast service every day to provide informa-tion on forecasts of solar flare, geomagnetic disturbances, solar proton event, and radio-wave propagation conditions in the ionosphere. The space weather forecast at NICT is conducted based on the three methodologies: observations, simulations and informatics (OSI model). For real-time or quasi real-time reporting of space weather, we conduct our original observations: Hiraiso solar observatory to monitor the solar activity (solar flare, coronal mass ejection, and so on), domestic ionosonde network, magnetometer HF radar observations in far-east Siberia, and south-east Asia low-latitude ionosonde network (SEALION). Real-time observation data to monitor solar and solar-wind activities are obtained through antennae at NICT from ACE and STEREO satellites. We have a middle-class super-computer (NEC SX-8R) to maintain real-time computer simulations for solar and solar

  14. Second-order nonlinear optical characteristics of nanoscale self-assembled multilayer organic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyman, Patrick J.

    Ionically self-assembled monolayer (ISAM) films are typically an assemblage of oppositely charged polymers built layer by layer through Coulombic attraction utilizing an environmentally friendly process to form ordered structures that are uniform, molecularly smooth and physically robust. ISAM films have been shown to be capable of the noncentrosymmetric order requisite for a second-order nonlinear optical response with excellent temporal and thermal stability. However, such films fabricated with a nonlinear optical (NLO) polyanion result in significant cancellation of the chromophore orientations. This cancellation occurs by two mechanisms: competitive orientation due to the ionic bonding of the polymer chromophore with the subsequent polycation layer, and random orientation of the chromophores within the bulk of each polyanion layer. A reduction in film thickness accompanied by an increase in net polar ordering is one possible avenue to obtain the second-order susceptibility chi (2) necessary for practical application in electro-optic devices. In this thesis, we discuss the structural characteristics of ISAM films and explore a novel approach to obtain the desired characteristics for nonlinear optical response. This approach involves a hybrid covalent/ionic self-assembly technique which affords improved net dipole alignment and concentration of monomer chromophores in the film. This technique yields a substantial increase in chi(2) due to the preferential chromophore orientation being locked in place by a covalent bond to the preceding polycation layer. The films fabricated in this manner yield a chi(2) (56 x 10-9 esu) that substantially exceeds that of any known polymer-polymer ISAM film (˜0.3 x 10-9 esu). This covalent-hybrid ionically self-assembled multilayer (CHISAM) technique is demonstrated to result in films suitable for electro-optic devices, with measured electro-optic coefficient (14 pm/V) comparable to that of the inorganic crystal lithium niobate

  15. Activities of the Space Studies Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This 1993 annual report of the Space Studies Board of the National research Council (NRC) describes the activities of the Board during a year filled with questions and change in the nation's civil space program. The accounts contained in this report briefly describe the activities of the Board and its committees and sketch out major space research issues. Two major reports are summarized, and the full text of three letter reports is included. Items considered include: (1) robotic missions to explore the Earth, the solar system, and the far reaches of the universe; (2) instability in the human flight program; (3) the redesign of the International Space Station; and (4) federal funding of research in all fields, especially basic research.

  16. POSSIM: Parameterizing Complete Second-Order Polarizable Force Field for Proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinbi; Ponomarev, Sergei Y; Sigalovsky, Daniel L; Cvitkovic, John P; Kaminski, George A

    2014-11-11

    Previously, we reported development of a fast polarizable force field and software named POSSIM (POlarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model). The second-order approximation permits the speed up of the polarizable component of the calculations by ca. an order of magnitude. We have now expanded the POSSIM framework to include a complete polarizable force field for proteins. Most of the parameter fitting was done to high-level quantum mechanical data. Conformational geometries and energies for dipeptides have been reproduced within average errors of ca. 0.5 kcal/mol for energies of the conformers (for the electrostatically neutral residues) and 9.7° for key dihedral angles. We have also validated this force field by running Monte Carlo simulations of collagen-like proteins in water. The resulting geometries were within 0.94 Å root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) from the experimental data. We have performed additional validation by studying conformational properties of three oligopeptides relevant in the context of N-glycoprotein secondary structure. These systems have been previously studied with combined experimental and computational methods, and both POSSIM and benchmark OPLS-AA simulations that we carried out produced geometries within ca. 0.9 Å RMSD of the literature structures. Thus, the performance of POSSIM in reproducing the structures is comparable with that of the widely used OPLS-AA force field. Furthermore, our fitting of the force field parameters for peptides and proteins has been streamlined compared with the previous generation of the complete polarizable force field and relied more on transferability of parameters for nonbonded interactions (including the electrostatic component). The resulting deviations from the quantum mechanical data are similar to those achieved with the previous generation; thus, the technique is robust, and the parameters are transferable. At the same time, the number of parameters used in this work was

  17. POSSIM: Parameterizing Complete Second-Order Polarizable Force Field for Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported development of a fast polarizable force field and software named POSSIM (POlarizable Simulations with Second order Interaction Model). The second-order approximation permits the speed up of the polarizable component of the calculations by ca. an order of magnitude. We have now expanded the POSSIM framework to include a complete polarizable force field for proteins. Most of the parameter fitting was done to high-level quantum mechanical data. Conformational geometries and energies for dipeptides have been reproduced within average errors of ca. 0.5 kcal/mol for energies of the conformers (for the electrostatically neutral residues) and 9.7° for key dihedral angles. We have also validated this force field by running Monte Carlo simulations of collagen-like proteins in water. The resulting geometries were within 0.94 Å root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) from the experimental data. We have performed additional validation by studying conformational properties of three oligopeptides relevant in the context of N-glycoprotein secondary structure. These systems have been previously studied with combined experimental and computational methods, and both POSSIM and benchmark OPLS-AA simulations that we carried out produced geometries within ca. 0.9 Å RMSD of the literature structures. Thus, the performance of POSSIM in reproducing the structures is comparable with that of the widely used OPLS-AA force field. Furthermore, our fitting of the force field parameters for peptides and proteins has been streamlined compared with the previous generation of the complete polarizable force field and relied more on transferability of parameters for nonbonded interactions (including the electrostatic component). The resulting deviations from the quantum mechanical data are similar to those achieved with the previous generation; thus, the technique is robust, and the parameters are transferable. At the same time, the number of parameters used in this work was

  18. Economic benefits of commercial space activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Barbara A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the current and potential impact on the economy of selected private sector space activities including materials processing in space and satellite communications. Spacehab, a commercially developed and manufactured pressurized metal cylinder which fits in the Shuttle payload bay and connects to the crew compartment is examined along with potential uses of the Shuttle external tank. Private sector upper stage development, the privatization of expendable launch vehicles, and the transfer of NASA technology are discussed.

  19. ACOSS Eleven (Active Control of Space Structures)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    type Difference order for use in • First order low resolution noise estimate • Second order - Third order Thresholding Polarity * Negative contrast...Communications Corp. !L-rs. 1. P. Leliakov and P. Barba, MS/G80 -5939 Fabian wayj Palo Alto, California 94304 Canter for Analyisis Mr. James Justice 134 Corporate

  20. Economic benefits of commercial space activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Barbara A.

    Space is not only an endless frontier for exploration, but also a potentially rich arena for profitable commerce to benefit all mankind. Access to the unique environment of space provides opportunities for unprecedented kinds of research to develop new products and services. This research can lead to commercially viable enterprises, which will become permanent businesses, which will provide good jobs for workers, pay taxes to their governments, and return dividends to their investors. Seeking superior products and processes is vital if the economy is to grow and prosper. This paper discusses the current and potential impact on the economy of selected private sector space activities.

  1. Activities of the Space Studies Board

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Since its founding as the Space Science Board in 1958, the Space Studies Board has provided independent external scientific and technical advice on the nation's civil space program. This 1991 Annual Report of the SSB and its committees represents the first of its kind. The report contains a summary of the board's meetings, complete texts of letter reports, executive summaries of full reports issued during the year, and congressional testimony. It is intended to serve as a ready reference to board activities and advisory reports in 1991.

  2. Environmental Impact Assessment and Space Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viikari, L.

    these developments in way or another. In addition to national EIA regulations, there are also international agreements on EIA (i.a. the Espoo Convention) which establish their own EIA systems. In international law of outer space, environmental impact assessment is, however, not a well-established tool. The UN space treaties were drafted during a time when such consideratio ns were still not among the highest ranking items on national agendas. Therefore, these instruments fail to contain provisions regarding impact assessment, and also rest of the environmental content found in them is rather modest. The nearest equivalent to any impact assessment is contained in the Outer Space Treaty Article IX, namely the requirement of prior consultations in case of planned space activity or experiment that might cause "potentially harmful interference" with space activities of other St ates Parties. There also exist some applicable provisions on national level, such as the requirement of "formal assessment" on NASA programs of "[orbital] debris generation potential and debris mitigation options" in NASA Policy for Limiting Orbital Debris Generation (Art. 1.b). Also the national legislation of some space faring countries provides at least for the supply of some kind of information assessing the possible environmental consequences of proposed space activities. For instance, the Russian Statute on Lisencing Space Operations requires that for obtaining a license for space operation in the Russian Federation, the applicant has to supply, i.a. "documents confirming the safety of space operations (including ecological, fire and explosion safety) and the reliability of space equipment'"(Art.5.h). However, such provisions are obviously not enough for ensuring effective international regulation of the issue. The goal of this paper is to consider the usefulness of international environmental impact assessment for space activities. The space environment, however, is a unique arena in many ways

  3. Non-Newtonian Effects of Second-Order Fluids on the Hydrodynamic Lubrication of Inclined Slider Bearings.

    PubMed

    Apparao, Siddangouda; Biradar, Trimbak Vaijanath; Naduvinamani, Neminath Bhujappa

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical study of non-Newtonian effects of second-order fluids on the performance characteristics of inclined slider bearings is presented. An approximate method is used for the solution of the highly nonlinear momentum equations for the second-order fluids. The closed form expressions for the fluid film pressure, load carrying capacity, frictional force, coefficient of friction, and centre of pressure are obtained. The non-Newtonian second order fluid model increases the film pressure, load carrying capacity, and frictional force whereas the center of pressure slightly shifts towards exit region. Further, the frictional coefficient decreases with an increase in the bearing velocity as expected for an ideal fluid.

  4. Non-Newtonian Effects of Second-Order Fluids on the Hydrodynamic Lubrication of Inclined Slider Bearings

    PubMed Central

    Apparao, Siddangouda; Biradar, Trimbak Vaijanath; Naduvinamani, Neminath Bhujappa

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical study of non-Newtonian effects of second-order fluids on the performance characteristics of inclined slider bearings is presented. An approximate method is used for the solution of the highly nonlinear momentum equations for the second-order fluids. The closed form expressions for the fluid film pressure, load carrying capacity, frictional force, coefficient of friction, and centre of pressure are obtained. The non-Newtonian second order fluid model increases the film pressure, load carrying capacity, and frictional force whereas the center of pressure slightly shifts towards exit region. Further, the frictional coefficient decreases with an increase in the bearing velocity as expected for an ideal fluid. PMID:27437446

  5. Second-order quadrupolar line shapes under molecular dynamics: An additional transition in the extremely fast regime.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ivan; Wu, Gang; Gan, Zhehong

    2016-12-10

    NMR spectroscopy is a powerful tool for probing molecular dynamics. For the classic case of two-site exchange, NMR spectra go through the transition from exchange broadening through coalescence and then motional narrowing as the exchange rate increases passing through the difference between the resonance frequencies of the two sites. For central-transition spectra of half-integer quadrupolar nuclei in solids, line shape change due to molecular dynamics occurs in two stages. The first stage occurs when the exchange rate is comparable to the second-order quadrupolar interaction. The second spectral transition comes at a faster exchange rate which approaches the Larmor frequency and generally reduces the isotropic quadrupolar shift. Such a two-stage transition phenomenon is unique to half-integer quadrupolar nuclei. A quantum mechanical formalism in full Liouville space is presented to explain the physical origin of the two-stage phenomenon and for use in spectral simulations. Variable-temperature (17)O NMR of solid NaNO3 in which the NO3(-) ion undergoes 3-fold jumps confirms the two-stage transition process. The spectra of NaNO3 acquired in the temperature range of 173-413K agree well with simulations using the quantum mechanical formalism. The rate constants for the 3-fold NO3(-) ion jumps span eight orders of magnitude (10(2)-10(10)s(-1)) covering both transitions of the dynamic (17)O line shape.

  6. Second Order of Accuracy Stable Difference Schemes for Hyperbolic Problems Subject to Nonlocal Conditions with Self-Adjoint Operator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Yildirim, Ozgur

    2011-09-01

    In the present paper, two new second order of accuracy absolutely stable difference schemes are presented for the nonlocal boundary value problem {d2u(t)/dt2+Au(t) = f(t) (0≤t≤1),u(0) = ∑ j = 1nαju(λj)+φ,ut(0) = ∑ j = 1nβjut(λj)+ψ,0<λ1<λ2<…<λn≤1 for differential equations in a Hilbert space H with the self-adjoint positive definite operator A. The stability estimates for the solutions of these difference schemes are established. In practice, one-dimensional hyperbolic equation with nonlocal boundary conditions and multidimensional hyperbolic equation with Dirichlet conditions are considered. The stability estimates for the solutions of difference schemes for the nonlocal boundary value hyperbolic problems are obtained and the numerical results are presented to support our theoretical statements.

  7. Dual-basis second-order Moller-Plesset perturbation theory: A reduced-cost reference for correlation calculations.

    PubMed

    Steele, Ryan P; DiStasio, Robert A; Shao, Yihan; Kong, Jing; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2006-08-21

    The resolution-of-the-identity (RI) approximation has placed the onus of the cost of a second-order Moller-Plesset (MP2) calculation on the underlying self-consistent field (SCF) calculation for many moderately sized molecules. A dual-basis approach to the SCF calculation, based on previous methods demonstrated for density functional theory, is combined with RI-MP2 calculations, and small basis subsets for cc-pVTZ, cc-pVQZ, and 6-311++G(3df,3pd) are presented. These subsets provide time savings of greater than 90%, with negligible errors in absolute and relative energies, compared to the associated full-basis counterpart. The method is tested with a series of rotational barriers, relative conformational energies of alanine tetrapeptides, as well as the full G3/99 molecular set. RI-MP2 calculations on alanine octapeptides (40 heavy atoms, 3460 basis functions), using cc-pVQZ, are presented. Results improve upon previous methods that diagonalize the virtual space separately.

  8. Radiation-Reaction Force on a Small Charged Body to Second Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moxon, Jordan; Flanagan, Eanna

    2015-04-01

    In classical electrodynamics, an accelerating charge emits radiation and experiences a corresponding radiation reaction force, or self force. We extend to greater precision (higher order in perturbation theory) a previous rigorous derivation of the electromagnetic self force in flat spacetime by Gralla, Harte, and Wald. The method introduced by Gralla, Harte, and Wald computes the self-force from the Maxwell field equations and conservation of stress-energy, and does not require regularization of a singular point charge, as has been necessary in prior computations. For our higher order compuation, it becomes necessary to adopt an adjusted definition of the mass of the body to avoid including self-energy from the electromagnetic field sourced during the history of the body. We derive the evolution equations for the mass, spin, and center of mass position of an extended body through second order using our adjusted formalism. The final equations give an acceleration dependent evolution of the spin (self-torque), as well as a mixing between the extended body effects and the acceleration dependent effects on the overall body motion.

  9. On the second-order asymptotics for entanglement-assisted communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Nilanjana; Tomamichel, Marco; Wilde, Mark M.

    2016-06-01

    The entanglement-assisted classical capacity of a quantum channel is known to provide the formal quantum generalization of Shannon's classical channel capacity theorem, in the sense that it admits a single-letter characterization in terms of the quantum mutual information and does not increase in the presence of a noiseless quantum feedback channel from receiver to sender. In this work, we investigate second-order asymptotics of the entanglement-assisted classical communication task. That is, we consider how quickly the rates of entanglement-assisted codes converge to the entanglement-assisted classical capacity of a channel as a function of the number of channel uses and the error tolerance. We define a quantum generalization of the mutual information variance of a channel in the entanglement-assisted setting. For covariant channels, we show that this quantity is equal to the channel dispersion and thus completely characterize the convergence toward the entanglement-assisted classical capacity when the number of channel uses increases. Our results also apply to entanglement-assisted quantum communication, due to the equivalence between entanglement-assisted classical and quantum communication established by the teleportation and super-dense coding protocols.

  10. Post-beamforming second-order Volterra filter for pulse-echo ultrasonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Phukpattaranont, Pornchai; Ebbini, Emad S

    2003-08-01

    We present a new algorithm for deriving a second-order Volterra filter (SVF) capable of separating linear and quadratic components from echo signals. Images based on the quadratic components are shown to provide contrast enhancement between tissue and ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) without loss in spatial resolution. It is also shown that the quadratic images preserve the low scattering regions due to their high dynamic range when compared with standard B-mode or harmonic images. A robust algorithm for deriving the filter has been developed and tested on real-time imaging data from contrast and tissue-mimicking media. Illustrative examples from image targets containing contrast agent and tissue-mimicking media are presented and discussed. Quantitative assessment of the contrast enhancement is performed on both the RF data and the envelope-detected log-compressed image data. It is shown that the quadratic images offer levels of enhancement comparable or exceeding those from harmonic filters while maintaining the visibility of low scattering regions of the image.

  11. Second-Order Schedules of Token Reinforcement with Pigeons: Implications for Unit Price

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Christopher E; Hackenberg, Timothy D

    2006-01-01

    Four pigeons were exposed to second-order schedules of token reinforcement, with stimulus lights serving as token reinforcers. Tokens were earned according to a fixed-ratio (token-production) schedule, with the opportunity to exchange tokens for food (exchange period) occurring after a fixed number had been produced (exchange-production ratio). The token-production and exchange-production ratios were manipulated systematically across conditions. Response rates varied inversely with the token-production ratio at each exchange-production ratio. Response rates also varied inversely with the exchange-production ratio at each token-production ratio, particularly at the higher token-production ratios. At higher token-production and exchange-production ratios, response rates increased in token-production segments closer to exchange periods and food. Some conditions were conducted in a closed economy, in which the pigeons earned all their daily ration of food within the session. Relative to comparable open-economy conditions, response rates in the closed economy were less affected by changes in token-production ratio, resulting in higher levels of food intake and body weight. Some of the results are consistent with the economic concept of unit price, a cost-benefit ratio comprised of responses per unit of food delivery, but most are well accounted for by a consideration of the number of responses required to produce exchange periods, without regard to the amount of reinforcement available during those exchange periods. PMID:16602378

  12. Stability of a nonlinear second order equation under parametric bounded noise excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Richard; Xie, Wei-Chau

    2016-09-01

    The motivation for the following work is a structural column under dynamic axial loads with both deterministic (harmonic transmitted forces from the surrounding structure) and random (wind and/or earthquake) loading components. The bounded noise used herein is a sinusoid with an argument composed of a random (Wiener) process deviation about a mean frequency. By this approach, a noise parameter may be used to investigate the behavior through the spectrum from simple harmonic forcing, to a bounded random process with very little harmonic content. The stability of both the trivial and non-trivial stationary solutions of an axially-loaded column (which is modeled as a second order nonlinear equation) under parametric bounded noise excitation is investigated by use of Lyapunov exponents. Specifically the effect of noise magnitude, amplitude of the forcing, and damping on stability of a column is investigated. First order averaging is employed to obtain analytical approximations of the Lyapunov exponents of the trivial solution. For the non-trivial stationary solution however, the Lyapunov exponents are obtained via Monte Carlo simulation as the stability equations become analytically intractable.

  13. Restoration and enhancement of textural properties in SAR images using second-order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezry, Edmond; Kohl, Hans-Guenther; De Groof, Hugo

    1994-12-01

    Local second order properties, describing spatial relations between pixels are introduced into the single-point speckle adaptive filtering processes, in order to account for the effects of speckle spatial correlation and to enhance scene textural properties in the restored image. To this end, texture measures originating, first from local grey level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM), and second from the local autocorrelation functions (ACF) are used. Results obtained on 3-look processed ERS-1 FDC and PRI spaceborne images illustrate the performance allowed by the introduction of these texture measures in the structure retaining speckle adaptive filters. The observable texture in remote sensing images is related to the physical spatial resolution of the sensor. For this reason, other spatial speckle decorrelation methods, more simple and easier to implement, for example post-filtering and linear image resampling, are also presented in this paper. In the particular case of spaceborne SAR imagery, all these methods lead to visually similar results. They produce filtered (radar reflectivity) images visually comparable to optical images.

  14. A second-order closure model for the effect of averaging time on turbulent plume dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, R.I.; Gabruk, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    Turbulent dispersion in the atmosphere is a result of chaotic advection by a wide spectrum of eddy motions. In genera, the larger scale motions behave like a time-dependent, spatially inhomogeneous mean wind and produce coherent meandering of a pollutant cloud or plume, while the smaller scale motions act to diffuse the pollutant and mix it with the ambient air. The distinction between the two types of motion is dependent on both the sampling procedure and the scale of the pollutant cloud. For the case of a continuous plume of material, the duration of the sampling time (the time average period) determines the effective size of the plume. The objective is the development of a practical scheme for representing the effect of time-averaging on plume width. The model must describe relative dispersion in the limit of short-term averages, and give the absolute, or ensemble, dispersion rate for long-term sampling. The authors shall generalize the second-order closure ensemble dispersion model of Sykes et al. to include the effect of time-averaging, so they first briefly review the basic model.

  15. The projective geometric theory of systems of second-order differential equations: straightening and symmetry theorems

    SciTech Connect

    Aminova, Asya V; Aminov, Nail' A-M

    2010-06-29

    In the framework of the projective geometric theory of systems of differential equations, which is being developed by the authors, conditions which ensure that a family of graphs of solutions of a system of m second-order ordinary differential equations y-vector-ddot=f-vector(t,y-vector,y-vector-dot) with m unknown functions y{sup 1}(t),...,y{sup m}(t) can be straightened (that is, transformed into a family of straight lines) by means of a local diffeomorphism of the variables of the system which takes it to the form z-vector''=0 (straightens the system) are investigated. It is shown that the system to be straightened must be cubic with respect to the derivatives of the unknown functions. Necessary and sufficient conditions for straightening the system are found, which have the form of differential equations for the coefficients of the system or are stated in terms of symmetries of the system. For m=1 the system consists of a single equation y-ddot=f-vector(t,y,y-dot), and the tests obtained reduce to the conditions for straightening this equations which were derived by Lie in 1883. Bibliography: 34 titles.

  16. Heterogeneous traffic flow modelling using second-order macroscopic continuum model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Ranju; Ramadurai, Gitakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Modelling heterogeneous traffic flow lacking in lane discipline is one of the emerging research areas in the past few years. The two main challenges in modelling are: capturing the effect of varying size of vehicles, and the lack in lane discipline, both of which together lead to the 'gap filling' behaviour of vehicles. The same section length of the road can be occupied by different types of vehicles at the same time, and the conventional measure of traffic concentration, density (vehicles per lane per unit length), is not a good measure for heterogeneous traffic modelling. First aim of this paper is to have a parsimonious model of heterogeneous traffic that can capture the unique phenomena of gap filling. Second aim is to emphasize the suitability of higher-order models for modelling heterogeneous traffic. Third, the paper aims to suggest area occupancy as concentration measure of heterogeneous traffic lacking in lane discipline. The above mentioned two main challenges of heterogeneous traffic flow are addressed by extending an existing second-order continuum model of traffic flow, using area occupancy for traffic concentration instead of density. The extended model is calibrated and validated with field data from an arterial road in Chennai city, and the results are compared with those from few existing generalized multi-class models.

  17. On the blind source separation of human electroencephalogram by approximate joint diagonalization of second order statistics.

    PubMed

    Congedo, Marco; Gouy-Pailler, Cédric; Jutten, Christian

    2008-12-01

    Over the last ten years blind source separation (BSS) has become a prominent processing tool in the study of human electroencephalography (EEG). Without relying on head modeling BSS aims at estimating both the waveform and the scalp spatial pattern of the intracranial dipolar current responsible of the observed EEG. In this review we begin by placing the BSS linear instantaneous model of EEG within the framework of brain volume conduction theory. We then review the concept and current practice of BSS based on second-order statistics (SOS) and on higher-order statistics (HOS), the latter better known as independent component analysis (ICA). Using neurophysiological knowledge we consider the fitness of SOS-based and HOS-based methods for the extraction of spontaneous and induced EEG and their separation from extra-cranial artifacts. We then illustrate a general BSS scheme operating in the time-frequency domain using SOS only. The scheme readily extends to further data expansions in order to capture experimental source of variations as well. A simple and efficient implementation based on the approximate joint diagonalization of Fourier cospectral matrices is described (AJDC). We conclude discussing useful aspects of BSS analysis of EEG, including its assumptions and limitations.

  18. The generalized log-derivative method for evaluation of second-order transition amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrugała, Felicja

    1989-07-01

    The log-derivative method of Johnson is generalized to calculate matrix elements of multichannel Green's functions—second-order transition amplitudes—which arise from description of a variety of physical processes involving weak interactions of initial and final (bound) states with a set of strongly coupled continuum and/or bound intermediate states. A purely approximate-solution algorithm and two hybrid approximate-solution approximate-potential versions, based on the use of piecewise constant reference potentials, are presented and tested on problems concerning investigations of nonadiabatic effects in the spectroscopy of H2. A comparison with the renormalized Numerov method, extended to calculation of considered transition amplitudes, is made and superior efficiency of the hybrid log-derivative algorithms is demonstrated. It is shown both practically and theoretically that discretization errors of the hybrid algorithms grow linearly with increasing energy in calculations, whereas cubic growth of errors with energy is characteristic for the purely approximate-solution log-derivative and Numerov algorithms.

  19. Second-order small-disturbance solutions for hypersonic flow over power-law bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Similarity solutions were found which give the adiabatic flow of an ideal gas about two-dimensional and axisymmetric power-law bodies at infinite Mach number to second order in the body slenderness parameter. The flow variables were expressed as a sum of zero-order and perturbation similarity functions for which the axial variations in the flow equations separated out. The resulting similarity equations were integrated numerically. The solutions, which are universal functions, are presented in graphic and tabular form. To avoid a singularity in the calculations, the results are limited to body power-law exponents greater than about 0.85 for the two-dimensional case and 0.75 for the axisymmetric case. Because of the entropy layer induced by the nose bluntness (for power-law bodies other than cones and wedges), only the pressure function is valid at the body surface. The similarity results give excellent agreement with the exact solutions for inviscid flow over wedges and cones having half-angles up to about 20 deg. They give good agreement with experimental shock-wave shapes and surface-pressure distributions for 3/4-power axisymmetric bodies, considering that Mach number and boundary-layer displacement effects are not included in the theory.

  20. Extinguished second-order conditioned fear responses are renewed but not reinstated.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Nathan M; Cai, Stefanie Yuxuan; Lay, Belinda Po Pyn; Watts, Nicola R; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2014-10-01

    A series of experiments used rats to examine renewal and reinstatement of extinguished second-order conditioned fear (freezing) responses. The initial experiment demonstrated that freezing responses to a stimulus (S2) were contingent on its pairings with a second stimulus (S1) and on the prior pairings of S1 and an aversive unconditioned stimulus (US). Subsequent experiments showed that these freezing responses extinguished across S2 alone presentations, but were renewed when: S2-S1 pairings and S2 alone presentations occurred in the same context and testing of S2 occurred elsewhere; S2-S1 pairings and testing were in the same context and S2 alone presentations were elsewhere; and when S2-S1 pairings, S2 alone presentations and testing occurred in different contexts. Freezing responses to an extinguished S1 were reinstated by US alone presentations. However, these responses were not reinstated to an extinguished S2 by US or S1 alone presentations, and, conversely, freezing to a nonextinguished S2 was unaffected by extinction of S1. The results were interpreted to mean that S2-S1 pairings produced an association between S2 and the fear responses elicited by S1 and that extinction of this association is controlled by context. The failure to reinstate fear responses to S2 is discussed in terms of theories developed to explain reinstatement of S1.